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Sample records for adult vascular cells

  1. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Rossi, Alessio; Naso, Agostino; Ruggiero, Michele; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs) at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms. PMID:25866513

  2. Adult bone marrow-derived cells recruited during angiogenesis comprise precursors for periendothelial vascular mural cells.

    PubMed

    Rajantie, Iiro; Ilmonen, Maritta; Alminaite, Agne; Ozerdem, Ugur; Alitalo, Kari; Salven, Petri

    2004-10-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived cells are thought to participate in the growth of blood vessels during postnatal vascular regeneration and tumor growth, a process previously attributed to stem and precursor cells differentiating to endothelial cells. We used multichannel laser scanning confocal microscopy of whole-mounted tissues to study angiogenesis in chimeric mice created by reconstituting C57BL mice with genetically marked syngeneic BM. We show that BM-derived endothelial cells do not significantly contribute to tumor- or cytokine-induced neoangiogenesis. Instead, BM-derived periendothelial vascular mural cells were persistently detected at sites of tumor- or vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis. Subpopulations of these cells expressed the pericyte-specific NG2 proteoglycan, or the hematopoietic markers CD11b and CD45, but did not detectably express the smooth muscle markers smooth muscle alpha-actin or desmin. Thus, the major contribution of the BM to angiogenic processes is not endothelial, but may come from progenitors for periendothelial vascular mural and hematopoietic effector cells. PMID:15191949

  3. Use of tritiated thymidine as a marker to compare the effects of matrix proteins on adult human vascular endothelial cell attachment: implications for seeding of vascular prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Hasson, J.E.; Wiebe, D.H.; Sharefkin, J.B.; D'Amore, P.A.; Abbott, W.M.

    1986-11-01

    We have developed a technique to measure attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to test surfaces with tritiated thymidine used as a marker. With this technique, we measured attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to a series of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), laminin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), and collagen-coated (1% gelatin) surfaces because of the role of these proteins in promoting cell attachment and growth. For a typical experiment, in the presence of serum, initial attachment (at 1 hour) was greatest on fibronectin-coated (63%) and gelatin-coated (60%) tissue culture plastic (polystyrene) and was least on laminin-coated (28%) or untreated polystyrene (18%). The data suggest that fibronectin, either alone, or with a more complex combination of extracellular components may need to be present on prosthetic surfaces to produce maximal cell attachment and subsequent growth to confluence in vivo. The described method of measuring attachment is independent of surface properties, ensures complete recovery of cells, and will allow systematic exploration of those properties that best support human endothelial cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces.

  4. Adult human dental pulp stem cells promote blood-brain barrier permeability through vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression.

    PubMed

    Winderlich, Joshua N; Kremer, Karlea L; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising new treatment option for stroke. Intravascular administration of stem cells is a valid approach as stem cells have been shown to transmigrate the blood-brain barrier. The mechanism that causes this effect has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that stem cells would mediate localized discontinuities in the blood-brain barrier, which would allow passage into the brain parenchyma. Here, we demonstrate that adult human dental pulp stem cells express a soluble factor that increases permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. This effect was shown to be the result of vascular endothelial growth factor-a. The effect could be amplified by exposing dental pulp stem cell to stromal-derived factor 1, which stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor-a expression. These findings support the use of dental pulp stem cell in therapy for stroke. PMID:26661186

  5. Vascular Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Hera; Goldie, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human stem and progenitor cells is critically important for the development and optimization of regenerative medicine strategies. For vascular regeneration studies, specifically, a true “vascular stem cell” population has not yet been identified. However, a number of cell types that exist endogenously, or can be generated or propagated ex vivo, function as vascular precursor cells and can participate in and/or promote vascular regeneration. Herein, we provide an overview of what is known about the regulation of their differentiation specifically toward a vascular endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:22866199

  6. Sertoli Cells Modulate Testicular Vascular Network Development, Structure, and Function to Influence Circulating Testosterone Concentrations in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rebourcet, Diane; Wu, Junxi; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Smith, Sarah E.; Milne, Laura; Fernando, Anuruddika; Wallace, Robert J.; Gray, Calum D.; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Mitchell, Rod T.; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The testicular vasculature forms a complex network, providing oxygenation, micronutrients, and waste clearance from the testis. The vasculature is also instrumental to testis function because it is both the route by which gonadotropins are delivered to the testis and by which T is transported away to target organs. Whether Sertoli cells play a role in regulating the testicular vasculature in postnatal life has never been unequivocally demonstrated. In this study we used models of acute Sertoli cell ablation and acute germ cell ablation to address whether Sertoli cells actively influence vascular structure and function in the adult testis. Our findings suggest that Sertoli cells play a key role in supporting the structure of the testicular vasculature. Ablating Sertoli cells (and germ cells) or germ cells alone results in a similar reduction in testis size, yet only the specific loss of Sertoli cells leads to a reduction in total intratesticular vascular volume, the number of vascular branches, and the numbers of small microvessels; loss of germ cells alone has no effect on the testicular vasculature. These perturbations to the testicular vasculature leads to a reduction in fluid exchange between the vasculature and testicular interstitium, which reduces gonadotropin-stimulated circulating T concentrations, indicative of reduced Leydig cell stimulation and/or reduced secretion of T into the vasculature. These findings describe a new paradigm by which the transport of hormones and other factors into and out of the testis may be influenced by Sertoli cells and highlights these cells as potential targets for enhancing this endocrine relationship. PMID:27145015

  7. Sertoli Cells Modulate Testicular Vascular Network Development, Structure, and Function to Influence Circulating Testosterone Concentrations in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Rebourcet, Diane; Wu, Junxi; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Smith, Sarah E; Milne, Laura; Fernando, Anuruddika; Wallace, Robert J; Gray, Calum D; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Mitchell, Rod T; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J; Smith, Lee B

    2016-06-01

    The testicular vasculature forms a complex network, providing oxygenation, micronutrients, and waste clearance from the testis. The vasculature is also instrumental to testis function because it is both the route by which gonadotropins are delivered to the testis and by which T is transported away to target organs. Whether Sertoli cells play a role in regulating the testicular vasculature in postnatal life has never been unequivocally demonstrated. In this study we used models of acute Sertoli cell ablation and acute germ cell ablation to address whether Sertoli cells actively influence vascular structure and function in the adult testis. Our findings suggest that Sertoli cells play a key role in supporting the structure of the testicular vasculature. Ablating Sertoli cells (and germ cells) or germ cells alone results in a similar reduction in testis size, yet only the specific loss of Sertoli cells leads to a reduction in total intratesticular vascular volume, the number of vascular branches, and the numbers of small microvessels; loss of germ cells alone has no effect on the testicular vasculature. These perturbations to the testicular vasculature leads to a reduction in fluid exchange between the vasculature and testicular interstitium, which reduces gonadotropin-stimulated circulating T concentrations, indicative of reduced Leydig cell stimulation and/or reduced secretion of T into the vasculature. These findings describe a new paradigm by which the transport of hormones and other factors into and out of the testis may be influenced by Sertoli cells and highlights these cells as potential targets for enhancing this endocrine relationship. PMID:27145015

  8. Regional and Stage-Specific Effects of Prospectively Purified Vascular Cells on the Adult V-SVZ Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Elizabeth E.; Liu, Chang; Silva-Vargas, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Adult neural stem cells reside in specialized niches. In the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) become activated (aNSCs), and generate transit amplifying cells (TACs), which give rise to neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb. The vasculature is an important component of the adult neural stem cell niche, but whether vascular cells in neurogenic areas are intrinsically different from those elsewhere in the brain is unknown. Moreover, the contribution of pericytes to the neural stem cell niche has not been defined. Here, we describe a rapid FACS purification strategy to simultaneously isolate primary endothelial cells and pericytes from brain microregions of nontransgenic mice using CD31 and CD13 as surface markers. We compared the effect of purified vascular cells from a neurogenic (V-SVZ) and non-neurogenic brain region (cortex) on the V-SVZ stem cell lineage in vitro. Endothelial and pericyte diffusible signals from both regions differentially promote the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of qNSCs, aNSCs, and TACs. Unexpectedly, diffusible cortical signals had the most potent effects on V-SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis, highlighting the intrinsic capacity of non-neurogenic vasculature to support stem cell behavior. Finally, we identify PlGF-2 as an endothelial-derived mitogen that promotes V-SVZ cell proliferation. This purification strategy provides a platform to define the functional and molecular contribution of vascular cells to stem cell niches and other brain regions under different physiological and pathological states. PMID:25788671

  9. Hedgehog and Resident Vascular Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Ciaran J.; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Kennedy, Eimear; Walls, Dermot; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M.; Cahill, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a pivotal morphogenic driver during embryonic development and a key regulator of adult stem cell self-renewal. The discovery of resident multipotent vascular stem cells and adventitial progenitors within the vessel wall has transformed our understanding of the origin of medial and neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during vessel repair in response to injury, lesion formation, and overall disease progression. This review highlights the importance of components of the Hh and Notch signalling pathways within the medial and adventitial regions of adult vessels, their recapitulation following vascular injury and disease progression, and their putative role in the maintenance and differentiation of resident vascular stem cells to vascular lineages from discrete niches within the vessel wall. PMID:26064136

  10. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A and Islet Vascularization Are Necessary in Developing, but Not Adult, Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Brissova, Marcela; Shostak, Alena; Pan, Fong Cheng; Poffenberger, Greg; Cai, Qing; Hundemer, Gregory L.; Kantz, Jeannelle; Thompson, Courtney S.; Dai, Chunhua; McGuinness, Owen P.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic islets are highly vascularized mini-organs, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A is a critical factor in the development of islet vascularization. To investigate the role of VEGF-A and endothelial cells (ECs) in adult islets, we used complementary genetic approaches to temporally inactivate VEGF-A in developing mouse pancreatic and islet progenitor cells or in adult β-cells. Inactivation of VEGF-A early in development dramatically reduced pancreatic and islet vascularization, leading to reduced β-cell proliferation in both developing and adult islets and, ultimately, reduced β-cell mass and impaired glucose clearance. When VEGF-A was inactivated in adult β-cells, islet vascularization was reduced twofold. Surprisingly, even after 3 months of reduced islet vascularization, islet architecture and β-cell gene expression, mass, and function were preserved with only a minimal abnormality in glucose clearance. These data show that normal pancreatic VEGF-A expression is critical for the recruitment of ECs and the subsequent stimulation of endocrine cell proliferation during islet development. In contrast, although VEGF-A is required for maintaining the specialized vasculature observed in normal adult islets, adult β-cells can adapt and survive long-term reductions in islet vascularity. These results indicate that VEGF-A and islet vascularization have a lesser role in adult islet function and β-cell mass. PMID:23884891

  11. A multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized cardiac tissue constructs using adult stem sells, dynamic cell cultures, and porous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Tirella, Annalisa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Duim, Sjoerd; Goumans, Marie-Josè; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The vascularization of tissue engineered products represents a key issue in regenerative medicine which needs to be addressed before the translation of these protocols to the bedside can be foreseen. Here we propose a multistep procedure to prepare pre-vascularized three-dimensional (3D) cardiac bio-substitutes using dynamic cell cultures and highly porous biocompatible gelatin scaffolds. The strategy adopted exploits the peculiar differentiation potential of two distinct subsets of adult stem cells to obtain human vascularized 3D cardiac tissues. In the first step of the procedure, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are seeded onto gelatin scaffolds to provide interconnected vessel-like structures, while human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (hCMPCs) are stimulated in vitro to obtain their commitment toward the cardiac phenotype. The use of a modular bioreactor allows the perfusion of the whole scaffold, providing superior performance in terms of cardiac tissue maturation and cell survival. Both the cell culture on natural-derived polymers and the continuous medium perfusion of the scaffold led to the formation of a densely packaged proto-tissue composed of vascular-like and cardiac-like cells, which might complete maturation process and interconnect with native tissue upon in vivo implantation. In conclusion, the data obtained through the approach here proposed highlight the importance to provide stem cells with complementary signals in vitro able to resemble the complexity of cardiac microenvironment. PMID:24917827

  12. Adult neurogenesis and the vascular Nietzsche.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Theo D

    2002-06-13

    Adult neurogenesis is mediated by immature neural precursors that divide within the residual germinal matrices of the brain. In the paper by in this issue of Neuron, the "cause and effect" of adult neurogenesis takes a major step forward with the description of a vascular signaling network that influences neuronal precursor migration and fate. PMID:12086632

  13. Potential of Newborn and Adult Stem Cells for the Production of Vascular Constructs Using the Living Tissue Sheet Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bourget, Jean-Michel; Gauvin, Robert; Duchesneau, David; Remy, Murielle; Auger, François A.; Germain, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Bypass surgeries using native vessels rely on the availability of autologous veins and arteries. An alternative to those vessels could be tissue-engineered vascular constructs made by self-organized tissue sheets. This paper intends to evaluate the potential use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from two different sources: (1) bone marrow-derived MSCs and (2) umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs. When cultured in vitro, a proportion of those cells differentiated into smooth muscle cell- (SMC-) like cells and expressed contraction associated proteins. Moreover, these cells assembled into manipulable tissue sheets when cultured in presence of ascorbic acid. Tubular vessels were then produced by rolling those tissue sheets on a mandrel. The architecture, contractility, and mechanical resistance of reconstructed vessels were compared with tissue-engineered media and adventitia produced from SMCs and dermal fibroblasts, respectively. Histology revealed a collagenous extracellular matrix and the contractile responses measured for these vessels were stronger than dermal fibroblasts derived constructs although weaker than SMCs-derived constructs. The burst pressure of bone marrow-derived vessels was higher than SMCs-derived ones. These results reinforce the versatility of the self-organization approach since they demonstrate that it is possible to recapitulate a contractile media layer from MSCs without the need of exogenous scaffolding material. PMID:26504783

  14. Potential of Newborn and Adult Stem Cells for the Production of Vascular Constructs Using the Living Tissue Sheet Approach.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Jean-Michel; Gauvin, Robert; Duchesneau, David; Remy, Murielle; Auger, François A; Germain, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Bypass surgeries using native vessels rely on the availability of autologous veins and arteries. An alternative to those vessels could be tissue-engineered vascular constructs made by self-organized tissue sheets. This paper intends to evaluate the potential use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from two different sources: (1) bone marrow-derived MSCs and (2) umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs. When cultured in vitro, a proportion of those cells differentiated into smooth muscle cell- (SMC-) like cells and expressed contraction associated proteins. Moreover, these cells assembled into manipulable tissue sheets when cultured in presence of ascorbic acid. Tubular vessels were then produced by rolling those tissue sheets on a mandrel. The architecture, contractility, and mechanical resistance of reconstructed vessels were compared with tissue-engineered media and adventitia produced from SMCs and dermal fibroblasts, respectively. Histology revealed a collagenous extracellular matrix and the contractile responses measured for these vessels were stronger than dermal fibroblasts derived constructs although weaker than SMCs-derived constructs. The burst pressure of bone marrow-derived vessels was higher than SMCs-derived ones. These results reinforce the versatility of the self-organization approach since they demonstrate that it is possible to recapitulate a contractile media layer from MSCs without the need of exogenous scaffolding material. PMID:26504783

  15. Effects of Hemodynamic Forces on the Vascular Differentiation of Stem Cells: Implications for Vascular Graft Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Rokhaya; Li, Song

    Although the field of vascular tissue engineering has made tremendous advances in the past decade, several complications have yet to be overcome in order to produce biocompatible small-diameter vascular conduits with long-term patency. Stem cells and progenitor cells represent potential cell sources in the development of autologous (or allogeneic), nonthrombogenic vascular grafts with mechanical properties comparable to native blood vessel. However, a better understanding of the effects of mechanical forces on stem cells and progenitor cells is needed to properly utilize these cells for tissue engineering applications. In this chapter, we discuss the current understanding of the effects of hemodynamic forces on the differentiation and function of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and progenitor cells. We also review the use of stem cells and progenitor cells in vascular graft engineering.

  16. In utero origins of adult insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; Regnault, Timothy R H

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (or syndrome X) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and central obesity that predispose to the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in adult life. Insulin resistance is believed to be a critical pathophysiological event early in the disease process, impacting both skeletal muscle metabolic function and vascular responses. Adverse changes in insulin sensitivity have been found to originate in utero; for instance, prenatal events such as placental insufficiency/oxidative stress leading to altered fetal growth trajectories are associated with increased rates of metabolic syndrome in adult life. Such intrauterine insults result in reduced skeletal muscle mass in conjunction with altered insulin signaling, decreased oxidative fibers, and impaired mitochondrial function. These developmental disturbances set the stage for development of muscle triglyceride accumulation and depressed insulin sensitivity in childhood. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function arising from deprived intrauterine conditions that are exacerbated by insulin resistance account for the progression of hypertension from childhood to adulthood. Arterial changes initiated in utero include reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and inflammation, events leading to endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis that are present in those destined for metabolic syndrome. In addition, the hypertensive phenotype that is a hallmark of metabolic syndrome may also be traced to blunted kidney development and renin-angiotensin system activation in growth-restricted offspring. The summative impact of these intrauterine programmed changes in terms of influencing adult health and disease encompasses dietary and lifestyle factors introduced postnatally. Establishing novel therapeutic interventions aimed at preventing and/or reducing in utero

  17. Bacterial invasion of vascular cell types: vascular infectology and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kozarov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    To portray the chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis, leukocytic cell types involved in the immune response to invading pathogens are often the focus. However, atherogenesis is a complex pathological deterioration of the arterial walls, where vascular cell types are participants with regards to deterioration and disease. Since other recent reviews have detailed the role of both the innate and adaptive immune response in atherosclerosis, herein we will summarize the latest developments regarding the association of bacteria with vascular cell types: infections as a risk factor for atherosclerosis; bacterial invasion of vascular cell types; the atherogenic sequelae of bacterial presence such as endothelial activation and blood clotting; and the identification of the species that are able to colonize this niche. The evidence of a polybacterial infectious component of the atheromatous lesions opens the doors for exploration of the new field of vascular infectology and for the study of atherosclerosis microbiome. PMID:22185451

  18. Cell-based strategies for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tongqiang; Fan, Jiabing; Fartash, Armita; Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Yubo

    2016-05-01

    Vascular regeneration is known to play an essential role in the repair of injured tissues mainly through accelerating the repair of vascular injury caused by vascular diseases, as well as the recovery of ischemic tissues. However, the clinical vascular regeneration is still challenging. Cell-based therapy is thought to be a promising strategy for vascular regeneration, since various cells have been identified to exert important influences on the process of vascular regeneration such as the enhanced endothelium formation on the surface of vascular grafts, and the induction of vessel-like network formation in the ischemic tissues. Here are a vast number of diverse cell-based strategies that have been extensively studied in vascular regeneration. These strategies can be further classified into three main categories, including cell transplantation, construction of tissue-engineered grafts, and surface modification of scaffolds. Cells used in these strategies mainly refer to terminally differentiated vascular cells, pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, and unipotent stem cells. The aim of this review is to summarize the reported research advances on the application of various cells for vascular regeneration, yielding insights into future clinical treatment for injured tissue/organ. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1297-1314, 2016. PMID:26864677

  19. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  20. Development of pluripotent stem cells for vascular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Katharina S.; Miljan, Erik; Khoo, Amanda; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by reduced limb blood flow due to arterial obstruction. Current treatment includes surgical or endovascular procedures, the failure of which may result in amputation of the affected limb. An emerging therapeutic approach is cell therapy to enhance angiogenesis and tissue survival. Small clinical trials of adult progenitor cell therapies have generated promising results, although large randomized clinical trials using well-defined cells have not been performed. Intriguing pre-clinical studies have been performed using vascular cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) or human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). In particular, hiPSC-derived vascular cells may be a superior approach for vascular regeneration. The regulatory roadmap to the clinic will be arduous, but achievable with further understanding of the reprogramming and differentiation processes; with meticulous attention to quality control; and perseverance. PMID:22387745

  1. Systemic vascular function is associated with muscular power in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-associated loss of muscular strength and muscular power are critical determinants of loss of physical function and progression to disability in older adults. In this study, we examined the association of systemic vascular function and measures of muscle strength and power in older adults. Measu...

  2. Vascular Inflammatory Cells in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.; Marvar, Paul J.; Titze, Jens M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients, and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease. PMID:22586409

  3. Injury mechanism dictates contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to murine hepatic vascular regeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem and progenitor cells derived from adult marrow have been shown to regenerate vascular cells in response to injury. However, it is unclear whether the type of injury dictates the contribution of such cells to neovascularization and which subpopulations of cells contribute to vascular regeneratio...

  4. Origin and differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Jacquet, Laureen; Karamariti, Eirini; Xu, Qingbo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), a major structural component of the vessel wall, not only play a key role in maintaining vascular structure but also perform various functions. During embryogenesis, SMC recruitment from their progenitors is an important step in the formation of the embryonic vascular system. SMCs in the arterial wall are mostly quiescent but can display a contractile phenotype in adults. Under pathophysiological conditions, i.e. vascular remodelling after endothelial dysfunction or damage, contractile SMCs found in the media switch to a secretory type, which will facilitate their ability to migrate to the intima and proliferate to contribute to neointimal lesions. However, recent evidence suggests that the mobilization and recruitment of abundant stem/progenitor cells present in the vessel wall are largely responsible for SMC accumulation in the intima during vascular remodelling such as neointimal hyperplasia and arteriosclerosis. Therefore, understanding the regulatory mechanisms that control SMC differentiation from vascular progenitors is essential for exploring therapeutic targets for potential clinical applications. In this article, we review the origin and differentiation of SMCs from stem/progenitor cells during cardiovascular development and in the adult, highlighting the environmental cues and signalling pathways that control phenotypic modulation within the vasculature. PMID:25952975

  5. Stem cell sources for vascular tissue engineering and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2012-10-01

    This review focuses on the stem cell sources with the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering and to promote vascular regeneration. The first clinical studies using tissue-engineered vascular grafts are already under way, supporting the potential of this technology in the treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases. Despite progress in engineering biomaterials with the appropriate mechanical properties and biological cues as well as bioreactors for generating the correct tissue microenvironment, the source of cells that make up the vascular tissues remains a major challenge for tissue engineers and physicians. Mature cells from the tissue of origin may be difficult to obtain and suffer from limited proliferative capacity, which may further decline as a function of donor age. On the other hand, multipotent and pluripotent stem cells have great potential to provide large numbers of autologous cells with a great differentiation capacity. Here, we discuss the adult multipotent as well as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation potential toward vascular lineages, and their use in engineering functional and implantable vascular tissues. We also discuss the associated challenges that need to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition of this technology from the bench to the bedside. PMID:22571595

  6. Stem Cell Sources for Vascular Tissue Engineering and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the stem cell sources with the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering and to promote vascular regeneration. The first clinical studies using tissue-engineered vascular grafts are already under way, supporting the potential of this technology in the treatment of cardiovascular and other diseases. Despite progress in engineering biomaterials with the appropriate mechanical properties and biological cues as well as bioreactors for generating the correct tissue microenvironment, the source of cells that make up the vascular tissues remains a major challenge for tissue engineers and physicians. Mature cells from the tissue of origin may be difficult to obtain and suffer from limited proliferative capacity, which may further decline as a function of donor age. On the other hand, multipotent and pluripotent stem cells have great potential to provide large numbers of autologous cells with a great differentiation capacity. Here, we discuss the adult multipotent as well as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, their differentiation potential toward vascular lineages, and their use in engineering functional and implantable vascular tissues. We also discuss the associated challenges that need to be addressed in order to facilitate the transition of this technology from the bench to the bedside. PMID:22571595

  7. Vascular-derived TGF-β increases in the stem cell niche and perturbs neurogenesis during aging and following irradiation in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Jose R; Daynac, Mathieu; Chicheportiche, Alexandra; Cebrian-Silla, Arantxa; Sii Felice, Karine; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Boussin, François D; Mouthon, Marc-André

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis decreases during aging and following cranial radiotherapy, causing a progressive cognitive decline that is currently untreatable. However, functional neural stem cells remained present in the subventricular zone of high dose-irradiated and aged mouse brains. We therefore investigated whether alterations in the neurogenic niches are perhaps responsible for the neurogenesis decline. This hypothesis was supported by the absence of proliferation of neural stem cells that were engrafted into the vascular niches of irradiated host brains. Moreover, we observed a marked increase in TGF-β1 production by endothelial cells in the stem cell niche in both middle-aged and irradiated mice. In co-cultures, irradiated brain endothelial cells induced the apoptosis of neural stem/progenitor cells via TGF-β/Smad3 signalling. Strikingly, the blockade of TGF-β signalling in vivo using a neutralizing antibody or the selective inhibitor SB-505124 significantly improved neurogenesis in aged and irradiated mice, prevented apoptosis and increased the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells. These findings suggest that anti-TGF-β-based therapy may be used for future interventions to prevent neurogenic collapse following radiotherapy or during aging. PMID:23526803

  8. Involvement of marrow-derived endothelial cells in vascularization.

    PubMed

    Larrivée, B; Karsan, A

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, the adult neovasculature was thought to arise only through angiogenesis, the mechanism by which new blood vessels form from preexisting vessels through endothelial cell migration and proliferation. However, recent studies have provided evidence that postnatal neovasculature can also arise though vasculogenesis, a process by which endothelial progenitor cells are recruited and differentiate into mature endothelial cells to form new blood vessels. Evidence for the existence of endothelial progenitors has come from studies demonstrating the ability of bone marrow-derived cells to incorporate into adult vasculature. However, the exact nature of endothelial progenitor cells remains controversial. Because of the lack of definitive markers of endothelial progenitors, the in vivo contribution of progenitor cells to physiological and pathological neovascularization remains unclear. Early studies reported that endothelial progenitor cells actively integrate into the adult vasculature and are critical in the development of many types of vascular-dependent disorders such as neoplastic progression. Moreover, it has been suggested that endothelial progenitor cells can be used as a therapeutic strategy aimed at promoting vascular growth in a variety of ischemic diseases. However, increasing numbers of studies have reported no clear contribution of endothelial progenitors in physiological or pathological angiogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss the origin of the endothelial progenitor cell in the embryo and adult, and we discuss the cell's link to the primitive hematopoietic stem cell. We also review the potential significance of endothelial progenitor cells in the formation of a postnatal vascular network and discuss the factors that may account for the current lack of consensus of the scientific community on this important issue. PMID:17554506

  9. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  10. Human Adipose Stromal Vascular Cell Delivery in a Fibrin Spray

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Rubin, J. Peter; Pfeifer, Melanie E.; Moore, L.R.; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue represents a practical source of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and vascular-endothelial progenitor cells, available for regenerative therapy without in vitro expansion. One of the problems confronting the therapeutic application of such cells is how to immobilize them at the wound site. Here, we evaluated in vitro the growth and differentiation of human adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells after delivery using a fibrin spray system. Methods SVF cells were harvested from four human adult patients undergoing elective abdominoplasty using the LipiVage™ system. After collagenase digestion, mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells (pericytes, supra-adventitial stromal cells, endothelial progenitors) were quantified by flow cytometry before culture. SVF cells were applied to culture vessels using the Tisseel™ fibrin spray system. SVF cell growth and differentiation was documented by immunofluorescence staining and photomicrography. Results SVF cells remained viable following application and were expanded up to three weeks, when they reached confluence and adipogenic differentiation. Under angiogenic conditions, SVF cells formed endothelial (vWF+, CD31+ and CD34+) tubules surrounded by CD146+ and α-SMA+ perivascular/stromal cells. Discussion Human adipose tissue is a rich source of autologous stem cells, which are readily available for regenerative applications such as wound healing, without in vitro expansion. Our results indicate that mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells, prepared in a closed system from unpassaged lipoaspirate samples, retain their growth and differentiation capacity when applied and immobilized on a substrate using a clinically approved fibrin sealant spray system. PMID:23260090

  11. From Here to There, Progenitor Cells and Stem Cells Are Everywhere in Lung Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Heise, Rebecca L; Link, Patrick A; Farkas, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially, in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Extensive research activity is exploring the lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field. PMID:27583245

  12. From Here to There, Progenitor Cells and Stem Cells Are Everywhere in Lung Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Rebecca L.; Link, Patrick A.; Farkas, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially, in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Extensive research activity is exploring the lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field. PMID:27583245

  13. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  14. Differential vascular permeability along the forebrain ventricular neurogenic niche in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Colín-Castelán, Dannia; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis is influenced by blood-borne factors. In this context, greater or lesser vascular permeability along neurogenic niches would expose differentially neural stem cells (NSCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and neuroblasts to such factors. Here we evaluate endothelial cell morphology and vascular permeability along the forebrain neurogenic niche in the adult brain. Our results confirm that the subventricular zone (SVZ) contains highly permeable, discontinuous blood vessels, some of which allow the extravasation of molecules larger than those previously reported. In contrast, the rostral migratory stream (RMS) and the olfactory bulb core (OBc) display mostly impermeable, continuous blood vessels. These results imply that NSCs, TACs, and neuroblasts located within the SVZ are exposed more readily to blood-borne molecules, including those with very high molecular weights, than those positioned along the RMS and the OBc, subregions in which every stage of neurogenesis also takes place. These observations suggest that the existence of specialized vascular niches is not a precondition for neurogenesis to occur; specialized vascular beds might be essential for keeping high rates of proliferation and/or differential differentiation of neural precursors located at distinct domains. PMID:26492830

  15. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C.; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O’Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G.; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H. C.; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R.; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modeling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies over 80% within six days. Upon purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  16. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O'Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H C; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L; Gerszten, Robert E; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A

    2015-08-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modelling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF-A or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies exceeding 80% within six days. On purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  17. miRNA and Vascular Cell Movement

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Junming

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are a new class of endogenous small RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Accumulating experimental evidence shows that miRNAs regulate cellular apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Dysregulation of miRNA expression leads to various human diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disease. miRNA maturation is regulated at multiple steps by different mechanisms, including miRNA editing, hairpin loop binding, self-regulation, and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Vascular cell movement plays a pivotal role in the development of various cancers and cardiovascular diseases. miRNAs have been found to regulate vascular cell movement. Presently the chemically synthesized antagomir, miRNA mimics have been widely used in investigating the biological functions of miRNA genes. The viral vectors, including adenoviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vectors, have been used to efficiently overexpress or knockdown miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, targeting vascular cell movement using miRNA-based drug or gene therapy would provide a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of cancers and vascular diseases. PMID:21241758

  18. Intraosseous approach to vascular access in adult resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Rob

    2010-07-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital to maximise resuscitation in critically ill children and adults (LaRocco and Wang 2003), and failure can result in delays in life-saving treatment (Nutbeam and Daniels 2010). The traditional intravenous access method can be difficult to achieve in patients with circulatory collapse (LaRocco and Wang 2003) and failure rates in emergency situations vary between 10 and 40 per cent (Lewis 1986). Other routes, such as endotracheal and intramuscular, do not provide controlled and reliable administration rates (Leidel et al 2009). This article focuses on the increased use of intraosseous (IO) access in adult resuscitation. The IO route is described and the indications and contraindications considered. Common insertion sites and devices of IO access are discussed. PMID:20662405

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation from human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah K; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-05-15

    Transplantation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a promising cellular therapy to promote angiogenesis and wound healing. However, VSMCs are derived from diverse embryonic sources which may influence their role in the development of vascular disease and in its therapeutic modulation. Despite progress in understanding the mechanisms of VSMC differentiation, there remains a shortage of robust methods for generating lineage-specific VSMCs from pluripotent and adult stem/progenitor cells in serum-free conditions. Here we describe a method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as skin-derived precursors, into lateral plate-derived VSMCs including 'coronary-like' VSMCs and neural crest-derived VSMC, respectively. We believe this approach will have broad applications in modeling origin-specific disease vulnerability and in developing personalized cell-based vascular grafts for regenerative medicine. PMID:26678794

  20. Interaction of Electric Fields with Vascular Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2012-04-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to be effective in improving healing rate of the non-healing or slow-healing wounds, a significant high-cost clinical issue. In order to optimize this process, identifying the mechanisms underlying the interaction of vascular cells with electric field (EF) is of interest. We have developed a 3D model of the cultured cells to simulate EF distribution in the cell membrane. The electrical stimulation of cells has been performed using our novel device that generates EF without any contact between electrodes and cells. The results indicate that cells respond to EF by releasing a specific growth factor (PlGF) which is important for blood vessel growth during wound healing.

  1. Mebendazole Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Neointimal Formation Following Vascular Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jintao; Wang, Hui; Guo, Chiao; Luo, Wei; Lawler, Alyssa; Reddy, Aswin; Wang, Julia; Sun, Eddy B.; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Mebendazole is an antihelminthic drug that exerts its effects via interference with microtubule function in parasites. To determine the utility of mebendazole as a potential treatment for vascular diseases involving proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the effects of mebendazole on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation were tested in vitro and in a mouse model of arterial injury. In vitro, mebendazole inhibited proliferation and migration of murine vascular smooth muscle cells and this was associated with altered intracellular microtubule organization. To determine in vivo effects of mebendazole following vascular injury, femoral arterial wire injury was induced in wild-type mice treated with either mebendazole or placebo control. Compared with placebo-treated mice, mebendazole-treated mice formed less neointima at the site of injury. Mebendazole is effective at inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, and neointimal formation following arterial injury in mice. PMID:24587248

  2. Gene modified cell transplantation for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Murasawa, Satoshi; Asahara, Takayuki

    2007-02-01

    Cell Transplantation is one of the powerful tools to ameliorate the capillary flow in ischemic condition. EPC (Endothelial Progenitor Cell) was identified in adult peripheral blood and thought to be a suitable candidate for cell transplantation. Also, gene therapy is already promising choice for enhancing angiogenic property. The combination of cell transplantation and gene therapy should be more effective way to regenerate vasculature in ischemic region. Recently, several research reports have come out regarding gene modified cell transplantation. We will mainly focus on the background of EPC, and then gene modified EPC findings in this review. PMID:17305524

  3. Engineering blood vessels using stem cells: innovative approaches to treat vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-10-01

    Vascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA, providing the impetus for new treatments and technologies. Current therapies rely on the implantation of stents or grafts to treat injured blood vessels. However, these therapies may be immunogenic or may incompletely recover the functional integrity of the vasculature. In light of these shortcomings, cell-based therapies provide new treatment options to heal damaged areas with more suitable substitutes. Current clinical trials employing stem cell-based therapies involve the transfusion of harvested endothelial progenitor cells. While the results from these trials have been encouraging, utilizing tissue-engineered approaches could yield technologically advanced solutions. This article discusses engineered stem cell-based therapies from three angles: the differentiation of adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells, into vascular lineages; investigation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells as inexhaustible sources of vascular cells; and tissue-engineering approaches, which incorporate these vascular progenitor cells into biomimetic scaffolds to guide regeneration. The optimal solution to vascular disease lies at the interface of these technologies--embedding differentiated cells into engineered scaffolds to impart precise control over vascular regeneration. PMID:20936930

  4. LPS-Stimulated Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells Enhance Neo-Vascularization during Dermal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Daniel H.; Kruse, Charli; Schumann, Sandra; Stang, Felix H.; Siemers, Frank; Matthießen, Anna E.

    2015-01-01

    High numbers of adult stem cells are still required to improve the formation of new vessels in scaffolds to accelerate dermal regeneration. Recent data indicate a benefit for vascularization capacity by stimulating stem cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, stem cells derived from human skin (SDSC) were activated with LPS and seeded in a commercially available dermal substitute to examine vascularization in vivo. Besides, in vitro assays were performed to evaluate angiogenic factor release and tube formation ability. Results showed that LPS-activated SDSC significantly enhanced vascularization of the scaffolds, compared to unstimulated stem cells in vivo. Further, in vitro assays confirmed higher secretion rates of proangiogenic as well as proinflammatoric factors in the presence of LPS-activated SDSC. Our results suggest that combining activated stem cells and a dermal substitute is a promising option to enhance vascularization in scaffold-mediated dermal regeneration. PMID:26565617

  5. Stromal vascular progenitors in adult human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Pfeifer, Melanie E.; Meyer, E. Michael; Péault, Bruno; Rubin, J. Peter; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The in vivo progenitor of culture-expanded mesenchymal-like adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) remains elusive, owing in part to the complex organization of stromal cells surrounding the small vessels, and the rapidity with which adipose stromal vascular cells adopt a mesenchymal phenotype in vitro. Methods Immunohistostaining of intact adipose tissue was used to identify 3 markers (CD31, CD34, CD146) which together unambiguously discriminate histologically distinct inner and outer rings of vessel-associated stromal cells, as well as capillary and small vessel endothelial cells. These markers were used in multiparameter flow cytometry in conjunction with stem/progenitor markers (CD90, CD117) to further characterize stromal vascular fraction (SVF) subpopulations. Two mesenchymal and two endothelial populations were isolated by high speed flow cytometric sorting, expanded in short term culture and tested for adipogenesis. Results The inner layer of stromal cells in contact with small vessel endothelium (pericytes) was CD146+/α-SMA+/CD90±/CD34−/CD31−; the outer adventitial stromal ring (designated supra adventitial-adipose stromal cells, SA-ASC) was CD146−/α-SMA−/CD90+/CD34+/CD31−. Capillary endothelial cells were CD31+/CD34+/CD90+ (endothelial progenitor), while small vessel endothelium was CD31+/CD34−/CD90− (endothelial mature). Flow cytometry confirmed these expression patterns and revealed a CD146+/CD90+/CD34+/CD31− pericyte subset that may be transitional between pericytes and SA-ASC. Pericytes had the most potent adipogenic potential, followed by the more numerous SA-ASC. Endothelial populations had significantly reduced adipogenic potential compared to unsorted expanded SVF cells. Conclusions In adipose tissue perivascular stromal cells are organized in two discrete layers, the innermost consisting of CD146+/CD34− pericytes, and the outermost of CD146−/CD34+ SA-ASC, both of which have adipogenic potential in culture. A CD146+/CD

  6. Stem cells and scaffolds for vascularizing engineered tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Luong, E; Gerecht, S

    2009-01-01

    The clinical impact of tissue engineering depends upon our ability to direct cells to form tissues with characteristic structural and mechanical properties from the molecular level up to organized tissue. Induction and creation of functional vascular networks has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering either in vitro, for the transplantation of prevascularized constructs, or in vivo, for cellular organization within the implantation site. In most cases, tissue engineering attempts to recapitulate certain aspects of normal development in order to stimulate cell differentiation and functional tissue assembly. The induction of tissue growth generally involves the use of biodegradable and bioactive materials designed, ideally, to provide a mechanical, physical, and biochemical template for tissue regeneration. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of a developing blastocyst, are capable of differentiating into all cell types of the body. Specifically, hESCs have the capability to differentiate and form blood vessels de novo in a process called vasculogenesis. Human ESC-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells have substantial potential for microvessel formation, in vitro and in vivo. Human adult EPCs are being isolated to understand the fundamental biology of how these cells are regulated as a population and to explore whether these cells can be differentiated and reimplanted as a cellular therapy in order to arrest or even reverse damaged vasculature. This chapter focuses on advances made toward the generation and engineering of functional vascular tissue, focusing on both the scaffolds - the synthetic and biopolymer materials - and the cell sources - hESCs and hEPCs. PMID:19082932

  7. Stem Cells and Scaffolds for Vascularizing Engineered Tissue Constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, E.; Gerecht, S.

    The clinical impact of tissue engineering depends upon our ability to direct cells to form tissues with characteristic structural and mechanical properties from the molecular level up to organized tissue. Induction and creation of functional vascular networks has been one of the main goals of tissue engineering either in vitro, for the transplantation of prevascularized constructs, or in vivo, for cellular organization within the implantation site. In most cases, tissue engineering attempts to recapitulate certain aspects of normal development in order to stimulate cell differentiation and functional tissue assembly. The induction of tissue growth generally involves the use of biodegradable and bioactive materials designed, ideally, to provide a mechanical, physical, and biochemical template for tissue regeneration. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of a developing blastocyst, are capable of differentiating into all cell types of the body. Specifically, hESCs have the capability to differentiate and form blood vessels de novo in a process called vasculogenesis. Human ESC-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells have substantial potential for microvessel formation, in vitro and in vivo. Human adult EPCs are being isolated to understand the fundamental biology of how these cells are regulated as a population and to explore whether these cells can be differentiated and reimplanted as a cellular therapy in order to arrest or even reverse damaged vasculature. This chapter focuses on advances made toward the generation and engineering of functional vascular tissue, focusing on both the scaffolds - the synthetic and biopolymer materials - and the cell sources - hESCs and hEPCs.

  8. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Ronco, Ana Maria; Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel; Saez, Daniel; Hirsch, Sandra; Zepeda, Ramiro; Llanos, Miguel N.

    2011-03-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-{kappa}B expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  9. In vitro differentiation of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Andrea; Bernardini, Chiara; Bertocchi, Martina; Zannoni, Augusta; Bianchi, Francesca; Avallone, Giancarlo; Mangano, Chiara; Sarli, Giuseppe; Calzà, Laura; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2015-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that progenitor and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are associated with vascular niches. Cells displaying mesenchymal properties and differentiating to whole components of a functional blood vessel, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells, can be defined as vascular stem cells (VSCs). Recently, we isolated a population of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells (pAVPCs), which have MSC- and pericyte-like properties. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether pAVPCs possess VSC-like properties and assess their differentiation potential toward endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. pAVPCs, maintained in a specific pericyte growth medium, were cultured in high-glucose DMEM + 10% FBS (long-term medium, LTM) or in human endothelial serum-free medium + 5% FBS and 50 ng/ml of hVEGF (endothelial differentiation medium, EDM). After 21 days of culture in LTM, pAVPCs showed an elongated fibroblast-like morphology, and they seem to organize in cord-like structures. qPCR analysis of smooth muscle markers [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and smooth muscle myosin (SMM) heavy chain] showed a significant increment of the transcripts, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of α-SMA and SMM proteins. After 21 days of culture in EDM, pAVPCs displayed an endothelial cell-like morphology and revealed the upregulation of the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, vascular endothelial-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase) showing the CD31-typical pattern. In conclusion, pAVPCs could be defined as a VSC-like population considering that, if they are maintained in a specific pericyte medium, they express MSC markers, and they have, in addition to the classical mesenchymal trilineage differentiation potential, the capacity to differentiate in vitro toward the smooth muscle and the endothelial cell phenotypes. PMID:26135800

  10. DISTINCT PROGENITOR POPULATIONS IN SKELETAL MUSCLE ARE BONE MARROW DERIVED AND EXHIBIT DIFFERENT CELL FATES DURING VASCULAR REGENERATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular progenitors were previously isolated from blood and bone marrow; herein, we define the presence, phenotype, potential, and origin of vascular progenitors resident within adult skeletal muscle. Two distinct populations of cells were simultaneously isolated from hindlimb muscle: the side popu...

  11. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26892967

  12. Endothelial Outgrowth Cells: Function and Performance in Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical need for vascular grafts continues to grow. Tissue engineering strategies have been employed to develop vascular grafts for patients lacking sufficient autologous vessels for grafting. Restoring a functional endothelium on the graft lumen has been shown to greatly improve the long-term patency of small-diameter grafts. However, obtaining an autologous source of endothelial cells for in vitro endothelialization is invasive and often not a viable option. Endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), derived from circulating progenitor cells in peripheral blood, provide an alternative cell source for engineering an autologous endothelium. This review aims at highlighting the role of EOCs in the regulation of processes that are central to vascular graft performance. To characterize EOC performance in vascular grafts, this review identifies the characteristics of EOCs, defines functional performance criteria for EOCs in vascular grafts, and summarizes the existing work in developing vascular grafts with EOCs. PMID:24004404

  13. Vaccination with vascular progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells elicits antitumor immunity targeting vascular and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ito, Masaki; Sagawa, Yukiko; Okamoto, Masato; Hayashi, Kazumi; Nagasaki, Eijiro; Kan, Shin; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Homma, Sadamu

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the lysate of induced vascular progenitor (iVP) cells derived from murine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells significantly suppressed the tumor of CMS-4 fibrosarcomas and prolonged the survival of CMS-4-inoculated mice. This prophylactic antitumor activity was more potent than that of immunization with DCs loaded with iPS cells or CMS-4 tumor cells. Tumors developed slowly in mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with iVP cells (DC/iVP) and exhibited a limited vascular bed. Immunohistochemistry and a tomato-lectin perfusion study demonstrated that the tumors that developed in the iVP-immunized mice showed a marked decrease in tumor vasculature. Immunization with DC/iVP induced a potent suppressive effect on vascular-rich CMS-4 tumors, a weaker effect on BNL tumors with moderate vasculature, and nearly no effect on C26 tumors with poor vasculature. Treatment of DC/iVP-immunized mice with a monoclonal antibody against CD4 or CD8, but not anti-asialo GM1, inhibited the antitumor activity. CD8(+) T cells from DC/iVP-vaccinated mice showed significant cytotoxic activity against murine endothelial cells and CMS-4 cells, whereas CD8(+) T cells from DC/iPS-vaccinated mice did not. DNA microarray analysis showed that the products of 29 vasculature-associated genes shared between genes upregulated by differentiation from iPS cells into iVP cells and genes shared by iVP cells and isolated Flk-1(+) vascular cells in CMS-4 tumor tissue might be possible targets in the immune response. These results suggest that iVP cells from iPS cells could be used as a cancer vaccine targeting tumor vascular cells and tumor cells. PMID:24627093

  14. Vascular cell biology in vivo: a new piscine paradigm?

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Brant

    2002-09-01

    Understanding how blood vessels form has become increasingly important in recent years yet remains difficult to study. The architecture and context of blood vessels are difficult to reproduce in vitro, and most developing blood vessels in vivo are relatively inaccessible to observation and experimental manipulation. Zebrafish, however, provide several advantages. They have small, accessible, transparent embryos and larvae, facilitating high-resolution imaging in vivo. In addition, genetic and experimental tools and methods are available for functional manipulation of the entire organism, vascular tissues or even single vascular- or non-vascular cells. Together, these features make the fish amenable to 'in vivo vascular cell biology'. PMID:12220865

  15. Chemerin Regulates Crosstalk Between Adipocytes and Vascular Cells Through Nox.

    PubMed

    Neves, Karla Bianca; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Lopes, Rheure Alves Moreira; Rios, Francisco Jose; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Lobato, Nubia Souza; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Tostes, Rita C; Montezano, Augusto C; Touyz, Rhian M

    2015-09-01

    Adipocytes produce adipokines, including chemerin, a chemoattractant that mediates effects through its ChemR23 receptor. Chemerin has been linked to endothelial dysfunction and vascular injury in pathological conditions, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Molecular mechanisms underlying this are elusive. Here we assessed whether chemerin through redox-sensitive signaling influences molecular processes associated with vascular growth, apoptosis, and inflammation. Human microvascular endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated with chemerin (50 ng/mL). Chemerin increased generation of reactive oxygen species and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, effects that were inhibited by ML171, GKT137831 (Nox inhibitors), and N-acetylcysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger). Chemerin increased mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators in vascular cells and increased monocyte-to-endothelial cell attachment. In human vascular smooth muscle cells, chemerin induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and stimulated proliferation (increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression [proliferation marker] and BrdU incorporation [proliferation assay]). Chemerin decreased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B activation and increased TUNEL-positive human vascular smooth muscle cells. In human microvascular endothelial cells, chemerin reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide production. Adipocyte-conditioned medium from obese/diabetic mice (db/db), which have elevated chemerin levels, increased reactive oxygen species generation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas adipocyte-conditioned medium from control mice had no effect. Chemerin actions were blocked by CCX 832, a ChemR23 inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that chemerin, through Nox activation and redox-sensitive mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling, exerts proapoptotic, proinflammatory, and

  16. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  17. Molecular Mechanisms for Vascular Development and Secondary Cell Wall Formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hyun; Wang, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues are important for transporting water and nutrients throughout the plant and as physical support of upright growth. The primary constituents of vascular tissues, xylem, and phloem, are derived from the meristematic vascular procambium and cambium. Xylem cells develop secondary cell walls (SCWs) that form the largest part of plant lignocellulosic biomass that serve as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production. For the last decade, research on vascular development and SCW biosynthesis has seen rapid progress due to the importance of these processes to plant biology and to the biofuel industry. Plant hormones, transcriptional regulators and peptide signaling regulate procambium/cambium proliferation, vascular patterning, and xylem differentiation. Transcriptional regulatory pathways play a pivot role in SCW biosynthesis. Although most of these discoveries are derived from research in Arabidopsis, many genes have shown conserved functions in biofuel feedstock species. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of vascular development and SCW formation and discuss potential biotechnological uses. PMID:27047525

  18. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  19. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein prevents vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells senescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meili; Fu, Yi; Gao, Cheng; Jia, Yiting; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Limei; Wang, Xian; Wang, Wengong; Kong, Wei

    2016-09-16

    Aging-related vascular dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a vascular extracellular matrix protein, has been described as a negative regulatory factor for the vascular aging-related processes including atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, whether COMP is implicated in the process of vascular aging remains unclear. Here, we identified a novel function of COMP in preventing vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) senescence. Firstly, vascular COMP expression was decreased in three different senescence-accelerated mouse models and was also declining with age. COMP(-/-) mice displayed elevated senescence-associated markers expression, including p53, p21 and p16, in the aortas compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In accordance, COMP deficiency induced aging-related vascular dysfunction as evidenced by the significantly reduced phenylephrine-induced contraction and increased vascular stiffness as evaluated by pulse wave velocity. The aortic wall of COMP(-/-) mice was susceptible to senescence by displaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity induced by periadventitial application of CaCl2 to the abdominal aorta. In vitro, COMP knockdown by small interfering (si) RNA led to the elevation of p53, p21 and p16 as well as SA β-gal activity in VSMCs after H2O2 stimulation. VSMCs isolated from COMP(-/-) mice showed elevated senescence-associated markers expression and supplement of COMP adenovirus to COMP-deficient VSMCs greatly rescued cellular senescence. Taken together, these findings revealed the essential role of COMP in retarding the development of vascular aging and VSMC senescence. PMID:27498005

  20. The role of miR-126 in embryonic angiogenesis, adult vascular homeostasis, and vascular repair and its alterations in atherosclerotic disease.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-08-01

    Expression of microRNA (miR)-126 is enriched in endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). MiR-126 is considered a master regulator of physiological angiogenesis. In embryonic vasculogenesis, this miRNA is involved in induction of angiogenic signaling, supports differentiation of embryonic stem cells to EPCs and ECs, and promotes EC maturation. However, in mature ECs and adult EPCs, miR-126 contributes to vascular homeostasis by inhibiting angiogenesis and maintaining the quiescent endothelial phenotype associated with increased vascular integrity and inhibited proliferation and motility. In a case of vessel injury and/or hypoxia, miR-126 up-regulation activates EPCs and ECs and contributes to vascular healing and neovessel formation. Indeed, miR-126 exhibits vasculoprotective and atheroprotective properties. The promising regenerative and proangiogenic potential of this miRNA will be helpful for development of cardioprotective strategies and cardiovascular repair therapies of myocardial infarction, heart failure, and other cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27180261

  1. Systemic Vascular Function Is Associated with Muscular Power in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Chalé, Angela; Hau, Cynthia; Cloutier, Gregory J.; Phillips, Edward M.; Warner, Patrick; Nickerson, Heather; Reid, Kieran F.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Age-associated loss of muscular strength and muscular power is a critical determinant of loss of physical function and progression to disability in older adults. In this study, we examined the association of systemic vascular function and measures of muscle strength and power in older adults. Measures of vascular endothelial function included brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and the pulse wave amplitude reactive hyperemia index (PWA-RHI). Augmentation index (AIx) was taken as a measure of systemic vascular function related to arterial stiffness and wave reflection. Measures of muscular strength included one repetition maximum (1RM) for a bilateral leg press. Peak muscular power was measured during 5 repetitions performed as fast as possible for bilateral leg press at 40% 1RM. Muscular power was associated with brachial FMD (r = 0.43, P < 0.05), PWA-RHI (r = 0.42, P < 0.05), and AIx (r = −0.54, P < 0.05). Muscular strength was not associated with any measure of vascular function. In conclusion, systemic vascular function is associated with lower-limb muscular power but not muscular strength in older adults. Whether loss of muscular power with aging contributes to systemic vascular deconditioning or vascular dysfunction contributes to decrements in muscular power remains to be determined. PMID:22966457

  2. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  3. An adult with central cyanosis and differential pulmonary vascularity.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Moorthy, Nagaraja; Rao, Dattatreya Pv; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male patient presented with progressive effort intolerance of 2-years duration. Clinical findings and investigations were suggestive of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In addition, there was a conspicuous difference in the pulmonary vascularity with oligemia on the left side and relative hypervascularity on the right side. The right pulmonary artery was arising from the proximal ascending aorta and the main pulmonary artery was continuing as the left pulmonary artery. The anomalous origin of a branch pulmonary artery from the aorta (AOPA) is a rare cardiac anomaly. We report this condition in association with TOF, highlighting the differential pulmonary vascularity. PMID:26556978

  4. An adult with central cyanosis and differential pulmonary vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Moorthy, Nagaraja; Rao, Dattatreya PV; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male patient presented with progressive effort intolerance of 2-years duration. Clinical findings and investigations were suggestive of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In addition, there was a conspicuous difference in the pulmonary vascularity with oligemia on the left side and relative hypervascularity on the right side. The right pulmonary artery was arising from the proximal ascending aorta and the main pulmonary artery was continuing as the left pulmonary artery. The anomalous origin of a branch pulmonary artery from the aorta (AOPA) is a rare cardiac anomaly. We report this condition in association with TOF, highlighting the differential pulmonary vascularity. PMID:26556978

  5. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  6. Deleterious effects of tributyltin on porcine vascular stem cells physiology.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Chiara; Zannoni, Augusta; Bertocchi, Martina; Bianchi, Francesca; Salaroli, Roberta; Botelho, Giuliana; Bacci, Maria Laura; Ventrella, Vittoria; Forni, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The vascular functional and structural integrity is essential for the maintenance of the whole organism and it has been demonstrated that different types of vascular progenitor cells resident in the vessel wall play an important role in this process. The purpose of the present research was to observe the effect of tributyltin (TBT), a risk factor for vascular disorders, on porcine Aortic Vascular Precursor Cells (pAVPCs) in term of cytotoxicity, gene expression profile, functionality and differentiation potential. We have demonstrated that pAVPCs morphology deeply changed following TBT treatment. After 48h a cytotoxic effect has been detected and Annexin binding assay demonstrated that TBT induced apoptosis. The transcriptional profile of characteristic pericyte markers has been altered: TBT 10nM substantially induced alpha-SMA, while, TBT 500nM determined a significant reduction of all pericyte markers. IL-6 protein detected in the medium of pAVPCs treated with TBT at both doses studied and with a dose response. TBT has interfered with normal pAVPC functionality preventing their ability to support a capillary-like network. In addition TBT has determined an increase of pAVPC adipogenic differentiation. In conclusion in the present paper we have demonstrated that TBT alters the vascular stem cells in terms of structure, functionality and differentiating capability, therefore effects of TBT in blood should be deeply explored to understand the potential vascular risk associated with the alteration of vascular stem cell physiology. PMID:26965667

  7. Endothelial cell FGF signaling is required for injury response but not for vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oladipupo, Sunday S.; Smith, Craig; Santeford, Andrea; Park, Changwon; Sene, Abdoulaye; Wiley, Luke A.; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Hsu, Joann; Zapata, Nicole; Liu, Fang; Nakamura, Rei; Lavine, Kory J.; Blumer, Kendall J.; Choi, Kyunghee; Apte, Rajendra S.; Ornitz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) express fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and are exquisitely sensitive to FGF signals. However, whether the EC or another vascular cell type requires FGF signaling during development, homeostasis, and response to injury is not known. Here, we show that Flk1-Cre or Tie2-Cre mediated deletion of FGFR1 and FGFR2 (Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre or Fgfr1/2Tie2-Cre mice), which results in deletion in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, is compatible with normal embryonic development. As adults, Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre mice maintain normal blood pressure and vascular reactivity and integrity under homeostatic conditions. However, neovascularization after skin or eye injury was significantly impaired in both Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre and Fgfr1/2Tie2-Cre mice, independent of either hematopoietic cell loss of FGFR1/2 or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Vegfr2) haploinsufficiency. Also, impaired neovascularization was associated with delayed cutaneous wound healing. These findings reveal a key requirement for cell-autonomous EC FGFR signaling in injury-induced angiogenesis, but not for vascular homeostasis, identifying the EC FGFR signaling pathway as a target for diseases associated with aberrant vascular proliferation, such as age-related macular degeneration, and for modulating wound healing without the potential toxicity associated with direct manipulation of systemic FGF or VEGF activity. PMID:25139991

  8. Stem cell-derived vascular endothelial cells and their potential application in regenerative medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although a 'vascular stem cell' population has not been identified or generated, vascular endothelial and mural cells (smooth muscle cells and pericytes) can be derived from currently known pluripotent stem cell sources, including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. We rev...

  9. Implantation of Vascular Grafts Lined with Genetically Modified Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, James M.; Birinyi, Louis K.; Salomon, Robert N.; Libby, Peter; Callow, Allan D.; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1989-06-01

    The possibility of using the vascular endothelial cell as a target for gene replacement therapy was explored. Recombinant retroviruses were used to transduce the lacZ gene into endothelial cells harvested from mongrel dogs. Prosthetic vascular grafts seeded with the genetically modified cells were implanted as carotid interposition grafts into the dogs from which the original cells were harvested. Analysis of the graft 5 weeks after implantation revealed genetically modified endothelial cells lining the luminal surface of the graft. This technology could be used in the treatment of atherosclerosis disease and the design of new drug delivery systems.

  10. Microenvironment influences vascular differentiation of murine cardiovascular progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Jessica M; Delman, Connor; Chyu, Jennifer; MacLellan, W Robb; Shemin, Richard J; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh

    2014-11-01

    We examined the effects of the microenvironment on vascular differentiation of murine cardiovascular progenitor cells (CPCs). We isolated CPCs and seeded them in culture exposed to the various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D culture systems. To better understand the contribution of the microenvironment to vascular differentiation, we analyzed endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiation at both day 7 and day 14. We found that laminin and vitronectin enhanced vascular endothelial cell differentiation while fibronectin enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. We also observed that the effects of the 3D electrospun scaffolds were delayed and not noticeable until the later time point (day 14), which may be due to the amount of time necessary for the cells to migrate to the interior of the scaffold. The study characterized the contributions of both ECM proteins and the addition of a 3D culture system to continued vascular differentiation. Additionally, we demonstrated the capability bioengineer a CPC-derived vascular graft. PMID:24687591

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes survival of retinal vascular endothelial cells via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor‐2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bojun; Smith, Gill; Cai, Jun; Ma, Aihua; Boulton, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF‐C) expression in retinal endothelial cells, its antiapoptotic potential and its putative role in diabetic retinopathy. Method Cultured retinal endothelial cells and pericytes were exposed to tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α and VEGF‐C expression determined by reverse transcriptase‐polymerase chain reaction. Secreted VEGF‐C protein levels in conditioned media from endothelial cells were examined by western blotting analysis. The ability of VEGF‐C to prevent apoptosis induced by TNFα or hyperglycaemia in endothelial cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The expression of VEGF‐C in diabetic retinopathy was studied by immunohistochemistry of retinal tissue. Result VEGF‐C was expressed by both vascular endothelial cells and pericytes. TNFα up regulated both VEGF‐C and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor‐2 (VEGFR)‐2 expression in endothelial cells in a dose‐dependent manner, but had no effect on VEGFR‐3. Flow cytometry results showed that VEGF‐C prevented endothelial cell apoptosis induced by TNFα and hyperglycaemia and that the antiapoptotic effect was mainly via VEGFR‐2. In pericytes, the expression of VEGF‐C mRNA remained stable on exogenous TNFα treatment. VEGF‐C immunostaining was increased in retinal vessels in specimens with diabetes compared with retinal specimens from controls without diabetes. Conclusion In retinal endothelial cells, TNFα stimulates the expression of VEGF‐C, which in turn protects endothelial cells from apoptosis induced by TNFα or hyperglycaemia via VEGFR‐2 and thus helps sustain retinal neovascularisation. PMID:16943230

  12. TGF-β Is Required for Vascular Barrier Function, Endothelial Survival and Homeostasis of the Adult Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Arindel S. R.; Sekiyama, Eiichi; Maldonado, Angel E.; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Pericyte-endothelial cell (EC) interactions are critical to both vascular development and vessel stability. We have previously shown that TGF-β signaling between EC and mural cells participates in vessel stabilization in vitro. We therefore investigated the role of TGF-β signaling in maintaining microvessel structure and function in the adult mouse retinal microvasculature. TGF-β signaling was inhibited by systemic expression of soluble endoglin (sEng) and inhibition was demonstrated by reduced phospho-smad2 in the adult retina. Blockade of TGF-β signaling led to increased vascular and neural cell apoptosis in the retina, which was associated with decreased retinal function, as measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Perfusion of the inner retinal vasculature was impaired and was accompanied by defective autoregulation and loss of capillary integrity. Fundus angiography and Evans blue permeability assay revealed a breakdown of the blood-retinal-barrier that was characterized by decreased association between the tight junction proteins zo-1 and occludin. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in cocultures of EC and 10T1/2 cells corroborated the in vivo findings, with impaired EC barrier function, dissociation of EC from 10T1/2 cells, and endothelial cell death, supporting the role of EC-mesenchymal interactions in TGF-β signaling. These results implicate constitutive TGF-β signaling in maintaining the integrity and function of the adult microvasculature and shed light on the potential role of TGF-β signaling in vasoproliferative and vascular degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:19340291

  13. Apoptosis and calcification of vascular endothelial cell under hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kuaifa; Chen, Zhujun; Liu, Meng; Peng, Jian; Wu, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is found that increase in Hcy level in blood can directly or indirectly cause vascular endothelial cell injury and induce vascular calcification. However, the mechanism of vascular endothelial cell injury and vascular calcification has not been studied thoroughly. This paper carried out experiment for research aiming at discussing the effect and action mechanism of Hhcy on endothelial cells and vascular calcification. Firstly, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and then intervened by Hcy of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mmol/L) and at different action time (3, 6, 12, 24 h). Then apoptosis rate and reactive oxygen were detected by flow cytometry. At the same time, the model for the culture of rat vascular calcification was set up and induced into Hhcy so as to detect the total plasma Hcy level and judge vascular calcification degree. The results showed that with the increase in Hcy concentration and extension of action period, the apoptosis rate and generation of reactive oxygen of HUVECs all significantly increased, and the differences were all statistically significant (P < 0.01). In animal calcification model, mass of black particle deposition was seen after Von Kossa staining of rat vessels in calcification group. Compared with the control group, the vascular calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin content in calcification group all increased (P < 0.01). The content of plasma lipid conjugated olefine from highest to lowest wasas follows: calcification plus homoetheionin, homoetheionin, and calcification group. There was no significant difference between the calcification group and control group. All these findings suggested that Hcy could induce the apoptosis of endothelial cells and its effect degree depended on its concentration and action period; Hhcy could promote the calcification of blood vessels, and its mechanism might relate with the strengthening of

  14. LOX-1-Mediated Effects on Vascular Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-01-01

    In healthy arteries, expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is almost undetectable. However, in proatherogenic conditions, LOX-1 is markedly up-regulated in vascular cells. In atherosclerosis, LOX-1 appears to be the key scavenger receptor for binding oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Notably, a positive feedback exists between LOX-1 and oxLDL. LOX-1 is involved in mediating of proatherosclerotic effects of oxLDL which result in endothelial dysfunction, proinflammatory recruitment of monocytes into the arterial intima, formation of foam cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), as well as in plaque destabilization and rupture. In this review, we consider effects of the LOX-1/oxLDL axis on several types of vascular cells such as ECs, VSMCs, and macrophages. PMID:27160316

  15. Transplanting normal vascular proangiogenic cells to tumor-bearing mice triggers vascular remodeling and reduced hypoxia in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sasajima, Junpei; Mizukami, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Kawamoto, Toru; Koizumi, Kazuya; Fujii, Rie; Motomura, Wataru; Sato, Kazuya; Suzuki, Yasuaki; Tanno, Satoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sasaki, Katsunori; Shimizu, Norihiko; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kono, Toru; Kawabe, Jun-ichi; Ii, Masaaki; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Ashida, Toshifumi; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Chung, Daniel C.; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues and vascular networks are spatially organized to meet metabolic needs for maintaining homeostasis. In contrast, the vasculature of tumors is immature and leaky, resulting in insufficient delivery of nutrients and oxygen. Vasculogenic processes occur normally in adult tissues to repair “injured” blood vessels, leading us to hypothesize that bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) may be able to restore appropriate vessel function in tumor vasculature. Culturing BMMNC with endothelial growth medium resulted in the early outgrowth of spindle-shaped attached cells expressing CD11b/Flt1/Tie2/c-Kit/CXCR4 with pro-angiogenic activity. Intravenous administration of these cultured vascular proangiogenic cells (VPC) into nude mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+ genetically engineered mice that develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma significantly reduced areas of hypoxia without enhancing tumor growth. The resulting vasculature structurally mimicked normal vessels with intensive pericyte coverage. Increases in the vascularized area within VPC-injected xenografts were visualized with the ultrasound diagnostic system during injection of a microbubble-based contrast agent (Sonazoid), indicating a functional “normalization” of the tumor vasculature. In addition, gene expression profiles on the VPC-transplanted xenografts revealed a marked reduction in major factors involved in drug resistance and “stemness” of cancer cells. Together, our findings identify a novel alternate approach to regulate abnormal tumor vessels, offering the potential to improve delivery and efficacy of anti-cancer drugs to hypoxic tumors. PMID:20631070

  16. Transplanting normal vascular proangiogenic cells to tumor-bearing mice triggers vascular remodeling and reduces hypoxia in tumors.

    PubMed

    Sasajima, Junpei; Mizukami, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Kawamoto, Toru; Koizumi, Kazuya; Fujii, Rie; Motomura, Wataru; Sato, Kazuya; Suzuki, Yasuaki; Tanno, Satoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sasaki, Katsunori; Shimizu, Norihiko; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kono, Toru; Kawabe, Jun-ichi; Ii, Masaaki; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Ashida, Toshifumi; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Chung, Daniel C; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2010-08-01

    Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients to tissues, and vascular networks are spatially organized to meet the metabolic needs for maintaining homeostasis. In contrast, the vasculature of tumors is immature and leaky, resulting in insufficient delivery of nutrients and oxygen. Vasculogenic processes occur normally in adult tissues to repair "injured" blood vessels, leading us to hypothesize that bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) may be able to restore appropriate vessel function in the tumor vasculature. Culturing BMMNCs in endothelial growth medium resulted in the early outgrowth of spindle-shaped attached cells expressing CD11b/Flt1/Tie2/c-Kit/CXCR4 with proangiogenic activity. Intravenous administration of these cultured vascular proangiogenic cells (VPC) into nude mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-Kras(G12D);p53(lox/+) genetically engineered mice that develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma significantly reduced areas of hypoxia without enhancing tumor growth. The resulting vasculature structurally mimicked normal vessels with intensive pericyte coverage. Increases in vascularized areas within VPC-injected xenografts were visualized with an ultrasound diagnostic system during injection of a microbubble-based contrast agent (Sonazoid), indicating a functional "normalization" of the tumor vasculature. In addition, gene expression profiles in the VPC-transplanted xenografts revealed a marked reduction in major factors involved in drug resistance and "stemness" of cancer cells. Together, our findings identify a novel alternate approach to regulate abnormal tumor vessels, offering the potential to improve the delivery and efficacy of anticancer drugs to hypoxic tumors. PMID:20631070

  17. A novel transgenic marker for migrating limb muscle precursors and for vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tidhar, A; Reichenstein, M; Cohen, D; Faerman, A; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Shani, M

    2001-01-01

    A unique pattern of LacZ expression was found in a transgenic mouse line, likely due to regulatory elements at the site of integration. Two new genes flanking the transgene were identified. At early stages of development, the transgene is transiently expressed in ventro-lateral demomyotomal cells migrating from the somites into the limb buds. At late developmental stages and in the adult, lacZ staining marks vascular smooth muscle cells throughout the vascular bed, with the exception of the major elastic arteries, and in pericytes. No expression was detected in skeletal and smooth muscles. Different patterns of expression in vascular smooth muscles was observed at distinct levels of the vascular tree, in arteries as well as in veins. Vessel injury, resulting in stimulation of smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration, is associated with transgene down-regulation. After the formation of neointima thickening, it is reactivated. This transgenic insertion may therefore be used as a useful marker to identify novel physiological cues or genetic elements involved in the regulation of the vascular smooth muscle phenotype(s). It may also provide an experimental tool for studying vasculature and the involvement of pericytes in regulating microvascular homeostasis. PMID:11146508

  18. Functional genomics indicate that schizophrenia may be an adult vascular-ischemic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moises, H W; Wollschläger, D; Binder, H

    2015-01-01

    In search for the elusive schizophrenia pathway, candidate genes for the disorder from a discovery sample were localized within the energy-delivering and ischemia protection pathway. To test the adult vascular-ischemic (AVIH) and the competing neurodevelopmental hypothesis (NDH), functional genomic analyses of practically all available schizophrenia-associated genes from candidate gene, genome-wide association and postmortem expression studies were performed. Our results indicate a significant overrepresentation of genes involved in vascular function (P<0.001), vasoregulation (that is, perivascular (P<0.001) and shear stress (P<0.01), cerebral ischemia (P<0.001), neurodevelopment (P<0.001) and postischemic repair (P<0.001) among schizophrenia-associated genes from genetic association studies. These findings support both the NDH and the AVIH. The genes from postmortem studies showed an upregulation of vascular-ischemic genes (P=0.020) combined with downregulated synaptic (P=0.005) genes, and ND/repair (P=0.003) genes. Evidence for the AVIH and the NDH is critically discussed. We conclude that schizophrenia is probably a mild adult vascular-ischemic and postischemic repair disorder. Adult postischemic repair involves ND genes for adult neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, glutamate and increased long-term potentiation of excitatory neurotransmission (i-LTP). Schizophrenia might be caused by the cerebral analog of microvascular angina. PMID:26261884

  19. Vascular health and longitudinal changes in brain and cognition in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Acker, James D

    2007-03-01

    The impact of vascular health on the relations between structural brain changes and cognition was assessed in a longitudinal study of 46 adults, 23 of whom remained healthy for 5 years and 23 of whom had hypertension at baseline or acquired vascular problems during follow-up. At both measurement occasions, the volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and regional brain volumes correlated with age. In 5 years, WMH volume more than doubled in the vascular risk group but did not increase in healthy participants. The frontal lobes had the highest WMH load at baseline and follow-up; the parietal WMH showed the greatest rate of expansion. In the vascular risk group, systolic blood pressure at follow-up correlated with posterior WMH volume. The fastest cortical shrinkage was observed in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. Fluid intelligence correlated with WMH burden and declined along with faster WMH progression. In the vascular risk group, WMH progression and shrinkage of the fusiform cortex correlated with decline in working memory. Thus, poor vascular health contributes to age-related declines in brain and cognition, and some of the age-related declines may be limited to persons with elevated vascular risk. PMID:17402815

  20. Vascular complications after adult living donor liver transplantation: Evaluation with ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been widely used to treat end-stage liver disease with improvement in surgical technology and the application of new immunosuppressants. Vascular complications after liver transplantation remain a major threat to the survival of recipients. LDLT recipients are more likely to develop vascular complications because of their complex vascular reconstruction and the slender vessels. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for the survival of graft and recipients. As a non-invasive, cost-effective and non-radioactive method with bedside availability, conventional gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography play important roles in identifying vascular complications in the early postoperative period and during the follow-up. Recently, with the detailed vascular tracing and perfusion visualization, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has significantly improved the diagnosis of postoperative vascular complications. This review focuses on the role of conventional gray-scale ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and CEUS for early diagnosis of vascular complications after adult LDLT. PMID:26819527

  1. Luteolin Ameliorates Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling through Inhibiting the Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jie; Xu, Han-Ting; Yu, Jing-Jing; Gao, Jian-Li; Lei, Jing; Yin, Qiao-Shan; Li, Bo; Pang, Min-Xia; Su, Min-Xia; Mi, Wen-Jia; Chen, Su-Hong; Lv, Gui-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Preliminary researches showed that luteolin was used to treat hypertension. However, it is still unclear whether luteolin has effect on the hypertensive complication such as vascular remodeling. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of luteolin on the hypertensive vascular remodeling and its molecular mechanism. Method and Results. We evaluated the effect of luteolin on aorta thickening of hypertension in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) and found that luteolin could significantly decrease the blood pressure and media thickness of aorta in vivo. Luteolin could inhibit angiotensin II- (Ang II-) induced proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) staining result showed that luteolin reduced Ang II-stimulated ROS production in VSMCs. Furthermore, western blot and gelatin zymography results showed that luteolin treatment leaded to a decrease in ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, MMP2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein level. Conclusion. These data support that luteolin can ameliorate hypertensive vascular remodeling by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of Ang II-induced VSMCs. Its mechanism is mediated by the regulation of MAPK signaling pathway and the production of ROS. PMID:26495010

  2. Vinpocetine suppresses pathological vascular remodeling by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A; Yan, Chen

    2012-11-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  3. Vinpocetine Suppresses Pathological Vascular Remodeling by Inhibiting Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E.; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  4. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  5. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation. PMID:26074079

  6. Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptors in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael J.; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Kraemer, Rosemary; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mahadeo, Debbie; Sharif, Setareh; Kaplan, David R.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Parada, Luis; Toran-Allerand, C. Dominique; Hajjar, David P.; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    1995-01-01

    The neurotrophins, a family of related polypeptide growth factors including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4/5 promote the survival and differentiation of distinctive sets of embryonic neurons. Here we define a new functional role for neurotrophins, as autocrine or local paracrine mediators of vascular smooth muscle cell migration. We have identified neurotrophins, and their cognate receptors, the trk tyrosine kinases, in human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo. In vitro, cultured human smooth muscle cells express BDNF; NT-3; and trk A, B, and C Similarly, rat smooth muscle cells expressed all three trk receptors as well as all four neurotrophins. Moreover, NGF induces cultured human smooth muscle cell migration at subnanomolar concentrations. In the rat aortic balloon deendothelialization model of vascular injury, the expression of NGF, BDNF, and their receptors trk A and trk B increased dramatically in the area of injury within 3 days and persisted during the formation of the neointima. In human coronary atherosclerotic lesions, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5, and the trk B and trk C receptors could be demonstrated in smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest that neurotrophins play an important role in regulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells to injury. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:7639328

  7. Modulation of Human Vascular Endothelial Cell Behaviors by Nanotopographic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Liliensiek, S.J.; Wood, J.A.; Yong, J.; Auerbach, R.; Nealey, P.F.; Murphy, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Basement membranes possess a complex three dimensional topography in the nanoscale and submicron range which have been shown to profoundly modulate a large menu of fundamental cell behaviors. Using the topographic features found in native vascular endothelial basement membranes as a guide, polyurethane substrates were fabricated containing anisotropically ordered ridge and groove structures and isotropically ordered pores from 200 nm to 2000 nm in size. We investigated the impact of biomimetic length-scale topographic cues on orientation/elongation, proliferation and migration on four human vascular endothelial cell-types from large and small diameter vessels. We found that all cell-types exhibited orientation and alignment with the most pronounced response on anisotropically ordered ridges ≥ 800 nm. HUVEC cells were the only cell-type examined to demonstrate a decrease in proliferation in response to the smallest topographic features regardless of surface order. On anisotropically ordered surfaces all cell types migrated preferentially parallel to the long axis of the ridges, with the greatest increase in cell migration being observed on the 1200 nm pitch. In contrast, cells did not exhibit any preference in direction or increase in migration speed on isotropically ordered surfaces. Overall, our data demonstrate that surface topographic features impact vascular endothelial cell behavior and that the impact of features varies with the cell behavior being considered, topographic feature scale, surface order, and the anatomic origin of the cell being investigated. PMID:20400175

  8. Lectin-Based Characterization of Vascular Cell Microparticle Glycocalyx

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, April K.; Cioffi, Eugene A.; Cioffi, Donna L.; King, Judy A. C.; Bauer, Natalie N.

    2015-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are released constitutively and from activated cells. MPs play significant roles in vascular homeostasis, injury, and as biomarkers. The unique glycocalyx on the membrane of cells has frequently been exploited to identify specific cell types, however the glycocalyx of the MPs has yet to be defined. Thus, we sought to determine whether MPs, released both constitutively and during injury, from vascular cells have a glycocalyx matching those of the parental cell type to provide information on MP origin. For these studies we used rat pulmonary microvascular and artery endothelium, pulmonary smooth muscle, and aortic endothelial cells. MPs were collected from healthy or cigarette smoke injured cells and analyzed with a panel of lectins for specific glycocalyx linkages. Intriguingly, we determined that the MPs released either constitutively or stimulated by CSE injury did not express the same glycocalyx of the parent cells. Further, the glycocalyx was not unique to any of the specific cell types studied. These data suggest that MPs from both normal and healthy vascular cells do not share the parental cell glycocalyx makeup. PMID:26274589

  9. Modulation of human vascular endothelial cell behaviors by nanotopographic cues.

    PubMed

    Liliensiek, Sara J; Wood, Joshua A; Yong, Jiang; Auerbach, Robert; Nealey, Paul F; Murphy, Christopher J

    2010-07-01

    Basement membranes possess a complex three-dimensional topography in the nanoscale and submicron range which have been shown to profoundly modulate a large menu of fundamental cell behaviors. Using the topographic features found in native vascular endothelial basement membranes as a guide, polyurethane substrates were fabricated containing anisotropically ordered ridge and groove structures and isotropically ordered pores from 200 nm to 2000 nm in size. We investigated the impact of biomimetic length-scale topographic cues on orientation/elongation, proliferation and migration on four human vascular endothelial cell-types from large and small diameter vessels. We found that all cell-types exhibited orientation and alignment with the most pronounced response on anisotropically ordered ridges > or =800 nm. HUVEC cells were the only cell-type examined to demonstrate a decrease in proliferation in response to the smallest topographic features regardless of surface order. On anisotropically ordered surfaces all cell-types migrated preferentially parallel to the long axis of the ridges, with the greatest increase in cell migration being observed on the 1200 nm pitch. In contrast, cells did not exhibit any preference in direction or increase in migration speed on isotropically ordered surfaces. Overall, our data demonstrate that surface topographic features impact vascular endothelial cell behavior and that the impact of features varies with the cell behavior being considered, topographic feature scale, surface order, and the anatomic origin of the cell being investigated. PMID:20400175

  10. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  11. Identification of myocardial and vascular precursor cells in human and mouse epicardium.

    PubMed

    Limana, Federica; Zacheo, Antonella; Mocini, David; Mangoni, Antonella; Borsellino, Giovanna; Diamantini, Adamo; De Mori, Roberta; Battistini, Luca; Vigna, Elisa; Santini, Massimo; Loiaconi, Vincenzo; Pompilio, Giulio; Germani, Antonia; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2007-12-01

    During cardiac development, the epicardium is the source of multipotent mesenchymal cells, which give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in coronary vessels and also, possibly, to cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether stem cells are retained in the adult human and murine epicardium and to investigate the regenerative potential of these cells following acute myocardial infarction. We show that c-kit(+) and CD34(+) cells can indeed be detected in human fetal and adult epicardium and that they represent 2 distinct populations. Both subsets of cells were negative for CD45, a cell surface marker that identifies the hematopoietic cell lineage. Immunofluorescence revealed that freshly isolated c-kit(+) and CD34(+) cells expressed early and late cardiac transcription factors and could acquire an endothelial phenotype in vitro. In the murine model of myocardial infarction, there was an increase in the absolute number and proliferation of epicardial c-kit(+) cells 3 days after coronary ligation; at this time point, epicardial c-kit(+) cells were identified in the subepicardial space and expressed GATA4. Furthermore, 1 week after myocardial infarction, cells coexpressing c-kit(+), together with endothelial or smooth muscle cell markers, were identified in the wall of subepicardial blood vessels. In summary, the postnatal epicardium contains a cell population with stem cell characteristics that retains the ability to give rise to myocardial precursors and vascular cells. These cells may play a role in the regenerative response to cardiac damage. PMID:17947800

  12. Glucocorticoid excess induces superoxide production in vascular endothelial cells and elicits vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Takahiko; Akaike, Masashi; Mitsui, Takao; Ohshima, Yasushi; Shintani, Yasumi; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2003-01-10

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess often elicits serious adverse effects on the vascular system, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, and effective prophylaxis for these complications is limited. We sought to reveal the mechanism underlying GC-induced vascular complications. Responses in forearm blood flow to reactive hyperemia in 20 GC-treated patients were significantly decreased to 43+/-8.9% (mean+/-SEM) from the values obtained before GC therapy (130+/-14%). An administration of vitamin C almost normalized blood flow responses. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), production of hydrogen peroxide was increased up to 166.5+/-3.3% of control values by 10(-7) mol/L dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (P<0.01). Concomitant with DEX-induced hydrogen peroxide production, intracellular amounts of peroxynitrite significantly increased and those of nitric oxide (NO) decreased, respectively (P<0.01). Immunoblotting analysis using anti-nitrotyrosine antibody showed that peroxynitrite formation was increased in DEX-treated HUVECs. Using inhibitors against metabolic pathways for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we identified that the major production sources of ROS by DEX treatment were mitochondrial electron transport chain, NAD(P)H oxidase, and xanthine oxidase. These findings suggest that GC excess causes overproduction of ROS and thereby perturbs NO availability in the vascular endothelium, leading to vascular complications in patients with GC excess. PMID:12522124

  13. Plant Phosphoglycerolipids: The Gatekeepers of Vascular Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gujas, Bojan; Rodriguez-Villalon, Antia

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, the plant vascular system has evolved as an inter-organ communication network essential to deliver a wide range of signaling factors among distantly separated organs. To become conductive elements, phloem and xylem cells undergo a drastic differentiation program that involves the degradation of the majority of their organelles. While the molecular mechanisms regulating such complex process remain poorly understood, it is nowadays clear that phosphoglycerolipids display a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular tissue formation. In animal cells, this class of lipids is known to mediate acute responses as signal transducers and also act as constitutive signals that help defining organelle identity. Their rapid turnover, asymmetrical distribution across subcellular compartments as well as their ability to rearrange cytoskeleton fibers make phosphoglycerolipids excellent candidates to regulate complex morphogenetic processes such as vascular differentiation. Therefore, in this review we aim to summarize, emphasize and connect our current understanding about the involvement of phosphoglycerolipids in phloem and xylem differentiation. PMID:26904069

  14. Stem cells: a promising source for vascular regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Rammal, Hassan; Harmouch, Chaza; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Laurent-Maquin, Dominique; Labrude, Pierre; Menu, Patrick; Kerdjoudj, Halima

    2014-12-15

    The rising and diversity of many human vascular diseases pose urgent needs for the development of novel therapeutics. Stem cell therapy represents a challenge in the medicine of the twenty-first century, an area where tissue engineering and regenerative medicine gather to provide promising treatments for a wide variety of diseases. Indeed, with their extensive regeneration potential and functional multilineage differentiation capacity, stem cells are now highlighted as promising cell sources for regenerative medicine. Their multilineage differentiation involves environmental factors such as biochemical, extracellular matrix coating, oxygen tension, and mechanical forces. In this review, we will focus on human stem cell sources and their applications in vascular regeneration. We will also discuss the different strategies used for their differentiation into both mature and functional smooth muscle and endothelial cells. PMID:25167472

  15. Endothelial cell–cell adhesion during zebrafish vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Lagendijk, Anne Karine; Yap, Alpha S; Hogan, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate vasculature is an essential organ network with major roles in health and disease. The establishment of balanced cell–cell adhesion in the endothelium is crucial for the functionality of the vascular system. Furthermore, the correct patterning and integration of vascular endothelial cell–cell adhesion drives the morphogenesis of new vessels, and is thought to couple physical forces with signaling outcomes during development. Here, we review insights into this process that have come from studies in zebrafish. First, we describe mutants in which endothelial adhesion is perturbed, second we describe recent progress using in vivo cell biological approaches that allow the visualization of endothelial cell–cell junctions. These studies underline the profound potential of this model system to dissect in great detail the function of both known and novel regulators of endothelial cell–cell adhesion. PMID:24621476

  16. Phase II open label study of the oral vascular endothelial growth factor-receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (vatalanib) in adult patients with refractory or relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Brander, Danielle; Rizzieri, David; Gockerman, Jon; Diehl, Louis; Shea, Thomas Charles; Decastro, Carlos; Moore, Joseph O; Beaven, Anne

    2013-12-01

    PTK787/ZK222584 (vatalanib), an orally active inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs), was evaluated in this phase II study of 20 patients with relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients received once-daily PTK787/ZK222584 at a target dose of 1250 mg. Eighteen patients were evaluable for response: one patient had a complete response (CR), six patients had stable disease but subsequently progressed, 10 patients had progressive disease by three cycles and one subject withdrew before response evaluation. The patient who attained a CR underwent autologous stem cell transplant and remains disease-free 76 months after study completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Grade 3 thrombocytopenia occurred in 20% and grade 3 hypertension occurred in 10%. There were no episodes of grade 3 proteinuria. In conclusion, PTK787/ZK222584 was well tolerated in a heavily pretreated population of patients with DLBCL, although its therapeutic potential as a single agent in DLBCL appears limited. PMID:23488610

  17. Vascular Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Ionela; Vats, Archana; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathologic processes is an essential part of the paradigm in enabling us to achieve a reduction in related deaths. Both human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising sources of cells for clinical cardiovascular therapies. Additional in vitro studies are needed, however, to understand their relative phenotypes and molecular regulation toward cardiovascular cell fates. Further studies in translational animal models are also needed to gain insights into the potential and function of both human ES- and iPS-derived cardiovascular cells, and enable translation from experimental and pre-clinical studies to human trials. PMID:20453170

  18. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. PMID:26742650

  19. Functional vascular smooth muscle cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells via mesenchymal stem cell intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Loh, Yuin-Han; Daley, George Q.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Smooth muscle cells (SMC) play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease. Although adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used as a source of contractile SMC, they suffer from limited proliferation potential and culture senescence, particularly when originating from older donors. By comparison, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) can provide an unlimited source of functional SMC for autologous cell-based therapies and for creating models of vascular disease. Our goal was to develop an efficient strategy to derive functional, contractile SMC from hiPSC. Methods and results We developed a robust, stage-wise, feeder-free strategy for hiPSC differentiation into functional SMC through an intermediate stage of multipotent MSC, which could be coaxed to differentiate into fat, bone, cartilage, and muscle. At this stage, the cells were highly proliferative and displayed higher clonogenic potential and reduced senescence when compared with parental hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, when exposed to differentiation medium, the myogenic proteins such as α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, and myosin heavy chain were significantly upregulated and displayed robust fibrillar organization, suggesting the development of a contractile phenotype. Indeed, tissue constructs prepared from these cells exhibited high levels of contractility in response to receptor- and non-receptor-mediated agonists. Conclusion We developed an efficient stage-wise strategy that enabled hiPSC differentiation into contractile SMC through an intermediate population of clonogenic and multipotent MSC. The high yield of MSC and SMC derivation suggests that our strategy may facilitate an acquisition of the large numbers of cells required for regenerative medicine or for studying vascular disease pathophysiology. PMID:22941255

  20. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  1. Perinatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Angiotensin II Receptor-Mediated Vascular Contractility in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, DaLiao; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Li, Yong; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that perinatal nicotine exposure causes development of hypertensive phenotype in adult offspring. Aims The present study was to determine whether perinatal nicotine exposure causes an epigenetic programming of vascular Angiotensin II receptors (ATRs) and their-mediated signaling pathway leading to heightened vascular contraction in adult offspring. Main methods Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps from day 4 of gestation to day 10 after birth. The experiments were conducted at 5 months of age of male offspring. Key Findings Nicotine treatment enhanced Angitension II (Ang II)-induced vasoconstriction and 20-kDa myosin light chain phosphorylation (MLC20-P) levels. In addition, the ratio of Ang II-induced tension/MLC-P was also significantly increased in nicotine-treated group compared with the saline group. Nicotine-mediated enhanced constrictions were not directly dependent on the changes of [Ca2+]i concentrations but dependent on Ca2+ sensitivity. Perinatal nicotine treatment significantly enhanced vascular ATR type 1a (AT1aR) but not AT1bR mRNA levels in adult rat offspring, which was associated with selective decreases in DNA methylation at AT1aR promoter. Contrast to the effect on AT1aR, nicotine decreased the mRNA levels of vascular AT2R gene, which was associated with selective increases in DNA methylation at AT2R promoter. Significance Our results indicated that perinatal nicotine exposure caused an epigenetic programming of vascular ATRs and their-mediated signaling pathways, and suggested that differential regulation of AT1R/AT2R gene expression through DNA methylation mechanism may be involved in nicotine-induced heightened vasoconstriction and development of hypertensive phenotype in adulthood. PMID:25265052

  2. Temporal modulation of collective cell behavior controls vascular network topology

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Esther; Kim, Jiha; Tata, Aleksandra; Comin, Cesar H; Harrington, Kyle I; Costa, Luciano da F; Bentley, Katie; Gu, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular network density determines the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to host tissues, but how the vast diversity of densities is generated is unknown. Reiterations of endothelial-tip-cell selection, sprout extension and anastomosis are the basis for vascular network generation, a process governed by the VEGF/Notch feedback loop. Here, we find that temporal regulation of this feedback loop, a previously unexplored dimension, is the key mechanism to determine vascular density. Iterating between computational modeling and in vivo live imaging, we demonstrate that the rate of tip-cell selection determines the length of linear sprout extension at the expense of branching, dictating network density. We provide the first example of a host tissue-derived signal (Semaphorin3E-Plexin-D1) that accelerates tip cell selection rate, yielding a dense network. We propose that temporal regulation of this critical, iterative aspect of network formation could be a general mechanism, and additional temporal regulators may exist to sculpt vascular topology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13212.001 PMID:26910011

  3. HYPOCHLORITE-SERUM REACTION PRODUCTS INHIBIT PORCINE VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL GROWTH IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro toxicity studies were initiated in order to determine if chlorination affects vascular endothelial cells. Twelfth to twentieth passage porcine aortic vascular endothelial cells (PAE) were grown to confluency and replated in the presence of complete media (Eagle's minimum...

  4. Parietal Bone Thickness and Vascular Diameters in Adult Modern Humans: A Survey on Cranial Remains.

    PubMed

    Eisová, Stanislava; Rangel de Lázaro, Gizéh; Píšová, Hana; Pereira-Pedro, Sofia; Bruner, Emiliano

    2016-07-01

    Cranial bone thickness varies among modern humans, and many factors influencing this variability remain unclear. Growth hormones and physical activity are thought to influence the vault thickness. Considering that both systemic factors and energy supply influence the vascular system, and taking into account the structural and biomechanical interaction between endocranial vessels and vault bones, in this study we evaluate the correlation between vascular and bone diameters. In particular, we tested the relationship between the thickness of the parietal bone (which is characterized, in modern humans, by a complex vascular network) and the lumen size of the middle meningeal and diploic vessels, in adult modern humans. Our results show no patent correlation between the thickness of parietal bone and the size of the main vascular channels. Values and distributions of the branching patterns, as well as anatomical relationships between vessels and bones, are also described in order to provide information concerning the arrangement of the endocranial vascular morphology. This information is relevant in both evolutionary and medical contexts. Anat Rec, 299:888-896, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072555

  5. [Intraosseous access in adults--an alternative if conventional vascular access is difficult?].

    PubMed

    Isbye, Dan Lou; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2006-08-21

    Intraosseous infusion is widely used in children, but its use in adults is much less common. This is probably because another vascular access can usually be achieved, and also because of lack of knowledge of the technique. Placement in adults is a quick procedure with a high rate of success. Drugs and fluids do not change the pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetics of intraosseous administration, and anything can be given. Infusion rates have been achieved that in part make fluid resuscitation possible. Its uses are many and the contraindications few; complications are rare when simple guidelines are followed. PMID:16942698

  6. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Néel, A; Artifoni, M; Donadieu, J; Lorillon, G; Hamidou, M; Tazi, A

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease characterized by the infiltration of one or more organs by Langerhans cell-like dendritic cells, most often organized in granulomas. The disease has been initially described in children. The clinical picture of LCH is highly variable. Bone, skin, pituitary gland, lung, central nervous system, lymphoid organs are the main organs involved whereas liver and intestinal tract localizations are less frequently encountered. LCH course ranges from a fulminant multisystem disease to spontaneous resolution. Several randomized controlled trials have enable pediatricians to refine the management of children with LCH. Adult LCH has some specific features and poses distinct therapeutic challenges, knowing that data on these patients are limited. Herein, we will provide an overview of current knowledge regarding adult LCH and its management. We will also discuss recent advances in the understanding of the disease, (i.e. the role of BRAF oncogene) that opens the way toward targeted therapies. PMID:26150351

  7. The control of vascular endothelial cell injury.

    PubMed

    Murota, S; Morita, I; Suda, N

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism by which MCI-186 showed a potent cytoprotective effect on the in vitro endothelial cell injury due to 15-HPETE was studied. Stimulation of human leukocytes with various chemical mediators such as TPA, f-Met-Leu-Phe, LTB4, etc. elicited the production of active oxygens, which could be detected by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Among the chemical mediators tested, TPA elicited the chemiluminescence the most, and f-Met-Leu-Phe and LTB4 came next. When the leukocytes were directly placed on a monolayer of cultured endothelial cells, followed by stimulating the leukocytes with TPA, severe endothelial cell injury was observed. The effect of TPA was dose dependent. There was good correlation between the active oxygen releasing activity and the cytotoxic activity. When the leukocytes were placed on a filter which was set apart from the monolayer of endothelial cell in a culture dish, and stimulated the leukocytes with TPA, no cytotoxicity was observed. These data strongly suggest that the substance responsible for the cytotoxicity must be a very labile and short-lived substance, presumably active oxygens. On the other hand, MCI-186 was found to have a complete quenching activity to the chemiluminescence due to active oxygens in the TPA-leukocyte system. Taken together, these factors indicate that the potent cytoprotective effect of MCI-186 may be due to its specific radical scavenging activity. PMID:2248437

  8. Vascular potential of human pluripotent stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathological processes is an ess...

  9. Human vascular smooth muscle cells express a urate transporter.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen L; Sautin, Yuri Y; Long, David A; Zhang, Li; Miyazaki, Hiroki; Mu, Wei; Endou, Hitoshi; Johnson, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    An elevated serum uric acid is associated with the development of hypertension and renal disease. Renal regulation of urate excretion is largely controlled by URAT1 (SLC22A12), a member of the organic anion transporter superfamily. This study reports the specific expression of URAT1 on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. Expression of URAT1 was localized to the cell membrane. Evidence that the URAT1 transporter was functional was provided by the finding that uptake of 14C-urate was significantly inhibited in the presence of probenecid, an organic anion transporter inhibitor. It is proposed that URAT1 may provide a mechanism by which uric acid enters the human vascular smooth muscle cell, a finding that may be relevant to the role of uric acid in cardiovascular disease. PMID:16775029

  10. The adult human brain harbors multipotent perivascular mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gesine; Özen, Ilknur; Christophersen, Nicolaj S; Reinbothe, Thomas; Bengzon, Johan; Visse, Edward; Jansson, Katarina; Dannaeus, Karin; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Roybon, Laurent; Anisimov, Sergey V; Renström, Erik; Svensson, Mikael; Haegerstrand, Anders; Brundin, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    Blood vessels and adjacent cells form perivascular stem cell niches in adult tissues. In this perivascular niche, a stem cell with mesenchymal characteristics was recently identified in some adult somatic tissues. These cells are pericytes that line the microvasculature, express mesenchymal markers and differentiate into mesodermal lineages but might even have the capacity to generate tissue-specific cell types. Here, we isolated, purified and characterized a previously unrecognized progenitor population from two different regions in the adult human brain, the ventricular wall and the neocortex. We show that these cells co-express markers for mesenchymal stem cells and pericytes in vivo and in vitro, but do not express glial, neuronal progenitor, hematopoietic, endothelial or microglial markers in their native state. Furthermore, we demonstrate at a clonal level that these progenitors have true multilineage potential towards both, the mesodermal and neuroectodermal phenotype. They can be epigenetically induced in vitro into adipocytes, chondroblasts and osteoblasts but also into glial cells and immature neurons. This progenitor population exhibits long-term proliferation, karyotype stability and retention of phenotype and multipotency following extensive propagation. Thus, we provide evidence that the vascular niche in the adult human brain harbors a novel progenitor with multilineage capacity that appears to represent mesenchymal stem cells and is different from any previously described human neural stem cell. Future studies will elucidate whether these cells may play a role for disease or may represent a reservoir that can be exploited in efforts to repair the diseased human brain. PMID:22523602

  11. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  12. Prognostic value of vascularity and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, R; Carlile, J; Pendleton, N; Schor, A

    2001-01-01

    Aims—High expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumours has been found to be associated with poor prognosis in some studies, but not in others. The aims of this study were to determine the prognostic value of VEGF in operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its possible association with vascularity. Methods—Sections from 81 NSCLC archival specimens were stained with antibodies to von Willebrand factor (vWF) and VEGF. Vascularity was measured by the average density of vWF positive vessels. VEGF expression in tumour cells was assessed by consensus of two independent observers according to three indices, namely: (1) percentage of area stained, (2) intensity of staining, and (3) final score (product of area and intensity). Results—VEGF immunoreactivity was present in all tumours and adjacent normal lung tissue. None of the three VEGF indices was associated with vascularity or the clinical parameters examined. Mean survival times were shorter in patients with high VEGF expression, but the difference was not significant. This applied to the full cohort of patients, or when analysed separately according to tumour type or stage. However, high VEGF expression was associated with poor survival in patients with high vascularity (p = 0.02). VEGF had no discriminant value among patients with low vascularity. Vascularity had no prognostic value, except for late stage patients (UICC stages II and IIIa combined; n = 36), where high vascularity was associated with longer survival (p = 0.01). Conclusions—VEGF on its own has no prognostic value in NSCLC, but may become a useful indicator when combined with vascularity. VEGF may play a physiological role in the normal lung. Key Words: non-small cell lung cancer • vascular endothelial growth factor • vascularity • prognosis PMID:11215279

  13. Niacin Suppresses Progression of Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Vascular Inflammation and Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gang; Sun, Guangli; Liu, Hai; Shu, Liliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Guo, Longhui; Huang, Chen; Xu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for the clinical therapy of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms by which niacin ameliorates atherosclerosis are not clear. Material/Methods The effect of niacin on atherosclerosis was assessed by detection of atherosclerotic lesion area. Adhesion molecules in arterial endothelial cells were determined by using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in ApoE−/− mice were detected by using ELISA. We detected the expression levels of phosphorylated nuclear factors-κB (NF-κB) p65 in aortic endothelial cells of mice using Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the anti-inflammation effect and endothelium-protecting function of niacin and their regulatory mechanisms in vitro. Results Niacin inhibited the progress of atherosclerosis and decreased the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in ApoE−/− mice. Niacin suppressed the activity of NF-κB and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, niacin induced phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and FAK inhibitor PF-573228 reduced the level of Bcl-2 and elevated the level of cleaved caspase-3 in VSMCs. Conclusions Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and apoptosis of VSMCs via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling and the FAK signaling pathway, respectively, thus protecting ApoE−/− mice against atherosclerosis. PMID:26712802

  14. Cell-Seeding Techniques in Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Villalona, Gustavo A.; Udelsman, Brooks; Duncan, Daniel R.; McGillicuddy, Edward; Sawh-Martinez, Rajendra F.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Painter, Christopher; Mirensky, Tamar; Erickson, Benjamin; Shinoka, Toshiharu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the benefits of cell seeding in the construction of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVG). However, seeding methods are diverse and no method is clearly superior in either promoting seeding efficiency or improving long-term graft function. As we head into an era during which a variety of different TEVG are under investigation in clinical trials around the world, it is important to consider the regulatory issues surrounding the translation of these technologies. In this review, we summarize important advances in the field of vascular tissue engineering, with particular attention on cell-seeding techniques for TEVG development and special emphasis placed on regulatory issues concerning the clinical translation of these various methods. PMID:20085439

  15. Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis for vascular homeostasis: role in neointimal formation after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Ashino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal increases in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the intimal region after a vascular injury is a key event in developing neointimal hyperplasia. To maintain vascular function, proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs is tightly controlled during vascular remodeling. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) system, a key component of the oxidative stress response that acts in maintaining homeostasis, plays an important role in neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury; however, the role of Nrf2/Keap1 in VSMC apoptosis has not been clarified. Here we report that 14 days after arterial injury in mice, TUNEL-positive VSMCs are detected in both the neointimal and medial layers. These layers contain cells expressing high levels of Nrf2 but low Keap1 expression. In VSMCs, Keap1 depletion induces features of apoptosis, such as positive TUNEL staining and annexin V binding. These changes are associated with an increased expression of nuclear Nrf2. Simultaneous Nrf2 depletion inhibits Keap1 depletion-induced apoptosis. At 14 days after the vascular injury, Nrf2-deficient mice demonstrated fewer TUNEL-positive cells and increased neointimal formation in the neointimal and medial areas. The results suggest that the Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates VSMC apoptosis during neointimal formation, thereby inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury. PMID:27198574

  16. Upregulation of decorin by FXR in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Fengtian; Zhang Qiuhong; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Gao Xiang; Li Jiang; Li Yong; Gong Wei; Jiang, Yu; Xie Wen; Li Song

    2008-08-08

    Decorin is a member of the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are present in blood vessels and synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Decorin plays complex roles in both normal vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of various types of vascular disorders. However, the mechanisms of regulation of decorin expression in vasculature are not clearly understood. Particularly little information is available about a role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of decorin expression. In the present study, we report that activation of vascular FXR by a specific ligand resulted in upregulation of decorin at the levels of both mRNA and protein. FXR appears to induce decorin expression at a transcriptional level because (1) upregulation of decorin mRNA expression was abolished by the treatment of a transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D; and (2) decorin promoter activity was significantly increased by activation of FXR. Functional analysis of human decorin promoter identified an imperfect inverted repeat DNA motif, IR8 (-2313TGGTCAtagtgtcaTGACCT-2294), as a likely FXR-responsive element that is involved in decorin regulation.

  17. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Methods and Application

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Biraja C.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Suh, Carol; Qyang, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and their capability to differentiation into virtually every cell type in the human body make this field a ray of hope for vascular regenerative therapy and for understanding disease mechanism. In this review, we first discuss the recent iPSC technology and vascular smooth muscle development from embryo and then examine different methodology to derive VSMCs from iPSCs and their applications in regenerative therapy and disease modeling. PMID:25559088

  18. Hepatoma-derived growth factor stimulates smooth muscle cell growth and is expressed in vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Allen D.; Lobe, David R.; Matsumura, Martin E.; Nakamura, Hideji; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is the first member identified of a new family of secreted heparin-binding growth factors highly expressed in the fetal aorta. The biologic role of HDGF in vascular growth is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that HDGF mRNA is expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), most prominently in proliferating SMCs, 8–24 hours after serum stimulation. Exogenous HDGF and endogenous overexpression of HDGF stimulated a significant increase in SMC number and DNA synthesis. Rat aortic SMCs transfected with a hemagglutinin-epitope–tagged rat HDGF cDNA contain HA-HDGF in their nuclei during S-phase. We also detected native HDGF in nuclei of cultured SMCs, of SMCs and endothelial cells from 19-day fetal (but not in the adult) rat aorta, of SMCs proximal to abdominal aortic constriction in adult rats, and of SMCs in the neointima formed after endothelial denudation of the rat common carotid artery. Moreover, HDGF colocalizes with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in SMCs in human atherosclerotic carotid arteries, suggesting that HDGF helps regulate SMC growth during development and in response to vascular injury. PMID:10712428

  19. [Pulmonary complications in adult sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    Maître, B; Mekontso-Dessap, A; Habibi, A; Bachir, D; Parent, F; Godeau, B; Galacteros, F

    2011-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is an autosomal genetic condition which represents the most frequent genetic disease in Île-de-France and Caribbean islands. The main clinical manifestations can be divided into infectious disease, hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive events. Pulmonary complications represent 20 to 30% of mortality due to sickle cell and can be divided into acute and chronic events. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is an acute lung injury often preceded by a vaso-occlusive crisis and triggered by different factors including: hypoventilation, pulmonary infectious disease and vascular occlusions. These occlusions can be secondary to fat embolism, thrombosis or sickling. Treatment is mainly supportive combining oxygen supplementation adequate hydration analgesia and sedation. Exchange transfusion may be indicated in severe forms of ACS, characterized by a right ventricular dysfunction and acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary hypertension is the most serious chronic complication. Its frequency is estimated at 6% in adult patients and is more often described in patients with venous ulcers and higher levels of chronic hemolysis. Prognosis is poor with 12.5% of patients dying in the first two years following diagnosis irrespective of the actual pulmonary artery pressure level. There are currently limited data on the effects of any treatment modality. Other respiratory complications such as sleep disorders and nocturnal hypoxemia, infiltrative lung disease and exertional dyspnea are described and should be considered. PMID:21402228

  20. EMILIN-1 Deficiency Induces Elastogenesis and Vascular Cell Defects

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Miriam; Braghetta, Paola; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Mura, Isabella; Doliana, Roberto; Colombatti, Alfonso; Volpin, Dino; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bressan, Giorgio M.

    2004-01-01

    EMILINs constitute a family of genes of the extracellular matrix with high structural similarity. Four genes have been identified so far in human and mouse. To gain insight into the function of this gene family, EMILIN-1 has been inactivated in the mouse by gene targeting. The homozygous animals were fertile and did not show obvious abnormalities. However, histological and ultrastructural examination revealed alterations of elastic fibers in aorta and skin. Formation of elastic fibers by mutant embryonic fibroblasts in culture was also abnormal. Additional alterations were observed in cell morphology and anchorage of endothelial and smooth muscle cells to elastic lamellae. Considering that EMILIN-1 is adhesive for cells and that the protein binds to elastin and fibulin-5, EMILIN-1 may regulate elastogenesis and vascular cell maintenance by stabilizing molecular interactions between elastic fiber components and by endowing elastic fibers with specific cell adhesion properties. PMID:14701737

  1. Modeling human endothelial cell transformation in vascular neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Victoria W.; MacKenzie, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC)-derived neoplasias range from benign hemangioma to aggressive metastatic angiosarcoma, which responds poorly to current treatments and has a very high mortality rate. The development of treatments that are more effective for these disorders will be expedited by insight into the processes that promote abnormal proliferation and malignant transformation of human ECs. The study of primary endothelial malignancy has been limited by the rarity of the disease; however, there is potential for carefully characterized EC lines and animal models to play a central role in the discovery, development and testing of molecular targeted therapies for vascular neoplasias. This review describes molecular alterations that have been identified in EC-derived neoplasias, as well as the processes that underpin the immortalization and tumorigenic conversion of ECs. Human EC lines, established through the introduction of defined genetic elements or by culture of primary tumor tissue, are catalogued and discussed in relation to their relevance as models of vascular neoplasia. PMID:24046386

  2. Zfp423 Promotes Adipogenic Differentiation of Bovine Stromal Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Das, Arun Kr; Yang, Qi-Yuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat or marbling is critical for the palatability of beef. In mice, very recent studies show that adipocytes and fibroblasts share a common pool of progenitor cells, with Zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423) as a key initiator of adipogenic differentiation. To evaluate the role of Zfp423 in intramuscular adipogenesis and marbling in beef cattle, we sampled beef muscle for separation of stromal vascular cells. These cells were immortalized with pCI neo-hEST2 and individual clones were selected by G418. A total of 288 clones (3×96 well plates) were isolated and induced to adipogenesis. The presence of adipocytes was assessed by Oil-Red-O staining. Three clones with high and low adipogenic potential respectively were selected for further analyses. In addition, fibro/adipogenic progenitor cells were selected using a surface marker, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α. The expression of Zfp423 was much higher (307.4±61.9%, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells, while transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was higher (156.1±48.7%, P<0.05) in low adipogenic cells. Following adipogenic differentiation, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) were much higher (239.4±84.1% and 310.7±138.4%, respectively, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells. Over-expression of Zfp423 in stromal vascular cells and cloned low adipogenic cells dramatically increased their adipogenic differentiation, accompanied with the inhibition of TGF-β expression. Zfp423 knockdown by shRNA in high adipogenic cells largely prevented their adipogenic differentiation. The differential regulation of Zfp423 and TGF-β between low and high adipogenic cells is associated with the DNA methylation in their promoters. In conclusion, data show that Zfp423 is a critical regulator of adipogenesis in stromal vascular cells of bovine muscle, and Zfp423 may provide a molecular target for enhancing intramuscular adipogenesis

  3. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  4. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial-mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  5. The flavonoid quercetin induces apoptosis and inhibits JNK activation in intimal vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco . E-mail: fperez@med.ucm.es; Bishop-Bailley, David; Lodi, Federica; Duarte, Juan; Cogolludo, Angel; Moreno, Laura; Bosca, Lisardo; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2006-08-04

    Quercetin, the most abundant dietary flavonol, exerts vasodilator, anti-hypertensive, and anti-atherogenic effects and reduces the vascular remodelling associated with elevated blood pressure. Here, we have compared the effects of quercetin in intimal- and medial-type rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in culture. After 48 h, quercetin reduced the viability of a polyclonal intimal-type cell line derived from neonatal aorta but not of a medial-type cell line derived from adult aorta. These differential effects were similar in both proliferating and quiescent VSMC. Quercetin also preferentially reduced the viability of intimal-type over medial-type VSMC in primary cultures derived from balloon-injured carotid arteries. The effects of quercetin on cell viability were mainly dependent upon induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and were unrelated to PPAR{gamma}, pro-oxidant effects or nitric oxide. The expression of MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK) and ERK phosphorylation were not different between intimal- and medial-type VSMC. p38 phosphorylation was negligible in both cell types. Medial-type showed a weak JNK phosphorylation while this was markedly increased in intimal-type cells. Quercetin reduced JNK phosphorylation but had no consistent effect on ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, quercetin preferentially produced apoptosis in intimal-type compared to medial-type VSMC. This might play a role in the anti-atherogenic and anti-hypertensive effects of quercetin.

  6. Prominin-1/CD133 expression as potential tissue-resident vascular endothelial progenitor cells in the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ayumi; Nishiwaki, Tetsu; Nishimura, Rintaro; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Urushibara, Takashi; Suda, Rika; Suzuki, Toshio; Takayanagi, Shin; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tada, Yuji; Iwama, Atsushi; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular endothelial cells could contribute to maintain homeostasis in adult lung vasculature. "Tissue-resident" endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play pivotal roles in postnatal vasculogenesis, vascular repair, and tissue regeneration; however, their local pulmonary counterparts remain to be defined. To determine whether prominin-1/CD133 expression can be a marker of tissue-resident vascular EPCs in the pulmonary circulation, we examined the origin and characteristics of prominin-1/CD133-positive (Prom1(+)) PVECs considering cell cycle status, viability, histological distribution, and association with pulmonary vascular remodeling. Prom1(+) PVECs exhibited high steady-state transit through the cell cycle compared with Prom1(-) PVECs and exhibited homeostatic cell division as assessed using the label dilution method and mice expressing green fluorescent protein. In addition, Prom1(+) PVECs showed more marked expression of putative EPC markers and drug resistance genes as well as highly increased activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase compared with Prom1(-) PVECs. Bone marrow reconstitution demonstrated that tissue-resident cells were the source of >98% of Prom1(+) PVECs. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that Prom1(+) PVECs preferentially resided in the arterial vasculature, including the resistant vessels of the lung. The number of Prom1(+) PVECs was higher in developing postnatal lungs. Sorted Prom1(+) PVECs gave rise to colonies and formed fine vascular networks compared with Prom1(-) PVECs. Moreover, Prom1(+) PVECs increased in the monocrotaline and the Su-5416 + hypoxia experimental models of pulmonary vascular remodeling. Our findings indicated that Prom1(+) PVECs exhibited the phenotype of tissue-resident EPCs. The unique biological characteristics of Prom1(+) PVECs predominantly contribute to neovasculogenesis and maintenance of homeostasis in pulmonary vascular tissues. PMID:27059286

  7. Comparing the Push-Pull Versus Discard Blood Sample Method From Adult Central Vascular Access Devices.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Dia

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of replacing the discard blood sampling method for central vascular access devices with the push-pull method. A comparative, within-subject design was used to evaluate 61 unique, paired blood samples from 1 adult outpatient oncology clinic. A 21-measure laboratory panel was conducted on each of the paired samples. Interpretation showed a small mean bias and excellent agreement between the methods. Blood samples obtained using the push-pull method were within clinically acceptable ranges. No hemolysis was noted by laboratory evaluation of 59 samples. PMID:27074989

  8. Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature within the Process of Vascular Remodeling: Cellular Basis, Clinical Relevance, and Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Until some years ago, the bone marrow and the endothelial cell compartment lining the vessel lumen (subendothelial space) were thought to be the only sources providing vascular progenitor cells. Now, the vessel wall, in particular, the vascular adventitia, has been established as a niche for different types of stem and progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into both vascular and nonvascular cells. Herein, vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells of mesenchymal nature (VW-MPSCs) have gained importance because of their large range of differentiation in combination with their distribution throughout the postnatal organism which is related to their existence in the adventitial niche, respectively. In general, mesenchymal stem cells, also designated as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), contribute to the maintenance of organ integrity by their ability to replace defunct cells or secrete cytokines locally and thus support repair and healing processes of the affected tissues. This review will focus on the central role of VW-MPSCs within vascular reconstructing processes (vascular remodeling) which are absolute prerequisite to preserve the sensitive relationship between resilience and stability of the vessel wall. Further, a particular advantage for the therapeutic application of VW-MPSCs for improving vascular function or preventing vascular damage will be discussed. PMID:26880936

  9. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Numerous risk factors for endothelial cell inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis have been identified, including inhalation of ultrafine particles. Recently, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as titanium (TiO2) NPs have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications. However, there are also great concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects in vascular systems. Although TiO2 NPs are known to induce oxidative stress and inflammation, the associated signaling pathways have not been well studied. The focus of this work, therefore, deals with examination of the cellular signaling pathways responsible for TiO2 NP-induced endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, primary vascular endothelial cells were treated with TiO2 NPs for 2–16 h at concentrations of 0–50 µg/mL. TiO2 NP exposure increased cellular oxidative stress and DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 was increased in cells exposed to TiO2 NPs. TiO2 NPs also significantly increased induction of mRNA and protein levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Pretreatment with inhibitors for NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), oxidative stress (epigallocatechin gallate and apocynin), Akt (LY294002), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580) significantly attenuated TiO2 NP-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 gene expression, as well as activation of NF-κB. These data indicate that TiO2 NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways. PMID:23380242

  10. Arteriolar vascular smooth muscle cells: mechanotransducers in a complex environment.

    PubMed

    Hill, Michael A; Meininger, Gerald A

    2012-09-01

    Contraction of small artery (diameters typically less than 250 μm) vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in local control of blood flow and arterial pressure through its affect on vascular caliber. Specifically, contraction of small arteries in response to increased intraluminal pressure is referred to as the myogenic response and represents an important role for mechanotransduction. Critical questions remain as to how changes in pressure are sensed by VSMCs and transduced across the cell membrane to tune the contractile state of the cell. Recent studies suggest a pivotal role for interactions between VSMCs and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Thus, pressure-induced deformation of ECM proteins and their cell surface receptors (for example, integrins) may initiate contraction and cytoskeletal remodeling through modulation of ion channels, membrane depolarization, increased intracellular Ca(2+) and actomyosin crossbridge cycling. Importantly, it is argued that the contractile properties of small artery VSMCs reflect an intimate and integrated interaction with their extracellular environment and the three-dimensional structure of the vessel wall. PMID:22677491

  11. Generalized Potential of Adult Neural Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Diana L.; Johansson, Clas B.; Wilbertz, Johannes; Veress, Biborka; Nilsson, Erik; Karlström, Helena; Lendahl, Urban; Frisén, Jonas

    2000-06-01

    The differentiation potential of stem cells in tissues of the adult has been thought to be limited to cell lineages present in the organ from which they were derived, but there is evidence that some stem cells may have a broader differentiation repertoire. We show here that neural stem cells from the adult mouse brain can contribute to the formation of chimeric chick and mouse embryos and give rise to cells of all germ layers. This demonstrates that an adult neural stem cell has a very broad developmental capacity and may potentially be used to generate a variety of cell types for transplantation in different diseases.

  12. Early responses of vascular endothelial cells to topographic cues

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Britta; Gasiorowski, Joshua Z.; Morgan, Joshua T.; Nealey, Paul F.; Russell, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells in vivo are exposed to multiple biophysical cues provided by the basement membrane, a specialized extracellular matrix through which vascular endothelial cells are attached to the underlying stroma. The importance of biophysical cues has been widely reported, but the signaling pathways that mediate cellular recognition and response to these cues remain poorly understood. Anisotropic topographically patterned substrates with nano- through microscale feature dimensions were fabricated to investigate cellular responses to topographic cues. The present study focuses on early events following exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to these patterned substrates. In serum-free medium and on substrates without protein coating, HUVECs oriented parallel to the long axis of underlying ridges in as little as 30 min. Immunocytochemistry showed clear differences in the localization of the focal adhesion proteins Src, p130Cas, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs cultured on topographically patterned surfaces and on planar surfaces, suggesting involvement of these proteins in mediating the response to topographic features. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that FAK was not necessary for HUVEC alignment in response to topographic cues, although FAK knockdown did modulate HUVEC migration. These data identify key events early in the cellular response to biophysical stimuli. PMID:23703527

  13. Cell growth density modulates cancer cell vascular invasion via Hippo pathway activity and CXCR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharif, G M; Schmidt, M O; Yi, C; Hu, Z; Haddad, B R; Glasgow, E; Riegel, A T; Wellstein, A

    2015-11-26

    Metastasis of cancer cells involves multiple steps, including their dissociation from the primary tumor and invasion through the endothelial cell barrier to enter the circulation and finding their way to distant organ sites where they extravasate and establish metastatic lesions. Deficient contact inhibition is a hallmark of invasive cancer cells, yet surprisingly the vascular invasiveness of commonly studied cancer cell lines is regulated by the density at which cells are propagated in culture. Cells grown at high density were less effective at invading an endothelial monolayer than cells grown at low density. This phenotypic difference was also observed in a zebrafish model of vascular invasion of cancer cells after injection into the yolk sac and extravasation of cancer cells into tissues from the vasculature. The vascular invasive phenotypes were reversible. A kinome-wide RNA interference screen was used to identify drivers of vascular invasion by panning small hairpin RNA (shRNA) library-transduced noninvasive cancer cell populations on endothelial monolayers. The selection of invasive subpopulations showed enrichment of shRNAs targeting the large tumor suppressor 1 (LATS1) kinase that inhibits the activity of the transcriptional coactivator yes-associated protein (YAP) in the Hippo pathway. Depletion of LATS1 from noninvasive cancer cells restored the invasive phenotype. Complementary to this, inhibition or depletion of YAP inhibited invasion in vitro and in vivo. The vascular invasive phenotype was associated with a YAP-dependent upregulation of the cytokines IL6, IL8 and C-X-C motif ligand 1, 2 and 3. Antibody blockade of cytokine receptors inhibited invasion and confirmed that they are rate-limiting drivers that promote cancer cell vascular invasiveness and could provide therapeutic targets. PMID:25772246

  14. Fenofibrate Improves Vascular Endothelial Function by Reducing Oxidative Stress While Increasing eNOS in Healthy Normolipidemic Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Lucking, Sara Marian S; Russell-Nowlan, Molly J; Eckel, Robert H; Seals, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction develops with aging, as indicated by impaired endothelium-dependent dilation(EDD), and is related to increased cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that short-term treatment with fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent with potential pleiotropic effects, would improve EDD in middle-aged and older normolipidemic adults by reducing oxidative stress. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of EDD, was assessed in 22healthy adults aged 50-77 years before and after 7days of fenofibrate (145 mg/d; n=12/7M) or placebo (n=10/5M). Brachial FMD was unchanged with placebo, but improved after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (5.1±0.7 vs. 2d: 6.0±0.7 and 7d: 6.4±0.6 %Δ; both P<0.005). The improvements in FMD after 7 days remained significant (P<0.05) after accounting for modest changes in plasma total and LDL-cholesterol. Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by fenofibrate or placebo (P>0.05). Infusion (i.v.) of the antioxidant vitamin C improved brachial FMD at baseline in both groups and during placebo treatment (P<0.05), but not after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (P>0.05). Fenofibrate treatment also reduced plasma oxidized LDL, a systemic marker of oxidative stress, compared with placebo (P<0.05). In vascular endothelial cells sampled from peripheral veins of the subjects, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression was unchanged with placebo and after 2 days of fenofibrate, but was increased after 7 days of fenofibrate (0.54±0.03 vs. 2d: 0.52±0.04 and 7d: 0.76±0.11 intensity/HUVEC control; P<0.05 7d). Short-term treatment with fenofibrate improves vascular endothelial function in healthy normolipidemic middle-aged/older adults by reducing oxidative stress and induces increases in eNOS. PMID:23108655

  15. Role of smooth muscle cell mineralocorticoid receptor in vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Tarjus, Antoine; Belozertseva, Ekaterina; Louis, Huguette; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Labat, Carlos; Lacolley, Patrick; Jaisser, Frédéric; Galmiche, Guillaume

    2015-08-01

    Identification of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vasculature (i.e., endothelial and smooth muscle cells) raised the question of its role in vascular function and blood pressure control. Using a mouse model with conditional inactivation of MR in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) (MR(SMKO)), we have recently shown that the VSMC MR is crucial for aldosterone-salt-induced carotid stiffening. In the present study, we have investigated the specific contribution of the VSMC MR in the regulation of vascular tone in large vessels. In MR(SMKO) mice, contractions induced by potassium chloride and calcium (Ca(2+)) are decreased in the aorta, whereas contraction is normal in response to phenylephrine and caffeine. The difference in response to Ca(2+) suggests that the VSMC-specific deficiency of the MR modifies VSM Ca(2+) signaling but without altering the intracellular Ca(2+) store handling. The relaxation induced by acetylcholine is not affected by the absence of MR. However, the relaxation induced by Ach in the presence of indomethacin and the relaxation induced by sodium nitroprussiate are significantly reduced in MR(SMKO) mice compared to controls. Since endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity is increased in mutant mice, their altered relaxation reflects impairment of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. In addition to altered NO and Ca(2+) signaling, the activity of myosin light chain and its regulators, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin phosphatase (MLCP), is reduced. In conclusion, MR expressed in VSMC is required for NO and Ca(2+) signaling pathways and contractile protein activity leading to an altered contraction/relaxation coupling. PMID:25262754

  16. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells. PMID:12931235

  17. Decreasing matrix modulus of PEG hydrogels induces a vascular phenotype in human cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, Shruthi; Robinson, Karyn G; Kharkar, Prathamesh M; Kiick, Kristi L; Akins, Robert E

    2015-09-01

    Adult and congenital cardiovascular diseases are significant health problems that are often managed using surgery. Bypass grafting is a principal therapy, but grafts fail at high rates due to hyperplasia, fibrosis, and atherosclerosis. Biocompatible, cellularized materials that attenuate these complications and encourage healthy microvascularization could reduce graft failure, but an improved understanding of biomaterial effects on human stem cells is needed to reach clinical utility. Our group investigates stem-cell-loaded biomaterials for placement along the adventitia of at-risk vessels and grafts. Here, the effects of substrate modulus on human CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood were evaluated. Cells were isolated by immunomagnetic separation and encapsulated in 3, 4, and 6 weight% PEG hydrogels containing 0.032% gelatin and 0.0044% fibronectin. Gels reached moduli of 0.34, 4.5, and 9.1 kPa. Cell viability approached 100%. Cell morphologies appeared similar across gels, but proliferation was significantly lower in 6 wt% gels. Expression profiling using stem cell signaling arrays indicated enhanced self-renewal and differentiation into vascular endothelium among cells in the lower weight percent gels. Thus, modulus was associated with cell proliferation and function. Gels with moduli in the low kilopascal range may be useful in stimulating cell engraftment and microvascularization of graft adventitia. PMID:26016692

  18. Globular adiponectin reduces vascular calcification via inhibition of ER-stress-mediated smooth muscle cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Yueru; Bai, Rui; Wang, Jiapu; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the mechanism of globular adiponectin inhibiting vascular calcification. Methods: We established drug-induced rat vascular calcification model, globular adiponectin was given to observe the effect of globular Adiponectin on the degree of calcification. The markers of vascular calcification and apoptosis were also investigated. Meanwhile, the in vitro effect of globular Adiponectin on vascular calcification was also evaluated using primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Results: We found that globular adiponectin could inhibit drug-induced rat vascular calcification significantly in vivo. The apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was also reduced. The possible mechanism could be the down-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by globular adiponectin. Experiments in primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells also confirmed that globular adiponectin could reduce cell apoptosis to suppress vascular calcification via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusions: This study confirmed that globular adiponectin could suppress vascular calcification; one of the mechanisms could be inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress to reduce cell apoptosis. It could provide an effective method in the therapy of vascular calcification-associated diseases. PMID:26045760

  19. Expression of fibronectin variants in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells in development.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, M A; Frid, M G; Shekhonin, B V; Balabanov, Y V; Koteliansky, V E

    1990-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies recognizing extra domain A (ED-A) and extra domain B (ED-B) fibronectin (FN) sequences were used to characterize FN variants expressed in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) during fetal and postnatal development and to compare spectrum of FN variants produced by vascular and visceral SMC. In 8- to 12-week-old fetuses both ED-A-containing FN (A-FN) and ED-B-containing FN (B-FN) were found in all smooth muscles studied--aorta, esophagus, stomach, and jejunum. By 20-25 weeks of gestation relative amounts of both A-FN and B-FN were reduced significantly in the aortic media (fivefold for A-FN and twofold for B-FN), while in visceral SMC only B-FN content was decreased. All the adult visceral smooth muscles examined contained A-FN rather than B-FN. Therefore, the cells from adult aortic media appear to be the only SMC so far known to produce FN that contains neither ED-A nor ED-B. Moreover, the data obtained show that, unlike other cells, medial SMC are embedded in vivo in the extracellular matrix that contains FN lacking both ED-A and ED-B. SMC from the minor intimal thickenings in the human child aorta as well as those from the atherosclerotic plaques produce A-FN rather than B-FN. We conclude that (1) vascular SMC change the spectrum of produced FN variants at least twice--during prenatal development between 12 and 20 weeks of gestation, and during the postnatal period, when they are recruited into the intimal cell population; (2) the production of FN variants in visceral SMC is also developmentally regulated; (3) all visceral SMC unlike the cells from adult aortic media produce A-FN; (4) the presence of ED-A and ED-B sequences in the FN molecule is not necessary for the extracellular matrix assembly in vivo. PMID:2202605

  20. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  1. Vascular channels formed by subpopulations of PECAM1+ melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavey, James M.; Xiao, Lin; Thompson, Joshua; Kim, Mi Mi; Shields, Janiel M.; Shelton, Sarah E.; Irvin, David M.; Brings, Victoria E.; Ollila, David; Brekken, Rolf A.; Dayton, Paul A.; Melero-Martin, Juan M.; Dudley, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the vasculature remains a promising approach for treating solid tumors; however, the mechanisms of tumor neovascularization are diverse and complex. Here we uncover a new subpopulation of melanoma cells that express the vascular cell adhesion molecule PECAM1, but not VEGFR-2, and participate in a PECAM1-dependent form of vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Clonally-derived PECAM1+ tumor cells coalesce to form PECAM1-dependent networks in vitro and they generate well-perfused, VEGF-independent channels in mice. The neural crest specifier AP-2α is diminished in PECAM1+ melanoma cells and is a transcriptional repressor of PECAM1. Reintroduction of AP-2α into PECAM1+ tumor cells represses PECAM1 and abolishes tube-forming ability whereas AP-2α knockdown in PECAM1− tumor cells up-regulates PECAM1 expression and promotes tube formation. Thus, VM-competent subpopulations, rather than all cells within a tumor, may instigate VM, supplant host-derived endothelium, and form PECAM1-dependent conduits that are not diminished by neutralizing VEGF. PMID:25335460

  2. Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Vascular Permeability of Circumventricular Organs in the Adult Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Mercado, Y. K.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.; Bañuelos-Pineda, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Feria-Velasco, A.

    2008-08-01

    The present work deals with the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on blood vessels permeability to non liposoluble substances of the circumventricular organs (CVO) of adult rats. Male Wistar adult rats were exposed to ELF-EMF and vascular permeability to colloidal carbon was investigated with the use of histological techniques. Results were compared to corresponding data from sham-exposed and control groups of animals. Exposure to ELF-EMF increased the CVO vascular permeability to colloidal carbon intravascularly injected, particularly in the subfornical organ, the median eminence, the pineal gland and the area postrema.

  3. Biomechanics and Intracellular Dynamics of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the internal mechanical properties of living cells is essential to gain insight to basic cellular functions ranging from cellular signal transduction, intracellular traffics to cell motility. Vascular endothelial cells form a single cell layer that lines all blood vessels and serves to regulate exchanges between the blood stream and the surrounding tissues. Endothelial cells are one of the most studied cell types because of their roles in cardiovascular diseases and the linkage between their growth control and strategies of cancer treatments. This talk reports the application of a novel methodology by which scientists can explore cellular functions and study cytoskeleton dynamics of living cells at the subcellular level with minimal invasion. The methodology is based on the realization that optical tweezers can be used to measure the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton in the vicinity of organelles and cellular structures. Optical tweezers is a technique based on the physics that dielectric materials, such as silica beads, latex particles or protein aggregates are attracted to and thus trapped at the focal point of a tightly focused laser beam in an aqueous medium. It has been shown that viscoelasticity can be determined from the movements of the trapped object in an oscillating optical tweezers. Applying the oscillating tweezers to intracellular cellular structures, we were able to determine the frequency dependent mechanical properties of the interior of cultured bovine endothelial cells. In contrast to the viscoelastic behavior expected of a network of cytoskelatal proteins, we found unusually large fluctuations in both elastic and loss moduli of the cell interior. More surprisingly, both mechanical moduli showed rhythmic behavior with a periodicity in the range of 20 - 30 seconds in healthy living cells. The rhythm could be altered by drug treatments, and the amplitude of the fluctuations diminished when cells were depleted of nutrients

  4. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  5. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Tikka, Saara

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  6. Induction of apoptosis by hemorrhagic snake venom in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Ishida, T; Yamamoto, T; Kaji, K; Hayashi, H

    1993-01-15

    Vascular degeneration appears to play crucial roles in producing many vascular malfunctions (1-3). In order to identify specific inducers of programmed death in vascular endothelial cells (VEC), examinations were made of the effects of substances that are known to affect the vascular system by using VEC in culture (4,5). We found that hemorrhagic snake venoms induced apoptotic cell death or programmed cell death of VEC. By contrast, neurotoxic snake venoms did not induce programmed cell death but caused necrosis at much higher doses of the venoms. No effect of hemorrhagic venom was observed with many types of cultured cells other than VEC. Thus, hemorrhagic snake venom appears to be a useful tool for studies of the molecular mechanisms of vascular apoptosis. The results also suggest a possible mechanism of action of hemorrhagic snake venom on the vascular system. PMID:8422240

  7. Tensile Properties of Contractile and Synthetic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    Tensile properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of synthetic and contractile phenotypes were determined using a newly developed tensile test system. Synthetic and contractile VSMCs were isolated from the rabbit thoracic aorta with an explant and an enzymatic digestion method, respectively. Each cell floated in Hanks' balanced salt solution of 37°C was attached to the fine tips of a pair of micropipettes with a cell adhesive and, then, stretched at the rate of 6µm/sec by moving one of the micropipettes with a linear actuator. Load applied to the cell was measured with a cantilever-type load cell; its elongation was determined from the distance between the micropipette tips using a video dimension analyzer. The synthetic and contractile VSMCs were not broken even at the tensile force of 2.4µN and 3.4µN, respectively. Their stiffness was significantly higher in contractile phenotype (0.17N/m) than in synthetic one (0.09N/m). The different tensile properties between synthetic and contractile cells are attributable to the differences in cytoskeletal structures and contractile apparatus.

  8. Progenitor cells in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew M; Góñez, L Jorge; Harrison, Leonard C

    2004-01-01

    The beta-cell mass in the adult pancreas possesses the ability to undergo limited regeneration following injury. Identifying the progenitor cells involved in this process and understanding the mechanisms leading to their maturation will open new avenues for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, despite steady advances in determining the molecular basis of early pancreatic development, the identification of pancreatic stem cells or beta-cell progenitors and the molecular mechanisms underlying beta-cell regeneration remain unclear. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells has heightened interest in the possible application of stem cell therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on the expanding knowledge of pancreas development, beta-cell regeneration and stem cell research, this review focuses on progenitor cells in the adult pancreas as a potential source of beta-cells. PMID:14737742

  9. Intertissue Signal Transfer of Abscisic Acid from Vascular Cells to Guard Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kuromori, Takashi; Sugimoto, Eriko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that responds to environmental stresses, such as water deficiency. Recent studies have shown that ABA biosynthetic enzymes are expressed in the vascular area under both nonstressed and water-stressed growth conditions. However, specific cells in the vasculature involved in ABA biosynthesis have not been identified. Here, we detected the expression of two genes encoding ABA biosynthetic enzymes, ABSCISIC ACID DEFICIENT2 and ABSCISIC ALDEHYDE OXIDASE3, in phloem companion cells in vascular tissues. Furthermore, we identified an ATP-binding cassette transporter, Arabidopsis thaliana ABCG25 (AtABCG25), expressed in the same cells. Additionally, AtABCG25-expressing Spodoptera frugiperda9 culture cells showed an ABA efflux function. Finally, we observed that enhancement of ABA biosynthesis in phloem companion cells induced guard cell responses, even under normal growth conditions. These results show that ABA is synthesized in specific cells and can be transported to target cells in different tissues. PMID:24521878

  10. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells. PMID:26329158

  11. Hypoxia-shaped vascular niche for cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Guillaume; El Hafny-Rahbi, Bouchra; Nadim, Mahdi; Tejchman, Anna; Klimkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment, long considered as determining cancer development, still offers research fields to define hallmarks of cancer. An early key-step, the “angiogenic switch”, allows tumour growth. Pathologic angiogenesis is a cancer hallmark as it features results of tumour-specific properties that can be summarised as a response to hypoxia. The hypoxic state occurs when the tumour mass reaches a volume sufficient not to permit oxygen diffusion inside the tumour centre. Thus tumour cells turn on adaptation mechanisms to the low pO2 level, inducing biochemical responses in terms of cytokines/chemokines/receptors and consequently recruitment of specific cell types, as well as cell-selection inside the tumour. Moreover, these changes are orchestrated by the microRNA balance strongly reflecting the hypoxic milieu and mediating the cross-talk between endothelial and tumour cells. MicroRNAs control of the endothelial precursor-vascular settings shapes the niche for selection of cancer stem cells. PMID:25691820

  12. Regulation of cyclooxygenase expression in cultured vascular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pash, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolism in vascular tissue results in synthesis of prostacylin. The key enzyme in this synthesis pathway, cyclooxygenase, is down-regulated through self-inactivation. An analogous refractory state is produced by aspirin which irreversibly acetylates the enzyme. To further understand this phenomenon, the inactivation and recovery of cyclooxygenase activity was assayed in cultured ray vascular smooth muscle cells using exogenously added arachidonic acid. Self-inactivation of cyclooxygenase was observed following treatment with micromolar amounts of arachidonic acid. The recovery of cyclooxygenase activity following self-inactivation was analogous to that observed following aspirin-inactivation in that it depended on protein synthesis and required either serum or EGF. Two additional factors, TGF-{beta} and uric acid, were found to enhance the stimulation of cyclooxygenase recovery by EGF. A defined medium containing 10 ng/mL EGF, 1 ng/mL TGF{beta} and 0.1 mM uric acid duplicated the cyclooxygenase recovery activity of 10% serum. Stimulation of cyclooxygenase activity by EGF and TGF-{beta} was inhibited by cycloheximide but not by actinomycin-D, indicating a link to increased translation of pre-existing mRNA. A lack of significant effect on overall protein synthesis by EGF and TGF-{beta}, measured by ({sup 35}S)-methionine incorporation under conditions where a multi-fold increase in cyclooxygenase activity was seen, indicates that the translational regulation of a small fraction of total mRNA and possibly cyclooxygenase is occurring.

  13. Direct cell-cell contact with the vascular niche maintains quiescent neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ottone, Cristina; Krusche, Benjamin; Whitby, Ariadne; Clements, Melanie; Quadrato, Giorgia; Pitulescu, Mara E.; Adams, Ralf H.; Parrinello, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature is a prominent component of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche. Although quiescent neural stem cells physically contact blood vessels at specialised endfeet, the significance of this interaction is not understood. In contrast, it is well established that vasculature-secreted soluble factors promote lineage progression of committed progenitors. Here we specifically investigated the role of cell-cell contact-dependent signalling in the vascular niche. Unexpectedly, we find that direct cell-cell interactions with endothelial cells enforces quiescence and promotes stem cell identity. Mechanistically, endothelial ephrinB2 and Jagged1 mediate these effects by suppressing cell-cycle entry downstream of mitogens and inducing stemness genes to jointly inhibit differentiation. In vivo, endothelial-specific ablation of either of the genes which encode these proteins, Efnb2 and Jag1 respectively, aberrantly activates quiescent stem cells, resulting in depletion. Thus, we identify the vasculature as a critical niche compartment for stem cell maintenance, furthering our understanding of how anchorage to the niche maintains stem cells within a pro-differentiative microenvironment. PMID:25283993

  14. Progerin expression disrupts critical adult stem cell functions involved in tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Laurin Marie; Gomez, Lourdes Adriana; Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noel M; Howard, Guy A; Schiller, Paul C

    2014-12-01

    Vascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Vascular repair, essential for tissue maintenance, is critically reduced during vascular disease and aging. Efficient vascular repair requires functional adult stem cells unimpaired by aging or mutation. One protein candidate for reducing stem cell?mediated vascular repair is progerin, an alternative splice variant of lamin A. Progerin results from erroneous activation of cryptic splice sites within the LMNA gene, and significantly increases during aging. Mutations triggering progerin overexpression cause the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), in which patients die at approximately 13-years of age due to atherosclerosis-induced disease. Progerin expression affects tissues rich in cells that can be derived from marrow stromal cells (MSCs. Studies using various MSC subpopulations and models have led to discrepant results. Using a well-defined, immature subpopulation of MSCs, Marrow Isolated Adult Multilineage Inducible (MIAMI) cells, we find progerin significantly disrupts expression and localization of self-renewal markers, proliferation, migration, and membrane elasticity. One potential treatment, farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ameliorates some of these effects. Our results confirm proposed progerin-induced mechanisms and suggest novel ways in which progerin disturbs critical stem cell functions collectively required for proper tissue repair, offering promising treatment targets for future therapies. PMID:25567453

  15. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  16. Virulent Treponema pallidum activates human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Riley, B S; Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Hansen, E J; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1992-03-01

    Perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, fibrin deposition, and endothelial cell abnormalities consistent with cellular activation are prominent histopathologic features of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum. Because activated endothelial cells play important roles in lymphocyte homing and hemostasis, the ability of virulent T. pallidum to activate cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was investigated. T. pallidum induced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and procoagulant activity on the surface of HUVEC. Electron microscopy of T. pallidum-stimulated HUVEC revealed extensive networks of fibrin strands not observed in cultures without treponemes. ICAM-1 expression in HUVEC also was promoted by a 47-kDa integral membrane lipoprotein purified from T. pallidum, implicating a role for spirochete membrane lipoproteins in endothelial cell activation. The combined findings are consistent with the pathology of syphilis and provide the first evidence that a pathogenic spirochetal bacterium such as T. pallidum or its constituent integral membrane lipoprotein(s) can activate directly host vascular endothelium. PMID:1347056

  17. Recent advances in bone regeneration using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Rudich, Utai; Michaeli Geller, Gal; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-04-26

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue reliant on the close spatial and temporal association between blood vessels and bone cells. Therefore, cells that participate in vasculogenesis and osteogenesis play a pivotal role in bone formation during prenatal and postnatal periods. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing of bone fracture is occasionally impaired due to insufficient blood and cellular supply to the site of injury. In these cases, bone regeneration process is interrupted, which might result in delayed union or even nonunion of the fracture. Nonunion fracture is difficult to treat and have a high financial impact. In the last decade, numerous technological advancements in bone tissue engineering and cell-therapy opened new horizon in the field of bone regeneration. This review starts with presentation of the biological processes involved in bone development, bone remodeling, fracture healing process and the microenvironment at bone healing sites. Then, we discuss the rationale for using adult stem cells and listed the characteristics of the available cells for bone regeneration. The mechanism of action and epigenetic regulations for osteogenic differentiation are also described. Finally, we review the literature for translational and clinical trials that investigated the use of adult stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and CD34(+) blood progenitors) for bone regeneration. PMID:25914769

  18. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  19. Expression of cancer stem cell markers and their correlation with pathogenesis in vascular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jiaojiao; Huang, Bing; Liu, Ruixue; Ju, Xinxin; Zhou, Yang; Jiang, Jinfang; Liang, Weihua; Shen, Yaoyuan; Li, Feng; Pang, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Vascular tumor, which belongs to a kind of complicated lesion in soft tissue tumor, is derived from mesenchymal tissue. Although many studies have been focused on the pathogenesis of vascular tumors in human, the specific mechanism of the vascular tumors was currently unclear. Previous studies have reported an association of cancer stem cells with the development of tumor in many solid tumors. Thus the purpose of this study was to explore whether different expression level of cancer stem cell markers including CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1 in vascular tumor may help to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of vascular tumor. In present study, tissues of 9 cases of hemangioma, 22 cases of hemangiosarcoma, 3 cases of Kaposi’s sarcoma, and 5 cases of hemangioendothelioma were immunostained for CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1. Of the 39 vascular tumor cases included in the current study, CD29, CD133 and nestin were positive in most vascular tumor cases. Although CD44 and ALDH1 were observed in vascular tumor cases, the percentage of cells staining for the two markers was less than 2% in all cases of vascular tumor. Capillary hemangiomas exhibited significantly higher expression rate of CD29 and nestin compared with malignant vascular tumors and hemangioendotheliomas (P<0.05, Fisher’s exact test), while CD44, CD133 and ALDH1 exhibited no statistically significant difference between these two groups. Pearson correlation analysis exhibited that CD29 expression and nestin expression in vascular tumor were no statistically significant relationship (C=0.288, P=0.063>0.05). Our findings confirmed that the five cancer stem cells markers, including CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1, exhibited different expression levels in vascular tumors and demonstrated that immonhistochemical analysis for cancer stem cells markers may provide useful information for studying the pathogenesis of vascular tumors. PMID:26722452

  20. Gax regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Hu, Zhenlei; Zhai, Xinming; Wang, Yongyi; Liu, Jidong; Wang, Weijun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and restenosis after angioplasty. Transcription factors have emerged as critical regulators for VSMCs function, and recently we verified inhibiting transcription factor Gax was important for controlling VSMCs proliferation and migration. This study aimed to determine its role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. Western blot revealed that overexpression of Gax increased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes such as calponin and SM-MHC 11. Then, Gax overexpression potently suppressed proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without platelet-derived growth factor-induced-BB (PDGF-BB) stimuli whereas Gax silencing inhibited these processes. Furthermore, cDNA array analysis indicated that Rap1A gene was the downstream target of Gax in human VSMCs. And overexpression of Gax significantly inhibited expression of Rap1A in VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Moreover, overexpression of Rap1A decreased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes and increased proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Finally, Gax overexpression significantly inhibited the neointimal formation in carotid artery injury of mouse models, specifically through maintaining VSMCs contractile phenotype by decreasing Rap1A expression. In conclusion, these results indicated that Gax was a regulator of human VSMCs phenotypic modulation by targeting Rap1A gene, which suggested that targeting Gax or its downstream targets in human VSMCs may provide an attractive approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27508012

  1. ELIMINATION OF VITAMIN D RECEPTOR IN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS ALTERS VASCULAR FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wei; Watts, Stephanie W.; Ng, Michael; Chen, Songcang; Glenn, Denis J.; Gardner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular dysfunction. We evaluated the role of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in vascular endothelial function, a marker of cardiovascular health, at baseline and in the presence of angiotensin II, using an endothelial-specific knockout of the murine VDR gene. In the absence of endothelial VDR, acetylcholine-induced aortic relaxation was significantly impaired (maximal relaxation, endothelial-specific VDR knockout =58% vs. control=73%, p<0.05). This was accompanied by a reduction in eNOS expression and phospho-vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein levels in aortae from the endothelial-specific VDR knockout vs. control mice. While blood pressure levels at baseline were comparable at 12 and 24 weeks of age, the endothelial VDR knockout mice demonstrated increased sensitivity to the hypertensive effects of angiotensin II compared to control mice (after 1-week infusion: knockout = 155±15 mmHg vs. control = 133±7 mmHg, p<0.01; after 2-week infusion: knockout = 164±9 mmHg vs. control = 152±13 mmHg, p<0.05). By the end of two weeks, angiotensin II infusion-induced, hypertrophy-sensitive myocardial gene expression was higher in endothelial-specific VDR knockout mice (fold change compared to saline-infused control mice, ANP: knockout mice = 3.12 vs. control= 1.7, p<0.05; BNP: knockout mice= 4.72 vs. control= 2.68, p<0.05). These results suggest that endothelial VDR plays an important role in endothelial cell function and blood pressure control and imply a potential role for VDR agonists in the management of cardiovascular disease associated with endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25201890

  2. RNA-Seq Reveals the Angiogenesis Diversity between the Fetal and Adults Bone Mesenchyme Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Yingmin; Liang, Yu; Nie, Chao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze 23 single cell samples and 2 bulk cells sample from human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. The results from the research demonstrated that there were big differences between two cell lines. Adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines showed a strong trend on the blood vessel differentiation and cell motion, 48/49 vascular related differential expressed genes showed higher expression in adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Abmsc) than fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Fbmsc). 96/106 cell motion related genes showed the same tendency. Further analysis showed that genes like ANGPT1, VEGFA, FGF2, PDGFB and PDGFRA showed higher expression in Abmsc. This work showed cell heterogeneity between human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. Also the work may give an indication that Abmsc had a better potency than Fbmsc in the future vascular related application. PMID:26901069

  3. RNA-Seq Reveals the Angiogenesis Diversity between the Fetal and Adults Bone Mesenchyme Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Yingmin; Liang, Yu; Nie, Chao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze 23 single cell samples and 2 bulk cells sample from human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. The results from the research demonstrated that there were big differences between two cell lines. Adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines showed a strong trend on the blood vessel differentiation and cell motion, 48/49 vascular related differential expressed genes showed higher expression in adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Abmsc) than fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Fbmsc). 96/106 cell motion related genes showed the same tendency. Further analysis showed that genes like ANGPT1, VEGFA, FGF2, PDGFB and PDGFRA showed higher expression in Abmsc. This work showed cell heterogeneity between human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. Also the work may give an indication that Abmsc had a better potency than Fbmsc in the future vascular related application. PMID:26901069

  4. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. II. Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Mooteri, S.N.; Podolski, J.L.; Drab, E.A.; Saclarides, T.J.

    1996-02-01

    Although the aminothiol WR-1065 protects normal tissues, its direct effect on the damage and restoration of the vascular endothelium is not clear. In endothelial cells, WR-1065 attenuates both the DNA damage and the G{sub 1}-phase arrest induced by radiation. After the destruction of nearby endothelial cells, the survivors rearrange their cytoskeleton, migrate and replicate. To determine the effect of radiation on morphology and migration, portions of bovine aortic endothelial cell cultures were denuded with a pipette tip and irradiated ({sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays). The following observations were noted after 5 Gy: within 10 min, there was increased formation of protein-mixed disulfides including actin-mixed disulfide; after 30 min, {alpha}{sub 5}{Beta}{sub 1}, the integrin receptor for fibronectin, was up-regulated on the apical membrane surface. Within 5 h, actin-containing stress fibers reorganized, although there was no change in the total filamentous (F-)actin content within the cells. Compared to controls after 24 h, the irradiated cells had migrated 15% farther (P < 0.01), and at the leading edge covered twice the surface area (P < 0.0001). The addition of 2 mM WR-1065 for 2 h before 5 Gy inhibited the increased expression of {alpha}{sub 5}{Beta}{sub 1}, promoted retention of stress fibers and prevented the enhanced cell migration and spreading. These results indicate that WR-1065 prevents radiation-induced morphological responses. This effect appears to be mediated by an impact on both adhesion molecule expression and cytoskeletal reorganization. 61 refs., 6 figs.

  5. PDMS Elastic Micropost Arrays for Studying Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qi; Sun, Zhe; Meininger, Gerald; Almasri, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, fabrication and characterization of a micromachined array of high-density 3-dimensional microposts (100×100) made of flexible material (silicone elastomers) for use to measure quantitatively the cellular traction force and contractile events in isolated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The micropost array was fabricated with diameters ranged from 3 to 10 μm, with edge to edge spacing of 5, 7 and 10 μm, and with a height to diameter aspect ratio up to 10. VSMCs exerted larger basal traction forces when they were grown on stiffer micropost arrays. These basal traction forces were 80% larger in control VSMCs than in VSMCs in which integrin linked kinase (ILK) was knocked down using shRNA. The addition of Angiotensin II (ANGII) led to VSMC contraction as evidenced by an increased traction force exerted on the microposts under the cell. This ANGII induced contractile response and change in traction force on the microposts was not observed in VSMCs lacking ILK. Following treatment of VSMCs with Cytochalasin D to depolymerize the actin cytoskeleton, the VSMCs exhibited relaxation that was apparent as a significant reduction in the measured traction force exerted on microposts under the cell. Overall, this study demonstrates the usefulness of micropost arrays for study of the contractile responsiveness of VSMC and the results indicate that ILK plays a critical role in the signaling pathways leading to the generation of substrate traction force in VSMC. PMID:26451074

  6. Progerin expression disrupts critical adult stem cell functions involved in tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Laurin Marie; Gomez, Lourdes Adriana; Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noel M; Howard, Guy A; Schiller, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Vascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Vascular repair, essential for tissue maintenance, is critically reduced during vascular disease and aging. Efficient vascular repair requires functional adult stem cells unimpaired by aging or mutation. One protein candidate for reducing stem cell–mediated vascular repair is progerin, an alternative splice variant of lamin A. Progerin results from erroneous activation of cryptic splice sites within the LMNA gene, and significantly increases during aging. Mutations triggering progerin overexpression cause the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), in which patients die at approximately 13-years of age due to atherosclerosis-induced disease. Progerin expression affects tissues rich in cells that can be derived from marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Studies using various MSC subpopulations and models have led to discrepant results. Using a well-defined, immature subpopulation of MSCs, Marrow Isolated Adult Multilineage Inducible (MIAMI) cells, we find progerin significantly disrupts expression and localization of self-renewal markers, proliferation, migration, and membrane elasticity. One potential treatment, farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ameliorates some of these effects. Our results confirm proposed progerin-induced mechanisms and suggest novel ways in which progerin disturbs critical stem cell functions collectively required for proper tissue repair, offering promising treatment targets for future therapies. PMID:25567453

  7. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  8. Vascular risk assessment in older adults without a history of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bambrick, P; Tan, W S; Mulcahy, R; Pope, G A; Cooke, J

    2016-06-15

    Modern cardiovascular risk prediction tools, which have their genesis in the Framingham Heart Study, have allowed more accurate risk stratification and targeting of treatments worldwide over the last seven decades. Better cardiovascular risk factor control during this time has led to a reduction in cardiovascular mortality and, at least in part, to improved life expectancy. As a result, western societies as a whole have seen a steady increase in the proportion of older persons in their populations. Unfortunately, several studies have shown that the same tools which have contributed to this increase cannot be reliably extrapolated for use in older generations. Recent work has allowed recalibration of existing models for use in older populations but these modified tools still require external validation before they can be confidently applied in clinical practice. Another complication is emerging evidence that aggressive risk factor modification in older adults, particularly more frail individuals, may actually be harmful. This review looks at currently available cardiovascular risk prediction models and the specific challenges faced with their use in older adults, followed by analysis of recent attempts at recalibration for this cohort. We discuss the issue of frailty, looking at our evolving understanding of its constituent features and various tools for its assessment. We also review work to date on the impact of frailty on cardiovascular risk modification and outline its potentially central role in determining the most sensible approach in older patients. We summarise the most promising novel markers of cardiovascular risk which may be of use in improving risk prediction in older adults in the future. These include markers of vascular compliance (such as aortic pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis), of endothelial function (such as flow mediated dilation, carotid intima-media thickness and coronary artery calcium scores), and also biochemical and

  9. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    PubMed Central

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications

  10. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process.

    PubMed

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix-only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications. PMID

  11. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Assoian, Richard K.; Rader, Daniel J.; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD44 to atherosclerosis, we bred CD44-null mice to atherosclerosis-prone apoE-deficient mice. We found a 50–70% reduction in aortic lesions in CD44-null mice compared with CD44 heterozygote and wild-type littermates. We demonstrate that CD44 promotes the recruitment of macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CD44 is required for phenotypic dedifferentiation of medial smooth muscle cells to the “synthetic” state as measured by expression of VCAM-1. Finally, we demonstrate that hyaluronan, the principal ligand for CD44, is upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE-deficient mice and that the low-molecular-weight proinflammatory forms of hyaluronan stimulate VCAM-1 expression and proliferation of cultured primary aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas high-molecular-weight forms of hyaluronan inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. We conclude that CD44 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. PMID:11581304

  12. Clinical grade adult stem cell banking

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Goebel, W Scott

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of scientific interest recently generated by the potential therapeutic applications of adult stem cells in human care but there are several challenges regarding quality and safety in clinical applications and a number of these challenges relate to the processing and banking of these cells ex-vivo. As the number of clinical trials and the variety of adult cells used in regenerative therapy increases, safety remains a primary concern. This has inspired many nations to formulate guidelines and standards for the quality of stem cell collection, processing, testing, banking, packaging and distribution. Clinically applicable cryopreservation and banking of adult stem cells offers unique opportunities to advance the potential uses and widespread implementation of these cells in clinical applications. Most current cryopreservation protocols include animal serum proteins and potentially toxic cryoprotectant additives (CPAs) that prevent direct use of these cells in human therapeutic applications. Long term cryopreservation of adult stem cells under good manufacturing conditions using animal product free solutions is critical to the widespread clinical implementation of ex-vivo adult stem cell therapies. Furthermore, to avoid any potential cryoprotectant related complications, reduced CPA concentrations and efficient post-thaw washing to remove CPA are also desirable. The present review focuses on the current strategies and important aspects of adult stem cell banking for clinical applications. These include current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs), animal protein free freezing solutions, cryoprotectants, freezing & thawing protocols, viability assays, packaging and distribution. The importance and benefits of banking clinical grade adult stem cells are also discussed. PMID:20046678

  13. Stromal vascular cells and adipogenesis: Cells within adipose depots regulate adipogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A collection of investigations indicate the importance of adipose tissue stromal/stem cells to vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during adipogenesis. Early in development the stromal-vascular (S-V) elements control and dictate the extent of adipogenesis in a depot dependent manner. For instance, the...

  14. Apoptosis in vascular cells induced by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis is a natural mechanism of cellular self-destruction. It can be triggered by moderate, yet irreversible damage. Apoptosis plays a major role in tissue renewal. Artificial apoptosis induction will become a novel therapy that meets all requirements for tissue-saving surgery. Diseased tissues can disappear without inflammation and scarring. This is particularly important in treatment of blockages in body tracts (e.g. cardiovascular diseases). Artificial induction of apoptosis can be achieved by means of cold plasma treatment. In this work an atmospheric micro-plasma operated in helium/air has been used to induce apoptosis in vascular cells. Parametric studies of apoptosis induction have been conducted; the efficiency is almost 100%. The apoptotic factors are ROS/RNS (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Their densities in the plasma have been measured by mass spectrometry. For apoptosis induction, RNS seem to be more important than ROS, because of their relative abundance. Moreover, addition of a ROS scavenger (ascorbic acid) to the cell culture medium does not reduce the occurrence of apoptosis. Cold plasma is a very efficient tool for fundamental studies of apoptosis, and later, for controlled tissue removal in vivo.

  15. Endothelial progenitor cell recruitment in a microfluidic vascular model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Abaci, Hasan E; Xu, Yu; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    During vessel injury, endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs) are recruited from bone marrow and directed to the hypoxic injury site. The hypoxic conditions in the damaged blood vessel promote TNF-α, which upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). EPCs attach to endothelial cell lining using ICAM-1. Here we aimed to examine EPC attachment to ECs in an injured-blood vessel conditions. We first determined ICAM-1 expression in stimulated HUVECs. We stimulated HUVECs with 21% oxygen (atmospheric), atmospheric with TNF-α-supplemented media, 1% oxygen (hypoxia), and hypoxia with TNF-α-supplemented media and found the highest ECFC attachment on HUVECs stimulated with TNF-α and hypoxia, correlating with the highest ICAM-1 expression. We next designed, fabricated and tested a three-dimensional microbioreactor (3D MBR) system with precise control and monitoring of dissolve oxygen and media flow rate in the cellular environment. We utilized a step-wise seeding approach, producing monolayer of HUVECs on all four walls. When stimulated with both TNF-α and hypoxia, ECFC retention on HUVECs was significantly increased under low shear stress compared to static controls. Overall, the 3D MBR system mimics the pathological oxygen tension and shear stress in the damaged vasculature, providing a platform to model vascular-related disorders. PMID:26693599

  16. Structural and Functional Vascular Alterations and Incident Hypertension in Normotensive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Carmen A.; Adeney, Kathryn L.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Jacobs, David; Duprez, Daniel; Bluemke, David; Polak, Joseph; Psaty, Bruce; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities may exist before clinical hypertension. Using Poisson regression, the authors studied the association of coronary artery calcium (CAC), common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), aortic distensibility, and large and small arterial elasticity with incident hypertension among 2,512 normotensive US adults free of cardiovascular disease. Incidence rate ratios for incident hypertension (blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or new antihypertensive medication) were calculated. Increased CAC was associated with incident hypertension in demographics-adjusted models (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.75; IRR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.78; and IRR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.25 for CAC scores of 30–99, 100–399, and ≥400, respectively) but was attenuated after further adjustment. Increased common CIMT was associated with incident hypertension (IRR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.28, 2.46 for quintile 4; IRR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.28, 2.53 for quintile 5). Participants with the lowest, compared with the highest, aortic distensibility had an increased risk of hypertension (IRR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.79), as did those with the lowest large arterial elasticity (IRR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.99). Lower small arterial elasticity was incrementally associated with incident hypertension starting at quintile 2 (IRR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.39, 2.91; IRR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.71, 3.57; IRR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.88, 3.95; and IRR = 2.85, 95% CI: 1.95, 4.16). Structural and functional vascular abnormalities are independent predictors of incident hypertension. These findings are important for understanding the pathogenesis of hypertension. PMID:19951938

  17. Evaluation of Objective and Perceived Mental Fatigability in Older Adults with Vascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Roiland, Rachel; Heffner, Kathi; Johnson, Melissa; Chen, Ding-Geng (Din); Mapstone, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mental fatigability refers to the failure to sustain participation in tasks requiring mental effort. Older adults with vascular risk are at particular risk for experiencing mental fatigability. The present study (1) tested a new way of measuring objective mental fatigability by examining its association with perceived mental fatigability; and (2) identified psychological, physiological, and situational factors that would be associated with mental fatigability. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 49 community-dwelling participants aged 75+ years with vascular risk. A 20-minute fatigability-manipulation task was used to induce mental fatigability and develop objective and perceived mental fatigability measures. Objective fatigability was calculated by the change of reaction time over the course of the task. Perceived fatigability was calculated by the change of fatigue self-reported before and after the task. A set of potential psychological, physiological, and situational predictors were measured. Results There was a significant increase in reaction time and self-reported fatigue to the fatigability manipulation task, indicating occurrence of objective and perceived mental fatigability. Reaction time and self-reported fatigue were moderately, but significantly correlated. Higher levels of executive control and having a history of more frequently engaging in mental activities were associated with lower objective mental fatigability. None of the examined factors were associated with perceived mental fatigability. Conclusion Objective and perceived mental fatigability were sensitive to our fatigability-manipulation task. While these two measures were correlated, they were not associated with the same factors. These findings need to be validated in a large study with a more heterogeneous sample and a greater variety of fatigability-manipulation tasks. PMID:24840140

  18. Coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia associated with impaired vascular endothelial function in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Jokura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Isamu; Umeda, Mika; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that habitual coffee consumption lowers the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Postprandial hyperglycemia is a direct and independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We previously demonstrated that coffee polyphenol ingestion increased secretion of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which has been shown to exhibit anti-diabetic and cardiovascular effects. We hypothesized coffee polyphenol consumption may improve postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function by increasing GLP-1 release and/or reducing oxidative stress. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized, acute, crossover, intervention study in healthy male adults, measuring blood parameters and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after ingestion of a meal with or without coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). Nineteen subjects consumed a test meal with either a placebo- or CPE-containing beverage. Blood biomarkers and FMD were measured at fasting and up to 180 minutes postprandially. The CPE beverage led to a significantly lower peak postprandial increase in blood glucose and diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite, and significantly higher postprandial FMD than the placebo beverage. Postprandial blood GLP-1 increase tended to be higher after ingestion of the CPE beverage, compared with placebo. Subclass analysis revealed that the CPE beverage significantly improved postprandial blood GLP-1 response and reduced blood glucose increase in the subjects with a lower insulinogenic index. Correlation analysis showed postprandial FMD was negatively associated with blood glucose increase after ingestion of the CPE beverage. In conclusion, these results suggest that coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function, which is associated with increased GLP-1 secretion and decreased oxidative stress in healthy humans. PMID:26337017

  19. Adrenomedullin and Adrenomedullin Binding Protein-1 Attenuate Vascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mian; Simms, H Hank; Wang, Ping

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether vascular endothelial cell apoptosis occurs in the late stage of sepsis and, if so, whether administration of a potent vasodilatory peptide adrenomedullin and its newly reported specific binding protein (AM/AMBP-1) prevents sepsis-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. Summary Background Data: Polymicrobial sepsis is characterized by an early, hyperdynamic phase followed by a late, hypodynamic phase. Our recent studies have shown that administration of AM/AMBP-1 delays or even prevents the transition from the hyperdynamic phase to the hypodynamic phase of sepsis, attenuates tissue injury, and decreases sepsis-induced mortality. However, the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of AM/AMBP-1 in sepsis remain unknown. Methods: Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture in adult male rats. Human AMBP-1 (40 μg/kg body weight) was infused intravenously at the beginning of sepsis for 20 minutes and synthetic AM (12 μg/kg body weight) was continuously administered for the entire study period using an Alzert micro-osmotic pump, beginning 3 hours prior to the induction of sepsis. The thoracic aorta and pulmonary tissues were harvested at 20 hours after cecal ligation and puncture (ie, the late stage of sepsis). Apoptosis was determined using TUNEL assay, M30 Cytodeath immunostaining, and electromicroscopy. In addition, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic Bax gene expression and protein levels were assessed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Results: Vascular endothelial cells underwent apoptosis formation at 20 hours after cecal ligation and puncture as determined by three different methods. Moreover, partial detached endothelial cell in the aorta was observed. Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels decreased significantly at 20 hours after the onset of sepsis while Bax was not altered. Administration of AM/AMBP-1 early after sepsis, however, significantly reduced the number of apoptotic endothelial

  20. Vascular niche factor PEDF modulates Notch-dependent stemness in the adult subependymal zone.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Agulló, Celia; Morante-Redolat, José Manuel; Delgado, Ana C; Fariñas, Isabel

    2009-12-01

    We sought to address the fundamental question of how stem cell microenvironments can regulate self-renewal. We found that Notch was active in astroglia-like neural stem cells (NSCs), but not in transit-amplifying progenitors of the murine subependymal zone, and that the level of Notch transcriptional activity correlated with self-renewal and multipotency. Moreover, dividing NSCs appeared to balance renewal with commitment via controlled segregation of Notch activity, leading to biased expression of known (Hes1) and previously unknown (Egfr) Notch target genes in daughter cells. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) enhanced Notch-dependent transcription in cells with low Notch signaling, thereby subverting the output of an asymmetrical division to the production of two highly self-renewing cells. Mechanistically, PEDF induced a non-canonical activation of the NF-kappaB pathway, leading to the dismissal of the transcriptional co-repressor N-CoR from specific Notch-responsive promoters. Our data provide a basis for stemness regulation in vascular niches and indicate that Notch and PEDF cooperate to regulate self-renewal. PMID:19898467

  1. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

  2. Ablation of the androgen receptor from vascular smooth muscle cells demonstrates a role for testosterone in vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongxing; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Wu, Junxi; Vesey, Alex T.; Lerman, Daniel. A.; Dweck, Marc R.; Newby, David E.; Smith, Lee B.; MacRae, Vicky E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification powerfully predicts mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease. Men have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to women of a similar age. These gender disparities suggest an influence of sex hormones. Testosterone is the primary and most well-recognised androgen in men. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that exogenous androgen treatment induces vascular calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed expression of androgen receptor (AR) in the calcified media of human femoral artery tissue and calcified human valves. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed increased phosphate (Pi)-induced mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification following either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment for 9 days. Testosterone and DHT treatment increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) mRNA expression. Testosterone-induced calcification was blunted in VSMC-specific AR-ablated (SM-ARKO) VSMCs compared to WT. Consistent with these data, SM-ARKO VSMCs showed a reduction in Osterix mRNA expression. However, intriguingly, a counter-intuitive increase in Alpl was observed. These novel data demonstrate that androgens play a role in inducing vascular calcification through the AR. Androgen signalling may represent a novel potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention. PMID:27095121

  3. Ablation of the androgen receptor from vascular smooth muscle cells demonstrates a role for testosterone in vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongxing; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Wu, Junxi; Vesey, Alex T; Lerman, Daniel A; Dweck, Marc R; Newby, David E; Smith, Lee B; MacRae, Vicky E

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification powerfully predicts mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease. Men have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to women of a similar age. These gender disparities suggest an influence of sex hormones. Testosterone is the primary and most well-recognised androgen in men. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that exogenous androgen treatment induces vascular calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed expression of androgen receptor (AR) in the calcified media of human femoral artery tissue and calcified human valves. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed increased phosphate (Pi)-induced mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification following either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment for 9 days. Testosterone and DHT treatment increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) mRNA expression. Testosterone-induced calcification was blunted in VSMC-specific AR-ablated (SM-ARKO) VSMCs compared to WT. Consistent with these data, SM-ARKO VSMCs showed a reduction in Osterix mRNA expression. However, intriguingly, a counter-intuitive increase in Alpl was observed. These novel data demonstrate that androgens play a role in inducing vascular calcification through the AR. Androgen signalling may represent a novel potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention. PMID:27095121

  4. Vascularization of hollow channel-modified porous silk scaffolds with endothelial cells for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Wray, Lindsay S; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Xu, Ling; Zou, Duohong; Wang, Shaoyi; Zhang, Maolin; Dong, Jiachen; Li, Guanglong; Kaplan, David L; Jiang, Xinquan

    2015-07-01

    Despite the promise for stem cell-based tissue engineering for regenerative therapy, slow and insufficient vascularization of large tissue constructs negatively impacts the survival and function of these transplanted cells. A combination of channeled porous silk scaffolds and prevascularization with endothelial cells was investigated to test the ability of this tissue engineering strategy to support rapid and extensive vascularization process. We report that hollow channels promote in vitro prevascularization by facilitating endothelial cell growth, VEGF secretion, and capillary-like tube formation. When implanted in vivo, the pre-established vascular networks in the hollow channel scaffolds anastomose with host vessels and exhibit accelerated vascular infiltration throughout the whole tissue construct, which provides timely and sufficient nutrients to ensure the survival of the transplanted stem cells. This tissue engineering strategy can promote the effective application of stem cell-based regeneration to improve future clinical applications. PMID:25934280

  5. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  6. A pro-inflammatory role of deubiquitinating enzyme cylindromatosis (CYLD) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Lv, Jiaju; Han, Liping; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency suppresses pro-inflammatory phenotypic switch of VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency inhibits MAPK rather than NF-kB activity in inflamed VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is up-regulated in the coronary artery with neointimal hyperplasia. -- Abstract: CYLD, a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), is a critical regulator of diverse cellular processes, ranging from proliferation and differentiation to inflammatory responses, via regulating multiple key signaling cascades such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. CYLD has been shown to inhibit vascular lesion formation presumably through suppressing NF-{kappa}B activity in vascular cells. However, herein we report a novel role of CYLD in mediating pro-inflammatory responses in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via a mechanism independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Adenoviral knockdown of Cyld inhibited basal and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (Icam-1) and interleukin-6 (Il-6) in rat adult aortic SMCs (RASMCs). The CYLD deficiency led to increases in the basal NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in RASMCs; however, did not affect the TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Intriguingly, the TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B phosphorylation was enhanced in the CYLD deficient RASMCs. While knocking down of Cyld decreased slightly the basal expression levels of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta} proteins, it did not alter the kinetics of TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B protein degradation in RASMCs. These results indicate that CYLD suppresses the basal NF-{kappa}B activity and TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B kinase activation without affecting TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity in VSMCs. In addition, knocking down of Cyld suppressed TNF{alpha}-induced activation of mitogen activated protein

  7. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9-1.5 pmol mg(-1) protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3-5 pmol mg(-1) protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5-13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  8. Alcohol and cardiovascular disease--modulation of vascular cell function.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Paul A; Redmond, Eileen M

    2012-04-01

    Alcohol is a commonly used drug worldwide. Epidemiological studies have identified alcohol consumption as a factor that may either positively or negatively influence many diseases including cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and dementia. Often there seems to be a differential effect of various drinking patterns, with frequent moderate consumption of alcohol being salutary and binge drinking or chronic abuse being deleterious to one's health. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the many effects of alcohol consumption is beginning to emerge, as well as a clearer picture as to whether these effects are due to the direct actions of alcohol itself, or caused in part by its metabolites, e.g., acetaldehyde, or by incidental components present in the alcoholic beverage (e.g., polyphenols in red wine). This review will discuss evidence to date as to how alcohol (ethanol) might affect atherosclerosis that underlies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, and the putative mechanisms involved, focusing on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell effects. PMID:22606372

  9. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  10. Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL) Reveals the Sequential Differentiation of Sieve Element-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Nurani, Alif Meem; Saito, Chieko; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Saito, Masato; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2016-06-01

    Cell differentiation is a complex process involving multiple steps, from initial cell fate specification to final differentiation. Procambial/cambial cells, which act as vascular stem cells, differentiate into both xylem and phloem cells during vascular development. Recent studies have identified regulatory cascades for xylem differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying phloem differentiation is largely unexplored due to technical challenges. Here, we established an ectopic induction system for phloem differentiation named Vascular Cell Induction Culture System Using Arabidopsis Leaves (VISUAL). Our results verified similarities between VISUAL-induced Arabidopsis thaliana phloem cells and in vivo sieve elements. We performed network analysis using transcriptome data with VISUAL to dissect the processes underlying phloem differentiation, eventually identifying a factor involved in the regulation of the master transcription factor gene APL Thus, our culture system opens up new avenues not only for genetic studies of phloem differentiation, but also for future investigations of multidirectional differentiation from vascular stem cells. PMID:27194709

  11. Adult stem-like cells in kidney.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Keiichi; Takase, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tsujimura, Taro; Nangaku, Masaomi; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-26

    Human pluripotent cells are promising for treatment for kidney diseases, but the protocols for derivation of kidney cell types are still controversial. Kidney tissue regeneration is well confirmed in several lower vertebrates such as fish, and the repair of nephrons after tubular damages is commonly observed after renal injury. Even in adult mammal kidney, renal progenitor cell or system is reportedly presents suggesting that adult stem-like cells in kidney can be practical clinical targets for kidney diseases. However, it is still unclear if kidney stem cells or stem-like cells exist or not. In general, stemness is defined by several factors such as self-renewal capacity, multi-lineage potency and characteristic gene expression profiles. The definite use of stemness may be obstacle to understand kidney regeneration, and here we describe the recent broad findings of kidney regeneration and the cells that contribute regeneration. PMID:25815133

  12. Localisation of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors to cells of vascular and avascular epiretinal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Hackett, S.; Schoenfeld, C.; Vinores, M.; Vinores, S.; Campochiaro, P.

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Epiretinal membranes (ERMs) arise from a variety of causes or, in some cases, for unknown reasons. Once established, ERMs tend to progress, becoming more extensive and exerting increasing traction along the inner surface of the retina. One possible cause for their progression is the production of growth factors by cells within ERMs that may provide autocrine or paracrine stimulation. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors have been localised to cells of ERMs and may play such a role. In this study, comparative data were sought for several other growth factors that have been implicated in ERM formation.
METHODS—Immunohistochemical staining of ERMs was done for PDGF-A, PDGF-B, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), three isoforms of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors, flt-1 and flk-1/KDR. Expression of flt-1 and flk-1/KDR was examined in cultured retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and retinal glia from postmortem eyes by immunohistochemistry and by reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
RESULTS—Staining was most intense and most frequently observed for VEGF and PDGF-A, both in vascular and avascular ERMs. The majority of cells stained for VEGF in nine of 11 (81.8%) diabetic ERMs and in 14 of 24 (58.3%) proliferative vitreoretinopathy ERMs. The receptors for VEGF, flt-1, and flk-1/KDR were also identified on cells in ERMs and on cultured RPE cells. By RT-PCR, mRNA for flt-1 was identified in RPE cells and retinal glia, and mRNA for flk-1/KDR was identified in RPE cells.
CONCLUSIONS—These data show that VEGF and its receptors are localised to both vascular and avascular ERMs and suggest that VEGF, like PDGF-A, may be an autocrine and paracrine stimulator that may contribute to progression of vascular and avascular ERMs.

 PMID:9486038

  13. UBIAD1-mediated vitamin K2 synthesis is required for vascular endothelial cell survival and development

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-organ animals, such as vertebrates, require the development of a closed vascular system to ensure the delivery of nutrients to, and the transport of waste from, their organs. As a result, an organized vascular network that is optimal for tissue perfusion is created through not only the generation of new blood vessels but also the remodeling and maintenance of endothelial cells via apoptotic and cell survival pathways. Here, we show that UBIAD1, a vitamin K2/menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme, functions cell-autonomously to regulate endothelial cell survival and maintain vascular homeostasis. From a recent vascular transgene-assisted zebrafish forward genetic screen, we have identified a ubiad1 mutant, reddish/reh, which exhibits cardiac edema as well as cranial hemorrhages and vascular degeneration owing to defects in endothelial cell survival. These findings are further bolstered by the expression of UBIAD1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human heart tissue, as well as the rescue of the reh cardiac and vascular phenotypes with either zebrafish or human UBIAD1. Furthermore, we have discovered that vitamin K2, which is synthesized by UBIAD1, can also rescue the reh vascular phenotype but not the reh cardiac phenotype. Additionally, warfarin-treated zebrafish, which have decreased active vitamin K, display similar vascular degeneration as reh mutants, but exhibit normal cardiac function. Overall, these findings reveal an essential role for UBIAD1-generated vitamin K2 to maintain endothelial cell survival and overall vascular homeostasis; however, an alternative UBIAD1/vitamin K-independent pathway may regulate cardiac function. PMID:23533172

  14. Generation of a functional liver tissue mimic using adipose stromal vascular fraction cell-derived vasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, S. S.; Maijub, J. G.; Krishnan, L.; Ramakrishnan, V. M.; Clayton, L. R.; Williams, S. K.; Hoying, J. B.; Boyd, N. L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in cell implantation therapies is to promote integration of the microcirculation between the implanted cells and the host. We used adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to vascularize a human liver cell (HepG2) implant. We hypothesized that the SVF cells would form a functional microcirculation via vascular assembly and inosculation with the host vasculature. Initially, we assessed the extent and character of neovasculatures formed by freshly isolated and cultured SVF cells and found that freshly isolated cells have a higher vascularization potential. Generation of a 3D implant containing fresh SVF and HepG2 cells formed a tissue in which HepG2 cells were entwined with a network of microvessels. Implanted HepG2 cells sequestered labeled LDL delivered by systemic intravascular injection only in SVF-vascularized implants demonstrating that SVF cell-derived vasculatures can effectively integrate with host vessels and interface with parenchymal cells to form a functional tissue mimic. PMID:23828203

  15. Sleep Disorders in Adult Sickle Cell Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Efird, Jimmy T.; Knupp, Charles; Kadali, Renuka; Liles, Darla; Shiue, Kristin; Boettger, Peter; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: While sleep apnea has been studied in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), little is known about sleep disorders in adult sickle cell patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate sleep disordered breathing and its polysomnographic characteristics in adult patients with sickle cell disease. Methods: The analysis cohort included 32 consecutive adult SCD patients who underwent a comprehensive sleep evaluation and overnight polysomnography in an accredited sleep center after reporting symptoms suggesting disordered sleep or an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score ≥ 10. Epworth score, sleep parameters, comorbid conditions, and narcotic use were reviewed and compared in patients with and without sleep disordered breathing. SCD complication rates in the two groups also were compared. Results: In adult SCD patients who underwent overnight polysomnography, we report a high prevalence (44%) of sleep disordered breathing. Disease severity was mild to moderate (mean apnea-hypopnea index = 17/h (95% CI: 10–24/h). Concomitant sleep disorders, including insomnia complaints (57%) and delayed sleep-phase syndrome (57%), also were common in this population. In this limited cohort, we did not find increased SCD complications associated with sleep disordered breathing in adult patients with sickle cell disease. Conclusions: A high burden of sleep disordered breathing and other sleep-related complaints were identified in the adult sickle cell population. Our results provide important information on this unique population. Citation: Sharma S, Efird JT, Knupp C, Kadali R, Liles D, Shiue K, Boettger P, Quan SF. Sleep disorders in adult sickle cell patients. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):219–223. PMID:25515282

  16. Adult Stem Cell Responses to Nanostimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tsimbouri, Penelope M.

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both internal and external forces at the nanoscale level and this response of stem cells to nanostimuli is the focus of this review. PMID:26193326

  17. The role of vascular peroxidase 1 in ox-LDL-induced vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yixin; Xu, Qian; Peng, Haiyang; Liu, Zhaoya; Yang, Tianlun; Yu, Zaixin; Cheng, Guangjie; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Guogang; Shi, Ruizheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is associated with the pathogenesis of vascular calcification. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1), a peroxidase in the cardiovascular system, utilizes the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by co-expressed NADPH oxidases to produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and catalyze peroxidative reactions. The aim of this study was to determine whether VPO1 plays a role in the osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs in the setting of the vascular calcification induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). In cultured primary rat VSMCs, we observed that the expression of VPO1 was significantly increased in combination with increases in calcification, as demonstrated via increased mineralization, as well as increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in ox-LDL-treated cells. Ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification and Runx2 expression were both inhibited by knockdown of VPO1 using a small interfering RNA or by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, the knockdown of VPO1 in VSMCs suppressed the production of HOCl and the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK and P38 MAPK. Furthermore, HOCl treatment facilitated the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and P38 MAPK and the expression of Runx2, whereas LY294002 (a specific inhibitor of PI3K), U0126 (a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2) and SB203580 (a specific inhibitor of P38 MAPK) significantly attenuated the HOCl-induced up-regulation of Runx2. Collectively, these results demonstrated that VPO1 promotes ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification via the VPO1/HOCl/PI3K/AKT, ERK1/2, and P38 MAPK/Runx2 signaling pathways. PMID:26520887

  18. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lisa B.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  19. Adult Stem Cells and Diseases of Aging.

    PubMed

    Boyette, Lisa B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-01-21

    Preservation of adult stem cells pools is critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis into old age. Exhaustion of adult stem cell pools as a result of deranged metabolic signaling, premature senescence as a response to oncogenic insults to the somatic genome, and other causes contribute to tissue degeneration with age. Both progeria, an extreme example of early-onset aging, and heritable longevity have provided avenues to study regulation of the aging program and its impact on adult stem cell compartments. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the effects of aging on stem cells, contributions of stem cells to age-related pathologies, examples of signaling pathways at work in these processes, and lessons about cellular aging gleaned from the development and refinement of cellular reprogramming technologies. We highlight emerging therapeutic approaches to manipulation of key signaling pathways corrupting or exhausting adult stem cells, as well as other approaches targeted at maintaining robust stem cell pools to extend not only lifespan but healthspan. PMID:24757526

  20. 28. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Henningson, Carl T; Stanislaus, Marisha A; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2003-02-01

    Stem cells are characterized by the ability to remain undifferentiated and to self-renew. Embryonic stem cells derived from blastocysts are pluripotent (able to differentiate into many cell types). Adult stem cells, which were traditionally thought to be monopotent multipotent, or tissue restricted, have recently also been shown to have pluripotent properties. Adult bone marrow stem cells have been shown to be capable of differentiating into skeletal muscle, brain microglia and astroglia, and hepatocytes. Stem cell lines derived from both embryonic stem and embryonic germ cells (from the embryonic gonadal ridge) are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal for long periods. Therefore embryonic stem and germ cells have been widely investigated for their potential to cure diseases by repairing or replacing damaged cells and tissues. Studies in animal models have shown that transplantation of fetal, embryonic stem, or embryonic germ cells may be able to treat some chronic diseases. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the use of stem cells as therapeutic agents for three such diseases: Diabetes, Parkinson disease, and congestive heart failure. We also discuss the potential use of stem cells as gene therapy delivery cells and the scientific and ethical issues that arise with the use of human stem cells. PMID:12592319

  1. RNAi targeting multiple cell adhesion molecules reduces immune cell recruitment and vascular inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Dutta, Partha; Dahlman, James E; Hulsmans, Maarten; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Heidt, Timo; Vinegoni, Claudio; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F; Kauffman, Kevin J; Xing, Yiping; Shaw, Taylor E; Libby, Peter; Langer, Robert; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Anderson, Daniel G; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) leads to a systemic surge of vascular inflammation in mice and humans, resulting in secondary ischemic complications and high mortality. We show that, in ApoE(-/-) mice with coronary ligation, increased sympathetic tone up-regulates not only hematopoietic leukocyte production but also plaque endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. To counteract the resulting arterial leukocyte recruitment, we developed nanoparticle-based RNA interference (RNAi) that effectively silences five key adhesion molecules. Simultaneously encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting intercellular cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (Icam1 and Icam2), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (Vcam1), and E- and P-selectins (Sele and Selp) into polymeric endothelial-avid nanoparticles reduced post-MI neutrophil and monocyte recruitment into atherosclerotic lesions and decreased matrix-degrading plaque protease activity. Five-gene combination RNAi also curtailed leukocyte recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Therefore, targeted multigene silencing may prevent complications after acute MI. PMID:27280687

  2. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease. PMID:19960544

  3. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  4. Gastrodin inhibits cell proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells and attenuates neointima formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, LIHUA; GUAN, HONGJING; CUI, CHANGPING; TIAN, SONG; YANG, DA; WANG, XINAN; ZHANG, SHUMING; WANG, LANG; JIANG, HONG

    2012-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation plays a critical role in the development of vascular diseases. In the present study, we tested the efficacy and the mechanisms of action of gastrodin, a bioactive component of the Chinese herb Gastrodia elata Bl, in relation to platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-dependent cell proliferation and neointima formation after acute vascular injury. Cell experiments were performed with VSMCs isolated from rat aortas. WST and BrdU incorporation assays were used to evaluate VSMC proliferation. Eight-week-old C57BL/6 mice were used for the animal experiments. Gastrodin (150 mg/kg/day) was administered in the animal chow for 14 days, and the mice were subjected to wire injury of the left carotid artery. Our data demonstrated that gastrodin attenuated the VSMC proliferation induced by PDGF-BB, as assessed by WST assay and BrdU incorporation. Gastrodin influenced the S-phase entry of VSMCs and stabilised p27Kip1 expression. In addition, pre-incubation with sinomenine prior to PDGF-BB stimulation led to increased smooth muscle-specific gene expression, thereby inhibiting VSMC dedifferentiation. Gastrodin treatment also reduced the intimal area and the number of PCNA-positive cells. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, Akt and GSK3β was suppressed by gastrodin. Our results suggest that gastrodin can inhibit VSMC proliferation and attenuate neointimal hyperplasia in response to vascular injury. Furthermore, the ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β signalling pathways were found to be involved in the effects of gastrodin. PMID:22922870

  5. Nonhematopoietic Nrf2 dominantly impedes adult progression of sickle cell anemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Samit; Ihunnah, Chibueze A.; Hazra, Rimi; Walker, Aisha L.; Hansen, Jason M.; Archer, David R.; Owusu-Ansah, Amma T.; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of organ damage and early death in young adults is a major clinical concern in sickle cell disease (SCD). However, mechanisms that control adult progression of SCD during the transition from adolescence are poorly defined with no cognate prophylaxis. Here, we demonstrate in a longitudinal cohort of homozygous SCD (SS) mice a link between intravascular hemolysis, vascular inflammation, lung injury, and early death. Prophylactic Nrf2 activation in young SS mice stabilized intravascular hemolysis, reversed vascular inflammation, and attenuated lung edema in adulthood. Enhanced Nrf2 activation in endothelial cells in vitro concurred with the dramatic effect on vascular inflammation in the mice. BM chimeric SS mice lacking Nrf2 expression in nonhematopoietic tissues were created to dissect the role of nonerythroid Nrf2 in SCD progression. The SS chimeras developed severe intravascular hemolysis despite having erythroid Nrf2. In addition, they developed premature vascular inflammation and pulmonary edema and died younger than donor littermates with intact nonhematopoietic Nrf2. Our results reveal a dominant protective role for nonhematopoietic Nrf2 against tissue damage in both erythroid and nonerythroid tissues in SCD. Furthermore, we show that prophylactic augmentation of Nrf2-coordinated cytoprotection effectively impedes onset of the severe adult phenotype of SCD in mice. PMID:27158670

  6. Exercise-induced changes of cerebrospinal fluid vascular endothelial growth factor in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Shanahan, Kaitlyn J; Shriver, Leah P; Luciano, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a growth factor demonstrated to be a key factor in cerebral angiogenesis and neurogenesis. It has been considered a critical component in hippocampus neurogenesis and memory formation and has been observed to increase in the rat hippocampus after exercise. We previously found increased VEGF levels in experimental chronic hydrocephalus in several brain areas and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), suggesting a role in the adaption to chronic hypoxia. Here we investigate the ability of moderate exercise to increase CSF-VEGF levels in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients. Lumbar CSF samples were collected from 17 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. During CSF collection, 11 patients (exercise group) underwent a standard in-room occupational therapy session; six patients (no-exercise group) did not undergo a physical therapy session. CSF-VEGF levels were evaluated for increase related to exercise and the clinical response to CSF drainage. CSF-VEGF levels in the exercise group demonstrated significant increases 1-3 hours post-exercise compared with the levels 1-2 hours pre-exercise (p=0.04), and also showed significantly higher levels than the no-exercise groups (p=0.03). The post-exercise CSF-VEGF level in the group that did not clinically improve was significantly higher than both their own pre-exercise level (p=0.02) and that seen in the clinically improving group (p=0.05) after exercise. We conclude that CSF-VEGF levels can increase after moderate exercise even in elderly hydrocephalus patients. This suggests that a potential benefit of exercise, especially in CSF drainage non-improved patients, may exist via a central VEGF mechanism. PMID:26498093

  7. The short and long of noncoding sequences in the control of vascular cell phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    The two principal cell types of importance for normal vessel wall physiology are smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Much progress has been made over the past 20 years in the discovery and function of transcription factors that coordinate proper differentiation of these cells and the maintenance of vascular homeostasis. More recently, the converging fields of bioinformatics, genomics, and next generation sequencing have accelerated discoveries in a number of classes of noncoding sequences, including transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), microRNA genes, and long noncoding RNA genes, each of which mediates vascular cell differentiation through a variety of mechanisms. Alterations in the nucleotide sequence of key TFBS or deviations in transcription of noncoding RNA genes likely have adverse effects on normal vascular cell phenotype and function. Here, the subject of noncoding sequences that influence smooth muscle cell or endothelial cell phenotype will be summarized as will future directions to further advance our understanding of the increasingly complex molecular circuitry governing normal vascular cell differentiation and how such information might be harnessed to combat vascular diseases. PMID:26022065

  8. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; De Palma, Michele

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  9. The short and long of noncoding sequences in the control of vascular cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Miano, Joseph M; Long, Xiaochun

    2015-09-01

    The two principal cell types of importance for normal vessel wall physiology are smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Much progress has been made over the past 20 years in the discovery and function of transcription factors that coordinate proper differentiation of these cells and the maintenance of vascular homeostasis. More recently, the converging fields of bioinformatics, genomics, and next generation sequencing have accelerated discoveries in a number of classes of noncoding sequences, including transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), microRNA genes, and long noncoding RNA genes, each of which mediates vascular cell differentiation through a variety of mechanisms. Alterations in the nucleotide sequence of key TFBS or deviations in transcription of noncoding RNA genes likely have adverse effects on normal vascular cell phenotype and function. Here, the subject of noncoding sequences that influence smooth muscle cell or endothelial cell phenotype will be summarized as will future directions to further advance our understanding of the increasingly complex molecular circuitry governing normal vascular cell differentiation and how such information might be harnessed to combat vascular diseases. PMID:26022065

  10. Tissue-Engineered Vascular Rings from Human iPSC-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dash, Biraja C; Levi, Karen; Schwan, Jonas; Luo, Jiesi; Bartulos, Oscar; Wu, Hongwei; Qiu, Caihong; Yi, Ting; Ren, Yongming; Campbell, Stuart; Rolle, Marsha W; Qyang, Yibing

    2016-07-12

    There is an urgent need for an efficient approach to obtain a large-scale and renewable source of functional human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to establish robust, patient-specific tissue model systems for studying the pathogenesis of vascular disease, and for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we have derived a large quantity of highly enriched functional VSMCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-VSMCs). Furthermore, we have engineered 3D tissue rings from hiPSC-VSMCs using a facile one-step cellular self-assembly approach. The tissue rings are mechanically robust and can be used for vascular tissue engineering and disease modeling of supravalvular aortic stenosis syndrome. Our method may serve as a model system, extendable to study other vascular proliferative diseases for drug screening. Thus, this report describes an exciting platform technology with broad utility for manufacturing cell-based tissues and materials for various biomedical applications. PMID:27411102

  11. Adult neural stem cells stake their ground

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel A.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The birth of new neurons in the walls of the adult brain lateral ventricles has captured the attention of many neuroscientists for over two decades, yielding key insights into the identity and regulation of neural stem cells (NSCs). In the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), NSCs are a specialized form of astrocyte that generates several types of neurons for the olfactory bulb. Here we discuss recent findings regarding the unique organization of the V-SVZ NSCs niche, the multiple regulatory controls of neuronal production, the distinct regional identities of adult NSCs, and the epigenetic mechanisms that maintain adult neurogenesis. Understanding how V-SVZ NSCs establish and maintain lifelong neurogenesis continues to provide surprising insights into the cellular and molecular regulation of neural development. PMID:25223700

  12. Augmented Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness and Adhesion when Hypertension is Superimposed on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C.; Hill, Michael A.; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most prior studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells compared to the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16 wks) and old (64 wks) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats, compared to young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats, compared to age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats vs. Wistar-Kyoto rats. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. This supports the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging. PMID:25452471

  13. Cell-based computational modeling of vascular morphogenesis using Tissue Simulation Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Daub, Josephine T; Merks, Roeland M H

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling has become a widely used tool for unraveling the mechanisms of higher level cooperative cell behavior during vascular morphogenesis. However, experimenting with published simulation models or adding new assumptions to those models can be daunting for novice and even for experienced computational scientists. Here, we present a step-by-step, practical tutorial for building cell-based simulations of vascular morphogenesis using the Tissue Simulation Toolkit (TST). The TST is a freely available, open-source C++ library for developing simulations with the two-dimensional cellular Potts model, a stochastic, agent-based framework to simulate collective cell behavior. We will show the basic use of the TST to simulate and experiment with published simulations of vascular network formation. Then, we will present step-by-step instructions and explanations for building a recent simulation model of tumor angiogenesis. Demonstrated mechanisms include cell-cell adhesion, chemotaxis, cell elongation, haptotaxis, and haptokinesis. PMID:25468600

  14. Adipose-derived stem cell differentiation as a basic tool for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Huber, Birgit; Kluger, Petra J

    2016-01-01

    The development of in vitro adipose tissue constructs is highly desired to cope with the increased demand for substitutes to replace damaged soft tissue after high graded burns, deformities or tumor removal. To achieve clinically relevant dimensions, vascularization of soft tissue constructs becomes inevitable but still poses a challenge. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) represent a promising cell source for the setup of vascularized fatty tissue constructs as they can be differentiated into adipocytes and endothelial cells in vitro and are thereby available in sufficiently high cell numbers. This review summarizes the currently known characteristics of ASCs and achievements in adipogenic and endothelial differentiation in vitro. Further, the interdependency of adipogenesis and angiogenesis based on the crosstalk of endothelial cells, stem cells and adipocytes is addressed at the molecular level. Finally, achievements and limitations of current co-culture conditions for the construction of vascularized adipose tissue are evaluated. PMID:26976717

  15. Tissue engineering using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eberli, Daniel; Atala, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Patients with a variety of diseases may be treated with transplanted tissues and organs. However, there is a shortage of donor tissues and organs, which is worsening yearly because of the aging population. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering are applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. The stem cell field is also advancing rapidly, opening new options for cellular therapy and tissue engineering. The use of adult stem cells for tissue engineering applications is promising. This chapter discusses applications of these new technologies for the engineering of tissues and organs. The first part provides an overview of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering techniques; the second highlights different adult stem cell populations used for tissue regeneration. PMID:17161702

  16. Epigenetic regulation in adult stem cells and cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate to distinct cell types. Multiple signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles as extrinsic cues in maintaining adult stem cell identity and activity. Recent studies also show dynamic regulation by epigenetic mechanisms as intrinsic factors in multiple adult stem cell lineages. Emerging evidence demonstrates intimate crosstalk between these two mechanisms. Misregulation of adult stem cell activity could lead to tumorigenesis, and it has been proposed that cancer stem cells may be responsible for tumor growth and metastasis. However, it is unclear whether cancer stem cells share commonalities with normal adult stem cells. In this review, we will focus on recent discoveries of epigenetic regulation in multiple adult stem cell lineages. We will also discuss how epigenetic mechanisms regulate cancer stem cell activity and probe the common and different features between cancer stem cells and normal adult stem cells. PMID:24172544

  17. Pulmonary vascular and right ventricular dysfunction in adult critical care: current and emerging options for management: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary vascular dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension (PH), and resulting right ventricular (RV) failure occur in many critical illnesses and may be associated with a worse prognosis. PH and RV failure may be difficult to manage: principles include maintenance of appropriate RV preload, augmentation of RV function, and reduction of RV afterload by lowering pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). We therefore provide a detailed update on the management of PH and RV failure in adult critical care. Methods A systematic review was performed, based on a search of the literature from 1980 to 2010, by using prespecified search terms. Relevant studies were subjected to analysis based on the GRADE method. Results Clinical studies of intensive care management of pulmonary vascular dysfunction were identified, describing volume therapy, vasopressors, sympathetic inotropes, inodilators, levosimendan, pulmonary vasodilators, and mechanical devices. The following GRADE recommendations (evidence level) are made in patients with pulmonary vascular dysfunction: 1) A weak recommendation (very-low-quality evidence) is made that close monitoring of the RV is advised as volume loading may worsen RV performance; 2) A weak recommendation (low-quality evidence) is made that low-dose norepinephrine is an effective pressor in these patients; and that 3) low-dose vasopressin may be useful to manage patients with resistant vasodilatory shock. 4) A weak recommendation (low-moderate quality evidence) is made that low-dose dobutamine improves RV function in pulmonary vascular dysfunction. 5) A strong recommendation (moderate-quality evidence) is made that phosphodiesterase type III inhibitors reduce PVR and improve RV function, although hypotension is frequent. 6) A weak recommendation (low-quality evidence) is made that levosimendan may be useful for short-term improvements in RV performance. 7) A strong recommendation (moderate-quality evidence) is made that pulmonary vasodilators

  18. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells. PMID:26769966

  19. Calcifying circulating cells: an uncharted area in the setting of vascular calcification in CKD patients.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, Giuseppe; Capelli, Irene; Cappuccilli, Maria; Schillaci, Roberto; Cozzolino, Mario; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    Vascular calcification, occurring during late-stage vascular and valvular disease, is highly associated with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD), representing a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The hallmark of vascular calcification, which involves both media and intima, is represented by the activation of cells committed to an osteogenic programme. Several studies have analysed the role of circulating calcifying cells (CCCs) in vascular calcification. CCCs are bone marrow (BM)-derived cells with an osteogenic phenotype, participating in intima calcification processes and defined by osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase expression. The identification of CCCs in diabetes and atherosclerosis is the most recent, intriguing and yet uncharted chapter in the scenario of the bone-vascular axis. Whether osteogenic shift occurs in the BM, the bloodstream or both, is not known, and also the factors promoting CCC formation have not been identified. However, it is possible to recognize a common pathogenic commitment of inflammation in atherosclerosis and diabetes, in which metabolic control may also have a role. Currently available studies in patients without CKD did not find an association of CCCs with markers of bone metabolism. Preliminary data on CKD patients indicate an implication of mineral bone disease in vascular calcification, as a consequence of functional and anatomic integrity interruption of BM niches. Given the pivotal role that parathyroid hormone and osteoblasts play in regulating expansion, mobilization and homing of haematopoietic stem/progenitors cells, CKD-MBD could promote CCC formation. PMID:26985381

  20. Emerging roles for vascular smooth muscle cell exosomes in calcification and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A N; Shanahan, C M

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to 'synthetic' state contributes to vascular pathologies including restenosis, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. We have recently found that the secretion of exosomes is a feature of 'synthetic' VSMCs and that exosomes are novel players in vascular repair processes as well as pathological vascular thrombosis and calcification. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors as well as mineral imbalance stimulate exosome secretion by VSMCs, most likely by the activation of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3) and cytoskeletal remodelling. Calcium stress induces dramatic changes in VSMC exosome composition and accumulation of phosphatidylserine (PS), annexin A6 and matrix metalloproteinase-2, which converts exosomes into a nidus for calcification. In addition, by presenting PS, VSMC exosomes can also provide the catalytic surface for the activation of coagulation factors. Recent data showing that VSMC exosomes are loaded with proteins and miRNA regulating cell adhesion and migration highlight VSMC exosomes as potentially important communication messengers in vascular repair. Thus, the identification of signalling pathways regulating VSMC exosome secretion, including activation of SMPD3 and cytoskeletal rearrangements, opens up novel avenues for a deeper understanding of vascular remodelling processes. PMID:26864864

  1. Aescin protection of human vascular endothelial cells exposed to cobalt chloride mimicked hypoxia and inflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Montopoli, Monica; Froldi, Guglielmina; Comelli, Maria Cristina; Prosdocimi, Marco; Caparrotta, Laura

    2007-03-01

    Human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to CoCl2 as an in vitro model of hypoxia. Expression of VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule), reduction of PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) and cytoskeletal changes without alterations in cell viability were observed. HUVECs were also exposed to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccaride (LPS) as an in vitro model of inflammation: significant IL-6 release was measured. Pre-treatment of HUVECs with aescin prevented, in a concentration-dependent fashion (0.1-1 microM), the action of CoCl2 on VCAM-1 and PECAM-1, also preserving endothelial cell morphology. Furthermore, aescin pre-treatment reduced IL-6 release from LPS-activated vascular endothelium. PMID:17310430

  2. Biomechanical regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell functions: from in vitro to in vivo understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Hu, Jianjun; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Guixue

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) have critical functions in vascular diseases. Haemodynamic factors are important regulators of VSMC functions in vascular pathophysiology. VSMCs are physiologically active in the three-dimensional matrix and interact with the shear stress sensor of endothelial cells (ECs). The purpose of this review is to illustrate how haemodynamic factors regulate VSMC functions under two-dimensional conditions in vitro or three-dimensional co-culture conditions in vivo. Recent advances show that high shear stress induces VSMC apoptosis through endothelial-released nitric oxide and low shear stress upregulates VSMC proliferation and migration through platelet-derived growth factor released by ECs. This differential regulation emphasizes the need to construct more actual environments for future research on vascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis and hypertension) and cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:24152813

  3. Qingxuan Jiangya Decoction Reverses Vascular Remodeling by Inducing Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; He, Fei; Chen, Hongwei; Lin, Shan; Shen, Aling; Chen, Youqin; Chu, Jianfeng; Peng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Qingxuan Jiangya Decoction (QXJYD), a traditional Chinese medicine formula prescribed by academician Ke-ji Chen, has been used in China to clinically treat hypertension for decades of years. However, the molecular mechanisms of its action remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the therapeutic efficacy of QXJYD against elevated systolic blood pressure in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that oral administration of QXJYD significantly reduced the elevation of systolic blood pressure in SHR but had no effect on body weight change. Additionally, QXJYD treatment significantly decreased the media thickness and ratio of media thickness/lumen diameter in the carotid arteries of SHR. Moreover, QXJYD remarkably promoted apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells and reduced the expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2. Furthermore, QXJYD significantly decreased the plasma Angiotensin II level in SHR. Collectively, our findings suggest that reversing vascular remodeling via inducing VSMC apoptosis could be one of the mechanisms whereby QXJYD treats hypertension. PMID:27455221

  4. Isolation and differentiation of stromal vascular cells to beige/brite cells.

    PubMed

    Aune, Ulrike Liisberg; Ruiz, Lauren; Kajimura, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipocytes have the ability to uncouple the respiratory chain in mitochondria and dissipate chemical energy as heat. Development of UCP1-positive brown adipocytes in white adipose tissues (so called beige or brite cells) is highly induced by a variety of environmental cues such as chronic cold exposure or by PPARγ agonists, therefore, this cell type has potential as a therapeutic target for obesity treatment. Although most immortalized adipocyte lines cannot recapitulate the process of "browning" of white fat in culture, primary adipocytes isolated from stromal vascular fraction in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) provide a reliable cellular system to study the molecular control of beige/brite cell development. Here we describe a protocol for effective isolation of primary preadipocytes and for inducing differentiation to beige/brite cells in culture. The browning effect can be assessed by the expression of brown fat-selective markers such as UCP1. PMID:23568137

  5. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  6. Myeloid Cell 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein Modulates the Response to Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhou; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Miwa, Takashi; Liu, Shulin; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Landersberg, Gavin; Jones, Peter L.; Scalia, Rosario; Song, Wenchao; Assoian, Richard K.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Human genetics have implicated the 5- lipoxygenase (5-LO) enzyme in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and an inhibitor of the 5-LO activating protein (FLAP) is in clinical development for asthma. Objective Here we determined whether FLAP deletion modifies the response to vascular injury. Methods and Results Vascular remodeling was characterized 4 weeks after femoral arterial injury in FLAP knockout (FLAP KO) mice and wild type (WT) controls. Both neointimal hyperplasia and the intima/media ratio of the injured artery were significantly reduced in the FLAP KOs while endothelial integrity was preserved. Lesional myeloid cells were depleted and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, as reflected by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, was markedly attenuated by FLAP deletion. Inflammatory cytokine release from FLAP KO macrophages was depressed and their restricted ability to induce VSMC migration ex vivo was rescued with leukotriene B4 (LTB4). FLAP deletion restrained injury and attenuated upregulation of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin C (TNC), which affords a scaffold for VSMC migration. Correspondingly, the phenotypic modulation of VSMC to a more synthetic phenotype, reflected by morphological change, loss of α-smooth muscle cell actin and upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) -1 was also suppressed in FLAP KO mice. Transplantation of FLAP replete myeloid cells rescued the proliferative response to vascular injury. Conclusion Expression of lesional FLAP in myeloid cells promotes LTB4 dependent VSMC phenotypic modulation, intimal migration and proliferation. PMID:23250985

  7. Early diagnosis of diabetic vascular complications: impairment of red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sehyun; Ku, Yunhee; Park, Cheol-Woo; Suh, Jang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Reduced deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) may play an important role on the pathogenesis of chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. However, available techniques for measuring RBC deformability often require washing process after each measurement, which is not optimal for day-to-day clinical use at point of care. The objectives of the present study are to develop a device and to delineate the correlation of impaired RBC deformability with diabetic nephropathy. We developed a disposable ektacytometry to measure RBC deformability, which adopted a laser diffraction technique and slit rheometry. The essential features of this design are its simplicity (ease of operation and no moving parts) and a disposable element which is in contact with the blood sample. We studied adult diabetic patients divided into three groups according to diabetic complications. Group I comprised 57 diabetic patients with normal renal function. Group II comprised 26 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Group III consisted of 30 diabetic subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. According to the renal function for the diabetic groups, matched non-diabetic groups were served as control. We found substantially impaired red blood cell deformability in those with normal renal function (group I) compared to non-diabetic control (P = 0.0005). As renal function decreases, an increased impairment in RBC deformability was found. Diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (group II) when compared to non-diabetic controls (CRF) had an apparently greater impairment in RBC deformability (P = 0.07). The non-diabetic cohort (CRF), on the other hand, manifested significant impairment in red blood cell deformability compared to healthy control (P = 0.0001). The newly developed slit ektacytometer can measure the RBC deformability with ease and accuracy. In addition, progressive impairment in cell deformability is associated with renal function loss in all

  8. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  9. Impairment of endothelial progenitor cell function and vascularization capacity by aldosterone in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Thum, Thomas; Schmitter, Kerstin; Fleissner, Felix; Wiebking, Volker; Dietrich, Bernd; Widder, Julian D.; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Hahner, Stefanie; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Aims Hyperaldosteronism is associated with vascular injury and increased cardiovascular events. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in endothelial repair and vascular homeostasis. We hypothesized that hyperaldosteronism impairs EPC function and vascularization capacity in mice and humans. Methods and results We characterized the effects of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade on EPC number and function as well as vascularization capacity and endothelial function. Treatment of human EPC with aldosterone induced translocation of the MR and impaired multiple cellular functions of EPC, such as differentiation, migration, and proliferation in vitro. Impaired EPC function was rescued by pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of the MR. Aldosterone protein kinase A (PKA) dependently increased reactive oxygen species formation in EPC. Aldosterone infusion in mice impaired EPC function, EPC homing to vascular structures and vascularization capacity in a MR-dependent but blood pressure-independent manner. Endothelial progenitor cells from patients with primary hyperaldosteronism compared with controls of similar age displayed reduced migratory potential. Impaired EPC function was associated with endothelial dysfunction. MR blockade in patients with hyperaldosteronism improved EPC function and arterial stiffness. Conclusion Endothelial progenitor cells express a MR that mediates functional impairment by PKA-dependent increase of reactive oxygen species. Normalization of EPC function may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the beneficial effects of MR blockade in cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment. PMID:20926363

  10. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoling; Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao; Zhao, Yunhui; Fan, Yubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ. PMID:27524062

  11. Stem cell differentiation on electrospun nanofibrous substrates for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Qin, Xiaohong; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-12-01

    Nanotechnology has enabled the engineering of a variety of materials to meet the current challenges and requirements in vascular tissue regeneration. In our study, poly-L-lactide (PLLA) and hybrid PLLA/collagen (PLLA/Coll) nanofibers (3:1 and 1:1) with fiber diameters of 210 to 430 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. Their morphological, chemical and mechanical characterizations were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), and tensile instrument, respectively. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on electrospun nanofibers that are capable of differentiating into vascular cells have great potential for repair of the vascular system. We investigated the potential of MSCs for vascular cell differentiation in vitro on electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibrous scaffolds using endothelial differentiation media. After 20 days of culture, MSC proliferation on PLLA/Coll(1:1) scaffolds was found 256% higher than the cell proliferation on PLLA scaffolds. SEM images showed that the MSC differentiated endothelial cells on PLLA/Coll scaffolds showed cobblestone morphology in comparison to the fibroblastic type of undifferentiated MSCs. The functionality of the cells in the presence of 'endothelial induction media', was further demonstrated from the immunocytochemical analysis, where the MSCs on PLLA/Coll (1:1) scaffolds differentiated to endothelial cells and expressed the endothelial cell specific proteins such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31) and Von Willebrand factor (vWF). From the results of the SEM analysis and protein expression studies, we concluded that the electrospun PLLA/Coll nanofibers could mimic the native vascular ECM environment and might be promising substrates for potential application towards vascular regeneration. PMID:24094171

  12. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington's epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington's theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality. PMID:25973327

  13. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease. PMID:20809708

  14. Investigation of Tumor Cell Behaviors on a Vascular Microenvironment-Mimicking Microfluidic Chip

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong; Zheng, Wenfu; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Long, Yunze; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    The extravasation of tumor cells is a key event in tumor metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying tumor cell extravasation remains unknown, mainly hindered by obstacles from the lack of complexity of biological tissues in conventional cell culture, and the costliness and ethical issues of in vivo experiments. Thus, a cheap, time and labor saving, and most of all, vascular microenvironment-mimicking research model is desirable. Herein, we report a microfluidic chip-based tumor extravasation research model which is capable of simultaneously simulating both mechanical and biochemical microenvironments of human vascular systems and analyzing their synergistic effects on the tumor extravasation. Under different mechanical conditions of the vascular system, the tumor cells (HeLa cells) had the highest viability and adhesion activity in the microenvironment of the capillary. The integrity of endothelial cells (ECs) monolayer was destroyed by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a hemodynamic background, which facilitated the tumor cell adhesion, this situation was recovered by the administration of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs). This model bridges the gap between cell culture and animal experiments and is a promising platform for studying tumor behaviors in the vascular system. PMID:26631692

  15. Investigation of Tumor Cell Behaviors on a Vascular Microenvironment-Mimicking Microfluidic Chip.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Zheng, Wenfu; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Long, Yunze; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    The extravasation of tumor cells is a key event in tumor metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying tumor cell extravasation remains unknown, mainly hindered by obstacles from the lack of complexity of biological tissues in conventional cell culture, and the costliness and ethical issues of in vivo experiments. Thus, a cheap, time and labor saving, and most of all, vascular microenvironment-mimicking research model is desirable. Herein, we report a microfluidic chip-based tumor extravasation research model which is capable of simultaneously simulating both mechanical and biochemical microenvironments of human vascular systems and analyzing their synergistic effects on the tumor extravasation. Under different mechanical conditions of the vascular system, the tumor cells (HeLa cells) had the highest viability and adhesion activity in the microenvironment of the capillary. The integrity of endothelial cells (ECs) monolayer was destroyed by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a hemodynamic background, which facilitated the tumor cell adhesion, this situation was recovered by the administration of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs). This model bridges the gap between cell culture and animal experiments and is a promising platform for studying tumor behaviors in the vascular system. PMID:26631692

  16. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Laila C; Jeffs, Sydney E; Witt, Amber S; Gill, Bartley J; West, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm(2), circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  17. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  18. Adult stem cells in the knifefish cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Sîrbulescu, Ruxandra F; Ilieş, Iulian; Vitalo, Antonia G; Trull, Krystal; Zhu, Jenny; Traniello, Ian M; Zupanc, Günther K H

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been described in dozens of brain regions in teleost fish, with the largest number of new neurons being generated in the cerebellum. Here, we characterized the cerebellar neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the brown ghost knifefish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus), an established model system of adult neurogenesis. The majority of the new cerebellar cells arise from neurogenic niches located medially, at the interface of the dorsal/ventral molecular layers and the granular layer. NSPCs within these niches give rise to transit-amplifying progenitors which populate the molecular layer, where they continue to proliferate during their migration toward target areas in the granular layer. At any given time, the majority of proliferating cells are located in the molecular layer. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the stem cell markers Sox2, Meis1/2/3, Islet1, and, to a lesser extent, Pax6, are widely expressed in all regions of the adult cerebellum. A large subpopulation of these NSPCs coexpress S100, GFAP, and/or vimentin, indicating astrocytic identity. This is further supported by the specific effect of the gliotoxin l-methionine sulfoximine, which leads to a targeted decrease in the number of GFAP+ cells that coexpress Sox2 or the proliferation marker PCNA. Pulse-chase analysis of the label size associated with new cells after administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine demonstrated that, on average, two additional cell divisions occur after completion of the initial mitotic cycle. Overall numbers of NSPCs in the cerebellum niches increase consistently over time, presumably in parallel with the continuous growth of the brain. PMID:25044932

  19. Highly Vascularized Primarily Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Omentum in an Adult Male: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chehade, Hiba Hassan El Hage; Zbibo, Riad Hassan; Hussein, Bassem Mahmoud Abou; Abtar, Houssam Khodor

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 38 Final Diagnosis: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor Symptoms: Abdominal pain • anorexia • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Operation Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Inflammatory pseudotumors can affect any organ, whereas primary omental tumors are very rare. A few cases have been reported in the literature, all affecting adult patients. They are usually difficult to diagnose preoperatively and pathology remains the criterion standard for diagnosis. Surgical resection is considered the first-line treatment in limited disease, whereas recurrent or metastatic disease is treated by re-excision. There is no role for chemo- or radio-therapy in limited disease. Here, we present a rare case of omental myofibroblastic tumor in an adult male. Case Report: A 38-year-old healthy man presented to our clinic complaining of lower abdominal pain associated with anorexia and low-grade fever, and he also reported weight loss. His initial hemoglobin was 9.7 g/dl. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an enhancing solid mass in the lower abdomen, with close proximity to the appendix and the urinary bladder. The patient was treated successfully with laparotomy and excision of the tumor. Histopathology of the mass revealed spindle cells of vague fascicular pattern. Further immunohistochemical staining showed presence of reaction for CD68, CD34, and ALK. No omental infiltration was noted. No adjuvant treatment was applied and the patient was free of disease after 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Omental pseudotumors are a rare pathology. They are usually slowly- growing, circumscribed tumors with a low malignant potential. They have a predilection for children. The overall mortality is reported to be 5–7% in cases with multiple recurrences. PMID:26867942

  20. Homing to solid cancers: a vascular checkpoint in adoptive cell therapy using CAR T-cells.

    PubMed

    Ager, Ann; Watson, H Angharad; Wehenkel, Sophie C; Mohammed, Rebar N

    2016-04-15

    The success of adoptive T-cell therapies for the treatment of cancer patients depends on transferred T-lymphocytes finding and infiltrating cancerous tissues. For intravenously transferred T-cells, this means leaving the bloodstream (extravasation) from tumour blood vessels. In inflamed tissues, a key event in extravasation is the capture, rolling and arrest of T-cells inside blood vessels which precedes transmigration across the vessel wall and entry into tissues. This depends on co-ordinated signalling of selectins, integrins and chemokine receptors on T-cells by their respective ligands which are up-regulated on inflamed blood vessels. Clinical data and experimental studies in mice suggest that tumour blood vessels are anergic to inflammatory stimuli and the recruitment of cytotoxic CD8(+)T-lymphocytes is not very efficient. Interestingly, and somewhat counter-intuitively, anti-angiogenic therapy can promote CD8(+)T-cell infiltration of tumours and increase the efficacy of adoptive CD8(+)T-cell therapy. Rather than inhibit tumour angiogenesis, anti-angiogenic therapy 'normalizes' (matures) tumour blood vessels by promoting pericyte recruitment, increasing tumour blood vessel perfusion and sensitizing tumour blood vessels to inflammatory stimuli. A number of different approaches are currently being explored to increase recruitment by manipulating the expression of homing-associated molecules on T-cells and tumour blood vessels. Future studies should address whether these approaches improve the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies for solid, vascularized cancers in patients. PMID:27068943

  1. A protocol for phenotypic detection and characterization of vascular cells of different origins in a lung neovascularization model in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rosemary C; Capen, Diane E; Cohen, Kenneth S; Munn, Lance L; Jain, Rakesh K; Duda, Dan G

    2009-01-01

    The goal of many current studies of neovascularization is to define the phenotype of vascular cell populations of different origins and to determine how such cells promote assembly of vascular channel. Here, we describe a protocol to immunophenotype vascular cells by high-resolution imaging and by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry in an in vivo rodent model of pulmonary microvascular remodeling. Analysis of cells by this combined approach will characterize their phenotype, quantify their number and identify their role in the assembly of vascular channels. PMID:18323810

  2. Deregulation of Flk-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in fibroblast growth factor receptor-1-deficient vascular stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Peetra; Rolny, Charlotte; Jakobsson, Lars; Wikner, Charlotte; Wu, Yan; Hicklin, Daniel J; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2004-03-15

    We have employed embryoid bodies derived from murine embryonal stem cells to study effects on vascular development induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor-1, in comparison to the established angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and its receptor VEGF receptor-2. Exogenous FGF-2 promoted formation of morphologically distinct, long slender vessels in the embryoid bodies, whereas VEGF-A-treated bodies displayed a compact plexus of capillaries. FGF-2 stimulation of embryonal stem cells under conditions where VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 function was blocked, led to formation of endothelial cell clusters, which failed to develop into vessels. FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies responded to VEGF-A by establishment of the characteristic vascular plexus, but FGF-2 had no effect on vascular development in the absence of FGFR-1. The FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies displayed considerably increased basal level of vessel formation, detected by immunohistochemical staining for platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31. This basal vascularization was blocked by neutralizing antibodies against VEGFR-2 or VEGF-A and biochemical analyses indicated changes in regulation of VEGFR-2 in the absence of FGFR-1 expression. We conclude that VEGF-A/VEGFR-2-dependent vessel formation occurs in the absence of FGF-2/FGFR-1, which, however, serve to modulate vascular development. PMID:15020678

  3. The stem cell marker prominin-1/CD133 interacts with vascular endothelial growth factor and potentiates its action.

    PubMed

    Adini, Avner; Adini, Irit; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Benny, Ofra; Pravda, Elke; Hu, Ron; Luyindula, Dema; D'Amato, Robert J

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1, a pentaspan transmembrane protein, is a unique cell surface marker commonly used to identify stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells and cancer stem cells. However, recent studies have shown that prominin-1 expression is not restricted to stem cells but also occurs in modified forms in many mature adult human cells. Although prominin-1 has been studied extensively as a stem cell marker, its physiological function of the protein has not been elucidated. We investigated prominin-1 function in two cell lines, primary human endothelial cells and B16-F10 melanoma cells, both of which express high levels of prominin-1. We found that prominin-1 directly interacts with the angiogenic and tumor survival factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in both the primary endothelial cells and the melanoma cells. Knocking down prominin-1 in the endothelial cells disrupted capillary formation in vitro and decreased angiogenesis in vivo. Similarly, tumors derived from prominin-1 knockdown melanoma cells had a reduced growth rate in vivo. Further, melanoma cells with knocked down prominin-1 had diminished ability to interact with VEGF, which was associated with decreased bcl-2 protein levels and increased apoptosis. In vitro studies with soluble prominin-1 showed that it stabilized dimer formation of VEGF164, but not VEGF121. Taken together, our findings support the notion that prominin-1 plays an active role in cell growth through its ability to interact and potentiate the anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic activities of VEGF. Additionally, prominin-1 promotes tumor growth by supporting angiogenesis and inhibiting tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:23150059

  4. Biphasic responses of human vascular smooth muscle cells to magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are promising in biodegradable cardiovascular stent applications. The degradation products of magnesium stents may have significant impacts on the surrounding vascular cells. However, knowledge on the interactions between magnesium ion and vascular cells at the molecular and cellular levels is still largely missing. Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of restenosis and wound healing after stent implantation. This study evaluated the short-term effects of extracellular magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) on the cellular behaviors of SMCs. Cellular responses to Mg(2+) were biphasic and in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10 mM) of Mg(2+) increased cell viability, cell proliferation rate, cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell migration rate, and actin expression. In contrast, higher concentrations (40-60 mM) of Mg(2+) had deleterious effects on cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that Mg(2+) altered the expressions of genes mostly related to cell adhesion, cell injury, angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and cell growth. Finding from this study provides some valuable information on SMC responses toward magnesium ions at the cellular and molecular levels, and guidance for future controlled release of magnesium from the stent material. PMID:26402437

  5. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fu; Chambon, Pierre; Tellides, George; Kong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  6. Growth Factor-Free Pre-vascularization of Cell Sheets for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marina; Pirraco, Rogério P; Cerqueira, Mariana T; Reis, Rui L; Marques, Alexandra P

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of tissue-engineered constructs is often compromised by inadequate inosculation and neo-vascularization. This problem is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the field and finding a solution is currently the focus of a great fraction of the research community. Many of the methodologies designed to address this issue propose the use of endothelial cells and angiogenic growth factors, or combinations of both, to accelerate neo-vascularization after transplantation. However, an adequate solution is still elusive. In this context, we describe a methodology that combines the use of the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) isolated from adipose tissue with low oxygen culture to produce pre-vascularized cell sheets as angiogenic tools for Tissue Engineering. The herein proposed approach takes advantage of the SVF angiogenic nature conferred by adipose stem cells, endothelial progenitors, endothelial and hematopoietic cells, and pericytes and further potentiates it using low oxygen, or hypoxic, culture. Freshly isolated nucleated SVF cells are cultured in hyperconfluent conditions under hypoxia (pO2 = 5 %) for up to 5 days in medium without extrinsic growth factors enabling the generation of contiguous sheets as described by the cell sheet engineering technique. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry allow confirming the phenotype of the different cell types composing the cell-sheets as well the organization of the CD31(+) cells in branched and highly complex tube-like structures. Overall, a simple and flexible approach to promote growth factor-free pre-vascularization of cell sheets for tissue engineering (TE) applications is described. PMID:27250706

  7. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  8. Glucose and Inflammatory Cells Decrease Adiponectin in Epicardial Adipose Tissue Cells: Paracrine Consequences on Vascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Trasancos, Ángel; Guerola-Segura, Raquel; Paradela-Dobarro, Beatriz; Álvarez, Ezequiel; García-Acuña, José María; Fernández, Ángel Luis; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Eiras, Sonia

    2016-05-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is a source of energy for heart that expresses the insulin-sensitizer, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic protein, adiponectin. But, in coronary artery disease, adiponectin production declines. Our objective was to determine its regulation by glucose and inflammation in stromal cells from EAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and its paracrine effect on endothelial cells. Stromal cells of EAT and SAT were obtained from patients who underwent cardiac surgery. Adipogenesis was induced at 117, 200, or 295 mg/dl glucose, with or without macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM). Expression of adiponectin, GLUT-4 and the insulin receptor was analyzed by real-time PCR. The paracrine effect of stromal cells was determined in co-cultures with endothelial cells, by exposing them to high glucose and/or MCM, and, additionally, to leukocyte-conditioned medium from patients with myocardial infarction. The endothelial response was determined by analyzing vascular adhesion molecule expression. Our results showed a U-shaped dose-response curve of glucose on adiponectin in EAT, but not in SAT stromal cells. Conversely, MCM reduced the adipogenesis-induced adiponectin expression of EAT stromal cells. The presence of EAT stromal increased the inflammatory molecules of endothelial cells. This deleterious effect was emphasized in the presence of inflammatory cell-conditioned medium from patients with myocardial infarction. Thus, high glucose and inflammatory cells reduced adipogenesis-induced adiponectin expression of EAT stromal cells, which induced an inflammatory paracrine process in endothelial cells. This inflammatory effect was lower in presence of mature adipocytes, producers of adiponectin. These results contribute to understanding the role of EAT dysfunction on coronary atherosclerosis progression. PMID:26406271

  9. Neutrophil AKT2 regulates heterotypic cell-cell interactions during vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Kim, Kyungho; Hahm, Eunsil; Molokie, Robert; Hay, Nissim; Gordeuk, Victor R; Du, Xiaoping; Cho, Jaehyung

    2014-04-01

    Interactions between platelets, leukocytes, and activated endothelial cells are important during microvascular occlusion; however, the regulatory mechanisms of these heterotypic cell-cell interactions remain unclear. Here, using intravital microscopy to evaluate mice lacking specific isoforms of the serine/threonine kinase AKT and bone marrow chimeras, we found that hematopoietic cell-associated AKT2 is important for neutrophil adhesion and crawling and neutrophil-platelet interactions on activated endothelial cells during TNF-α-induced venular inflammation. Studies with an AKT2-specific inhibitor and cells isolated from WT and Akt KO mice revealed that platelet- and neutrophil-associated AKT2 regulates heterotypic neutrophil-platelet aggregation under shear conditions. In particular, neutrophil AKT2 was critical for membrane translocation of αMβ2 integrin, β2-talin1 interaction, and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. We found that the basal phosphorylation levels of AKT isoforms were markedly increased in neutrophils and platelets isolated from patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), an inherited hematological disorder associated with vascular inflammation and occlusion. AKT2 inhibition reduced heterotypic aggregation of neutrophils and platelets isolated from SCD patients and diminished neutrophil adhesion and neutrophil-platelet aggregation in SCD mice, thereby improving blood flow rates. Our results provide evidence that neutrophil AKT2 regulates αMβ2 integrin function and suggest that AKT2 is important for neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil-platelet interactions under thromboinflammatory conditions such as SCD. PMID:24642468

  10. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  11. Transforming growth factor beta 1 and hyaluronan oligomers synergistically enhance elastin matrix regeneration by vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R; Taylor, Patricia M; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Yacoub, Magdi H; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2009-03-01

    Elastin is a vital structural and regulatory matrix protein that plays an important role in conferring elasticity to blood vessel wall. Previous tissue engineering approaches to regenerate elastin in situ or within tissue engineering constructs are curtailed by innate poor elastin synthesis potential by adult vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Currently, we seek to develop cellular cues to enhance tropoelastin synthesis and improve elastin matrix yield, stability, and ultrastructure. Our earlier studies attest to the elastogenic utility of hyaluronan (HA)-based cellular cues, though their effects are fragment size dependent and dose dependent, with HA oligomers deemed most elastogenic. We presently show transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1) and HA oligomers, when provided concurrently, to synergistically and dramatically improve elastin matrix regeneration by adult vascular SMCs. Together, these cues suppress SMC proliferation, enhance synthesis of tropoelastin (8-fold) and matrix elastin protein (5.5-fold), and also improve matrix elastin yield (45% of total elastin vs. 10% for nonadditive controls), possibly by more efficient recruitment of tropoelastin for crosslinking. The density of desmosine crosslinks within the elastin matrix was itself attenuated, although the cues together modestly increased production and activity of the elastin crosslinking enzyme, lysyl oxidase. TGF-beta1 and HA oligomers together induced much greater assembly of mature elastin fibers than they did separately, and did not induce matrix calcification. The present outcomes might be great utility to therapeutic regeneration of elastin matrix networks in situ within elastin-compromised vessels, and within tissue-engineered vascular graft replacements. PMID:18847364

  12. The cell cycle: A critical therapeutic target to prevent vascular proliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Thierry; Nili, Nafiseh; Strauss, Bradley H

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is the preferred revascularization approach for most patients with coronary artery disease. However, this strategy is limited by renarrowing of the vessel by neointimal hyperplasia within the stent lumen (in-stent restenosis). Vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation is a major component in this healing process. This process is mediated by multiple cytokines and growth factors, which share a common pathway in inducing cell proliferation: the cell cycle. The cell cycle is highly regulated by numerous mechanisms ensuring orderly and coordinated cell division. The present review discusses current concepts related to regulation of the cell cycle and new therapeutic options that target aspects of the cell cycle. PMID:16498512

  13. Progesterone induces adult mammary stem cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Purna A; Jackson, Hartland W; Beristain, Alexander G; Di Grappa, Marco A; Mote, Patricia A; Clarke, Christine L; Stingl, John; Waterhouse, Paul D; Khokha, Rama

    2010-06-10

    Reproductive history is the strongest risk factor for breast cancer after age, genetics and breast density. Increased breast cancer risk is entwined with a greater number of ovarian hormone-dependent reproductive cycles, yet the basis for this predisposition is unknown. Mammary stem cells (MaSCs) are located within a specialized niche in the basal epithelial compartment that is under local and systemic regulation. The emerging role of MaSCs in cancer initiation warrants the study of ovarian hormones in MaSC homeostasis. Here we show that the MaSC pool increases 14-fold during maximal progesterone levels at the luteal dioestrus phase of the mouse. Stem-cell-enriched CD49fhi cells amplify at dioestrus, or with exogenous progesterone, demonstrating a key role for progesterone in propelling this expansion. In aged mice, CD49fhi cells display stasis upon cessation of the reproductive cycle. Progesterone drives a series of events where luminal cells probably provide Wnt4 and RANKL signals to basal cells which in turn respond by upregulating their cognate receptors, transcriptional targets and cell cycle markers. Our findings uncover a dynamic role for progesterone in activating adult MaSCs within the mammary stem cell niche during the reproductive cycle, where MaSCs are putative targets for cell transformation events leading to breast cancer. PMID:20445538

  14. [Cryopreservation of vascular mixed cell for tissue engineering in cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Hibino, N; Shin'oka, T; Matsumura, G; Watanabe, M; Toyama, S; Imai, Y

    2001-06-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) is a new discipline that offers the potential to create replacement structures from autologous cells and biodegradable polymer scaffold. Various vascular and valvular grafts have been tried to create with this TE approach. In clinical use of this technique, harvested and cultured cells have to keep viability until implantation as tissue engineered tissue. But few research for cryopreservation of vascular mixed cells has been performed. So, we investigated the proper method for cryopreservation of vascular mixed cells harvested from femoral artery and vein of dogs. Cells were cultured and divide into three groups, A: cryopreserving in 5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), and fetal bovine serum (FBS) with -80 degrees C freezer; B: cryopreserving in 10% DMSO and FBS with programmed freezer; C: control (continuous culture in media). After rapid thawing at 40 degrees C, group A showed higher viability than group B with flow cytometry. The results means that vascular mixed cells can be successfully cryopreserved in the DMSO/HES mixture simply and inexpensively, without rate controlled freezing. PMID:11424498

  15. Electrospun PELCL membranes loaded with QK peptide for enhancement of vascular endothelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Zhou, Fang; Zhao, Yunhui; Jia, Xiaoling; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo

    2016-06-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering of small-diameter vascular grafts is to inhibit intimal hyperplasia and keep long-term patency after implantation. Rapid endothelialization of the grafts could be an effective approach. In this study, QK, a peptide mimicking vascular endothelial growth factor, was selected as the bioactive substrate and loaded in electrospun membranes for enhancement of vascular endothelial cell growth. In detail, QK peptide was firstly introduced with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate into a thiolated chitosan solution that could transfer into hydrogel. Then, suspensions or emulsions of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) containing QK peptide (with or without chitosan hydrogel) were electrospun into fibrous membranes. For comparison, the electrospun PELCL membrane without QK was also fabricated. Results of release behaviors showed that the electrospun membranes, especially that contained chitosan hydrogel prepared by suspension electrospinning, could successfully encapsulate QK peptide and maintain its secondary structure after released. In vitro cell culture studies exhibited that the release of QK peptide could accelerate the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells in the 9 days. It was suggested that the electrospun PELCL membranes loaded with QK peptide might have potential applications in vascular tissue engineering. PMID:27107890

  16. Ex Vivo Prefabricated Rat Skin Flap Using Cell Sheets and an Arteriovenous Vascular Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Sekine, Hidekazu; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, research on tissue-engineered skin substitutes have been active in plastic surgery, and significant development has been made in this area over the past several decades. However, a regenerative skin flap has not been developed that could provide immediate blood flow after transplantation. Here, we make a regenerative skin flap ex vivo that is potentially suitable for microsurgical transplantation in future clinical applications. Methods: In rats, for preparing a stable vascular carrier, a femoral vascular pedicle was sandwiched between collagen sponges and inserted into a porous chamber in the abdomen. The vascular bed was harvested 3 weeks later, and extracorporeal perfusion was performed. A green fluorescent protein positive epidermal cell sheet was placed on the vascular bed. After perfusion culture, the whole construct was harvested and fixed for morphological analyses. Results: After approximately 10 days perfusion, the epidermal cell sheet cornified sufficiently. The desquamated corneum was positive for filaggrin. The basement membrane protein laminin 332 and type 4 collagen were deposited on the interface area between the vascular bed and the epidermal cell sheet. Moreover, an electron microscopic image showed anchoring junctions and keratohyalin granules. These results show that we were able to produce native-like skin. Conclusions: We have succeeded in creating regenerative skin flap ex vivo that is similar to native skin, and this technique could be applied to create various tissues in the future. PMID:26180725

  17. Composite vascular grafts with high cell infiltration by co-electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhikai; Wang, Hongjie; Gao, Xiangkai; Liu, Tong; Tan, Yongjun

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for functional small-diameter vascular grafts (diameter<6mm) to be used in clinical arterial replacement. An ideal vascular graft should have appropriate biomechanical properties and be biocompatible. Electrospinning has become a popular polymer processing technique for vascular tissue engineering, but the grafts fabricated by electrospinning often have relatively small pores and low porosity, which limit cell infiltration into scaffolds and hinder the regeneration and remodeling of grafts. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient method to prepare electrospun composite vascular grafts comprising natural and synthetic materials. We fabricated grafts made of polycaprolactone, gelatin, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by co-electrospinning, and the scaffolds were further functionalized by immobilizing heparin on them. The PVA fibers degraded rapidly in vivo and generated electrospun scaffolds with high porosity, which significantly enhanced cell proliferation and infiltration. The mechanical properties of the grafts are suitable for use in artery replacement. Heparin functionalization of the grafts yielded a good antithrombogenic effect, which was demonstrated in platelet adhesion tests. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that the heparin release from the grafts enhanced the growth of endothelial cells, which is important for the endothelium of implanted grafts. The results of this study indicate that our method is effective and controllable for the fabrication of vascular grafts that meet the clinical requirements for blood vessel transplantation. PMID:27287133

  18. Quantification of stromal vascular cell mechanics with a linear cell monolayer rheometer

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, Claire M. Fuller, Gerald G.; Shen, Wen-Jun; Khor, Victor K.; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2015-01-15

    Over the past few decades researchers have developed a variety of methods for measuring the mechanical properties of whole cells, including traction force microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and single-cell tensile testing. Though each of these techniques provides insight into cell mechanics, most also involve some nonideal conditions for acquiring live cell data, such as probing only one portion of a cell at a time, or placing the cell in a nonrepresentative geometry during testing. In the present work, we describe the development of a linear cell monolayer rheometer (LCMR) and its application to measure the mechanics of a live, confluent monolayer of stromal vascular cells. In the LCMR, a monolayer of cells is contacted on both top and bottom by two collagen-coated plates and allowed to adhere. The top plate then shears the monolayer by stepping forward to induce a predetermined step strain, while a force transducer attached to the top plate collects stress information. The stress and strain data are then used to determine the maximum relaxation modulus recorded after step-strain, G{sub r}{sup 0}, referred to as the zero-time relaxation modulus of the cell monolayer. The present study validates the ability of the LCMR to quantify cell mechanics by measuring the change in G{sub r}{sup 0} of a confluent cell monolayer upon the selective inhibition of three major cytoskeletal components (actin microfilaments, vimentin intermediate filaments, and microtubules). The LCMR results indicate that both actin- and vimentin-deficient cells had ∼50% lower G{sub r}{sup 0} values than wild-type, whereas tubulin deficiency resulted in ∼100% higher G{sub r}{sup 0} values. These findings constitute the first use of a cell monolayer rheometer to quantitatively distinguish the roles of different cytoskeletal elements in maintaining cell stiffness and structure. Significantly, they are consistent with results obtained using single-cell mechanical testing methods

  19. Understanding the effects of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone in physiological fatty tissue for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-11-01

    Engineering of large vascularized adipose tissue constructs is still a challenge for the treatment of extensive high-graded burns or the replacement of tissue after tumor removal. Communication between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells is important for homeostasis and the maintenance of adipose tissue mass but, to date, is mainly neglected in tissue engineering strategies. Thus, new co-culture strategies are needed to integrate adipocytes and endothelial cells successfully into a functional construct. This review focuses on the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells and considers their influence on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone. In addition, the properties and challenges with regard to these two cell types for vascularized tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26340984

  20. Proteome Changes during Transition from Human Embryonic to Vascular Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Bagli, Eleni; Kanaki, Katerina; Zografou, Sofia; Carpentier, Sebastien; Bei, Ekaterini S; Christoforidis, Savvas; Zervakis, Michalis; Murphy, Carol; Fotsis, Theodore; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are promising in regenerative medicine (RM) due to their differentiation plasticity and proliferation potential. However, a major challenge in RM is the generation of a vascular system to support nutrient flow to newly synthesized tissues. Here we refined an existing method to generate tight vessels by differentiating hESCs in CD34(+) vascular progenitor cells using chemically defined media and growth conditions. We selectively purified these cells from CD34(-) outgrowth populations also formed. To analyze these differentiation processes, we compared the proteomes of the hESCs with those of the CD34(+) and CD34(-) populations using high resolution mass spectrometry, label-free quantification, and multivariate analysis. Eighteen protein markers validate the differentiated phenotypes in immunological assays; nine of these were also detected by proteomics and show statistically significant differential abundance. Another 225 proteins show differential abundance between the three cell types. Sixty-three of these have known functions in CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells. CD34(+) cells synthesize proteins implicated in endothelial cell differentiation and smooth muscle formation, which support the bipotent phenotype of these progenitor cells. CD34(-) cells are more heterogeneous synthesizing muscular/osteogenic/chondrogenic/adipogenic lineage markers. The remaining >150 differentially abundant proteins in CD34(+) or CD34(-) cells raise testable hypotheses for future studies to probe vascular morphogenesis. PMID:27146950

  1. Differentiation of Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Ectopic Calcification of Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    PubMed

    Leszczynska, Aleksandra; O'Doherty, Aideen; Farrell, Eric; Pindjakova, Jana; O'Brien, Fergal J; O'Brien, Timothy; Barry, Frank; Murphy, Mary

    2016-04-01

    The cellular and molecular basis of vascular calcification (VC) in atherosclerosis is not fully understood. Here, we investigate role of resident/circulating progenitor cells in VC and contribution of inflammatory plaque environment to this process. Vessel-derived stem/progenitor cells (VSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mice showed significantly more in vitro osteogenesis and chondrogenesis than cells generated from control C57BL/6 mice. To assess their ability to form bone in vivo, cells were primed chondrogenically or cultured in control medium on collagen glycosaminoglycan scaffolds in vitro prior to subcutaneous implantation in ApoE(-/-) and C57BL/6 mice using a crossover study design. Atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) MSCs and VSCs formed bone when implanted in C57BL/6 mice. In ApoE(-/-) mice, these cells generated more mature bone than C57BL/6 cells. The atherosclerotic in vivo environment alone promoted bone formation by implanted C57BL/6 cells. Un-primed C57BL/6 VSCs were unable to form bone in either mouse strain. Treatment of ApoE(-/-) VSC chondrogenic cultures with interleukin (IL)-6 resulted in significantly increased glycosaminoglycan deposition and expression of characteristic chondrogenic genes at 21 days. In conclusion, resident vascular cells from atherosclerotic environment respond to the inflammatory milieu and undergo calcification. IL-6 may have a role in aberrant differentiation of VSCs contributing to vascular calcification in atherosclerosis. Stem Cells 2016;34:913-923. PMID:26840742

  2. Effect of melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction on vascularity and cell proliferation in the ovine placenta.

    PubMed

    Eifert, Adam W; Wilson, Matthew E; Vonnahme, Kimberly A; Camacho, Leticia E; Borowicz, Pawel P; Redmer, Dale A; Romero, Sinibaldo; Dorsam, Sheri; Haring, Jodie; Lemley, Caleb O

    2015-02-01

    Previously we reported increased umbilical artery blood flow in ewes supplemented with melatonin from mid- to late-pregnancy, while maternal nutrient restriction decreased uterine artery blood flow. To further unravel these responses, this study was designed to assess placental cell proliferation and vascularity following supplementation with melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction. For the first experiment, 31 primiparous ewes were supplemented with 5mg of melatonin per day (MEL) or no melatonin (CON) and allocated to receive 100% (adequate fed; ADQ) or 60% (restricted; RES) of their nutrient requirements from day 50 to 130 of gestation. To examine melatonin receptor dependent effects, a second experiment was designed utilizing 14 primiparous ewes infused with vehicle, melatonin, or luzindole (melatonin receptor 1 and 2 antagonist) from day 62 to 90 of gestation. For experiment 1, caruncle concentrations of RNA were increased in MEL-RES compared to CON-RES. Caruncle capillary area density and average capillary cross-sectional area were decreased in MEL-RES compared to CON-RES. Cotyledon vascularity was not different across dietary treatments. For experiment 2, placental cellular proliferation and vascularity were not affected by infusion treatment. In summary, melatonin interacted with nutrient restriction to alter caruncle vascularity and RNA concentrations during late pregnancy. Although melatonin receptor antagonism alters feto-placental blood flow, these receptor dependent responses were not observed in placental vascularity. Moreover, placental vascularity measures do not fully explain the alterations in uteroplacental blood flow. PMID:25578503

  3. Whole Genome Expression Analysis Reveals Differential Effects of TiO2 Nanotubes on Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lily; Barczak, Andrea J.; Barbeau, Rebecca A.; Xiao, Yuanyuan; LaTempa, Thomas J.; Grimes, Craig A.; Desai, Tejal A.

    2010-01-01

    The response of primary human endothelial (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to TiO2 nanotube arrays is studied through gene expression analysis. Microarrays revealed that nanotubes enhanced EC proliferation and motility, decreased VSMC proliferation, and decreased expression of molecules involved in inflammation and coagulation in both cell types. Networks generated from significantly affected genes suggest that cells may be sensing nanotopographical cues via pathways previously implicated in sensing shear stress. PMID:20030358

  4. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived—dairy products and meat) on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans)), Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans)), and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans)) for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses) did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation. PMID:22216328

  5. Electrospun elastin-like polypeptide enriched polyurethanes and their interactions with vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Blit, Patrick H; Battiston, Kyle G; Yang, Meilin; Paul Santerre, J; Woodhouse, Kimberly A

    2012-07-01

    In vascular tissue, elastin is an essential extracellular matrix protein that plays an important biomechanical and biological signalling role. Native elastin is insoluble and is difficult to extract from tissues, which results in its relatively rare use for the fabrication of vascular tissue engineering scaffolds. Recombinant elastin-like polypeptide-4 (ELP4), which mimics the structure and function of native tropoelastin, represents a practical alternative to the native elastic fibre for vascular applications. In this study, electrospinning was utilized to fabricate fibrous scaffolds which were subsequently surface modified with ELP4 and used as substrates for smooth muscle cell culture. ELP4 surface modified materials demonstrated enhanced smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion and maintenance of cell numbers over a 1-week period relative to controls. SMCs seeded on the ELP4 surface modified materials were also shown to exhibit the cell morphology and biological markers of a contractile phenotype including a spindle-like morphology, actin filament organization and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain expression. Competitive inhibition experiments demonstrated that the elastin-laminin cell surface receptor and its affinity for the VGVAPG peptide sequence on ELP4 molecules are likely involved in the initial SMC contact with the ELP4 modified materials. Elastin-like polypeptides show promise as surface modifiers for candidate scaffolds for engineering contractile vascular tissues. PMID:22459513

  6. SAM-based Cell Transfer to Photopatterned Hydrogels for Microengineering Vascular-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Sadr, Nasser; Zhu, Mojun; Osaki, Tatsuya; Kakegawa, Takahiro; Yang, Yunzhi; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in tissue engineering is to reproduce the native 3D microvascular architecture fundamental for in vivo functions. Current approaches still lack a network of perfusable vessels with native 3D structural organization. Here we present a new method combining self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based cell transfer and gelatin methacrylate hydrogel photopatterning techniques for microengineering vascular structures. Human umbilical vein cell (HUVEC) transfer from oligopeptide SAM-coated surfaces to the hydrogel revealed two SAM desorption mechanisms: photoinduced and electrochemically triggered. The former, occurs concomitantly to hydrogel photocrosslinking, and resulted in efficient (>97%) monolayer transfer. The latter, prompted by additional potential application, preserved cell morphology and maintained high transfer efficiency of VE-cadherin positive monolayers over longer culture periods. This approach was also applied to transfer HUVECs to 3D geometrically defined vascular-like structures in hydrogels, which were then maintained in perfusion culture for 15 days. As a step toward more complex constructs, a cell-laden hydrogel layer was photopatterned around the endothelialized channel to mimic the vascular smooth muscle structure of distal arterioles. This study shows that the coupling of the SAM-based cell transfer and hydrogel photocrosslinking could potentially open up new avenues in engineering more complex, vascularized tissue constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. PMID:21802723

  7. Reactive oxygen species: physiological roles in the regulation of vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Vara, D; Pula, G

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now appreciated to play several important roles in a number of biological processes and regulate cell physiology and function. ROS are a heterogeneous chemical class that includes radicals, such as superoxide ion (O2(•-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) and nitric oxide (NO(•)), and non-radicals, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and peroxynitrite (NO3 (-)). In the cardiovascular system, besides playing a critical role in the development and progression of vasculopathies and other important pathologies such as congestive heart failure, atherosclerosis and thrombosis, ROS also regulate physiological processes. Evidence from a wealth of cardiovascular research studies suggests that ROS act as second messengers and play an essential role in vascular homeostasis by influencing discrete signal transduction pathways in various systems and cell types. They are produced throughout the vascular system, regulate differentiation and contractility of vascular smooth muscle cells, control vascular endothelial cell proliferation and migration, mediate platelet activation and haemostasis, and significantly contribute to the immune response. Our understanding of ROS chemistry and cell biology has evolved to the point of realizing that different ROS have distinct and important roles in cardiovascular physiology. This review will outline sources, functions and molecular mechanisms of action of different ROS in the cardiovascular system and will describe their emerging role in healthy cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis. PMID:24894168

  8. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:26883442

  9. BMP-2 gene expression and effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Willette, R N; Gu, J L; Lysko, P G; Anderson, K M; Minehart, H; Yue, T

    1999-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their serine/threonine kinase receptors have been identified in atherosclerotic arteries and vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Thus, BMPs (the largest subfamily of the TGF-beta superfamily) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the origins of BMP biosynthesis and the functional roles of BMP in blood vessels are unclear. The present study explored BMP-2 gene expression in various human blood vessels and vascular cell types. Functional in vitro studies were also performed to determine the effects of recombinant human BMP-2 on migration (transwell assay) and proliferation ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HASMC). RT-PCR experiments revealed BMP-2 gene expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries as well as cultured human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human macrophages. In cellular migration studies, incubation with BMP-2 produced efficacious (cell types in the blood vessel wall may play a chemotactic or cochemotactic role in the smooth muscle cell response to vascular injury. PMID:10213907

  10. Intima modifier locus 2 controls endothelial cell activation and vascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    Smolock, Elaine M.; Burke, Ryan M.; Wang, Chenjing; Thomas, Tamlyn; Batchu, Sri N.; Qiu, Xing; Zettel, Martha; Fujiwara, Keigi; Berk, Bradford C.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid intima formation is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. C3H/FeJ (C3H/F) and SJL/J (SJL) inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to immune and vascular traits. Using a congenic approach we demonstrated that the Intima modifier 2 (Im2) locus on chromosome 11 regulates leukocyte infiltration. We sought to determine whether inflammation was due to changes in circulating immune cells or activation of vascular wall cells in genetically pure Im2 (C3H/F.SJL.11.1) mice. Complete blood counts showed no differences in circulating monocytes between C3H/F and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with SJL mice. Aortic vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) total protein levels were dramatically increased in SJL and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with C3H/F mice. Immunostaining of aortic endothelial cells (EC) showed a significant increase in VCAM-1 expression in SJL and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with C3H/F under steady flow conditions. Immunostaining of EC membranes revealed a significant decrease in EC size in SJL and C3H/F.SJL.11.1 vs. C3H/F in regions of disturbed flow. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in C3H/F.SJL.11.1 compared with C3H/F. Our results indicate that Im2 regulation of leukocyte infiltration is mediated by EC inflammation and permeability. RNA sequencing and pathway analyses comparing genes in the Im2 locus to C3H/F provide insight into candidate genes that regulate vascular wall inflammation and permeability highlighting important genetic mechanisms that control vascular intima in response to injury. PMID:24986958

  11. A Role of TDIF Peptide Signaling in Vascular Cell Differentiation is Conserved Among Euphyllophytes

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yuki; Bowman, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide signals mediate a variety of cell-to-cell communication crucial for plant growth and development. During Arabidopsis thaliana vascular development, a CLE (CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related) family peptide hormone, TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor), regulates procambial cell fate by its inhibitory activity on xylem differentiation. To address if this activity is conserved among vascular plants, we performed comparative analyses of TDIF signaling in non-flowering vascular plants (gymnosperms, ferns and lycophytes). We identified orthologs of TDIF/CLE as well as its receptor TDR/PXY (TDIF RECEPTOR/PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM) in Ginkgo biloba, Adiantum aethiopicum, and Selaginella kraussiana by RACE-PCR. The predicted TDIF peptide sequences in seed plants and ferns were identical to that of A. thaliana TDIF. We examined the effects of exogenous CLE peptide-motif sequences of TDIF in these species. We found that liquid culturing of dissected leaves or shoots was useful for examining TDIF activity during vascular development. TDIF treatment suppressed xylem/tracheary element differentiation of procambial cells in G. biloba and A. aethiopicum leaves. In contrast, neither TDIF nor putative endogenous TDIF inhibited xylem differentiation in developing shoots and rhizophores of S. kraussiana. These data suggest that activity of TDIF in vascular development is conserved among extant euphyllophytes. In addition to the conserved function, via liquid culturing of its bulbils, we found a novel inhibitory activity on root growth in the fern Asplenium × lucrosum suggesting lineage-specific co-option of peptide signaling occurred during the evolution of vascular plant organs. PMID:26635860

  12. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Takov, Kaloyan; Korczak, Agnieszka; Denvir, Martin A.; Smith, Lee B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO) and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall. Methods and Results Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO) from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO), endothelial cells (VE-ARKO), or both (SM/VE-ARKO) were compared with wild type (WT) controls. Hindlimb ischaemia was induced in these mice by ligation and removal of the femoral artery. Post-operative reperfusion was reduced in SM-ARKO and SM/VE-ARKO mice. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this was accompanied by a reduced density of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels but no change in the density of isolectin B4-positive vessels in the gastrocnemius muscle. Deletion of AR from the endothelium (VE-ARKO) did not alter post-operative reperfusion or vessel density. In an ex vivo (aortic ring culture) model of angiogenesis, AR was not detected in vascular outgrowths and angiogenesis was not altered by vascular ARKO or by exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT 10−10–10-7M; 6 days). Conclusion These results suggest that loss of AR from vascular smooth muscle, but not from the endothelium, contributes to impaired reperfusion in the ischaemic hindlimb of G-ARKO. Impaired reperfusion was associated with reduced collateral formation rather than reduced angiogenesis. PMID:27159530

  13. A Role of TDIF Peptide Signaling in Vascular Cell Differentiation is Conserved Among Euphyllophytes.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yuki; Bowman, John L

    2015-01-01

    Peptide signals mediate a variety of cell-to-cell communication crucial for plant growth and development. During Arabidopsis thaliana vascular development, a CLE (CLAVATA3/EMBRYO SURROUNDING REGION-related) family peptide hormone, TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor), regulates procambial cell fate by its inhibitory activity on xylem differentiation. To address if this activity is conserved among vascular plants, we performed comparative analyses of TDIF signaling in non-flowering vascular plants (gymnosperms, ferns and lycophytes). We identified orthologs of TDIF/CLE as well as its receptor TDR/PXY (TDIF RECEPTOR/PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM) in Ginkgo biloba, Adiantum aethiopicum, and Selaginella kraussiana by RACE-PCR. The predicted TDIF peptide sequences in seed plants and ferns were identical to that of A. thaliana TDIF. We examined the effects of exogenous CLE peptide-motif sequences of TDIF in these species. We found that liquid culturing of dissected leaves or shoots was useful for examining TDIF activity during vascular development. TDIF treatment suppressed xylem/tracheary element differentiation of procambial cells in G. biloba and A. aethiopicum leaves. In contrast, neither TDIF nor putative endogenous TDIF inhibited xylem differentiation in developing shoots and rhizophores of S. kraussiana. These data suggest that activity of TDIF in vascular development is conserved among extant euphyllophytes. In addition to the conserved function, via liquid culturing of its bulbils, we found a novel inhibitory activity on root growth in the fern Asplenium × lucrosum suggesting lineage-specific co-option of peptide signaling occurred during the evolution of vascular plant organs. PMID:26635860

  14. ROBO4-Mediated Vascular Integrity Regulates the Directionality of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Berdan, Stephanie; Nguyen, Andrew; Hong, Matthew A.; Forsberg, E. Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clinical therapy for over half a century, the mechanisms that regulate HSC trafficking, engraftment, and life-long persistence after transplantation are unclear. Here, we show that the vascular endothelium regulates HSC trafficking into and out of bone marrow (BM) niches. Surprisingly, we found that instead of acting as barriers to cellular entry, vascular endothelial cells, via the guidance molecule ROBO4, actively promote HSC translocation across vessel walls into the BM space. In contrast, we found that the vasculature inhibits the reverse process, as induced vascular permeability led to a rapid increase in HSCs in the blood stream. Thus, the vascular endothelium reinforces HSC localization to BM niches both by promoting HSC extravasation from blood-to-BM and by forming vascular barriers that prevent BM-to-blood escape. Our results uncouple the mechanisms that regulate the directionality of HSC trafficking and show that the vasculature can be targeted to improve hematopoietic transplantation therapies. PMID:25640759

  15. The application of cell sheet engineering in the vascularization of tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Moschouris, Kathryn; Firoozi, Negar; Kang, Yunqing

    2016-09-01

    Scaffold-free cell sheet engineering (CSE) is a new technology to regenerate injured or damaged tissues, which has shown promising potential in tissue regeneration. CSE uses a thermosensitive surface to form a dense cell sheet that can be detached when temperature decreases. The detached cell sheet can be stacked on top of one another according to the thickness of cell sheet for the specific tissue regeneration application. One of the key challenges of tissue engineering is vascularization. CSE technique provides excellent microenvironment for vascularization since the technique can maintain the intact cell matrix that is crucial for angiogenesis. In this review paper, we will highlight the principle technique of CSE and its application in tissue regeneration. PMID:27527673

  16. Heterotaxy Polysplenia Syndrome In An Adult With Unique Vascular Anomalies: Case Report With Review Of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Gupta, Kanchan Kumar; Qasim, Muhammad; Gupta, Om Prakash

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of anatomical organization of the thoraco-abdominal visceral and vascular structures which is not the expected normal arrangement, is called as situs ambiguous or heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with heterotaxy syndrome exhibit a wide spectrum of anatomical variations involving thoraco-abdominal structures. We present here an incidental finding of heterotaxy syndrome associated with unique vascular anomalies in a 35 year old male patient evaluated initially for nephrolithiasis by ultrasonography, and intravenous pyelography. Further evaluation by multidetector row computed tomography showed bilateral bilobed lungs with hyparterial bronchi, cardiac apex to the left, five branches from left-sided aortic arch with retroesophageal right subclavian artery, interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation, left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein and replaced common hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. Other vascular anomalies include right internal iliac vein joining the left common iliac vein and precaval course of the single main right renal artery. Anomalies involving abdominal organs include right-sided stomach, midline liver, multiple splenules (polysplenia) in right upper quadrant of abdomen, short truncated pancreas, intestinal malrotation, inversion of superior mesenteric vessels and a preduodenal portal vein. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein, precaval right renal artery and anomalous branching pattern of aortic arch with heterotaxy syndrome. PMID:26629295

  17. Heterotaxy Polysplenia Syndrome In An Adult With Unique Vascular Anomalies: Case Report With Review Of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan; Gupta, Kanchan Kumar; Qasim, Muhammad; Gupta, Om Prakash

    2015-07-01

    The pattern of anatomical organization of the thoraco-abdominal visceral and vascular structures which is not the expected normal arrangement, is called as situs ambiguous or heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with heterotaxy syndrome exhibit a wide spectrum of anatomical variations involving thoraco-abdominal structures. We present here an incidental finding of heterotaxy syndrome associated with unique vascular anomalies in a 35 year old male patient evaluated initially for nephrolithiasis by ultrasonography, and intravenous pyelography. Further evaluation by multidetector row computed tomography showed bilateral bilobed lungs with hyparterial bronchi, cardiac apex to the left, five branches from left-sided aortic arch with retroesophageal right subclavian artery, interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation, left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein and replaced common hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery. Other vascular anomalies include right internal iliac vein joining the left common iliac vein and precaval course of the single main right renal artery. Anomalies involving abdominal organs include right-sided stomach, midline liver, multiple splenules (polysplenia) in right upper quadrant of abdomen, short truncated pancreas, intestinal malrotation, inversion of superior mesenteric vessels and a preduodenal portal vein. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of left renal vein continuing as hemiazygos vein, precaval right renal artery and anomalous branching pattern of aortic arch with heterotaxy syndrome. PMID:26629295

  18. Nestin-expressing vascular wall cells drive development of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saboor, Farhan; Reckmann, Ansgar N; Tomczyk, Claudia U M; Peters, Dorothea M; Weissmann, Norbert; Kaschtanow, Andre; Schermuly, Ralph T; Michurina, Tatyana V; Enikolopov, Grigori; Müller, Dieter; Mietens, Andrea; Middendorff, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Nestin, a well-known marker of neuronal stem cells, was recently suggested to characterise stem cell-like progenitors in non-neuronal structures during development and tissue repair. Integrating novel morphological approaches (CLARITY), we investigate whether nestin expression defines the proliferating cell population that essentially drives vascular remodelling during development of pulmonary hypertension.The role of nestin was investigated in lungs of nestin-GFP (green fluorescent protein) mice, models of pulmonary hypertension (rat: monocrotaline, SU5416/hypoxia; mouse: hypoxia), samples from pulmonary hypertension patients and human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs).Nestin was solely found in lung vasculature and localised to proliferating VSMCs, but not bronchial smooth muscle cells. Nestin was shown to affect cell number and was significantly enhanced in lungs early during development of pulmonary hypertension, correlating well with increased VSMC proliferation, expression of phosphorylated (activated) platelet-derived growth factor receptor β and downregulation of the smooth muscle cell differentiation marker calponin. At later time points when pulmonary hypertension became clinically evident, nestin expression and proliferation returned to control levels. Increase of nestin-positive VSMCs was also found in human pulmonary hypertension, both in vessel media and neointima.Nestin expression seems to be obligatory for VSMC proliferation, and specifies lung vascular wall cells that drive remodelling and (re-)generation. Our data promise novel diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets for pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26699726

  19. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  20. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  1. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Carlos; Yee, Sarah; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Kobayashi, Miharu; Vaswani, Kanchan; Kvaskoff, David; Illanes, Sebastian E.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Rice, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA) remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT) interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration. Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37°C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected, and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo) isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™). Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software). Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30%) invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 × 108 ± 2.5 × 108 particles/106 cells) compared to JEG-3 (2.86 × 108 ± 0.78 × 108 particles/106 cells). VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (−exosomes) (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, vs. control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p < 0.05). Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes. Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content, and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls. PMID:25157233

  2. Molecular Hallmarks of Adult T Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) comprise outstanding deregulations of signaling pathways that control the cell cycle, resistance to apoptosis, and proliferation of leukemic cells, all of which have been identified by early excellent studies. Nevertheless, we are now confronted the therapeutic difficulties of ATL that is a most aggressive T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Using next-generation strategies, emerging molecular characteristics such as specific surface markers and an additional catalog of signals affecting the fate of leukemic cells have been added to the molecular hallmarks that constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of ATL. Although human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is undoubtedly involved in ATL leukemogenesis, most leukemic cells do not express the viral protein Tax. Instead, cellular gene expression changes dominate homeostasis disorders of infected cells and characteristics of ATL. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of ATL molecular pathology, which supports the biological properties of leukemic cells. In addition, we discuss the recent discovery of two molecular hallmarks of potential generality; an abnormal microRNA pattern and epigenetic reprogramming, which strongly involve the imbalance of the molecular network of lymphocytes. Global analyses of ATL have revealed the functional impact of crosstalk between multifunctional pathways. Clinical and biological studies on signaling inhibitory agents have also revealed novel oncogenic drivers that can be targeted in future. ATL cells, by deregulation of such pathways and their interconnections, may become masters of their own destinies. Recognizing and understanding of the widespread molecular applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of novel strategies for treating ATL. PMID:23060864

  3. Estrogen-induced DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells is mediated by ROS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Felty, Quentin

    2006-01-01

    Background Since estrogen is known to increase vascular endothelial cell growth, elevated estrogen exposure from hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives has the potential to contribute in the development of abnormal proliferative vascular lesions and subsequent thickening of the vasculature. How estrogen may support or promote vascular lesions is not clear. We have examined in this study whether estrogen exposure to vascular endothelial cells increase the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and estrogen-induced ROS is involved in the growth of endothelial cells. Methods The effect of estrogen on the production of intracellular oxidants and the role of estrogen-induced ROS on cell growth was studied in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ROS were measured by monitoring the oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin by spectrofluorometry. Endothelial cell growth was measured by a colorimetric immunoassay based on BrdU incorporation into DNA. Results Physiological concentrations of estrogen (367 fmol and 3.67 pmol) triggered a rapid 2-fold increase in intracellular oxidants in endothelial cells. E2-induced ROS formation was inhibited to basal levels by cotreatment with the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone (2 μM) and xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol (50 μM). Inhibitors of NAD(P)H oxidase, apocynin and DPI, did not block E2-induced ROS formation. Furthermore, the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, did not prevent the increase in E2-induced ROS. These findings indicate both mitochondria and xanthine oxidase are the source of ROS in estrogen treated vascular endothelial cells. E2 treated cells showed a 2-fold induction of BrdU incorporation at 18 h which was not observed in cells exposed to vehicle alone. Cotreatment with ebselen (20 μM) and NAC (1 mM) inhibited E2-induced BrdU incorporation without affecting the basal levels of DNA synthesis. The observed inhibitory effect of NAC and ebselen on E2-induced DNA synthesis was also shown to be dose dependent

  4. Construction of a fucoidan/laminin functional multilayer to direction vascular cell fate and promotion hemocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changrong; Wang, Yan; Su, Hong; Yang, Ping; Huang, Nan; F Maitz, Manfred; Zhao, Anshan

    2016-07-01

    Surface biofunctional modification of cardiovascular stents is a versatile approach to reduce the adverse effects after implantation. In this work, a novel multifunctional coating was fabricated by coimmobilization of the sulfated polysaccharide of brown algae fucoidan and laminin to biomimic the vascular intimal conditions in order to support rapid endothelialization, prevent restenosis and improve hemocompatibility. The surface properties of the coating such as hydrophilicity, bonding density of biomolecules and stability were evaluated and optimized. According to the biocompatibility tests, the fucoidan/laminin multilayer coated surface displayed less platelet adhesion with favorable anticoagulant property. In addition, the fucoidan/laminin complex showed function to selectively regulate vascular cells growth behavior. The proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) on the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. For the smooth muscle cells (SMCs), inhibitory effects on cell adhesion and proliferation were observed. In conclusion, the fucoidan/laminin biofunctional coating was successfully fabricated with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization properties which show a promising application in the vascular devices such as vascular stents or grafts surface modification. PMID:27127049

  5. Red light, green light: Signals that control endothelial cell proliferation during embryonic vascular development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proper regulation of endothelial cell proliferation is critical for vascular development in the embryo. VEGF-A and bFGF, which are important in the induction of mesodermal progenitors to form a capillary plexus, are also key mitogenic signals. Disruption in VEGF-A or bFGF decreases endothelial c...

  6. SIGNALING HIERARCHY THAT REGULATES ENDOTHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND VASCULAR REMODELING DURING VASCULOGENESIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously demonstrated that during vascular morphogenesis, retinoic acid (RA) is required for the control of endothelial cell proliferation and capillary plexus remodeling. In the present studies, we define the signaling hierarchy downstream of RA that independently regulates these cellular eve...

  7. Spatiotemporal Dysfunction of the Vascular Permeability Barrier in Transgenic Mice with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Samit; Tan, Fang; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis that generates excess cell-free hemoglobin in the blood circulation. Hemoglobin causes multiple endothelial dysfunctions including increased vascular permeability, impaired reactivity to vasoactive agonists, and increased adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium. While the adhesive and vasomotor defects of SCD associated with cell-free hemoglobin are well defined, the vascular permeability phenotype remains poorly appreciated. We addressed this issue in two widely used and clinically relevant mouse models of SCD. We discovered that the endothelial barrier is normal in most organs in the young but deteriorates with aging particularly in the lung. Indeed, middle-aged sickle mice developed pulmonary edema revealing for the first time similarities in the chronic permeability phenotypes of the lung in mice and humans with SCD. Intravenous administration of lysed red blood cells into the circulation of sickle mice increased vascular permeability significantly in the lung without impacting permeability in other organs. Thus, increased vascular permeability is an endothelial dysfunction of SCD with the barrier in the lung likely the most vulnerable to acute inflammation. PMID:22778926

  8. Dehydroleucodine inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in G2 phase.

    PubMed

    Cruzado, M; Castro, C; Fernandez, D; Gomez, L; Roque, M; Giordano, O E; Lopez, L A

    2005-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis and in the vascular changes seen in hypertension. Dehydroleucodine (DhL) is a sesquiterpene lactone that inhibits cell proliferation in plant cells. In this paper, we study the effect of DhL in the proliferation of VSMCs stimulated with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Very low concentrations of DhL (2-6 microM) inhibited VSMC proliferation and induced cell accumulation in G2. DhL did not affect the dynamics of 3H-thymidine incorporation, and did not modify either the activity of DNA polymerase or the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides in an in vitro assay. Moreover, DhL did not induce apoptosis in VSMCs. These results indicate that DhL, in very low concentration, induces a transient arrest of VSMCs in G2. Our data show that VSMCs are especially sensitive to DhL effect, suggesting that DhL could be potentially useful to prevent the vascular pathological changes seen in hypertension and other vascular diseases. PMID:16309576

  9. Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Radiation Injury.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Juliann G

    2016-08-01

    Recent understanding of the cellular and molecular signaling activations in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has provided new insights into their potential clinical applications, particularly for tissue repair and regeneration. This review focuses on these advances, specifically in the context of self-renewal for tissue repair and recovery after radiation injury. Thus far, MSCs have been characterized extensively and shown to be useful in mitigation and therapy for acute radiation syndrome and cognitive dysfunction. Use of MSCs for treating radiation injury alone or in combination with additional trauma is foreseeable. PMID:27356065

  10. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. I. Cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Kang, H.J.; Baumann, F.E.; Blazek, E.R.

    1996-02-01

    Normal tissue toxicity limits radiation therapy and could depend on the extent of damage to the vascular endothelium. Aminothiols such as WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] provide radioprotection for normal tissues, but little is known about how the aminothiols specifically affect the endothelium. Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture were exposed to WR-1065 for 2 h before irradiation ({sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, 1 Gy/min). Alone, WR-1065 demonstrated an antiproliferative effect that was related to dose (0.5-4 mM) and was evident by lowered counts of adherent cells 48 h after exposure. WR-1065 was clearly radioprotective when assessed by colony formation and incorporation of [{sup 3}H]thymidine. However, when the number of adherent cells was evaluated, radioprotection appeared to be slight and evident only in logarithmically growing cells. WR-1065 at 2 mM suppressed single-strand DNA breaks after 3 Gy by 22% and double-strand breaks after 9 Gy by 47%. Also in the irradiated cells, WR-1065 more than doubled the rate of progression of cells from G{sub 1} to S phase. WR-1065 pretreatment elevated cellular glutathione (GSH) content more than twofold. Although pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine inhibited the elevation of GSH, the radioprotective impact of WR-1065 on total DNA strand breaks and colony formation was unaffected. These results suggest that WR-1065 may enable tissue recovery from irradiation by promoting the replication of endothelial cells, possibly by mechanisms independent of GSH. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Effect of Lyso-phosphatidylcholine and Schnurri-3 on Osteogenic Transdifferentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Calcifying Vascular Cells in 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando; Vickers, Kasey C.; Sam Lee, Jae; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Morrisett, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background In vitro cell culture is a widely used technique for investigating a range of processes such as stem cell behavior, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and drug discovery. Conventional cell culture is performed in Petri dishes or flasks where cells typically attach to a flat glass or plastic surface as a cell monolayer. However, 2D cell mono-layers do not provide a satisfactory representation of in vivo conditions. A 3D culture could be a much better system for representing the conditions that prevail in vivo. Methods and results To simulate 3D conditions, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were loaded with gold–polyvmer–iron oxide hydrogel, enabling levitation of the cells by using spatially varying magnetic fields. These magnetically levitated 3D cultures appeared as freely suspended, clustered cells which proliferated 3–4 times faster than cells in conventional 2D cultures. When the levitated cells were treated with 10 nM lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), for 3 days, cell clusters exhibited translucent extensions/rods 60–80 µm wide and 200–250 µm long. When 0.5 µg/µl Schnurri-3 was added to the culture containing LPC, these extensions were smaller or absent. When excited with 590–650 nm light, these extensions emitted intrinsic fluorescence at >667 nm. When the 3D cultures were treated with a fluorescent probe specific for calcium hydroxyapatite (FITC-HABP-19), the cell extensions/rods emitted intensely at 518 nm, the λmax for FITC emission. Pellets of cells treated with LPC were more enriched in calcium, phosphate, and glycosaminogly-cans than cells treated with LPC and Schnurri-3. Conclusions In 3D cultures, VSMCs grow more rapidly and form larger calcification clusters than cells in 2D cultures. Transdifferentiation of VSMC into calcifying vascular cells is enhanced by LPC and attenuated by Schnurri-3. General significance The formation of calcified structures in 3D VSMC cultures suggests that similar structures may be formed

  12. Changes in endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability after systemic lipopolysaccharide administration in the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Nakahara, Kazuki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-09-15

    The subfornical organ (SFO) has highly permeable fenestrated vasculature and is a key site for immune-to-brain communications. Recently, we showed the occurrence of continuous angiogenesis in the SFO. In the present study, we found that systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced the vascular permeability and endothelial cell proliferation. In LPS-administered mice, the SFO vasculature showed a significant decrease in the immunoreactivity of plasmalemma vesicle associated protein-1, a marker of endothelial fenestral diaphragms. These data suggest that vasculature undergoes structural change to decrease vascular permeability in response to systemic LPS administration. PMID:27609286

  13. The relationship of pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance to pulmonary artery wedge pressure during submaximal exercise in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen P.; Granton, John T.; Esfandiari, Sam; Goodman, Jack M.

    2016-01-01

    Key points A consistent inverse hyperbolic relationship has been observed between pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance, although changes in pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) may modify this relationship.This relationship predicts that pulmonary artery systolic, diastolic and mean pressure maintain a consistent relationship relative to the PAWP.We show that, in healthy exercising human adults, both pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance decrease in relation to exercise‐associated increases in PAWP.Pulmonary artery systolic, diastolic and mean pressures maintain a consistent relationship with one another, increasing linearly with increasing PAWP.Increases in PAWP in the setting of exercise are directly related to a decrease in pulmonary vascular compliance, despite small decreases in pulmonary vascular resistance, thereby increasing the pulsatile afterload to the right ventricle. Abstract The resistive and pulsatile components of right ventricular afterload (pulmonary vascular resistance, Rp; compliance, Cp) are related by an inverse hyperbolic function, expressed as their product known as RpCp‐time. The RpCp‐time exhibits a narrow range, although it may be altered by the pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP). Identifying the determinants of RpCp‐time should improve our understanding of the physiological behaviour of pulmonary arterial systolic (PASP), diastolic (PADP) and mean (mPAP) pressures in response to perturbations. We examined the effect of exercise in 28 healthy non‐athletic adults (55 ± 6 years) who underwent right heart catheterization to assess haemodynamics and calculate Rp and Cp. Measurements were made at rest and during two consecutive 8–10 min stages of cycle ergometry, at targeted heart‐rates of 100 beats min–1 (Light) and 120 beats min–1 (Moderate). Cardiac output increased progressively during exercise. PASP, PADP, mPAP and PAWP increased for Light exercise, without any further rise for Moderate

  14. Strain magnitude-dependent calcific marker expression in valvular and vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, Zannatul; Jo, Hanjoong; Nerem, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve disease and atherosclerosis tend to coexist in most patients with cardiovascular disease; however, the causes and mechanisms of disease development in heart valves are still not clearly understood. To understand the contributions of the magnitude of cyclic strain (5% hypotension, 10% physiological, and 15% hypertension) in calcification, we used a model system of tissue-engineered collagen gels containing human aortic smooth muscle cells and human aortic valvular interstitial cells, both isolated from noncalcific heart transplant tissue. The compacted collagen gels were cultured in osteogenic media for 3 weeks in a custom-designed bioreactor and all assessments were performed at the end of the culture period. The major finding of this study is that bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4 and transforming growth factor-β1 mRNA expression significantly changed in response to the magnitude of applied strain in valvular cells, while the lowest expression was observed for the representative physiological strain. On the other hand, mRNA expression in vascular cells did not vary in response to the magnitude of strain. Regarding BMP-2 and BMP-4 protein expression determined by immunostaining, trends were similar to mRNA expression in vascular and valvular cells, where only valvular cells showed a varied protein expression depending on the magnitude of the strain applied. Our results suggest that cellular differences exist between vascular and valvular cells in their response to altered levels of cyclic strain during calcification. PMID:23548742

  15. Functions of Müller cell-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Zhu, Meili; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Müller cells are macroglia and play many essential roles as supporting cells in the retina. To respond to pathological changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major complication in the eye of diabetic patients, retinal Müller glia produce a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A). As VEGF is expressed by multiple retinal cell-types and Müller glia comprise only a small portion of cells in the retina, it has been a great challenge to reveal the function of VEGF or other globally expressed proteins produced by Müller cells. With the development of conditional gene targeting tools, it is now possible to dissect the function of Müller cell-derived VEGF in vivo. By using conditional gene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Müller glia are a major source of retinal VEGF in diabetic mice and Müller cell-derived VEGF plays a significant role in the alteration of protein expression and peroxynitration, which leads to retinal inflammation, neovascularization, vascular leakage, and vascular lesion, key pathological changes in DR. Therefore, Müller glia are a potential cellular target for the treatment of DR, a leading cause of blindness. PMID:26069721

  16. CXCL12-producing vascular endothelial niches control acute T cell leukemia maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Lauren A.; Tikhonova, Anastasia N.; Hu, Hai; Trimarchi, Thomas; King, Bryan; Gong, Yixiao; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Tsirigos, Aris; Littman, Dan R.; Ferrando, Adolfo; Morrison, Sean J.; Fooksman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of the microenvironment in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), or any acute leukemia, is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that T-ALL cells are in direct, stable contact with CXCL12-producing bone marrow stroma. Cxcl12 deletion from vascular endothelial, but not perivascular, cells impeded tumor growth, suggesting a vascular niche for T-ALL. Moreover, genetic targeting of CXCR4 in murine T-ALL after disease onset led to rapid, sustained disease remission, and CXCR4 antagonism suppressed human T-ALL in primary xenografts. Loss of CXCR4 targeted key T-ALL regulators, including the MYC pathway, and decreased leukemia initiating cell activity in vivo. Our data identify a T-ALL niche, and suggest targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling as a powerful therapeutic approach for T-ALL. PMID:26058075

  17. Factor VIIa binding to endothelial cell protein C receptor protects vascular barrier integrity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    SUNDARAM, J.; KESHAVA, S.; GOPALAKRISHNAN, R.; ESMON, C. T.; PENDURTHI, U. R.; RAO, L . V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Recent studies have shown that factor VIIa binds to endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), a cellular receptor for protein C and activated protein C. At present, the physiologic significance of FVIIa interaction with EPCR in vivo remains unclear. Objective: To investigate whether exogenously administered FVIIa, by binding to EPCR, induces a barrier protective effect in vivo. Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage in the skin, were used to evaluate the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Wild-type, EPCR-deficient, EPCR-overexpressing and hemophilia A mice were used in the studies. Results Administration of FVIIa reduced LPS-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney; the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect was attenuated in EPCR-deficient mice. The extent of VEGF-induced vascular leakage in the skin was highly dependent on EPCR expression levels. Therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa attenuated VEGF-induced vascular leakage in control mice but not in EPCR-deficient mice. Blockade of FVIIa binding to EPCR with a blocking mAb completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Similarly, administration of protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist blocked the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Hemophilic mice showed increased vascular permeability, and administration of therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa improved barrier integrity in these mice. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that FVIIa binding to EPCR leads to a barrier protective effect in vivo. This finding may have clinical relevance, as it indicates additional advantages of using FVIIa in treating hemophilic patients. PMID:24977291

  18. Gelatinases promote calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells by up-regulating bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meng, Fan-Xing; Li, Bing-Wei; Sheng, You-Ming; Liu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Bing; Li, Hong-Wei; Xiu, Rui-Juan

    2016-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), also known as gelatinase A, is involved in vascular calcification. Another member of gelatinases is MMP-9 (gelatinase B). However, the role of gelatinases in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification is not well understood. The current study aims to clarify the relationship between gelatinases and vascular calcification and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) was used to induce calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with or without 2-[[(4-Phenoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]methyl]-thiirane (SB-3CT), a specific gelatinases inhibitor. Levels of calcification were determined by assessing calcium content and calcification area of VSMCs. Phenotype transition of VSMCs was observed by assessing expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), smooth muscle α-actin (SM-α-actin) and desmin. Gelatin zymography was applied to determine the activities of gelatinases, and western blot was applied to determine expressions of gelatinases, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and msh homeobox homolog 2 (Msx-2). Gelatinases inhibition by SB-3CT alleviated calcification and phenotype transition of VSMCs induced by β-GP. Increased gelatinases expression and active MMP-2 were observed in calcifying VSMCs. Gelatinases inhibition reduced expression of RUNX2, Msx-2 and BMP-2. BMP-2 treatment increased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2, while noggin, an antagonist of BMP-2, decreased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2. Gelatinases promote vascular calcification by upregulating BMP-2 which induces expression of RUNX2 and Msx-2, two proteins associated with phenotype transition of VSMCs in vascular calcification. Interventions targeting gelatinases inhibition might be a proper candidate for ameliorating vascular calcification. PMID:26797522

  19. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guangliang; Chen, Jieli; Chopp, Michael; Li, Lian; Yan, Tao; Li, Qingjiang; Cui, Chengcheng; Davarani, Siamak P N; Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg) of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8) or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (n = 8) via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05) decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI. PMID:26900843

  20. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Guangliang; Chen, Jieli; Chopp, Michael; Li, Lian; Yan, Tao; Li, Qingjiang; Cui, Chengcheng; Davarani, Siamak P. N.; Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg) of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8) or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (n = 8) via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05) decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI. PMID:26900843

  1. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN WHITE MATTER MICROSTRUCTURE, EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS AND PROCESSING SPEED IN OLDER ADULTS: THE IMPACT OF VASCULAR HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Heidi I.L.; Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Williams, Victoria J.; Van Boxtel, Martin P.J.; van der Elst, Wim; Jolles, Jelle; Verhey, Frans R. J.; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Salat, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral white matter damage is a commonly reported consequence of healthy aging, but is also associated with cognitive decline and dementia. The aetiology of this damage is unclear, however, individuals with hypertension have a greater burden of white matter signal abnormalities (WMSA) on MR imaging than those without hypertension. It is therefore possible that elevated blood pressure (BP) impacts white matter tissue structure which in turn has a negative impact on cognition. However, little information exists about whether vascular health indexed by BP mediates the relationship between cognition and white matter tissue structure. We used diffusion tensor imaging to examine the impact of vascular health on regional associations between white matter integrity and cognition in healthy older adults spanning the normotensive to moderate-severe hypertensive BP range (43–87 years; N=128). We examined how white matter structure was associated with performance on tests of two cognitive domains, executive functioning (EF) and processing speed (PS), and how patterns of regional associations were modified by BP and WMSA. Multiple linear regression and structural equation models demonstrated associations between tissue structure, EF and PS in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital white matter regions. Radial diffusivity was more prominently associated with performance than axial diffusivity. BP only minimally influenced the relationship between white matter integrity, EF and PS. However, WMSA volume had a major impact on neurocognitive associations. This suggests that, although BP and WMSA are causally related, these differential metrics of vascular health may act via independent pathways to influence brain structure, EF and PS. PMID:21954054

  2. Association between white matter microstructure, executive functions, and processing speed in older adults: the impact of vascular health.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Heidi I L; Leritz, Elizabeth C; Williams, Victoria J; Van Boxtel, Martin P J; van der Elst, Wim; Jolles, Jelle; Verhey, Frans R J; McGlinchey, Regina E; Milberg, William P; Salat, David H

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral white matter damage is not only a commonly reported consequence of healthy aging, but is also associated with cognitive decline and dementia. The aetiology of this damage is unclear; however, individuals with hypertension have a greater burden of white matter signal abnormalities (WMSA) on MR imaging than those without hypertension. It is therefore possible that elevated blood pressure (BP) impacts white matter tissue structure which in turn has a negative impact on cognition. However, little information exists about whether vascular health indexed by BP mediates the relationship between cognition and white matter tissue structure. We used diffusion tensor imaging to examine the impact of vascular health on regional associations between white matter integrity and cognition in healthy older adults spanning the normotensive to moderate-severe hypertensive BP range (43-87 years; N = 128). We examined how white matter structure was associated with performance on tests of two cognitive domains, executive functioning (EF) and processing speed (PS), and how patterns of regional associations were modified by BP and WMSA. Multiple linear regression and structural equation models demonstrated associations between tissue structure, EF and PS in frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital white matter regions. Radial diffusivity was more prominently associated with performance than axial diffusivity. BP only minimally influenced the relationship between white matter integrity, EF and PS. However, WMSA volume had a major impact on neurocognitive associations. This suggests that, although BP and WMSA are causally related, these differential metrics of vascular health may act via independent pathways to influence brain structure, EF and PS. PMID:21954054

  3. The expression of endothelial cell surface antigens by AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma. Evidence for a vascular endothelial cell origin.

    PubMed Central

    Rutgers, J. L.; Wieczorek, R.; Bonetti, F.; Kaplan, K. L.; Posnett, D. N.; Friedman-Kien, A. E.; Knowles, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigated 19 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) obtained from patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) for their expression of Factor VIII-related antigen (FVIIIRAg), HLA-DR (Ia) antigens, OKM1, and three distinctive vascular, but not lymphatic, endothelial-cell-associated antigens, E92, OKM5, and HCl. Antigen expression was demonstrated by immunoperoxidase staining of cryostat sections. FVIIIRAg is strongly expressed by the cells lining the vascular spaces (VCs) but is absent, weakly or focally, and variably expressed by the spindle cell (SC) component of KS. The VC component of each KS lesion examined strongly expressed E92, moderately expressed HCl, and weakly expressed OKM5. In contrast, the entire SC component of each KS lesion studied strongly expressed E92 and OKM5 and weakly expressed HCl. Neither the VCs nor the SCs expressed OKM1. These studies provide strong and compelling evidence for the vascular endothelial cell histogenesis of both the vascular and spindle cell components of KS, demonstrate the intertumor and intratumor phenotypic heterogeneity of KS, and suggest that monoclonal antibodies OKM5 and anti-E92 are the best currently available immunohistochemical markers for identifying the spindle cell component of AIDS-associated KS in cryostat sections. Images Figure 1 PMID:3953772

  4. Heterogeneous vascular permeability and alternative diffusion barrier in sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shoko; Furube, Eriko; Mannari, Tetsuya; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Wanaka, Akio; Miyata, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    Fenestrated capillaries of the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, the subfornical organ and the area postrema, lack completeness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to sense a variety of blood-derived molecules and to convey the information into other brain regions. We examine the vascular permeability of blood-derived molecules and the expression of tight-junction proteins in sensory CVOs. The present tracer assays revealed that blood-derived dextran 10 k (Dex10k) having a molecular weight (MW) of 10,000 remained in the perivascular space between the inner and outer basement membranes, but fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC; MW: 389) and Dex3k (MW: 3000) diffused into the parenchyma. The vascular permeability of FITC was higher at central subdivisions than at distal subdivisions. Neither FITC nor Dex3k diffused beyond the dense network of glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes/tanycytes. The expression of tight-junction proteins such as occludin, claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was undetectable at the central subdivisions of the sensory CVOs but some was expressed at the distal subdivisions. Electron microscopic observation showed that capillaries were surrounded with numerous layers of astrocyte processes and dendrites. The expression of occludin and ZO-1 was also observed as puncta on GFAP-positive astrocytes/tanycytes of the sensory CVOs. Our study thus demonstrates the heterogeneity of vascular permeability and expression of tight-junction proteins and indicates that the outer basement membrane and dense astrocyte/tanycyte connection are possible alternative mechanisms for a diffusion barrier of blood-derived molecules, instead of the BBB. PMID:26048259

  5. Brain endothelial cells and the glio-vascular complex.

    PubMed

    Wolburg, Hartwig; Noell, Susan; Mack, Andreas; Wolburg-Buchholz, Karen; Fallier-Becker, Petra

    2009-01-01

    We present and discuss the role of endothelial and astroglial cells in managing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and aspects of pathological alterations in the BBB. The impact of astrocytes, pericytes, and perivascular cells on the induction and maintenance of the gliovascular unit is largely unidentified so far. An understanding of the signaling pathways that lie between these cell types and the endothelium and that possibly are mediated by components of the basal lamina is just beginning to emerge. The metabolism for the maintenance of the endothelial barrier is intimately linked to and dependent on the microenvironment of the brain parenchyma. We report the structure and function of the endothelial cells of brain capillaries by describing structures involved in the regulation of permeability, including transporter systems, caveolae, and tight junctions. There is increasing evidence that caveolae are not only vehicles for endo- and transcytosis, but also important regulators of tight-junction-based permeability. Tight junctions separate the luminal from the abluminal membrane domains of the endothelial cell ("fence function") and control the paracellular pathway ("gate function") thus representing the most significant structure of the BBB. In addition, the extracellular matrix between astrocytes/pericytes and endothelial cells contains numerous molecules with inherent signaling properties that have to be considered if we are to improve our knowledge of the complex and closely regulated BBB. PMID:18633647

  6. Impact of intense pulsed light irradiation on cultured primary fibroblasts and a vascular endothelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    WU, DI; ZHOU, BINGRONG; XU, YANG; YIN, ZHIQIANG; LUO, DAN

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of intense pulsed light (IPL) on cell proliferation and the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human fibroblasts and vascular endothelial cell lines, and to investigate the effects of IPL on the mRNA expression levels of type I and III procollagens in cultured human fibroblasts. Foreskin fibroblasts and a vascular endothelial cell line (ECV034) were cultured and treated with various wavelengths and doses of IPL irradiation. After culture for 1, 12, 24 and 48 h following IPL irradiation, fibroblasts and the vascular endothelial cell line were harvested for investigation of morphological changes by light microscopy, cell proliferation viability by MTT assay, and VEGF and MMP secretions by ELISA. The mRNA expression levels of type I and III procollagens in the fibroblasts were detected by RT-PCR. No marked morphological changes were observed in the cultured fibroblasts compared with the control. Cell growth and cellular viability were increased in fibroblasts 24 and 48 h after IPL irradiation. The levels of type I and III procollagen mRNA expression in fibroblasts increased in a time-dependent manner. However, the IPL management had no impact on VEGF and MMP secretion levels in fibroblasts and the ECV034 cell line at any time-point after irradiation as well as cell morphology and cellular proliferation. IPL irradiation may induce cellular proliferation and promote the expression of procollagen mRNAs directly in cultured primary fibroblasts, which may primarily contribute to photorejuvenation. PMID:23170124

  7. Nanoarchitecture of scaffolds and endothelial cells in engineering small diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Krishna Kumar; Subramanian, Anuradha; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of functional small diameter blood vessels still remains a challenge, as the synthetic vascular grafts fail to mimic the complex structural architecture and dynamic functions of blood vessels and also lack with the lack of non-thrombogenicity. Although, the existence of nanofibrous extracellular matrix components in the native tissue promotes many physical and molecular signals to the endothelial cells for the regulation of morphogenesis, homeostasis, and cellular functions in vascular tissue, poor understanding of the structural architecture on the functional activation of appropriate genes limits the development of successful vascular graft design. Hence, the present review outlines the functional contributions of various nanofibrous extracellular matrix components in native blood vessels. Further, the review focuses on the role of nanofiber topography of biomaterial scaffolds in endothelial cell fate processes such as adhesion, proliferation, migration, and infiltration with the expression of vasculature specific genes; thereby allowing the reader to envisage the communication between the nano-architecture of scaffolds and endothelial cells in engineering small diameter vascular grafts. PMID:25641941

  8. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage.

    PubMed

    Wenceslau, Camilla F; McCarthy, Cameron G; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma. PMID:27532003

  9. Engineering micropatterned surfaces to modulate the function of vascular stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jennifer; Wu, Michelle; Chu, Julia; Sochol, Ryan; Patel, Shyam

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • We examine vascular stem cell function on microgrooved and micropost patterned polymer substrates. • 10 μm microgrooved surfaces significantly lower VSC proliferation but do not modulate calcified matrix deposition. • Micropost surfaces significantly lower VSC proliferation and decrease calcified matrix deposition. - Abstract: Multipotent vascular stem cells have been implicated in vascular disease and in tissue remodeling post therapeutic intervention. Hyper-proliferation and calcified extracellular matrix deposition of VSC cause blood vessel narrowing and plaque hardening thereby increasing the risk of myocardial infarct. In this study, to optimize the surface design of vascular implants, we determined whether micropatterned polymer surfaces can modulate VSC differentiation and calcified matrix deposition. Undifferentiated rat VSC were cultured on microgrooved surfaces of varied groove widths, and on micropost surfaces. 10 μm microgrooved surfaces elongated VSC and decreased cell proliferation. However, microgrooved surfaces did not attenuate calcified extracellular matrix deposition by VSC cultured in osteogenic media conditions. In contrast, VSC cultured on micropost surfaces assumed a dendritic morphology, were significantly less proliferative, and deposited minimal calcified extracellular matrix. These results have significant implications for optimizing the design of cardiovascular implant surfaces.

  10. Vascularized Bone Tissue Formation Induced by Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cultured with Osteoblasts and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinhui; Zhang, Guoping; Hou, Chuanyong; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yelin; Guan, Guoping; Dong, Wei; Gao, Hongyang

    2013-01-01

    The repair of the damaged bone tissue caused by damage or bone disease was still a problem. Current strategies including the use of autografts and allografts have the disadvantages, namely, diseases transmission, tissue availability and donor morbidity. Bone tissue engineering has been developed and regarded as a new way of regenerating bone tissues to repair or substitute damaged or diseased ones. The main limitation in engineering in vitro tissues is the lack of a sufficient blood vessel system, the vascularization. In this paper, a new-typed hydroxyapatite/collagen composite scaffold which was reinforced by chitosan fibers and cultured with osteoblasts and endothelial cells was fabricated. General observation, histological observation, detection of the degree of vascularization, and X-ray examination had been done to learn the effect of vascularized bone repair materials on the regeneration of bone. The results show that new vessel and bone formed using implant cultured with osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Nanofiber-reinforced scaffold cultured with osteoblasts and endothelial cells can induce vascularized bone tissue formation. PMID:24369019

  11. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslau, Camilla F.; McCarthy, Cameron G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma. PMID:27532003

  12. Controlling shape and position of vascular formation in engineered tissues by arbitrary assembly of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Kuroda, Masatoshi; Muraoka, Megumi; Itoga, Kazuyoshi; Okano, Teruo; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2015-12-01

    Cellular self-assembly based on cell-to-cell communication is a well-known tissue organizing process in living bodies. Hence, integrating cellular self-assembly processes into tissue engineering is a promising approach to fabricate well-organized functional tissues. In this research, we investigated the capability of endothelial cells (ECs) to control shape and position of vascular formation using arbitral-assembling techniques in three-dimensional engineered tissues. To quantify the degree of migration of ECs in endothelial network formation, image correlation analysis was conducted. Positive correlation between the original positions of arbitrarily assembled ECs and the positions of formed endothelial networks indicated the potential for controlling shape and position of vascular formations in engineered tissues. To demonstrate the feasibility of controlling vascular formations, engineered tissues with vascular networks in triangle and circle patterns were made. The technique reported here employs cellular self-assembly for tissue engineering and is expected to provide fundamental beneficial methods to supply various functional tissues for drug screening and regenerative medicine. PMID:26545138

  13. Adult stem cell-based apexogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Shu, Li-Hong; Yan, Ming; Dai, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Generally, the dental pulp needs to be removed when it is infected, and root canal therapy (RCT) is usually required in which infected dental pulp is replaced with inorganic materials (paste and gutta percha). This treatment approach ultimately brings about a dead tooth. However, pulp vitality is extremely important to the tooth itself, since it provides nutrition and acts as a biosensor to detect the potential pathogenic stimuli. Despite the reported clinical success rate, RCT-treated teeth are destined to be devitalized, brittle and susceptible to postoperative fracture. Recently, the advances and achievements in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have inspired novel biological approaches to apexogenesis in young patients suffering from pulpitis or periapical periodontitis. This review mainly focuses on the benchtop and clinical regeneration of root apex mediated by adult stem cells. Moreover, current strategies for infected pulp therapy are also discussed here. PMID:25332909

  14. Adult stem cell-based apexogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Shu, Li-Hong; Yan, Ming; Dai, Wen-Yong; Li, Jun-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Dong; Yu, Jin-Hua

    2014-06-26

    Generally, the dental pulp needs to be removed when it is infected, and root canal therapy (RCT) is usually required in which infected dental pulp is replaced with inorganic materials (paste and gutta percha). This treatment approach ultimately brings about a dead tooth. However, pulp vitality is extremely important to the tooth itself, since it provides nutrition and acts as a biosensor to detect the potential pathogenic stimuli. Despite the reported clinical success rate, RCT-treated teeth are destined to be devitalized, brittle and susceptible to postoperative fracture. Recently, the advances and achievements in the field of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have inspired novel biological approaches to apexogenesis in young patients suffering from pulpitis or periapical periodontitis. This review mainly focuses on the benchtop and clinical regeneration of root apex mediated by adult stem cells. Moreover, current strategies for infected pulp therapy are also discussed here. PMID:25332909

  15. Preparation of three-dimensional vascularized MSC cell sheet constructs for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liling; Ma, Dongyang; Liu, Bin; Li, Jinda; Chen, Jia; Yang, Dan; Gao, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) vascularized constructs remains a challenge due to the inability to form rich microvessel networks. In this study we engineered a prevascularized 3D cell sheet construct for tissue regeneration using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells as cell sources. hMSCs were cultured to form a thick cell sheet, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were then seeded on the hMSCs sheet to form networks. The single prevascularized HUVEC/hMSC cell sheet was folded to form a 3D construct by a modified cell sheet engineering technique. In vitro results indicated that the hMSCs cell sheet promoted the HUVECs cell migration to form networks in horizontal and vertical directions. In vivo results showed that many blood vessels grew into the 3D HUVEC/hMSC cell sheet constructs after implanted in the subcutaneous pocket of immunodeficient mice. The density of blood vessels in the prevascularized constructs was higher than that in the nonprevascularized constructs. Immunohistochemistry staining further showed that in vitro preformed human capillaries in the prevascularized constructs anastomosed with the host vasculature to form functional blood vessels. These results suggest the promising potential of this 3D prevascularized construct using hMSCs cell sheet as a platform for wide applications in engineering vascularized tissues. PMID:25110670

  16. βA3/A1-crystallin in astroglial cells regulates retinal vascular remodeling during development

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Debasish; Klise, Andrew; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Bhutto, Imran A.; Hackler, Laszlo; Malpic-llanos, Tanya; Samtani, Sonia; Grebe, Rhonda; Goldberg, Morton F.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Nath, Avindra; Zack, Donald J.; Fariss, Robert N.; McLeod, D. Scott; Sundin, Olof; Broman, Karl W.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Zigler, J. Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a complex process critical to development of the mature vascular system. Astrocytes are known to be indispensable for initial formation of the retinal vasculature; our studies with the Nuc1 rat provide novel evidence that these cells are also essential in the retinal vascular remodeling process. Nuc1 is a spontaneous mutation in the Sprague–Dawley rat originally characterized by nuclear cataracts in the heterozygote and microphthalmia in the homozygote. We report here that the Nuc1 allele results from mutation of the βA3/A1-crystallin gene, which in the neural retina is expressed only in astrocytes. We demonstrate striking structural abnormalities in Nuc1 astrocytes with profound effects on the organization of intermediate filaments. While vessels form in the Nuc1 retina, the subsequent remodeling process required to provide a mature vascular network is deficient. Our data implicate βA3/A1-crystallin as an important regulatory factor mediating vascular patterning and remodeling in the retina. PMID:17931883

  17. [Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adults].

    PubMed

    Feuillet, Séverine; Giroux-Leprieur, Bénédicte; Tazi, Abdellatif

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans-cell histiocytosis in adults is a rare condition of unknown etiology characterized by the accumulation of Langerhans cells organized in granulomas involving the distal bronchioles and destroying their walls. It occurs in young subjects who smoke, with frequency peaking between 20 and 40 years. High-resolution thoracic CT is essential for diagnosis; in typical forms it shows a combination of nodules, cavitary nodules, thick-walled cysts, and thin-walled cysts. Diagnostic certainty requires a surgical lung biopsy, by videothoracoscopy, but only if a specialist considers it indicated. It is difficult to predict the disease course for any given patient. A prospective multicenter cohort study currently underway should provide more information about the natural history of this disease. Management is empirical, for efficacy has not been proved for any treatment. Stopping smoking is especially important to prevent the added development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular complications, or the onset of bronchopulmonary cancer, the frequency of which appears elevated in these patients. Oral corticosteroids are used to treat disease progression, especially in the symptomatic mainly nodular forms, but their efficacy for respiratory function has not been shown. Vinblastine, the reference treatment for multisystem forms of Langerhans-cell histiocytosis, is not indicated for pulmonary involvement in adults. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in this condition should eventually make it possible to develop innovative treatment strategies. The creation of the national reference center for Langerhans-cell histiocytosis has given new momentum to clinical and pathophysiologic research on this orphan disease. PMID:19959324

  18. Sertoli Cells Maintain Leydig Cell Number and Peritubular Myoid Cell Activity in the Adult Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana; Milne, Laura; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Jeffrey, Nathan; Guillou, Florian; Freeman, Tom C.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2014-01-01

    The Sertoli cells are critical regulators of testis differentiation and development. In the adult, however, their known function is restricted largely to maintenance of spermatogenesis. To determine whether the Sertoli cells regulate other aspects of adult testis biology we have used a novel transgenic mouse model in which Amh-Cre induces expression of the receptor for Diphtheria toxin (iDTR) specifically within Sertoli cells. This causes controlled, cell-specific and acute ablation of the Sertoli cell population in the adult animal following Diphtheria toxin injection. Results show that Sertoli cell ablation leads to rapid loss of all germ cell populations. In addition, adult Leydig cell numbers decline by 75% with the remaining cells concentrated around the rete and in the sub-capsular region. In the absence of Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cell activity is reduced but the cells retain an ability to exclude immune cells from the seminiferous tubules. These data demonstrate that, in addition to support of spermatogenesis, Sertoli cells are required in the adult testis both for retention of the normal adult Leydig cell population and for support of normal peritubular myoid cell function. This has implications for our understanding of male reproductive disorders and wider androgen-related conditions affecting male health. PMID:25144714

  19. Emerging role of TRP channels in cell migration: from tumor vascularization to metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Gkika, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels modulate intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, controlling critical cytosolic and nuclear events that are involved in the initiation and progression of cancer. It is not, therefore, surprising that the expression of some TRP channels is altered during tumor growth and metastasis. Cell migration of both epithelial and endothelial cells is an essential step of the so-called metastatic cascade that leads to the spread of the disease within the body. It is in fact required for both tumor vascularization as well as for tumor cell invasion into adjacent tissues and intravasation into blood/lymphatic vessels. Studies from the last 15 years have unequivocally shown that the ion channles and the transport proteins also play important roles in cell migration. On the other hand, recent literature underlies a critical role for TRP channels in the migration process both in cancer cells as well as in tumor vascularization. This will be the main focus of our review. We will provide an overview of recent advances in this field describing TRP channels contribution to the vascular and cancer cell migration process, and we will systematically discuss relevant molecular mechanism involved. PMID:24204345

  20. Hypertonic upregulation of amino acid transport system A in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J G; Klus, L R; Steenbergen, D K; Kempson, S A

    1994-08-01

    The A10 line of vascular smooth muscle cells has Na+ dependent transport systems for alanine, proline, and Pi, whereas uptake of leucine, myo-inositol and D-glucose is Na+ independent. When A10 cells were incubated for 4 h in medium made hypertonic by addition of sucrose, there was a marked increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of alanine and proline but no change in Na(+)-dependent Pi uptake or Na(+)-independent uptake of leucine and inositol. Intracellular alanine content was increased 61% by the hypertonic treatment. Other nonpenetrating solutes, such as cellobiose and mannitol, reproduced the effect of sucrose, but urea, a penetrating solute, did not. Studies with 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid revealed that the upregulation by hypertonicity involved only system A. Increases in alanine and proline uptake also occurred after incubating the cells in isotonic medium containing 0.1 mM ouabain, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Na+ may be part of the intracellular signal for upregulation of system A. Hypertonic upregulation of Na(+)-dependent alanine transport occurred also in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. The response was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that gene transcription and protein synthesis play important roles in the mechanism leading to increased alanine uptake. We conclude that vascular smooth muscle cells, during prolonged hypertonic stress, activate system A and accumulate specific neutral amino acids which may act as organic osmolytes to help maintain normal cell volume. PMID:8074188

  1. ER Alpha Rapid Signaling Is Required for Estrogen Induced Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Ueda, Kazutaka; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Diomede, Olga I.; Andrade, Tiffany; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which likely underlies its ability to accelerate re-endothelialization and reduce adverse remodeling after vascular injury. In previous studies, we have shown that the protective effects of E2 (the active endogenous form of estrogen) in vascular injury require the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). ERα transduces the effects of estrogen via a classical DNA binding, “genomic” signaling pathway and via a more recently-described “rapid” signaling pathway that is mediated by a subset of ERα localized to the cell membrane. However, which of these pathways mediates the effects of estrogen on endothelial cells is poorly understood. Here we identify a triple point mutant version of ERα (KRR ERα) that is specifically defective in rapid signaling, but is competent to regulate transcription through the “genomic” pathway. We find that in ECs expressing wild type ERα, E2 regulates many genes involved in cell migration and proliferation, promotes EC migration and proliferation, and also blocks the adhesion of monocytes to ECs. ECs expressing KRR mutant ERα, however, lack all of these responses. These observations establish KRR ERα as a novel tool that could greatly facilitate future studies into the vascular and non-vascular functions of ERα rapid signaling. Further, they support that rapid signaling through ERα is essential for many of the transcriptional and physiological responses of ECs to E2, and that ERα rapid signaling in ECs, in vivo, may be critical for the vasculoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen. PMID:27035664

  2. A pilot trial to examine the association between circulating endothelial cell levels and vascular injury in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Shayan; Grant, Candace; Rambhujun, Vikash; Sharma, Ritika; Patel, Ronak; Islam, Shahidul; Mattana, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Objective While albuminuria is a marker for progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), both albuminuric and normoalbuminuric patients appear prone to vascular injury. This pilot study examines the association between circulating endothelial cell (CEC) levels and vascular injury in patients with T2DM and CKD. Methods In this cross-sectional study, eligible adult patients had T2DM, and stage 3 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate between 30 and 60 mL/min/1.73m 2). CEC levels were tested by Janssen Diagnostics, LLC using an immuno-magnetic bead-based assay. CEC levels were compared to levels in a previously tested normal population. Correlations between CEC levels and other vascular injury markers (urine albumin, von-Willebrand factor antigen, hs-CRP, uric acid) were performed. Results Patients included 40 adults of which nineteen were normoalbuminuric.  Mean CEC levels (38.7, SD 38.1 cells) were significantly higher than the normal population (M = 21±18 cells, p<0.001; N = 249), including in the normoalbuminuric subgroup (M = 42.9±42.5 cells, p<0.001). CEC levels were significantly correlated with uric acid levels (r=0.33, p=0.039). Conclusions CEC levels in patients with T2DM and CKD, both albuminuric and normoalbuminuric, are significantly higher than a normal population, suggesting the presence of vascular injury in both groups. Future studies are needed to evaluate the role of CECs as a biomarker to predict outcomes in normoalbuminuric patients with CKD. PMID:27303625

  3. Control of vascular network location in millimeter-sized 3D-tissues by micrometer-sized collagen coated cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yen; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-25

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) vascularized constructs remains a central challenge because capillary network structures are important for sufficient oxygen and nutrient exchange to sustain the viability of engineered constructs. However, construction of 3D-tissues at single cell level has yet to be reported. Previously, we established a collagen coating method for fabricating a micrometer-sized collagen matrix on cell surfaces to control cell distance or cell densities inside tissues. In this study, a simple fabrication method is presented for constructing vascular networks in 3D-tissues over micrometer-sized or even millimeter-sized with controlled cell densities. From the results, well vascularized 3D network structures can be observed with a fluorescence label method mixing collagen coated cells and endothelia cells, indicating that constructed ECM rich tissues have the potential for vascularization, which opens up the possibility for various applications in pharmaceutical or tissue engineering fields. PMID:26920051

  4. The Use of Fiber-Reinforced Scaffolds Cocultured with Schwann Cells and Vascular Endothelial Cells to Repair Rabbit Sciatic Nerve Defect with Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function. PMID:24490158

  5. The use of fiber-reinforced scaffolds cocultured with Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells to repair rabbit sciatic nerve defect with vascularization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function. PMID:24490158

  6. Effects of Gingko biloba extract (EGb 761) on vascular smooth muscle cell calcification induced by β-glycerophosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, En-Gang; Tian, Jun; Xu, Zhong-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Gingko biloba extract (EGb 761) on calcification induced by β-glycerophosphate in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods Rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells were cultured with various concentrations of EGb 761 and β-glycerophosphate for 7 days. Calcium content in the cells, alkaline phosphatase activity, cell protein content, NF-κB activation, and reactive oxygen species production were assayed, respectively. Results The calcium depositions of vascular smooth muscle cells of the β-glycerophosphate group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.01), and were inhibited by EGb 761 in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Data showed β-glycerophosphate induced the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase, up-regulated the NF-κB activity and increased reactive oxygen species production of vascular smooth muscle cells while these decreased when administrated with EGb 761(p < 0.05). Conclusions EGb 761 significantly reduced deposition of calcium induced by β-glycerophosphate in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. It not only reduced the deposition of calcium, but also inhibited osteogenic transdifferentiation, which may be associated with decreasing expression of alkaline phosphatase, down-regulating the NF-κB activity, and reducing reactive oxygen species production of vascular smooth muscle cells, and may have the potential to serve as a role for vascular calcification in clinical situations. PMID:26908182

  7. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs. PMID:24486216

  8. Nutrient regulation of tumor and vascular endothelial cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific bioactive dietary components, such as the steroid receptor superfamily ligands vitamins A and D, have been studied extensively as potential cancer preventive and therapeutic agents due to their ability to regulate key processes in a variety of cell types that are dysregulated in neoplastic ...

  9. Characterization of neural stem cells and their progeny in the sensory circumventricular organs of adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Furube, Eriko; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    Although evidence has accumulated that neurogenesis and gliogenesis occur in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of adult mammalian brains, recent studies indicate the presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in adult brains, particularly the circumventricular regions. In the present study, we aimed to determine characterization of NSCs and their progenitor cells in the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs), including organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, subfornical organ, and area postrema of adult mouse. There were two types of NSCs: tanycyte-like ependymal cells and astrocyte-like cells. Astrocyte-like NSCs proliferated slowly and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) actively divided. Molecular marker protein expression of NSCs and their progenitor cells were similar to those reported in the SVZ and SGZ, except that astrocyte-like NSCs expressed S100β. These circumventricular NSCs possessed the capacity to give rise to oligodendrocytes and sparse numbers of neurons and astrocytes in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. The inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling by using a VEGF receptor-associated tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 largely suppressed basal proliferation of OPCs. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide attenuated proliferation of OPCs and induced remarkable proliferation of microglia. The present study indicates that sensory circumventricular NSCs provide new neurons and glial cells in the sensory CVOs and adjacent brain regions. PMID:25994374

  10. A Factor Capable of Increasing Vascular Permeability Present in Lymph Node Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, D. A.; Boughton, Barbara; Schild, H. O.

    1963-01-01

    A soluble extract from guinea-pig lymph node cells (LPF) has been found to increase vascular permeability in the skin of the rat. The active substance has been differentiated from histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin, substance P, kallikrein and the globulin permeability factors from rat and guinea-pig serum by means of parallel quantitative assays. LPF was present in both sensitized and non-sensitized guinea-pig lymph node cells and in lymph node cells from rats and mice. LPF also increased vascular permeability in the skin of guinea-pigs, mice and rabbits. The possible importance of this factor in the mechanism of the delayed reactions is discussed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3 PMID:14069726

  11. Iron ion irradiation increases promotes adhesion of monocytic cells to arterial vascular endothelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucik, Dennis; Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran; Wu, Xing; Yu, Tao; Chang, Polly; Kabarowski, Janusz

    Radiation causes inflammation, and chronic, low-level vascular inflammation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Consistent with this, exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Part of the inflammatory response to radiation is a change in the adhesiveness of the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, triggering inappropriate accumulation of leukocytes, leading to later, damaging effects of inflammation. Although some studies have been done on the effects of gamma irradiation on vascular endothelium, the response of endothelium to heavy ion radiation likely to be encountered in prolonged space flight has not been determined. We investigated how irradiation of aortic endothelial cells with iron ions affects adhesiveness of cultured aortic endothelial cells for monocytic cells and the consequences of this for development of atherosclerosis. Aortic endothelial cells were irradiated with 600 MeV iron ions at Brookhaven National Laboratory and adhesion-related changes were measured. Cells remained viable for at least 72 hours, and were even able to repair acute damage to cell junctions. We found that iron ion irradiation altered expression levels of specific endothelial cell adhesion molecules. Further, these changes had functional consequences. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay to measure adhesion of monocytic cells to endothelial cells under physiological shear stress, we found that adhesivity of vascular endothelium was enhanced in as little as 24 hours after irradiation. Further, the radiation dose dependence was not monotonic, suggesting that it was not simply the result of endothelial cell damage. We also irradiated aortic arches and carotid arteries of Apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice. Histologic analysis of these mice will be conducted to determine whether effects of radiation on endothelial adhesiveness result in consequences for development of atherosclerosis. (Supported by NSBRI

  12. Effects of dopamine in the renal vascular bed of fetal, newborn, and adult sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.T.; Felder, R.A.; Jose, P.A.; Robillard, J.E.

    1987-03-01

    The renal hemodynamic response to renal arterial dopamine infusions was compared in unanesthetized fetal, newborn, and adult sheep. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged during intrarenal dopamine infusions. Dopamine produced dose-related decreases in mean renal blood flow velocity in all three groups. When compared with adult sheep fetal sheep were slightly more sensitive to the vasoconstrictive effects of dopamine ED/sub 50/. Increases in mean renal blood flow velocity were not seen at any dose given until dopamine was infused during ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-adrenoceptor blockade. The largest mean increase in renal flow velocity was 13 +/- 3, 16 +/- 3, and 17 +/- 4% in fetal, newborn, and adult sheep, respectively. cis-Flupentixol inhibited the vasodilation. Renal blood flow was measured using the radioactive microspheres techniques. This study demonstrates the presence of renal vasodilation following renal arterial dopamine infusions in fetal, newborn, and adult sheep when renal ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-adrenoceptors are blocked. Vasodilator responses are similar in all three groups, and increases in renal blood flow velocity are small compared with that of other experimental models.

  13. Hypercholesterolemic diet induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in sympathectomized rats via intrinsic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hachani, Rafik; Dab, Houcine; Feriani, Anouar; Saber, Sami; Sakly, Mohsen; Vicaut, Eric; Callebert, Jacques; Sercombe, Richard; Kacem, Kamel

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we intend to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemic diet, a high risk factor for atherosclerosis, on vascular cell apoptosis in rats that have been previously sympathectomized. Thus, newborn male Wistar rats received injections of guanethidine for sympathectomy. Sham received injections of vehicle. The two groups were fed 1% cholesterol diet for 3months. Sympathectomy alone group was also exploited. Apoptosis in abdominal aortic tissue was identified by TUNEL method and conventional agarose gel electrophoresis to detect specific DNA fragmentation. Caspases 3 and 9, Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c were examined by immunoblotting. Oil Red O staining was used to reveal lipid in the arterial wall. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages were identified by immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and rat macrophage marker (ED1), respectively. The efficacy of sympathectomy was evaluated by analysis of perivascular sympathetic fibers. Our study showed that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, 1) increased aortic TUNEL-positive cells compared to sham and sympathectomy alone groups, 2) illustrated a typical apoptotic DNA ladder on agarose gel electrophoresis, 3) induced Bax translocation from cytosol to mitochondria, 4) enhanced cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, 5) increased expression of active caspases 3 and 9, and 6) decreased Bcl-2 expression. VSMCs are identified as the major cell type exhibiting apoptosis in this model. Taken together, it can be concluded that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, induces vascular cell apoptosis in an intrinsic pathway. PMID:24708922

  14. ATP-containing vesicles in stria vascular marginal cell cytoplasms in neonatal rat cochlea are lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Liu, Wenjing; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We confirmed that ATP is released from cochlear marginal cells in the stria vascular but the cell organelle in which ATP stores was not identified until now. Thus, we studied the ATP-containing cell organelles and suggest that these are lysosomes. Primary cultures of marginal cells of Sprague-Dawley rats aged 1–3 days was established. Vesicles within marginal cells stained with markers were identified under confocal laser scanning microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then ATP release from marginal cells was measured after glycyl-L-phenylalanine-ß- naphthylamide (GPN) treatment using a bioluminescent assay. Quinacrine-stained granules within marginal cells were labeled with LysoTracker, a lysosome tracer, and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1(LAMP1), but not labeled with the mitochondrial tracer MitoTracker. Furthermore, LysoTracker-labelled puncta showed accumulation of Mant-ATP, an ATP analog. Treatment with 200 μM GPN quenched fluorescently labeled puncta after incubation with LysoTracker or quinacrine, but not MitoTracker. Quinacrine-labeled organelles observed by TEM were lysosomes, and an average 27.7 percent increase in ATP luminescence was observed in marginal cells extracellular fluid after GPN treatment. ATP-containing vesicles in cochlear marginal cells of the stria vascular from neonatal rats are likely lysosomes. ATP release from marginal cells may be via Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. PMID:26864824

  15. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  16. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn(2+)) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn(2+) are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn(2+) on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn(2+) was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn(2+) had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn(2+) displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn(2+) concentrations (80-120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  17. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Co-Activator-1α Cooperate to Protect Cells from DNA Damage and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Vascular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2015-10-01

    Reduced telomere length with increasing age in dividing cells has been implicated in contributing to the pathologies of human aging, which include cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, through induction of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening results from the absence of telomerase, an enzyme required to maintain telomere length. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the protein subunit of telomerase, is expressed only transiently in a subset of adult somatic cells, which include stem cells and smooth muscle cells. A recent report from Xiong and colleagues demonstrates a pivotal role for the transcription co-factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α) in maintaining TERT expression and preventing vascular senescence and atherosclerosis in mice. Ablation of PGC-1α reduced TERT expression and increased DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in shortened telomeres and vascular senescence. In the ApoE(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis, forced expression of PGC-1α increased expression of TERT, extended telomeres, and reversed genomic DNA damage, vascular senescence, and the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) stimulated expression of PGC-1α and TERT and reversed DNA damage, vascular senescence, and atherosclerosis, similarly to ectopic expression of PGC-1α. ALA stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, which in turn activated the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a co-factor for PGC-1α expression. The possibility that ALA might induce TERT to extend telomeres in human cells suggests that ALA may be useful in treating atherosclerosis and other aging-related diseases. However, further investigation is needed to identify whether ALA induces TERT in human cells, which cell types are susceptible, and whether such changes have clinical significance. PMID:26414604

  18. Nitric oxide influences red blood cell velocity independently of changes in the vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Keymel, Stefanie; Kumara, Intan; Burghoff, Sandra; Schrader, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2011-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in regulation of vascular tone and blood flow. In the microcirculation blood flow is strongly dependent on red blood cells (RBC) deformability. In vitro NO increases RBC deformability. This study hypothesized that NO increases RBC velocity in vivo not only by regulating vascular tone, but also by modifying RBC deformability. The effects of NO on RBC velocity were analysed by intra-vital microscopy in the microcirculation of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the avian embryo at day 7 post-fertilization, when all vessels lack smooth muscle cells and vascular tone is not affected by NO. It was found that inhibition of enzymatic NO synthesis and NO scavenging decreased intracellular NO levels and avian RBC deformability in vitro. Injection of a NO synthase-inhibitor or a NO scavenger into the microcirculation of the CAM decreased capillary RBC velocity and deformation, while the diameter of the vessels remained constant. The results indicate that scavenging of NO and inhibition of NO synthesis decrease RBC velocity not only by regulating vascular tone but also by decreasing RBC deformability. PMID:21480762

  19. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Maria; Busch, Bianca; Mueller, Daniel; Nolze, Alexander; Schreier, Barbara; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Inappropriately activated mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a risk factor for vascular remodeling with unclear molecular mechanism. Recent findings suggest that post-transcriptional regulation by micro-RNAs (miRs) may be involved. Our aim was to search for MR-dependent miRs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism and the pathologic relevance. We detected that aldosteroneviathe MR reduces miR-29bin vivoin murine aorta and in human primary and cultured VSMCs (ED50= 0.07 nM) but not in endothelial cells [quantitative PCR (qPCR), luciferase assays]. This effect was mediated by an increased decay of miR-29b in the cytoplasm with unchanged miR-29 family member or primary-miR levels. Decreased miR-29b led to an increase in extracellular matrix measured by ELISA and qPCR and enhanced VSMC migration in single cell-tracking experiments. Additionally, cell proliferation and the apoptosis/necrosis ratio (caspase/lactate dehydrogenase assay) was modulated by miR-29b. Enhanced VSMC migration by aldosterone required miR-29b regulation. Control experiments were performed with scrambled RNA and empty plasmids, by comparing aldosterone-stimulated with vehicle-incubated cells. Overall, our findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of aldosterone-mediated vascular pathogenesis by identifying miR-29b as a pathophysiologic relevant target of activated MR in VSMCs and by highlighting the importance of miR processing for miR regulation.-Bretschneider, M., Busch, B., Mueller, D., Nolze, A., Schreier, B., Gekle, M., Grossmann, C. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:26728178

  20. Slow and sustained nitric oxide releasing compounds inhibit multipotent vascular stem cell proliferation and differentiation without causing cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Brandon M.; Leix, Kyle Alexander; Ji, Yajing; Glaves, Richard Samuel Elliot; Ash, David E.; Mohanty, Dillip K.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) proliferate and differentiate. • Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of MVSCs. • Nitric oxide inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs). • Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) neither de-differentiate nor proliferate. - Abstract: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of cerebral and myocardial infarction. It is believed that neointimal growth common in the later stages of atherosclerosis is a result of vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) de-differentiation in response to endothelial injury. However, the claims of the SMC de-differentiation theory have not been substantiated by monitoring the fate of mature SMCs in response to such injuries. A recent study suggests that atherosclerosis is a consequence of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) differentiation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known mediator against atherosclerosis, in part because of its inhibitory effect on SMC proliferation. Using three different NO-donors, we have investigated the effects of NO on MVSC proliferation. Results indicate that NO inhibits MVSC proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. A slow and sustained delivery of NO proved to inhibit proliferation without causing cell death. On the other hand, larger, single-burst NO concentrations, inhibits proliferation, with concurrent significant cell death. Furthermore, our results indicate that endogenously produced NO inhibits MVSC differentiation to mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) and subsequently to SMC as well.

  1. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  2. MECHANISM BY WHICH AVENANTHRAMIDE-C, A POLYPHENOL OF OATS, BLOCKS CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avenanthramides (Avn) are unique polyphenols present in oats. We have reported that Avn-c, one of the major forms of Avn with the most antioxidant activity, inhibited the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), an important process in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis fo...

  3. Elk3 deficiency causes transient impairment in post-natal retinal vascular development and formation of tortuous arteries in adult murine retinae.

    PubMed

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(-/-) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(-/-) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(-/-) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients. PMID:25203538

  4. Elk3 Deficiency Causes Transient Impairment in Post-Natal Retinal Vascular Development and Formation of Tortuous Arteries in Adult Murine Retinae

    PubMed Central

    Weinl, Christine; Wasylyk, Christine; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Beck, Susanne C.; Riehle, Heidemarie; Stritt, Christine; Roux, Michel J.; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Nordheim, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Serum Response Factor (SRF) fulfills essential roles in post-natal retinal angiogenesis and adult neovascularization. These functions have been attributed to the recruitment by SRF of the cofactors Myocardin-Related Transcription Factors MRTF-A and -B, but not the Ternary Complex Factors (TCFs) Elk1 and Elk4. The role of the third TCF, Elk3, remained unknown. We generated a new Elk3 knockout mouse line and showed that Elk3 had specific, non-redundant functions in the retinal vasculature. In Elk3(−/−) mice, post-natal retinal angiogenesis was transiently delayed until P8, after which it proceeded normally. Interestingly, tortuous arteries developed in Elk3(−/−) mice from the age of four weeks, and persisted into late adulthood. Tortuous vessels have been observed in human pathologies, e.g. in ROP and FEVR. These human disorders were linked to altered activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the affected eyes. However, in Elk3(−/−) mice, we did not observe any changes in VEGF or several other potential confounding factors, including mural cell coverage and blood pressure. Instead, concurrent with the post-natal transient delay of radial outgrowth and the formation of adult tortuous arteries, Elk3-dependent effects on the expression of Angiopoietin/Tie-signalling components were observed. Moreover, in vitro microvessel sprouting and microtube formation from P10 and adult aortic ring explants were reduced. Collectively, these results indicate that Elk3 has distinct roles in maintaining retinal artery integrity. The Elk3 knockout mouse is presented as a new animal model to study retinal artery tortuousity in mice and human patients. PMID:25203538

  5. Relationship between vascularity, age and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrachud, L. M.; Pendleton, N.; Chisholm, D. M.; Horan, M. A.; Schor, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Lung tumours in the elderly show reduced growth potential; impaired angiogenesis may contribute to this phenomenon. Recent studies have suggested that the angiogenic potential of a tumour may be inferred by the vascularity measured in histological sections. The purpose of this study has been to determine whether vascularity is related to age, survival or other clinical parameters in resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A group of 88 consecutive patients with a follow-up period of at least 5 years was selected. The group exhibited a wide age range (37-78 years) and similar survival characteristics to those of the general NSCLC population. Tumour sections were stained with a pan-endothelial antibody (vWF) and vascularity was quantitated, without knowledge of the clinical details, by three methods: highest microvascular density; average microvascular density; and average microvascular volume. The results were analysed by non-parametric statistical tests. A correlation was found between all three methods of quantitation. Vascularity was not associated with age, sex, tumour type, stage, volume, size (TNM-T) nodal status (TNM-N) or survival. However, survival time was generally longer for patients with higher vascularity, reaching borderline significance (P = 0.06) for the average microvascular density values. Higher tumour volume (P = 0.02) and stage (P = 0.05) were associated with lower survival times. Using multivariate survival analysis, tumour volume was the only factor related to survival. We conclude that vascularity is not associated with age and has no significant prognostic value in NSCLC. Images Figure 1 PMID:9374385

  6. Continuous Taurocholic Acid Exposure Promotes Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression Due to Reduced Cell Loss Resulting from Enhanced Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Yamamoto, Hiroto; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Saito, Shota; Hattori, Takanori; Yamamoto, Gaku; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA) exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. Methods A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR) was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. Conclusion Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells. PMID:24551170

  7. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O.; Herbert, Karl E.; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R.; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J.; Goodall, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  8. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O; Herbert, Karl E; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J; Goodall, Alison H; Bevington, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  9. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  10. Immortalized Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lines from Umbilical Cord Blood for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sobhan, Praveen K.; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K.E.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial–cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell–biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications. PMID:22889128

  11. Persistent Disparities in Adult Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crockett, David G; Loberiza, Fausto R

    2015-09-01

    The use of large databases has provided advancements in the understanding of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in the field of adult hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT). Disparities exist on individual, institutional, and systemic levels for both allogeneic and autologous HCT. We reviewed the most recent publications that utilized large databases to elucidate disparities in HCT and placed them into historical context of the other major studies in the field. Two emerging themes were identified. These themes are persistent inequalities in both allogeneic HCT and autologous HCT for myeloma and the importance of improving homogeneity of care in HCT. Minimization of inequalities can be achieved only with an understanding of the persistent barriers that exist in the field. PMID:26104908

  12. Early origins of adult disease: low birth weight and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Visentin, Silvia; Grumolato, Francesca; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Di Camillo, Barbara; Grisan, Enrico; Cosmi, Erich

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes still represent the main cause of mortality and morbidity in the industrialized world. Low birth weight (LBW), caused by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), was recently known to be associated with increased rates of CVD and non-insulin dependent diabetes in adult life (Barker's hypothesis). Well-established animal models have shown that environmentally induced IUGR (diet, diabetes, hormone exposure, hypoxia) increases the risk of a variety of diseases later in life with similar phenotypic outcomes in target organs. This suggests that a range of disruptions in fetal and postnatal growth may act through common pathways to regulate the developmental programming and produce a similar adult phenotype. The identification of all involved signaling cascades, underlying the physiopathology of these damages in IUGR fetuses, with their influence on adult health, is still far from satisfactory. The endothelium may be important for long-term remodeling and in the control of elastic properties of the arterial wall. Several clinical and experimental studies showed that IUGR fetuses, neonates, children and adolescents present signs of endothelial dysfunction, valuated by aorta intima media thickness, carotid intima media thickness and stiffness, central pulse wave velocity, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, laser Doppler skin perfusion and by the measure of arterial blood pressure. In utero identification of high risk fetuses and long-term follow-up are necessary to assess the effects of interventions aimed at preventing pregnancy-induced hypertension, reducing maternal obesity, encouraging a healthy life style and preventing childhood obesity on adult blood pressure and cardiovascular disease in later life. PMID:25463063

  13. Disturbed Homeostasis of Lung Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 During Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Laudes, Ines J.; Guo, Ren-Feng; Riedemann, Niels C.; Speyer, Cecilia; Craig, Ron; Sarma, J. Vidya; Ward, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice was associated with perturbations in vascular adhesion molecules. In CLP mice, lung vascular binding of 125I-monoclonal antibodies to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 revealed sharp increases in binding of anti-ICAM-1 and significantly reduced binding of anti-VCAM-1. In whole lung homogenates, intense ICAM-1 up-regulation was found (both in mRNA and in protein levels) during sepsis, whereas very little increase in VCAM-1 could be measured although some increased mRNA was found. During CLP soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1) and soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) appeared in the serum. When mouse dermal microvascular endothelial cells (MDMECs) were incubated with serum from CLP mice, constitutive endothelial VCAM-1 fell in association with the appearance of sVCAM-1 in the supernatant fluids. Under the same conditions, ICAM-1 cell content increased in MDMECs. When MDMECs were evaluated for leukocyte adhesion, exposure to CLP serum caused increased adhesion of neutrophils and decreased adhesion of macrophages and T cells. The progressive build-up in lung myeloperoxidase after CLP was ICAM-1-dependent and independent of VLA-4 and VCAM-1. These data suggest that sepsis disturbs endothelial homeostasis, greatly favoring neutrophil adhesion in the lung microvasculature, thereby putting the lung at increased risk of injury. PMID:15039231

  14. Stem Cells on Biomaterials for Synthetic Grafts to Promote Vascular Healing

    PubMed Central

    Babczyk, Patrick; Conzendorf, Clelia; Klose, Jens; Schulze, Margit; Harre, Kathrin; Tobiasch, Edda

    2014-01-01

    This review is divided into two interconnected parts, namely a biological and a chemical one. The focus of the first part is on the biological background for constructing tissue-engineered vascular grafts to promote vascular healing. Various cell types, such as embryonic, mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells, progenitor cells and endothelial- and smooth muscle cells will be discussed with respect to their specific markers. The in vitro and in vivo models and their potential to treat vascular diseases are also introduced. The chemical part focuses on strategies using either artificial or natural polymers for scaffold fabrication, including decellularized cardiovascular tissue. An overview will be given on scaffold fabrication including conventional methods and nanotechnologies. Special attention is given to 3D network formation via different chemical and physical cross-linking methods. In particular, electron beam treatment is introduced as a method to combine 3D network formation and surface modification. The review includes recently published scientific data and patents which have been registered within the last decade. PMID:26237251

  15. Slug Is Increased in Vascular Remodeling and Induces a Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferative Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Peinado, Victor I.; Pisano, María V.; Párrizas, Marcelina; Blanco, Isabel; Evers, Maurits; Engelmann, Julia C.; García-Lucio, Jessica; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Meister, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have confirmed Slug as a key player in regulating phenotypic changes in several cell models, however, its role in smooth muscle cells (SMC) has never been assessed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of Slug during the phenotypic switch of SMC in vitro and throughout the development of vascular remodeling. Methods and Results Slug expression was decreased during both cell-to-cell contact and TGFβ1 induced SMC differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a known inductor of a proliferative/dedifferentiated SMC phenotype, induces the expression of Slug in SMC. Slug knockdown blocked TNFα-induced SMC phenotypic change and significantly reduced both SMC proliferation and migration, while its overexpression blocked the TGFβ1-induced SMC differentiation and induced proliferation and migration. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis showed that in SMC, Slug knockdown induced changes mainly in genes related to proliferation and migration, indicating that Slug controls these processes in SMC. Notably, Slug expression was significantly up-regulated in lungs of mice using a model of pulmonary hypertension-related vascular remodeling. Highly remodeled human pulmonary arteries also showed an increase of Slug expression compared to less remodeled arteries. Conclusions Slug emerges as a key transcription factor driving SMC towards a proliferative phenotype. The increased Slug expression observed in vivo in highly remodeled arteries of mice and human suggests a role of Slug in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27441378

  16. Akt Suppression of TGFβ Signaling Contributes to the Maintenance of Vascular Identity in Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Israely, Edo; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel; Ding, Bi-Sen; James, Daylon; Elemento, Olivier; Rafii, Shahin; Rabbany, Sina Y

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate and maintain stable in vitro cultures of mouse endothelial cells (EC) has great potential for genetic dissection of the numerous pathologies involving vascular dysfunction as well as therapeutic applications. However, previous efforts at achieving sustained cultures of primary stable murine vascular cells have fallen short, and the cellular requirements for EC maintenance in vitro remain undefined. In this study, we have generated vascular ECs from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, and show that active Akt is essential to their survival and propagation as homogeneous monolayers in vitro. These cells harbor the phenotypical, biochemical, and functional characteristics of ECs, and expand throughout long-term cultures, while maintaining their angiogenic capacity. Moreover, Akt-transduced embryonic ECs form functional perfused vessels in vivo that anastomose with host blood vessels. We provide evidence for a novel function of Akt in stabilizing EC identity, whereby the activated form of the protein protects mouse ES cell-derived ECs from TGFβ-mediated transdifferentiation by downregulating SMAD3. These findings identify a role for Akt in regulating the developmental potential of ES cell-derived ECs, and demonstrate that active Akt maintains endothelial identity in embryonic ECs by interfering with active TGFβ-mediated processes that would ordinarily usher these cells to alternate fates. PMID:23963623

  17. Usefulness of visceral obesity (waist/hip ratio) in predicting vascular endothelial function in healthy overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Brook, R D; Bard, R L; Rubenfire, M; Ridker, P M; Rajagopalan, S

    2001-12-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) is associated with obesity; however, its etiology remains controversial. By determining the predictors of fasting and postprandial endothelial function in overweight adults without other cardiovascular risk factors, we were able to investigate novel mechanisms directly linking obesity to VED. Thirty-two healthy adults (body mass index [BMI] > or =27 kg/m(2)) underwent determination of fasting low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size, high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, anthropometric measurements, and endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Postprandial lipemia and FMD were measured 4 hours after ingestion of a high-fat meal. Blood pressures and fasting levels of lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and fatty acids were within normal limits in all subjects. An abdominal fat pattern, as determined by an increased waist/hip ratio (WHR), was the sole significant predictor of FMD (r = -0.58, p = 0.001), despite no significant correlation between whole body obesity (BMI) and FMD. At comparable levels of BMI, obese subjects with a WHR > or =0.85 had a significantly blunted FMD compared with those with a WHR <0.85 (3.93 +/- 2.85% vs 8.34 +/- 5.47%, p = 0.016). Traditional coronary risk factors, C-reactive protein, postprandial lipemia, and LDL particle size did not predict FMD. We found no appreciable alteration in the postprandial state from fasting FMD (6.31 +/- 4.62% vs 6.25 +/- 5.47%, p = 0.95). The same results were found when women were analyzed alone. Increased abdominal adiposity determined by a simple WHR is a strong independent predictor of VED even in healthy overweight adults; this is a finding unexplained by alterations in conventional risk factors, systemic inflammation, or the atherogenic lipoprotein pattern. PMID:11728354

  18. Direct cytotoxic action of Shiga toxin on human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Obrig, T G; Del Vecchio, P J; Brown, J E; Moran, T P; Rowland, B M; Judge, T K; Rothman, S W

    1988-01-01

    To help explain a role of the Shiga toxin family in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans, it has been hypothesized that these toxins cause direct damage to the vascular endothelium. We now report that Shiga toxin purified from Shigella dysenteriae 1 does indeed have a direct cytotoxic effect on vascular endothelial cells in cultures. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in confluent monolayers were reduced 50% by 10(-8) M Shiga toxin after a lag period of 48 to 96 h. In comparison, nonconfluent HUVEC were reduced 50% by 10(-10) M Shiga toxin within a 24-h period. These data suggest that dividing endothelial cells are more sensitive to Shiga toxin than are quiescent cells in confluent monolayers. Both confluent and nonconfluent HUVEC specifically bound 125I-Shiga toxin. However, in response to the toxin, rates of incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein were more severely reduced in nonconfluent cells than in confluent cells. Toxin inhibition of protein synthesis preceded detachment of cells from the substratum. The specific binding of 125I-Shiga toxin to human endothelial cells and the cytotoxic response were both toxin dose dependent and neutralized by anti-Shiga toxin antibody. Heat-denatured Shiga toxin was without the cytotoxic effect. In addition, the complete culture system contained less than 0.1 ng of bacterial endotoxin per ml, as measured by the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test. PMID:3044997

  19. Age-dependent modulation of vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumbe, Anjali P; Ramasamy, Saravana K; Itkin, Tomer; Mäe, Maarja Andaloussi; Langen, Urs H; Betsholtz, Christer; Lapidot, Tsvee; Adams, Ralf H

    2016-04-21

    Blood vessels define local microenvironments in the skeletal system, play crucial roles in osteogenesis and provide niches for haematopoietic stem cells. The properties of niche-forming vessels and their changes in the ageing organism remain incompletely understood. Here we show that Notch signalling in endothelial cells leads to the expansion of haematopoietic stem cell niches in bone, which involves increases in CD31-positive capillaries and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ)-positive perivascular cells, arteriole formation and elevated levels of cellular stem cell factor. Although endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor signalling promotes some of these changes, it fails to enhance vascular niche function because of a lack of arterialization and expansion of PDGFRβ-positive cells. In ageing mice, niche-forming vessels in the skeletal system are strongly reduced but can be restored by activation of endothelial Notch signalling. These findings indicate that vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells are part of complex, age-dependent microenvironments involving multiple cell populations and vessel subtypes. PMID:27074508

  20. Dengue vascular leakage is augmented by mast cell degranulation mediated by immunoglobulin Fcγ receptors

    PubMed Central

    Syenina, Ayesa; Jagaraj, Cyril J; Aman, Siti AB; Sridharan, Aishwarya; St John, Ashley L

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most significant human arboviral pathogen and causes ∼400 million infections in humans each year. In previous work, we observed that mast cells (MC) mediate vascular leakage during DENV infection in mice and that levels of MC activation are correlated with disease severity in human DENV patients (St John et al., 2013b). A major risk factor for developing severe dengue is secondary infection with a heterologous serotype. The dominant theory explaining increased severity during secondary DENV infection is that cross-reactive but non-neutralizing antibodies promote uptake of virus and allow enhanced replication. Here, we define another mechanism, dependent on FcγR-mediated enhanced degranulation responses by MCs. Antibody-dependent mast cell activation constitutes a novel mechanism to explain enhanced vascular leakage during secondary DENV infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05291.001 PMID:25783751

  1. Essential role for calcium waves in migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; O'Neil, Caroline; Chrones, Tom; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Sims, Stephen M

    2011-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration is characterized by extension of the lamellipodia at the leading edge, lamellipodial attachment to substrate, and release of the rear (uropod) of the cell, all of which enable forward movement. However, little is known regarding the role of intracellular cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in coordinating these distinct activities of migrating SMCs. The objective of our study was to determine whether regional changes of Ca(2+) orchestrate the migratory cycle in human vascular SMCs. We carried out Ca(2+) imaging using digital fluorescence microscopy of fura-2 loaded human smooth muscle cells. We found that motile SMCs exhibited Ca(2+) waves that characteristically swept from the rear of polarized cells toward the leading edge. Ca(2+) waves were less evident in nonpolarized, stationary cells, although acute stimulation of these SMCs with the agonists platelet-derived growth factor-BB or histamine could elicit transient rise of [Ca(2+)](i). To investigate a role for Ca(2+) waves in the migratory cycle, we loaded cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA, which abolished Ca(2+) waves and significantly reduced retraction, supporting a causal role for Ca(2+) in initiation of retraction. However, lamellipod motility was still evident in BAPTA-loaded cells. The incidence of Ca(2+) oscillations was reduced when Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was disrupted with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin or by treatment with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor blocker 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borate or xestospongin C, implicating Ca(2+) stores in generation of waves. We conclude that Ca(2+) waves are essential for migration of human vascular SMCs and can encode cell polarity. PMID:21572011

  2. Role of retinal vascular endothelial cells in development of CMV retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N A; Zhang, J; Ishimoto, S

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is known to occur in association with retinal microangiopathy in individuals with marked immunodeficiency, glial cells are believed to be the initial target cells in the development of retinitis. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that CMV gains access to the retinal glia because of altered vascular permeability. In an attempt to address the hypothesis, we studied 30 autopsy eyes of AIDS patients with systemic CMV infection, with or without clinically apparent CMV retinitis. METHODS: The autopsy eyes were processed in three ways. First, dual immunohistochemical studies were done by using anti-CMV antibodies for immediate early, early, and late antigens. The retinal cell types infected with the virus were then determined by using anti-GFAP, anti-VonWillebrand's factor, neuronal specific enolase, and leukocyte marker CD68. Second, selected eyes were processed for in situ hybridization with DNA probe specific to CMV. Third, an eye with clinically apparent CMV retinitis was submitted for electron microscopic examination. RESULTS: At the site of retinal necrosis in those eyes with a clinical diagnosis of CMV retinitis, the immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and ultrastructural examinations revealed that CMV was present primarily in the Müller cells and in perivascular glial cells. Adjacent to these infected cells, focal areas of positive staining for CMV antigen were seen in the glial cells, neuronal cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells. At these sites most of the retinal capillaries were devoid of endothelial cells. Few vessels located at the advancing margin of retinal necrosis showed the presence of viral proteins in the endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicate that retinal vascular endothelial cells could be the initial target in the development of viral retinitis, with subsequent spread of the infection to perivascular glia, Müller cells, and other retinal cells, including the

  3. The immunolocation of a xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase specific to elongating tissues in Cicer arietinum suggests a role in the elongation of vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Teresa; Martín, Ignacio; Labrador, Emilia; Dopico, Berta

    2006-01-01

    In a previous work, a Cicer arietinum cDNA clone (CaXTH1) encoding a xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH1) protein was isolated and characterized. CaXTH1 showed an expression pattern specific to growing tissue: mostly epicotyls and the upper growing internodes of adult stems. CaXTH1 mRNA was not detected in any other organs of either seedlings or adult plants, suggesting an involvement of the putative XTH encoded by CaXTH1 in the chickpea cell expansion process. After the generation of polyclonal antibodies by using the XTH1 recombinant protein and the analysis of the specificity of the antibodies for XTH proteins, here the specific location of the chickpea XTH1-cross-reacting protein in cell walls of epicotyls, radicles, and stems is reported, evaluated by western blot and immunocytochemical studies. The results indicate a function for this protein in the elongation of parenchyma cells of epicotyls and also in developing vascular tissue, suggesting a role in the elongation of vascular cells. PMID:17075081

  4. Regulatory mechanism of human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transformation induced by NELIN.

    PubMed

    Pei, Changan; Qin, Shiyong; Wang, Minghai; Zhang, Shuguang

    2015-11-01

    Vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis, arise from dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, which can be controlled by regulatory factors. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism of the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs by NELIN in order to evaluate its potential as a preventive and therapeutic of vascular disorders. An in vitro model of NELIN‑overexpressing VSMCs was prepared by transfection with a lentiviral (LV) vector (NELIN‑VSMCs) and NELIN was slienced using an a lentiviral vector with small interfering (si)RNA in another group (LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs). The effects of NELIN overexpression or knockdown on the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs were observed, and its regulatory mechanism was studied. Compared with the control group, cells in the NELIN‑VSMCs group presented a contractile phenotype with a significant increase of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, smooth muscle (SM)α‑actin and total Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) protein expression. The intra‑nuclear translocation of SMα‑actin‑serum response factor (SMα‑actin‑SRF) occurred in these cells simultaneously. Following exposure to Rho kinsase inhibitor Y‑27632, SRF and SMα‑actin expression decreased. However, cells in the LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs group presented a synthetic phenotype, and the expression of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, SMα‑actin protein and total RhoA protein was decreased. The occurrence of SRF extra‑nuclear translocation was observed. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NELIN was able to activate regulatory factors of SMα‑actin, RhoA and SRF successively in human VSMCs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, NELIN‑induced phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs was regulated via the RhoA/SRF signaling pathway. The results of the present study provide a foundation for the use of NELIN in preventive and therapeutic treatment of vascular remodeling

  5. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction. PMID:27357950

  6. Vascular patterning regulates interdigital cell death by a ROS-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eshkar-Oren, Idit; Krief, Sharon; Ferrara, Napoleone; Elliott, Alison M; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-02-15

    Blood vessels serve as key regulators of organogenesis by providing oxygen, nutrients and molecular signals. During limb development, programmed cell death (PCD) contributes to separation of the digits. Interestingly, prior to the onset of PCD, the autopod vasculature undergoes extensive patterning that results in high interdigital vascularity. Here, we show that in mice, the limb vasculature positively regulates interdigital PCD. In vivo, reduction in interdigital vessel number inhibited PCD, resulting in syndactyly, whereas an increment in vessel number and distribution resulted in elevation and expansion of PCD. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), toxic compounds that have been implicated in PCD, also depended on interdigital vascular patterning. Finally, ex vivo incubation of limbs in gradually decreasing oxygen levels led to a correlated reduction in both ROS production and interdigital PCD. The results support a role for oxygen in these processes and provide a mechanistic explanation for the counterintuitive positive role of the vasculature in PCD. In conclusion, we suggest a new role for vascular patterning during limb development in regulating interdigital PCD by ROS production. More broadly, we propose a double safety mechanism that restricts PCD to interdigital areas, as the genetic program of PCD provides the first layer and vascular patterning serves as the second. PMID:25617432

  7. Effects of Cyclic Strain and Growth Factors on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kona, Soujanya; Chellamuthu, Prithiviraj; Xu, Hao; Hills, Seth R; Nguyen, Kytai Truong

    2009-01-01

    Under physiological and pathological conditions, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) are exposed to different biochemical factors and biomechanical forces. Previous studies pertaining to SMC responses have not investigated the effects of both factors on SMCs. Thus, in our research we investigated the combined effects of growth factors like Bfgf (basic fibroblast growth factor), TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) and PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor) along with physiological cyclic strain on SMC responses. Physiological cyclic strain (10% strain) significantly reduced SMC proliferation compared to static controls while addition of growth factors bFGF, TGF-β or PDGF-AB had a positive influence on SMC growth compared to strain alone. Microarray analysis of SMCs exposed to these growth factors and cyclic strain showed that several bioactive genes (vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor, etc.) were altered upon exposure. Further work involving biochemical and pathological cyclic strain stimulation will help us better understand the role of cyclic strain and growth factors in vascular functions and development of vascular disorders. PMID:19812708

  8. Structural and functional vascular alterations and incident hypertension in normotensive adults: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Carmen A; Adeney, Kathryn L; Shlipak, Michael G; Jacobs, David; Duprez, Daniel; Bluemke, David; Polak, Joseph; Psaty, Bruce; Kestenbaum, Bryan R

    2010-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities may exist before clinical hypertension. Using Poisson regression, the authors studied the association of coronary artery calcium (CAC), common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), aortic distensibility, and large and small arterial elasticity with incident hypertension among 2,512 normotensive US adults free of cardiovascular disease. Incidence rate ratios for incident hypertension (blood pressure > or =140/90 mm Hg or new antihypertensive medication) were calculated. Increased CAC was associated with incident hypertension in demographics-adjusted models (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 1.75; IRR = 1.35, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.78; and IRR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.25 for CAC scores of 30-99, 100-399, and > or =400, respectively) but was attenuated after further adjustment. Increased common CIMT was associated with incident hypertension (IRR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.28, 2.46 for quintile 4; IRR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.28, 2.53 for quintile 5). Participants with the lowest, compared with the highest, aortic distensibility had an increased risk of hypertension (IRR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.79), as did those with the lowest large arterial elasticity (IRR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.99). Lower small arterial elasticity was incrementally associated with incident hypertension starting at quintile 2 (IRR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.39, 2.91; IRR = 2.47, 95% CI: 1.71, 3.57; IRR = 2.73, 95% CI: 1.88, 3.95; and IRR = 2.85, 95% CI: 1.95, 4.16). Structural and functional vascular abnormalities are independent predictors of incident hypertension. These findings are important for understanding the pathogenesis of hypertension. PMID:19951938

  9. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  10. Disruption of astrocyte-vascular coupling and the blood-brain barrier by invading glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Stacey; Robel, Stefanie; Kimbrough, Ian F.; Robert, Stephanie M.; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Sontheimer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet cover the entire cerebral vasculature and serve as exchange sites for ions, metabolites, and energy substrates from the blood to the brain. They maintain endothelial tight junctions that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and release vasoactive molecules that regulate vascular tone. Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors that use the perivascular space for invasion and co-opt existing vessels as satellite tumors form. Here we use a clinically relevant mouse model of glioma and find that glioma cells, as they populate the perivascular space of pre-existing vessels, displace astrocytic endfeet from endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells. This causes a focal breach in the BBB. Furthermore, astrocyte-mediated gliovascular coupling is lost, and glioma cells seize control over regulation of vascular tone through Ca2+-dependent release of K+. These findings have important clinical implications regarding blood flow in the tumor-associated brain and the ability to locally deliver chemotherapeutic drugs in disease. PMID:24943270

  11. Antagonism of Stem Cell Factor/c-kit Signaling Attenuates Neonatal Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karen C; Torres, Eneida; Hehre, Dorothy; Wu, Shu; Suguihara, Cleide; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that c-kit positive cells are present in the remodeled pulmonary vasculature bed of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether stem cell factor (SCF)/ c-kit regulated pathways potentiate pulmonary vascular remodeling is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that attenuated c-kit signaling would decrease chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling by decreasing pulmonary vascular cell mitogenesis. Methods Neonatal FVB/NJ mice treated with non-immune IgG (PL), or c-kit neutralizing antibody (ACK2) as well as c-kit mutant mice (WBB6F1- Kit W− v/ +) and their congenic controls, were exposed to normoxia (FiO2=0.21) or hypoxia (FiO2=0.12) for two weeks. Following this exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling were evaluated. Results As compared to chronically hypoxic controls, c-kit mutant mice had decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular remodeling and proliferation. Consistent with these findings, administration of ACK2 to neonatal mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling. This attenuation in PH was accompanied by decreased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Conclusion SCF/c-kit signaling may potentiate chronic hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling by modulating ERK activation. Inhibition of c-kit activity may be a potential strategy to alleviate PH. PMID:26705118

  12. Adult stem cells and biocompatible scaffolds as smart drug delivery tools for cardiac tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Pagliari, Stefania; Romanazzo, Sara; Mosqueira, Diogo; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpetua; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of adult stem cells to cardiac repair is mostly ascribed to an indirect paracrine effect, rather than to their actual engraftment and differentiation into new contractile and vascular cells. This effect consists in a direct reduction of host cell death, promotion of neovascularization, and in a "bystander effect" on local inflammation. A number of cytokines secreted by adult stem/progenitor cells has been proposed to be responsible for the consistent beneficial effect reported in the early attempts to deliver different stem cell subsets to the injured myocardium. Aiming to maximize their beneficial activity on the diseased myocardium, the genetic modification of adult stem cells to enhance and/or control the secretion of specific cytokines would turn them into active drug delivery vectors. On the other hand, engineering biocompatible scaffolds as to release paracrine factors could result in multiple advantages: (1) achieve a local controlled release of the drug of interest, thus minimizing off-target effects, (2) enhance stem cell retention in the injured area and (3) boost the beneficial paracrine effects exerted by adult stem cells on the host tissue. In the present review, a critical overview of the state-of-the-art in the modification of stem cells and the functionalization of biocompatible scaffolds to deliver beneficial soluble factors to the injured myocardium is offered. Besides the number of concerns to be addressed before a clinical application can be foreseen for such concepts, this path could translate into the generation of active scaffolds as smart cell and drug delivery systems for cardiac repair. PMID:23745554

  13. Statin-exposed vascular smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with decreased binding affinity for LDL.

    PubMed

    Meyers, C Daniel; Tannock, Lisa R; Wight, Thomas N; Chait, Alan

    2003-11-01

    Retention of LDL in the artery intima is mediated by extracellular matrix proteoglycans and plays an important role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Compared with quiescent cells, proliferating smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with elongated glycosaminoglycan side chains, which have an increased binding affinity to LDL. Because 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) decrease smooth muscle cell proliferation, we hypothesized that statin exposure would decrease both the size and LDL binding affinity of vascular proteoglycans. Monkey aortic smooth muscle cells grown in culture were exposed to simvastatin (10 and 100 microM) and cerivastatin (0.1 and 1 microM), and newly secreted proteoglycans were quantified and characterized. Both simvastatin and cerivastatin caused a concentration-dependent reduction in cell growth and reduced 35SO4 incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, on both an absolute and a per cell basis. Interestingly, statin exposure increased the apparent molecular weight and hydrodynamic size of secreted proteoglycans. However, proteoglycans secreted from statin-exposed cells demonstrated a reduction in binding affinity to LDL. Thus, statins may induce atheroprotective changes in vascular proteoglycans and lower LDL retention in the vessel wall. These findings suggest a mechanism whereby statins may benefit atherosclerosis in a manner unrelated to serum LDL lowering. PMID:12923222

  14. Development of Non-Cell Adhesive Vascular Grafts Using Supramolecular Building Blocks.

    PubMed

    van Almen, Geert C; Talacua, Hanna; Ippel, Bastiaan D; Mollet, Björne B; Ramaekers, Mellany; Simonet, Marc; Smits, Anthal I P M; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Kluin, Jolanda; Dankers, Patricia Y W

    2016-03-01

    Cell-free approaches to in situ tissue engineering require materials that are mechanically stable and are able to control cell-adhesive behavior upon implantation. Here, the development of mechanically stable grafts with non-cell adhesive properties via a mix-and-match approach using ureido-pyrimidinone (UPy)-modified supramolecular polymers is reported. Cell adhesion is prevented in vitro through mixing of end-functionalized or chain-extended UPy-polycaprolactone (UPy-PCL or CE-UPy-PCL, respectively) with end-functionalized UPy-poly(ethylene glycol) (UPy-PEG) at a ratio of 90:10. Further characterization reveals intimate mixing behavior of UPy-PCL with UPy-PEG, but poor mechanical properties, whereas CE-UPy-PCL scaffolds are mechanically stable. As a proof-of-concept for the use of non-cell adhesive supramolecular materials in vivo, electrospun vascular scaffolds are applied in an aortic interposition rat model, showing reduced cell infiltration in the presence of only 10% of UPy-PEG. Together, these results provide the first steps toward advanced supramolecular biomaterials for in situ vascular tissue engineering with control over selective cell capturing. PMID:26611660

  15. In Vivo Vascularization of Endothelial Cells Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in SCID Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Allameh, Abdolamir; Jazayeri, Maryam; Adelipour, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objective In vivo and in vitro stem cell differentiation into endothelial cells is a promising area of research for tissue engineering and cell therapy. Materials and Methods We induced human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate to endothelial cells that had the ability to form capillaries on an extracellular matrix (ECM) gel. Thereafter, the differentiated endothelial cells at early stage were characterized by expression of specific markers such as von Willebrand factor (vWF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2, and CD31. In this experimental model, the endothelial cells were transplanted into the groins of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. After 30 days, we obtained tissue biopsies from the transplantation sites. Biopsies were processed for histopathological and double immunohistochemistry (DIHC) staining. Results Endothelial cells at the early stage of differentiation expressed endothelial markers. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, in addition to DIHC demonstrated homing of the endothelial cells that underwent vascularization in the injected site. Conclusion The data clearly showed that endothelial cells at the early stage of differentiation underwent neovascularization in vivo in SCID mice. Endothelial cells at their early stage of differentiation have been proven to be efficient for treatment of diseases with impaired vasculogenesis. PMID:27540522

  16. Circulating Progenitor Cells and Vascular Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Sandra; García-Lucio, Jéssica; Peinado, Víctor I.; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Díez, Marta; Blanco, Isabel; Sitges, Marta; Petriz, Jordi; Torralba, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Roca, Josep; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), decreased progenitor cells and impairment of systemic vascular function have been suggested to confer higher cardiovascular risk. The origin of these changes and their relationship with alterations in the pulmonary circulation are unknown. Objectives To investigate whether changes in the number of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells are associated with pulmonary hypertension or changes in endothelial function. Methods 62 COPD patients and 35 controls (18 non-smokers and 17 smokers) without cardiovascular risk factors other than cigarette smoking were studied. The number of circulating progenitors was measured as CD45+CD34+CD133+ labeled cells by flow cytometry. Endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation. Markers of inflammation and angiogenesis were also measured in all subjects. Results Compared with controls, the number of circulating progenitor cells was reduced in COPD patients. Progenitor cells did not differ between control smokers and non-smokers. COPD patients with pulmonary hypertension showed greater number of progenitor cells than those without pulmonary hypertension. Systemic endothelial function was worse in both control smokers and COPD patients. Interleukin-6, fibrinogen, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor were increased in COPD. In COPD patients, the number of circulating progenitor cells was inversely related to the flow-mediated dilation of systemic arteries. Conclusions Pulmonary and systemic vascular impairment in COPD is associated with cigarette smoking but not with the reduced number of circulating hematopoietic progenitors. The latter appears to be a consequence of the disease itself not related to smoking habit. PMID:25171153

  17. Fluid shear stress induces differentiation of Flk-1-positive embryonic stem cells into vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Sokabe, Takaaki; Watabe, Tetsuro; Miyazono, Kohei; Yamashita, Jun K; Obi, Syotaro; Ohura, Norihiko; Matsushita, Akiko; Kamiya, Akira; Ando, Joji

    2005-04-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into all cell lineages, but the molecular mechanisms that regulate ES cell differentiation have not been sufficiently explored. In this study, we report that shear stress, a mechanical force generated by fluid flow, can induce ES cell differentiation. When Flk-1-positive (Flk-1(+)) mouse ES cells were subjected to shear stress, their cell density increased markedly, and a larger percentage of the cells were in the S and G(2)-M phases of the cell cycle than Flk-1(+) ES cells cultured under static conditions. Shear stress significantly increased the expression of the vascular endothelial cell-specific markers Flk-1, Flt-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, and PECAM-1 at both the protein level and the mRNA level, but it had no effect on expression of the mural cell marker smooth muscle alpha-actin, blood cell marker CD3, or the epithelial cell marker keratin. These findings indicate that shear stress selectively promotes the differentiation of Flk-1(+) ES cells into the endothelial cell lineage. The shear stressed Flk-1(+) ES cells formed tubelike structures in collagen gel and developed an extensive tubular network significantly faster than the static controls. Shear stress induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Flk-1 in Flk-1(+) ES cells that was blocked by a Flk-1 kinase inhibitor, SU1498, but not by a neutralizing antibody against VEGF. SU1498 also abolished the shear stress-induced proliferation and differentiation of Flk-1(+) ES cells, indicating that a ligand-independent activation of Flk-1 plays an important role in the shear stress-mediated proliferation and differentiation by Flk-1(+) ES cells. PMID:15576436

  18. [Progress in treating diabetes mellitus with adult stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Teng, Chunbo; An, Tiezhu

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic diseases, mainly including type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Treatment for type 1 and part of type 2 often involves regular insulin injection. However, this treatment neither precisely controls the blood sugar levels, nor prevents the diabetes complications. Transplantation of islets of Langerhans offers an attractive strategy for diabetes therapies, but its wide application has been limited by donor shortage and immunological rejection after transplantation. Stem cells with strong proliferation capacity and multipotential may be potential cell sources in diabetes therapies. For this, adult stem cells are interesting because of absence of teratoma formation and ethnical problems. Adult pancreatic stem cells (PSCs) really exist and could produce insulin-secreting cells both under the condition of pancreatic injury and in vitro culture, but lack of effective markers to enrich PSCs hampers the studies of exploring the expanding and differentiating conditions in vitro. Some other adult stem cells, such as hepatic stem cells, marrow stem cells or intestine stem cells, were also suggested to transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under special culture conditions in vitro or by genetic modifications. Moreover, transplanting these adult stem cells-derived insulin-secreting cells into the diabetic mouse could cure diabetes. Thus, adult stem cells would supply the abundant beta-cell sources for cell replacement therapy of diabetes. PMID:18464596

  19. Biomaterials patterned with discontinuous microwalls for vascular smooth muscle cell culture: biodegradable small diameter vascular grafts and stable cell culture substrates.

    PubMed

    Heath, Daniel E; Kang, Gavin C W; Cao, Ye; Poon, Yin Fun; Chan, Vincent; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-10-01

    The medial layer of small diameter blood vessels contains circumferentially aligned vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) that possess contractile phenotype. In tissue-engineered constructs, these cellular characteristics are usually achieved by seeding planar scaffolds with vSMC, rolling the cell-laden scaffold into a tubular structure, and maturing the construct in a pulsatile bioreactor, a lengthy process that can take up to two months. During the maturation phase, the cells circumferentially orient, their contractile protein expression increases, and they obtain a contractile phenotype. Generating cell culture platforms that enable the rapid production of directionally oriented vSMC with increased contractile protein expression would be a major step forward for blood vessel tissue engineering and would greatly facilitate the in vitro study of vSMC biology. Previously, we developed a micropatterned cell culture surface that promotes orientation and contractile protein expression of vSMC. Herein, we explore two potential applications of this technology. First, we fabricate tubular and biodegradable scaffolds that possess the micropatterning on their exterior surface. When vSMC are seeded on these scaffolds, they initially proliferate in order to fill the microchannels and as confluence is reached the cells align in the direction of the micropatterning resulting in a biodegradable scaffold that is inhabited by circumferentially aligned vSMC within a week. Second, we illustrate that we can generate biostable cell culture surfaces that allow the in vitro study of the cells in a more contractile state. Specifically, we explore contractile protein expression of cells cultured on the micropatterned surfaces with the addition of soluble transforming growth factor beta one (TGFβ1). PMID:27444318

  20. Non-expanded adipose stromal vascular fraction cell therapy for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Min, Wei-Ping; Wang, Hao; Solano, Fabio; Lara, Fabian; Alfaro, Miguel; Rodriguez, Jorge Paz; Harman, Robert J; Patel, Amit N; Murphy, Michael P; Lee, Roland R; Minev, Boris

    2009-01-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue is known to contain mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), T regulatory cells, endothelial precursor cells, preadipocytes, as well as anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Safety of autologous adipose tissue implantation is supported by extensive use of this procedure in cosmetic surgery, as well as by ongoing studies using in vitro expanded adipose derived MSC. Equine and canine studies demonstrating anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects of non-expanded SVF cells have yielded promising results. Although non-expanded SVF cells have been used successfully in accelerating healing of Crohn's fistulas, to our knowledge clinical use of these cells for systemic immune modulation has not been reported. In this communication we discuss the rationale for use of autologous SVF in treatment of multiple sclerosis and describe our experiences with three patients. Based on this rationale and initial experiences, we propose controlled trials of autologous SVF in various inflammatory conditions. PMID:19393041

  1. The effect of ageing on fMRI: Correction for the confounding effects of vascular reactivity evaluated by joint fMRI and MEG in 335 adults

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Richard N. A.; Tyler, Lorraine K.; Davis, Simon W.; Shafto, Meredith A.; Taylor, Jason R.; Williams, Nitin; Cam‐CAN; Rowe, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research one is typically interested in neural activity. However, the blood‐oxygenation level‐dependent (BOLD) signal is a composite of both neural and vascular activity. As factors such as age or medication may alter vascular function, it is essential to account for changes in neurovascular coupling when investigating neurocognitive functioning with fMRI. The resting‐state fluctuation amplitude (RSFA) in the fMRI signal (rsfMRI) has been proposed as an index of vascular reactivity. The RSFA compares favourably with other techniques such as breath‐hold and hypercapnia, but the latter are more difficult to perform in some populations, such as older adults. The RSFA is therefore a candidate for use in adjusting for age‐related changes in vascular reactivity in fMRI studies. The use of RSFA is predicated on its sensitivity to vascular rather than neural factors; however, the extent to which each of these factors contributes to RSFA remains to be characterized. The present work addressed these issues by comparing RSFA (i.e., rsfMRI variability) to proxy measures of (i) cardiovascular function in terms of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) and (ii) neural activity in terms of resting state magnetoencephalography (rsMEG). We derived summary scores of RSFA, a sensorimotor task BOLD activation, cardiovascular function and rsMEG variability for 335 healthy older adults in the population‐based Cambridge Centre for Ageing and Neuroscience cohort (Cam‐CAN; www.cam-can.com). Mediation analysis revealed that the effects of ageing on RSFA were significantly mediated by vascular factors, but importantly not by the variability in neuronal activity. Furthermore, the converse effects of ageing on the rsMEG variability were not mediated by vascular factors. We then examined the effect of RSFA scaling of task‐based BOLD in the sensorimotor task. The scaling analysis revealed that much of the effects

  2. Smoking and Female Sex: Independent Predictors of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Vaquero, André Ramos; Martelini, André Ricardo; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent evidence shows the rigidity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to vascular mechanics. Arterial rigidity is an independent cardiovascular risk factor whose associated modifications in VSMC viscoelasticity have never been investigated. This study’s objective was to evaluate if the arterial rigidity risk factors aging, African ancestry, female sex, smoking and diabetes mellitus are associated with VMSC stiffening in an experimental model using a human derived vascular smooth muscle primary cell line repository. Methods Eighty patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled. VSMCs were extracted from internal thoracic artery fragments and mechanically evaluated using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry assay. The obtained mechanical variables were correlated with the clinical variables: age, gender, African ancestry, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results The mechanical variables Gr, G’r and G”r had a normal distribution, demonstrating an inter-individual variability of VSMC viscoelasticity, which has never been reported before. Female sex and smoking were independently associated with VSMC stiffening: Gr (apparent cell stiffness) p = 0.022 and p = 0.018, R2 0.164; G’r (elastic modulus) p = 0.019 and p = 0.009, R2 0.184 and G”r (dissipative modulus) p = 0.011 and p = 0.66, R2 0.141. Conclusion Female sex and smoking are independent predictors of VSMC stiffening. This pro-rigidity effect represents an important element for understanding the vascular rigidity observed in post-menopausal females and smokers, as well as a potential therapeutic target to be explored in the future. There is a significant inter-individual variation of VSMC viscoelasticity, which is slightly modulated by clinical variables and probably relies on molecular factors. PMID:26661469

  3. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  4. Endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin deficiency attenuates LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension☆

    PubMed Central

    Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Starr, Anna; Nandi, Manasi; Channon, Keith M.; McNeill, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be a key mediator of the vascular dysfunction and severe hypotension in patients with endotoxaemia and septic shock. The contribution of NO produced directly in the vasculature by endothelial cells to the hypotension seen in these conditions, vs. the broader systemic increase in NO, is unclear. To determine the specific role of endothelium derived NO in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular dysfunction we administered LPS to mice deficient in endothelial cell tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), the essential co-factor for NO production by NOS enzymes. Mice deficient in endothelial BH4 production, through loss of the essential biosynthesis enzyme Gch1 (Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice) received a 24 hour challenge with LPS or saline control. In vivo LPS treatment increased vascular GTP cyclohydrolase and BH4 levels in aortas, lungs and hearts, but this increase was significantly attenuated in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, which were also partially protected from the LPS-induced hypotension. In isometric tension studies, in vivo LPS treatment reduced the vasoconstriction response and impaired endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilatations in mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mesenteric arteries. Ex vivo LPS treatment decreased vasoconstriction response to phenylephrine in aortic rings from wild-type and not in Gch1fl/flTie2cre mice, even in the context of significant eNOS and iNOS upregulation. These data provide direct evidence that endothelial cell NO has a significant contribution to LPS-induced vascular dysfunction and hypotension and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of systemic inflammation and patients with septic shock. PMID:26276526

  5. Telmisartan Induced Inhibition of Vascular Cell Proliferation beyond Angiotensin Receptor Blockade and PPARγ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Ho, Christopher; Kurtz, Theodore W; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ability of ARBs with PPARγ agonist activity (telmisartan and irbesartan), and ARBs devoid of PPARγ agonist activity (eprosartan and valsartan), to inhibit vascular cell proliferation studied in the absence of angiotensin II stimulation. Telmisartan and to a lesser extent irbesartan, inhibited proliferation of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose dependent fashion whereas eprosartan and valsartan did not. To investigate the role of PPARγ in the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan, we studied genetically engineered NIH3T3 cells that express PPARγ. Pioglitazone inhibited proliferation of NIH3T3 cells expressing PPARγ, but had little effect on control NIH3T3 cells that lack PPARγ. In contrast, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in NIH3T3 with and without PPARγ. Valsartan failed to inhibit proliferation of either cell line. In addition, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in aortic smooth muscle cells derived from mice with targeted knockout of PPARγ in smooth muscle and from control mice whereas valsartan had no effect on cell proliferation. Telmisartan but not valsartan, reduced phosphorylation of AKT but not ERK otherwise induced by exposure to serum of either quiescent human smooth muscle cells, quiescent mice smooth muscle cells lacking PPARγ or quiescent CHO-K1 cells lacking AT1 receptor. In summary, the antiproliferative effect of telmisartan in the absence of exogenously supplemented angiotensin II involve more than just AT1 receptor blockade and do not require activation of PPARγ. It might be postulated that inhibition of AKT activation is a mechanism mediating the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan including in cells lacking AT1 receptors or PPARγ. PMID:19822796

  6. Radiologic indicators prior to renal cell cancer thrombectomy: Implications for vascular reconstruction and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Overholser, Stephen; Raheem, Omer; Zapata, David; Kaushik, Dharam; Rodriguez, Ronald; Derweesh, Ithaar H.; Liss, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal cancer may invade the inferior vena cava (IVC) creating more complex surgical intervention. We investigate radiologic findings that may predict vascular reconstruction prior to surgery and future renal cancer-specific mortality. Materials and Methods: Radiologic findings included Mayo Clinic risk factors for vascular reconstruction: Right-sided tumor, anteroposterior diameter of the IVC at the ostium of the renal vein ≥24.0 mm, and radiologic identification of complete occlusion of the IVC. Additional factors included thrombus in the lumen of the hepatic veins and metastasis. Along with other demographic factors, analysis included Chi-squared analysis for vascular reconstruction and logistic regression for mortality. A Kaplan–Meier curve was created for the most significant radiologic factor. Results: Thirty-seven patients underwent IVC tumor thrombectomy at two institutions from April 2007 to February 2015. We found that Mayo risk factors of 0, 1, 2, and 3 and the proportions of vascular reconstruction of 0%, 0%, 12.5%, and 13.6%, respectively (P = 0.788). Hepatic vein involvement was the most significant determinate of renal cell carcinoma-specific mortality in multivariable analysis, controlling for the size of IVC at the hepatic veins, pulmonary metastasis, and Fuhrman grade (P = 0.02, Log-rank P = 0.002). Conclusion: Mayo risk factors did not predict vascular reconstruction in our small cohort of Level II–Level IV IVC thrombus undergoing IVC thrombectomy. Tumor thrombus traveling into the lumen of the hepatic veins was a significant risk factor for accelerated mortality. PMID:27453653

  7. Histological vascular invasion is a novel prognostic indicator in extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Xinke; Xia, Zhongjun; Lu, Yue; Huang, Huiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, (ENKTL), nasal type, is an aggressive lymphoma with no validated prognostic parameters, to date. In the present study, vascular invasion by this tumor was retrospectively analyzed in 214 patients with untreated ENKTL to evaluate its association with clinical features, treatment response and prognosis. Histological vascular invasion by the tumor was confirmed in 32.7% of patients with ENKTL. The presence of vascular invasion significantly correlated with poor performance status, B symptoms, extranodal involved sites, advanced stage, elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase, D-dimer and cluster of differentiation 68+ tumor-associated macrophages. Upon treatment termination, the complete remission (CR) rate and overall response rate were significantly lower for the vascular invasion group compared with the non-vascular invasion group. Furthermore, vascular invasion resulted in significantly reduced 5-year progression-free survival (PFS; 21.8 vs. 60.1%) and overall survival (OS; 36.8 vs. 77.0%) rates. Using the multivariate Cox regression model, vascular invasion, stage III/IV and CR after chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for OS and PFS. Thus, histological vascular invasion by the tumor affected the response to treatment, and was also an independent prognostic factor for OS and PFS in ENKTL, nasal type, suggesting a role for vascular invasion in disease progression. PMID:27446357

  8. Role of UBIAD1 in Intracellular Cholesterol Metabolism and Vascular Cell Calcification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Guo, Wang; Han, Xue; Dai, Wendi; Diao, Zongli; Liu, Wenhu

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an important risk factor associated with mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease. Intracellular cholesterol metabolism is involved in the process of vascular cell calcification. In this study, we investigated the role of UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1) in intracellular cholesterol metabolism and vascular cell calcification, and identified its subcellular location. Primary human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) were incubated with either growth medium (1.4 mmol/L Pi) or calcification medium (CM) (3.0 mmol/L Pi). Under treatment with CM, HUVSMCs were further incubated with exogenous cholesterol, or menaquinone-4, a product of UBIAD1. The plasmid and small interfering RNA were transfected in HUVSMCs to alter the expression of UBIAD1. Matrix calcium quantitation, alkaline phosphatase activity, intracellular cholesterol level and menaquinone-4 level were measured. The expression of several genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were analyzed. Using an anti-UBIAD1 antibody, an endoplasmic reticulum marker and a Golgi marker, the subcellular location of UBIAD1 in HUVSMCs was analyzed. CM increased matrix calcium, alkaline phosphatase activity and intracellular cholesterol level, and reduced UBIAD1 expression and menaquinone-4 level. Addition of cholesterol contributed to increased matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 in HUVSMCs treated with CM significantly reduced intracellular cholesterol level, matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity, but increased menaquinone-4 level. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 reduced the gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, and increased gene expression of ATP binding cassette transporters A1, which are in charge of cholesterol synthesis and efflux. UBIAD1 co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum marker and the Golgi

  9. Role of UBIAD1 in Intracellular Cholesterol Metabolism and Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sha; Guo, Wang; Han, Xue; Dai, Wendi; Diao, Zongli; Liu, Wenhu

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an important risk factor associated with mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease. Intracellular cholesterol metabolism is involved in the process of vascular cell calcification. In this study, we investigated the role of UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1) in intracellular cholesterol metabolism and vascular cell calcification, and identified its subcellular location. Primary human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) were incubated with either growth medium (1.4 mmol/L Pi) or calcification medium (CM) (3.0 mmol/L Pi). Under treatment with CM, HUVSMCs were further incubated with exogenous cholesterol, or menaquinone-4, a product of UBIAD1. The plasmid and small interfering RNA were transfected in HUVSMCs to alter the expression of UBIAD1. Matrix calcium quantitation, alkaline phosphatase activity, intracellular cholesterol level and menaquinone-4 level were measured. The expression of several genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were analyzed. Using an anti-UBIAD1 antibody, an endoplasmic reticulum marker and a Golgi marker, the subcellular location of UBIAD1 in HUVSMCs was analyzed. CM increased matrix calcium, alkaline phosphatase activity and intracellular cholesterol level, and reduced UBIAD1 expression and menaquinone-4 level. Addition of cholesterol contributed to increased matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 in HUVSMCs treated with CM significantly reduced intracellular cholesterol level, matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity, but increased menaquinone-4 level. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 reduced the gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, and increased gene expression of ATP binding cassette transporters A1, which are in charge of cholesterol synthesis and efflux. UBIAD1 co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum marker and the Golgi

  10. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Reznickova, Alena; Novotna, Zdenka; Kolska, Zdenka; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova; Rimpelova, Silvie; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2015-01-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells. PMID:25953566

  11. Physiology and pathophysiology of oxLDL uptake by vascular wall cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Formoso, Gloria; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease in which endothelial cell dysfunction, macrophage foam cell formation, and smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, lead to the loss of vascular homeostasis. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) may play a pre-eminent function in atherosclerotic lesion formation, even if their role is still debated. Several types of scavenger receptors (SRs) such as SR-AI/II, SRBI, CD36, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), toll-like receptors (TLRs) and others can promote the internalization of oxLDL. They are expressed on the surface of vascular wall cells (endothelial cells, macrophages and smooth muscle cells) and they mediate the cellular effects of oxLDL. The key influence of both oxLDL and SRs on the atherogenic process has been established in atherosclerosis-prone animals, in which antioxidant treatment and/or silencing of SRs has been shown to reduce atherogenesis. Despite some discrepancies, the indication from cohort studies that there is an association between oxLDL and cardiovascular (CV) events seems to point toward a role for oxLDL in atherosclerotic plaque progress and disruption. Finally, randomized clinical trials using antioxidants have demonstrated benefits only in high-risk patients, suggesting that additional proofs are still needed to better define the involvement of each type of modified LDL in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27256928

  12. Neural crest cell contribution to the developing circulatory system: implications for vascular morphology?

    PubMed

    Bergwerff, M; Verberne, M E; DeRuiter, M C; Poelmann, R E; Gittenberger-de Groot, A C

    1998-02-01

    In this study, the distribution patterns of neural crest (NC) cells (NCCs) in the developing vascular system of the chick were thoroughly studied and examined for a correlation with smooth muscle cell differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. For this purpose, we performed long-term lineage tracing using quail-chick chimera techniques and premigratory NCC infection with a replication-incompetent retrovirus containing the LacZ reporter gene in combination with immunohistochemistry. Results indicate that NCC deposition around endothelial tubes is influenced by anteroposterior positional information from the pharyngeal arterial system. NCCs were shown to be among the first cells to differentiate into primary smooth muscle cells of the arch arteries. At later stages, NCCs eventually differentiated into adventitial fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells and nonmuscular cells of the media and intima. NCCs were distributed in the aortic arch and pulmonary arch arteries and in the brachiocephalic and carotid arteries. The coronary and pulmonary arteries and the descending aorta, however, remained devoid of NCCs. A new finding was that the media of part of the anterior cardinal veins was also determined to be NC-derived. NC-derived elastic arteries differed from non-NC elastic vessels in their cellular constitution and elastic fiber organization, and the NC appeared not to be involved in designating a muscular or elastic artery. Boundaries between NC-infested areas and mesodermal vessel structures were mostly very sharp and tended to coincide with marked changes in vascular morphology, with the exception of an intriguing area in the aortic and pulmonary trunks. PMID:9468193

  13. [Effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 on vascular smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Saneshige, S; Shigehiro, K

    1997-07-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, obesity, and essential hypertension are associated with hyperinsulinemia that results from insulin resistance and insulin has been reported to accelerate atherosclerosis. We studied the effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on the growth of porcine vascular smooth muscle cells and on the synthesis of extracellular matrix. The cells were cultured 3-8 changes of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with 10% FCS. Subconfulent cells were put in wells 1 x 10(4) or 1 x 10(5) cells/well in DMEM with or without insulin or IGF-1. The number of cells was counted, and protein and DNA synthesis, expression of genes for collagen alpha1(1), and collagen synthesis were measured. Insulin (0, 16, and 160 nM) and IGF-1 (0, 1, 31, and 13.1 nM) increased number of cells by 50% and 40%, in a dose-dependent manner. Protein and DNA synthesis were also increased by insulin (3.8 and 3.0 times) and by IGF-1 (3.9 and 1.8 time). Collaged protein synthesis was increased 2.3-fold by IGF-1 at 13.1 nM, and insulin (16,000 nM) caused a 26.5-fold increase. Levels of collagen alpha1(1) mRNA were also increased by both insulin and IGF-1. These results suggest that insulin and IGF-1 can cause vascular hyperplasia associated with increased collagen synthesis, which indicates that insulin, IGF-1, or both may have an important role in vascular growth. PMID:9388374

  14. Substance-specific importance of EGFR for vascular smooth muscle cells motility in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Barbara; Schwerdt, Gerald; Heise, Christian; Bethmann, Daniel; Rabe, Sindy; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Gekle, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Besides their importance for the vascular tone, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) also contribute to pathophysiological vessel alterations. Various G-protein coupled receptor ligands involved in vascular dysfunction and remodeling can transactivate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of VSMC, yet the importance of EGFR transactivation for the VSMC phenotype is incompletely understood. The aims of this study were (i) to characterize further the importance of the VSMC-EGFR for proliferation, migration and marker gene expression for inflammation, fibrosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and (ii) to test the hypothesis that vasoactive substances (endothelin-1, phenylephrine, thrombin, vasopressin and ATP) rely differentially on the EGFR with respect to the abovementioned phenotypic alterations. In primary, aortic VSMC from mice without conditional deletion of the EGFR, proliferation, migration, marker gene expression (inflammation, fibrosis and ROS homeostasis) and cell signaling (ERK 1/2, intracellular calcium) were analyzed. VSMC-EGFR loss reduced collective cell migration and single cell migration probability, while no difference between the genotypes in single cell velocity, chemotaxis or marker gene expression could be observed under control conditions. EGF promoted proliferation, collective cell migration, chemokinesis and chemotaxis and leads to a proinflammatory gene expression profile in wildtype but not in knockout VSMC. Comparing the impact of five vasoactive substances (all reported to transactivate EGFR and all leading to an EGFR dependent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation), we demonstrate that the importance of EGFR for their action is substance-dependent and most apparent for crowd migration but plays a minor role for gene expression regulation. PMID:27012600

  15. Cells of renin lineage are adult pluripotent progenitors in experimental glomerular disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaverina, Natalya V.; Eng, Diana G.; Krofft, Ronald D.; Glenn, Sean T.; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Shankland, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Modified vascular smooth muscle cells of the kidney afferent arterioles have recently been shown to serve as progenitors for glomerular epithelial cells in response to glomerular injury. To determine whether such cells of renin lineage (CoRL) serve as progenitors for other cells in kidney disease characterized by both glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury, permanent genetic cell fate mapping of adult CoRL using Ren1cCreER × Rs-tdTomato-R reporter mice was performed. TdTomato-labeled CoRL were almost completely restricted to the juxtaglomerular compartment in healthy kidneys. Following 2 wk of antibody-mediated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) or 16 wk of ⅚ nephrectomy-induced chronic kidney diseases, tdTomato-mapped CoRL were identified in both interstitial and glomerular compartments. In the interstitium, PDGFβ receptor (R)-expressing cells significantly increased, and a portion of these expressed tdTomato. This was accompanied by a decrease in native pericyte number, but an increase in the number of tdTomato cells that coexpressed the pericyte markers PDGFβ-R and NG2. These cells surrounded vessels and coexpressed the pericyte markers CD73 and CD146, but not the endothelial marker ERG. Within glomeruli of reporter mice with the ⅚ nephrectomy model, a subset of labeled CoRL migrated to the glomerular tuft and coexpressed podocin and synaptopodin. By contrast, labeled CoRL were not detected in glomerular or interstitial compartments following uninephrectomy. These observations indicate that in addition to supplying new adult podocytes to glomeruli, CoRL have the capacity to become new adult pericytes in the setting of interstitial disease. We conclude that CoRL have the potential to function as progenitors for multiple adult cell types in kidney disease. PMID:26062877

  16. Cells of renin lineage are adult pluripotent progenitors in experimental glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Pippin, Jeffrey W; Kaverina, Natalya V; Eng, Diana G; Krofft, Ronald D; Glenn, Sean T; Duffield, Jeremy S; Gross, Kenneth W; Shankland, Stuart J

    2015-08-15

    Modified vascular smooth muscle cells of the kidney afferent arterioles have recently been shown to serve as progenitors for glomerular epithelial cells in response to glomerular injury. To determine whether such cells of renin lineage (CoRL) serve as progenitors for other cells in kidney disease characterized by both glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury, permanent genetic cell fate mapping of adult CoRL using Ren1cCreER × Rs-tdTomato-R reporter mice was performed. TdTomato-labeled CoRL were almost completely restricted to the juxtaglomerular compartment in healthy kidneys. Following 2 wk of antibody-mediated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) or 16 wk of ⅚ nephrectomy-induced chronic kidney diseases, tdTomato-mapped CoRL were identified in both interstitial and glomerular compartments. In the interstitium, PDGFβ receptor (R)-expressing cells significantly increased, and a portion of these expressed tdTomato. This was accompanied by a decrease in native pericyte number, but an increase in the number of tdTomato cells that coexpressed the pericyte markers PDGFβ-R and NG2. These cells surrounded vessels and coexpressed the pericyte markers CD73 and CD146, but not the endothelial marker ERG. Within glomeruli of reporter mice with the ⅚ nephrectomy model, a subset of labeled CoRL migrated to the glomerular tuft and coexpressed podocin and synaptopodin. By contrast, labeled CoRL were not detected in glomerular or interstitial compartments following uninephrectomy. These observations indicate that in addition to supplying new adult podocytes to glomeruli, CoRL have the capacity to become new adult pericytes in the setting of interstitial disease. We conclude that CoRL have the potential to function as progenitors for multiple adult cell types in kidney disease. PMID:26062877

  17. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro

    2012-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) was first described in 1977 as a distinct clinico-pathological entity with a suspected viral etiology. Subsequently, a novel RNA retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was isolated from a cell line established from the leukemic cells of an ATL patient, and the finding of a clear association with ATL led to its inclusion among human carcinogenic pathogens. The three major routes of HTLV-1 transmission are mother-to-child infections via breast milk, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusions. HTLV-1 infection early in life, presumably from breast feeding, is crucial in the development of ATL. The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subtype-classification into four categories, acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types defined by organ involvement, and LDH and calcium values. In cases of acute, lymphoma, or unfavorable chronic subtypes (aggressive ATL), intensive chemotherapy such as VCAP-AMP-VECP is usually recommended. In cases of favorable chronic or smoldering ATL (indolent ATL), watchful waiting until disease progression has been recommended although the long term prognosis was inferior to those of, for instance, chronic lymphoid leukemia. Retrospective analysis suggested that the combination of interferon alpha and zidovudine was apparently promising for the treatment of ATL, especially for types with leukemic manifestation. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also promising for the treatment of aggressive ATL possibly reflecting graft vs. ATL effect. Several new agent-trials for ATL are ongoing and in preparation, including a defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 monoclonal antibody. Two steps should be considered for the prevention of HTLV-1-associated ATL. The first is the prevention of HTLV-1 infections and the second is the prevention of ATL among HTLV-1 carriers. So far, no agent has been found to be

  18. Mesothelial Cells Within Vascular Transformation of Mediastinal Lymph Node Sinuses: An Unusual Benign Collision Mimicking Colliding Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Mark N; Tawil, Ayman N; Boulos, Fouad I

    2016-04-01

    Vascular transformation of lymph node sinuses represents a rare benign entity mimicking malignant counterparts such as nodal Kaposi sarcoma. The presence of mildly atypical benign mesothelial cells within nodal sinuses raises the possibility of metastatic malignancy. Herein, a rare case of vascular transformation of lymph node sinuses with reactive sinusoidal mesothelial cells is outlined as a unique benign pathology and a potential mimicker of a malignant collision tumor. PMID:26689690

  19. Vascular niche promotes hematopoietic multipotent progenitor formation from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Butler, Jason M.; Chan, Yan-Yi; Chandrasekaran, Devikha; Poulos, Michael G.; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J.; Elemento, Olivier; Wood, Brent L.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an alternative hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for treating hematopoietic disease. The limited engraftment of human PSC–derived (hPSC-derived) multipotent progenitor cells (MPP) has hampered the clinical application of these cells and suggests that MPP require additional cues for definitive hematopoiesis. We hypothesized that the presence of a vascular niche that produces Notch ligands jagged-1 (JAG1) and delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4) drives definitive hematopoiesis. We differentiated hes2 human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and Macaca nemestrina–induced PSC (iPSC) line-7 with cytokines in the presence or absence of endothelial cells (ECs) that express JAG1 and DLL4. Cells cocultured with ECs generated substantially more CD34+CD45+ hematopoietic progenitors compared with cells cocultured without ECs or with ECs lacking JAG1 or DLL4. EC-induced cells exhibited Notch activation and expressed HSC-specific Notch targets RUNX1 and GATA2. EC-induced PSC-MPP engrafted at a markedly higher level in NOD/SCID/IL-2 receptor γ chain–null (NSG) mice compared with cytokine-induced cells, and low-dose chemotherapy-based selection further increased engraftment. Long-term engraftment and the myeloid-to-lymphoid ratio achieved with vascular niche induction were similar to levels achieved for cord blood–derived MPP and up to 20-fold higher than those achieved with hPSC-derived MPP engraftment. Our findings indicate that endothelial Notch ligands promote PSC-definitive hematopoiesis and production of long-term engrafting CD34+ cells, suggesting these ligands are critical for HSC emergence. PMID:25664855

  20. Anti-vascular endothelial cell antibodies (AECA): comparison of two assay methods and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Meyer, O; Kaiser, P; Haim, T; Edgell, C J; Pasquier, C; de Bandt, M; Bridey, F; Sellak, H; Lansaman, J; Kahn, M F

    1995-12-01

    Vascular endothelial cells may be a target for autoantibodies (AECAs) against membrane antigens that are constitutively expressed, induced or bound to their surface. To test this hypothesis, we used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with two types of human endothelial cells as the substrate, i.e., human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or the hybrid cell line EAhy-926 obtained by fusion of HUVECs with the bronchial carcinoma cell line A549. A comparative functional study of these two cell types demonstrated that EAhy-926 cells produced only small amounts of VIII von Willebrand factor and tissular factor, did not contain Weibel Palade bodies visible under the electron microscope, and expressed ICAM-1 and selectin E in levels of no more than 15% of those expressed by human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells both after stimulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and under basal conditions. However, the two assay methods yielded similar IgG AECA titers when used on sera from patients with rheumatoid vasculitis or antiphospholipid syndrome. These antibodies did not exhibit cytotoxicity for cord vein or EAhy-926 cells. They were not specific for endothelium, since their activity decreased by a mean of 40% after incubation of sera with the epithelial cell line A549. A cross-sectional study of 565 sera demonstrated that anti-vascular IgG and IgM AECAs reactive with EAhy-926 cells occurred mainly in patients with dermatomyositis (IgG, 58%; IgM, 22%), systemic scleroderma (IgG, 48%; IgM, 18%), primary Sjögren's syndrome (IgG, 44%; IgM, 12%) and secondary and primary systemic vasculitides (IgG, 38%; IgM, 18%) including Wegener's granulomatosis. A longitudinal study in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis showed that AECAS were predictive of disease activity. PMID:8869215

  1. A bHLH-Based Feedback Loop Restricts Vascular Cell Proliferation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Vera-Sirera, Francisco; De Rybel, Bert; Úrbez, Cristina; Kouklas, Evangelos; Pesquera, Marta; Álvarez-Mahecha, Juan Camilo; Minguet, Eugenio G; Tuominen, Hannele; Carbonell, Juan; Borst, Jan Willem; Weijers, Dolf; Blázquez, Miguel A

    2015-11-23

    Control of tissue dimensions in multicellular organisms requires the precise quantitative regulation of mitotic activity. In plants, where cells are immobile, tissue size is achieved through control of both cell division orientation and mitotic rate. The bHLH transcription factor heterodimer formed by target of monopteros5 (TMO5) and lonesome highway (LHW) is a central regulator of vascular width-increasing divisions. An important unanswered question is how its activity is limited to specify vascular tissue dimensions. Here we identify a regulatory network that restricts TMO5/LHW activity. We show that thermospermine synthase ACAULIS5 antagonizes TMO5/LHW activity by promoting the accumulation of SAC51-LIKE (SACL) bHLH transcription factors. SACL proteins heterodimerize with LHW-therefore likely competing with TMO5/LHW interactions-prevent activation of TMO5/LHW target genes, and suppress the over-proliferation caused by excess TMO5/LHW activity. These findings connect two thus-far disparate pathways and provide a mechanistic understanding of the quantitative control of vascular tissue growth. PMID:26609958

  2. Spontaneous myogenic differentiation of Flk-1-positive cells from adult pancreas and other nonmuscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Tritarelli, Alessandra; Toietta, Gabriele; Gatto, Ilaria; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Pagani, Francesca; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-02-01

    At the embryonic or fetal stages, autonomously myogenic cells (AMCs), i.e., cells able to spontaneously differentiate into skeletal myotubes, have been identified from several different sites other than skeletal muscle, including the vascular compartment. However, in the adult animal, AMCs from skeletal muscle-devoid tissues have been described in only two cases. One is represented by thymic myoid cells, a restricted population of committed myogenic progenitors of unknown derivation present in the thymic medulla; the other is represented by a small subset of adipose tissue-associated cells, which we recently identified. In the present study we report, for the first time, the presence of spontaneously differentiating myogenic precursors in the pancreas and in other skeletal muscle-devoid organs such as spleen and stomach, as well as in the periaortic tissue of adult mice. Immunomagnetic selection procedures indicate that AMCs derive from Flk-1(+) progenitors. Individual clones of myogenic cells from nonmuscle organs are morphologically and functionally indistinguishable from skeletal muscle-derived primary myoblasts. Moreover, they can be induced to proliferate in vitro and are able to participate in muscle regeneration in vivo. Thus, we provide evidence that fully competent myogenic progenitors can be derived from the Flk-1(+) compartment of several adult tissues that are embryologically unrelated to skeletal muscle. PMID:18094147

  3. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. PMID:27016579

  4. Bilayered vascular graft derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells with biomimetic structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Karina H; Joshi, Prajakta A; Lai, Edwina S; Gujar, Prachi; Joubert, Lydia-M; Chen, Bertha; Huang, Ngan F

    2015-01-01

    Background: We developed an aligned bi-layered vascular graft derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that recapitulates the cellular composition, orientation, and anti-inflammatory function of blood vessels. Materials & methods: The luminal layer consisted of longitudinal-aligned nanofibrillar collagen containing primary endothelial cells (ECs) or iPSC-derived ECs (iPSC-ECs). The outer layer contained circumferentially oriented nanofibrillar collagen with primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or iPSC-derived SMCs(iPSC-SMCs). Results: On the aligned scaffolds, cells organized F-actin assembly within 8º from the direction of nanofibrils. When compared to randomly-oriented scaffolds, EC-seeded aligned scaffolds had significant reduced inflammatory response, based on adhesivity to monocytes. Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of anisotropic scaffolds in directing cell form and function, and has therapeutic significance as physiologically relevant blood vessels. PMID:26440211

  5. Knockout of insulin and IGF-1 receptors on vascular endothelial cells protects against retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Vicent, David; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; King, George L.; Holzenberger, Martin; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Both insulin and IGF-1 have been implicated in control of retinal endothelial cell growth, neovascularization, and diabetic retinopathy. To precisely define the role of insulin and IGF-1 signaling in endothelium in these processes, we have used the oxygen-induced retinopathy model to study mice with a vascular endothelial cell–specific knockout of the insulin receptor (VENIRKO) or IGF-1 receptor (VENIFARKO). Following relative hypoxia, VENIRKO mice show a 57% decrease in retinal neovascularization as compared with controls. This is associated with a blunted rise in VEGF, eNOS, and endothelin-1. By contrast, VENIFARKO mice show only a 34% reduction in neovascularization and a very modest reduction in mediator generation. These data indicate that both insulin and IGF-1 signaling in endothelium play a role in retinal neovascularization through the expression of vascular mediators, with the effect of insulin being most important in this process. PMID:12813019

  6. Indirect co‑culture of vascular smooth muscle cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells inhibits vascular calcification and downregulates the Wnt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng'en; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Shaoqiong; Li, Wei; Guan, Siming

    2016-06-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is widely considered to be a crucial clinical indicator of cardiovascular disease. Recently, certain properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been hypothesized to have potential in treating cardiovascular diseases. However, their effect on the initiation and progression of VC remains controversial. The present study aimed to investigate whether MSCs indirectly mediate VC and their impact on the Wnt signaling pathways. A Transwell system was selected to establish the indirect co‑culture environment, and hence, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were indirectly co‑cultured in the presence or absence of MSCs at a ratio of 1:1. Osteogenic medium (OS) was added to imitate a calcifying environment. Fourteen days later, VSMCs in the lower layers of the Transwell plates were harvested. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium nodules were markedly increased in calcific VSMCs induced by OS. However, these parameters were significantly decreased in VSMCs by indirectly co‑culturing with MSCs in the same medium. Furthermore, the messenger RNA expression levels of osteopontin and osteoprotegerin were notably increased in VSMCs cultured in OS, but reduced by indirect interaction with MSCs. In addition, the activities of canonical and noncanonical Wnt ligands, wingless‑type MMTV integration site family, number 5A (Wnt5a), receptor tyrosine kinase‑like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2) and β‑catenin, which are important in the process of VC, were downregulated by indirect contact with MSCs in OS. Thus, indirect co‑culture with MSCs inhibits VC and downregulates the Wnt signaling pathways. PMID:27121342

  7. Cell Phone Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryen, Diane Nelson; Carey, Allison; Friedman, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Although cell phone use has grown dramatically, there is a gap in cell phone access between people with disabilities and the general public. The importance of cell phone use among people with intellectual disabilities and studies about use of cell phones by adults with intellectual disabilities was described. Our goal was to determine the extent…

  8. Hepatic cancer stem cells may arise from adult ductal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Kostas C; Talianidis, Iannis

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are defined as cells within tumors that can self-renew and differentiate into heterogeneous lineages of cancerous cells. The origin of CSCs is not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that CSCs in hepatocellular carcinoma could be generated via oncogenic transformation and partial differentiation of adult hepatic ductal progenitor cells.

  9. Novel role of lactosylceramide in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Kolmakova, Antonina; Chatterjee, Subroto

    2005-10-14

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in angiogenesis associated with coronary heart disease, vascular complications in diabetes, inflammatory vascular diseases, and tumor metastasis. The mechanism of VEGF-driven angiogenesis involving glycosphingolipids such as lactosylceramide (LacCer), however, is not known. To demonstrate the involvement of LacCer in VEGF-induced angiogenesis, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of LacCer synthase expression (GalT-V) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This gene silencing markedly inhibited VEGF-induced platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) expression and angiogenesis. Second, we used D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP), an inhibitor of LacCer synthase and glucosylceramide synthase, that significantly mitigated VEGF-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes were reversed by LacCer but not by structurally related compounds such as glucosylceramide, digalactosylceramide, and ceramide. In a human mesothelioma cell line (REN) that lacks the endogenous expression of PECAM-1, VEGF/LacCer failed to stimulate PECAM-1 expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In REN cells expressing human PECAM-1 gene/protein, however, both VEGF and LacCer-induced PECAM-1 protein expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In fact, VEGF-induced but not LacCer-induced angiogenesis was mitigated by SU-1498, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Also, VEGF/LacCer-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis was mitigated by protein kinase C and phospholipase A2 inhibitors. These results indicate that LacCer generated in VEGF-treated endothelial cells may serve as an important signaling molecule for PECAM-1 expression and in angiogenesis. This finding and the reagents developed in our report may be useful as anti-angiogenic drugs for further studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16151023

  10. Dimethylfumarate attenuates restenosis after acute vascular injury by cell-specific and Nrf2-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Joo; Park, Sungmi; Kim, Joon-Young; Kim, Han-Jong; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Choi, Young-Keun; Go, Younghoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and incomplete re-endothelialization is a major clinical problem limiting the long-term efficacy of percutaneous coronary angioplasty. We tested if dimethylfumarate (DMF), an anti-psoriasis drug, could inhibit abnormal vascular remodeling via NF−E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity. DMF significantly attenuated neointimal hyperplasia induced by balloon injury in rat carotid arteries via suppression of the G1 to S phase transition resulting from induction of p21 protein in VSMCs. Initially, DMF increased p21 protein stability through an enhancement in Nrf2 activity without an increase in p21 mRNA. Later on, DMF stimulated p21 mRNA expression through a process dependent on p53 activity. However, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) or NQO1 activity, well-known target genes induced by Nrf2, were dispensable for the DMF induction of p21 protein and the effect on the VSMC proliferation. Likewise, DMF protected endothelial cells from TNF-α-induced apoptosis and the dysfunction characterized by decreased eNOS expression. With knock-down of Nrf2 or NQO1, DMF failed to prevent TNF-α-induced cell apoptosis and decreased eNOS expression. Also, CD31 expression, an endothelial specific marker, was restored in vivo by DMF. In conclusion, DMF prevented abnormal proliferation in VSMCs by G1 cell cycle arrest via p21 upregulation driven by Nrf2 and p53 activity, and had a beneficial effect on TNF-α-induced apoptosis and dysfunction in endothelial cells through Nrf2–NQO1 activity suggesting that DMF might be a therapeutic drug for patients with vascular disease. PMID:25009787

  11. Platelet-activating factor biosynthesis in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, P R; Croft, K; Harris, T; Stewart, A G

    1994-01-01

    The ability of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists to protect rats from the cardiovascular collapse induced by large doses of endothelin 1 led us to examine the capacity of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells to produce PAF and also to evaluate its potential functional roles in this cell type. Adenosine triphosphate and the vasoactive peptides, endothelin 1, angiotensin II, and arginine vasopressin, each elicited an increase in the PAF level in extracts of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells as determined by bioassay. PAF was not detectable (above 20 fmol/mg protein) in the supernatants of these cells. The identity of the bioactivity as PAF was confirmed by GC/MS which indicated that more than 80% of the PAF was 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-3-sn-glyceryl-phosphorylcholine. Exogenous PAF (100 nM) elicited increases in intracellular calcium that were inhibited by WEB 2086 (10 microM). Endothelin 1, at a concentration which stimulated PAF synthesis, (1 nM), elicited increases in intracellular calcium levels that were not inhibited by WEB 2086 (10 microM). Thus, endogenous PAF is unlikely to be involved in the endothelin-1-induced calcium increases. Although WEB 2086 (3-100 microM) inhibited concentration dependently fetal calf serum (10% v/v) induced [3H]-thymidine incorporation, reaching a maximum effect at 30 microM of 40-50% reduction, in parallel experiments WEB 2086 had no effect on serum-induced increases in cell numbers. We conclude that PAF is produced and retained by cultured rat vascular smooth muscle and that it is unlikely to contribute to the signaling of increases in intracellular calcium or proliferation. PMID:8148465

  12. Collagen degradation and platelet-derived growth factor stimulate the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Stringa, E; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Gavrilovic, J

    2000-06-01

    Cell migration is a key event in many biological processes and depends on signals from both extracellular matrix and soluble motogenic factors. During atherosclerotic plaque development, vascular smooth muscle cells migrate from the tunica media to the intima through a basement membrane and interstitial collagenous matrix and proliferate to form a neointima. Matrix metalloproteinases have previously been implicated in neointimal formation and in this study smooth muscle cell adhesion and migration on degraded collagen have been evaluated. Vascular smooth muscle cells adhered to native intact collagen type I and to its first degradation by-product, 3/4 fragment (generated by collagenase-3 cleavage), unwound at 35 degrees C to mimic physiological conditions. PDGF-BB pre-treatment induced a fourfold stimulation of smooth muscle cell motility on the collagen 3/4 fragment whereas no increase in smooth muscle cell motility on collagen type I was observed. Cell migration on collagen type I was mediated by alpha2 integrin, whereas PDGF-BB-stimulated migration on the 3/4 collagen fragment was dependent on alphavbeta3 integrin. alphavbeta3 integrin was organised in clusters concentrated at the leading and trailing edges of the cells and was only expressed when cells were exposed to the 3/4 collagen fragment. Tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of PDGF receptor-beta tyrosine kinase activity, resulted in complete abolition of migration of PDGF-BB treated cells on collagen type I and 3/4 fragment. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the cellular migratory response to soluble motogens can be regulated by proteolytic modification of the extracellular matrix. PMID:10806116

  13. Real-time measurements of endogenous CO production from vascular cells using an ultrasensitive laser sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Durante, W.; Lancaster, D. G.; Klattenhoff, J.; Tittel, F. K.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been implicated as a biological messenger molecule analogous to nitric oxide. A compact gas sensor based on a midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for direct and real-time measurement of trace levels (in approximate pmol) of CO release by vascular cells. The midinfrared light is generated by difference frequency mixing of two nearinfrared lasers in a nonlinear optical crystal. A strong infrared absorption line of CO (4.61 microm) is chosen for convenient CO detection without interference from other gas species. The generation of CO from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells was detected every 20 s without any chemical modification to the CO. The sensitivity of the sensor reached 6.9 pmol CO. CO synthesis was measured from untreated control cells (0.25 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), sodium nitroprusside-treated cells (0.29 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), and hemin-treated cells (0.49 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). The sensor also detected decreases in CO production after the addition of the heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX (from 0.49 to 0.02 nmol per 10(7) cells/h) and increases after the administration of the HO substrate hemin (from 0.27 to 0.64 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). These results demonstrate that midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy is a useful technique for the noninvasive and real-time detection of trace levels of CO from biological tissues.

  14. Real-time measurements of endogenous CO production from vascular cells using an ultrasensitive laser sensor.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Durante, W; Lancaster, D G; Klattenhoff, J; Tittel, F K

    2001-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been implicated as a biological messenger molecule analogous to nitric oxide. A compact gas sensor based on a midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for direct and real-time measurement of trace levels (in approximate pmol) of CO release by vascular cells. The midinfrared light is generated by difference frequency mixing of two nearinfrared lasers in a nonlinear optical crystal. A strong infrared absorption line of CO (4.61 microm) is chosen for convenient CO detection without interference from other gas species. The generation of CO from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells was detected every 20 s without any chemical modification to the CO. The sensitivity of the sensor reached 6.9 pmol CO. CO synthesis was measured from untreated control cells (0.25 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), sodium nitroprusside-treated cells (0.29 nmol per 10(7) cells/h), and hemin-treated cells (0.49 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). The sensor also detected decreases in CO production after the addition of the heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX (from 0.49 to 0.02 nmol per 10(7) cells/h) and increases after the administration of the HO substrate hemin (from 0.27 to 0.64 nmol per 10(7) cells/h). These results demonstrate that midinfrared laser absorption spectroscopy is a useful technique for the noninvasive and real-time detection of trace levels of CO from biological tissues. PMID:11123266

  15. Phosphotyrosine-dependent targeting of mitogen-activated protein kinase in differentiated contractile vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Khalil, R A; Menice, C B; Wang, C L; Morgan, K G

    1995-06-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation has been linked to plasmalemmal targeting of src homology-2-containing proteins, activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, nuclear signaling, and proliferation of cultured cells. Significant tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase activities have also been reported in differentiated cells, but the signaling role of tyrosine-phosphorylated MAP kinase in these cells is unclear. The spatial and temporal relation between phosphotyrosine and MAP kinase immunoreactivity was quantified in differentiated contractile vascular smooth muscle cells by using digital imaging microscopy. An initial association of MAP kinase with the plasmalemma required upstream protein kinase C activity but occurred in a tyrosine phosphorylation-independent manner. Subsequent to membrane association, a delayed redistribution of MAP kinase, colocalizing with the actin-binding protein caldesmon, occurred in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. The apparent association of MAP kinase with the contractile proteins coincided with contractile activation. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation appears to target MAP kinase to cytoskeletal proteins in contractile vascular cells. This targeting mechanism may determine the specific destination and thereby the specialized function of MAP kinase in other phenotypes. PMID:7538916

  16. Rat vascular smooth muscle cells in culture contract upon Ca2+ repletion after depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S.; Kanaide, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nakamura, M.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Ca2+-repletion following depletion on cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from the rat aorta. With Ca2+-repletion, the cells in primary cultures contracted, as indicated by a decrease in cell area. The process was slow (30 min to maximum effect) and reversible (relaxation completed by 120 min). Contraction during Ca2+-repletion was never observed in subcultured cells. The SMCs in primary culture after treatment maintained the ability to grow and to exclude dye, with a normal plating efficiency. There was no treatment-related additional leakage of intracellular enzymes, LDH and CPK, into the medium. Ca2+-repletion at first accelerated the 45Ca uptake by SMCs (1-5 min after repletion) and then increased Ca2+ efflux after about 10 min of Ca2+-repletion. We conclude that Ca2+-repletion after depletion induces a transient and reversible contraction of vascular SMCs in primary culture, without cell injury and in association with a transient increase in Ca2+ influx and then efflux. This phenomenon may relate to the decrease in perfusion flow in hearts and kidneys during Ca2+-repletion after depletion (Ca2+-paradox). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:4084451

  17. Metabolomic Profiling of Cellular Responses to Carvedilol Enantiomers in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxuan; Bai, Jing; Chen, Wei Ning; Ching, Chi Bun

    2010-01-01

    Carvedilol is a non-selective β-blocker indicated in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. Although the differential pharmacological effects of individual Carvedilol enantiomer is supported by preceding studies, the cellular response to each enantiomer is not well understood. Here we report the use of GC-MS metabolomic profiling to study the effects of Carvedilol enantiomers on vascular smooth muscle cells (A7r5) and to shed new light on molecular events underlying Carvedilol treatment. The metabolic analysis revealed alternations in the levels of 8 intracellular metabolites and 5 secreted metabolites in A7r5 cells incubated separately with S- and R-Carvedilol. Principal component analysis of the metabolite data demonstrated the characteristic metabolic signatures in S- and R-Carvedilol-treated cells. A panel of metabolites, including L-serine, L-threonine, 5-oxoproline, myristic acid, palmitic acid and inositol are closely correlated to the vascular smooth muscle contraction. Our findings reveal the differentiating metabolites for A7r5 cells incubated with individual enantiomer of Carvedilol, which opens new perspectives to employ metabolic profiling platform to study chiral drug-cell interactions and aid their incorporation into future improvement of β-blocker therapy. PMID:21124793

  18. Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Furqan; Dutta, Naba K; Zannettino, Andrew; Vandyke, Kate; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2014-04-14

    The aim of this investigation was to understand and engineer the interactions between endothelial cells and the electrospun (ES) polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) nanofiber surfaces and evaluate their potential for endothelialization. Elastomeric PVDF-HFP samples were electrospun to evaluate their potential use as small diameter artificial vascular graft scaffold (SDAVG) and compared with solvent cast (SC) PVDF-HFP films. We examined the consequences of fibrinogen adsorption onto the ES and SC samples for endothelialisation. Bone marrow derived endothelial cells (BMEC) of human origin were incubated with the test and control samples and their attachment, proliferation, and viability were examined. The nature of interaction of fibrinogen with SC and ES samples was investigated in detail using ELISA, XPS, and FTIR techniques. The pristine SC and ES PVDF-HFP samples displayed hydrophobic and ultrahydrophobic behavior and accordingly, exhibited minimal BMEC growth. Fibrinogen adsorbed SC samples did not significantly enhance endothelial cell binding or proliferation. In contrast, the fibrinogen adsorbed electrospun surfaces showed a clear ability to modulate endothelial cell behavior. This system also represents an ideal model system that enables us to understand the natural interaction between cells and their extracellular environment. The research reported shows potential of ES surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications. PMID:24564790

  19. Vasopressin induces release of arachidonic acid from vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grillone, L.R.; Clark, M.A.; Heckman, G.; Schmidt, D.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells (A-10), derived from rat thoracic aorta, have vascular (V/sub 1/) vasopressin receptors. They have previously shown that these receptors mediate phosphatidylinositol turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and inhibition of isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP. Here they studied the effect of vasopressin on arachidonic acid metabolism of A-10 cells. Cells were incubated for 18-20 hr with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid (80 Ci/mmol). Vasopressin stimulated release of arachidonic acid in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significant release of arachidonic acid was observed after 4 min with 10/sup -9/ M vasopressin. Maximum release was reached 4 min after addition of 10/sup -7/ M vasopressin (1100 dpm/10/sup 6/ cells). About 800 dmp were released after 1 and 4 min with 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin, respectively. The vasopressin-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was blocked by the specific V/sub 1//V/sub 2/ vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)VAVP. These data indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells increase arachidonic acid release in response to vasopressin. This response is likely mediated by V/sub 1/ receptors.

  20. Heparin fragments inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, S.C.; Johnson, W.V.; Maciag, T.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the effect of heparin on human abdominal aortic smooth muscle cell growth. Cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 90% at a concentration of 20 ..mu..g/ml in a 12 day growth assay using heparin from Sigma, Upjohn or Calbiochem. Additionally, 200 ..mu..g/ml Upjohn heparin inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 50% in short term assays using serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor (25-100ng/ml) to initiate the cell cycle. Homogeneous size classes of heparin fragments were prepared by nitrous acid cleavage and BioGel P-10 filtration chromatography. Deca-, octa-, hexa-, tetra-, and di-saccharides inhibited proliferation by 90% at concentrations of 280, 320, 260, 180 and 100 ..mu..g/ml, respectively, in a 12 day growth assay. These data confirm the work of Castellot et.al. and extend the range of inhibitory fragments down to the tetra- and di-saccharide size. These data suggest, therefore, that di-saccharide subunit of heparin is sufficient to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The authors are now examining the role of the anhydromannose moiety on the reducing end of the nitrous acid generated fragments as a possible mediator of heparin-induced inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  1. BMP-2 promotes phosphate uptake, phenotypic modulation, and calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Yang, Hsueh-Ying; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2008-08-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events that are the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that phosphate transport through the type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1, was necessary for phosphate-induced calcification and osteochondrogenic phenotypic change in cultured human smooth muscle cells (SMC). BMP-2 is a potent osteogenic protein required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation that has been implicated in vascular calcification. In the present study, we have examined the effects of BMP-2 on human SMC calcification in vitro. We found that treatment of SMC with BMP-2 enhanced elevated phosphate-induced calcification, but did not induce calcification under normal phosphate conditions. mRNAs for BMP receptors, including ALK2, ALK3, ALK6, BMPR-II, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB were all detected in human SMCs. Mechanistically, BMP-2 dose-dependently stimulated phosphate uptake in SMC (200 ng/ml BMP-2 vs. vehicle: 13.94 vs. 7.09 nmol/30 min/mg protein, respectively). Real-time PCR and Western blot revealed the upregulation of Pit-1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, by BMP-2. More importantly, inhibition of phosphate uptake by a competitive inhibitor of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport, phosphonoformic acid, abrogated BMP-2-induced calcification. These results indicate that phosphate transport via Pit-1 is crucial in BMP-2-regulated SMC calcification. In addition, BMP-2-induced Runx2 and inhibited SM22 expression, indicating that it promotes osteogenic phenotype transition in these cells. Thus, BMP-2 may promote vascular calcification via increased phosphate uptake and induction of osteogenic phenotype modulation in SMC. PMID:18179800

  2. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  3. [Heart and vascular surgery interventions with hypothermic circulatory arrest in adults].

    PubMed

    Kipfer, B; Leupi, F; Althaus, U

    1990-10-01

    In the period between 1981 and 1988, 51 patients were operated on the thoracic aorta using the hypothermic circulatory arrest technique. 31 patients had a dissection of the thoracic aorta, in 16 cases, an aneurysm was the reason for the intervention. In addition, we used the hypothermic circulatory arrest for a thrombectomy in the aortic arch and two mitral-valve replacements. The following operations were performed: 14 x composite graft, 19 x supracoronar prosthesis (6 x with aortic valve replacement, 3 x with partial replacement of aortic arch), 17 operations were performed either for aortic arch or aorta descendens replacement. In our retrospective study, 7 courses were fata (14%), 3 patients had complications with residuals. Compared with a group of 105 patients operated on the thoracic aorta in the same period without circulatory arrest, we found no difference with regard to the lethality and morbidity. We conclude that the hypothermic circulatory arrest is a safe technique for selected problems in cardiovascular surgery in adults. PMID:2074178

  4. In vivo vascularization of cell sheets provided better long-term tissue survival than injection of cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ryohei; Kuruma, Yosuke; Sekine, Hidekazu; Dobashi, Izumi; Yamato, Masayuki; Umezu, Mitsuo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    Cell sheets have shown a remarkable ability for repairing damaged myocardium in clinical and preclinical studies. Although they demonstrate a high degree of viability as engrafted cells in vivo, the reason behind their survivability is unclear. In this study, the survival and vascularization of rat cardiac cell sheets transplanted in the subcutaneous tissue of athymic rats were investigated temporally. The cell sheets showed significantly higher survival than cell suspensions for up to 12 months, using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging system to detect luciferase-positive transplanted cells. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay also showed a smaller number of apoptotic cells in the cell sheets than in the cell suspensions at 1 day. Rapid vascular formation and maturation were observed inside the cell sheets using an in vivo imaging system. Leaky vessels appeared at 6 h, red blood cells flowing through functional vessels appeared at 12 h, and morphologically matured vessels appeared at 7 days. In addition, immunostaining of cell sheets with nerve/glial antigen-2 (NG2) showed that vessel maturity increased over time. Interestingly, these results correlated with the dynamics of cell sheet mRNA expression. Genes related to endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation, migration and vessel sprouting were highly expressed within 1 day, and genes related to pericyte recruitment and vessel maturation were highly expressed at 3 days or later. This suggested that the cell sheets could secrete appropriate angiogenic factors in a timely way after transplantation, and this ability might be a key reason for their high survival. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24470393

  5. Rosiglitzone Suppresses Angiotensin II-Induced Production of KLF5 and Cell Proliferation in Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dengfeng; Hao, Guanghua; Meng, Zhe; Ning, Ning; Yang, Guang; Liu, Zhongwei; Dong, Xin; Niu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor (KLF) 5, which initiates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, also participates in Angiotensin (Ang) II-induced vascular remodeling. The protective effect of rosiglitazone on vascular remodeling may be due to their impact on VSMC proliferation. However, the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether the antiproliferation effects of rosiglitazone are mediated by regulating Ang II/KLF5 response. We found that, in aortas of Ang II-infused rats, vascular remodeling and KLF5 expression were markedly increased, and its target gene cyclin D1 was overexpressed. Co-treatment with rosiglitazone diminished these changes. In growth-arrested VSMCs, PPAR-γ agonists (rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2) dose-dependently inhibited Ang II-induced cell proliferation and expression of KLF5 and cyclin D1. Moreover, these effects were attenuated by the PPAR-γ antagonists GW9662, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and PPAR-γ specific siRNA. Furthermore, rosiglitazone inhibited Ang II-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) ζ and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and activation of early growth response protein (Egr). In conclusion, in Ang II-stimulated VSMCs, rosiglitazone might have an antiproliferative effect through mechanisms that include reducing KLF5 expression, and a crosstalk between PPAR-γ and PKCζ/ERK1/2/Egr may be involved in. These findings not only provide a previously unrecognized mechanism by which PPAR-γ agonists inhibit VSMC proliferation, but also document a novel evidence for the beneficial vascular effect of PPAR-γ activation. PMID:25874449

  6. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  7. Metal-free Phtalocyanine and 5-Aminolevulenic Acid in Photodynamic Treatment of Human Vascular Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udartseva, Olga O.; Andreeva, Elena R.; Buravkova, Ludmila B.; Tararak, Eduard M.

    2010-05-01

    Originally developed as a tumor therapy, now photodynamic therapy (PDT) may become a useful tool for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Different cell types are involved in this vascular pathology, and these cells possess different susceptibility to PDT. In this study we screened the effects of two new photosensitizers (PtS and ALA) on human vascular cells. Human macrophages (Mph), aorta endothelial (HAEC) and smooth muscle (SMC) cells were obtained and cultured as described elsewhere. 2-10 ug/ml PtS was added to culture medium 24 h before PDT. ALA was added in 2-10 mM concentration in serum-free culture medium. Then cells were washed carefully and illuminated with 692-nm (PtS) or 633-nm (ALA) light. Cellular viability was measured with MTT-test. Except the case of use 5-10 mM ALA, either photosensitizer accumulation alone or laser illumination alone did not affect cells. Illumination of PtS or ALA-loaded cells (1-20 J/cm2) impaired cellular viability in dose-dependent manner. LD90 for different vascular cells with PtS were as follows: HAEC -1 J/cm2, SMC -2 J/cm2, Mph -5 J/cm2. HAEC and some Mph were unsusceptible to ALA-PDT. SMC LD90 with ALA was 20 J/cm2. Effects of ALA-PDT depended on protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) formation in cells. HAEC didn't accumulate PpIX and were non-sensitive to ALA-PDT. PpIX formation in Mph changed individually according to donor. Illumination of ALA-loaded Mph with low PpIX formation did not affect cells. However LD90 for Mph with high PpIX formation comprised 20 J/cm2. All cell types were more susceptible to PtS-PDT compared to ALA-PDT. Among tested photosensitizers PtS was the most effective one. HAEC were the most susceptible to PtS-PDT.

  8. [Nondeficiency chronic polyneuropathies in celiac disease in adults (2 cases with inflammatory neuromuscular vascularitis)].

    PubMed

    Bernier, J J; Buge, A; Rambaud, J C; Rancurel, G; Hauw, J J; Modigliani, R; Denvil, D

    1976-10-01

    The neurological and muscular complications seen in coeliac disease in adults are usually attributed to deficiency secondary to malabsorption. Amongst them, however, there exists a very rare cateogory, described by Cooke et al. (1966) taking the form of a chronic myeloneuropathy which cannot be explained in terms of the malabsorption syndrome. Our two cases of gluten intolerance enteropathy, confirmed by biopsy before and after diet, fell into this group of polyneuropathies. The patients, both women, suffered from an essentially sensory ataxic polyneuropathy with accessory motor component with pyramidal and posterior column signs. CSF findings showed a meningeal inflammatory reaction in one of the two cases. These neurological signs, appearing paradoxically during a digestive disease cured by diet, evolve chronically but become stabilised with corticosteroid therapy. Any vitamin deficiency may be excluded in the aetiology of these problems. Neuropathological study of neuromuscular biopsies in very fine serial sections confirmed the mild peripheral nervous involvement but revealed identical inflammatory lesions in the nerve and muscle which were remarkable by virtue of their very highly segmentally selective micro-vasculitis appearance. In these two cases, general, clinical and biological arguments, as well as the type of histological lesion, make it possible to exclude monoclonal gammapathies, malignant haemopathies, amyloidosis and the major collagen diseases. This micro-vasculitis, having transient forms with P.A.N. is no less distinctive, and may be integrated into the provisional group of "allergic angeitis", related to physiopathology of circulating immune complexes and very fashionable in theories as to the mechanism of gluten-sensitive enteropathies. The exact nature of the link between the latter and these types of polyneuropathy remains unknown. PMID:1008365

  9. Effect of urea and osmotic cell shrinkage on Ca2+ entry and contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C A; Huber, S M; Wärntges, S; Zempel, G; Kaba, N K; Fux, R; Orth, N; Busch, G L; Waldegger, S; Lambert, I; Nilius, B; Heinle, H; Lang, F

    2000-06-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the effects of urea on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Addition of urea (20, 50, 100 mM) to physiological salt solution blunted the vasoconstrictory effect of phenylephrine (by 17, 25 and 30%, respectively) and of an increased extracellular K+ concentration (by 7, 14 and 19%, respectively) without affecting the basal tone of rabbit arterial rings. According to Fura-2 fluorescence in cultured SMC (A7r5), urea had no effect on basal intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i), but significantly blunted the increase of [Ca2+]i following an increase of extracellular K+. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the Ca2+ current through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels is significantly inhibited in the presence of urea. As evident from calcein fluorescence, addition of urea leads to sustained cell shrinkage. The effects of urea on vascular tone, [Ca2+]i activity, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and cell volume are mimicked by addition of raffinose or NaCl. However, the cell shrinkage induced by urea is sustained, whereas the addition of equiosmolar NaCl is only transient and followed by a regulatory cell volume increase. Moreover, hypertonic NaCl increases, whereas urea decreases, the transcription of cell-volume-regulated kinase hsgk. In conclusion, urea leads to sustained shrinkage of vascular smooth muscle cells, which is followed by inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, a decrease of [Ca2+]i and thus blunts the vasoconstrictory action of phenylephrine and increased extracellular K+ concentration. PMID:10898530

  10. A novel adipocytokine, chemerin exerts anti-inflammatory roles in human vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamawaki, Hideyuki; Kameshima, Satoshi; Usui, Tatsuya; Okada, Muneyoshi; Hara, Yukio

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is a novel adipocytokine with almost unknown function in vasculature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin activates Akt/eNOS/NO pathways in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-induced VCAM-1 via suppressing NF-{kappa}B and p38 signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is anti-inflammatory through producing NO in vascular endothelium. -- Abstract: Chemerin is a recently identified adipocytokine which plays a role on inflammation and adipocytes metabolism. However, its function in vasculature is largely unknown. We examined the effects of chemerin on vascular endothelial inflammatory states. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with chemerin (300 ng/ml, 20 min) induced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177). Consistently, chemerin increased intracellular cyclic GMP content. Pretreatment with chemerin (1-300 ng/ml, 24 h) significantly inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B p65 (Ser536) and p38 as well as vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} (5 ng/ml, 20 min-6 h). Inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B or p38 significantly inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression. Chemerin also inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in rat isolated aorta. Moreover, chemerin significantly inhibited monocytes adhesion to TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of chemerin on TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 was reversed by a NOS inhibitor. Conversely, an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1. The present results for the first time demonstrate that chemerin plays anti-inflammatory roles by preventing TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocytes adhesion in vascular

  11. Clinicopathological implications of vascular endothelial growth factor 165b expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma stroma.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Masahiro; Kondo, Seiji; Mukudai, Yoshiki; Kamatani, Takaaki; Akizuki, Ayako; Yaso, Atsushi; Shimane, Toshikazu; Shirota, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important angiogenic factors. VEGF165b was recently isolated as the anti-angiogenic VEGF splice variant. In the present study, we examined the association between VEGF165b expression and clinicopathological characteristics in order to determine how VEGF165b produced from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) affects the stromal cell biological activity. We examined the relationships between the expressions of both VEGF isoforms in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) and OSCC cell lines (HSC2, 3, 4 and SAS). Our analyses indicated that both the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF165b in the HSC2 and SAS cells were higher than those in the NHDFs. VEGF165b did not promote cell growth or invasive capabilities, but it induced the cell adhesive capabilities to ECM. Although strong expression of the VEGF165 isoforms in tumor cells of OSCC tissues was observed, there was no significant difference in the VEGF165b expression level among the various degrees of malignancy. OSCC cells secrete VEGF165b into the stroma, and this factor may contribute to the process of anti-angiogenesis by inhibiting gelatinase-expressing cells and activating cell adhesive capabilities to ECM, such as that of fibroblasts surrounding tumor cells. PMID:27221145

  12. p73 is required for endothelial cell differentiation, migration and the formation of vascular networks regulating VEGF and TGFβ signaling.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alonso, R; Martin-Lopez, M; Gonzalez-Cano, L; Garcia, S; Castrillo, F; Diez-Prieto, I; Fernandez-Corona, A; Lorenzo-Marcos, M E; Li, X; Claesson-Welsh, L; Marques, M M; Marin, M C

    2015-08-01

    Vasculogenesis, the establishment of the vascular plexus and angiogenesis, branching of new vessels from the preexisting vasculature, involves coordinated endothelial differentiation, proliferation and migration. Disturbances in these coordinated processes may accompany diseases such as cancer. We hypothesized that the p53 family member p73, which regulates cell differentiation in several contexts, may be important in vascular development. We demonstrate that p73 deficiency perturbed vascular development in the mouse retina, decreasing vascular branching, density and stability. Furthermore, p73 deficiency could affect non endothelial cells (ECs) resulting in reduced in vivo proangiogenic milieu. Moreover, p73 functional inhibition, as well as p73 deficiency, hindered vessel sprouting, tubulogenesis and the assembly of vascular structures in mouse embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell cultures. Therefore, p73 is necessary for EC biology and vasculogenesis and, in particular, that DNp73 regulates EC migration and tube formation capacity by regulation of expression of pro-angiogenic factors such as transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factors. DNp73 expression is upregulated in the tumor environment, resulting in enhanced angiogenic potential of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results demonstrate, by the first time, that differential p73-isoform regulation is necessary for physiological vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and DNp73 overexpression becomes a positive advantage for tumor progression due to its pro-angiogenic capacity. PMID:25571973

  13. Arsenite enhances tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, T.-C. . E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsai, E.-M.; Tsai, F.-Y.; Chao, H.-R.; Chang, Louis W.

    2005-11-15

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated a high association of vascular diseases with arsenite exposure. We hypothesize that arsenite potentiates the effect of proinflammatory cytokines on vascular endothelial cells, and hence contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of arsenite and its induction of glutathione (GSH) on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) protein expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a typical proinflammatory cytokine. Our study demonstrated that arsenite pretreatment potentiated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with up-regulations of both activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). To elucidate the role of GSH in regulation of AP-1, NF-{kappa}B, and VCAM-1 expression, we employed L-buthionine (S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) inhibitor, to block intracellular GSH synthesis. Our investigation revealed that, by depleting GSH, arsenite attenuated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression as well as a potentiation of AP-1 and an attenuation of NF-{kappa}B activations by TNF-{alpha}. Moreover, we found that depletion of GSH would also attenuate the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with a down-regulation of the TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation and without significant effect on AP-1. On the other hand, the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression could be completely abolished by inhibition of AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B was necessary for VCAM-1 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that arsenite enhances the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs via regulation of AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B activities in a GSH-sensitive manner. Our present study suggested a potential mechanism for arsenite in the induction of vascular inflammation and vascular diseases via modulating the actions

  14. Effects of autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Huang, Lu; Yang, Yunmei; Xu, Liqian; Yang, Ji; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-01

    It is reported that the autocrine loop of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is crucial for the survival and proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. In this study we aimed to systematically investigate the role of autocrine vascular VEGF in NSCLC cell line A549 through inhibition of endogenous VEGF. A549 cells were transfected with florescence-labeled VEGF oligodeoxynucleotide with lipofectamine. For the experimental group, cells were transfected with VEGF anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN), sense oligodeoxynucleotide (SODN) and mutant oligodeoxynuleotide (MODN) respectively. For the control group cells were mock transfected with lipofectamine or culture medium. At indicated time point after transfection, the expression levels of VEGF mRNA and protein in A549 cells were analyzed by RT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry. As revealed by RT-PCR assay, the mRNA level of VEGF in cells transfected with ASDON was significantly lower than the other four groups (P < 0.05) at 24 and 48 h after transfection. ELISA assay yielded similar result with significantly decreased level of VEGF protein expression (P < 0.05). The survival fraction of A549 cells transfected with ASDON was significantly lower than the other four groups (P < 0.05) at 24 h after transfection. Also the percentage of G2 phase cells of ASODN group was significantly lower than other four groups. Our data indicate that VEGF expression is efficiently inhibited in A549 cells by ASODN transfection and this inhibition leads to inhibited cell growth and impaired cell cycle distribution. PMID:23459872

  15. Amyloid beta-peptide induces cell monolayer albumin permeability, impairs glucose transport, and induces apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, E M; Toborek, M; Mark, R J; Hennig, B; Mattson, M P

    1997-05-01

    Amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) is deposited as insoluble fibrils in the brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to neuronal degeneration, cerebral vascular alterations indicative of damage to vascular endothelial cells and disruption of the blood-brain barrier occur in AD. Here we report that A beta25-35 can impair regulatory functions of endothelial cells (ECs) from porcine pulmonary artery and induce their death. Subtoxic exposures to A beta25-35 induced albumin transfer across EC monolayers and impaired glucose transport into ECs. Cell death induced by A beta25-35 was of an apoptotic form, characterized by DNA condensation and fragmentation, and prevented by inhibitors of macromolecular synthesis and endonucleases. The effects of A beta25-35 were specific because A beta1-40 also induced apoptosis in ECs with the apoptotic cells localized to the microenvironment of A beta1-40 aggregates and because astrocytes did not undergo similar changes after exposure to A beta25-35. Damage and death of ECs induced by A beta25-35 were attenuated by antioxidants, a calcium channel blocker, and a chelator of intracellular calcium, indicating the involvement of free radicals and dysregulation of calcium homeostasis. The data show that A beta induces increased permeability of EC monolayers to macromolecules, impairs glucose transport, and induces apoptosis. If similar mechanisms are operative in vivo, then A beta and other amyloidogenic peptides may be directly involved in vascular EC damage documented in AD and other disorders that involve vascular amyloid accumulation. PMID:9109512

  16. EFFECT OF TERAZOSIN ON TISSUE VASCULARITY AND APOPTOSIS IN TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF BLADDER

    PubMed Central

    TAHMATZOPOULOS, ANASTASIOS; LAGRANGE, CHAD A.; ZENG, LI; MITCHELL, BONNIE L.; CONNER, WILLIAM T.; KYPRIANOU, NATASHA

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To present a pilot study to determine whether the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin can induce apoptosis in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder, similar to the effect seen with prostate cancer. The alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist terazosin has recently been shown to induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo and to reduce prostatic tissue vascularity by potentially affecting endothelial cell adhesion. Methods The records of 24 men who underwent radical cystectomy for TCC of the bladder at the Lexington Veterans Affairs Medical Center were reviewed. The control group consisted of 15 men who were never exposed to terazosin. The study group consisted of 9 men who were treated with terazosin before cystectomy. Sections of th