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Sample records for adult volunteers received

  1. Institutional Facilitation in Sustained Volunteering among Older Adult Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengyan; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Songiee

    2009-01-01

    As more nonprofit organizations rely on older adult volunteers to provide services, it is important to retain volunteers for an extended period of time to ensure service quality and the beneficial outcomes of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are positioned to facilitate older adult volunteers' role performance. Based on an institutional…

  2. Handbook for Volunteers: Adult Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, C. Russell

    Designed for volunteers in Olympic College's Adult Education Volunteer Classroom Assistant Project, this handbook discusses volunteer tutors' roles, characteristics of Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English as a Second Language (ESL) students, suggested teaching techniques, tips for working with instructors, and college policies and regulations.…

  3. Volunteer drivers: their contributions to older adults and to themselves.

    PubMed

    Kerschner, Helen; Rousseau, Marie-Hélène

    2008-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Beverly Foundation surveyed volunteer drivers in an effort to better understand how and why they support older adults. The sample comprised 714 volunteer drivers from 367 communities, representing 40 states, who responded to the survey. Their responses provided qualitative and quantitative information about who they are, why they volunteer, the challenges they face, and the satisfaction they receive from volunteering to drive. They also addressed current topics including mobility and transportation for older adults, volunteerism and civic engagement, and an innovative method of joining the two sides of aging--the "wellderly" and the elderly. The involvement of volunteer drivers and the organizations that enable them to provide transportation services may be one solution for today and a hope of the future for meeting the transportation needs of older adults. PMID:19064473

  4. Cryptosporidium meleagridis: Infectivity in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Akiyoshi, Donna E.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2011-01-01

    Most Cryptosporidium infections in humans are caused by C. parvum or C. hominis. However, genotyping techniques have identified infections caused by unusual Cryptosporidium species. Cryptosporidium meleagridis has been identified in ≤ 1% of persons with diarrhea, although prevalence is higher in developing nations. We examined the infectivity of C. meleagridis in healthy adults. Five volunteers were challenged with 105 C. meleagridis oocysts and monitored six weeks for fecal oocysts and clinical manifestations. Four volunteers had diarrhea; three had detectable fecal oocysts; and one infected volunteer remained asymptomatic. Fecal DNA from two volunteers was amplified by using a polymerase chain reaction specific for the Cryptosporidium small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Nucleotide sequence of these amplicons was diagnostic for C. meleagridis. All infections were self-limited; oocysts were cleared within ≤ 12 days of challenge. These studies establish that healthy adults can be infected and become ill from ingestion of C. meleagridis oocysts. PMID:21813841

  5. Organizational Support and Volunteering Benefits for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengyan; Choi, Eunhee; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested a theoretical model of volunteering benefits and examined the mechanism through which volunteering benefits older adults. Design and Methods: This is a 2-wave study of 253 older adult volunteers serving in 10 volunteer programs. Older volunteers completed the mailed surveys in 2005 and 2006. Structural equation modeling…

  6. Adult Literacy Volunteers. Overview. ERIC Digest No. 48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    Although volunteer tutors traditionally have formed the basis of the programs of Laubach Literacy Action and Literacy Volunteers of America, volunteers have begun to play a greater role in adult literacy instruction provided through community-based organizations, correctional institutions, churches, and federally funded adult basic education.…

  7. Volunteer Drivers: Their Contributions to Older Adults and to Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschner, Helen; Rousseau, Marie-Helene

    2008-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Beverly Foundation surveyed volunteer drivers in an effort to better understand how and why they support older adults. The sample comprised 714 volunteer drivers from 367 communities, representing 40 states, who responded to the survey. Their responses provided qualitative and quantitative information about who they are, why…

  8. An evaluation of diphtheria--tetanus (adult) vaccine in unselected human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Harcus, A W; Ward, A E; Roberts, J S; Bryett, K A

    1989-01-01

    One hundred unselected adult volunteers received an adult diphtheria (less than 2 Lf)-tetanus (greater than or equal to 40 IU) adsorbed vaccine without prior Schick testing. No volunteer had a moderate or severe reaction although 39% complained of a transient sore arm. Only 10% reported local erythema. Of the study group, 37/43 (86%) patients who were initially seronegative for diphtheria attained levels normally considered as seropositive. The results confirm the safety and efficacy of adult diphtheria-tetanus vaccine and allow its recommendation for use in 'at risk' individuals without the need for prior Schick testing. PMID:2767328

  9. Adults Who Learn Differently: Help through a Volunteer Literacy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Louise; Gillespie, Phyllis; Balkam, Lynda

    1997-01-01

    Presents an overview of preservice volunteer training at READ/San Diego, an adult literacy program. It discusses the program's informal assessment procedures that help identify possible language/learning disabilities and provide valuable information for instructional planning. Also described are selected multisensory teaching techniques designed…

  10. Less May Be More: Rethinking Adult Literacy Volunteer Tutor Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Alisa

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed the relation between volunteer tutor training and reading instruction in 4 adult literacy programs. The data focus on tutors' choices of reading materials and strategies for assisting in the development of comprehension and word identification skills. Tutor training did not always transfer to practice, and it did not always…

  11. Reassessment of stiripentol pharmacokinetics in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Peigné, Sophie; Rey, Elisabeth; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Pons, Gerard; Jullien, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Because children who have been receiving stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet syndrome for more than 10 years are now becoming young adults, it is important to accurately characterize stiripentol pharmacokinetics in this age range. A double-blind placebo-controlled dose ranging study was therefore conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of stiripentol in 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject received 3 single doses of stiripentol (500, 1000, and 2000 mg) separated by a wash-out period of 1 week. Pharmacokinetics of stiripentol was analyzed for each dose by non-compartmental analysis. Median area under the curve (AUC), terminal elimination half-life (t1/2,z) and maximal concentration (Cmax) were calculated for between-dose comparison. Safety was evaluated based on both clinical and biological criteria. Oppositely to previous results, there was no concentration rebounds in the elimination phase, which could be the consequence of the food intake. A more than proportional increase in the AUC was observed, associated with a significant increase in the t1/2,z, for increasing doses (median AUC of 8.3, 31 and 88 mgh/L, and median t1/2,z of 2, 7.7 and 10h for the 500, 1000, and 2000 mg doses respectively), which confirmed the Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetics of Stiripentol. However, dose-normalized Cmax did not significantly vary between doses. Median Michaelis-Menten parameters were 117 mg/h for Vmax and 1.9 mg/L for Km. No safety concern was observed during the study. The present study allowed a better characterization of the disposition phase of stiripentol and confirmed its non-linear pharmacokinetic behaviour. Further pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies would be useful to determine the optimal dose of stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet patients in adulthood. PMID:24725808

  12. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. NIH Research: Children Research Volunteers Receive Care and Help Advance Knowledge Past ... NIH Clinical Center. Photo: NIH Clinical Center Children research volunteers receive care and help advance knowledge I ...

  13. Cryptosporidium muris: Infectivity and Illness in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Lupo, Philip J.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Although Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis cause the majority of human cryptosporidiosis cases, other Cryptosporidium species are also capable of infecting humans, particularly when individuals are immunocompromised. Ten C. muris cases have been reported, primarily in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients with diarrhea. However, asymptomatic cases were reported in two HIV-negative children, and in another case, age and immune status were not described. This study examines the infectivity of C. muris in six healthy adults. Volunteers were challenged with 105 C. muris oocysts and monitored for 6 weeks for infection and/or illness. All six patients became infected. Two patients experienced a self-limited diarrheal illness. Total oocysts shed during the study ranged from 6.7 × 106 to 4.1 × 108, and the number was slightly higher in volunteers with diarrhea (2.8 × 108) than asymptomatic shedders (4.4 × 107). C. muris-infected subjects shed oocysts longer than occurred with other species studied in healthy volunteers. Three volunteers shed oocysts for 7 months. Physical examinations were normal, with no reported recurrence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal complaints. Two persistent shedders were treated with nitazoxanide, and the infection was resolved. Thus, healthy adults are susceptible to C. muris, which can cause mild diarrhea and result in persistent, asymptomatic infection. PMID:25311695

  14. Adult 4-H Volunteer Empowerment in 4-H Youth Development Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine which factors related to adult 4-H volunteer empowerment in 4-H youth development settings. This study examined the relationship of adult 4-H volunteers' perceived leadership styles of Oregon 4-H Youth Development Educators (YDE) to the adult 4-H volunteer sense of empowerment. In addition,…

  15. Volunteering and Psychological Well-Being among Young-Old Adults: How Much Is Too Much?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windsor, Timothy D.; Anstey, Kaarin J.; Rodgers, Bryan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Research concerned with the relationship between volunteer activity and psychological well-being has typically reported higher levels of well-being among older adult volunteers relative to nonvolunteers. However, few studies have examined nonlinear associations between frequency of volunteer activity and well-being. We examined nonlinear…

  16. Factors Affecting Volunteering among Older Rural and City Dwelling Adults in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Jeni; Stirling, Christine

    2007-01-01

    In the absence of large scale Australian studies of volunteering among older adults, this study compared the relevance of two theoretical approaches--social capital theory and sociostructural resources theory--to predict voluntary activity in relation to a large national database. The paper explores volunteering by older people (aged 55+) in order…

  17. Goals and Personal Resources that Contribute to the Development and Agency Attachment of Older Adult Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Alayna A.; Gottlieb, Benjamin H.; Maitland, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the volunteer service contribution of older adults (N = 100) to volunteer role development and agency attachment. Informed by a developmental regulation framework and socio-emotional selectivity theory, we tested a twofold hypothesis for the premise that greater role development and agency attachment would be experienced by (1) older…

  18. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  19. A Case Study of a Volunteer-Based Literacy Class with Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine participants' perspectives on how a volunteer-based adult literacy class supports the learning of adults with developmental/intellectual disabilities. Interviews were conducted with four tutors, three adult learners, and two coordinators and observations of the class occurred over a 6-month period…

  20. Plasma cortisol levels in normal volunteers receiving either betamethasone valerate or desoximetasone by topical application.

    PubMed

    Bromley, P A; Müller, F O; Malan, J; Torres, J; Vanderbeke, O

    1978-08-01

    Desoximetasone (Topisolon; Hoechst), a new topical steroid, and betamethasone 17-valerate were compared with respect to their effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function as evidenced by plasma cortisol concentrations. Three grams of each test preparation were applied daily for 21 days to intact skin of the ventral aspects of alternate forearms of 15 normal volunteers. Five received betamethasone 17-valerate 0.1%, 5 desoximetasone 0.05%, and 5 desoximetasone 0.25%. Plasma cortisol levels were determined before and after the initial applications on days 1, 3, 10, 17, 22, 24 and 28. These values were compared with the mean control values by analysis of covariance. There was no significant difference in plasma cortisol levels. The value of performing similar studies on larger skin areas and with larger doses is discussed. PMID:362568

  1. Diurnal variation in the quantitative EEG in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, L; Dane, A; Rhodes, J; Lynch, P; Hughes, A M

    2000-01-01

    Aims To define the change in power in standard waveband frequencies of quantitative cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) data over a 24 h period, in a drug free representative healthy volunteer population. Methods This was an open, non randomised study in which 18 volunteers (9 male and 9 female) were studied on 1 study day, over a 24 h period. Volunteers had a cortical EEG recording taken at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 and 24 h. Each recording lasted for 6 min (3 min eyes open, 3 min eyes closed). All EEG recordings were taken in a quietened ward environment with the curtains drawn round the bed and the volunteer supine. During the 3 min eyes open, volunteers were asked to look at a red circle on a screen at the foot of the bed, and refrain from talking. Results Plots produced of geometric mean power by time of the standard wave band frequencies gave some indication of a circadian rhythm over the 24 h period for θ (4.75–6.75 Hz), α1 (7.0–9.5 Hz) and β1 (12.75–18.50 Hz) wavebands. Mixed models were fitted to both the eyes open and eyes closed data which confirmed a change in mean waveband power with time with statistical significance at the conventional 5% level (P < 0.05). Conclusions These data indicate the presence of a diurnal variation in the cortical quantitative EEG. They support the use of a placebo control group when designing clinical trials which utilize quantitative EEG to screen for central nervous system (CNS) activity of pharmaceutical agents, to control for the confounding variable of time of day at which the EEG recordings were made. PMID:10886113

  2. The interplay of frequency of volunteering and prosocial motivation on purpose in life in emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Okun, Morris A; Kim, Ga Young

    2016-01-01

    One developmental task in emerging adulthood is finding meaning and purpose in life. Volunteering has been touted as one role that fosters purpose in life. We examined whether the association between frequency of volunteering and purpose in life varies with pleasure-based prosocial motivation and pressure-based prosocial motivation in a sample of 576 undergraduates, ages 18-22 years old. In a regression analysis predicting purpose in life, the frequency of volunteering by pleasure-based prosocial motivation by pressure-based prosocial motivation interaction effect was significant (p = .042). Simple slopes analyses revealed that frequency of volunteering was not significantly (p = .478) related to purpose in life among college students who were low in both pleasure-based and pressure-based prosocial motivation. The findings of the present study highlight the importance of prosocial motivation for understanding whether emerging adults' purpose in life will be enhanced by volunteering. PMID:27064183

  3. Volunteer Client Adult Attachment, Memory for In-Session Emotion, and Mood Awareness: An Affect Regulation Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodhouse, Susan S.; Gelso, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined relations between volunteer client adult attachment and both (a) memory for negative affect occurring within the first session of therapy and (b) mood awareness (mood labeling and mood monitoring). Participants were 80 volunteer clients (students with a personal issue who volunteered to participate in the…

  4. Integrating Volunteering into the Adult Immigrant Second Language Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    For immigrants, the acquisition of language, specifically the ability to communicate effectively, is one prerequisite of full integration into the host society. For an adult immigrant second language (L2) learner in Canada, access to opportunities that may enhance communicative ability are often limited to the ESL classroom. However, while…

  5. Connecting Socially Isolated Older Rural Adults with Older Volunteers through Expressive Arts.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ann; Skinner, Mark W; Wilkinson, Fay; Reid, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Employing a participatory arts-based research approach, we examined an innovative program from rural Ontario, Canada, designed to address social isolation among older people. Older socially isolated adults were matched to trained volunteers, where in dyads, the eight pairs created expressive art in their home setting over the course of 10 home visits. With thematic and narrative inquiry, we analysed the experiences and perceptions of the program leader, older participants, and older volunteers via their artistic creations, weekly logs, evaluations, and field notes. The findings reveal a successful intervention that positively influenced the well-being of older adult participants and older volunteers, especially in regards to relationships, personal development, and creating meaning as well as extending the intervention's impact beyond the program's duration. We also discuss opportunities for similar programs to inform policy and enable positive community-based health and social service responses to rural social isolation. PMID:26934547

  6. Motives and Determinants of Volunteering in Older Adults: An Integrated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grano, Caterina; Lucidi, Fabio; Zelli, Arnaldo; Violani, Cristiano

    2008-01-01

    The present study focused on changes in volunteering over time among Italian adults and examined a model in which motives from self-determination theory (SDT) were hypothesized to influence a series of social-cognitive processes including self-efficacy judgments and constructs from the theory of planned behavior (TPB). The study was conducted with…

  7. A One-to-One Programme for At-Risk Readers Delivered by Older Adult Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fives, Allyn; Kearns, Noreen; Devaney, Carmel; Canavan, John; Russell, Dan; Lyons, Rena; Eaton, Patricia; O'Brien, Aoife

    2013-01-01

    This paper is based on a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation of a reading programme delivered by older adult volunteers for at-risk early readers. Wizards of Words (WoW) was targeted at socially disadvantaged children in first and second grade experiencing delays in reading but who were not eligible for formal literacy supports. The…

  8. Everyday Memory Function of Older Adults: The Impact of Intergenerational School Volunteer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sally; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Participants in an intergenerational school volunteer program (26 adults over 60) completed memory instruments at 3 time periods. The effect of program participating on actual and perceived memory function varied with age and educational level. Dramatic positive mood changes were noted for those over 70 and those who were college educated. (SK)

  9. A Community-based Education Project: Intertidal Surveys With Student and Adult Volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Parker, G.; Bingham, B. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Fidalgo Learning about the Intertidal Project (FLIP) brought together scientists, educators, students and adult volunteers (20-30 total individuals) to conduct studies of the intertidal zone of a section of Fidalgo Island, Wa. in 2003 and 2004. The project goals were to: 1) obtain basic data on diversity and abundance of intertidal species in different habitats, 2) promote public awareness and appreciation of the intertidal zone, and 3) develop a model program for volunteer participation in scientific surveys. The 2-week program began with 2 days of workshops on local intertidal organisms to teach the FLIP participants how to classify and identify the different organisms and substrates they were likely to encounter in the surveys. We provided general lectures on intertidal habitats and on the importance of the intertidal zone to coastal resources. The FLIP participants worked together on identifying organisms, practicing the use of quadrats and data collection before the surveys began. Following 4 days of field surveys, the participants signed up for workshops that included compilation and analysis of the data, photography, nature writing and algae pressing. The final activity was a public tour of the intertidal day held at a local park. 50-60 people of all ages participated. The goal was to educate the public in plant and animal identification and habitat variability as well as "beach etiquette." Successful model program elements included self-selected volunteers and attention to the composition of each survey team, with one scientist/leader per team and one adult and two students or two adults and one student per team (4-5 teams, each completing one transect per site). Program flexibility was also crucial; FLIP volunteers were not required to attend every single day and post-survey workshops were optional. Volunteers participated to different extents and for different lengths of time depending on their abilities and interests. Project ownership was important

  10. The Relationship between Ministry Satisfaction and Spiritual Maturity among Adult Church Volunteers in the Korean Presbyterian Church in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nho, Sung Hyun

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the relationship between ministry satisfaction and spiritual maturity among adult church volunteers in the Korean Presbyterian church in South Korea (Kosin). It also sought to investigate factors related to volunteers' job satisfaction and their spiritual maturity. Participants included 531 adult small group…

  11. The pharmacokinetic profile of crocetin in healthy adult human volunteers after a single oral administration.

    PubMed

    Umigai, N; Murakami, K; Ulit, M V; Antonio, L S; Shirotori, M; Morikawa, H; Nakano, T

    2011-05-15

    Crocetin, a unique carotenoid with a short carbon chain length, is an active compound of saffron and Gardenia jasminoides Ellis used as traditional herbal medicine. The present study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetic profiles of crocetin in healthy adult subjects. The study was conducted as an open-label, single dose escalation with 10 Filipino volunteers (5 men and 5 women). The subjects received a single dose of crocetin at three doses (7.5, 15 and 22.5 mg) in one week interval. Blood samples were collected from the brachial vein before and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 24 h after administration. Plasma concentrations of crocetin were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Crocetin was rapidly absorbed and detected within an hour of administration with a mean time to reach maximum concentration (T(max)) of crocetin ranging from 4.0 to 4.8 h. The mean values of C(max) and AUC(0-24h) ranged from 100.9 to 279.7 ng/ml and 556.5 to 1720.8 ng. h/ml respectively. C(max) and AUC values increased with dose proportional manner. Crocetin was eliminated from human plasma with a mean elimination half life (T(½) of 6.1 to 7.5 h. In summary, there were no serious adverse events up to 22.5 mg dose of crocetin while crocetin was found to be absorbed more quickly than the other carotenoids such as β-carotene, lutein and lycopene. PMID:21112749

  12. Adult Volunteers. A Handbook for Teacher-Librarians in the Vancouver School Board to Provide Assistance to Teacher-Librarians Who Are Establishing Adult Volunteer Programs, [and] to Suggest Ideas for Teacher-Librarians Who Wish to Enlarge or Enhance Their Volunteer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vancouver School Board (British Columbia).

    Guidelines are presented for establishing, enhancing, and evaluating adult volunteer programs in school library resource centers, especially those in Vancouver, Canada. It is noted that in 1982 over 200 adults volunteered their time to work on a regular basis with teacher-librarians in Vancouver. Sections include: (1) a rationale for establishing…

  13. Volunteer Support for Mothers with New Babies: Perceptions of Need and Support Received

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPherson, Kristen; Barnes, Jacqueline; Nichols, Michelle; Dixon, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 55 mothers of infants. Some had received Home-Start during their infant's first year, others were offered the support but declined and the remainder were not offered Home-Start. Most of their support had come from informal sources, such as family and friends with less from professionals. Mothers who…

  14. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  15. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  16. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  17. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  18. Volunteering as a Pathway to Productive and Social Engagement among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Lee, Yung Soo; McCrary, Stacey; McBride, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Research on outcomes of volunteering in later life largely focuses on the health of volunteers. This is in contrast to studies of youth, where attention is directed toward the effects of volunteering on subsequent productive and citizen behaviors. In this study, we examined the effects of volunteering on subsequent social and civic…

  19. A cerebral functional imaging study by positron emission tomography in healthy volunteers receiving true or sham acupuncture needling.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xinsheng; Zhang, Guifeng; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chunzhi; Yang, Junjun; Wang, Shuxia; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2009-03-13

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that needling in Baihui, Shuigou and Shenmen enhances glucose metabolism in the frontal lobes, thalamus, temporal lobe, and the lentiform nucleus in vascular dementia. This study examined the effect of true, sham and overt needling in Waiguan (TE5) on cerebral changes by positron emission tomography (PET) technique. Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomized to receive overt control, true or sham needling therapy. To manipulate true needling, a needle was inserted into 15+/-2mm into Waiguan and "deqi" was achieved by proper needle manipulation. For sham needling, needles with a blunt tip were pushed against the skin as the shaft moved into the handle, giving an illusion of insertion. For overt placebo, blunt needles were used and subjects did not receive any needling penetration. The tracer used was (18)fluoride-deoxygluocse. PET images obtained were processed and analyzed by the SPM2 software. Compared with overt needling, brain areas BA7, 13, 18, 19, 21, 22, 27, 38, 40, 42 and 45 in Waiguan true needling group were significantly activated and areas BA4, 6, 7, 19, 22 and 41 in sham needling group showed obvious activation. Compared to sham needling group, marked activation points were found in the areas of BA13 and 42 and left cerebellum in true needling group. Our study revealed a marked difference in brain metabolic changes between true and sham needling in Waiguan. Further studies are needed to explore the cerebral changes in patients with acupuncture and the pathological implications. PMID:19383438

  20. Marketing Public Health Through Older Adult Volunteering: Experience Corps as a Social Marketing Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Elizabeth K.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Xue, Qian-Li; Rebok, George W.; Frick, Kevin D.; Carlson, Michelle C.; Wang, Tao; Piferi, Rachel L.; McGill, Sylvia; Whitfield, Keith E.; Fried, Linda P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We present a social marketing conceptual framework for Experience Corps Baltimore City (EC) in which the desired health outcome is not the promoted product or behavior. We also demonstrate the feasibility of a social marketing–based recruitment campaign for the first year of the Baltimore Experience Corps Trial (BECT), a randomized, controlled trial of the health benefits of EC participation for older adults. Methods. We recruited older adults from the Baltimore, MD, area. Participants randomized to the intervention were placed in public schools in volunteer roles designed to increase healthy behaviors. We examined the effectiveness of a recruitment message that appealed to generativity (i.e., to make a difference for the next generation), rather than potential health benefits. Results. Among the 155 participants recruited in the first year of the BECT, the average age was 69 years; 87% were women and 85% were African American. Participants reported primarily generative motives as their reason for interest in the BECT. Conclusions. Public health interventions embedded in civic engagement have the potential to engage older adults who might not respond to a direct appeal to improve their health. PMID:20167888

  1. The effect of titrated fentanyl on suppressed cough reflex in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H E; Shaw, G M; Brett, C N; Greenwood, F M; Huckabee, M L

    2016-05-01

    Cough suppression is part of the pharmacodynamic profile of opioids. We investigated the impact of clinical doses of fentanyl on suppressing the cough reflex. Thirteen volunteers received 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl in a divided administration protocol. Three minutes after each administration and at 10 min intervals during washout, suppressed cough reflex testing with nebulised citric acid was performed and compared with fentanyl effect-site concentration. Mean (SD) citric acid concentration provoking cough increased from 0.5 (0.28) mol.l(-1) at baseline to 1.2 (0.50) mol.l(-1) after 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl (p = 0.01). Mean (SD) fentanyl effect-site concentration after the final dose of fentanyl was 1.89 (0.05) ng.ml(-1) . A strong positive correlation was found between suppressed cough reflex thresholds and fentanyl effect-site concentrations during both fentanyl administration and washout phases of the study (r(2) = 0.79, p = 0.01). The mean (SD) length of time for return of suppressed cough response was 44.6 (18.8) min. Clinically relevant doses of fentanyl produced cough reflex suppression in healthy volunteers. PMID:26919658

  2. To Make Their Journey Better: Research-Focused Aspirations for Preparing Adult Volunteers for Facilitating Positive Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Joshua Aaron

    2010-01-01

    This basic interpretive qualitative research study explored the personal and professional backgrounds, training experiences, perspectives, and perceptions held by adult volunteers serving as crew advisors in the Venturing program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). Venturing is the BSA's adventure oriented youth development program for coeds age…

  3. Nutrition Risk in Home-Bound Older Adults: Using Dietician-Trained and Supervised Nutrition Volunteers for Screening and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laforest, Sophie; Goldin, Benita; Nour, Kareen; Roy, Marie-Andree; Payette, Helene

    2007-01-01

    Nutrition screening and early intervention in home-bound older adults are key to preventing unfavourable health outcomes and functional decline. This pilot study's objectives were (a) to test the reliability of the Elderly Nutrition Screening Tool (ENS [C]) when administered by dietician-trained and supervised nutrition volunteers, and (b) to…

  4. Combinations of Types of Mental Health Services Received in the Past Year Among Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... 08, 2015* Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults ...

  5. Assisting the Adult Receiving Inhalation and Intravenous Therapy. Care of the Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Area Vocational Technical Inst., MN.

    These two units for students in a practical nursing program provide supplemental instruction in caring for adult patients receiving inhalation and intravenous therapy. Unit titles are The Administration of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing (IPPB RX) and Intravenous Therapy of Fluids and Blood. Each unit contains the following: objectives,…

  6. Pharmacokinetics of experimental pentavalent antimony after intramuscular administration in adult volunteers*

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Laura; Scorza Dagert, José V.; Scorza, José V.; Vicuña-Fernández, Nelson; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; López, Sabrina; Bendezú, Herminia; Rojas, Elina; Vásquez, Libia; Pérez, Belén

    2006-01-01

    Background: Pentavalent antimony (SbV) has demonstrated therapeuticeffectiveness against clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis, an infection caused by Leishmania, a genus of flagellate protozoa comprising parasites of worldwide distribution. Approximately 1.8 million new cases are reported annually. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of the investigational generic SbV, Ulamina (pentachloride of antimony + N-methylglucamine), in healthy adult volunteers. Methods: In this study, SbV was administered IM as a single 5-mg/kg dose.Blood samples were collected at 0.25, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after administration; urine samples were collected at 6-hour intervals during the 24-hour postadministration period. Determination of trivalent antimony, SbV, and total antimony concentrations in blood and urine samples was carried out using atomic absorption spectrometry. Clinical history was reviewed and the subjects were monitored before and after administration of SbV using physical examination, weight, and hepatic- and renal-function studies. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated were Cmax, Tmax, absorption constant (Ka), elimination constant (Kel), AUC2–24h, AUC0-∞, elimination phase (t½β), volume of distribution (Vd), and urinary excretion rate. Results: Five subjects (3 men, 2 women; mean age, 28 years [range, 18–34 years]) were included in the study. One hour after drug administration the following values were obtained: Cmax, 1.1 μg/mL; Tmax, 1.3 hours; Ka, 1.87 hours; Kel, 0.043 hours; AUC0–24h, 12.26 μg/mL · h; AUC0-∞, 19.84 μg/mL · h; t½β, 17.45 hours; Vd, 6.6 L/kg; and urinary excretion rate, 2.8 μg/h; these were mean values for the entire study group. The single dose was well tolerated by all subjects. Conclusions: The investigational generic SbV, Ulamina, was associated with linearelimination after IM administration of a single 5-mg/kg dose. A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model was observed in

  7. Cortical activity evoked by an acute painful tissue-damaging stimulus in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gemma; Lee, Amy; Meek, Judith; Slater, Rebeccah; Olhede, Sofia; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Everyday painful experiences are usually single events accompanied by tissue damage, and yet most experimental studies of cutaneous nociceptive processing in the brain use repeated laser, thermal, or electrical stimulations that do not damage the skin. In this study the nociceptive activity in the brain evoked by tissue-damaging skin lance was analyzed with electroencephalography (EEG) in 20 healthy adult volunteers (13 men and 7 women) aged 21–40 yr. Time-frequency analysis of the evoked activity revealed a distinct late event-related vertex potential (lance event-related potential, LERP) at 100–300 ms consisting of a phase-locked energy increase between 1 and 20 Hz (delta-beta bands). A pairwise comparison between lance and sham control stimulation also revealed a period of ultralate stronger desynchronization after lance in the delta band (1–5 Hz). Skin application of mustard oil before lancing, which sensitizes a subpopulation of nociceptors expressing the cation channel TRPA1, did not affect the ultralate desynchronization but reduced the phase-locked energy increase in delta and beta bands, suggesting a central interaction between different modalities of nociceptive inputs. Verbal descriptor screening of individual pain experience revealed that lance pain is predominantly due to Aδ fiber activation, but when individuals describe lances as C fiber mediated, an ultralate delta band event-related desynchronization occurs in the brain-evoked activity. We conclude that pain evoked by acute tissue damage is associated with distinct Aδ and C fiber-mediated patterns of synchronization and desynchronization of EEG oscillations in the brain. PMID:23427303

  8. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES): Evaluating the feasibility of using volunteers to deliver nutrition and food safety education to rural older adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, Morgan

    Due to their limited resources, rural, older adults in the United States are at risk for poor diet-related health outcomes. Nutrition education is a key component in improving health outcomes in older adults. Cooking Healthy, Eating Smart (CHES) is a nine-lesson curriculum designed to teach rural, older adults culturally appropriate nutrition and food safety information. Funding to hire health professionals to deliver such a curriculum is limited, presenting the need to explore a less expensive mode of dissemination. In this community-based, participatory research study, a formative evaluation and feasibility study were conducted to examine the use of volunteers to deliver a nutrition and food safety curriculum to rural, older adults in South Carolina. Seven focus groups were conducted with members of the South Carolina Family and Community Leaders (SCFCL) and members of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) in the four regions of South Carolina to explore barriers and facilitators of volunteers delivering CHES (N=65 participants). The focus group findings informed the development of the volunteer training manual. A comparative case study method was used to examine the feasibility of a volunteer-based approach by observing and describing the delivery of CHES by two groups of volunteers in SC. The case study findings, including volunteer knowledge change, self-efficacy change, curriculum experience, program experience, and project team observations of volunteers indicated that using volunteers to deliver CHES is a plausible approach with the assistance of paid staff or project team members.

  9. Volunteers Help Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Isolde Chapin

    A discussion of ways in which both adult and young Americans are volunteering to aid in the positive development of young people is presented in this booklet. The wide variety of programs that are designed to use volunteers and the need for additional volunteers are described. These programs are discussed under the following topic headings: School…

  10. Dose response of A/Alaska/6/77 (H3N2) cold-adapted reassortant vaccine virus in adult volunteers: role of local antibody in resistance to infection with vaccine virus.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, M L; O'Donnell, S; Levine, M M; Chanock, R M; Murphy, B R

    1983-01-01

    An attenuated influenza A candidate vaccine virus, derived from the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (H2N2) cold-adapted (ca) donor virus and the A/Alaska/6/77 (H3N2) wild-type virus, was evaluated in adult seronegative volunteers (serum hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titer, less than or equal to 1:8) for level of attenuation, infectivity, antigenicity, and genetic stability. Four groups with similar preinoculation mean titers of serum and nasal wash antibodies were inoculated intranasally with 10(4.5), 10(5.5), 10(6.5), or 10(7.5) 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50) of the ca reassortant virus, and eight other seronegative adult volunteers received the wild-type virus. Only 2 of 66 vaccinees developed fever or mild and brief systemic or upper respiratory tract illness or both. Both volunteers with vaccine-related reactions received the highest dose (10(7.5) TCID50) of ca virus, which indicates that the vaccine retains some mild reactogenicity at a high dosage. In contrast, four of eight volunteers infected with the wild-type virus became ill. Each of the 54 isolates tested retained the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the vaccine virus. Thus, the ca reassortant was genetically stable and attenuated at 10(4.5) to 10(7.5) TCID50 for seronegative adults. The 50% human infective dose of ca virus was approximately 10(5.3) TCID50. Ten and one hundred 50% human infectious doses infected 73 and 83% of vaccinees, respectively, and approximately 75% developed an immunological response at these doses. The failure of the vaccine virus to infect some volunteers was correlated with the presence of pre-inoculation nasal wash immunoglobulin A hemagglutinin antibody. PMID:6852910

  11. Life Satisfaction and Psychological Well-Being of Older Adults With Cancer Experience: The Role of Optimism and Volunteering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinmoo; Chun, Sanghee; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Junhyoung

    2016-09-01

    Promoting health and well-being among individuals of advancing age is a significant issue due to increased incidence of cancer among older adults. This study demonstrates the benefits of expecting positive outcomes and participating in volunteer activities among older adults with cancer. We used a nationally representative sample of 2,670 individuals who have experienced cancer from the 2008 wave of the Health and Retirement Study. We constructed a structural equation model to explore the associations of optimism, volunteerism, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being. The level of optimism was a significant predictor of volunteerism, which in turn affected life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The level of engagement in volunteer activities was found to have significant path coefficients toward both life satisfaction and psychological well-being. Our study provides evidence that older adults who have experienced cancer and maintained a positive outlook on their lives and engaged in personally meaningful activities tended to experience psychological well-being and life satisfaction. PMID:27273518

  12. Community Based Learning and Civic Engagement: Informal Learning among Adult Volunteers in Community Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundel, Karsten; Schugurensky, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Many iterations of community based learning employ models, such as consciousness raising groups, cultural circles, and participatory action research. In all of them, learning is a deliberate part of an explicit educational activity. This article explores another realm of community learning: the informal learning that results from volunteering in…

  13. Changes in Social Participation and Volunteer Activity among Recently Widowed Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Elizabeth A.; Hinterlong, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Widowhood eliminates a key source of support that may trigger greater involvement in social activities and volunteer participation, which are related to better late-life health and functioning. We reexamine and build upon 2 recent studies exploring recent widowhood and social participation. Using different data, we perform a…

  14. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20.332 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive...

  15. Subacromial space in adult patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis and in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gumina, Stefano; Di Giorgio, Giantony; Postacchini, Franco; Postacchini, Roberto

    2008-02-01

    The assumption that subacromial space decreases in patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis arises from sporadic and personal observations. The purpose of this study was to compare width of subacromial space calculated on radiographs and CT scans of a high number of patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis that registered on exams of healthy volunteers. We measured the subacromial space, using Petersson's method, on radiographs of 47 patients with idiopathic or acquired thoracic hyperkyphosis and of 175 healthy shoulder volunteers. Both groups were further distinguished considering gender and age. Females with hyperkyphosis were also divided in two subgroups: those with a kyphotic curve of less (24 patients) or more (19 patients) than 50 degrees , respectively. Subacromial space of all patients and of 21 volunteers was also evaluated using CT. Acromio-humeral space was less wide in patients with hyperkyphosis with respect to coeval volunteers of the same gender; in females and in subjects older than 60. Subacromial width of females with hyperkyphosis whose curve was more than 50 degrees was significantly narrower (p<0.05) than that measured on radiograms or CT scans of females with a less severe spinal deformity. Decrease of subacromial space may be attributed to less posterior tilting of the scapula and to dyskinesis of the scapular movement. Scapular malposition causes an anomalous orientation of the acromion that may contribute to subacromial impingement. Patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis greater than 50 degrees had a subacromial space narrower than that measured in patients with a less severe kyphosis. This suggests that subacromial width is directly related to severity of thoracic kyphosis. Because hyperkyphosis of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures may worsen over the time, subacromial decompression could give only temporary shoulder pain relief. PMID:18320381

  16. Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, H.

    1983-07-01

    Before discussing Deep Space Network receivers, a brief description of the functions of receivers and how they interface with other elements of the Network is presented. Different types of receivers are used in the Network for various purposes. The principal receiver type is used for telemetry and tracking. This receiver provides the capability, with other elements of the Network, to track the space probe utilizing Doppler and range measurements, and to receive telemetry, including both scientific data from the onboard experiments and engineering data pertaining to the health of the probe. Another type of receiver is used for radio science applications. This receiver measures phase perturbations on the carrier signal to obtain information on the composition of solar and planetary atmospheres and interplanetary space. A third type of receiver utilizes very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) techniques for both radio science and spacecraft navigation data. Only the telemetry receiver is described in detail in this document. The integration of the Receiver-Exciter subsystem with other portions of the Deep Space Network is described.

  17. Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, H.

    1983-01-01

    Before discussing Deep Space Network receivers, a brief description of the functions of receivers and how they interface with other elements of the Network is presented. Different types of receivers are used in the Network for various purposes. The principal receiver type is used for telemetry and tracking. This receiver provides the capability, with other elements of the Network, to track the space probe utilizing Doppler and range measurements, and to receive telemetry, including both scientific data from the onboard experiments and engineering data pertaining to the health of the probe. Another type of receiver is used for radio science applications. This receiver measures phase perturbations on the carrier signal to obtain information on the composition of solar and planetary atmospheres and interplanetary space. A third type of receiver utilizes very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) techniques for both radio science and spacecraft navigation data. Only the telemetry receiver is described in detail in this document. The integration of the Receiver-Exciter subsystem with other portions of the Deep Space Network is described.

  18. Cobalt whole blood concentrations in healthy adult male volunteers following two-weeks of ingesting a cobalt supplement.

    PubMed

    Tvermoes, Brooke E; Finley, Brent L; Unice, Kenneth M; Otani, Joanne M; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Galbraith, David A

    2013-03-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the marketing and sales of dietary supplements, energy drinks, and other consumer products that may contain relatively high concentrations of essential elements. Cobalt-containing supplements are readily available in the U.S. and have been marketed to consumers as energy enhancers. However, little information is available regarding cobalt (Co) body burden and steady-state blood concentrations following the intake of Co dietary supplements. We assessed Co whole blood concentrations in four healthy adult male volunteers who ingested a commercially available Co supplement (0.4 mg Co/day) for 15 or 16 days. Pre-supplementation blood Co concentrations were less than the reporting limit of 0.5 μg/L, consistent with background concentrations reported to range between 0.1 and 0.4 μg/L. The mean whole blood Co concentration in the volunteers after 15 or 16 days of dosing was 3.6 μg Co/L and ranged from 1.8 to 5.1 μg Co/L. The mean observed concentration in the study group was approximately 9-36 times greater than background concentrations. Further studies of Co whole blood concentrations following supplementation over longer time periods with additional monitoring of physiological parameters may provide useful information for evaluating the health of persons who take various doses of Co. PMID:23207477

  19. Determinants of Adult Functional Outcome in Adolescents Receiving Special Educational Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeown, H. R.; Johnstone, E. C.; McKirdy, J.; Owens, D. C.; Stanfield, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. Methods: A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood…

  20. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  1. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  2. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  3. Helping Adult ESOL Students Increase Speaking and Listening Skills by Serving as Volunteers in Authentic Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Edith Lynn

    This practicum paper documents a program that was developed and implemented to help adult, advanced English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students increase their speaking and listening skills and build self confidence with native English speakers. The objective was to increase group average exit test scores in speaking and listening by at least two…

  4. Nearly Half Of US Adults Living With HIV Received Federal Disability Benefits In 2009.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Lin A; Frazier, Emma L; Sansom, Stephanie L; Farnham, Paul G; Shrestha, Ram K; Hutchinson, Angela B; Fagan, Jennifer L; Viall, Abigail H; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The effects of HIV infection on national labor-force participation have not been rigorously evaluated. Using data from the Medical Monitoring Project and the National Health Interview Survey, we present nationally representative estimates of the receipt of disability benefits by adults living with HIV receiving care compared with the general US adult population. We found that in 2009, adults living with HIV were nine times more likely than adults in the general population to receive disability benefits. The risk of being on disability is also greater for younger and more educated adults living with HIV compared to the general population, which suggests that productivity losses can result from HIV infection. To prevent disability, early diagnosis and treatment of HIV are essential. This study offers a baseline against which to measure the impacts of recently proposed or enacted changes to Medicaid and private insurance markets, including the Affordable Care Act and proposed revisions to the Social Security Administration's HIV Infection Listings. PMID:26438741

  5. Improving Educational Opportunities for the Adult Basic Education Student with a Specific Learning Disability: One to One Volunteer Tutor Program. A 310 Special Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lois F.; Bell, Bernadette S.

    This manual describes the implementation of a demonstration project at Daytona Beach Community College (DBCC) to: (1) develop an individual education plan to enable adult students with a specific learning disability to reach an 8th grade level of proficiency; (2) recruit volunteers and train them as tutors; and (3) develop a series of in-service…

  6. Developing an Older Adult Volunteer Program in a New York Chinese Community: An Evidence-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Mui, Ada C; Glajchen, Myra; Chen, Huajuan; Sun, Juanjuan

    2013-06-01

    This study reports the results of a pilot volunteer project for older Chinese immigrants and documents benefits for both volunteers and caregiver recipients. Using a social marketing approach, the volunteer project was designed as a social model to promote better health among older Chinese immigrants in New York City. The packaging of this health promotion project as a volunteer program was based on a strengths perspective. In the program, 18 older Chinese immigrants were trained to provide support and referral to family caregivers of ill relatives in the Chinese community. At 6 months, outcomes were evaluated for both volunteers and caregivers. The older volunteers perceived benefits associated with volunteering, specifically, a greater sense of well-being and satisfaction with life. In addition, the majority of volunteers felt empowered by training and volunteering (100 %), felt the skills they learned improved communication with their own families (90 %), and reported physical and emotional health benefits (61 %). At the same time, caregivers reported stress reduction following volunteer support. Findings suggest that a volunteer program model may be an effective health promotion intervention for older Chinese immigrants. PMID:23645945

  7. The Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Paul C., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    This journal answers several questions concerning the use of volunteers in the classroom. The contents include: "Editor's Page," which discusses the growth of volunteer programs; "An Overview: Volunteer Use in Public Schools," which discusses the general aims of a volunteer program (e.g., to teachers in providing a more individualized approach, to…

  8. Bioequivalence evaluation of two capsule formulations of amoxicillin in healthy adult male bangladeshi volunteers: A single-dose, randomized, open-label, two-period crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Ashik; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Sultana, Rebeka; Akbor, Maruf Mohammad; Hasan, Ahasanul; Latif, Mahbub; Hasnat, Abul

    2008-01-01

    Background: Amoxicillin, a semisynthetic penicillin antibiotic, is widely prescribed in Bangladesh due to its extended spectrum and its rapid and extensive oral absorption with good tolerability. Although a number of generic oral formulations of amoxicillin are available in Bangladesh, a study of the bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic properties of these formulations has not yet been conducted in a Bangladeshi population. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic properties and bioequivalence of 2 formulations of amoxicillin 500-mg capsules (test, SK-mox®; reference, Amoxil-Bencard®) using serum data. Methods: This single-dose, randomized, open-label, 2-period crossover study was conducted in healthy male subjects in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki and International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines. Subjects were assigned to receive the test or the reference drug as a single-dose, 500-mg capsule under fasting conditions after a 1-week washout period. After oral administration, blood samples were collected and analyzed for amoxicillin concentration using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using a noncompartmental method. The formulations were considered bioequivalent if the natural log-transformed ratios of pharmacokinetic parameters were within the predetermined equivalence range of 80% to 125%, according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirement. Results: Twenty-four healthy adult male Bangladeshi volunteers (mean [SD] age, 26.92 [3.37] years; age range, 23–34 years; mean [SD] body mass index, 23.O9 [1.58] kg/m2) participated in the study. Using serum data, the values obtained for the test and reference formulations, respectively, were as follows: Cmax, 9.85 (2.73) and 10.63 (2.12) μg/mL; Tmax, 1.29 (0.58) and 1.33 (0.49) hours; and AUC0–12, 27.09 (7.62) and 28.56 (6.30) μg/mL · h−1. No period, sequence, or formulation effects

  9. Comparative fasting bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of 2 formulations of glucosamine hydrochloride in healthy Chinese adult male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Liu, M; Wang, S; Zhao, H; Yao, W; Feng, W; Yan, M; Tang, Y; Wei, M

    2012-08-01

    Glucosamine (CAS 66-84-2) hydrochloride is an amino monosaccharide indicated for the treatment of arthrosis, especially osteoarthritis of the knee joint. This study was conducted to assess and compare the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, bioavailability of a newly developed dispersible tablet formulation (test) of glucosamine hydrochloride with those of an established branded capsule formulation (reference) in healthy Chinese adult male volunteers.This single-dose, randomized, open-label, 2-period crossover study was conducted in 18 healthy Chinese adult male volunteers under fasting condition. Plasma samples were collected at pre-specified times over a 12-h period following administration in each period and analyzed the plasma glucosamine concentrations by Liquid Chromatography coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method. The mean (SD) PK parameters of Cmax, Tmax, AUC0-12, and AUC0-∞ after administration of the test and reference formulations were, respectively, as follows: Cmax, 907.01 (444.22) vs. 944.40 (429.89) ng/mL, Tmax, 3.03 (0.95) vs. 3.30 (0.99) hours, AUC0-12, 2891.41 (1352.30) vs. 2889.69 (925.48) ng/mL/h, and AUC0-∞, 3029.90 (1321.36) vs. 3091.87 (870.36) ng/mL/h. The mean (SD) t1/2 was 1.10 (0.52) hours for the test formulation and 1.50 (1.17) hours for the reference formulation. On ANOVA, neither period nor sequence effects were observed for any PK properties. The relative bioavailability of the test formulation was 98.3% assessed by AUC0-12. The 90% CIs of glucosamine for the log-transformed ratios of Cmax, AUC0-12, and AUC0-∞ were 78.4-113.9%, 80.8-108.5% and 80.8-105.8%, respectively, meeting the predetermined criteria for bioequivalence of SFDA. PMID:22791244

  10. Oral T4-like phage cocktail application to healthy adult volunteers from Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; McCallin, Shawna; Barretto, Caroline; Berger, Bernard; Pittet, Anne-Cecile; Sultana, Shamima; Krause, Lutz; Huq, Sayeda; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; Bruttin, Anne; Reuteler, Gloria; Bruessow, Harald

    2012-12-20

    The genomic diversity of 99 T4-like coliphages was investigated by sequencing an equimolar mixture with Illumina technology and screening them against different databases for horizontal gene transfer and undesired genes. A 9-phage cocktail was given to 15 healthy adults from Bangladesh at a dose of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} plaque-forming units and placebo respectively. Phages were detected in 64% of the stool samples when subjects were treated with higher titer phage, compared to 30% and 28% with lower-titer phage and placebo, respectively. No Escherichia coli was present in initial stool samples, and no amplification of phage was observed. One percent of the administered oral phage was recovered from the feces. No adverse events were observed by self-report, clinical examination, or from laboratory tests for liver, kidney, and hematology function. No impact of oral phage was seen on the fecal microbiota composition with respect to bacterial 16S rRNA from stool.

  11. Effect of formulation variables on oral grittiness and preferences of multiparticulate formulations in adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Felipe L; Bowles, Alexandra; Gul, Mine Orlu; Clapham, David; Ernest, Terry B; Tuleu, Catherine

    2016-09-20

    Multiparticulate formulations are composed of multiple solid dosage units which can be administered directly to the mouth or sprinkled on food. Oral grittiness (i.e. rough mouthfeel) may arise from the presence of particles in the mouth, limiting palatability. In this work, multiparticulate formulations were prepared by dispersion of spherical granules into orange flavoured vehicles thickened with hypromellose (HPMC) at different viscosities in order to assess oral perception of grittiness by a panel of thirty adults through direct scaling on a 100mm visual analogue scale. The effect of formulation factors such as particle size (90, 127, 263μm), amount of particles per 10ml (0.25, 0.50, 1.00g) and viscosity of the vehicle (0.08, 0.43, 2.80Pas) were investigated. Grittiness was increasingly perceived with increasing amount and size of particles. Increasing viscosity of the administration media had a masking effect on the perception of particles. Less gritty samples were generally regarded as 'more pleasant' by the participants of the study. However, samples dispersed in thickened vehicles seemed to be less preferred despite being less gritty; which could be ascribed to an unpleasant mouthfeel of the vehicle. In the design of multiparticulate formulations acceptable for a targeted patient group all these formulation factors will need to be considered and optimised. PMID:27402099

  12. Call to volunteer.

    PubMed

    Pati, Anita

    Volunteers can contribute a great deal to people receiving health or social care. Some of the quirky activities they offer are contact with owls and the provision of arts and crafts materials. PMID:19323106

  13. Barriers to nutrition education for older adults, and nutrition and aging training opportunities for educators, healthcare providers,volunteers and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Meck Higgins, Mary; Barkley, Mary Clarke

    2004-01-01

    Literature citations of barriers to nutrition education found in those who teach and care for older adults, as well as within older adults themselves, are discussed. No attempt was made to compare educational barriers for learners of varying ages. These obstacles need to be addressed in order for nutrition to be taught or learned effectively so that nutrition practices and health improve. Barriers for healthcare professionals to providing nutrition education include misconceptions and stereotypes about older adults and about their nutritional concerns; lack of attention to and lack of funding for older adult educational programs; and difficulties recruiting older learners. Hindrances for older adults in responding to nutrition education can be categorized as attitudinal, motivational, environmental, and related to low literacy and poverty. Published examples of opportunities for education and training about nutrition and aging that are in place for health educators, healthcare providers, volunteers and caregivers regarding nutrition and aging are discussed. Suggestions are presented regarding future efforts to minimize educational barriers and to provide training for healthcare professionals, volunteers and caregivers. New research is needed in this field of study in order to realize the potential quality of life benefits and reduced healthcare costs associated with providing effective nutrition education to older adults. This is one of a series of reviews of recent literature on nutrition education for older adults. PMID:15149943

  14. Food Insecurity and Food Choices in Rural Older Adults with Diabetes Receiving Nutrition Education via Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homenko, Daria R.; Morin, Philip C.; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate differences between rural older adults with diabetes reporting the presence or absence of food insecurity with respect to meal planning, preparation, shopping, obesity, and glycemic control after receiving nutrition counseling through telemedicine. Methods: Food insecurity data were obtained by telephone survey (n = 74).…

  15. Barriers to Successful Transition for Young Adults Who Receive SSI and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Jennifer L.; Timmons, Jaime Ciulla; Moloney, Mairead

    2003-01-01

    A study examined barriers to transition faced by 12 young adults with disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and their families. Obstacles to transition planning that were associated with SSI included difficulties managing the receipt of SSI and unawareness of the supports available through the SSI system. (Contains references.)…

  16. Peer volunteers in an integrative pain management program for frail older adults with chronic pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common among the older population. A literature review on pain management program showed that exercise, yoga, massage therapy, Tai Chi, and music therapy could significantly reduce pain. In spite of the proven benefits of pain management programs, these intervention programs were effective only in the short term, and older adults would resume their old habits. It has been suggested that interventions comprising some type of social support have great potential to increase the participation of older adults. Therefore, we propose the inclusion of peer volunteers in an integrated pain management program to relieve pain among frail older adults. This study aims to explore the effectiveness of an integrated pain management program supplemented with peer volunteers in improving pain intensity, functional mobility, physical activity, loneliness levels, happiness levels, and the use of non-pharmacological pain-relieving methods among frail older adults with chronic pain. Methods/Design We intend to recruit 30 nursing home residents and 30 peer volunteers from the Institute of Active Ageing in Hong Kong in a group trial for an 8-week group-based integrated pain management program. There will be 16 sessions, with two 1-hour sessions each week. The primary outcome will be pain levels, while secondary outcomes will be assessed according to functional mobility, physical activity, loneliness levels, happiness levels, the use of non-pharmacological pain-relieving methods, and through a questionnaire for volunteers. Discussion In view of the high prevalence of chronic pain among older adults and its adverse impacts, it is important to provide older adults with tools to control their pain. We propose the use of peer volunteers to enhance the effects of an integrated pain management program. It is expected that pain can be reduced and improvements can be achieved among older adults in the areas of physical activity, functional mobility, loneliness levels

  17. Reasons Why Canadian Seniors Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Prince, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    A study examined types of and reasons for volunteering among Canadian adults over 64 (n=1,569) and compared them with those given by adults aged 45-64 (n=5,563). Results indicate that the older group volunteers out of self-interest and are more likely to volunteer because of a feeling of obligation and social value than those aged 45-64. (JOW)

  18. Changes in Quality of Life in 7 Older Adult Patients Receiving Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; Kimura, Melissa N.; Cowie, Harriet R.; de Groot, Caroline M.M.; McMinn, Elise A.P.; Sherson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to report on symptomatic and quality of life (QoL) changes in 7 older adult chiropractic patients who were receiving care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT). Clinical Features Seven patients were selected from 2 chiropractic offices in Auckland, New Zealand. Patients were included if they were older adults receiving AMCT care and for whom at least 2 QoL assessments had been performed. The patients, aged 69-80 years, primarily received care for a variety of musculoskeletal complaints. Intervention and Outcomes The patients reported improvements in their presenting complaints as well as a number of nonmusculoskeletal symptoms. Each patient demonstrated clinical improvements in their RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) results. The average improvement in QoL measured using a SF-36 questionnaire was 8.0 points in the physical component and 4.1 points in the mental component. Four cases had a second progress evaluation using the SF-36 and showed an overall improvement of 5.2 in the physical and 9.8 in the mental components from baseline. Conclusion This case series describes an improvement in QoL, as measured by the SF-36 instrument, as well as subjectively reported improvements in both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms in 7 older adults receiving chiropractic care. PMID:27069434

  19. Sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Weymann, Deirdre; Pratt, Brandy; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J.; Raymond, Colette; Mintzes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to measure sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescription drugs and to examine what are the factors that contribute to these differences. Design: a retrospective cohort study. Setting: community setting of British Columbia, Canada. Participants: residents of British Columbia aged 65 and older (n = 660,679). Measurements: we measured 2013 period prevalence of prescription dispensations satisfying the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. We used logistic regressions to test for associations between this outcome and a number of clinical and socioeconomic factors. Results: a larger share of women (31%) than of men (26%) filled one or more potentially inappropriate prescription in the community. The odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions are associated with several clinical and socioeconomic factors. After controlling for those factors, community-dwelling women were at 16% higher odds of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription than men (adjusted odds ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.12–1.21). Much of this sex difference stemmed from women's increased odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions for benzodiazepines and other hypnotics, for tertiary tricyclic antidepressants and for non-selective NSAIDs. Conclusion: there are significant sex differences in older adults' risk of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription as a result of complex intersections between gender and other social constructs. Appropriate responses will therefore require changes in the information, norms and expectations of both prescribers and patients. PMID:27151390

  20. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  1. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  2. Patterns of symptom distress in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Mary E; Short, Thomas H; Moriarty, Helene J

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the patterns of symptom distress in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer is an important first step in developing interventions that can potentially lessen symptom distress. The purposes of this secondary analysis were to describe the changes in patterns of symptom distress over time in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer, and to examine the relationship of selected demographic and clinical characteristics to symptom distress. Complete data were available for 117 patients. The patterns of symptom distress in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer varied between treatment groups and over time. Symptom distress scores were moderate to high on entry into the study, indicating that symptom management in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients is essential and should begin early in the course of illness. Moreover, clinical interventions should be tailored to the type of treatment. Various demographic and clinical variables were weak and inconsistent predictors of symptom distress, underscoring the importance of examining the role of psychosocial factors in mediating symptom distress. PMID:12418365

  3. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  4. Serum antibody response in adult volunteers elicited by injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 12F polysaccharide alone or conjugated to diphtheria toxoid.

    PubMed Central

    Fattom, A; Lue, C; Szu, S C; Mestecky, J; Schiffman, G; Bryla, D; Vann, W F; Watson, D; Kimzey, L M; Robbins, J B

    1990-01-01

    Conjugates of an uronic acid-containing capsular polysaccharide (CP), pneumococcous type 12F (Pn12F) bound to diphtheria toxoid (DT), were studied for safety and immunogenicity in adult volunteers. In mice, these conjugates, prepared with the same lot of DT and Pn12F-40234-006, a homogenous CP of high molecular weight, or Pn12-812408, a polydisperse CP with lower-molecular-weight material, were more immunogenic than the Pn12F alone and had T-cell dependent properties (A. Fattom, W. F. Vann, S.C. Szu, A. Sutton, X. Li, B. Bryla, G. Schiffman, J. B. Robbins, and R. Schneerson, Infect. Immun. 56:2292-2298, 1988). Adult volunteers, randomized into three groups, were injected either with one of these two conjugates or with Pnu-Imune, the 23 valent pneumococcus vaccine containing 25 micrograms of Pn12F as one of its components. Volunteers were injected two times, 4 weeks apart, with the Pn12F-DT conjugates and once with the Pnu-Imune. Side reactions following injection of the conjugates of Pnu-Imune were mild and short-lived. At 4 weeks and at 7 months after the first injection, higher levels of Pn12F antibodies were found in the volunteers injected with the conjugates than in the Pnu-Imune group (P less than 0.001). The conjugate prepared with the higher-molecular-weight Pn12F elicited higher levels of antibodies than the conjugate prepared with a lower-molecular-weight Pn12F preparation (P = 0.05). Both conjugates elicited about a 13-fold rise in DT antibodies. PMID:2365462

  5. Parallel Volunteer Learning during Youth Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesmeister, Marilyn K.; Green, Jeremy; Derby, Amy; Bothum, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Lack of time is a hindrance for volunteers to participate in educational opportunities, yet volunteer success in an organization is tied to the orientation and education they receive. Meeting diverse educational needs of volunteers can be a challenge for program managers. Scheduling a Volunteer Learning Track for chaperones that is parallel to a…

  6. School Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    Intended as a guide for school administrators, this publication describes and discusses "The Varying Role of the School Volunteer,""A Tutorial Program in Operation,""A Volunteer Resource Program in Operation,""An Inner-City Extended School-Day Program,""Essential Ingredients of a Successful Program," and "How to Recruit, Screen, and Retain."…

  7. APPALACHIAN VOLUNTEERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    COLLEGE STUDENT VOLUNTEERS WORKING IN THE ISOLATED AREAS OF EASTERN KENTUCKY HAVE INSTITUTED A PROGRAM DESIGNED TO AID IN THE WAR ON POVERTY. THE APPALACHIAN VOLUNTEERS WERE INITIALLY SUPPORTED BY A GRANT FROM THE AREA REDEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION AND BY CONTRIBUTIONS, FROM PRIVATE CORPORATIONS AND FOUNDATIONS, OF MONEY AND MATERIALS. GROUNDWORK…

  8. Managing Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Beverly

    1991-01-01

    Discusses changing nature of volunteers in Peter Drucker's book "Managing the Nonprofit Corporation." Points out that most volunteers have full-time jobs, families, very little leisure; they are not willing to do such routine work as stuffing envelopes; they want carefully defined projects with beginning and end. Discusses real requirements for…

  9. EDUCATION IN THE PEACE CORPS, EVOLVING CONCEPTS OF VOLUNTEER TRAINING. NOTES AND ESSAYS ON EDUCATION FOR ADULTS, 48.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PAGANO, JULES

    THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLE OF PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER TRAINING--TOTAL CULTURAL IMMERSION--IS ACHIEVED THROUGH DIRECT TEACHING AND FIELD EXPERIENCE. TRAINEES LEARN LANGUAGE (THROUGH INTENSIVE AUDIOLINGUAL METHODS, BRINGING LANGUAGE LEARNING INTO EVERY ASPECT OF LIFE AT THE TRAINING SITE), CUSTOMS (THROUGH ROLE PLAYING AND CROSS CULTURAL STUDIES), AND…

  10. Recruiting 4-H Volunteer Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Four-H Club Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The guide is intended to assist 4-H Club extension workers in recruiting volunteer adult and youth leaders. It discusses: why volunteers serve (organizational identity, desire to serve, involvement of other family members, future opportunities and obligations, community status, self interest, and public opinion); how to recruit (person-to-person…

  11. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services...

  12. Reclaiming Joy: Pilot Evaluation of a Mental Health Peer Support Program for Older Adults Who Receive Medicaid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Rosemary K.; Sergeant, Julie F.; Landry, Sarah; Leedahl, Skye N.; Rachlin, Roxanne; Koenig, Terry; Graham, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stigma and lack of access to providers create barriers to mental health treatment for older adults living in the community. In order to address these barriers, we developed and evaluated a peer support intervention for older adults receiving Medicaid services. Design and Methods: Reclaiming Joy is a mental health intervention that pairs…

  13. A Randomized, Single-Blind, Substitution Study of OROS Methylphenidate (Concerta) in ADHD Adults Receiving Immediate Release Methylphenidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Mick, Eric; Surman, Craig B. H.; Hammerness, Paul; Doyle, Robert; Aleardi, Megan; Kotarski, Meghan; Williams, Courtney G.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the efficacy, tolerability, and compliance of an extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) in adults with ADHD receiving immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH). Method: Participants were outpatient adults with ADHD who were stable on IR-MPH-administered TID. Participants…

  14. Trained Community Volunteers Improve Tuberculosis Knowledge and Attitudes Among Adults in a Periurban Community in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Balogun, Mobolanle; Sekoni, Adekemi; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Odukoya, Oluwakemi; Onajole, Adebayo; Longe-Peters, Olukemi; Ogunsola, Folasade; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Nigeria has the world's 10th largest tuberculosis (TB) burden. Targeted community-based interventions can potentially help reduce TB incidence. We designed an intervention in a periurban community where 10 community volunteers were trained to provide community TB education and also detect and refer TB suspects to a nearby clinic. To determine the effect of the intervention on knowledge, attitude, and preventive practices of TB, we compared results from a pre-intervention survey with those of a post-intervention survey. Pre-intervention, respondents had a mean knowledge score of 10.6 ± 7.0 of a possible 34, a mean attitude score of 5.8 ± 3.3 of a possible 10, and a mean practice score of 5.3 ± 1.4 of a possible 7. The intervention significantly increased the mean knowledge score to 16 ± 5.4 (P < 0.001) and mean attitude score to 7.0 ± 1.8 (P < 0.001); however, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean practice score. Eight TB suspects were referred to the clinic, and one suspect was subsequently diagnosed with TB. The use of trained community volunteers to share information on TB improved the overall knowledge and attitudes of respondents. Continued empowerment of the community should be encouraged to promote TB prevention and care. PMID:25510722

  15. Understanding paratyphoid infection: study protocol for the development of a human model of Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A challenge in healthy adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, David; Dobinson, Hazel C; Darton, Thomas; Campbell, Danielle; Jones, Claire; Snape, Matthew; Stevens, Zoe; Plested, Emma; Voysey, Merryn; Kerridge, Simon; Martin, Laura B; Angus, Brian; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study will develop the first human challenge model of paratyphoid infection which may then be taken forward to evaluate paratyphoid vaccine candidates. Salmonella Paratyphi A is believed to cause a quarter of the estimated 20 million cases of enteric fever annually. Epidemiological evidence also suggests that an increasing proportion of the enteric fever burden is attributable to S. Paratyphi infection meriting further attention and interest in vaccine development. Assessment of paratyphoid vaccine efficacy in preclinical studies is complicated by the lack of a small animal model and the human-restricted nature of the infection. The use of experimental human infection in healthy volunteers provides an opportunity to address these problems in a cost-effective manner. Methods and analysis Volunteers will ingest virulent S. Paratyphi A bacteria (NVGH308 strain) with a bicarbonate buffer solution to establish the infectious dose resulting in an ‘attack rate’ of 60–75%. Using an a priori decision-making algorithm, the challenge dose will be escalated or de-escalated to achieve the target attack rate, with the aim of reaching the study end point while exposing as few individuals as possible to infection. The attack rate will be determined by the proportion of paratyphoid infection in groups of 20 healthy adult volunteers, with infection being defined by one or more positive blood cultures (microbiological end point) and/or fever, defined as an oral temperature exceeding 38°C sustained for at least 12 h (clinical end point); 20–80 participants will be required. Challenge participants will start a 2-week course of an oral antibiotic on diagnosis of infection, or after 14 days follow-up. Ethics and dissemination The strict eligibility criterion aims to minimise risk to participants and their close contacts. Ethical approval has been obtained. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses

  16. An Experience with Volunteers in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillsworth, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Offers examples of the use of volunteers in recreation and adult education programs. Describes Fanshawe College's local community advisory committees for continuing education centers. Identifies conditions for using volunteers effectively. Reviews Edison College's Talent Banking system which involves volunteers as visiting lecturers, career…

  17. A Phase I Clinical Study of a Live Attenuated Bordetella pertussis Vaccine - BPZE1; A Single Centre, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Escalating Study of BPZE1 Given Intranasally to Healthy Adult Male Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Thorstensson, Rigmor; Trollfors, Birger; Al-Tawil, Nabil; Jahnmatz, Maja; Bergström, Jakob; Ljungman, Margaretha; Törner, Anna; Wehlin, Lena; Van Broekhoven, Annie; Bosman, Fons; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Locht, Camille

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular pertussis vaccines do not control pertussis. A new approach to offer protection to infants is necessary. BPZE1, a genetically modified Bordetella pertussis strain, was developed as a live attenuated nasal pertussis vaccine by genetically eliminating or detoxifying 3 toxins. Methods We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study of BPZE1 given intranasally for the first time to human volunteers, the first trial of a live attenuated bacterial vaccine specifically designed for the respiratory tract. 12 subjects per dose group received 103, 105 or 107 colony-forming units as droplets with half of the dose in each nostril. 12 controls received the diluent. Local and systemic safety and immune responses were assessed during 6 months, and nasopharyngeal colonization with BPZE1 was determined with repeated cultures during the first 4 weeks after vaccination. Results Colonization was seen in one subject in the low dose, one in the medium dose and five in the high dose group. Significant increases in immune responses against pertussis antigens were seen in all colonized subjects. There was one serious adverse event not related to the vaccine. Other adverse events were trivial and occurred with similar frequency in the placebo and vaccine groups. Conclusions BPZE1 is safe in healthy adults and able to transiently colonize the nasopharynx. It induces immune responses in all colonized individuals. BPZE1 can thus undergo further clinical development, including dose optimization and trials in younger age groups. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01188512 PMID:24421886

  18. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  19. Response to Booster Doses of Hepatitis B Vaccine among Young Adults Who Had Received Neonatal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul K. S.; Ngai, Karry L. K.; Lao, Terence T.; Wong, Martin C. S.; Cheung, Theresa; Yeung, Apple C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Luk, Scotty W. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Newborns who have received hepatitis B immunization in 1980s are now young adults joining healthcare disciplines. The need for booster, pre- and post-booster checks becomes a practical question. Aims The aim of this study is to refine the HBV vaccination policy for newly admitted students in the future. Methods A prospective study on medical and nursing school entrants to evaluate hepatitis B serostatus and the response to booster doses among young adults. Findings Among 212 students, 17–23-year-old, born after adoption of neonatal immunization, 2 (0.9%) were HBsAg positive, 40 (18.9%) were anti-HBs positive. At 1 month after a single-dose booster for anti-HBs-negative students, 14.5% had anti-HBs <10 mIU/mL, 29.0% and 56.5% were 10–100 and >100 mIU/mL, respectively. The anti-HBs levels were significantly higher for females than males (mean [SD]: 431 [418] vs. 246 [339] mIU/mL, P = 0.047). At 2–4 month after the third booster dose, 97.1% had anti-HBs >100 mIU/mL and 2.9% had 10–100 mIU/mL. Conclusions Pre-booster check is still worthwhile to identify carriers among newly recruited healthcare workers born after adoption of neonatal immunization. A 3-dose booster, rather than a single dose, is required for the majority to achieve an anti-HBs level >100 mIU/mL, as memory immunity has declined in a substantial proportion of individuals. Cost-effectiveness of post-booster check for anti-HBs is low and should be further evaluated based on contextual specific utilization of results. PMID:25198289

  20. Time Preferences Predict Mortality among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Hayashi, Kami; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Vreeman, Rachel C.; Levin, Irwin P.; Bangsberg, David R.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying characteristics of HIV-infected adults likely to have poor treatment outcomes can be useful for targeting interventions efficiently. Research in economics and psychology suggests that individuals’ intertemporal time preferences, which indicate the extent to which they trade-off immediate vs. future cost and benefits, can influence various health behaviors. While there is empirical support for the association between time preferences and various non-HIV health behaviors and outcomes, the extent to which time preferences predict outcomes of those receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) has not been examined previously. Methods HIV-infected adults initiating ART were enrolled at a health facility in Kenya. Participants’ time preferences were measured at enrollment and used to classify them as having either a low or high discount rate for future benefits. At 48 weeks, we assessed mortality and ART adherence, as measured by Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Logistic regression models adjusting for socio-economic characteristics and risk factors were used to determine the association between time preferences and mortality as well as MEMS adherence ≥90%. Results Overall, 44% (96/220) of participants were classified as having high discount rates. Participants with high discount rates had significantly higher 48-week mortality than participants with low discount rates (9.3% vs. 3.1%; adjusted odds ratio 3.84; 95% CI 1.03, 14.50). MEMS adherence ≥90% was similar for participants with high vs. low discount rates (42.3% vs. 49.6%, AOR 0.70; 95% CI 0.40, 1.25). Conclusion High discount rates were associated with significantly higher risk of mortality among HIV-infected patients initiating ART. Greater use of time preference measures may improve identification of patients at risk of poor clinical outcomes. More research is needed to further identify mechanisms of action and also to build upon and test the generalizability of this finding

  1. The Training of Volunteer Adult Sunday School Teachers in the Wisconsin Jurisdictions of the Church of God in Christ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the methodological training needs of adult Sunday School teachers in the Church of God in Christ. Pastors and instructional leaders of two Wisconsin jurisdictions were utilized as participants in the study. Research methodology included a blended approach of quantitative and qualitative methods with the…

  2. Educational Quality Indicator Program (EQuIP). An Adult and Community Educator Training Manual for Administrators, Teachers and Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Workforce Development.

    This self-paced, individualized manual provides guidance in evaluating the quality of adult education programs. The manual contains state-adopted indicators of program quality for Florida. Each of the indicators requires from 1 to 1-1/2 hours of review; a sample checklist or evaluation sheet is provided at the end of each indicator to allow for…

  3. Project LOVE (Let Older Volunteers Educate).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Sally; Weinrich, Martin C.

    The effect of contact with older adult volunteers on the attitudes of elementary school students was investigated by twice administering questionnaires to all first-, third-, and fourth-grade students at Chapin Elementary School, Chapin, South Carolina. Teachers first administered the questionnaire before the older adults began volunteer work in…

  4. How can surgeonfish help pediatric surgeons? A pilot study investigating the antinociceptive effect of fish aquariums in adult volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Matthieu; Delpont, Marion; Bachy, Manon; Kabbaj, Reda; Annequin, Daniel; Vialle, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple distraction strategies have been proposed to reduce the incidence of anxiety and pain in children. Animal-assisted therapy is acknowledged and used in children as an adjunctive treatment with cognitive, physical, psychosocial and spiritual benefits. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of fish aquarium animal-assisted therapy (FA-AAT) on pain perception in a cohort of healthy volunteers. METHODS: Sixty-nine healthy subjects (mean age 27.3 years) were exposed to >20 different species of soft or hard corals and >25 fish in a 1000 L saltwater aquarium. Pain perception was assessed using an electrical stimulation device, the Pain Matcher (Cefar Medical AB, Sweden), after 5 min, 10 min, 20 min and 30 min of continuous aquarium viewing. The measurements were repeated 10 min after stopping aquarium viewing. RESULTS: A statistically significant pain perception threshold augmentation was observed after a 5 min aquarium viewing. This threshold augmentation was also increased after 10 min, 20 min and 30 min of FA-AAT. A remnant effect was noted up to 10 min after exposure. This short post-viewing time period could be useful in clinical practice to perform certain painful procedures in children, such as those involving needles, under improved conditions immediately after aquarium exposure. CONCLUSIONS: In the authors’ department, FA-AAT is now used as a nonpharmacological antinociceptive technique in association with a protocol of inhalated oxygen/nitrous oxide mixtures for needle-related procedures. Children and parents are invited to watch the aquarium during the 10 min to 20 min before venous punctures. PMID:25222572

  5. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN...

  6. Experiences of Receiving a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Survey of Adults in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lydia; Goddard, Lorna; Hill, Elisabeth L.; Henry, Lucy A.; Crane, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A total of 128 adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders were surveyed concerning the process they went through to obtain their diagnosis and the subsequent support they received. Results suggested that routes to diagnosis were quite heterogeneous and overall levels of satisfaction with the diagnostic process were mixed; 40% of…

  7. The Impact of Support Received and Support Provision on Changes in Perceived Social Support among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with…

  8. Well-Being and Institutional Care in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional and Time Effects of Provided and Received Support

    PubMed Central

    Kroemeke, Aleksandra; Gruszczynska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of provided and received support on older adults’ subjective well-being (positive affect and depression) and to examine whether being a recipient of institutional care moderates these effects. Methods Social support (provided and received), positive affect, and depressive symptoms were assessed twice (at baseline and 1 month later) for 277 older adults (age 77.39 ± 9.20 years, 67.50% women, 65% residents of an institutional care facility). Findings Two structural equation models were analyzed: cross-sectional (at baseline) and longitudinal (after 1 month). The first model revealed a significant positive relationship between providing and receiving support and positive affect, and a negative relationship between receiving support and depression. However, being a recipient of institutional care appeared to be a significant moderator in the longitudinal model. Specifically, the findings indicated effects of both providing and receiving support on positive affect but only for noninstitutionalized older adults. Discussion Although both types of support may be beneficial for older adults, their effects depend on the nature of social exchange and the dimensions of well-being. This suggests that such factors should be systematically investigated in future research. PMID:27548721

  9. Relative bioavailability of two 5-mg montelukast sodium chewable tablets: a single dose, randomized, open-label, 2-period crossover comparison in healthy korean adult male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kim, H T; Song, Y-K; Lee, S D; Park, Y; Kim, C-K

    2012-03-01

    Montelukast sodium, cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 specific antagonist, has been marketed in Korea for the treatment of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics and relative bioavailability of a test and reference formulation of montelukast 5-mg chewable tablets in healthy Korean male volunteers to meet KFDA regulatory criteria for marketing of the new generic formulation. This study was designed as a single-dose, 2-treatment, and 2-period crossover trial with 32 healthy volunteers. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive the test (Dong-Kook Montelukast Sodium Chewable Tablet 5 mg®) or reference (Singulair Chewable Tablet 5 mg®) formulation. The tablet was chewed 20 times, and then swallowed with 240 mL of water. Plasma concentrations of montelukast up to 24 h after the dose were determined using a validated UPLC-MS/MS method, and the bioequivalence between the 2 formulations was assessed by statistical analysis of mean ratios of log-transformed AUC0-24 h and Cmax. No period or sequence effects were detected. The AUC0-24 h was 1 835 ng·h/mL for the test formulation, and 1 930 ng·h/mL for the reference formulation. The respective values of AUC0-∞ were 1 917 and 2 015 ng·h/mL. The Cmax of the test and reference products (247 and 283 ng/mL, respectively) reached at 2.25 and 2.72 h, respectively. Then, they gradually decreased with the mean terminal t1/2 of 5.25 and 5.30 h for the test and reference products, respectively. The 90% CIs for the ratio of log-transformed AUC0-24 h and Cmax for the test and reference formulations were 0.92-0.99 and 0.83-0.91, respectively. No adverse events were reported in this study. This single dose study found that the test and reference products met the regulatory criteria for bioequivalence in these fasting healthy Korean male volunteers. PMID:22407900

  10. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, ABT-288, in healthy young adults and elderly volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ahmed A; Haig, George; Florian, Hana; Locke, Charles; Zhang, Jun; Dutta, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Aim The objective of this work was to characterize the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABT-288, a highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, in healthy young adults and elderly subjects following single and multiple dosing in a phase 1 setting. Methods Single doses (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20 and 40 mg ABT-288) and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 14 days) were evaluated in young adults and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 5 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 12 days) were evaluated in elderly subjects using randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study designs. The effect of food on ABT-288 pharmacokinetics (5 mg single dose) was evaluated using an open label, randomized, crossover design. Results ABT-288 safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics were comparable in young and elderly subjects. Single doses up to 40 mg and multiple doses up to 3 mg once-daily were generally safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events were hot flush, headache, abnormal dreams, insomnia, nausea and dizziness. ABT-288 exposure (AUC) was dose-proportional over the evaluated dose ranges. The mean elimination half-life ranged from 40 to 61 h across dose groups. Steady state was achieved by day 10 of once-daily dosing with 3.4- to 4.2-fold accumulation. Food did not have a clinically meaningful effect on ABT-288 exposure. Conclusions Based on the above results, 1 and 3 mg once-daily doses of ABT-288 were advanced to phase 2 evaluation in Alzheimer's patients. PMID:23016924

  11. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  12. The impact of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kimberly A

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with both receiving social support and providing social support specific to the food. Individuals with higher levels of support provision and received support in turn reported higher levels of perceived support post disaster. Women were more likely to have received flood specific support and to have perceived higher social support post flood. This study provides support and elaboration of earlier findings that link disaster exposure to post-disaster changes in perceived social support. PMID:16454481

  13. Characteristics and Outcomes of Young Adult Opiate Users Receiving Residential Substance Abuse Treatment.

    PubMed

    Morse, Siobhan; MacMaster, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Opiate use patterns, user characteristics, and treatment response among young adults are of interest due to current high use prevalence and historical low levels of treatment engagement relative to older populations. Prior research in this population suggests that overall, young adults present at treatment with different issues. In this study the authors investigated potential differences between young adult (18-25 years of age) and older adult (26 and older) opiate users and the impact of differences relative to treatment motivation, length and outcomes. Data for this study was drawn from 760 individuals who entered voluntary, private, residential treatment. Study measures included the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), the Treatment Service Review (TSR), and University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA). Interviews were conducted at program intake and 6-month post-discharge. Results indicate that older adults with a history of opiate use present at treatment with higher levels of severity for alcohol, medical, and psychological problems and young adults present at treatment with greater drug use and more legal issues. Significant improvement for both groups was noted at 6 months post treatment; there were also fewer differences between the two age groups of opiate users. Results suggest different strategies within treatment programs may provide benefit in targeting the disparate needs of younger opiate users. Overall, however, results suggest that individualized treatment within a standard, abstinence-based, residential treatment model can be effective across opiate users at different ages and with different issues, levels of severity, and impairment at intake. PMID:25879396

  14. Working with Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Virginia; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This special section features research concluding that volunteers find the time because they believe they have more time to help (Rowland); an extension program using volunteer master teachers (Feather); use of volunteer marketing professionals (Fromer); retaining volunteers through leadership training (Balliette, Smith); "problem" volunteers and…

  15. Volunteering and Volunteers: Benefit-Cost Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Femida; Mook, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the phenomenon of volunteering from a benefit-cost perspective. Both the individual making a decision to volunteer and the organization making a decision to use volunteer labor face benefits and costs of their actions, yet these costs and benefits almost always remain unarticulated, perhaps because the common perception of…

  16. Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of PTC124, a nonaminoglycoside nonsense mutation suppressor, following single- and multiple-dose administration to healthy male and female adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hirawat, Samit; Welch, Ellen M; Elfring, Gary L; Northcutt, Valerie J; Paushkin, Sergey; Hwang, Seongwoo; Leonard, Eileen M; Almstead, Neil G; Ju, William; Peltz, Stuart W; Miller, Langdon L

    2007-04-01

    Nonsense (premature stop codon) mutations are causative in 5% to 15% of patients with monogenetic inherited disorders. PTC124, a 284-Dalton 1,2,4-oxadiazole, promotes ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons in mRNA and offers therapeutic potential for multiple genetic diseases. The authors conducted 2 phase I studies of PTC124 in 62 healthy adult volunteers. The initial, single-dose study evaluated doses of 3 to 200 mg/kg and assessed fed-fasting status on pharmacokinetics following a dose of 50 mg/kg. The subsequent multiple-dose study evaluated doses from 10 to 50 mg/kg/dose twice per day (bid) for up to 14 days. PTC124 administered orally as a liquid suspension was palatable and well tolerated through single doses of 100 mg/kg. At 150 and 200 mg/kg, PTC124 induced mild headache, dizziness, and gastrointestinal events. With repeated doses through 50 mg/kg/dose bid, reversible transaminase elevations <2 times the upper limit of normal were sometimes observed. Immunoblot analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cell extracts revealed no protein elongation due to nonspecific ribosomal readthrough of normal stop codons. PTC124 plasma concentrations exceeding the 2- to 10-microg/mL values associated with activity in preclinical genetic disease models were safely achieved. No sex-related differences in pharmacokinetics were seen. No drug accumulation with repeated dosing was apparent. Diurnal variation was observed, with greater PTC124 exposures after evening doses. PTC124 excretion in the urine was <2%. PTC124 pharmacokinetics were described by a 1-compartment model. Collectively, the data support initiation of phase II studies of PTC124 in patients with nonsense mutation-mediated cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:17389552

  17. Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults with ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Gary G.; Michaels, M. Alex; Pakull, Barton

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychostimulant treatment may improve simulated driving performance in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of simulated driving performance with mixed amphetamine salts--extended release (MAS XR) 50 mg/day (Cohort 1) and…

  18. Persisting high prevalence of pneumococcal carriage among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heinsbroek, Ellen; Tafatatha, Terence; Phiri, Amos; Ngwira, Bagrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Read, Jonathan M.; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HIV-infected adults have high rates of pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults prior to infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) rollout. Design: Observational cohort study. Methods: We recruited HIV-infected adults newly attending a rural HIV clinic in northern Malawi between 2008 and 2010. Nasopharyngeal samples were taken at baseline and after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. We compared pneumococcal carriage by ART status using generalized estimated equation models adjusted for CD4+ cell count, sex, seasonality, and other potential confounders. Results: In total, 336 individuals were included, of which 223 individuals started ART during follow-up. Individuals receiving ART had higher pneumococcal carriage than individuals not receiving ART (25.9 vs. 19.8%, P = 0.03) particularly for serotypes not included in PCV13 (16.1 vs. 9.6% P = 0.003). Following adjustment, increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes was still observed for individuals on ART, but results for all serotypes were nonsignificant [all serotypes: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.22 (0.95–1.56); non-PCV13 serotypes: aRR 1.72, 95% CI 1.13–2.62]. Conclusion: Pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults in Malawi remained high despite use of ART, consistent with failure of mucosal immune reconstitution in the upper respiratory tract. There was evidence of increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes. HIV-infected adults on ART could remain an important reservoir for pneumococcal diversity post infant pneumococcal vaccine introduction. Control of pneumococcal disease in African HIV remains a priority. PMID:26218599

  19. Evaluation of a one week intradermal regimen for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis: results of a randomized, open label, active-controlled trial in healthy adult volunteers in India.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Mysore Kalappa; Narayana, Doddabele Hanumanthaiah Ashwath; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Holla, Ramesh; Ashwin, Belludi Yajaman; Gangaboraiah, Bilagumba; Ravish, Haradanahalli S

    2012-08-01

    The currently recommended intradermal regimen for post-exposure prophylaxis spreads over a month period which many times lead to low compliance from the patients. There is a need to introduce and evaluate short course regimens to overcome this problem. This study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of a "new one week intradermal regimen" for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis. A total of 80 healthy adult volunteers were enrolled and allocated randomly either to purified chick embryo cell (PCECV) rabies vaccine or purified verocell rabies vaccine (PVRV), 40 in each group. Each subject received intradermally one of the vaccines , using the one week regimen (4-4-4). Blood samples were collected on Days 0, 7, 14, 28,180 and 365 for estimation of rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) concentration. The sera samples were analyzed by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). All subjects in both the groups had adequate RVNA concentration of  0.5 IU/mL from day 14 to till day 180 and the difference of geometric mean concentrations between the two groups was not significant (P > 0.606). Further to assess the immunological memory produced by this new regimen, a "single visit four site" intradermal booster vaccination was given to those who did not have adequate RVNA concentration on day 365. This resulted in a quick and enhanced RVNA concentration in these subjects thus denoting a successful anamnestic response. The incidence of adverse events was 8.3% in PCECV group and 1.6% in PVRV group (P=0.001) and the regimen was well tolerated without any dropouts. In conclusion, the new "one week intradermal regimen" is immunogenic and safe for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis and needs to be further evaluated in persons exposed to rabies. PMID:22699446

  20. Relationships among Young Adults' Marital Messages Received, Marital Attitudes, and Relationship Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurts, W. Matthew; Myers, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined relationships among university students' marital messages received (MMR), marital attitudes, and romantic relationship self-efficacy (RSE). Results indicated that students' marital attitudes and romantic relationship status predicted their level of RSE. The authors found differences in MMR, marital attitudes, and RSE on the…

  1. Baseline Morbidity in 2,990 Adult African Volunteers Recruited to Characterize Laboratory Reference Intervals for Future HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Wendy; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Jaoko, Walter; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Mulenga, Joseph; Dally, Len; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Farah, Bashir; Birungi, Josephine; Hughes, Peter; Manigart, Olivier; Stevens, Gwynn; Yates, Sarah; Thomson, Helen; von Lieven, Andrea; Krebs, Marietta; Price, Matt A.; Stoll-Johnson, Lisa; Ketter, Nzeera

    2008-01-01

    Background An understanding of the health of potential volunteers in Africa is essential for the safe and efficient conduct of clinical trials, particularly for trials of preventive technologies such as vaccines that enroll healthy individuals. Clinical safety laboratory values used for screening, enrolment and follow-up of African clinical trial volunteers have largely been based on values derived from industrialized countries in Europe and North America. This report describes baseline morbidity during recruitment for a multi-center, African laboratory reference intervals study. Methods Asymptomatic persons, aged 18–60 years, were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study at seven sites (Kigali, Rwanda; Masaka and Entebbe, Uganda; Kangemi, Kenyatta National Hospital and Kilifi, Kenya; and Lusaka, Zambia). Gender equivalency was by design. Individuals who were acutely ill, pregnant, menstruating, or had significant clinical findings were not enrolled. Each volunteer provided blood for hematology, immunology, and biochemistry parameters and urine for urinalysis. Enrolled volunteers were excluded if found to be positive for HIV, syphilis or Hepatitis B and C. Laboratory assays were conducted under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP). Results and Conclusions Of the 2990 volunteers who were screened, 2387 (80%) were enrolled, and 2107 (71%) were included in the analysis (52% men, 48% women). Major reasons for screening out volunteers included abnormal findings on physical examination (228/603, 38%), significant medical history (76, 13%) and inability to complete the informed consent process (73, 13%). Once enrolled, principle reasons for exclusion from analysis included detection of Hepatitis B surface antigen (106/280, 38%) and antibodies against Hepatitis C (95, 34%). This is the first large scale, multi-site study conducted to the standards of GCLP to describe African laboratory reference intervals applicable to potential volunteers in clinical

  2. Sexual risk behaviour and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Christine L.; Freedman, Mark; Fagan, Jennifer L.; Frazier, Emma L.; Beer, Linda; Huang, Ping; Valverde, Eduardo E.; Johnson, Christopher; Sanders, Catherine; McNaghten, A.D.; Sullivan, Patrick; Lansky, Amy; Mermin, Jonathan; Heffelfinger, James; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence and association of sexual risk behaviours and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults in the United States. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of weighted data from a probability sample of HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient medical care. The facility and patient response rates were 76 and 51%, respectively. Methods: We analysed 2009 interview and medical record data. Sexual behaviours were self-reported in the past 12 months. Viral suppression was defined as all viral load measurements in the medical record during the past 12 months less than 200 copies/ml. Results: An estimated 98 022 (24%) HIV-infected adults engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex; 50 953 (12%) engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex with at least one partner of negative or unknown HIV status; 23 933 (6%) did so while not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in vaginal or anal sex [prevalence ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.93]; unprotected vaginal or anal sex (prevalence ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73–0.98); and unprotected vaginal or anal sex with a partner of negative or unknown HIV status (prevalence ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99). Conclusion: The majority of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the U.S. did not engage in sexual risk behaviours that have the potential to transmit HIV, and of the 12% who did, approximately half were not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in sexual risk behaviours. PMID:25000558

  3. Screening and risk factors of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in critically ill adult patients receiving enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Malnutrition is a frequent problem associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. To avoid malnutrition, most studies focus on the prevention of inadequate nutrition delivery, whereas little attention is paid to the potential role of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). In this trial, we aim to evaluate the prevalence of EPI and identify its potential risk factors in critically ill adult patients without preexisting pancreatic diseases. Methods In this prospective cross-sectional study, we recruited 563 adult patients with critical illnesses. All details of the patients were documented, stool samples were collected three to five days following the initiation of enteral nutrition, and faecal elastase 1 (FE-1) concentrations were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Blood samples were also taken to determine serum amylase and lipase activity. Results The percentages of recruited patients with EPI (FE-1 concentration <200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration <100 μg/g) were 52.2% and 18.3%, respectively. The incidences of steatorrhea were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the patients without EPI, with moderate EPI (FE-1 concentration = 100 to 200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration < 100 μg/g). Both multivariate logistic regression analysis and z-tests indicated that the occurrence of EPI was closely associated with shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Conclusions More than 50% of critically ill adult patients without primary pancreatic diseases had EPI, and nearly one-fifth of them had severe EPI. The risk factors for EPI included shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Trial registration NCT01753024 PMID:23924602

  4. Extensive molluscum contagiosum virus infection in a young adult receiving fingolimod.

    PubMed

    Behle, Valeria; Wobser, Marion; Goebeler, Matthias; Stoevesandt, Johanna

    2016-06-01

    Fingolimod-related viral infections have been described on several occasions since its introduction in 2010. We hereby add a report on an otherwise immunocompetent, 18-year old Caucasian man with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who developed a protracted and extensive molluscum contagiosum (MC) virus infection shortly after being started on fingolimod. Wide-spread cutaneous MC infections in adult patients are considered indicative of underlying immunosuppression. Neurologists prescribing fingolimod ought to be aware of a possibly increased risk of MC, but also need to know about its relative benignity, lack of extra-cutaneous complications, and adequate treatment options. PMID:26860987

  5. Volunteers in College and Career Information (VICCI)!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Unified School District, CA.

    The Volunteers in College and Career Information (VICCI) is an innovative attempt to improve guidance services within San Francisco High Schools. To insure that the volunteers receive proper training and supervision, the program was placed under the direction of a credentialed counselor or project director. Three major results have been…

  6. When Volunteers Attack!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    Working with alumni volunteers shouldn't create horror and suspense. Following a few key steps can help maintain a smooth relationship between alumni volunteers and the alumni relations office staff. In this article, the author discusses how to manage volunteers and keep the alumni volunteer relationship on track.

  7. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through “Embrace,” an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach. Results Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1) Experiences with aging, with the themes “Struggling with health,” “Increasing dependency,” “Decreasing social interaction,” “Loss of control,” and “Fears;” and 2) Experiences with Embrace, with the themes “Relationship with the case manager,” “Interactions,” and “Feeling in control, safe, and secure”. The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants’ ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system. Conclusion The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging. PMID:26489096

  8. Perceived Discrimination in Clinical Care in a Nationally Representative Sample of HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Mark A; Collins, Rebecca; Cunningham, William E; Morton, Sally C; Zierler, Sally; Wong, Myra; Tu, Wenli; Kanouse, David E

    2005-01-01

    Background Perceived discrimination in clinical settings could discourage HIV-infected people from seeking health care, adhering to treatment regimens, or returning for follow-up. Objectives This study aims to determine whether HIV-infected people perceive that physicians and other health care providers have discriminated against them. Design, Participants Cross-sectional data (1996 to 1997) from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), which conducted in-person interviews with a nationally representative probability sample of 2,466 HIV-infected adults receiving health care within the contiguous U.S. Measurements Reports of whether health care providers have been uncomfortable with the respondent, treated the respondent as an inferior, preferred to avoid the respondent, or refused the respondent service. Questions also covered the types of providers who engaged in these behaviors. Results Twenty-six percent of HIV-infected adults receiving health care reported experiencing at least 1 of 4 types of perceived discrimination by a health care provider since becoming infected with HIV, including 8% who had been refused service. White respondents (32%) were more likely than others (27%) and Latinos (21%) and nearly twice as likely as African Americans (17%) to report perceived discrimination (P<.001). Respondents whose first positive HIV test was longer ago were also more likely to report discrimination (P<.001). Respondents who reported discrimination attributed it to physicians (54%), nurses and other clinical staff (39%), dentists (32%), hospital staff (31%), and case managers or social workers (8%). Conclusions Many HIV-infected adults believe that their clinicians have discriminated against them. Clinicians should make efforts to address circumstances that lead patients to perceive discrimination, whether real or imagined. PMID:16117747

  9. Values important to terminally ill African American older adults in receiving hospice care.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    While racial disparity in the use of hospice care by older African Americans is widely acknowledged, little is known about the values that they consider as important in receiving health care services along with direct experiences with having these values respected by hospice care providers. Using individual, face-to-face interviews, data were collected directly from 28 African American hospice patients about their experiences in hospice care. Content analysis was used to identify and categorize themes from multiple readings of the qualitative data. Resulting themes included: dying at home, open communications, independent decision-making, autonomy in daily life, unwillingness to be a burden, and relationships. Through the initial assessment, value preferences can be explored and then shared with hospice team members to ensure that services are provided in such a way that their values and preferences are respected. PMID:25494930

  10. Development Strategies for Online Volunteer Training Modules: A Team Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robideau, Kari; Vogel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Volunteers are central to the delivery of 4-H programs, and providing quality, relevant training is key to volunteer success. Online, asynchronous modules are an enhancement to a training delivery menu for adult volunteers, providing consistent, accessible options traditionally delivered primarily face to face. This article describes how Minnesota…

  11. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals Changes in Intestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Who Received a Daily Dose of Immunomodulatory Probiotic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota. PMID:26016655

  12. Risk Factors for Thrombocytopenia in Adult Chinese Patients Receiving Linezolid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Guo, Dai-Hong; Cao, Xiutang; Cai, Yun; Xu, Yuanjie; Zhu, Man; Ma, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Linezolid (LZD), an oxazolidinone antibiotic agent, has excellent activity and bioavailability against most methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant gram-positive bacteria. Although LZD is generally well tolerated, several studies have found adverse hematologic effects, of which thrombocytopenia is of most concern. Objective To investigate the risk factors for thrombocytopenia in patients who received oral or parenteral LZD therapy between February 1 and November 30, 2010. Methods Data were extracted retrospectively from the electronic medical records in our hospital information system. Thrombocytopenia was defined as either a final platelet count of <100 × 109/L (criterion 1) or a 25% reduction from the baseline platelet count (criterion 2). Risk factors were determined using logistic regression analysis, and clinical features were predicted using receiver operating characteristic curves. Results The study included 254 patients, with mean (SD) age of 59 (17.66) years. The duration of LZD therapy was 9.43 (5.63) days. Thrombocytopenia developed in 69 patients (27.2%), as defined by criterion 1, and in 127 patients (50%), as defined by criterion 2. At univariate analysis, age, weight, creatinine clearance, serum albumin concentration, baseline platelet count, daily dosage, and concomitant use of caspofungin, levofloxacin, and meropenem were significant risk factors for thrombocytopenia. At multivariate analysis and using ROC curves, daily dose ≥18.75 mg/kg, baseline platelet count ≤181 × 109/L, duration of LZD therapy ≥10 days, and concomitant use of caspofungin and levofloxacin were independent risk factors for thrombocytopenia as defined by criterion 1, whereas creatinine clearance ≤88.39 mL/min/1.73 m2, serum albumin concentration ≤33.5 g/L, daily dose ≥18.46 mg/kg, and caspofungin were independent risk factors for thrombocytopenia as defined by criterion 2. Conclusions The incidence of LZD-related thrombocytopenia in the Chinese

  13. Volunteering for College Credit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfering, David L.; Biasco, Frank

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the literature in volunteering as it relates to a university credit course for students volunteering in human services agencies. Discusses the development of the program, along with the advantages to students, agencies, and the university. (Author/RC)

  14. The association of recent incarceration and health outcomes among HIV-infected adults receiving care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Frazier, Emma; Fagan, Jennifer; Hardnett, Felicia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-09-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe factors associated with incarceration as well as the association between recent incarceration and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors, access to insurance, healthcare utilization (emergency department (ED) and hospital use), antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and viral suppression. Design/methodology/approach Using 2009-2010 data from a cross-sectional, nationally representative three-stage sample of HIV-infected adults receiving care in the USA, the authors assessed the demographic characteristics, healthcare utilization, and clinical outcomes of HIV-infected persons who had been recently incarcerated (detention for>24 hours in the past year) using bivariate analyses. The authors used multivariable logistic regression to examine associations of recent incarceration with insurance status as well as clinical and behavioral outcomes. Findings An estimated 22,949 (95 percent confidence interval (CI) 19,062-26,836) or 5.4 percent (CI: 4.7-6.1) of all HIV-infected persons receiving care were recently incarcerated. Factors associated with recent incarceration were age <50 years, being a smoker, having high school diploma or less, being homeless, income at or below the poverty guidelines, having a geometric mean of CD4 count <500 cells/ μL, and using drugs in the past 12 months. Results from multivariable modeling indicated that incarcerated persons were more likely to use ED services, and to have been hospitalized, and less likely to have achieved viral suppression. Originality/value Recent incarceration independently predicted worse health outcomes and greater use of emergency services among HIV-infected adults currently in HIV care. Options to improve the HIV continuum of care, including pre-enrollment for healthcare coverage and discharge planning, may lead to better health outcomes for HIV-infected inmates post-release. PMID:27548016

  15. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  16. Smart Use of Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vissing, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Volunteers pose a special area of concern for child care centers. On one hand, they are indispensable as they donate countless hours of time, energy, and resources. On the other hand, there are challenges to coordinating the efforts of volunteering parents. The use of volunteers has incredible potential for benefit from the center, child, and…

  17. School Volunteer Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Public Television, Madison.

    This guide to implementing a school volunteer program was developed for the 1995 Wisconsin Volunteer-A-Thon project, which was intended to encourage individuals, schools, organizations, and corporations to volunteer time to youth and education. Part 1 contains a timeline for the implementation of the project, a description of how to participate,…

  18. Metabolic syndrome in adults who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute childhood leukemia: an LEA study.

    PubMed

    Oudin, C; Auquier, P; Bertrand, Y; Contet, A; Kanold, J; Sirvent, N; Thouvenin, S; Tabone, M-D; Lutz, P; Ducassou, S; Plantaz, D; Dalle, J-H; Gandemer, V; Beliard, S; Berbis, J; Vercasson, C; Barlogis, V; Baruchel, A; Leverger, G; Michel, G

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated prospectively the incidence and risk factors of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components in 170 adult patients (mean age at evaluation: 24.8±5.4 years) who received an hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for childhood ALL, n=119, or AML, n=51. TBI was carried out in 124 cases; a busulfan-based conditioning was done in 30 patients. Twenty-nine patients developed a MS (17.1%, 95% confidence intervals: 11.7-23.6). The cumulative incidence was 13.4% at 25 years of age and 35.5% at 35 years of age. A higher body mass index (BMI) before transplantation and a growth hormone deficiency were associated with increased MS risk (P=0.002 and 0.01, respectively). MS risk was similar for patients who received TBI or busulfan-based conditioning. The TBI use increased the hyperglycemia risk (odds ratio (OR): 4.7, P=0.02). Women were at the risk of developing increased waist circumference (OR: 7.18, P=0.003) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR: 2.72, P=0.007). The steroid dose was not a risk factor. The MS occurs frequently among transplanted survivors of childhood leukemia. Its incidence increases with age. Both intrinsic (BMI, gender) and extrinsic factors (TBI, alkylating agents) contribute to its etiopathogenesis. PMID:26191949

  19. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Safety and Immunogenicity Study of 4 Formulations of Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Plus CPG 7909 (AV7909) in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Robert J.; Daczkowski, Nancy F.; Kaptur, Paulina E.; Muse, Derek; Sheldon, Eric; LaForce, Craig; Sari, Suha; Rudge, Thomas L.; Bernton, Edward

    2013-01-01

    A new anthrax vaccine that could accelerate the immune response and possibly reduce the number of injections needed for protection would be desirable in a post-exposure setting. This Phase 1 study compared the safety and immunogenicity of 2 IM doses (Days 0 and 14) of 4 formulations of AV7909 (AVA plus CPG 7909) with 2 IM doses of BioThrax® (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed) and 2 IM doses of saline placebo administered on Days 0 and 14. A total of 105 healthy adults 18 to 50 years of age were randomized to 1 of 6 study groups: BioThrax (0.5 mL), AV7909 Formulation 1 (0.5 mL AVA + 0.5 mg CPG 7909), AV7909 Formulation 2 (0.5 mL AVA + 0.25 mg CPG 7909), AV7909 Formulation 3 (0.25 mL AVA + 0.5 mg CPG 7909), AV7909 Formulation 4 (0.25 mL AVA + 0.25 mg CPG 7909), or saline placebo (0.5 mL). All randomized subjects received at least 1 vaccination, and 100 subjects completed the trial. After 2 doses, mean peak normalized toxin neutralizing antibody responses (TNA NF50) in the AV7909 groups were higher than in the BioThrax group. Differences among the 4 AV7909 groups were not statistically significant. Subjects who received AV7909 reached peak titers on Day 28 vs. Day 35 in the BioThrax group. The most common adverse events (AEs) in the BioThrax and AV7909 groups assessed as related to vaccination were injection site reactions. Transient lymphopenia was observed after the first dose in each AV7909 group. Frequencies of injection site and systemic reactions recorded by subjects in diaries for 7 days after each injection were highest with AV7909 Formulation 1. No AEs of special interest (autoimmune events) were observed in the study. Further studies of doses and dosing regimens are planned to assess the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of AV7909. PMID:23701746

  20. Changes in bone marrow morphology in adults receiving romiplostim for the treatment of thrombocytopenia associated with primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Ann; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Anderson, David; Chong, Beng H; Boda, Zoltán; Pabinger, Ingrid; Červinek, Libor; Terrell, Deirdra R; Wang, Xuena; Franklin, Janet

    2016-06-01

    The effects of romiplostim on bone marrow morphology were evaluated in adults with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Patients with platelet counts <50 × 10(9)/L, ≥1 prior ITP therapies, and no collagen at baseline received weekly subcutaneous romiplostim starting at 1 μg/kg, adjusted to maintain platelet counts between 50 and 200 × 10(9)/L. Biopsies were scheduled after 1, 2, or 3 years of romiplostim (cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Irrespective of scheduled time, biopsies were performed earlier if patients discontinued or failed to achieve/maintain a response to romiplostim. Reticulin (silver stain) and collagen (trichrome stain) were graded by two hematopathologists using the modified Bauermeister scale (0-4). Of 169 patients, 131 had evaluable biopsies; 9/131 (6.9 %) had increases of ≥2 grades on the modified Bauermeister scale (cohort 1: 0/34; cohort 2: 2/39; cohort 3: 7/58), including two with collagen. Three of the nine patients had follow-up biopsies, including one patient with collagen; changes were reversible after romiplostim discontinuation. Of the nine patients, one had neutropenia detected by laboratory test and two had adverse events of anemia, both non-serious and not treatment-related. By actual exposure (as some biopsies did not occur as scheduled), the number of patients with grade increases ≥2 were year 1: 3/41, year 2: 1/38, year 3: 5/52. Twenty-four patients sustained platelet counts ≥50 × 10(9)/L for ≥6 months with no ITP medications after discontinuing romiplostim, i.e., they entered clinical remission of their ITP. In conclusion, in patients with ITP receiving romiplostim, bone marrow changes were observed in a small proportion of patients.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT#00907478. PMID:27130310

  1. Persistently Elevated Serum Interleukin-6 Predicts Mortality Among Adults Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Botswana: Results from a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Bethan; Moyo, Sikhulile; Gabaitiri, Lesego; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Bussmann, Hermann; Koethe, John R.; Musonda, Rosemary; Makhema, Joseph; Novitsky, Vladimir; Marlink, Richard G.; Wester, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Elevated serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in European and U.S. cohorts. Few similar data are available from sub-Saharan Africa, where most cART-treated adults reside and the prevalence of advanced immunosuppression and opportunistic infections (OIs) at cART initiation is higher. This was a retrospective nested case-control analysis of clinical trial data from the completed Adult Antiretroviral Treatment and Drug Resistance (“Tshepo”) study, 2002–2007, Gaborone, Botswana. We measured pretreatment serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and D-dimer in stored plasma samples from 32 deceased participants (cases) and 64 survivors (controls), matched for age, sex, baseline CD4+ cell count, and plasma HIV-1 RNA. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses were used to compare inflammatory biomarker levels, adjusting for pretreatment body mass index (BMI) and the presence of OIs. A total of 37 (5.7%) of 650 patients died on study, for a crude mortality rate of 20.6/1,000 person-years. Of 37 (86%) study participants who died on study 32 were included in this analysis. Causes of death (n=32) included non-AIDS-defining events (31.3%), HIV-related OIs (28.1%), cART/toxicity-related (21.9%), other infectious etiologies (15.6%), and unknown (3.1%). Median time to death was 31 weeks [interquartile range (IQR) 14–64]. Median baseline levels of all three biomarkers were higher in cases compared to matched controls. After adjusting for BMI and the presence of OIs, only baseline and most recent (near time of event) levels of IL-6 remained as significant predictors of all-cause mortality [adjusted OR (aOR)=1.25, 95% CI (1.05–1.48); p=0.012; and aOR=1.48 (1.05–2.09); p=0.027, respectively]. Serum IL-6 levels are important predictors of all-cause mortality in this adult

  2. Prevalence of 'being at risk of malnutrition' and associated factors in adult patients receiving nursing care at home in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Franck MPsych, Erik; Lopez Hartmann, Maja; Weyler, Joost; Ysebaert, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is a known problem in hospitals and nursing homes. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of being at risk of malnutrition in community living adults receiving homecare nursing and to determine factors independently associated with this risk of malnutrition. Furthermore, it also aimed to describe aspects of current nutritional nursing care. Patients (n = 100) are screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool to evaluate their risk of malnutrition. A patient survey was used to analyse associated factors. In this population, 29% are at risk for malnutrition. Following a multivariate logistic regression analysis, 'loss of appetite' proved the most important factor. A survey for nurses (n = 61) revealed low awareness, poor knowledge, poor communication between stakeholders and a moderate approach of malnutrition. These findings should encourage homecare nurses to use a recommended screening tool for malnutrition and to actively observe and report loss of appetite to initiate the prescription of individual tailored interventions. Belgian homecare nurses' management does not yet fully comply with international recommendations. Additional training in nutritional nursing care and screening methods for malnutrition is needed. Systematic screening should be further developed and evaluated in this at-risk population. PMID:24810494

  3. Cancer-related pain in older adults receiving palliative care: Patient and family caregiver perspectives on the experience of pain

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Lobchuk, Michelle M; Kilgour, Kelly N

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite an emphasis on pain management in palliative care, pain continues to be a common problem for individuals with advanced cancer. Many of those affected are older due to the disproportionate incidence of cancer in this age group. There remains little understanding of how older patients and their family caregivers perceive patients’ cancer-related pain, despite its significance for pain management in the home setting. OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the cancer pain perceptions and experiences of older adults with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach was used to describe and interpret data collected from semistructured interviews with 18 patients (≥65 years of age) with advanced cancer receiving palliative care at home and their family caregivers. RESULTS: The main category ‘Experiencing cancer pain’ incorporated three themes. The theme ‘Feeling cancer pain’ included the sensory aspects of the pain, its origin and meanings attributed to the pain. A second theme, ‘Reacting to cancer pain’, included patients’ and family caregivers’ behavioural, cognitive (ie, attitudes, beliefs and control) and emotional responses to the pain. A third theme, ‘Living with cancer pain’ incorporated individual and social-relational changes that resulted from living with cancer pain. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an awareness of cancer pain experienced by older patients and their family caregivers within the wider context of ongoing relationships, increased patient morbidity and other losses common in the aged. PMID:23957019

  4. Endangered species: volunteers.

    PubMed

    Fitch, J J

    1994-11-01

    Volunteerism in America is changing. To continue to be an effective force in EMS, volunteers need to embrace rather than resist enhanced levels of care and other advances in providing service. Special care must be taken by medical directors to recognize the strengths and limitations of volunteer squads. In many suburban and rural areas, volunteers are strategically located to work with the EMS system and the medical director to bridge geographic or organizational service gaps. PMID:10137716

  5. Effects of rehydration and food consumption on salivary flow, pH and buffering capacity in young adult volunteers during ergometer exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of rehydration and food consumption on salivary flow, pH, and buffering capacity during bicycle ergometer exercise in participants. Methods Ten healthy volunteers exercised on a bicycle ergometer at 80% of their maximal heart rate. These sessions lasted for two periods of 20 min separated by 5-min rest intervals. Volunteers were subjected to one of the following conditions: (1) no water (mineral water) or food consumption, (2) only water for rehydration, (3) water and food consumption, (4) a sports drink only for rehydration, and (5) rehydration with a sports drink and food. Statistical significance was assessed using one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett’s test (p < 0.05). Results The salivary pH decreased significantly during and after exercise in conditions 4 and 5. The salivary buffering capacity decreased significantly during exercise and/or after the exercise in conditions 1, 3, 4, and 5. Conclusions The results showed that salivary pH and buffering capacity decreased greatly depending on the combination of a sports drink and food. PMID:24160307

  6. Prognostic factors for health-related quality of life in adults and children with primary antibody deficiencies receiving SCIG home therapy.

    PubMed

    Gardulf, A; Borte, M; Ochs, H D; Nicolay, U

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and treatment satisfaction (TS) of adults and children with primary antibody deficiencies (PAD) before and after the introduction of subcutaneous immunoglobulin G (SCIG) self-infusions at home and to identify prognostic factors (demographic/social, medical, patient/parent reported) for HRQL. 85 adults and 21 parents of children with PAD answered the SF-36 (adults), CHQ-PF50 (parents), and the LQI (adults and parents) at baseline and following 10 months of weekly self-administered SCIG infusions at home. The SCIG home therapy was associated with significant improvements in HRQL and TS, particularly in patients who had previously received IVIG therapy in hospital settings. Background factors that were found to be associated with HRQL changes in adults were age, serum IgG levels at month 10, concomitant joint/muscle/skeletal disorders, clinical study location and smoking status. PMID:17964220

  7. College Students' Volunteering: Factors Related to Current Volunteering, Volunteer Settings, and Motives for Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Erin W.; Warta, Samantha; Erichsen, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Research has not explored the types of settings that college students prefer to volunteer for and how these settings might be influenced by personal factors (e.g., demographic, academic major, volunteering motivation, religiosity). Students from a Midwestern university (N = 406, 71.9% female) completed a survey that inquired about their…

  8. Recruiting Today's Volunteer Corps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paresky, Susan S.

    1994-01-01

    College and university development officers are encouraged to adjust their expectations of volunteers to the current reality of graduates' schedules and commitments. Five barriers to volunteering (economic, time and distance, language and cultural, environmental, and competitive) are identified, and techniques for overcoming them are offered. (MSE)

  9. Native Son. Vista Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urvant, Ellen; And Others

    The June issue of the Vista Volunteer is devoted to a presentation of the current plight of the American Indian emphasizing the injustice with which the Indian has been treated. Throughout the 5 articles the achievements and efforts of the Vista volunteers working with various Indian tribes are described. Statements by Indian leaders point up the…

  10. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  11. Volunteer Shelter Bed Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    The volunteer shelter bed program development guidelines in this booklet are offered as a community-based alternative to the institutionalization of status offenders. The volunteer shelter bed program is described as a nonsecure residential alternative for status offenders, which can be implemented without the creation of new facilities or the…

  12. Early Systemic Cellular Immune Response in Children and Young Adults Receiving Decellularized Fresh Allografts for Pulmonary Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Anneke; Breymann, Thomas; Cebotari, Serghei; Boethig, Dietmar; Horke, Alexander; Beerbaum, Philipp; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Bertram, Harald; Ono, Masamichi; Tudorache, Igor; Haverich, Axel; Beutel, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The longevity of homografts is determined by the activation of the recipients' immune system resulting from allogenic antigen exposition. Fresh decellularized pulmonary homografts (DPH) have shown promising early results in pulmonary valve replacement in children and young adults and could potentially avoid significant activation of the immune system, as more than 99% of the donor DNA is removed during the decellularization process. While the humoral immune response to decellularized allografts has been studied, detailed information on the more significant cellular immune response is currently lacking. Methods and Results: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from patients undergoing pulmonary valve replacement with DPH before, after, and for approximately 3 years after implantation. Absolute counts and percentages of mature T- (CD3+), B- (CD19+), and natural killer- (CD16+/CD56+) cells, as well as T helper- (CD4+) and cytotoxic T-cell- (CD8+) subsets, were determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Between May 2009 and September 2013, 199 blood samples taken from 47 patients with a mean age at DPH implantation of 16.6±10.8 years were analyzed. The hemodynamic performance of DPH was excellent in all but one patient, and no valve-related deaths or conduit explantations were observed. The short-term follow up revealed a significant postoperative decrease in cell counts of most subtypes with reconstitution after 3 months. Continued assessment did not show any significant deviations in cell counts from their baseline values. Conclusion: The absence of cellular immune response in patients receiving DPH supports the concept that decellularization can provide a basis for autologous regeneration. PMID:24138470

  13. Effects of a wheat bran extract containing arabinoxylan oligosaccharides on gastrointestinal health parameters in healthy adult human volunteers: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    François, Isabelle E J A; Lescroart, Olivier; Veraverbeke, Wim S; Marzorati, Massimo; Possemiers, Sam; Evenepoel, Pieter; Hamer, Henrike; Houben, Els; Windey, Karen; Welling, Gjalt W; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M; Verbeke, Kristin; Broekaert, Willem F

    2012-12-28

    Wheat bran extract (WBE) is a food-grade soluble fibre preparation that is highly enriched in arabinoxylan oligosaccharides. In this placebo-controlled cross-over human intervention trial, tolerance and effects on colonic protein and carbohydrate fermentation were studied. After a 1-week run-in period, sixty-three healthy adult volunteers consumed 3, 10 and 0 g WBE/d for 3 weeks in a random order, with 2 weeks' washout between each treatment period. Fasting blood samples were collected at the end of the run-in period and at the end of each treatment period for analysis of haematological and clinical chemistry parameters. Additionally, subjects collected a stool sample for analysis of microbiota, SCFA and pH. A urine sample, collected over 48 h, was used for analysis of p-cresol and phenol content. Finally, the subjects completed questionnaires scoring occurrence frequency and distress severity of eighteen gastrointestinal symptoms. Urinary p-cresol excretion was significantly decreased after WBE consumption at 10 g/d. Faecal bifidobacteria levels were significantly increased after daily intake of 10 g WBE. Additionally, WBE intake at 10 g/d increased faecal SCFA concentrations and lowered faecal pH, indicating increased colonic fermentation of WBE into desired metabolites. At 10 g/d, WBE caused a mild increase in flatulence occurrence frequency and distress severity and a tendency for a mild decrease in constipation occurrence frequency. In conclusion, WBE is well tolerated at doses up to 10 g/d in healthy adults volunteers. Intake of 10 g WBE/d exerts beneficial effects on gut health parameters. PMID:22370444

  14. Who's in Charge Here? The Administrative Challenges of Being a Volunteer Board Member for a Community-Based Adult Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Marion

    2006-01-01

    A 2003 qualitative study examined the perspectives of 70 stakeholders in two adult literacy programs in Manitoba, Canada. Two stakeholders were Literacy Working Group (LWG) chairpersons, who held administrative positions akin to public school boards. Of particular significance to these administrators were issues related to program coordination,…

  15. Language Learning Strategies for Peace Corps Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleppegrell, Mary; Oxford, Rebecca

    The handbook, designed for Peace Corps volunteers but adaptable for other adult learners, offers ideas about how to improve one's own language learning through effective learning strategies. The handbook intended as a reference, not a text, for when the learner becomes discouraged with his rate of progress, is progressing well but looking for new…

  16. 28 CFR 115.32 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115.32 Section 115.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Training and Education § 115.32 Volunteer...

  17. 28 CFR 115.32 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115.32 Section 115.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Training and Education § 115.32 Volunteer...

  18. 28 CFR 115.32 - Volunteer and contractor training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volunteer and contractor training. 115.32 Section 115.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Training and Education § 115.32 Volunteer...

  19. Measuring the Impacts of a Volunteer-Based Community Development Program in Developing Volunteers' Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Amy; Singletary, Loretta; Hill, George

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an evaluation of the impacts of a community development program to develop leadership skills in its adult volunteers. The evaluation featured 20 questions about leadership skills learned as a result of volunteer experiences. Data analysis strategies beyond a simple means ranking resulted in evidence…

  20. Trends in Adults Receiving a Recommendation for Exercise or Other Physical Activity from a Physician or Other Health ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... a physician's advice to exercise vary by body mass index (BMI)? Adults who were obese were about ... and varies substantially across population subgroups. Definitions Body mass index : Based on respondent-reported height and weight ...

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-Term Services and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubritsky, Cynthia; Abbott, Katherine M.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Foust, Janice B.; Naylor, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL)…

  2. Motivations of German Hospice Volunteers: How Do They Compare to Nonhospice Volunteers and US Hospice Volunteers?

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Eva-Maria; Lang, Frieder R

    2016-03-01

    We examined reasons of volunteering for hospice and nonhospice organizations in a study with 125 volunteers (22-93 years) from the United States and Germany. Motives of US and German hospice volunteers revealed similarities and few differences. Hospice volunteers are involved because they seek to help others, seek new learning experiences, seek social contacts, or seek personal growth. The US hospice volunteers reported motives related to altruistic concerns, enhancement, and social influence as more influential, while German hospice volunteers rated career expectations as being more important. Comparison of German hospice with nonhospice volunteers revealed stronger differences: German hospice volunteers scored higher on altruistic motives, while German nonhospice volunteers yielded higher scores on self-serving motives. Findings contribute to improved understanding of volunteering motivation and of activating or retaining hospice volunteers. PMID:25422517

  3. Vaccine adjuvant systems containing monophosphoryl lipid A and QS21 induce strong and persistent humoral and T cell responses against hepatitis B surface antigen in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vandepapelière, Pierre; Horsmans, Yves; Moris, Philippe; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Janssens, Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Van Belle, Pascale; Clement, Frédéric; Hanon, Emmanuel; Wettendorff, Martine; Garçon, Nathalie; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2008-03-01

    A randomised, double-blind study assessing the potential of four adjuvants in combination with recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen has been conducted to evaluate humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in healthy adults after three vaccine doses at months 0, 1 and 10. Three Adjuvant Systems (AS) contained 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21, formulated either with an oil-in-water emulsion (AS02B and AS02V) or with liposomes (AS01B). The fourth adjuvant was CpG oligonucleotide. High levels of antibodies were induced by all adjuvants, whereas cell-mediated immune responses, including cytolytic T cells and strong and persistent CD4(+) T cell response were mainly observed with the three MPL/QS21-containing Adjuvant Systems. The CD4(+) T cell response was characterised in vitro by vigorous lymphoproliferation, high IFN-gamma and moderate IL-5 production. Antigen-specific T cell immune response was further confirmed ex vivo by detection of IL-2- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells, and in vivo by measuring increased levels of IFN-gamma in the serum and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. The CpG adjuvanted vaccine induced consistently lower immune responses for all parameters. All vaccine adjuvants were shown to be safe with acceptable reactogenicity profiles. The majority of subjects reported local reactions at the injection site after vaccination while general reactions were recorded less frequently. No vaccine-related serious adverse event was reported. Importantly, no increase in markers of auto-immunity and allergy was detected over the whole study course. In conclusion, the Adjuvant Systems containing MPL/QS21, in combination with hepatitis B surface antigen, induced very strong humoral and cellular immune responses in healthy adults. The AS01B-adjuvanted vaccine induced the strongest and most durable specific cellular immune responses after two doses. These Adjuvant Systems, when added to recombinant protein antigens, can be

  4. Under-nutrition at baseline and health services utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbin; Brown, Cynthia J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Roth, David L.; West, Delia Smith; Locher, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Older adults receiving Medicare home health services who experience under-nutrition may be at increased risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. We sought to identify the association between baseline nutritional status and subsequent health service utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services. Design This was a longitudinal study using questionnaires and anthropometric measures designed to assess nutritional status (Mini-Nutritional Assessment [MNA]) at baseline and health services utilization and mortality status at six-month and one-year follow-ups. Setting Participants were evaluated in their homes. Participants 198 older adults who were receiving Medicare home health services. Results Based upon MNA, 12.0% of patients were Malnourished, 51.0% were At Risk for Malnourishment, and 36.9% had Normal Nutrition Status. Based upon body mass index (BMI), 8.1% of participants were underweight, 37.9% were normal weight, 25.3% were overweight, and 28.8% were obese. Using multivariate binary logistic regression analyses, participants who were Malnourished or At Risk for Malnourishment were more likely to experience subsequent hospitalization, emergency room visit, home health aide use, and mortality for the entire sample and hospitalization and nursing home stay for overweight and obese participants. Conclusions Experiencing under-nutrition at the time of receipt of Medicare home health services was associated with increased health services utilization and mortality for the entire sample, and with increased health services utilization only for the overweight and obese subsample. Opportunities exist to address risk of under-nutrition in patients receiving home health services, including those who are overweight or obese, to prevent subsequent adverse health outcomes. PMID:21527170

  5. Reducing HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adults Receiving Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael P.; Carey, Kate B.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a 10-session, HIV-risk-reduction intervention with 221 women and 187 men receiving outpatient psychiatric care for a mental illness. Patients were randomly assigned to the HIV intervention, a structurally equivalent substance use reduction (SUR) intervention, or standard care; they were assessed pre- and postintervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Patients receiving the HIV-risk-reduction intervention reported less unprotected sex, fewer casual sex partners, fewer new sexually transmitted infections, more safer sex communications, improved HIV knowledge, more positive condom attitudes, stronger condom use intentions, and improved behavioral skills relative to patients in the SUR and control conditions. Patients receiving the SUR intervention reported fewer total and casual sex partners compared with control patients. Exploratory analyses suggested that female patients and patients diagnosed with a major depressive disorder were more likely to benefit from the HIV-risk-reduction intervention. PMID:15065959

  6. A randomized, crossover pharmacodynamic study of immediate-release omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate and delayed-release lansoprazole in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pratha, Vijayalakshmi S; McGraw, Thomas; Tobin, William

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) effectively block gastric acid secretion and are the treatment of choice for heartburn. PPIs differ, however, in onset of action and bioavailability. In this single-center, open-label, three-way crossover study, onset of action of immediate-release omeprazole 20 mg/sodium bicarbonate 1100 mg (IR-OME) and delayed-release (DR) lansoprazole 15 mg was evaluated in 63 healthy fasting adults. Subjects were randomized to once daily IR-OME, or DR-lansoprazole, or no treatment for 7 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was the earliest time where a statistically significant difference was observed between IR-OME and DR-lansoprazole in median intragastric pH scores for three consecutive 5-min intervals on day 7. Secondary endpoints compared effects of active treatments on days 1 and 7 (e.g., time to sustained inhibition, percentage of time with pH >4). A significant difference in median intragastric pH favoring IR-OME was observed on day 7 starting at the 10- to 15-min interval postdosing (P = 0.024) and sustaining through the 115- to 120-min interval (P = 0.017). On day 1, IR-OME achieved sustained inhibition of intragastric acidity significantly faster than DR-lansoprazole. IR-OME maintained pH >4 significantly longer than DR-lansoprazole over a 24-h period (P = 0.007) on day 7. Overall, results of this study demonstrate IR-OME is safe and well tolerated and that treatment with IR-OME results in significantly faster onset of action and better gastric acid suppression at steady state than DR-lansoprazole. PMID:27433347

  7. Volunteers Supporting Children with Reading Difficulties in Schools: Motives and Rewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Danielle; Hornery, Samantha; Seaton, Marjorie; Craven, Rhonda G.; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2014-01-01

    Research on volunteer mentor programs has demonstrated mostly positive outcomes for mentees. As a result, many schools seek to attract and retain volunteers to assist children in need of support. The researchers interviewed 26 adult volunteers (from Australian companies) who help children with reading difficulties and examined intervention effects…

  8. Volunteers: A Challenge For Extension Workers: Developing Volunteer Leaders From Disadvantaged Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Minerva O.; And Others

    A series of guidelines for use by Extension agents, as they involve socially and economically disadvantaged youth and adults in volunteer leadership roles in rural and urban Extension programs, is presented. Section headings are: Know Your Audience, Establish Rapport, Levels of Leadership, Leader Development, Leadership Roles, Volunteer…

  9. Volunteer Awareness and Educational Enabling: Staff Development Project for Volunteer Literacy Tutors. 353 Special Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford County Literacy Council, Meadville, PA.

    A project assisted volunteers and staff of the Crawford County (Pennsylvania) READ Program in increasing their personal awareness of and sensitivity to factors in the life of adult learners that may hinder or otherwise affect learning. The object was to help tutors and staff become aware of when help is needed and how to refer or provide that help…

  10. Volunteer Community Language Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Sigfrid S.; And Others

    Lake Charles, Louisiana established a language bank capable of providing interpreters for 20 foreign languages. All participants are volunteers who offer to help free of charge in case of emergencies arising because of the considerable numbers of foreign visitors in the area. Smooth operation of the language bank depends on the following: (1) an…

  11. UTAH VOLUNTEER MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goal 1) Promote and coordinate stream monitoring efforts in Utah as an effective watershed educational tool. Task 1) Inventory and compile an annotated list of existing volunteer monitoring programs and related efforts in Utah. Task 2) Promote monitoring activities throughout the...

  12. Reducing HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adults Receiving Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Michael P.; Carey, Kate B.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a 10-session, HIV-risk-reduction intervention with 221 women and 187 men receiving outpatient psychiatric care for a mental illness. Patients were randomly assigned to the HIV intervention, a structurally equivalent substance use reduction (SUR) intervention, or standard care; they were assessed pre- and…

  13. Safety Evaluation of Crocin (a constituent of saffron) Tablets in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadpour, Amir Houshang; Ayati, Zahara; Parizadeh, Mohammad–Reza; Rajbai, Omid; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Crocin is the chemical ingredient primarily responsible for the color of saffron. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant, anticancer and memory improving activities. Crocin tablets were evaluated for short-term safety and tolerability in healthy adult volunteers. Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design consisting of one month treatment of crocin tablets. Volunteers who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomized into 2 groups of 22 each (males and females) and received 20 mg crocin tablets or placebo. General measures of health were recorded during the study such as hematological, biochemical, hormonal and urinary parameters in pre and post-treatment periods. Results: No major adverse events were reported during the trial. Crocin tablets did not change the above parameters except that it decreased amylase, mixed white blood cells and PTT in healthy volunteers after one month. Conclusion: This clinical safety evaluation showed a relatively safe and normal profile for crocin in healthy volunteers at the given doses within the trial period. PMID:23638291

  14. Salvia lavandulaefolia (Spanish sage) enhances memory in healthy young volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tildesley, N T J; Kennedy, D O; Perry, E K; Ballard, C G; Savelev, S; Wesnes, K A; Scholey, A B

    2003-06-01

    Sage (Salvia) has a longstanding reputation in British herbal encyclopaedias as an agent that enhances memory, although there is little evidence regarding the efficacy of sage from systematized trials. Based on known pharmacokinetic and binding properties, it was hypothesised that acute administration of sage would enhance memory in young adult volunteers. Two experiments utilised a placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced, crossover methodology. In Trial 1, 20 participants received 50, 100 and 150 microl of a standardised essential oil extract of Salvia lavandulaefolia and placebo. In Trial 2, 24 participants received 25 and 50 microl of a standardised essential oil extract of S. lavandulaefolia and placebo. Doses were separated by a 7-day washout period with treatment order determined by Latin squares. Assessment was undertaken using the Cognitive Drug Research computerised test battery prior to treatment and 1, 2.5, 4 and 6 h thereafter. The primary outcome measures were immediate and delayed word recall. The 50 microl dose of Salvia essential oil significantly improved immediate word recall in both studies. These results represent the first systematic evidence that Salvia is capable of acute modulation of cognition in healthy young adults. PMID:12895685

  15. Ivermectin distribution using community volunteers in Kabarole district, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kipp, W; Burnham, G; Bamuhiiga, J; Weis, P; Büttner, D W

    1998-06-01

    Ivermectin mass distribution for the control of onchocerciasis in Uganda began in 1991. This report describes a community based ivermectin distribution programme covering two foci in the Kabarole district which have an estimated 32,000 persons infected and another 110,000 at risk. Through nodule palpation in adult males, 143 villages were identified where nodule prevalence exceeded 20%. Skin snips were also taken from a sample of the population to measure changes in community microfilarial load (CMFL) with treatment. The delivery programme was integrated into the district health management structure, and used community volunteers supervised by medical assistants from adjacent health facilities for annual ivermectin distribution campaigns. After initial efforts by the community to support distributors in-kind proved inadequate, ivermectin distributors earned money retailing condoms as part of the social marketing component of district STD/AIDS programme. Reduction in the CMFL ranged from 40-62% twelve months after the second ivermectin treatment in three villages, and from 69-84% six months after the fourth round of treatment in two villages. After four years of treatment, 85% of eligible persons were receiving ivermectin from community volunteers in each treatment cycle. Drop out rates among volunteers did not exceed 20% over the four years reported here. The direct cost of treatment was US $0.29 per person. Among the reasons for low per-person treatment costs were the strong supervisory structure, the presence of health centres in the foci and a well developed and capable district Primary Health Care management team. PMID:10180405

  16. The influence of calcium supplement on body composition, weight loss and insulin resistance in obese adults receiving low calorie diet

    PubMed Central

    Shalileh, Maryam; Shidfar, Farzad; Haghani, Hamid; Eghtesadi, Shahriar; Heydari, Iraj

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are the most important problems of public health. Evidence from molecular animal research and epidemiologic investigations indicate that calcium intake may have an influence on body composition, weight and insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of calcium supplementation on body composition, weight, insulin resistance and blood pressure in the face of calorie restriction in obese adults. METHODS: A double blind randomized placebo-controlled trial on 40 adults with Body Mass Index > 25kg/m2 was conducted. Subjects were maintained for 24 weeks on a balanced deficit diet (-500 kcal/d deficit) and randomly assigned into two groups with 1000 mg ca/d as calcium carbonate or placebo. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in variables at the 12th and 24th week between the two groups. The lean mass showed no significant increase in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to baseline and in placebo group at the 24th week compared to the 12th week. The insulin concentration showed a significant decrease in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to the baseline (p < 0.05). The diastolic blood pressure had a significant decrease at the 24th week compared to the 12th week in both groups (p = 0.013-0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study suggest that 24 weeks of supplementation with 1000 mg ca/d did not have any effect on weight, body composition, insulin resistance and blood pressure beyond what can be achieved in an energy restricted diet in obese adults. PMID:21526081

  17. A Pilot Study of Brief Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback to Reduce Craving in Young Adult Men Receiving Inpatient Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eddie, D.; Kim, C.; Lehrer, P.; Deneke, E.; Bates, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the implementation feasibility, and efficacy for reducing alcohol and drug craving, of a brief, 3-session heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV BFB) intervention added to a traditional 28-day substance abuse disorder (SUD) inpatient treatment program. Forty-eight young adult men received either treatment as usual (TAU) plus three sessions of HRV BFB training over three weeks, or TAU only. Participants receiving HRV BFB training were instructed to practice daily using a handheld HRV BFB device. HRV BFB training was well tolerated by participants and supported by treatment staff. Men receiving TAU + HRV BFB demonstrated a greater, medium effect size reduction in alcohol and drug craving compared to those receiving TAU only, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, an interaction effect was observed in analyses that accounted for baseline craving levels, wherein heart rate variability (HRV) levels at treatment entry were predictive of changes in craving in the TAU group only. Low baseline levels of HRV were associated with increases in craving, whereas higher baseline HRV levels were associated with greater decreases in craving from start to end of treatment. In the TAU + HRV BFB group, however, there was no such association. That is, HRV BFB appeared to dissociate individual differences in baseline HRV levels from changes in craving. Given that alcohol and drug craving often precipitates relapse, HRV BFB merits further study as an adjunct treatment to ameliorate craving experienced by persons with substance use disorders. PMID:25179673

  18. Dose Proportionality of Fentanyl Buccal Tablet in Healthy Japanese Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Mona; Tempero, Kenneth; Jiang, John G; Thompson, Jeffrey; Simonson, Philip G

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to assess the dose proportionality, safety, and tolerability of fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT) in Japanese volunteers. Methods Healthy, opioid-naive Japanese adults received single-dose FBT 100, 200, 400, and 800 µg in a randomized, open-label, crossover fashion. Naltrexone was given to minimize the opioid effects of fentanyl. Peak serum fentanyl concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (tmax), area under the serum fentanyl concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞), and AUC from 0 to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0–last) were summarized using descriptive statistics. Dose proportionality was claimed if the ln-ln plots of Cmax, AUC0–∞, and AUC0–last vs. dose were linear and the 90% confidence intervals (CI) of the slopes were within 0.8927 and 1.1073. The safety population comprised volunteers who received ≥1 FBT. Results Twenty-five volunteers were enrolled, 23 were included in the safety population (mean age 35.3 years), and 19 completed the study. The assessment of dose proportionality did not meet the statistical criteria (slope [90% CI]: 0.9118 [0.8601, 0.9635] for Cmax, 1.0756 [1.0377, 1.1136] for AUC0–∞, and 1.0992 [1.0677, 1.1307] for AUC0–last). However, the increase in systemic exposure with dose appeared linear, and a post hoc analysis of partial AUCs from time 0 to 8, 12, 18, and 24 hours supported dose proportionality. Median tmax of 90 minutes (range 30–180 minutes) was independent of dose. Adverse events (AEs) were mild or moderate. The most frequent AEs were nausea (N = 9), dizziness (N = 8), headache (N = 6), somnolence (N = 6), dyspepsia (N = 5), and vomiting (N = 3). No application-site or serious AEs were reported. Conclusions Systemic exposure to FBT was approximately dose proportional across the range 100 µg to 800 µg in healthy Japanese adults. Adverse events were mild or moderate. PMID:19915713

  19. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-05-01

    Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV. PMID:25844941

  20. Enhancing Leadership Skills in Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Landry L.; Boyd, Barry

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how professionals leading volunteers can purposefully work toward developing the "leadership identity" of individual volunteers. These concepts and the application of them are presented in the context of Cooperative Extension volunteer groups. Specific methods of developing the leadership identity and capacity of individual…

  1. Perceptions of the Volunteer Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Wayne L.

    1987-01-01

    Examined questionnaire responses from 51 probation and parole line officers to determine staff perceptions of one Volunteers in Corrections program. Findings suggest that officers view volunteer role as involving several functions, including research, treatment, counseling, supervision, volunteer program operations, clerical, and investigation.…

  2. Talk or text to tell? How young adults in Canada and South Africa prefer to receive STI results, counseling, and treatment updates in a wireless world.

    PubMed

    Labacher, Lukas; Mitchell, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Young adults often lack access to confidential, long-lasting, and nonjudgmental interactions with sexual health professionals at brick-and-mortar clinics. To ensure that patients return for their STI test results, post-result counseling, and STI-related information, computer-mediated health intervention programming allows them to receive sexual health information through onsite computers, the Internet, and mobile phone calls and text messages. To determine whether young adults (age: M = 21 years) prefer to communicate with health professionals about the status of their sexual health through computer-mediated communication devices, 303 second-year university students (183 from an urban North American university and 120 from a periurban university in South Africa) completed a paper-based survey indicating how they prefer to communicate with doctors and nurses: talking face to face, mobile phone call, text message, Internet chat programs, Facebook, Twitter, or e-mail. Nearly all students, and female students in South Africa in particular, prefer to receive their STI test results, post-results counseling, and STI-related information by talking face to face with doctors and nurses rather than communicating through computers or mobile phones. Results are clarified in relation to gender, availability of various technologies, and prevalence of HIV in Canada and in South Africa. PMID:24015829

  3. Effect of nutritional counseling on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol among Thai HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Chotivichien, Saipin; Arab, Lenore; Prasithsirikul, Wisit; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Sinawat, Sangsom; Detels, Roger

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy have increased risk of metabolic syndrome, including dyslipidemia. In this study, we determined whether individual nutritional counseling reduced dyslipidemia, particularly low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, among HIV-infected patients with dyslipidemia not currently taking lipid-lowering medication. We conducted a randomized 24-week trial among HIV-infected patients with dyslipidemia who were on antiretroviral therapy and were eligible to initiate therapeutic lifestyle changes according to the Thai National Cholesterol Education Program. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention group that received individual counseling with a nutritionist for seven sessions (baseline, weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24) and a control group that received standard verbal diet information at baseline and nutritional counseling only at week 24. A 24-h recall technique was used to assess dietary intake for both groups at baseline and week 24. Lipid profile (total cholesterol, LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride) was measured at baseline and after 12 and 24 weeks of therapy. An intention-to-treat and linear mixed model were used. Seventy-two patients were randomly assigned, and 62 (86%) participants completed their lipid profile test. After 12 weeks of follow-up, there were significant reductions in the intervention group for total cholesterol (-14.4 ± 4.6 mg/dL, P = .002), LDL cholesterol (-13.7 ± 4.1 mg/dL, P = .001), and triglyceride (-30.4 ± 13.8 mg/dL, P = .03). A significant reduction in LDL cholesterol was also observed in the control group (-7.7 ± 3.8 mg/dL, P = .04), but there were no significant differences in change of mean lipid levels between the groups at 12 weeks of follow-up. After 24 weeks, participants assigned to the intervention group demonstrated significantly greater decreases in serum total cholesterol (-19.0 ± 4.6 vs. 0.2

  4. Prospective Surveillance for Cardiac Adverse Events in Healthy Adults Receiving Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vaccines: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Elizaga, Marnie L.; Vasan, Sandhya; Marovich, Mary A.; Sato, Alicia H.; Lawrence, Dale N.; Chaitman, Bernard R.; Frey, Sharon E.; Keefer, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vaccinia-associated myo/pericarditis was observed during the US smallpox vaccination (DryVax) campaign initiated in 2002. A highly-attenuated vaccinia strain, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) has been evaluated in clinical trials as a safer alternative to DryVax and as a vector for recombinant vaccines. Due to the lack of prospectively collected cardiac safety data, the US Food and Drug Administration required cardiac screening and surveillance in all clinical trials of MVA since 2004. Here, we report cardiac safety surveillance from 6 phase I trials of MVA vaccines. Methods Four clinical research organizations contributed cardiac safety data using common surveillance methods in trials administering MVA or recombinant MVA vaccines to healthy participants. ‘Routine cardiac investigations’ (ECGs and cardiac enzymes obtained 2 weeks after injections of MVA or MVA-HIV recombinants, or placebo-controls), and ‘Symptom-driven cardiac investigations’ are reported. The outcome measure is the number of participants who met the CDC-case definition for vaccinia-related myo/pericarditis or who experienced cardiac adverse events from an MVA vaccine. Results Four hundred twenty-five study participants had post-vaccination safety data analyzed, 382 received at least one MVA-containing vaccine and 43 received placebo; 717 routine ECGs and 930 cardiac troponin assays were performed. Forty-five MVA recipients (12%) had additional cardiac testing performed; 22 for cardiac symptoms, 19 for ECG/laboratory changes, and 4 for cardiac symptoms with an ECG/laboratory change. No participant had evidence of symptomatic or asymptomatic myo/pericarditis meeting the CDC-case definition and judged to be related to an MVA vaccine. Conclusions Prospective surveillance of MVA recipients for myo/pericarditis did not detect cardiac adverse reactions in 382 study participants. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00082446 NCT003766090 NCT00252148 NCT00083603 NCT00301184

  5. Identifying religious and/or spiritual perspectives of adolescents and young adults receiving blood and marrow transplants: a prospective qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Hegner, Mary Ann; Mueller, Mark; Davies, Stella

    2014-08-01

    The potential benefits (or detriments) of religious beliefs in adolescent and young adults (AYA) are poorly understood. Moreover, the literature gives little guidance to health care teams or to chaplains about assessing and addressing the spiritual needs of AYA receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). We used an institutional review board-approved, prospective, longitudinal study to explore the use of religion and/or spirituality (R/S) in AYA HSCT recipients and to assess changes in belief during the transplantation experience. We used the qualitative methodology, grounded theory, to gather and analyze data. Twelve AYA recipients were interviewed within 100 days of receiving HSCT and 6 participants were interviewed 1 year after HSCT; the other 6 participants died. Results from the first set of interviews identified 5 major themes: using R/S to address questions of "why me?" and "what will happen to me;" believing God has a reason; using faith practices; and benefitting from spiritual support people. The second set of interviews resulted in 4 major themes: believing God chose me; affirming that my life has a purpose; receiving spiritual encouragement; and experiencing strengthened faith. We learned that AYA patients were utilizing R/S far more than we suspected and that rather than losing faith in the process of HSCT, they reported using R/S to cope with illness and HSCT and to understand their lives as having special purpose. Our data, supported by findings of adult R/S studies, suggest that professionally prepared chaplains should be proactive in asking AYA patients about their understanding and use of faith, and the data can actively help members of the treatment team understand how AYA are using R/S to make meaning, address fear, and inform medical decisions. PMID:24769327

  6. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  7. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  8. Characterizing Adults Receiving Primary Medical Care in New York City: Implications for Using Electronic Health Records for Chronic Disease Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Romo, Matthew L.; Lurie-Moroni, Elizabeth; Perlman, Sharon E.; Newton-Dame, Remle; Thorpe, Lorna E.; McVeigh, Katharine H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Electronic health records (EHRs) from primary care providers can be used for chronic disease surveillance; however, EHR-based prevalence estimates may be biased toward people who seek care. This study sought to describe the characteristics of an in-care population and compare them with those of a not-in-care population to inform interpretation of EHR data. Methods We used data from the 2013–2014 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES), considered the gold standard for estimating disease prevalence, and the 2013 Community Health Survey, and classified participants as in care or not in care, on the basis of their report of seeing a health care provider in the previous year. We used χ2 tests to compare the distribution of demographic characteristics, health care coverage and access, and chronic conditions between the 2 populations. Results According to the Community Health Survey, approximately 4.1 million (71.7%) adults aged 20 or older had seen a health care provider in the previous year; according to NYC HANES, approximately 4.7 million (75.1%) had. In both surveys, the in-care population was more likely to be older, female, non-Hispanic, and insured compared with the not-in-care population. The in-care population from the NYC HANES also had a higher prevalence of diabetes (16.7% vs 6.9%; P < .001), hypercholesterolemia (35.7% vs 22.3%; P < .001), and hypertension (35.5% vs 26.4%; P < .001) than the not-in-care population. Conclusion Systematic differences between in-care and not-in-care populations warrant caution in using primary care data to generalize to the population at large. Future efforts to use primary care data for chronic disease surveillance need to consider the intended purpose of data collected in these systems as well as the characteristics of the population using primary care. PMID:27126554

  9. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure among HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but has not been studied extensively in resource-limited settings. Insight in the predictors or correlates of poor HRQoL may be helpful to identify patients most in need of additional support and to design appropriate interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and April 2013 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients who were at least 6 months on cART were randomly selected and individual patient data were retrieved from medical records. HRQoL was measured by the WHOQoL-HIVBREF, depressive-symptoms by the Kessler-6 scale, and stigma by the Kalichman internalized AIDS-related stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was carried-out to examine associations between HRQoL and the other variables. A total of 664 patients (response-rate 95%) participated in the study. A higher level of depressive-symptoms was most strongly and consistently associated with a lower HRQoL, both in terms of the magnitude of the relationship and in the number of HRQoL domains associated with it. Also, a higher level of HIV-stigma was associated with a lower HRQoL except for the physical domain, while obtaining sufficient nutritious food and job opportunity were associated with a better HRQoL except for the spiritual and social domains, respectively. Demographics, clinical, and treatment characteristics yielded few significant associations with HRQoL. Our study findings suggest that interventions to improve HRQoL should focus on reducing depressive-symptoms and HIV-stigma, and on enhancing food security and job opportunity. PMID:25782603

  10. Factors affecting satisfaction among community-based hospice volunteer visitors.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, F; Steuer, R; MacKenzie, J

    1994-01-01

    Trained volunteers are an essential component in the delivery of care to clients and families facing a terminal and/or life-threatening illness. As the need for hospice care increases, so does the need to increase the number of volunteers available for visiting. Hospice of London, which is a community based hospice, proposed that volunteers who felt satisfied would remain with the organization longer, thereby, decreasing the costs associated with training new volunteers and enhancing the ability of the agency to provide high-quality volunteer client matches. Accordingly, a survey was conducted in August 1992 to determine which factors were related to hospice volunteer satisfaction. One hundred and five volunteer were surveyed over the telephone. Results demonstrated a positive correlation between satisfaction and feeling like a team member, receiving feedback from staff, feeling valuable and having the volunteer's expectations match the position. Differences in the factors related to satisfaction were noted when the groups were divided by age and gender. PMID:7893559

  11. A first-in-human randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single- and multiple-ascending oral dose study of novel Imidazolopiperazine KAF156 to assess its safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel; Zhao, Rong; Zeng, Shuqi; Magnusson, Baldur; Diagana, Thierry T; Pertel, Peter

    2014-11-01

    KAF156 belongs to a new class of antimalarial, the imidazolopiperazines, and is currently in clinical development for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. This first-in-human, single- and multiple-ascending-dose study in 70 healthy male volunteers determined the maximum oral dose of KAF156 tolerated by healthy adults and derived pharmacokinetic data (including preliminary food effect) to enable dose calculations for malaria patients. KAF156 was studied in single-dose cohorts (10 to 1,200 mg, including one 400-mg food effect cohort (4 to 10 subjects/cohort), and in multiple-dose cohorts (60 to 600 mg once daily for 3 days; 8 subjects/cohort). The follow-up period was 6 to 14 days after the last dose. KAF156 was tolerated, with self-limited mild to moderate gastrointestinal and neurological adverse events. In treated subjects after single doses, headache (n = 4; 11.1%), diarrhea (n = 3; 8.3%), dizziness (n = 3; 8.3%), and abdominal pain (n = 2; 5.6%) were the most common adverse events. Headache (n = 4; 16.7%), nausea (n = 3; 12.5%), upper respiratory tract infection (n = 3; 12.5%), and dizziness (n = 2; 8.3%) were the most common adverse events following multiple doses. KAF156 time to maximum concentration (Tmax) was between 1.0 and 6.0 h. Both the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (Cmax) increased more than dose-proportionally in both single- and multiple-ascending-dose cohorts (terminal half-life, 42.5 to 70.7 h). There was no significant accumulation over 3-day repeated administration. The extent of absorption was not significantly affected by food at a single dose of 400 mg, while mean Cmax decreased from 778 ng/ml to 627 ng/ml and Tmax was delayed from a median of 3.0 h under fasting conditions to 6.0 h under fed conditions. Renal elimination is a minor route. PMID:25136017

  12. Volunteering for charity: pride, respect, and the commitment of volunteers.

    PubMed

    Boezeman, Edwin J; Ellemers, Naomi

    2007-05-01

    This study builds upon and extends the social-identity-based model of cooperation with the organization (T. R. Tyler, 1999; T. R. Tyler & S. L. Blader, 2000) to examine commitment and cooperative intent among fundraising volunteers. In Study 1, structural equation modeling indicated that pride and respect related to the intent to remain a volunteer with an organization, and that this relation was mediated primarily by normative organizational commitment. In Study 2, structural equation modeling indicated that the perceived importance of volunteer work was related to pride, that perceived organizational support related to the experience of respect, and that pride and respect mediated the relation between perceived importance and support on the one hand and organizational commitment on the other. Overall, the results suggest that volunteer organizations may do well to implement pride and respect in their volunteer policy, for instance to address the reliability problem (J. L. Pearce, 1993). PMID:17484556

  13. Prison Volunteers: Profiles, Motivations, Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tewksbury, Richard; Dabney, Dean

    2004-01-01

    Large numbers of correctional institutions rely on volunteers to assist staff in various programs and tasks. At present there exists a paucity of literature describing these programs and/or subjecting them to systematic evaluation. The present study uses self-report data from a sample of active volunteers at a medium-security Southern prison to…

  14. Tools for Today's PTA Volunteer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Becoming a PTA volunteer takes more than a willingness to serve; it takes knowing how to work effectively within the PTA and school community. This article describes what National PTA offers volunteers. When one trains with PTA resources, one has a chance to: (1) Participate in workshops and seminars with family-engagement experts; (2) Network…

  15. The Effective Use of Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Scott G.

    1980-01-01

    If volunteers are to be effective, they must perform needed tasks, have a clear job description, a sense of importance, a schedule for completion, and an understood term of office. Identifying, recruiting, and training fund-raising volunteers are discussed. Annual giving specialists are classified as leaders, personal solicitors, class agents,…

  16. Managing Library Volunteers, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driggers, Preston; Dumas, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers are essential to a successful library program--and at a time when deep budget cuts are the norm, there are many libraries that depend on the help of dedicated volunteers, who do everything from shelving books to covering the phones. Whether these are friends, trustees, or community members, managing them effectively is the key to…

  17. Volunteer Development. Practice Application Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Certain practices in volunteer development have proved successful to help organizations make the best use of their volunteers. Development should be a comprehensive, continuous process through which individuals can extend, update, and adapt their knowledge, skills, and abilities to enhance their performance and potential. A model for volunteer…

  18. Non-AIDS-defining events among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in resource-replete versus resource-limited urban setting

    PubMed Central

    Wester, C. William; Koethe, John R.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Stinnette, Samuel E.; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Kipp, Aaron M.; Hong, Hwanhee; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; McGowan, Catherine C.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Marlink, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare incidence and distribution of non-AIDS-defining events (NADEs) among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in urban sub-Saharan African versus United States settings. Design Retrospective cohort analysis of clinical trial and observational data. Methods Compared crude and standardized (to US cohort by age and sex) NADE rates from two urban adult HIV-infected cART-initiating populations: a clinical trial cohort in Gaborone, Botswana (Botswana) and an observational cohort in Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Results Crude NADE incidence rates were similar: 10.0 [95% confidence interval 6.3–15.9] per 1000 person-years in Botswana versus 12.4 [8.4–18.4] per 1000 person-years in the United States. However, after standardizing to an older, predominantly male US population, the overall NADE incidence rates were higher in Botswana [18.7 (8.3–33.1) per 1000 person-years]. Standardized rates differed most for cardiovascular events (8.4 versus 5.0 per 1000 person-years) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (8.0 versus 0.5 per 1000 person-years) – both higher in Botswana. Conversely, hepatic NADE rates were higher in the United States (4.0 versus 0.0 per 1000 person-years), whereas renal NADE rates [3.0 per 1000 person-years (United States) versus 2.4 per 1000 person-years (Botswana)] were comparable. Conclusion Crude NADE incidence rates were similar between cART-treated patients in a US observational cohort and a sub-Saharan African clinical trial. However, when standardized to the US cohort, overall NADE rates were higher in Botswana. NADEs appear to be a significant problem in our sub-Saharan African setting, and the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of NADEs should be a critical component of care in resource-limited settings. PMID:21572309

  19. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups. PMID:26860637

  20. Volunteer Work in the Church Among Older Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal; Hayward, R. David

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that influence the amount of volunteer work that older Mexican Americans perform in the place where they worship. The relationship between religion and volunteering is viewed from a social identity perspective. Data from a nationally representative sample of older Mexican Americans suggest that Evangelical/Pentecostal church members spend more time performing volunteer work at church than older Mexican Americans who affiliate with other denominations. Moreover, the findings indicate that the difference in the amount of volunteering between the two groups can largely be explained by differences in the nature of the spiritual support that Evangelical/Pentecostal receive from their fellow church members as well as depth of their commitment to their faith. PMID:22686148

  1. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. PMID:26350595

  2. Longitudinal changes of endocrine and bone disease in adults with β-thalassemia major receiving different iron chelators over 5 years.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Maurizio; Sorrentino, Francesco; Pugliese, Pellegrina; Smacchia, Maria Paola; Daniele, Carmine; Equitani, Francesco; Terlizzi, Filomena; Guitarrini, Maria Rita; Monti, Salvatore; Maffei, Laura; Losardo, Anna; Pasin, Methap; Toscano, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we compared the long-term effects of different iron chelation regimens (deferoxamine, deferiprone, deferoxamine + deferiprone, and deferasirox) in preventing or reversing endocrinopathy (diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, or hypogonadism) and bone disease (measured through DEXA) in 165 adults with β-thalassemia major (TM) (mean age 39.9 ± 8.3 years, 43 % males). After five consecutive years of therapy, patients on deferasirox had the highest decrease in the prevalence of any endocrinopathy compared to other chelators which either had no change (deferiprone and deferoxamine) or had an increase (deferoxamine + deferiprone), p = 0.015. This was attributed to a lower proportion of patients on deferasirox developing new-onset endocrinopathy and higher proportion showing reversal of disease, compared to other chelators. A serum ferritin level of >1300 ng/mL predicted the development of new endocrinopathy (p = 0.025) while a level of <200 ng/mL predicted reversal of existing endocrinopathy (p = 0.147). A significant increase in mean BMD T-score (p < 0.001) and a considerable decrease in osteoporosis prevalence were observed in patients receiving deferasirox but not other chelators. Iron chelation therapy with deferasirox has a role in the prevention of endocrinopathy and reversal of existing disease. PMID:26957357

  3. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. PMID:26350595

  4. Trends Impacting Volunteer Administrators in the Next Ten Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Ken, III; Nolan, Mike

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 49 volunteer leadership development programs (39% response) and 704 professional association members (46% response) identified the top volunteer trends: virtual volunteering, corporate/workplace volunteers, episodic volunteering, and changing demographics of volunteers. (JOW)

  5. Mobilizing Volunteers for Community-Based Education and Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, J. Lin

    1979-01-01

    Using a case study approach, describes the efforts of three community organizers--a literacy worker and a medical doctor in the Phillipines, and an adult basic education supervisor in North Carolina--to develop and implement community-based volunteer programs. (DR)

  6. Episodic Volunteers: Reality for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macduff, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    Episodic volunteer opportunities allow for short-term services--either one-time or recurring. The organization using such volunteers must identify new jobs that can be performed on an episodic basis or redesign traditional volunteer jobs. (SK)

  7. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-06-16

    An improved receiver and receiver mount for calutrons are described. The receiver can be manipulated from outside the tank by a single control to position it with respect to the beam. A door can be operated exteriorly also to prevent undesired portions of the beam from entering the receiver. The receiver has an improved pocket which is more selective in the ions collected. (T.R.H.)

  8. Becoming Qualified to Teach Low-literate Refugees: A Case Study of One Volunteer Instructor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kristen H.

    2013-01-01

    This case study investigates Carolyn, an effective volunteer ESL and literacy instructor of adult African refugees, in order to understand both what it means to be a qualified instructor, and also how community-based volunteer instructors may become more qualified. The study's findings suggest that Carolyn's qualifications are a…

  9. Incidence and risk factors of post-engraftment invasive fungal disease in adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients receiving oral azoles prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, P; Rodríguez-Veiga, R; Boluda, B; Martínez-Cuadrón, D; Cano, I; Lancharro, A; Sanz, J; Arilla, M J; López-Chuliá, F; Navarro, I; Lorenzo, I; Salavert, M; Pemán, J; Calvillo, P; Martínez, J; Carpio, N; Jarque, I; Sanz, G F; Sanz, M A

    2015-11-01

    Studies that analyze the epidemiology and risk factors for invasive fungal disease (IFD) after engraftment in alloSCT are few in number. This single-center retrospective study included 404 alloSCT adult recipients surviving >40 days who engrafted and were discharged without prior IFD. All patients who received ⩾20 mg/day of prednisone were assigned to primary oral prophylaxis (itraconazole or low-dose voriconazole). The primary end point was the cumulative incidence (CI) of probable/proven IFD using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria. The independent prognostic factors after multivariate analyses were used to construct a post-engraftment IFD risk score. The 1-year CI of IFD was 11%. The non-relapse mortality was 40% in those developing IFD and 16% in those who did not. The intent-to-treat analysis showed that 17% of patients abandoned the assigned prophylaxis. Age >40 years, ⩾1 previous SCT, pre-engraftment neutropenia >15 days, extensive chronic GVHD and CMV reactivation were independent risk factors. The post-engraftment IFD score stratified patients into low risk (0-1 factor, CI 0.7%), intermediate risk (2 factors, CI 9.9%) and high risk (3-5 factors, CI 24.7%) (P<0.0001). The antifungal prophylaxis strategy failed to prevent post-engraftment IFD in 11% of alloSCT. Our risk score could be useful to implement risk-adapted strategies using antifungal prophylaxis after engraftment. PMID:26281032

  10. Magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia among adult HIV patients receiving first line HAART in Northwestern Tanzania: a cross sectional clinic based study

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Daniel Wilfred; Kilonzo, Semvua Bukheti; Mpondo, Bonaventura Cornel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Moderate to severe anemia is an important clinical problem in HIV patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. The rate of progression and mortality in this sub group of patients is high compared to non anemic patients. In sub Saharan Africa with scale up of Anti retroviral therapy, the magnitude of this problem is not known especially in Tanzania. This study aimed at determining the magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia in HIV patients receiving first line ART in northwestern Tanzania. Methods This was a cross sectional clinic based study, involving adult HIV patients on first line Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy at Bugando Medical Centre Care and Treatment Center. The patients’ data were analyzed using STATA version 11 to determine the prevalence of moderate to severe anemia and risk factors that could predict occurrence of anemia. Results In this study 346 patients on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy were enrolled, of whom 100(40.46%) had moderate to severe anemia. The odds of being anemic were strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 count (< 200 cells/μl) and HIV stage 3&4 at enrollment. Most of the anemic patients had mean corpuscular volume of >100fl. Conclusion The prevalence of moderate to severe anemia is significantly high in this cohort of HIV-infected patients on first line Anti Retroviral Therapy and it is strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 and HIV stage 3 and 4. On clinical grounds this suggests that patients who are initiated on Zidovudine based regimen and those in advanced HIV at enrollment should have regular haemoglobin follow up to identify anemia at its earliest stage to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:27200131

  11. Delayed entry into HIV medical care in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the USA.

    PubMed

    Robertson, McKaylee; Wei, Stanley C; Beer, Linda; Adedinsewo, Demilade; Stockwell, Sandra; Dombrowski, Julia C; Johnson, Christopher; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Before widespread antiretroviral therapy (ART), an estimated 17% of people delayed HIV care. We report national estimates of the prevalence and factors associated with delayed care entry in the contemporary ART era. We used Medical Monitoring Project data collected from June 2009 through May 2011 for 1425 persons diagnosed with HIV from May 2004 to April 2009 who initiated care within 12 months. We defined delayed care as entry >three months from diagnosis. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated to identify risk factors associated with delayed care. In this nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3-8.8) delayed care after diagnosis. Black race was associated with a lower likelihood of delay than white race (aPR 0.38). Men who have sex with women versus women who have sex with men (aPR 1.86) and persons required to take an HIV test versus recommended by a provider (aPR 2.52) were more likely to delay. Among those who delayed 48% reported a personal factor as the primary reason. Among persons initially diagnosed with HIV (non-AIDS), those who delayed care were twice as likely (aPR 2.08) to develop AIDS as of May 2011. Compared to the pre-ART era, there was a nearly 60% reduction in delayed care entry. Although relatively few HIV patients delayed care entry, certain groups may have an increased risk. Focus on linkage to care among persons who are required to take an HIV test may further reduce delayed care entry. PMID:26493721

  12. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Brunk, W.O.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given for an improved calutron receiver having a face plate lying at an angle to the direction of the entering ion beams but having an opening, the plane of which is substantially perpendicular to that of the entering ion beams. By so positioning the opening in the receiver, the effective area through which the desired material may enter the receiver is increased, and at the same time the effective area through which containattng material may enter the receiver is reduced.

  13. Adult Academy Tutor Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isserlis, Janet; And Others

    This handbook is for volunteer tutors, student interns, and VISTA volunteers working with adult basic education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) learners. The community-based handbook contains information about adult literacy and tutoring--what tutors do, who the learners are, and how the literacy learning process works. Introductory…

  14. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    York, H.F.

    1959-07-01

    A receiver construction is presented for calutrons having two or more ion sources and an individual receiver unit for each source. Design requirements dictate that the face plate defining the receiver entrance slots be placed at an angle to the approaching beam, which means that ions striking the face plate are likely to be scattcred into the entrance slots of other receivers. According to the present invention, the face plate has a surface provided with parallel ridges so disposed that one side only of each ridge's exposed directly to the ion beam. The scattered ions are directed away from adjacent receivers by the ridges on the lace plate.

  15. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Programs and Taxpayer Actions to Improve Personal Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbitt, Erica; Bowen, Cathy F.; Kuleck, Robin L.; Taverno, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The income tax-filing process creates teachable moments for learning about taxes and other financial matters. Educators and volunteers from Penn State Cooperative Extension helped taxpayers file 2008 returns under Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). Nearly 600 filers (588) completed and simultaneously received educational information…

  16. Volunteering among High School Students. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet explores volunteering among high school students, ages 16-18. Overall, volunteering among high school students was down slightly in 2006 as compared to 2005. Additional information includes types of volunteer organizations and activities, and ways that high school students become involved in these activities. Volunteer rate vary by…

  17. Nothing's Free: Calculating the Cost of Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingle, W. Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Most school district administrators recognize the benefits of using parent and community volunteers, including improved school-community relations. But volunteers are not cost free. At their best, volunteers can be a valuable resource for schools and districts. At their worst, volunteers can consume already limited resources. However, their use…

  18. Something Wonderful Happens When R.S.V.P. Comes into a School. Guide for R.S.V.P. Directors Interested in Involving Schools in Accepting Retired Senior Volunteers in Local School Systems, Grades K to 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Mildred G.

    RSVP (Retired Senior Volunteer Program) is one program of ACTION--The Agency for Volunteer Service. ACTION, created in 1971, is a Federal agency which administers a number of volunteer programs. Its purpose is to provide a recognized role in the community and a meaningful life in retirement for older adults through significant volunteer service.…

  19. Radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankov, V. N.; Barulin, L. G.; Zhodzishskii, M. I.; Malyshev, I. V.; Petrusinskii, V. V.

    The book is concerned with the design of microelectronic radio receivers and their components based on semiconductor and hybrid integrated circuits. Topics discussed include the hierarchical structure of radio receivers, the synthesis of structural schemes, the design of the principal functional units, and the design of radio receiver systems with digital signal processing. The discussion also covers the integrated circuits of multifunctional amplifiers, analog multipliers, charge-transfer devices, frequency filters, piezoelectronic devices, and microwave amplifiers, filters, and mixers.

  20. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1958-09-01

    Improvements are described in isotope separation devices of the calutron type and, in particular, deals with a novel caiutron receiver which passes the optimum portions of the ion beam to a collecting chamber. In broad aspects the receiver provides means for pass delimited pontion of the beam and an elongated collecting pocket disposed to receive ions passed by the beam delimiting means. The collecting pocket is transversely partitioned into a plurality of ion receiving compartments respectively defined by a corresponding plurality of separately removable liner elements.

  1. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.H.; Stone, K.F.

    1958-09-01

    S>This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and, more specifically, describes a receiver fer collecting the ion curreot after it is formed into a beam of non-homogeneous isotropic cross-section. The invention embodies a calutron receiver having an ion receiving pocket for separately collecting and retaining ions traveling in a selected portion of the ion beam and anelectrode for intercepting ions traveling in another selected pontion of the ion beam. The electrode is disposed so as to fix the limit of one side of the pontion of the ion beam admitted iato the ion receiving pocket.

  2. Correlation of nasal geometry with aerosol deposition in human volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Seng; Simpson, S.Q.; Cheng, Kuo-His; Swift, D.L.; Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Guilmette, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    The nasal airways act as the first filter in the respiratory tract to remove very large or small particles, that would otherwise penetrate to the lower airways. Aerosol deposition data obtained with human volunteers vary considerably under comparable experimental conditions. Reasons for the intersubject variations have been frequently attributed to the geometry of the nasal passages. Because there is no direct proof of this hypothesis, nasal deposition of ultrafine particles in human volunteers has been studied in our laboratory. Preliminary results obtained with four adult volunteers also vary considerably between subjects. The purpose of this part of the study was to establish a theoretical equation relating diffusional deposition in nasal airways to the geometrical dimensions of the individual nasal airways. This relationship was then applied to the experimental deposition data and measurement of airway morphometry for correlation.

  3. North Central Region 4-H Volunteers: Documenting Their Contributions and Volunteer Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nippolt, Pamela Larson; Pleskac, Sue; Schwartz, Vicki; Swanson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Documenting volunteer contributions strengthens Extension partnerships with volunteers. A team of North Central Region 4-H volunteer specialists collaborated to conduct a study of 4-H volunteer contributions and impacts related to working with youth within the 4-H program. Over three thousand (3,332) 4-H volunteers from throughout the 12-state…

  4. More than Volunteering: Active Citizenship through Youth Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This pack aims to provide materials to help all those involved in youth volunteering and post-16 citizenship education to ensure that there are some citizenship learning outcomes from these valuable experiences. The pack has been produced by the Post-16 Citizenship Support Programme to help the integration of citizenship education into post-16…

  5. The relationship between diabetes attitudes and treatment among free clinic patients and volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Nourian, Maziar M; Myers, Kyl; Saunders, AnnMarie; Solis, Silvia P; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-12-01

    Free clinics provide free primary care to the under or uninsured and have been playing an important role in serving the socio-economically disadvantaged. Free clinic patients represent a group of people who experience significant barriers to receiving diabetes prevention and intervention. This study examined diabetes attitudes among free clinic patients and volunteers. English or Spanish speaking patients and volunteers (N = 384), aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes compared to non-diabetic patients. Among patients, ethnicity, education level, diabetes education, and family history affected diabetes attitudes. Among volunteers, diabetes education was an important factor associated with positive diabetes attitudes. Whether the volunteer is a healthcare professional or student was related only to one aspect of diabetes attitudes, seriousness of type 2 diabetes. The results, indicating free clinic diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes, were positive for maintaining and developing diabetes education programs at a free clinic. Unfortunately, the average length of volunteering at this free clinic was short and student volunteers likely leave the clinic upon graduation. Future research should examine issues of volunteer retention in free clinics. Diabetes education for patients may need to be diversified according to ethnicity, family history of diabetes, and educational level. Finally, non-healthcare professional volunteers could potentially be involved in diabetes education at a free clinic. PMID:24756836

  6. Volunteered Geographic Information in Wikipedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Darren

    2010-01-01

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) refers to the geographic subset of online user-generated content. Through Geobrowsers and online mapping services, which use geovisualization and Web technologies to share and produce VGI, a global digital commons of geographic information has emerged. A notable example is Wikipedia, an online collaborative…

  7. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    MacKenzie, K.R.

    1958-09-16

    A novel calutron receiver is described for collecting the constituent material of two closely adjacent selected portions of an ion beam in separate compartments. The receiver is so conntructed that ion scatter and intermixing of the closely adjacent beam portions do nnt occur when the ions strike the receiver structure, and the beam is sharply separated Into the two compartments. In essence, these desirable results are achieved by inclining the adjoining wall of one compartment with respect to the approaching ions to reduce possible rebounding of ions from the compartment into the adjacent compartment.

  8. Rubella Immunization of Volunteers Via the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R.; Ogra, P. L.; Regas, S.; Waldman, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The efficacy of various routes of administration of the live attenuated rubella virus vaccine was evaluated by using 46 seronegative volunteers who were divided into 4 vaccine groups: subcutaneous, nosedrops, spray into posterior oropharynx and nose using large particle aerosol, and inhalation of small particle aerosol through the mouth. Seroconversion was observed in all of the vaccinees regardless of route of immunization. Nasal secretion antibody 6 weeks after immunization was highest in the volunteers who received the vaccine by nose drops (all members of this group had demonstrable nasal secretion antibody after immunization). Only half of the volunteers in the subcutaneous group developed demonstrable nasal secretion antibody. This suggests that nasal secretion antibody was best stimulated when vaccine was given directly into the nose. Volunteers were challenged with the vaccine intranasally at 6 to 8 weeks. None of the volunteers exhibited clinical symptoms or fourfold or greater serum antibody rises after challenge, but fourfold or greater nasal secretion antibody rises were observed in three volunteers in the subcutaneous vaccine group and two in the aerosol group, suggesting that those volunteers had not been protected against challenge. Rubella virus was isolated 8 to 12 days after challenge in two persons in the subcutaneous group and three in the aerosol vaccine group, but none in the nose drops or spray groups. Thus, protection after nasal challenge appeared to be best in those groups which also had the best nasal secretion antibody response after immunization. However, protection did not seem to be correlated with either nasal secretion or serum antibody levels. PMID:4200537

  9. Effects of Tocotrienol Supplementation on Hair Growth in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Beoy, Lim Ai; Woei, Wong Jia; Hay, Yuen Kah

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown an association between oxidative stress and alopecia. Patients with alopecia generally exhibit lower levels of antioxidants in their scalp area as well as a higher lipid peroxidation index. Tocotrienols belong to the vitamin E family and are known to be potent antioxidants. Hence, a study was conducted to investigate the effect of tocotrienol supplementation on hair growth in volunteers suffering from hair loss. Twenty one volunteers were randomly assigned to orally receive 100 mg of mixed tocotrienols daily while 17 volunteers were assigned to receive placebo capsule orally. The volunteers were monitored for the number of hairs in a pre-determined scalp area as well as the weight of 20 strands of 1 cm length hair clippings at 0 (before supplementation), 4 and 8 months. The number of hairs of the volunteers in the tocotrienol supplementation group increased significantly as compared to the placebo group, with the former recording a 34.5% increase at the end of the 8-month supplementation as compared to a 0.1% decrease for the latter. Nevertheless, the cumulative weight of 20 strands of hair clippings did not differ much from the baseline for both supplementation groups at the end of the study period. In conclusion, this trial demonstrated that supplementation with tocotrienol capsules increases hair number in volunteers suffering from hair loss as compared to the placebo group. This observed effect was most likely to be due to the antioxidant activity of tocotrienols that helped to reduce lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in the scalp, which are reported to be associated with alopecia. PMID:24575202

  10. Effects of tocotrienol supplementation on hair growth in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Beoy, Lim Ai; Woei, Wong Jia; Hay, Yuen Kah

    2010-12-01

    Studies have shown an association between oxidative stress and alopecia. Patients with alopecia generally exhibit lower levels of antioxidants in their scalp area as well as a higher lipid peroxidation index. Tocotrienols belong to the vitamin E family and are known to be potent antioxidants. Hence, a study was conducted to investigate the effect of tocotrienol supplementation on hair growth in volunteers suffering from hair loss. Twenty one volunteers were randomly assigned to orally receive 100 mg of mixed tocotrienols daily while 17 volunteers were assigned to receive placebo capsule orally. The volunteers were monitored for the number of hairs in a pre-determined scalp area as well as the weight of 20 strands of 1 cm length hair clippings at 0 (before supplementation), 4 and 8 months. The number of hairs of the volunteers in the tocotrienol supplementation group increased significantly as compared to the placebo group, with the former recording a 34.5% increase at the end of the 8-month supplementation as compared to a 0.1% decrease for the latter. Nevertheless, the cumulative weight of 20 strands of hair clippings did not differ much from the baseline for both supplementation groups at the end of the study period. In conclusion, this trial demonstrated that supplementation with tocotrienol capsules increases hair number in volunteers suffering from hair loss as compared to the placebo group. This observed effect was most likely to be due to the antioxidant activity of tocotrienols that helped to reduce lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in the scalp, which are reported to be associated with alopecia. PMID:24575202

  11. Fight Illiteracy with Volunteer Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozol, Jonathan

    1982-01-01

    Describes utilizing secondary students and college undergraduates of the United States to teach illiterate adults to read by returning their stories (oral history) to them in writing allowing literacy lessons on subjects known to the adult. (ERB)

  12. The GEMS Model of Volunteer Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Ken, III; Deppe, Catherine A.; Castillo, Jaime X.; Wells, Betty J.

    1998-01-01

    Describes GEMS, a spiral model that profiles volunteer administration. Components include Generate, Educate, Mobilize, and Sustain, four sets of processes that span volunteer recruitment and selection to retention or disengagement. (SK)

  13. 76 FR 29720 - Information Collection: Volunteer Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Farm Service Agency Information Collection: Volunteer Programs AGENCY: Farm Service Agency, USDA... an extension of a currently approved information collection associated with the Volunteer Programs... Desk Officer for Agriculture, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management...

  14. Not Just Helping: What and How Older Men Learn When They Volunteer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Participation or active engagement with life is advocated internationally and is the core for successful aging of individuals. Although participating in volunteering has been proven to benefit older adults' health and well-being, men participate less in volunteerism than do women. Experiences are considered the primary resources for adults' growth…

  15. Comparison of alternative buffers for use with a new live oral cholera vaccine, Peru-15, in outpatient volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Shimko, J; Sack, R B; Gomes, J G; MacLeod, K; O'Sullivan, D; Spriggs, D

    1997-06-01

    During development of Peru-15, a new live oral vaccine for cholera, the role of buffer needed to be evaluated. Generally, oral bacterial vaccines are acid labile and need to be administered by using a formulation which protects them from gastric acid. We compared three different buffers for use with Peru-15, including a standard bicarbonate-ascorbic acid buffer, Alka-Seltzer, and a new electrolyte-rice buffer, CeraVacx. Saline served as the control. Thirty-nine healthy adult volunteers received Peru-15 (10(8) CFU) with one of the three buffers or saline in a double-masked study. The volunteers were monitored for symptoms for 7 days after the dose, serum was tested for antibody responses by vibriocidal antibody and immunoglobulin G antitoxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and stool samples were tested for excretion of the vaccine strain. Side effects were minimal in all groups. All 30 volunteers who took Peru-15 with a buffer showed significant rises in vibriocidal antibody titer. The magnitude of the rises was higher in the CeraVacx group than in the other two buffer groups. Four of nine volunteers who took the vaccine with saline also showed increased titers, but they were lower than those in any of the three buffer groups. Excretion of the vaccine strain was similar in the buffer groups, but excretion was not associated with the magnitude of the vibriocidal responses. Excretion of Peru-15 was not detected in the saline group. We conclude that buffer does amplify the serological response to Peru-15 and that CeraVacx may provide benefits not provided by other buffers. PMID:9169739

  16. Comparison of alternative buffers for use with a new live oral cholera vaccine, Peru-15, in outpatient volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Sack, D A; Shimko, J; Sack, R B; Gomes, J G; MacLeod, K; O'Sullivan, D; Spriggs, D

    1997-01-01

    During development of Peru-15, a new live oral vaccine for cholera, the role of buffer needed to be evaluated. Generally, oral bacterial vaccines are acid labile and need to be administered by using a formulation which protects them from gastric acid. We compared three different buffers for use with Peru-15, including a standard bicarbonate-ascorbic acid buffer, Alka-Seltzer, and a new electrolyte-rice buffer, CeraVacx. Saline served as the control. Thirty-nine healthy adult volunteers received Peru-15 (10(8) CFU) with one of the three buffers or saline in a double-masked study. The volunteers were monitored for symptoms for 7 days after the dose, serum was tested for antibody responses by vibriocidal antibody and immunoglobulin G antitoxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and stool samples were tested for excretion of the vaccine strain. Side effects were minimal in all groups. All 30 volunteers who took Peru-15 with a buffer showed significant rises in vibriocidal antibody titer. The magnitude of the rises was higher in the CeraVacx group than in the other two buffer groups. Four of nine volunteers who took the vaccine with saline also showed increased titers, but they were lower than those in any of the three buffer groups. Excretion of the vaccine strain was similar in the buffer groups, but excretion was not associated with the magnitude of the vibriocidal responses. Excretion of Peru-15 was not detected in the saline group. We conclude that buffer does amplify the serological response to Peru-15 and that CeraVacx may provide benefits not provided by other buffers. PMID:9169739

  17. Youth Sport Volunteering: Developing Social Capital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Tess; Bradbury, Steven

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the capacity of youth sport volunteering to contribute to the development of social capital. Following a review of the emergence of social capital as a key theme in UK sport policy, the paper focuses on the ability of a structured sports volunteering programme to equip young people with skills for effective volunteering, and…

  18. Volunteer Program Development Guide: Participant Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This guide is addressed to those individuals who are considering the development of a volunteer program in agencies that provide prevention of, and treatment and rehabilitation services for alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Specific steps for planning and implementing a volunteer program utilizing individual volunteers to extend and complement staff…

  19. Substitute or Complement?: Spousal Influence on Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotolo, Thomas; Wilson, John

    2006-01-01

    Social scientists have documented the influence of family statuses on volunteering, ignoring intrafamily effects. Using newly issued data from the Current Population Survey on the volunteer behavior of 19,626 American couples, we test two competing theories concerning spousal influences on volunteering. Substitution theory predicts that spouses…

  20. Volunteers: The Life-Line of Hospice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patchner, Michael A.; Finn, Mark B.

    1988-01-01

    Survey of 68 hospice volunteers found volunteers to be relatively young, well-educated, in good health, motivated by religious beliefs and personal experience, and prepared for jobs after training and some on-the-job experience. Volunteers were most satisfied when working in direct contact with patients and families and in the hospital.…

  1. The Volunteers Speak: A World-Wide Survey of Peace Corps Volunteers. ACTION Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    A survey questionnaire was mailed to all active Peace Corps Volunteers (PCVs) in the summer of 1975. Based on an internal analysis of the 3,479 respondents (a 66% return), the following findings represent the manner in which PCVs perceive their volunteer experience. Perceived volunteer accomplishments and morale are very high. Volunteers believe…

  2. Volunteering and Giving among American Teenagers 14 to 17 Years of Age. Findings from a National Survey. 1990 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Virginia A.; Weitzman, Murray S.

    This survey was conducted by the Gallup organization on the volunteering and giving behavior of U.S. teenagers as a supplement to a national survey on giving and volunteering among U.S. adults. Information was obtained from in-home personal interviews with 301 teenagers from 14 to 17 years of age. Results indicated that 58 percent of teenagers…

  3. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improvement in a calutron receiver for collecting the isotopes ts described. The electromagnetic separation of the isotopes produces a mass spectrum of closely adjacent beams of ions at the foci regions, and a dividing wall between the two pockets is arranged at an angle. Substantially all of the tons of the less abundant isotope enter one of the pockets and strike one side of the wall directly, while substantially none of the tons entering the other pocket strikes the wall directly.

  4. Giving Back and Staying Put: Volunteering as a Stabilizing Force in Relocation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huei-Wern; Perry, Tam E

    2014-01-01

    Relocation in older adulthood has been shown to have health-related and environmental triggering factors. This study explores the relationship between volunteering in a community and relocation. Using data from 2008 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study, which included 9,220 community-dwelling older individuals who were 65 years and older, our findings show that volunteering significantly reduces the likelihood of relocating out of the area, and such relationship is partially mediated by having friends nearby. This study is innovative because it identifies a stabilizing mechanism important for understanding "protective" factors, such as volunteering, as a way communities can retain older adults. PMID:25404786

  5. Great Spotted Cuckoo Fledglings Often Receive Feedings from Other Magpie Adults than Their Foster Parents: Which Magpies Accept to Feed Foreign Cuckoo Fledglings?

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius) – magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism. PMID:25272009

  6. Great spotted cuckoo fledglings often receive feedings from other magpie adults than their foster parents: which magpies accept to feed foreign cuckoo fledglings?

    PubMed

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius)--magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism. PMID:25272009

  7. Perceptions of the Role of Short-Term Volunteerism in International Development: Views from Volunteers, Local Hosts, and Community Members.

    PubMed

    Loiseau, Bethina; Sibbald, Rebekah; Raman, Salem A; Darren, Benedict; Loh, Lawrence C; Dimaras, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-term international volunteer trips traditionally involve volunteers from high-income countries travelling to low- and middle-income countries to assist in service-related development activities. Their duration typically ranges from 7 to 90 days. The city of La Romana, Dominican Republic, receives hundreds of short-term international volunteers annually. They participate in activities aimed at improving conditions faced by a marginalized ethnic-Haitian community living in bateyes. Methods. This qualitative analysis examined perceptions of short-term international volunteerism, held by three key stakeholder groups in La Romana: local hosts, international volunteers, and community members. Responses from semistructured interviews were recorded and analysed by thematic analysis. Results. Themes from the 3 groups were broadly categorized into general perceptions of short-term volunteerism and proposed best practices. These were further subdivided into perceptions of value, harms, and motivations associated with volunteer teams for the former and best practices around volunteer composition and selection, partnership, and skill sets and predeparture training for the latter. Conclusion. Notable challenges were associated with short-term volunteering, including an overemphasis on the material benefits from volunteer groups expressed by community member respondents; misalignment of the desired and actual skill sets of volunteers; duplicate and uncoordinated volunteer efforts; and the perpetuation of stereotypes suggesting that international volunteers possess superior knowledge or skills. Addressing these challenges is critical to optimizing the conduct of short-term volunteerism. PMID:27382372

  8. Perceptions of the Role of Short-Term Volunteerism in International Development: Views from Volunteers, Local Hosts, and Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Bethina; Sibbald, Rebekah; Raman, Salem A.; Darren, Benedict; Loh, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-term international volunteer trips traditionally involve volunteers from high-income countries travelling to low- and middle-income countries to assist in service-related development activities. Their duration typically ranges from 7 to 90 days. The city of La Romana, Dominican Republic, receives hundreds of short-term international volunteers annually. They participate in activities aimed at improving conditions faced by a marginalized ethnic-Haitian community living in bateyes. Methods. This qualitative analysis examined perceptions of short-term international volunteerism, held by three key stakeholder groups in La Romana: local hosts, international volunteers, and community members. Responses from semistructured interviews were recorded and analysed by thematic analysis. Results. Themes from the 3 groups were broadly categorized into general perceptions of short-term volunteerism and proposed best practices. These were further subdivided into perceptions of value, harms, and motivations associated with volunteer teams for the former and best practices around volunteer composition and selection, partnership, and skill sets and predeparture training for the latter. Conclusion. Notable challenges were associated with short-term volunteering, including an overemphasis on the material benefits from volunteer groups expressed by community member respondents; misalignment of the desired and actual skill sets of volunteers; duplicate and uncoordinated volunteer efforts; and the perpetuation of stereotypes suggesting that international volunteers possess superior knowledge or skills. Addressing these challenges is critical to optimizing the conduct of short-term volunteerism. PMID:27382372

  9. Pharmacokinetic Interaction Study of Ranitidine and Daijokito in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Yusuke; Ishihara, Yoshitaka; Tsuno, Satoshi; Matsuda, Akiko; Qian, Weibin; Miura, Norimasa; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Ranitidine is a histamine 2 receptor antagonist, and daijokito is a Kampo (Chinese herbal medicine as practiced in Japan) formula, which is traditionally used for treating constipation and digestive trouble. Previous study demonstrated that daijokito significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of ranitidine in rats; however, the doses of ranitidine and daijokito in that study were higher than in clinical practice. Therefore, we examined the pharmacokinetic interaction between ranitidine and daijokito in clinical practice doses in healthy volunteers. Methods This was a randomized, open label, two-period crossover study in healthy volunteers (n = 7). Volunteers received administrations of either a single dose of ranitidine 300 mg, or ranitidine 300 mg in combination with daijokito extract granules 2.5 g. Plasma concentrations of ranitidine were measured over 12 h by LC/MS/MS method. Results Plasma concentrations of ranitidine were lower with co-administration of daijokito compared with ranitidine alone. Co-administration of daijokito significantly decreased ranitidine area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h (AUC0–12) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) with geometric mean (GM) ratio [90% confidence interval (CI)] for AUC0–12 of 0.609 (0.449, 0.826) and Cmax of 0.515 (0.345, 0.771). Conclusion Co-administration of ranitidine with daijokito resulted in a significant decrease in plasma level of ranitidine in healthy volunteers. PMID:27493481

  10. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  11. Challenges and opportunities in healthcare volunteer management: insights from volunteer administrators.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sean E; Rogers, Carmen M; Boyd, Karen D

    2013-01-01

    Volunteer administrators from 105 hospitals in five states in the northeast and southern United States provided open-ended survey responses about what they perceived to be the most pressing challenges and opportunities facing healthcare volunteer management. Taken together, these 105 hospitals used a total of 39,008 volunteers and 5.3 million volunteer hours during a 12-month period between 2010 and 2011. A qualitative content analysis of administrator responses suggests that primary challenges include volunteer recruitment and retention, administrative issues, and operational difficulties brought about by the current economic crisis. Key opportunities include more explicitly linking the volunteer function to hospital outcomes and community impact, expanding volunteer recruitment pools and roles and jobs, and developing organizational support for volunteers and making the volunteer management function more efficient and effective. PMID:23822549

  12. Phase IIa study of the immunogenicity and safety of the novel Staphylococcus aureus vaccine V710 in adults with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Moustafa; Aronoff, George R; Chandran, Chandra; Hartzel, Jonathan S; Smugar, Steven S; Galphin, Claude M; Mailloux, Lionel U; Brown, Elizabeth; Dinubile, Mark J; Kartsonis, Nicholas A; Guris, Dalya

    2012-09-01

    Bacteremia is the second leading cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are on hemodialysis. A vaccine eliciting long-term immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus in patients on chronic hemodialysis may reduce the incidence of bacteremia and its complications in these patients. V710 is a vaccine containing iron surface determinant B (IsdB), a highly conserved S. aureus surface protein, which has been shown to be immunogenic in healthy subjects. In this blinded phase II immunogenicity study, 206 chronic hemodialysis patients between the ages of 18 and 80 years old were randomized to receive 60 μg V710 (with or without adjuvant), 90 μg V710 (with adjuvant), or a placebo in various combinations on days 1, 28, and 180. All 201 vaccinated patients were to be followed through day 360. The primary hypothesis was that at least 1 of the 3 groups receiving 2 V710 doses on days 1 and 28 would have a ≥2.5 geometric mean fold rise (GMFR) in anti-IsdB IgG titers over the baseline 28 days after the second vaccination (day 56). At day 56, all three groups receiving 2 doses of V710 achieved a ≥2.5 GMFR in anti-IsdB antibodies compared to the baseline (P values of <0.001 for all 3 groups), satisfying the primary immunogenicity hypothesis. None of the 33 reported serious adverse experiences were considered vaccine related by the investigators. V710 induced sustained antibody responses for at least 1 year postvaccination in patients on chronic hemodialysis. PMID:22837094

  13. What do we need for airway management of adult casualties on the Primary Casualty Receiving Facility? A review of airway management on Role 3 Afloat.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S; Read, J; Sudheer, S; Risdall, J E; Connor, D

    2015-01-01

    The Primary Casualty Receiving Facility (PCRF) of the Royal Navy (RN) is currently based on Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) ARGUS and provides a functioning hospital with surgical teams and a CT scanner (Role 3) within the maritime environment. The case mix could include complex trauma, critically ill patients returning to theatre several times, as well as non-battle injury procedures. This paper describes how we have used national guidelines, evidence from recent military experience, and the Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs) to review and rationalise the airway equipment that is available and that would be required for the PCRF in its current configuration, whilst maintaining capability in a deployed setting. PMID:26867417

  14. Achieving Adult Literacy. Fastback 330.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Pamela J.

    Leaders in business and industry are demanding workers who not only can read and write but can think creatively and critically and solve problems. Federal- and state-funded programs and volunteer organizations are involved with adult literacy. Increasingly, corporations are funding adult literacy projects. Adults read for different reasons than…

  15. The boundaries of care work: a comparative study of professionals and volunteers in Denmark and Australia.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the manner in which two hospices--one located in Denmark and one in Australia--negotiate and determine the boundaries of volunteer workers vis-à-vis paid staff. A comparative case study approach was used to juxtapose organisations with similar activity fields located in different welfare state systems, i.e. a social democratic welfare state and a liberal welfare state. This study involved non-participant observation of volunteers at work and unstructured interviews with volunteers, staff and management in the hospices (n = 41). Data were collected between August 2012 and February 2013. Data were managed using NVivo and analysed thematically. A key finding is that volunteers in the Danish hospice were excluded from all direct care work due to the effective monopoly of the professional care providers, whereas the Australian volunteers participated in the provision of care to the extent that risk could be eliminated or mitigated to an acceptable level. The findings suggest two different models of the roles of volunteers in tension with professional care providers. Both models recognise that volunteers add to the level of care delivered by the organisations and allow for a discussion that moves away from the normative discussions of 'not taking somebody's job', while also recognising that volunteers must be more than just the 'nice extra' if they are to be of any real value to the organisation and to care receivers. PMID:25442013

  16. High rates of malnutrition in older adults receiving different levels of health care in Lleida, Catalonia: an assessment of contributory factors.

    PubMed

    Jürschik, Pilar; Torres, Joan; Solá, Román; Nuin, Carmen; Botigué, Teresa; Lavedán, Ana

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to define the factors associated with the presence or risk of malnutrition in older adults (>65 years of age) attending health care centers in Lleida, Catalonia, using a cross-sectional study approach. Nutritional parameters assessed included the Mini Nutritional Assessment Scale, sociodemographic and psychosocial factors, functional and cognitive status, swallowing and oral problems, texture and route of administration of the diet, changes in dietary intake, and presence of digestive disorders. A total of 398 individuals (184 men) with an average age of 77 years were included in the assessment. Poor nutritional status was recorded in 58% of the individuals. Factors independently associated with unsatisfactory nutritional status included weight loss, functional dependence, cognitive impairment, loneliness, living without a partner, history of heart disease, lung disease, and the presence of acute vomiting. PMID:21104512

  17. 20 CFR 10.730 - What are the conditions of coverage for Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? 10.730 Section... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? (a) Any injury sustained by a volunteer or volunteer leader while he or she is located abroad shall be presumed to...

  18. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  19. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Charlotte A.; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods. This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results. Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7–27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4+ cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions. The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  20. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate Extended-Release Multiple Layer Beads Administered as Intact Capsule or Sprinkles Versus Methylphenidate Immediate-Release Tablets (Ritalin®) in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Teuscher, Nathan S.; Kupper, Robert J.; Chang, Wei-Wei; Greenhill, Laurence; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Connor, Daniel F.; Wigal, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative bioavailability and safety of a multilayer extended-release bead methylphenidate (MPH) hydrochloride 80 mg (MPH-MLR) capsule or sprinkles (37% immediate-release [IR]) versus MPH hydrochloride IR(Ritalin®) tablets, and to develop a pharmacokinetic (PK) model simulating MPH concentration-time data for different MPH-MLR dosage strengths. Methods: This was a single-center, randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study conducted in 26 fasted healthy adults (mean weight±standard deviation, 70.4±11.7 kg) assigned to single-dose oral MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule or sprinkles with applesauce, or Ritalin IR 25 mg (1×5 mg and 1×20 mg tablet) administered at 0, 4, and 8 hours. Results: MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule and sprinkles were bioequivalent; ratios for maximum concentration (Cmax), area under plasma drug concentration versus time curve (AUC)0-t, and AUC0-inf were 1.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 96.3–112.4), 0.99 (95% CI, 95.3–102.8), and 0.99 (95% CI, 95.4–103.0), respectively. MPH-MLR capsule/sprinkles produced highly comparable, biphasic profiles of plasma MPH concentrations characterized by rapid initial peak, followed by moderate decline until 5 hours postdose, and gradual increase until 7 hours postdose, culminating in an attenuated second peak. Based on 90% CIs, total systemic exposure to MPH-MLR 80 mg capsule/sprinkles was similar to that for Ritalin IR 25 mg three times daily, but marked differences in Cmax values indicated that MPH-MLR regimens were not bioequivalent to Ritalin. MPH Cmax and total systemic exposure over the first 4 hours postdose with MPH-MLR capsule/sprinkles was markedly higher than that associated with the first dose of Ritalin. All study drugs were safe and well tolerated. The PK modeling in adults suggested that differences in MPH pharmacokinetics between MPH-MLR and Ritalin are the result of dosage form design attributes and the associated

  1. Relative Bioavailability of Fentanyl Following Various Dosing Regimens of Fentanyl Buccal Tablet in Healthy Japanese Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Mona; Tempero, Kenneth; Jiang, John G; Simonson, Philip G

    2008-01-01

    Background Fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT; FENTORA®, Cephalon, Inc., Frazer, PA, USA) is indicated in the US for breakthrough pain in patients with cancer who are already receiving and are tolerant to around-the-clock opioid therapy for underlying persistent cancer pain. For each individual patient, FBT should be titrated to the effective dose. Objective The primary objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetic parameters of FBT 400 µg administered as a single 400 µg tablet (regimen A) or as two 200 µg tablets given simultaneously (regimen B) and determine whether these are bioequivalent in healthy Japanese volunteers. Regimen C (two 200 µg tablets 30 minutes apart) was also compared as a secondary objective. Methods Healthy Japanese adults received regimens A, B, and C in a crossover fashion. Naltrexone was given to minimize the opioid effects of fentanyl. Serum fentanyl concentrations were determined in venous blood collected through 36 hours post dose. Regimens were declared bioequivalent with respect to bioavailability (as reflected by AUC0–∞, AUC0–last, and Cmax) if the 90% confidence interval (CI) of the regimens' ratio fell within 0.80–1.25 (80%–125%). Results Twenty-nine volunteers (13 men, 16 women) were enrolled; 24 completed the study. Regimens A and B had bioequivalent systemic exposure parameters (B/A [90% CI]: AUC0–∞108.4 [103.4, 113.7], AUC0–last 106.1 [100.7, 111.7], and Cmax 92.3 [83.2, 102.4]). Regimen C was bioequivalent to both A and B for AUCs, but only to B for Cmax. Median time to Cmax was 45 minutes for regimen A and 60 minutes for regimens B and C. The most frequent AEs were dizziness, application-site erythema, headache, somnolence, nausea, and vomiting. All AEs were mild or moderate. Conclusions Bioavailability of fentanyl after FBT 400 µg administered as a single tablet was bioequivalent to that after 2 simultaneously administered 200 µg tablets in healthy Japanese volunteers. AEs were mild or moderate. PMID

  2. Should desperate volunteers be included in randomised controlled trials?

    PubMed

    Allmark, P; Mason, S

    2006-09-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) sometimes recruit participants who are desperate to receive the experimental treatment. This paper defends the practice against three arguments that suggest it is unethical first, desperate volunteers are not in equipoise. Second clinicians, entering patients onto trials are disavowing their therapeutic obligation to deliver the best treatment; they are following trial protocols rather than delivering individualised care. Research is not treatment; its ethical justification is different. Consent is crucial. Third, desperate volunteers do not give proper consent: effectively, they are coerced. This paper responds by advocating a notion of equipoise based on expert knowledge and widely shared values. Where such collective, expert equipoise exists there is a prima facie case for an RCT. Next the paper argues that trial entry does not involve clinicians disavowing their therapeutic obligation; individualised care based on insufficient evidence is not in patients best interest. Finally, it argues that where equipoise exists it is acceptable to limit access to experimental agents; desperate volunteers are not coerced because their desperation does not translate into a right to receive what they desire. PMID:16943339

  3. Predictors and impact of non-adherence in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder receiving OROS methylphenidate: results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication non-adherence has an important impact on treatment efficacy and healthcare burden across a range of conditions and therapeutic areas. The aim of this analysis was to determine predictors of non-adherence and impact of non-adherence on treatment response in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Post-hoc analysis of a 13-week randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study of OROS methylphenidate (MPH) 54 and 72 mg/day. Primary efficacy variable was the Conners’ Adult ADHD Rating Scale – Screening Version (CAARS:O-SV). Daily adherence was calculated as average daily adherence (100 × capsules taken/2), with overall adherence calculated as the average daily adherence. Predictors of adherence were assessed using mixed-effects logistic regression. Descriptive statistics were generated for change in CAARS:O-SV score for adherent (> 95% adherence) and non-adherent subjects. Predictors of change were analyzed using a mixed model. Results Subjects were allocated to OROS MPH (54 mg, n = 87; 72 mg, n = 92) or placebo (n = 97). Mean adherence was 92.6% and 93.3% (OROS MPH 54 and 72 mg/day, respectively), versus 97.5% (placebo). Adherence was higher and less variable in completers. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included female sex, shorter time since ADHD diagnosis, higher education level (completion of university) and score on the Drug Use Screening Inventory psychiatric disorders subscale. Improvements from baseline in CAARS:O-SV score were numerically greater in subjects defined as adherent than in those who were non-adherent. Significant predictors of CAARS:O-SV change in patients who completed the study included percentage adherence up to the point of assessment (p < 0.0001), baseline score (p < 0.0001) and family history of ADHD (p = 0.0003). Conclusion The results of this analysis suggest that newly diagnosed patients, those with a high score on the DUSI-R psychiatric disorder scale, women

  4. Ohio 4-H Agents' and Volunteer Leaders' Perceptions of the Volunteer Leadership Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwarteng, Joseph A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This study found that six areas of volunteer leadership development are important to volunteers and 4-H agents. The areas are (1) recruiting, (2) training, (3) motivation, (4) recognition, (5) retention, and (6) supervision. (JOW)

  5. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  6. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  7. Obesity Among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States: Data From the Cross-Sectional Medical Monitoring Project and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Paul, Angela M; Wei, Stanley C; Mattson, Christine L; Robertson, McKaylee; Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C; Bell, Tanvir K; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-07-01

    Our objective was to compare obesity prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults receiving care and the U.S. general population and identify obesity correlates among HIV-infected men and women.Cross-sectional data was collected in 2009 to 2010 from 2 nationally representative surveys: Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).Weighted prevalence estimates of obesity, defined as body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m, were compared using prevalence ratios (PR, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Correlates of obesity in HIV-infected adults were examined using multivariable logistic regression.Demographic characteristics of the 4006 HIV-infected adults in MMP differed from the 5657 adults from the general U.S. population in NHANES, including more men (73.2% in MMP versus 49.4% in NHANES, respectively), black or African Americans (41.5% versus 11.6%), persons with annual incomes <$20,000 (64.5% versus 21.9%), and homosexuals or bisexuals (50.9% versus 3.9%). HIV-infected men were less likely to be obese (PR 0.5, CI 0.5-0.6) and HIV-infected women were more likely to be obese (PR1.2, CI 1.1-1.3) compared with men and women in the general population, respectively. Among HIV-infected women, younger age was associated with obesity (<40 versus >60 years). Among HIV-infected men, correlates of obesity included black or African American race/ethnicity, annual income >$20,000 and <$50,000, heterosexual orientation, and geometric mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count >200 cells/μL.Obesity is common, affecting 2 in 5 HIV-infected women and 1 in 5 HIV-infected men. Correlates of obesity differ for HIV-infected men and women; therefore, different strategies may be needed for the prevention and treatment. PMID:26166086

  8. Parent-Teacher Association, Soup Kitchen, Church, or the Local Civic Club? Life Stage Indicators of Volunteer Domain.

    PubMed

    Carr, Dawn C; King, Katherine; Matz-Costa, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Gaps in existing literature hinder our knowledge of how life stage-related identities (e.g., worker, parent, student, etc.) influence individuals' decisions about whether and how to get involved in community service. Interventions to increase volunteerism throughout the life course require a more nuanced understanding of this relationship. We use multinomial logistic models to analyze how life phase factors relate to involvement in different types of voluntary organizations across the adult life course in the Chicago Community Adult Health Study. Half of the adults did not volunteer. Those who did volunteer were categorized as charitable, youth-oriented, religious, civic, or multidomain volunteers. Age, employment, family structure, demographics, and self-rated health differentially predicted volunteering in specific domains. Findings from this study suggest that recruitment and retention efforts employed by different nonprofit organizations may be more effective if they take into consideration the life phase factors that enhance or detract from likelihood of engagement. PMID:26342022

  9. Radiation doses received by adult Japanese populations living outside Fukushima Prefecture during March 2011, following the Fukushima 1 nuclear power plant failures.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D

    2012-12-01

    Data on the concentration of radionuclides in air for March following the reactor failures at the Fukushima NPP were available for Takasaki, Chiba and Tokyo. Gamma dose data for the same/close locations and for fixed locations in other prefectures were also obtained. Gamma dose data was used to calculate the cumulative gamma dose, during 2 weeks (15th-28th March) following the power plant failures. Corresponding doses were calculated for sites in other Japanese prefectures - except Fukushima Prefecture, for which equivalent monitoring data was not published. For Takasaki, Chiba and Tokyo air concentration data and ICRP dose coefficients were used to calculate inhalation committed effective doses (CED, E(50)) and thyroid equivalent doses (H) for adult members of the public. Average ratios of gamma dose to inhalation CED and inhalation CED from iodine isotopes to thyroid equivalent dose, determined for Takasaki, Chiba and Tokyo, were then used to predict these quantities for sites in other prefectures. Cumulative gamma dose profiles were used to identify dose increments that could be attributed to Fukushima releases within 11 prefectures (excluding Fukushima Prefecture). The most impacted of these were located in Gunma, Ibaraki, Tochigi and Saitama Prefectures - to the south of Fukushima - and in Miyagi Prefecture - to the north of Fukushima. Calculated total doses ranged from 16 μSv in Shizuoka (Shizuoka) to 400 μSv in Ibaraki (Mito). The total doses calculated for the major population centres of Tokyo and Chiba were 97 μSv and 80 μSv, respectively. For all prefecture locations the largest calculated contribution to total dose, during the period of assessment, was from inhalation (~80%). Estimated thyroid equivalent doses ranged from 5.9 mSv in Ibaraki to 200 μSv in Shizuoka. All total doses calculated were probably overestimates - since no allowances were made for shielding and shelter during the passage of radioactive clouds. Minor contributions to dose from

  10. Leadership and Management of Volunteer Programs: A Guide for Volunteer Administrators. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, James C.; Cole, Kathleen M.

    Based on the Association for Volunteer Administration (AVA) Certification Competencies, this book describes the knowledge, skills, and abilities required of professional managers to involve volunteers effectively in the work of organizations. Chapter 1 examines the leadership and management roles of volunteer administrators. Chapters 2 and 3 focus…

  11. Volunteer map data collection at the USGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eric, B. Wolf; Poore, Barbara S.; Caro, Holly K.; Matthews, Greg D.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1994, citizen volunteers have helped the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) improve its topographic maps. Through the Earth Science Corps program, citizens were able to "adopt a quad" and collect new information and update existing map features. Until its conclusion in 2001, as many as 300 volunteers annotated paper maps which were incorporated into the USGS topographic-map revision process.

  12. Training Volunteers for an AIDS Buddy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojanlatva, Ansa; And Others

    In 1986, the Baton Rouge Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Task Force began to implement an individual volunteer support program to provide support services through a companion, a buddy, whose functions would be either emotional support or assistance in daily activities, or both. In order to have trained volunteers, an education program…

  13. Meaningful Commitment: Finding Meaning in Volunteer Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Tatjana; Hoof, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that volunteer work is associated with various aspects of meaning making by employing a multi-dimensional model of meaning operationalized by the "Sources of Meaning and Meaning in Life Questionnaire" ("SoMe"). An empirical study comparing 168 volunteers with a representative sample of the general population (N =…

  14. Training Shelter Volunteers to Teach Dog Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Veronica J.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which training procedures influenced the integrity of behaviorally based dog training implemented by volunteers of an animal shelter. Volunteers were taught to implement discrete-trial obedience training to teach 2 skills (sit and wait) to dogs. Procedural integrity during the baseline and written instructions…

  15. Non-Alumni Advisory Board Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Judy; Nehls, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Advisory boards typically offer guidance, support, social, and financial capital to academic units within colleges and universities. They are generally comprised of prominent volunteers from the community and appropriate industries or businesses. The results of this exploratory study found that non-alumni advisory board volunteers developed…

  16. Tutoring ESL: A Handbook for Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reck, Deborah L.; And Others

    This handbook is designed for use by Tacoma Community House volunteer tutors of English as a Second Language (ESL) as a supplement to basic volunteer training. The handbook includes detailed information in areas briefly covered during training and specific instructional ideas and class activities. A section on getting started discusses the…

  17. Skill Development for Volunteering in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Stirling, Christine; Orpin, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the skills required of volunteers in the voluntary sector organisations that operate in three rural Tasmanian communities. It reports how volunteers acquire those skills and reveals the challenges faced by voluntary sector organisations in rural communities whose industries and, following from this, community members have a…

  18. School Volunteers: Hidden Benefits and Hidden Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Brian O.

    2001-01-01

    A survey of 68 schools shows that half of all volunteers have college degrees; most support classroom and tutoring activities. Volunteers are beneficial, despite costs associated with program administration, recruitment, interviewing, screening, orientation, training, performance assessment, motivation, recognition, record keeping, reporting,…

  19. Senior Volunteers: Helping Hands & Willing Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessely, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Volunteers and other community-based assistants can relieve some of the financial burden brought on by school-budget cutbacks. This publication describes how enlisting the help of senior volunteers and workers benefits both children and seniors, and it presents some guidelines for implementation of intergeneration programs. The programs provide…

  20. Handbook on Volunteers in Army Community Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This handbook has been prepared for the purpose of offering guidance and assistance in the development and administration of a volunteer program within Army Community Service. It contains eight chapters. Chapter 1 is the Introduction. Chapter 2, Volunteers Are Partners and Team Members, considers the importance of attitudes, agreement on volunteer…

  1. Volunteers in the Child Development Center Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Development Services Bureau (DHEW/OCD), Washington, DC. Project Head Start.

    Suggestions for expanding and improving the volunteer participation in all local Head Start programs are provided in this manual. The primary aims of the volunteer programs are to: (1) provide additional staff in all areas of the program, thus increasing the effectiveness of the paid staff; (2) give interested local citizens, including parents of…

  2. Sterilization for Large Volunteer Temporary Clinics.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Eve

    2015-12-01

    Large portable clinics staffed by volunteers present many unique challenges, including establishing appropriate instrument processing services. This article explores many of the specific steps an organization can take to ensure a safe care environment for patients and a safe working environment for volunteers. PMID:26819989

  3. Evaluating Presentation Skills of Volunteer Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohan, Donna K.

    A systematic method for evaluating the presentation skills of volunteer trainers would enable the discovery of hidden problems. It would also increase individual trainer skills and satisfaction and improve the overall effectiveness of the training program. A first step is to determine the general presentation skills a successful volunteer trainer…

  4. No Surprises: Controlling Risks in Volunteer Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremper, Charles; Kostin, Gwynne

    This booklet provides general and specific advice to volunteer programs to help them manage physical, economic, legal, personnel, and public relations risks. It examines various myths about the risks that volunteer programs face and outlines a strategy for implementing a risk management process. This process can be used to identify and assess…

  5. 78 FR 24321 - National Volunteer Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty- seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-09867 Filed 4-23-13... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8960 of April 19, 2013 National Volunteer Week, 2013 By the President of the... accept certain obligations to one another. National Volunteer Week is a time to renew that...

  6. 76 FR 20215 - National Volunteer Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-8837 Filed 4-11-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195... Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation America's story has been... they see a need. During National Volunteer Week, we celebrate the profound impact of volunteers...

  7. A VNA-Organized Hospice Volunteer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorang, Edith S.

    1981-01-01

    Factors contributing to the success of a hospice volunteer program, organized by a visiting nurse association, include patient involvement in defining agency expectations of a volunteer, careful selection of candidates, a well-planned training program, contractual agreements, and record-keeping. (CT)

  8. Health Care Outcomes and Advance Care Planning in Older Adults Who Receive Home-Based Palliative Care: A Pilot Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Cha, Stephen S.; Hanson, Gregory J.; Peterson, Stephanie M.; Rahman, Parvez A.; Naessens, James M.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Approximately 20% of seniors live with five or more chronic medical illnesses. Terminal stages of their lives are often characterized by repeated burdensome hospitalizations and advance care directives are insufficiently addressed. This study reports on the preliminary results of a Palliative Care Homebound Program (PCHP) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota to service these vulnerable populations. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate inpatient hospital utilization and the adequacy of advance care planning in patients who receive home-based palliative care. Methods: This is a retrospective pilot cohort study of patients enrolled in the PCHP between September 2012 and March 2013. Two control patients were matched to each intervention patient by propensity scoring methods that factor in risk and prognosis. Primary outcomes were six-month hospital utilization including ER visits. Secondary outcomes evaluated advance care directive completion and overall mortality. Results: Patients enrolled in the PCHP group (n=54) were matched to 108 controls with an average age of 87 years. Ninety-two percent of controls and 33% of PCHP patients were admitted to the hospital at least once. The average number of hospital admissions was 1.36 per patient for controls versus 0.35 in the PCHP (p<0.001). Total hospital days were reduced by 5.13 days. There was no difference between rates of ER visits. Advanced care directive were completed more often in the intervention group (98%) as compared to controls (31%), with p<0.001. Goals of care discussions were held at least once for all patients in the PCHP group, compared to 41% in the controls. PMID:25375663

  9. Environmental Volunteering and Health Outcomes over a 20-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Pillemer, Karl; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; Reid, M. C.; Wells, Nancy M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the hypothesis that volunteering in environmental organizations in midlife is associated with greater physical activity and improved mental and physical health over a 20-year period.  Design and Methods: The study used data from two waves (1974 and 1994) of the Alameda County Study, a longitudinal study of health and mortality that has followed a cohort of 6,928 adults since 1965. Using logistic and multiple regression models, we examined the prospective association between environmental and other volunteerism and three outcomes (physical activity, self-reported health, and depression), with 1974 volunteerism predicting 1994 outcomes, controlling for a number of relevant covariates.  Results: Midlife environmental volunteering was significantly associated with physical activity, self-reported health, and depressive symptoms.  Implications: This population-based study offers the first epidemiological evidence for a significant positive relationship between environmental volunteering and health and well-being outcomes. Further research, including intervention studies, is needed to confirm and shed additional light on these initial findings. PMID:20172902

  10. National Retired Senior Volunteer Program Participant Impact Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A study examined the long-term effects of participation in the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) on participants from 20 RSVP projects nationwide. Three rounds of interviews were conducted. In Round 1, 750 volunteers were interviewed: 595 veteran volunteers and 155 new volunteers. In Round 2, 792 volunteers were intereviewed: 175 new…

  11. No Exceptions: Documenting the Abortion Experiences of US Peace Corps Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Foster, Angel M; Arnott, Grady; Parniak, Simone; LaRoche, Kathryn J; Trussell, James

    2015-01-01

    Since 1979, US federal appropriations bills have prohibited the use of federal funds from covering abortion care for Peace Corps volunteers. There are no exceptions; unlike other groups that receive health care through US federal funding streams, including Medicaid recipients, federal employees, and women in federal prisons, abortion care is not covered for volunteers even in cases of life endangerment, rape, or incest. We interviewed 433 returned Peace Corps volunteers to document opinions of, perceptions about, and experiences with obtaining abortion care. Our results regarding the abortion experiences of Peace Corps volunteers, especially those who were raped, bear witness to a profound inequity and show that the time has come to lift the "no exceptions" funding ban on abortion coverage. PMID:25494207

  12. 20 CFR 10.731 - What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes? 10.731 Section 10.731 Employees' Benefits OFFICE... Volunteers § 10.731 What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for...

  13. Nebivolol decreases systemic oxidative stress in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Troost, R; Schwedhelm, E; Rojczyk, S; Tsikas, D; Frölich, J C

    2000-01-01

    Aims Nebivolol is a selective, vasodilatory β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist which has been suggested to possess additional antioxidative properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the actions of nebivolol in antihypertensive doses on systemic oxidative stress in healthy volunteers, reflected by 24h urinary excretion of 8-iso-PGF2α. Methods In a double-blind, cross-over study, 12 healthy volunteers received 5 mg nebivolol once daily or placebo for a total of 7 days, separated by a wash out period of 2 weeks. After each treatment period 24h urinary excretion of 8-iso-PGF2α was determined by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results After the 7 day treatment period nebivolol decreased significantly urinary excretion of 8-iso-PGF2α by 24% from 55.3 ± 5.1 pmol mmol−1 creatinine during the placebo period to 42.3 ± 4.7 pmol mmol−1 creatinine (mean ± s.e. mean, P = 0.01), a mean decrease of 13 pmol mmol−1 creatinine (95% CI: −22.8; −3.1). Conclusions Our data show for the first time that nebivolol decreases systemic oxidative stress in young healthy volunteers. PMID:11012562

  14. 77 FR 4654 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Final Rule, Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... on September 1, 2010. 75 FR 53786. Previously, an interim final rule (IFR) on performance measures... an Additional Indicator for Volunteer Work, on November 23, 2010. 75 FR 71514. The additional... adult civic engagement, cited a report from the Corporation for National and Community...

  15. Process and Positive Development: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of University Student Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeela, Pádraig; Gannon, Niall

    2014-01-01

    Volunteering among university students is an important expression of civic engagement, but the impact of this experience on the development of emerging adults requires further contextualization. Adopting interpretative phenomenological analysis as a qualitative research approach, we carried out semistructured interviews with 10 students of one…

  16. 28 CFR 115.77 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Corrective action for contractors and volunteers. 115.77 Section 115.77 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Discipline § 115.77 Corrective...

  17. 28 CFR 115.77 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Corrective action for contractors and volunteers. 115.77 Section 115.77 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Discipline § 115.77 Corrective...

  18. 28 CFR 115.77 - Corrective action for contractors and volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Corrective action for contractors and volunteers. 115.77 Section 115.77 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Discipline § 115.77 Corrective...

  19. Wood Block and Toy Project. Designed for Diversely-Abled Senior Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Willis E.

    This document describes a volunteer work project designed for nursing home and day-care center persons with minimal physical skills. Potential users of the project are cautioned to plan carefully for the host location where the project will be conducted, as the location must be easily accessible to older adults who may be handicapped and who may…

  20. Teens as Volunteers. Research-to-Results Fact Sheet. Publication #2006-19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theokas, Christina; Bloch, Margot

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents who volunteer do better in school, feel more positive about themselves, and avoid risky behaviors (for example, using drugs). Teens who participate in service activities also are more likely to vote, and to have a positive work ethic and a socially responsible attitude as adults. In addition to benefits for the individual, the…

  1. The Rewards and Restrictions of Recess: Reflections on Being a Playground Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Leigh M.

    Based on the experiences of a participant observer (weekly playground volunteer) over the course of one school year, this paper recounts the experiences of first through third graders during recess and discusses the importance of outdoor play for providing children an opportunity to speak and act unfettered by adult expectations, thereby promoting…

  2. Constructing Reading: Building Conceptions of Literacy in a Volunteer Read-Aloud Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawes, Erika Thulin

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the interactions of three adult-child reading partnerships in a program that matches corporate volunteers with "at risk" students for weekly hour-long story reading sessions. Using discourse analysis within a sociocultural framework, the researcher identified variation in the way these partners were constructing the act and…

  3. New Jersey 4-H Goat Extravaganza: Efficiently Meeting the Educational Needs of 4-H Goat Project Members, Volunteers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripberger, Chad

    2014-01-01

    The 4-H Goat Extravaganza maximizes limited resources to help youth and adults develop knowledge and skills in goat care and management. It capitalizes on the talents and interests of volunteers to efficiently combine a goat-themed art show, team presentation contest, quiz bowl, skillathon, and adult workshop into 1 day. This article outlines the…

  4. AGU Committee Volunteers for 2010-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-08-01

    The success of AGU as a scientific society depends on dedicated volunteers who reflect the diverse interests of our international membership. To function effectively, we need a strong core of volunteers who generously devote time, talent, and energy to Union committee work. To our members who have stepped up and unselfishly volunteered to serve for 2010-2012, I say thank you for your commitment to AGU's mission and programs. It is through your leadership and example that we will achieve our goals as an organization.

  5. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  6. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  7. 75 FR 56501 - Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys... organizations on the new information collection, the Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys. DATES: Comments... Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys. OMB Number:...

  8. 32 CFR 1627.2 - Registration of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.2 Registration of volunteers. (a) If a person who is required to be registered but who has failed to register volunteers for induction, he shall be registered. (b)...

  9. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  10. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  11. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  12. The role of prehealth student volunteers at a student-run free clinic in New York, United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The medical student-run Einstein Community Health Outreach Clinic provides free healthcare to the uninsured adult population of New York, the United States. During the summer, prehealth student volunteers are recruited to assist with clinic operations. Methods: We designed a survey study to identify the baseline characteristics of the volunteers between June and August of 2013 and 2014 in order to evaluate the influence of working in a medical student-run free clinic on their education, impressions, and career goals. Results: A total of 38 volunteers (response rate, 83%) participated in the study. The volunteers were demographically diverse and interested in primary care specialties and community service. Conclusion: After the Einstein Community Health Outreach program, the volunteers showed an improved understanding of the healthcare process and issues relevant to uninsured patients. They also developed favorable attitudes towards primary care medicine and an increased level of interest in pursuing careers in primary care. PMID:26582631

  13. Obesity Among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States: Data From the Cross-Sectional Medical Monitoring Project and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Paul, Angela M.; Wei, Stanley C.; Mattson, Christine L.; Robertson, McKaylee; Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C.; Bell, Tanvir K.; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to compare obesity prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults receiving care and the U.S. general population and identify obesity correlates among HIV-infected men and women. Cross-sectional data was collected in 2009 to 2010 from 2 nationally representative surveys: Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Weighted prevalence estimates of obesity, defined as body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m2, were compared using prevalence ratios (PR, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Correlates of obesity in HIV-infected adults were examined using multivariable logistic regression. Demographic characteristics of the 4006 HIV-infected adults in MMP differed from the 5657 adults from the general U.S. population in NHANES, including more men (73.2% in MMP versus 49.4% in NHANES, respectively), black or African Americans (41.5% versus 11.6%), persons with annual incomes <$20,000 (64.5% versus 21.9%), and homosexuals or bisexuals (50.9% versus 3.9%). HIV-infected men were less likely to be obese (PR 0.5, CI 0.5–0.6) and HIV-infected women were more likely to be obese (PR1.2, CI 1.1–1.3) compared with men and women in the general population, respectively. Among HIV-infected women, younger age was associated with obesity (<40 versus >60 years). Among HIV-infected men, correlates of obesity included black or African American race/ethnicity, annual income >$20,000 and <$50,000, heterosexual orientation, and geometric mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count >200 cells/μL. Obesity is common, affecting 2 in 5 HIV-infected women and 1 in 5 HIV-infected men. Correlates of obesity differ for HIV-infected men and women; therefore, different strategies may be needed for the prevention and treatment. PMID:26166086

  14. A Zen Approach to Volunteer Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Michael L.; Cahill, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    New York University's Zen approach to community service focuses on the principles of mindfulness, awareness, compassion, and engagement in the present moment. It enables a more holistic approach to the measurement of volunteer management objectives. (SK)

  15. Volunteers, Head Start Children, and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooden, Howard E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Investigated with 12 preschool children were whether IQ scores are a predictive indicator of potential learning disability and whether nonprofessional volunteers can remediate possible motor, perceptual, or verbal deficiencies with a concomitant increase in IQ score. (DB)

  16. Volunteering Internationally: Why, Where and How.

    PubMed

    Frost, David E; Kelly, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    Oral health volunteers have an important role in addressing oral health care shortages around the world, but to be effective they need to understand and prepare for the challenges of working overseas. PMID:26819987

  17. Medical volunteers: guidelines for success and safety.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Eddie L.; Cole-Hoover, Gwendolyn; Berry, Paula K.; Hoover, Evan T.; Harris, Betsy; Rageh, Deman; Weaver, W. Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Many African Americans from a variety of medical specialties are interested in satisfying a life-long dream of visiting Africa by volunteering their services to faith-based and private volunteer organizations doing missionary work on the continent. While this can be an extremely rewarding experience in which measurable good can be accomplished, this path can also be strewn with many obstacles that will affect both the success of the mission and the personal well-being of the volunteer. The American Medical Team for Africa is a nonprofit, tax-exempt, volunteer organization that has been doing medical missionary work in Africa since 1993. This manuscript is a compilation of this 10-year experience that has established some very useful guidelines for insuring a successful and safe mission if you are fortunate enough to have this opportunity. PMID:15719877

  18. A Mentoring Volunteer Program for Orthodox Jewish Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Robin Fran

    2012-01-01

    Prevocational and vocational training are interventions that are widely recognized as personally satisfying forms of occupation that can increase self-determination and employability while improving a person's health and well-being. In recent years a related intervention, structured peer mentoring, has been associated with increased community…

  19. Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  20. International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Vincent K L; Lee, Seng-Teik T; Lambrecht, Thomas J; Barnett, John; Gorney, Mark; Hardjowasito, Widanto; Lemperle, Gottfried; McComb, Harold; Natsume, Nagato; Stranc, Mirek; Wilson, Libby

    2002-01-01

    The International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions was set up to provide a report to be presented at the Eighth International Congress of Cleft Palate and Associated Craniofacial Anomalies on September 12, 1997, in Singapore. The aim of the report was to provide data from a wide range of different international teams performing volunteer cleft missions and, thereafter, based on the collected data, to identify common goals and aims of such missions. Thirteen different groups actively participating in volunteer cleft missions worldwide were selected from the International Confederation of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's list of teams actively participating in volunteer cleft missions. Because of the time frame within which the committee had to work, three groups that did not respond by the stipulated deadline were omitted from the committee. The represented members and their respective institutions have undertaken more than 50 volunteer cleft missions to underdeveloped nations worldwide within the last 3 years. They have visited over 20 different countries, treating more than 3,500 patients worldwide. Based on the data collected and by consensus, the committee outlined recommendations for future volunteer cleft missions based on 1) mission objectives, 2) organization, 3) personal health and liability, 4) funding, 5) trainees in volunteer cleft missions, and 6) public relations. The task force believed that all volunteer cleft missions should have well-defined objectives, preferably with long-term plans. The task force also decided that it was impossible to achieve a successful mission without good organization and close coordination. All efforts should be made, and care taken, to ensure that there is minimal morbidity and no mortality. Finally, as ambassadors of goodwill and humanitarian aid, the participants must make every effort to understand and respect local customs and protocol. The main aims are to provide top-quality surgical service, train local

  1. Clinical pharmacology of DP-b99 in healthy volunteers: First administration to humans

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Gilad; Angel, Itzchak; Kozak, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Aims To investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of DP-b99 in healthy volunteers. DP-b99 is a newly developed lipophilic, cell permeable derivative of BAPTA (1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid), which selectively modulates the distribution of metal ions in hydrophobic milieu, and is in clinical development as a neuroprotectant for cerebral ischaemic stroke. To our knowledge no BAPTA derivative has ever been administered to man. Here we report the first human administration of DP-b99 in a phase I, two-part, double-blind, randomized placebo controlled study, with single IV doses of 0.003–1.0 mg kg−1 day−1 DP-b99 (part 1) or multiple ascending doses of 0.03–1.0 mg kg−1 day−1 DP-b99 over 4 days (part 2). Methods A double-blind, dose escalating tolerability study of DP-b99 in normal (young – aged between 18 and 40 years and elderly – aged between 65 and 85 years) healthy adult male volunteers was conducted. Part 1 of the study investigated single administration of ascending intravenous doses, and part 2 examined the effects of ascending doses given repeatedly over 4 days. Twenty-four young volunteers in part 1 received single dose administrations and 26 young volunteers in part 2 received repeated ascending dose administrations of either intravenous DP-b99 or placebo. Subsequently, 10 elderly volunteers received repeated intravenous DP-b99 (1 mg kg−1) or placebo in part 2 over 4 days. Adverse events were identified by either subject self reporting or based upon laboratory parameters (blood chemistry, complete blood cell count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin (PTT), physical examination, vital signs (blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature) and urinalysis. A comprehensive set of cardiovascular parameters was assessed as well (blood pressure, 12 lead-ECG recordings and continuous bedside cardiac monitoring for 6 h on day 1). Results The administration of DP-b99 up

  2. Profiles of Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Library, Springfield.

    Since January 1986, when the Illinois Secretary of State Literacy Grant Program began funding a wide variety of adult literacy programs, more than 30,000 students have sought help with reading. They have been matched with 25,000 tutors who have provided more than 2 million hours of volunteer instruction. The profiles in this booklet are stories of…

  3. Healthy Volunteer 2020: Comparing Peace Corps Volunteers' health metrics with Healthy People 2020 national objectives.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Susan J; Newman, Jeannette; Ferguson, Rennie W; Jung, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) provides a set of quantifiable objectives for improving the health and well-being of Americans. This study examines Peace Corps Volunteers' health metrics in comparison with the Leading Health Indicators (LHIs) in order to set baseline measures for Volunteers' health care and align our measurements with Healthy People 2020 standards. Health data from multiple internal Peace Corps datasets were compared with relevant LHIs and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Seventeen (65%) of the 26 LHIs were relevant to Peace Corps Volunteers. Of these, Volunteers' health measures met or were more favorable than the goals of 13 (76%) of the LHIs. There were no data available for 4 (24%) of the LHIs. The entire Volunteer population has full access to primary care, oral health, and reproductive health services. No suicides or homicides were reported among Volunteers during the analyzed time period. Utilizing the LHIs, we have identified high-priority public health issues relevant for the Peace Corps Volunteer population. We discuss the need for quality data to measure and monitor Volunteers' health progress and outcomes over time, and also to standardize our measurements with Healthy People 2020 benchmarks. This framework may foster greater collaboration to engage in health promotion and disease prevention activities driven by evidence-based information, which may, in turn, encourage healthy behavior among Volunteers. PMID:27413680

  4. Volunteerism, Health, and Civic Engagement among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Benjamin H.; Gillespie, Alayna A.

    2008-01-01

    In North America, 40-50 per cent of older adults are actively involved as formal volunteers in providing diverse health and human services. We review empirical studies concerning older adults' motivations for volunteering, as well as the health and morale benefits they derive from this expression of altruism. Knowledge of the exact nature and…

  5. MDMA Impairs Response to Water Intake in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Matthew J; Garrison, Kathleen J; Coyle, Jeremy R; Galloway, Gantt P; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A; Mendelson, John E

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a serious complication of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use. We investigated potential mechanisms in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. In Study 1, healthy drug-experienced volunteers received MDMA or placebo alone and in combination with the alpha-1 adrenergic inverse agonist prazosin, used as a positive control to release antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In Study 2, volunteers received MDMA or placebo followed by standardized water intake. MDMA lowered serum sodium but did not increase ADH or copeptin, although the control prazosin did increase ADH. Water loading reduced serum sodium more after MDMA than after placebo. There was a trend for women to have lower baseline serum sodium than men, but there were no significant interactions with drug condition. Combining studies, MDMA potentiated the ability of water to lower serum sodium. Thus, hyponatremia appears to be a significant risk when hypotonic fluids are consumed during MDMA use. Clinical trials and events where MDMA use is common should anticipate and mitigate this risk. PMID:27403159

  6. MDMA Impairs Response to Water Intake in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen J.; Coyle, Jeremy R.; Galloway, Gantt P.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Mendelson, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a serious complication of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use. We investigated potential mechanisms in two double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. In Study 1, healthy drug-experienced volunteers received MDMA or placebo alone and in combination with the alpha-1 adrenergic inverse agonist prazosin, used as a positive control to release antidiuretic hormone (ADH). In Study 2, volunteers received MDMA or placebo followed by standardized water intake. MDMA lowered serum sodium but did not increase ADH or copeptin, although the control prazosin did increase ADH. Water loading reduced serum sodium more after MDMA than after placebo. There was a trend for women to have lower baseline serum sodium than men, but there were no significant interactions with drug condition. Combining studies, MDMA potentiated the ability of water to lower serum sodium. Thus, hyponatremia appears to be a significant risk when hypotonic fluids are consumed during MDMA use. Clinical trials and events where MDMA use is common should anticipate and mitigate this risk. PMID:27403159

  7. 75 FR 29969 - Information Collection; Volunteer Application for Natural Resources Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... the following natural resource agencies are included: Department of Agriculture: U.S. Forest Service... Forest Service Information Collection; Volunteer Application for Natural Resources Agencies AGENCY... Application for Natural Resources Agencies. DATES: Comments must be received in writing on or before July...

  8. A City Year. On the Streets and in the Neighborhoods with Twelve Young Community Service Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Suzanne

    City Year is a community-service program based in Boston (Massachusetts) that has frequently been praised as a model for other service programs. In City Year, young people of all races and from differing backgrounds work together for 9 months on public service programs ranging from physical labor to tutoring. Volunteers receive a small stipend and…

  9. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls. PMID:23101561

  10. Pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of multidose sublingual triazolam in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Douglass L; Milgrom, Peter; Heacox, Gail A; Kharasch, Evan D

    2006-02-01

    Triazolam is increasing in popularity as a premedication prescribed by dentists to help their fearful and anxious patients tolerate the potentially aversive nature of some dental procedures. Recent anecdotal reports suggest that incremental sublingual dosing of triazolam may be an effective technique for producing conscious sedation in the dental setting. Although promising, no laboratory or clinical data have been available to evaluate the efficacy or safety of this approach. This study was designed to determine the pharmacokinetics and sedative effects of incremental sublingual dosing of triazolam (total, 1.0 mg) in healthy adults. Ten healthy adult volunteers received sublingual triazolam (0.25 mg) followed by additional doses after 60 (0.50 mg) and 90 (0.25 mg) minutes. Plasma triazolam concentrations, clinical effects (Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation score), and processed electroencephalogram (bispectral index score) were measured intermittently for 3 hours. Plasma triazolam concentrations (mean +/- SD, 5.1 +/- 1.1 ng/mL) and drug effects (Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation score, 2 +/- 1; and the bispectral index score, 62 +/- 16) were greatest in all subjects at the end of the 3-hour evaluation period. Eight of the subjects had Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scores consistent with the definition of deep sedation or general anesthesia (Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation score, <3) at some of the later time points in the 180 minutes of data collection. In comparison, 4 of the subjects had bispectral index scores less than 60 during these later time points of data collection. Given the considerable intersubject variability in triazolam concentrations and effects, additional research is needed to assess this multidosing strategy before it can be endorsed as a useful and safe sedation technique for managing fearful and anxious patients in dental practice. PMID:16415697

  11. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  12. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  13. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in §...

  14. 45 CFR 1226.11 - Part time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part time volunteers. 1226.11 Section 1226.11... SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Volunteer Activities § 1226.11 Part time volunteers. (a) The provisions in this section are applicable to part time volunteers, as defined in §...

  15. Volunteer Programs: When Good Intentions Aren't Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingley, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    With structure and support, volunteers can be a great resource for after-school programs. Program managers should train volunteers with specific information, provide appropriate teaching strategies and materials, put important information in writing, match volunteers appropriately, facilitate icebreaker activities, respect volunteers' time, stress…

  16. Above and Beyond: Secondary Activities for Peace Corps Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Judy; And Others

    This manual focuses on what prompts Peace Corps volunteers to get involved, activities that volunteers have tried while on assignment, and a series of guidelines volunteers can apply to secondary activity, which is organized during school recesses or at times when the Volunteer is otherwise unoccupied. The book is divided into three sections. Part…

  17. Liability Issues of Using Volunteers in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harshfield, James B.

    1996-01-01

    School districts must properly manage volunteers to protect children from negligent behavior. Districts can reduce the risk of using volunteers by developing volunteer-management policies and procedures; maintaining adequate liability insurance; developing descriptions of volunteer responsibilities; screening interested persons; and providing…

  18. Effect of volunteers on maize gene flow.

    PubMed

    Palaudelmàs, Montserrat; Peñas, Gisela; Melé, Enric; Serra, Joan; Salvia, Jordi; Pla, Maria; Nadal, Anna; Messeguer, Joaquima

    2009-08-01

    Regulatory approvals for deliberate release of GM maize events into the environment have lead to real situations of coexistence between GM and non-GM, with some fields being cultivated with GM and conventional varieties in successive seasons. Given the common presence of volunteer plants in maize fields in temperate areas, we investigated the real impact of GM volunteers on the yield of 12 non-GM agricultural fields. Volunteer density varied from residual to around 10% of plants in the field and was largely reduced using certain cultural practices. Plant vigour was low, they rarely had cobs and produced pollen that cross-fertilized neighbour plants only at low--but variable--levels. In the worst-case scenario, the estimated content of GMO was 0.16%. The influence of GM volunteers was not enough to reach the 0.9% adventitious GM threshold but it could potentially contribute to adventitious GM levels, especially at high initial densities (i.e. above 1,000 volunteers/ha). PMID:19225900

  19. 45 CFR 2551.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer? 2551.72 Section 2551.72 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SENIOR COMPANION PROGRAM Senior Companion Placements and Assignments § 2551.72 Is a...

  20. Volunteer Management in Boards of Probation: Perceptions of Equity, Efficiency, and Reciprocity among Vermont Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesire, J. D.; Karp, David R.

    2007-01-01

    A statewide "Reparative Probation" intervention was evaluated in Vermont in which volunteers serve on local Boards and meet with probationers to negotiate a "reparative contract." Our sample (n = 229) was drawn from the universe of Vermont volunteers who completed a 54-question instrument measuring perceived equity, efficiency, and reciprocity in…

  1. A New Breed of Volunteer Calls for a New Volunteer Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    PTAs have always faced the challenge of competing for volunteer time. A PTA's primary volunteer base is made up of parents of public school children, and parents are being pulled in many directions, as their children are more engaged than ever in multiple extracurricular activities that may have their own specialized parent groups. Parents with…

  2. The investigator as volunteer subject.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Howard B

    1982-07-01

    It is particularly within the past three decades that increased attention has been focused on human experimentation, both in regard to the scientific design that ensures the greatest chance of success and to conformity to ethical principles that are most likely to receive public approbation. The story of man's experimentation on man dates back to prehistoric times. In the past two centuries, these investigations have been carried out at an increasing level of sophistication. In this saga, the narratives of the auto-experimenters define a special group of investigators, to many of whom the term "heroic" can be applied. When investigators involve themselves as subjects of their research, a situation of informed consent is often assumed to exist. Discussions concerning voluntarism and ethical propriety have been much less voluminous when the investigators have themselves been subjects that when this is not so. It is within the past half century that physiologists particularly have often been auto-experimenters, and Dr. Earl Wood belongs to the best of this illustrious group. PMID:11650742

  3. Adult volunteerism in Pennsylvania 4-H natural resources programs for youth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sanford Sherrick

    2001-07-01

    Pennsylvania's 4-H Youth Development Program relies on adult volunteers to reach youth with educational information and opportunities. Finding adults willing to do this volunteer work is challenging. This study looks at the current status of adult volunteerism with natural resources 4-H projects, and seeks to understand potential volunteers. The literature has much to offer in regards to general volunteer trends, management, motivations, and task preferences; however, few studies focus on volunteers in natural resources or environmental education. A telephone survey conducted with county 4-H agents revealed that only 3.2% of Pennsylvania's 4-H volunteers work with natural resources projects in 56 out of 67 counties, and that very few volunteers have any formal background in natural resources. Semi-structured interviews with 41 adult volunteers currently working with natural resources projects explored volunteer demographics, history, program design preferences, and ideas for seeking more volunteers. Findings from the telephone survey and the semi-structured interviews were used to generate a mail survey with large, random samples from three population groups: (1) 4-H Volunteers, (2) 4-H Parents, and (3) Natural Resources Professionals. Confidence with youth and subject matter, and adult willingness to volunteer was explored for each of the groups in relation to background, demographic characteristics, motivational needs, past and present volunteer activity, personal interests, and program design importance. Natural resources subject matter confidence was shown to be the most significant variable determining willingness to volunteer for all three groups. The variables that contributed to subject matter and youth confidence varied for each population. Key variables effecting willingness to volunteer included outdoor activity level, personal interest in natural resources, the need to fulfill feelings of social responsibility, and confidence with youth. Program design

  4. Motivations for Youth Volunteer Participation: Types and Structure--An Analysis of Interviews with Twenty-Four Young Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luping, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Scholars who study volunteer activities are attaching ever greater importance to the motivations of volunteers who participate in volunteer activities. However, deficiencies are, on the whole, to be found in the empirical studies by scholars in China on the participating volunteers' motivations. To make up for the deficiencies in the research on…

  5. Volunteered Cloud Computing for Disaster Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster management relies increasingly on interpreting earth observations and running numerical models; which require significant computing capacity - usually on short notice and at irregular intervals. Peak computing demand during event detection, hazard assessment, or incident response may exceed agency budgets; however some of it can be met through volunteered computing, which distributes subtasks to participating computers via the Internet. This approach has enabled large projects in mathematics, basic science, and climate research to harness the slack computing capacity of thousands of desktop computers. This capacity is likely to diminish as desktops give way to battery-powered mobile devices (laptops, smartphones, tablets) in the consumer market; but as cloud computing becomes commonplace, it may offer significant slack capacity -- if its users are given an easy, trustworthy mechanism for participating. Such a "volunteered cloud computing" mechanism would also offer several advantages over traditional volunteered computing: tasks distributed within a cloud have fewer bandwidth limitations; granular billing mechanisms allow small slices of "interstitial" computing at no marginal cost; and virtual storage volumes allow in-depth, reversible machine reconfiguration. Volunteered cloud computing is especially suitable for "embarrassingly parallel" tasks, including ones requiring large data volumes: examples in disaster management include near-real-time image interpretation, pattern / trend detection, or large model ensembles. In the context of a major disaster, we estimate that cloud users (if suitably informed) might volunteer hundreds to thousands of CPU cores across a large provider such as Amazon Web Services. To explore this potential, we are building a volunteered cloud computing platform and targeting it to a disaster management context. Using a lightweight, fault-tolerant network protocol, this platform helps cloud users join parallel computing projects

  6. Cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to freshwater cyanobacteria – human volunteer studies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; Robertson, Ivan M; Webb, Penelope M; Schluter, Philip J; Shaw, Glen R

    2006-01-01

    Background Pruritic skin rashes associated with exposure to freshwater cyanobacteria are infrequently reported in the medical and scientific literature, mostly as anecdotal and case reports. Diagnostic dermatological investigations in humans are also infrequently described. We sought to conduct a pilot volunteer study to explore the potential for cyanobacteria to elicit hypersensitivity reactions. Methods A consecutive series of adult patients presenting for diagnostic skin patch testing at a hospital outpatient clinic were invited to participate. A convenience sample of volunteers matched for age and sex was also enrolled. Patches containing aqueous suspensions of various cyanobacteria at three concentrations were applied for 48 hours; dermatological assessment was made 48 hours and 96 hours after application. Results 20 outpatients and 19 reference subjects were recruited into the study. A single outpatient produced unequivocal reactions to several cyanobacteria suspensions; this subject was also the only one of the outpatient group with a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. No subjects in the reference group developed clinically detectable skin reactions to cyanobacteria. Conclusion This preliminary clinical study demonstrates that hypersensitivity reactions to cyanobacteria appear to be infrequent in both the general and dermatological outpatient populations. As cyanobacteria are widely distributed in aquatic environments, a better appreciation of risk factors, particularly with respect to allergic predisposition, may help to refine health advice given to people engaging in recreational activities where nuisance cyanobacteria are a problem. PMID:16584576

  7. Pharmacokinetics of ambroxol and clenbuterol tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Ge; Song, Li-Xue; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Xue-Ting; Di, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers after a single or multiple dosages oral administration. Methods: A total of 9 healthy adult subjects were given Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in a single dosage or multiple dosages respectively. LC/MS/MS were used for the determination of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol of in plasma. The important pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by DAS 2.0 software (compartment model). Results: Single and multiple dosage groups of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol were all fitted two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetics fitted first order kinetics process. No difference in pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol in single and multiple dosage groups volunteers was observed, Which showed no marked changes, suggesting that multiple dosing did not influence the velocity of drug metabolism. Moreover, parameters of Clenbuterol had significant difference between the single and multiple dosage groups (P<0.05), showing there was accumulation in the body. 9 subjects had completed single or multiple dosages oral administration test, with no adverse drug reactions appeared during the test. Conclusion: There was no obvious accumulation of Ambroxol after repeated dosing. But obvious accumulation of Clenbuterol was noted in multiple-dose administration. The established method is sensitive, accurate, reliable and specific, and it can meet the requirement of clinical pharmacokinetic trial. PMID:26770490

  8. Some Books about Alaska Received in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of State Libraries.

    This annual bibliography of Alaska- and Arctic-related publications received by the Alaska Division of State Libraries is divided into three categories. There are 26 titles in the "Juvenile Fiction" section, 122 in the "Adult Non-Fiction" section, and 19 in the "Adult Fiction" section. Government publications are generally not included, although a…

  9. Some Books about Alaska Received in 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of State Libraries.

    This publication is an annotated listing of 143 books about Alaska or the Arctic, received by the Alaska Division of State Libraries in 1986. Most of the material is current or published in recent years, with the exception of government publications. Categories are juvenile, adult non-fiction, adult fiction, and reference. A few Alaska state and…

  10. Volunteer Losing Balance Wearing Inverted Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Brad McLain for the Space Biology Museum Network puts a volunteer back on balance as he tries to adjust to a world inverted by a special pair of glasses. This helps illustrate how dependent the human vestibular system is on visual cues. A volunteer is The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107.

  11. Meaning of Educating Science Volunteer Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masa-aki; Hoshino, T.; Yoshimura, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Uchida, T.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2010-07-01

    We hold many science events for non-scientists such as primary school students and their parents in a year. We prepare and carry out these events with students who are mainly fast-track students belonging to our center. We encourage them to be instructors in some events, and they teach simple science experiments to children and their parents. While they have experiences to hold several events, they learn a lot of science knowledge and experiments gradually, and become so-called science volunteer leaders. In this article, we consider the meaning of educating science volunteer leaders such as them.

  12. Volunteers build Bay St. Louis playground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    More than 650 volunteers - many of them employees at NASA's Stennis Space Center - weathered rain and cold to transform Bay St. Louis' old City Park into a playground Dec. 17. Volunteers assembled and erected a slide, swing set, jungle gym, sand box and planter benches in an eight-hour time frame. The playground was the first new structure built in the town devastated by Hurricane Katrina and the first on the Gulf Coast after the storm. The project was financed and led by nonprofit organization KaBOOM!, whose vision is to create a great place to play within walking distance of every child in America.

  13. Catastrophic events and older adults.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Elizabeth; Dyer, Carmel B

    2010-12-01

    The plight of older adults during catastrophic events is a societal concern. Older persons have an increased prevalence of cognitive disorders, chronic illnesses, and mobility problems that limit their ability to cope. These disorders may result in a lack of mental capacity and the ability to discern when they should evacuate or resolve problems encountered during a catastrophe. Some older persons may have limited transportation options, and many of the elderly survivors are at increased risk for abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Recommendations for future catastrophic events include the development of a federal tracking system for elders and other vulnerable adults, the designation of separate shelter areas for elders and other vulnerable adults, and involvement of gerontological professionals in all aspects of emergency preparedness and care delivery, including training of frontline workers. Preparation through preevent planning that includes region-specific social services, medical and public health resources, volunteers, and facilities for elders and vulnerable adults is critical. Elders need to be protected from abuse and fraud during catastrophic events. A public health triage system for elders and other vulnerable populations in pre- and postdisaster situations is useful, and disaster preparedness is paramount. Communities and members of safety and rescue teams must address ethical issues before an event. When older adults are involved, consideration needs to be given to triage decision making, transporting those who are immobile, the care of older adults who receive palliative care, and the equitable distribution of resources. Nurses are perfectly equipped with the skills, knowledge, and training needed to plan and implement disaster preparedness programs. In keeping with the tradition of Florence Nightingale, nurses can assume several crucial roles in disaster preparedness for older adults. Nurses possess the ability to participate and lead community

  14. Plasmodium vivax Sporozoite Challenge in Malaria-Naïve and Semi-Immune Colombian Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Forero-Peña, David A.; Rubiano, Kelly; Gómez-Hincapie, José; Martínez, Nora L.; Lopez-Perez, Mary; Castellanos, Angélica; Céspedes, Nora; Palacios, Ricardo; Oñate, José Millán; Herrera, Sócrates

    2014-01-01

    Background Significant progress has been recently achieved in the development of Plasmodium vivax challenge infections in humans, which are essential for vaccine and drug testing. With the goal of accelerating clinical development of malaria vaccines, the outcome of infections experimentally induced in naïve and semi-immune volunteers by infected mosquito bites was compared. Methods Seven malaria-naïve and nine semi-immune Colombian adults (n = 16) were subjected to the bites of 2–4 P. vivax sporozoite-infected Anopheles mosquitoes. Parasitemia levels, malaria clinical manifestations, and immune responses were assessed and compared. Results All volunteers developed infections as confirmed by microscopy and RT-qPCR. No significant difference in the pre-patent period (mean 12.5 and 12.8 days for malaria-naïve and malaria-exposed, respectively) was observed but naïve volunteers developed classical malaria signs and symptoms, while semi-immune volunteers displayed minor or no symptoms at the day of diagnosis. A malaria-naïve volunteer developed a transient low submicroscopic parasitemia that cured spontaneously. Infection induced an increase in specific antibody levels in both groups. Conclusion Sporozoite infectious challenge was safe and reproducible in semi-immune and naïve volunteers. This model will provide information for simultaneous comparison of the protective efficacy of P. vivax vaccines in naïve and semi-immune volunteers under controlled conditions and would accelerate P. vivax vaccine development. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01585077 PMID:24963662

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of live recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Ty21a expressing urease A and B from Helicobacter pylori in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bumann, D; Metzger, W G; Mansouri, E; Palme, O; Wendland, M; Hurwitz, R; Haas, G; Aebischer, T; von Specht, B U; Meyer, T F

    2001-12-12

    Helicobacter pylori urease was expressed in the common live typhoid vaccine Ty21a yielding Ty21a(pDB1). Nine volunteers received Ty21a(pDB1) and three control volunteers received Ty21a. No serious adverse effects were observed in any of the volunteers. Ten out of 12 volunteers developed humoral immune responses to the Salmonella carrier as detected by antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells but only two volunteers seroconverted. A total of five volunteers showed responses in one or two out of three assays for cellular responses to the carrier (proliferation, IFN-gamma-secretion, IFN-gamma-ELISPOT). Three of the volunteers that had received Ty21a(pDB1) showed a weak but significant T-cell response to Helicobacter urease, while no volunteer had detectable humoral responses to urease. Ty21a(pDB1) is a suitable prototype to optimize Salmonella-based vaccination for efficient cellular responses that could mediate protective immunity against Helicobacter. PMID:11738748

  16. Differences in motivations of paid versus nonpaid volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Lawrence H; Wilkeson, David A; Anderson, Heather

    2004-02-01

    143 AmeriCorps volunteers (30 men; 113 women) and 127 college student volunteers (43 men; 84 women) completed the Volunteer Functions Inventory to assess whether monetary compensation was associated with choice to volunteer to provide educational services, e.g., tutoring, mentoring. Based on Snyder's 1993 theory of functionalism, motives of paid (AmeriCorps participants) and nonpaid (college students) volunteers were expected to differ. It was also predicted that the motives of female and male volunteers would differ. Multivariate analysis of variance confirmed these assumptions. In general, paid male participants reported perceiving numerous benefits associated with volunteering and reported stronger beliefs about such benefits. Female participants reported motives for volunteering, in contrast, which were not linked with monetary compensation. The women reported recognizing the benefits of volunteering and engaging in this activity for egoistic reasons. Their reported motives had little relation to compensation. PMID:15077760

  17. The neuropsychiatric effects of aspartame in normal volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, K A; Greenblatt, D J; Goddard, J E; Harmatz, J S; Shader, R I

    1990-05-01

    Ten healthy volunteers with no history of aspartame intolerance (6 men and 4 women, aged 21-36 years) received a single dose of aspartame (15 mg/kg body weight in capsules) or matching placebo in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Eleven blood samples collected over 24 hours were analyzed for plasma glucose and amino acid concentrations. The following variables were evaluated at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours post-dosage: changes in mood measured on visual analog scales, cognitive function determined by digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) and arithmetic test scores, and reaction time measured with a brake-pedal reaction timer. Memory was tested at 2 and 24 hours after dosage based on recall of standardized 16-item word lists. No significant differences between aspartame and placebo were found in measures of sedation, hunger, headache, reaction-time, cognition, or memory at any time during the study. Plasma phenylalanine levels were significantly higher following aspartame (P less than .01) than with placebo between 1 and 6 hours postdosage, reaching a maximum difference of +3.36 mumols/dl at 2 hours. Plasma glucose concentrations were not significantly different between aspartame and placebo. The results of this study suggest that following a single 15 mg/kg dose of aspartame, no detectable effects are observed in a group of healthy volunteers with no history of aspartame intolerance, despite significant increases in plasma phenylalanine concentrations. PMID:2347957

  18. CNS effects of sumatriptan and rizatriptan in healthy female volunteers.

    PubMed

    van der Post, J; Schram, M T; Schoemaker, R C; Pieters, M S M; Fuseau, E; Pereira, A; Baggen, S; Cohen, A F; van Gerven, J M A

    2002-05-01

    This study investigates the CNS effects of sumatriptan and rizatriptan, with temazepam as an active comparator, in healthy female volunteers. Sixteen volunteers completed a randomized, double-blind, crossover study and on four separate occasions received either 100 mg sumatriptan, 20 mg rizatriptan or 20 mg temazepam. The main parameters were eye movements, EEG, body sway, visual analogue scales and a cognitive test battery. Rizatriptan and sumatriptan decreased saccadic peak velocity by 18.3 (95% CI: 5.7, 30.8) and 15.0 (2.2, 27.9) degrees/sec, respectively, about half the decrease induced by temazepam (35.0 (22.1, 47.8) degrees/sec). Body sway increased (30% for rizatriptan (16%, 45%) and 14% for sumatriptan (1%, 27%), respectively). Temazepam caused larger, similar effects. In contrast to temazepam, sumatriptan and rizatriptan decreased reaction times of recognition tasks and increased EEG alpha power (significant for sumatriptan, 0.477 (0.02, 0.935). Therapeutic doses of sumatriptan and rizatriptan caused CNS effects indicative of mild sedation. For EEG and recognition reaction times the effects were opposite to temazepam, indicating central stimulation. PMID:12100089

  19. Oral and dermal pharmacokinetics of triclopyr in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, N G; Nolan, R J; Perkins, J M; Davies, R; Warrington, S J

    1989-11-01

    Blood levels and urinary excretion of triclopyr, the active ingredient in Garlon herbicides, were followed in six volunteers given single oral doses of 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg body weight. Five of these volunteers later received dermal applications of Garlon 4 herbicide formulation equivalent to 3.7 mg triclopyr/kg body weight applied to the forearm. Following oral administration blood levels peaked at 2-3 h and declined to undetectable levels within 48 h; more than 80% of the dose was found as unchanged triclopyr in the urine. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of triclopyr clearance; half-lives for the rapid initial and slower terminal phases were 1.3 h and 5.1 h respectively, and were independent of dose. Due to the slow half-life for dermal absorption (t1/2 = 16.8 h) the rapid initial elimination phase was obscured and the pharmacokinetics could be simplified by a one-compartment model. An average of 1.37% of the applied dose was recovered in the urine; when corrected for recovery after oral administration this was equivalent to an absorption of 1.65%. Triclopyr is slowly absorbed through skin and is rapidly eliminated. It has very low potential to accumulate in man or to be absorbed through the skin in acutely toxic amounts. PMID:2591984

  20. International Volunteering: Employability, Leadership and More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Andrew; Charleston, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of individuals in transition between education and work during international volunteering expeditions. While it was expected that outcomes might include employability enhancement and skill development, the authors aimed to clarify what the main factors were, examine employability…

  1. Volunteer Development: Strengthening Your Literacy Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gang, Bobbie; Buckley, Bonnie, Ed.

    This guide, prepared for a Nevada State literacy council, provides practical information and step-by-step planning for recruiting, training, using, retaining, documenting, and recognizing volunteers. The 11 sections of the guide cover the following topics: (1) establishing goals and objectives and writing a plan; (2) identifying jobs and writing…

  2. Volunteers in Wikipedia: Why the Community Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baytiyeh, Hoda; Pfaffman, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Wikipedia is a reliable encyclopedia with over seven million articles in several languages all contributed and maintained by volunteers. To learn more about what drives people to devote their time and expertise to building and maintaining this remarkable resource, surveys with Likert-scaled items measuring different types of motivations were…

  3. Personalized genomic disease risk of volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; McGuire, Amy L.; Pereira, Stacey; Caskey, C. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is commonly used for researching the causes of genetic disorders. However, its usefulness in clinical practice for medical diagnosis is in early development. In this report, we demonstrate the value of NGS for genetic risk assessment and evaluate the limitations and barriers for the adoption of this technology into medical practice. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on 81 volunteers, and for each volunteer, we requested personal medical histories, constructed a three-generation pedigree, and required their participation in a comprehensive educational program. We limited our clinical reporting to disease risks based on only rare damaging mutations and known pathogenic variations in genes previously reported to be associated with human disorders. We identified 271 recessive risk alleles (214 genes), 126 dominant risk alleles (101 genes), and 3 X-recessive risk alleles (3 genes). We linked personal disease histories with causative disease genes in 18 volunteers. Furthermore, by incorporating family histories into our genetic analyses, we identified an additional five heritable diseases. Traditional genetic counseling and disease education were provided in verbal and written reports to all volunteers. Our report demonstrates that when genome results are carefully interpreted and integrated with an individual’s medical records and pedigree data, NGS is a valuable diagnostic tool for genetic disease risk. PMID:24082139

  4. BOINC service for volunteer cloud computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høimyr, N.; Blomer, J.; Buncic, P.; Giovannozzi, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Jones, P. L.; Karneyeu, A.; Marquina, M. A.; Mcintosh, E.; Segal, B.; Skands, P.; Grey, F.; Lombraña González, D.; Zacharov, I.

    2012-12-01

    Since a couple of years, a team at CERN and partners from the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) have been working on a project that enables general physics simulation programs to run in a virtual machine on volunteer PCs around the world. The project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework. Based on CERNVM and the job management framework Co-Pilot, this project was made available for public beta-testing in August 2011 with Monte Carlo simulations of LHC physics under the name “LHC@home 2.0” and the BOINC project: “Test4Theory”. At the same time, CERN's efforts on Volunteer Computing for LHC machine studies have been intensified; this project has previously been known as LHC@home, and has been running the “Sixtrack” beam dynamics application for the LHC accelerator, using a classic BOINC framework without virtual machines. CERN-IT has set up a BOINC server cluster, and has provided and supported the BOINC infrastructure for both projects. CERN intends to evolve the setup into a generic BOINC application service that will allow scientists and engineers at CERN to profit from volunteer computing. This paper describes the experience with the two different approaches to volunteer computing as well as the status and outlook of a general BOINC service.

  5. Parent Volunteer Programs/Reading Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyer, Diane

    Designed to be an example of how elementary and secondary schools can involve parents in their children's education, this guide is a compilation of letters to parents, memos, newsletters, and general information concerning Parkway (Missouri) School District's Parent Volunteer program, focusing primarily on the reading program. The first of the…

  6. 20 CFR 628.540 - Volunteer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Volunteer program. 628.540 Section 628.540 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Program Design Requirements for Programs Under Title II of the...

  7. The Benefits of Volunteering for Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromnick, Rachel; Horowitz, Ava; Shepherd, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Within the current economic climate students are seen as needing more than a degree to succeed in securing graduate employment. One way that students chose to enhance their employability is through engaging in voluntary work. In this empirical study, undergraduate psychology students' reasons for volunteering are explored within the context of…

  8. Guidelines for Volunteer for Credit Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biasco, Frank

    The University of West Florida has developed a program in which students are able to serve as volunteers to agencies and schools of the community. The psychology department offers credit to any student donating so many clock hours of service per week for 10 weeks or a total or 30 hours per quarter. This paper presents a very brief course outline,…

  9. The Development of An Ecumenical Volunteer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tissington, Vickie I.; Steber, Linda T.

    In light of federal budget cuts limiting traditional social service agency offerings, Ecumenical Ministries, Inc. developed an ecumenical volunteer program in Baldwin County, Alabama, to enable trained church members to recognize and address some of the unmet needs of the poor. In its first year, the successful program researched community needs…

  10. 75 FR 20891 - National Volunteer Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-9415 Filed... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8500 of April 16, 2010 National Volunteer Week, 2010 By the President of the... country. This week, we recognize their enduring contributions and encourage more Americans, especially...

  11. 77 FR 22177 - National Volunteer Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-9017 Filed 4-11-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... April 12, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8797--National Volunteer Week, 2012 Proclamation 8798--Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2012 Proclamation 8799--National Former Prisoner of...

  12. NICKEL ABSORPTION AND KINETICS IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical modelling was performed of the kinetics of nickel absorption, distribution and elimination in healthy human volunteers, who ingested NiS04 in drinking water or added food. ickel was analyzed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry in serum, urine, and f...

  13. Volunteer Outreach Activities at ESO Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESO-Chile Outreach Volunteer Team

    2012-06-01

    ESO staff in Chile are often asked to disseminate astronomical knowledge to schools and to the general public. A significant number of volunteers are now involved in these activities and the most recent projects in low-income schools and neighbourhoods are described and possible perspectives discussed.

  14. Physical Activity Program Delivery by Professionals versus Volunteers: the TEAM Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Cynthia M.; Pruitt, Leslie A.; Buman, Matthew P.; King, Abby C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults have low rates of physical activity participation but respond positively to telephone-mediated support programs. Programs are often limited by reliance on professional staff. This study tested telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff versus trained volunteer peer mentors. Design A 12-month, randomized, controlled clinical trial was executed from 2003–2008. Setting/participants: Twelve volunteer peer mentors and 181 initially inactive adults ages 50 years and older were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. Intervention Participants were randomized to: (1) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff, (2) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by trained volunteer peers, or (3) an attention-control arm of staff-delivered telephone support for nutrition. Main Outcome Measures: Moderate-intensity or more vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months with the CHAMPS Questionnaire, with accelerometry validation (Actigraph) in a randomly selected subsample. Treatment fidelity was examined through analysis of quantity and quality of intervention delivery. Results At 6 and 12 months, both physical activity arms significantly increased MVPA relative to the control arm. Both physical activity arms were comparable in quantity of intervention delivery, but peers demonstrated more versatility and comprehensiveness in quality of intervention content. Conclusions This study demonstrates that trained peer volunteers can effectively promote physical activity increases through telephone-based advice. The results support a program delivery model with good dissemination potential for a variety of community settings. PMID:21553972

  15. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  16. Stress and Burnout: Concerns for the Hospice Volunteer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Hastings, Janice L.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of stress for hospice volunteers are environmental, ideological, and personal. Attention to volunteer stress and burnout involves defining job requirements and responsibilities, frequent communication and feedback, stress management techniques, flexibility in assignments, and opportunities to verbalize emotions. (SK)

  17. Pathways to the All-Volunteer Military

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Glen H.; Wang, Lin; Spence, Naomi J.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Brown, Tyson H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The present study investigates the role of a disadvantaged background, the lack of social connectedness, and behavioral problems in channeling young men to the opportunities of the all-volunteer military instead of to college and the labor market. Methods Data from three waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health in the United States. The analytic sample consists of 6,938 white, black, and other males. Results The greatest likelihood of military service versus college and the labor force occurs when young men of at least modest ability come from disadvantaged circumstances, experience minimal connectedness to others, and report a history of adolescent fighting. Discussion Findings suggest the importance of access to post-high school education and worklife opportunities as a military service incentive for less advantaged young men in the all volunteer era. PMID:21960728

  18. Defecography in normal volunteers: results and implications.

    PubMed Central

    Shorvon, P J; McHugh, S; Diamant, N E; Somers, S; Stevenson, G W

    1989-01-01

    Forty seven healthy young volunteers underwent defecographic examination to determine the range of normal findings. Normality was shown to encompass radiological features often considered pathological. These features included broad ranges of anorectal angle and pelvic floor descent which overlap with reported pathological states. Furthermore, the formation of rectocoeles during defecation was a very common finding in women. Finally, a subgroup of the volunteers had marginal anorectal function. The marginal anorectal function and certain radiological findings such as rectocoeles or intussusceptions may predispose to later problems, or contribute to clinical problems when combined with other factors such as dietary fibre deficiency. The radiological findings raise a number of questions with respect to different aspects of the functioning of the continence and defecation mechanisms. Images Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:2612988

  19. Extent of Fentanyl Accumulation Following Multiple Doses of Fentanyl Buccal Tablet 400 µg in Healthy Japanese Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Mona; Tempero, Kenneth; Jiang, John G; Simonson, Philip G

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to characterize the pharmacokinetics, including extent of accumulation, and safety and tolerability of fentanyl following multiple doses of fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT) in healthy Japanese volunteers. Methods Healthy Japanese adults received 10 successive doses of open-label FBT 400 µg at 6-hour intervals. Naltrexone was given to minimize the opioid effects of fentanyl. FBT was placed above a molar tooth between the gum and cheek. Peak serum fentanyl concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (tmax), and area under the serum fentanyl concentration-time curve from 0 to 6 hours (AUC0–6) were summarized using descriptive statistics. Accumulation ratio was calculated as Cmax for dose 10/Cmax for dose 1, and was calculated similarly for AUC0–6. Results Fourteen volunteers (mean age 33 years) were enrolled, and 13 completed the study. After doses 1 and 10, respectively, mean (SD) Cmax was 1.70 (0.49) ng/mL and 1.97 (0.42) ng/mL, AUC0–6 was 4.46 (1.14) ng·h/mL and 6.81 (0.90) ng·h/mL, and median (range) tmax was 50 (30–110) minutes and 30 (15–120) minutes. Following 10 successive doses, systemic exposure (AUC0–6) was 55% higher than after dose 1, and Cmax was 23% higher. Steady state was achieved within 3 days of dosing at 6-hour intervals, i.e., prior to dose 10. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) were somnolence (N = 9), decreased oxygen saturation (N = 4), headache (N = 3), application-site pain (N = 8), application-site erythema (N = 6), and application-site reaction (N = 5). All AEs were mild or moderate. Conclusions Following administration of FBT at 6-hour intervals to healthy Japanese volunteers, at steady state, fentanyl exposure was higher by 55% (AUC0–6) and 23% (Cmax) than after a single dose of FBT. Adverse events were mild or moderate. PMID:19915714

  20. Measuring Engagement in Later Life Activities: Rasch-Based Scenario Scales for Work, Caregiving, Informal Helping, and Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.; Matz-Costa, Christina; Johnson, Clair; Brown, Melissa; Besen, Elyssa; James, Jacquelyn B.

    2014-01-01

    The development of Rasch-based "comparative engagement scenarios" based on Guttman's facet theory and sentence mapping procedures is described. The scenario scales measuring engagement in work, caregiving, informal helping, and volunteering illuminate the lived experiences of role involvement among older adults and offer multiple…

  1. Benefits and Dynamics of Learning Gained through Volunteering: A Qualitative Exploration Guided by Seniors' Self-Defined Successful Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Social participation is an important strategy in promoting successful aging. Although participating in volunteering has been proven to benefit older adults' health and well-being, we often ignore its role as a process of learning while helping others. The purpose of this study was to use the self-defined successful aging concept of seniors to…

  2. STUDIES OF ECHOVIRUS-12 IN VOLUNTEERS: DETERMINATION OF MINIMAL INFECTIOUS DOSE AND THE EFFECT OF PREVIOUS INFECTION ON INFECTIOUS DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-part study of echovirus-12 was done in volunteers. In the first part the human infectious dose of the virus was determined in 149 healthy adults with undetectable serum antibody, each of whom drank 0-330,000 plaque-forming units (pfu) of virus in 100 ml of nonchlorinated wa...

  3. Will Natural Resources Professionals Volunteer to Teach Youth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sanford S.; Finley, James C.; San Julian, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    A unique approach to volunteer marketing research involved a mail survey with natural resources professionals from across Pennsylvania. Previous work identified this group as a source of potential volunteers for the 4-H youth natural resources program. The results give insights into those most likely to volunteer to teach youth through 4-H…

  4. Making the Most of Volunteers. P/PV Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Furano, Kathryn

    An examination of hundreds of studies on the use of volunteers in mentoring programs, service programs, and local community change initiatives highlight the importance of screening, training, and volunteer management. Each year, more than 90 million Americans contribute more than 20 billion volunteer hours. Personal benefits of volunteering…

  5. The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

    PubMed

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs. PMID:17895491

  6. Volunteer Motivations at a National Special Olympics Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Selina; Engelhorn, Rich

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the motivations for people to volunteer with the management and execution of major sporting events is important for the recruitment and retention of the volunteers. This research investigated volunteer motivations at the first National Special Olympics held in Ames, Iowa, USA in July 2006. A total of 289 participants completed the 28…

  7. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... eligible for representation under the Criminal Justice Act (18 U.S.C. 3006A). ... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With... for the defense of the volunteer in Federal, state and local criminal proceedings,...

  8. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... eligible for representation under the Criminal Justice Act (18 U.S.C. 3006A). ... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With... for the defense of the volunteer in Federal, state and local criminal proceedings,...

  9. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... eligible for representation under the Criminal Justice Act (18 U.S.C. 3006A). ... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With... for the defense of the volunteer in Federal, state and local criminal proceedings,...

  10. 45 CFR 1220.2-2 - Part-time volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... eligible for representation under the Criminal Justice Act (18 U.S.C. 3006A). ... SERVICE PAYMENT OF VOLUNTEER LEGAL EXPENSES Criminal Proceedings § 1220.2-2 Part-time volunteers. (a) With... for the defense of the volunteer in Federal, state and local criminal proceedings,...

  11. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  12. 32 CFR 1627.3 - Classification of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification of volunteers. 1627.3 Section 1627.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM VOLUNTEERS FOR INDUCTION § 1627.3 Classification of volunteers. When a registrant who is eligible...

  13. A Phenomenological Look at 4-H Volunteer Motives for Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrock, Jessalyn; Kelsey, Kathleen D.

    2013-01-01

    Volunteers play a vital role in 4-H programs. Without their service, many programs would not be possible. Understanding volunteer motives provides Extension educators with tools for finding high-quality volunteers. The research reported here used McClelland's (1985) framework for motivation (affiliation, achievement, and power) and…

  14. Uncommon Human Resources: The Newberry Library Volunteer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyly, Mary

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues in the management of volunteers in research libraries, outlining the benefits to volunteers and libraries, as well as potential hazards. The volunteer program at Chicago's Newberry Library is described, focusing on recruitment, job assignments, motivation, staff attitudes, retention and library benefits. (26 references) (EA)

  15. A New Competitive Edge. Volunteers from the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vizza, Cynthia; And Others

    This book provides information on workplace volunteering and how employee volunteering programs operate in specific corporate cultures. Chapter 1 focuses on the rationale upon which corporate volunteer programs are constructed. The rationale's four basic components are discussed in detail: quality of life, worker participation, responding to…

  16. The Motivation to Volunteer: A Systemic Quality of Life Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shye, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to volunteer motivation research is developed. Instead of asking what motivates the volunteer (accepting "any" conceptual category), we ask to what extent volunteering rewards the individual with each benefit taken from a complete set of possible benefits. As a "complete set of benefits" we use the 16 human functioning modes…

  17. 45 CFR 1210.3-10 - Reinstatement of Volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reinstatement of Volunteer. 1210.3-10 Section 1210.3-10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE VISTA TRAINEE DESELECTION AND VOLUNTEER EARLY TERMINATION PROCEDURES VISTA Volunteer Early Termination § 1210.3-10 Reinstatement...

  18. Acting on Our Values: Do Social Workers Volunteer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibelman, Margaret; Sweifach, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Volunteer activity among social workers is explored in this article. Anecdotal evidence suggests social workers are not major contributors of volunteer time. The overriding research questions of this descriptive-exploratory study are to what extent do social workers engage in volunteer activities, what factors influence their decisions to…

  19. Affecting Community Change: Involving "Pro Bono" Professionals as Extension Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Diane T.; Culp, Ken, III

    2013-01-01

    "Pro bono" volunteers provide an effective means for Extension professionals to expand limited financial and human resources. Volunteers recruited from business settings can provide skills, abilities, expertise, leadership, and resources to Extension programs. Allowing professional volunteers to meet their desired leadership goals while…

  20. Motivations of Volunteer Leaders in an Extension Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Lisa T.; Cornell, Carol E.; Traywick, LaVona; Felix, Holly C.; Phillips, Martha

    2015-01-01

    This article describes findings from a qualitative study of volunteer leaders in the StrongWomen strength training program in Arkansas. The study explored reasons volunteers initially agreed to serve, perceptions of volunteer role, and motivations for continuing to lead strength training groups long-term. Findings suggest a combination of factors…

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chairat, Kalayanee; Jittamala, Podjanee; Hanpithakpong, Warunee; Day, Nicholas P. J.; White, Nicholas J.; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aims of the present study were to compare the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and its active antiviral metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate in obese and non‐obese individuals and to determine the effect of obesity on the pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate. Methods The population pharmacokinetic properties of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were evaluated in 12 obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg m−2) and 12 non‐obese (BMI <30 kg m−2) Thai adult volunteers receiving a standard dose of 75 mg and a double dose of 150 mg in a randomized sequence. Concentration–time data were collected and analysed using nonlinear mixed‐effects modelling. Results The pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir and oseltamivir carboxylate were described simultaneously by first‐order absorption, with a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir, followed by a metabolism compartment and a one‐compartment disposition model for oseltamivir carboxylate. Creatinine clearance was a significant predictor of oseltamivir carboxylate clearance {3.84% increase for each 10 ml min−1 increase in creatinine clearance [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.178%, 8.02%]}. Obese individuals had an approximately 25% (95% CI 24%, 28%) higher oseltamivir clearance, 20% higher oseltamivir volume of distribution (95% CI 19%, 23%) and 10% higher oseltamivir carboxylate clearance (95% CI 9%, 11%) compared with non‐obese individuals. However, these altered pharmacokinetic properties were small and did not change the overall exposure to oseltamivir carboxylate. Conclusions The results confirmed that a dose adjustment for oseltamivir in obese individuals is not necessary on the basis of its pharmacokinetics. PMID:26810861

  2. Concomitant efavirenz reduces pharmacokinetic exposure to the antimalarial drug artemether-lumefantrine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liusheng; Parikh, Sunil; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Lizak, Patricia; Marzan, Florence; Dorsey, Grant; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral drug efavirenz (EFV) and the antimalarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) artemether-lumefantrine (AL) are commonly co-administered to treat HIV and malaria. EFV is a known inducer of cytochrome P450 3A4, which converts artemether to dihydroartemisinin (DHA) that is also active and metabolizes longer acting lumefantrine (LR). A study in healthy volunteers was completed to address the concern that EFV impacts AL pharmacokinetics (PK). Methods Adults received AL (80/480 mg BID) for 3-days prior to and during EFV co-administration (600 mg daily for 26-days) with intensive PK for artemether, DHA, and LR conducted after the last AL dose for each period. EFV PK was evaluated with and without AL. PK parameters were estimated using non-compartmental methods. Results Twelve subjects completed the two-period study. PK exposure for artemether, DHA, and LR [as estimated by the area under the concentration time curve (AUClast)] decreased or trended toward decrease with EFV, compared to when administered alone [−51% (p=0.084), −46% (p=0.005), and −21% (p=0.102), respectively]. Day 7 LR levels, previously deemed predictive of treatment success, were 46% lower (p=0.002) with EFV, but the LR half-life was unchanged. EFV PK exposure was minimally altered following AL co-administration [AUC0–24h decreased by 17% (p=0.034)]. Conclusions Exposure to DHA, but not LR, was significantly lower during EFV-AL co-administration compared to that during administration of AL alone. These findings may have implications for the treatment efficacy of AL, particularly in children. However, the observed modest changes probably do not warrant dosage adjustment during co-administration of AL with EFV. PMID:22918158

  3. The Vaccine Candidate Vibrio cholerae 638 Is Protective against Cholera in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    García, Luis; Jidy, Manuel Díaz; García, Hilda; Rodríguez, Boris L.; Fernández, Roberto; Año, Gemma; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Suzarte, Edith; Ramírez, Margarita; Pino, Yadira; Campos, Javier; Menéndez, Jorge; Valera, Rodrigo; González, Daniel; González, Irma; Pérez, Oliver; Serrano, Teresita; Lastre, Miriam; Miralles, Fernando; del Campo, Judith; Maestre, Jorge Luis; Pérez, José Luis; Talavera, Arturo; Pérez, Antonio; Marrero, Karen; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 638 is a living candidate cholera vaccine strain attenuated by deletion of the CTXΦ prophage from C7258 (O1, El Tor Ogawa) and by insertion of the Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase A gene into the hemagglutinin/protease coding sequence. This vaccine candidate was previously found to be well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers. This article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted to test short-term protection conferred by 638 against subsequent V. cholerae infection and disease in volunteers in Cuba. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and assigned to receive vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained 109 CFU of freshly harvested 638 buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3, while the placebo was buffer alone. After vaccine but not after placebo intake, 96% of volunteers had at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers, and 50% showed a doubling of at least the lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin A titers in serum. At 1 month after vaccination, five volunteers from the vaccine group and five from the placebo group underwent an exploratory challenge study with 109 CFU of ΔCTXΦ attenuated mutant strain V. cholerae 81. Only two volunteers from the vaccine group shed strain 81 in their feces, but none of them experienced diarrhea; in the placebo group, all volunteers excreted the challenge strain, and three had reactogenic diarrhea. An additional 12 vaccinees and 9 placebo recipients underwent challenge with 7 × 105 CFU of virulent strain V. cholerae 3008 freshly harvested from a brain heart infusion agar plate and buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3. Three volunteers (25%) from the vaccine group and all from the placebo group shed the challenge agent in their feces. None of the 12 vaccinees but 7 volunteers from the placebo group had diarrhea, and 2 of the latter exhibited severe cholera (>5,000 g of diarrheal stool). These results indicate that at 1 month after ingestion of a single oral dose (109 CFU) of strain

  4. The role of SVS volunteer vascular surgeons in the care of combat casualties: results from Landstuhl, Germany.

    PubMed

    Bush, Ruth L; Fairman, Ronald M; Flaherty, Stephen F; Gillespie, David L

    2009-01-01

    With a shortage of active duty vascular surgeons in the military, Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) members have been called upon to perform short-term rotations at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC), the US military's receiving facility for combat injuries sustained in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. From September 2007 to May 2008, 20 SVS vascular surgeons have performed 2-week rotations at LRMC through American Red Cross and US Army sponsorship. Volunteers were surveyed for previous military and/or trauma experience. In addition to reporting number and types of procedures performed, volunteers were queried on their experience and impression of the rotation. Several volunteers have had prior military experience and all have had vascular trauma experience through residency, fellowship, and current practices. With most definitive vascular repairs being done in theater, SVS members were most often called upon for clinical expertise in the care of combat casualties and evaluation of revascularization procedures. The volunteers contributed to daily rounds, patient care, and teaching conferences, as well as actively participated in surgical procedures with the most common being wound examinations under anesthesia for which intraoperative vascular consultation was occasionally requested (5-20 per volunteer). Additional procedures that volunteers performed included: inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement, thrombectomy, revision of lower and upper extremity interposition vein grafts, retroperitoneal spine exposures, diagnostic and therapeutic angiograms, iliac stenting, and duplex ultrasound scan interrogation of vascular repairs, suspected arterial injuries, and deep vein thrombosis. All volunteers described the experience as valuable and will return if needed. With a limited number of military vascular surgeons and the unpredictable need for a vascular specialist at LRMC, civilian volunteers are playing an important role in providing high-quality vascular

  5. Effectiveness of one-to-one volunteer support for patients with psychosis: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Stefan; Pavlickova, Hana; Eldridge, Sandra; Golden, Eoin; McCrone, Paul; Ockenden, Nick; Pistrang, Nancy; King, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Social isolation is common in patients with psychosis and associated with a number of negative outcomes. Programmes in which volunteers provide one-to-one support—often referred to as befriending—have been reputed to achieve favourable outcomes. However, trial-based evidence for their effectiveness is limited. Methods and analysis This is a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of one-to-one volunteer support with an active control condition for patients with psychosis over a 1-year period. Patients in the intervention group will receive the support of a volunteer for 1 year, who will meet them weekly and engage them in social and recreational activities. Patients in the control group will not receive support from a volunteer. In both groups, patients will be given a booklet detailing locally available social activities and otherwise receive treatment as usual. Patients, volunteers, clinicians and researchers involved in the delivery of the intervention will not be blinded to group assignment, while researchers carrying out data collection will be blinded. Data collection will be conducted at baseline, at 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome is the amount of time spent engaging in social activities per day. Secondary outcomes include symptoms, quality of life, self-esteem and costs of care. Attitudes of volunteers towards mentally ill people will be assessed. Finally, in-depth interviews will be conducted with patients and volunteers. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee London—Camden & Kings Cross (reference 15/LO/0674). The findings of the trial will be published in open access peer-reviewed journals and in the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) journals library, and presented at scientific conferences. In addition, findings will be summarised for a lay audience and circulated to all relevant National Health Service (NHS) and voluntary

  6. Urinary excretion of diazepam metabolites in healthy volunteers and drug users.

    PubMed

    Smith-Kielland, A; Skuterud, B; Olsen, K M; Mørland, J

    2001-05-01

    Urinary excretion profiles of diazepam metabolites were investigated. The subjects were healthy volunteers receiving one single 10-mg dose of diazepam or drug abusers starting a prison sentence. Urinary excretion of metabolites was analysed by immunological screening, liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Relating the metabolite concentration to creatinine concentration in the specimens decreased sample-to-sample variations. In some cases such correction could protect a subject from erroneous accusations of a new intake. PMID:11386610

  7. Experimental manipulations of pain catastrophizing influence pain levels in patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Kasch, Helge; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Pain catastrophizing (PC) has been related to pain levels in both patients experiencing acute or chronic pain and in healthy volunteers exposed to experimental pain. Still, it is unclear whether high levels of pain catastrophizing lead to high levels of pain or vice versa. We therefore tested whether levels of pain catastrophizing could be increased and decreased in the same participant through hypnotic suggestions and whether the altered level of situation-specific pain catastrophizing was related to increased and decreased pain levels, respectively. Using the spontaneous pain of 22 patients with chronic tension-type headache and experimentally induced pain in 22 healthy volunteers, participants were tested in 3 randomized sessions where they received 3 types of hypnotic suggestions: Negative (based on the 13 items in the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), Positive (coping-oriented reversion of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and Neutral (neutral sentence) hypnotic suggestions. The hypnotic suggestions significantly increased and decreased situation-specific PC in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Also, the levels of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were significantly altered in both patients and healthy volunteers (P < 0.001). Furthermore, regression analyses showed that changes in pain catastrophizing predicted changes in pain in patients (R = 0.204-0.304; P < 0.045) and in healthy volunteers (R = 0.328-0.252; P < 0.018). This is the first study to successfully manipulate PC in positive and negative directions in both patients with chronic pain and healthy volunteers and to show that these manipulations significantly influence pain levels. These findings may have important theoretical and clinical implications. PMID:26871534

  8. Experiences and benefits of volunteering in a community AIDS organization.

    PubMed

    Crook, Joan; Weir, Robin; Willms, Dennis; Egdorf, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the AIDS service organization-volunteer relationship from the volunteer's point of view. Factors that led to a relationship with an AIDS service organization included personal values and individual characteristics and needs. Volunteers reported many rewards from the work itself and the responses of others. Volunteers also encountered challenges that included role demands, role-ability fit, and stress/burnout concerns as well as limited organizational resources and structural obstacles. These results suggest that care must be taken to ensure that the volunteer role meets the needs, skills, and abilities of the individual volunteering. The need to ameliorate challenges is clear for AIDS service organizations seeking to retain volunteers. Some of the preventive strategies include goal-setting and feedback, individual-sensitive role redesign, opportunity to participate in decisions, and increased communication. PMID:16849088

  9. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  10. Hemodynamic characteristics of midazolam, propofol, and dexmedetomidine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Michael A.; Arabshahi, Ali; Katholi, Charles; Prasain, Jeevan; Barnes, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective To study the effect of intravenous (IV) sedation on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rates (RR) to determine if IV sedatives differ with respect to their effect on BP, HR, and RR. Design Prospective, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Setting Monitored patient care room at a clinical research center. Subjects 60 healthy ASA physical status 1 volunteers. Interventions Subjects were randomized to receive, in increasing doses, one of three IV sedatives: propofol, midazolam, or dexmedetomidine; or saline control. Measurements Blood pressure (systolic, diastolic), HR, and RR were recorded. Main Results A significant dose-dependent BP reduction occurred with dexmedetomidine and, to a lesser degree, with propofol; and there was good agreement of predicted versus measured drug concentrations for all sedatives. Blood pressure and HR of participants who received midazolam did not change. Conclusions When administered in sedative doses, dexmedetomidine and, to a lesser extent, midazolam, reduces BP in a dose-dependent fashion. Dexmedetomidine also reduces HR. Midazolam does not affect BP or HR. PMID:21570617

  11. Spaceborne receivers: Basic principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principles of operation of microwave receivers for space observations of planetary surfaces were examined. The design philosophy of the receiver as it is applied to operate functionally as an efficient receiving system, the principle of operation of the key components of the receiver, and the important differences among receiver types are explained. The operating performance and the sensitivity expectations for both the modulated and total power receiver configurations are outlined. The expressions are derived from first principles and are developed through the important intermediate stages to form practicle and easily applied equations. The transfer of thermodynamic energy from point to point within the receiver is illustrated. The language of microwave receivers is applied statistics.

  12. Comparison of aspirin and indobufen in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Young; Sung, Ki-Chul; Choi, Hyo-In

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the extent and recovery of platelet inhibition after administration of indobufen and aspirin in healthy volunteers. Indobufen inhibits platelet aggregation by reversibly inhibiting the platelet cyclooxygenase enzyme, thereby suppressing thromboxane synthesis. Twenty healthy volunteers completed the study and received aspirin (200 mg/day for 2 weeks) followed by a 4-week washout period and then indobufen (200 mg twice a day for 2 weeks). The percent (%) inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) was assessed using arachidonic acid (0.5 mg/ml) and adenosine diphosphate (5 µM) at 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours after last dose of each drug. IPA assessed using arachidonic acid as the agonist was similar at 4 hours after the last dose of indobufen (81.07 ± 9.36%) and aspirin (96.99 ± 0.29%, p = 0.10), but significantly lower at 12 hours (74.04 ± 9.55% vs. 97.94 ± 0.28%, p = 0.02), 24 hours (33.39 ± 11.13% vs. 97.48 ± 0.32%, p < 0.001) and 48 hours (14.12 ± 9.74% vs. 98.22 ± 0.31%, p < 0.001) after indobufen, compared to the relative values for aspirin. IPA assessed using adenosine diphosphate as the agonist was similar in the two groups at 4, 12 and 24 hours after the last dose, but significantly lower 48 hours after the last dose of indobufen, compared to the relative value for aspirin (1.98 ± 3.57% vs. 12.61 ± 2.71%, p = 0.002). Indobufen (200 mg twice a day) caused equivalent initial inhibition of platelet aggregation to aspirin (200 mg daily), and the anti-aggregation effect diminished faster than after aspirin. PMID:26083594

  13. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  14. Employment and Older Adults. Overview: ERIC Fact Sheet No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Bart

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the employment situation facing older adults. Statistics (Harris 1974 and 1979) are presented on the number of older Americans who are working, volunteering, or have an interest in working or volunteering; the attitudes of employers and employees about retirement and about working after age 65; and the…

  15. Volunteering as a means to an equal end? The impact of a social justice function on intention to volunteer.

    PubMed

    Jiranek, Patrick; Kals, Elisabeth; Humm, Julia Sophia; Strubel, Isabel Theresia; Wehner, Theo

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we combined components of the theory of planned behavior and the functional approach to predict the social sector volunteering intention of nonvolunteers (N = 513). Moreover, we added a new other-oriented "social justice function" to the Volunteer Functions Inventory of Clary and colleagues (1998), which contains mainly self-oriented functions. We distinguished the social justice function from the other five measured volunteer functions in confirmatory factor analysis, and showed its incremental validity in predicting intention to volunteer beyond established constructs such as self-efficacy, subjective norm, and the five volunteer functions. This study suggests that emphasizing potential social justice improvements by means of volunteering may attract new volunteers. PMID:24003581

  16. The Relationship between Coping Strategies and Perceived Stress in Telephone Intervention Volunteers at a Suicide Prevention Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishara, Brian L.; Giroux, Guy

    1993-01-01

    Examined stress perceived by telephone intervention volunteers (N=80) at suicide prevention center. Only amount of experience in telephone intervention with suicidal persons predicted stress level before shift. Stress during high-urgency call was related to level of urgency of call; total length of all calls received; and coping mechanisms of…

  17. Reading Partners: The Implementation and Effectiveness of a One-on-One Tutoring Program Delivered by Community Volunteers. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Robin Tepper; Smith, Thomas J.; Willard, Jacklyn A.; Rifkin, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief summarizes the positive results of a rigorous evaluation of Reading Partners, a widely used program that offers one-on-one tutoring provided by community volunteers to struggling readers in low-income elementary schools. A total of 1,265 students in 19 schools in three states were randomly assigned to receive Reading…

  18. Who Does a Better Job? Work Quality and Quantity Comparison between Student Volunteers and Students Who Get Extra Credit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omori, Megumi; Feldhaus, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Although undergraduate students are often involved in academic research as volunteers, paid assistants or to receive extra-credit, very little attention has been paid to how well these students perform when they assist researchers. The current study compares the number of surveys gathered at a large local event and the number of missing entries…

  19. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of single oral doses of 882C87, a potent, new anti-varicella-zoster virus agent, in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Peck, R W; Weatherley, B C; Wootton, R; Crome, P; Holdich, T A; Posner, J

    1995-01-01

    882C87 is a nucleoside analog with potent, specific activity against varicella-zoster virus. It is approximately seven times as potent as acyclovir with an in vitro 50% inhibitory concentration of 1 to 2 microM. The tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single doses of 882C87 have been investigated in a series of studies with healthy young and elderly adult volunteers. The young received 50 to 1,600 mg, and the elderly received 50 and 100 mg. Concentrations of 882C87 and its main metabolite, the pyrimidine base 5-(1-propynyl)uracil (5PU), in plasma and urine were assayed by an automated sequential trace enrichment of dialysate-high-performance liquid chromatography procedure, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were derived from the data. Concentrations of 882C87 in plasma increased proportionally for doses of up to 400 mg, but after higher doses the increase was less than dose proportional. In young adults, after 200, 400, and 1,600 mg, the maximum concentrations of the drug in plasma were 9.0, 16.3, and 34.7 microM, respectively, and the areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 h to infinity were 166.6, 333.7, and 822.9 microM.h, respectively. Elimination half-life was 11.3 to 13.0 h after 50 to 400 mg, increasing to 15.3 h after 1,600 mg, associated with a small decrease in renal clearance. In healthy elderly volunteers concentrations of 882C87 in plasma after 50 and 100 mg were similar to those in young adults after twice the dose; apparent clearance and renal clearance were significantly reduced, and half-life was significantly longer at 15 h. Administration of 882C87 with food produced a small, nonsignificant reduction in mean AUC from 0 h to infinity, but in subjects with a low fasting AUC there was an increase after food and in subjects with a high fasting AUC there was a decrease. Concentrations of 5PU in plasma were one-third to one-half those of 882C87 and, in most subjects, were not dose proportional. There was a lag of at least

  20. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance of cefuroxime axetil in volunteers during repeated dosing.

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, D K; Van Wyk, M; Williams, P E; Harding, S M

    1984-01-01

    A total of 158 volunteers each received 21 repeated oral doses of 500 mg of cefuroxime axetil (CAE) during four comparative cross-over trials. Pharmacokinetics were studied in 8 volunteers (CAE versus ampicillin), relative bioavailability and tolerance were studied in 100 volunteers (CAE versus pivmecillinam and CAE versus pivampicillin), and tolerance alone was studied in 50 volunteers (CAE versus ampicillin). Overall, urinary recoveries of the active antibiotics ranked absorption of the drugs in the order least to greatest: pivmecillinam, ampicillin, CAE, and pivampicillin. The pharmacokinetics of CAE and ampicillin did not change after repeated dosing. Peak serum levels of cefuroxime were significantly higher than those of ampicillin after doses 1 and 21 but the urinary recoveries of both antibiotics were around 35% of the dose. CAE was as well tolerated as ampicillin but there were smaller numbers of episodes of fluid bowel motions on pivmecillinam and pivampicillin than on CAE, which may have been due to the smaller amounts of active antibiotic in the doses of the pivaloyloxymethyl esters. PMID:6721467

  1. Diclofenac does not interact with codeine metabolism in vivo: A study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ammon, Susanne; Marx, Claudia; Behrens, Christoph; Hofmann, Ute; Mürdter, Thomas; Griese, Ernst-Ulrich; Mikus, Gerd

    2002-01-01

    Background Previously, we have demonstrated a marked inhibition of codeine glucuronidation by diclofenac in human liver tissue homogenate. We therefore aimed to investigate whether diclofenac inhibits glucuronidation of codeine also in vivo in healthy volunteers. Methods In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study, 12 healthy volunteers received a singe of 100 mg codeine phosphate plus 50 mg diclofenac sodium or codeine phosphate plus placebo. Over a 36 hour period serum concentrations of codeine and its metabolites as well as urinary excretion were analysed using LC-mass spectrometry. Side effects were recorded and analgesic efficacy was determined using the cold pressor test (0–6 h). Results A single dose of diclofenac did not alter the formation of codeine-6-glucuronide in healthy volunteers. Metabolic clearance of codeine to morphine was not affected by diclofenac. In terms of side effects, both treatments were well tolerated. Diclofenac did not significantly influence the analgesic effects of codeine in the cold pressor test. Conclusions In contrast to recent in vitro data, a single oral dose of diclofenac did not alter the glucuronidation of codeine in healthy volunteers. PMID:11943073

  2. Evolutionary Stability in the Asymmetric Volunteer's Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao-Tang

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that in public goods games, contributors are either strong or weak players and each individual has an equal probability of exhibiting cooperation. It is difficult to explain why the public good is produced by strong individuals in some cooperation systems, and by weak individuals in others. Viewing the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma game as an evolutionary game, we find that whether the strong or the weak players produce the public good depends on the initial condition (i.e., phenotype or initial strategy of individuals). These different evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS) associated with different initial conditions, can be interpreted as the production modes of public goods of different cooperation systems. A further analysis revealed that the strong player adopts a pure strategy but mixed strategies for the weak players to produce the public good, and that the probability of volunteering by weak players decreases with increasing group size or decreasing cost-benefit ratio. Our model shows that the defection probability of a “strong” player is greater than the “weak” players in the model of Diekmann (1993). This contradicts Selten's (1980) model that public goods can only be produced by a strong player, is not an evolutionarily stable strategy, and will therefore disappear over evolutionary time. Our public good model with ESS has thus extended previous interpretations that the public good can only be produced by strong players in an asymmetric game. PMID:25111781

  3. Growing Your Career through Volunteering and Leadership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Riordan, C. A.; Meth, C.

    2007-12-01

    From giving your first paper at a scientific meeting to chairing committees that make multi-million dollar decisions, scientific organizations provide critical opportunities for growing your career. Many organizations support student activities by providing travel grants and fellowships - an important first step towards joining the larger scientific community. Beyond these standard opportunities, organizations also provide opportunities for students interested in gaining leadership experience, a skill not typically acquired in graduate science programs. For example, the Consortium for Leadership's Schlanger Ocean Drilling Fellowship provides research funds to graduate students, but also introduces the fellows to the communication skills needed to become successful members of their scientific community. Beyond student opportunities, volunteering provides mid-career and established scientists further experience in leadership. Opportunities exist in advising government science policy, guiding large-scale research programs, organizing large scientific meetings, and serving on non-profit boards. The variety of volunteer and leadership opportunities that are available give scientists at all stages of their career a chance to expand and diversify their experience, leading to new successes.

  4. Ascorbic acid supplementation does not alter oxidative stress markers in healthy volunteers engaged in a supervised exercise program.

    PubMed

    Bunpo, Piyawan; Anthony, Tracy G

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of ascorbic acid (AA) consumption on the oxidative stress status of untrained volunteers participating in a supervised exercise program. The study included 46 young adults (average age, 23.5 ± 0.59 years; 37 females, 9 males) who remained sedentary (n = 16) or participated in 30 min of outdoor aerobic running (n = 30) at an intensity corresponding to 65%-75% of maximum heart rate for 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Exercised subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group without AA supplementation (control; n = 10) or received either 250 mg (n = 10) or 500 mg (n = 10) of AA supplementation previous to each exercise session. Blood samples were taken on day 0 and day 84 to evaluate metabolic profiles and antioxidant status. Sedentary subjects underwent in a single bout of aerobic running to determine total antioxidant status (TAS) and malondiadehyde (MDA) at pre- and postexercise with or without AA supplementation. No significant change in TAS was observed. Plasma MDA significantly increased at postexercise (P < 0.05), and AA supplementation decreased MDA level significantly (P < 0.05). After 3 months of exercise, there was no significant change in blood glucose, lipid profile, MDA, TAS, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase activities amongst groups. Supplementation of AA was associated with minor and inconsistent reductions in SOD, GPx, and catalase activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that pre-exercise supplementation of ascorbic acid does not alter oxidative stress markers in the plasma and erythrocytes of young adults engaged in a supervised exercise program. PMID:26789096

  5. 26 CFR 31.3121(i)-3 - Computation of remuneration for service performed by an individual as a volunteer or volunteer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... performed by an individual as a volunteer or volunteer leader within the meaning of the Peace Corps Act. 31... or volunteer leader within the meaning of the Peace Corps Act. In the case of an individual performing service in his capacity as a volunteer or volunteer leader within the meaning of the Peace...

  6. MMPI Comparison of Black Heroin Users Volunteering or Not Volunteering for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinowitz, R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Black volunteers differed significantly, scoring higher on the Hypochondriasis, Depression, and Hysteria scales. Such differences add evidence against the addiction-prone personality hypothesis and underscore the need for evaluating the effects of voluntarism and ethnicity in personality research on drug abuse. (Author)

  7. CEBUANO PARA SA MGA PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS. (CEBUANO FOR THE PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAURA, BETTY; AND OTHERS

    THE BASIC VOCABULARY AND STRUCTURE OF CEBUANO VISAYAN ARE PRESENTED HERE THROUGH TWENTY-TWO SHORT DIALOGUES AND ACCOMPANYING PATTERN DRILLS AND CULTURAL NOTES. THE DIALOGUES ARE BASED ON EVERYDAY SITUATIONS AND COMMON USAGE THAT THE PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER ENCOUNTERS IN THIS AREA OF THE PHILIPPINES. INTRODUCTORY PAGES PRESENT THE STUDENT WITH THE…

  8. Volunteer Development for Intercultural Exchange Programs: The Case of Jamaica. Volunteer Development Discussion Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Geof

    One in a series of discussion papers intended to promote exploration of issues related to volunteer motivation, recruitment, and development around the world, this report suggests that any country starting an intercultural exchange program may face problems similar to those encountered in Jamacia. The national director of an organization that…

  9. 45 CFR 2551.72 - Is a written volunteer assignment plan required for each volunteer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SENIOR COMPANION PROGRAM Senior Companion...) All Senior Companions performing direct services to individual clients in home settings and individual... volunteer station that: (1) Is approved by the sponsor and accepted by the Senior Companion; (2)...

  10. Volunteer Notes on Reforestation. A Handbook for Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Steve, Comp.

    Provided in this document are descriptions of reforestation projects and techniques presented by Peace Corps volunteers from Chad, Ivory Coast, Upper Volta, and Niger. The purpose of the document is to aid individuals in trying to find solutions to the problems facing forestry in the Sahel. These projects include: (1) reforestation of Ronier palm…

  11. Design of a Medical Triage Evidence-Based Clinical Management Protocol and Implementation of Medical Triage On-Line Training for Use by Mission of Mercy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kimberly D; DiBartolo, Mary C; Welsh, Debra L; Brown, Voncelia

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based protocols in safety net settings can help standardize care practices, increase organizational workflow, and enhance quality outcomes for those receiving services. The purpose of this quality improvement project is two-fold: to design an evidence-based medical triage clinical management protocol, and, to influence adherence to that protocol by safety net medical triage volunteers through an on-line volunteer orientation. Leadership skills were required to help translate evidence-based practice recommendations into useful tools to assist in directing practice. Project outcomes included successful multidisciplinary practice change, significantly improved volunteer knowledge surrounding medical triage protocol parameters, increased organizational workflow, and enhanced quality client outcomes. PMID:26529107

  12. The role of nonprofessional volunteers in a Suicide Prevention Center.

    PubMed

    Heilig, S M; Farberow, N L; Litman, R E; Shneidman, E S

    1968-08-01

    The procedures in the selection, training and supervision of 10 nonprofessional volunteers, to provide direct therapeutic crisis services to patients in a Suicide Prevention Center are described. One year's experience indicates a high degree of proficiency achieved by the volunteer in the handling of suicidal crises. The volunteers' reactions to the program are reported. Significant problems for the agency emerged in reference to precipitous increase in size of staff communication, and for the volunteer, in stimulation of problems of identity and selfconcept. The comments are limited to agency situations involving the use of nonprofessional volunteers in regular collaboration with a professional staff. Other models, such as entirely volunteer staffed groups, must be evaluated separately. PMID:24185391

  13. Limited Engagements? Women's and Men's Work/Volunteer Time in the Encore Life Course Stage.

    PubMed

    Moen, Phyllis; Flood, Sarah

    2013-05-01

    Americans are living healthier and longer lives, but the shifting age distribution is straining existing and projected social welfare protections for older adults (e.g., Social Security, Medicare). One solution is to delay retirement. Another is an alternative to "total leisure" retirement -- an "encore" stage of paid or unpaid engagement coming after career jobs but before infirmities associated with old age. We draw on gendered life-course themes together with data from the American Time Use Survey (2003-2009) to examine the real time American men and women ages 50-75 apportion to paid work and unpaid volunteer work on an average day, as well as factors predicting their time allocations. We find that while full-time employment declines after the 50s, many Americans allot time to more limited engagements - working part time, being self-employed, volunteering, helping out - through and even beyond their 60s. Caring for a child or infirm adult reduces the odds of paid work but not volunteering. While time working for pay declines with age (though more slowly for men than women), time volunteering does not. Older men and women in poor health, without a college degree, with a disability or SSI income are the least likely to be publicly engaged. This social patterning illustrates that while the ideal of an encore of paid or unpaid voluntary, flexible, and meaningful engagement is an emerging reality for some, it appears less attainable for others. This suggests the importance of organizational and public policy innovations offering all Americans a range of encore opportunities. PMID:24273348

  14. Data-fusion receiver

    DOEpatents

    Gabelmann, Jeffrey M.; Kattner, J. Stephen; Houston, Robert A.

    2006-12-19

    This invention is an ultra-low frequency electromagnetic telemetry receiver which fuses multiple input receive sources to synthesize a decodable message packet from a noise corrupted telemetry message string. Each block of telemetry data to be sent to the surface receiver from a borehole tool is digitally encoded into a data packet prior to transmission. The data packet is modulated onto the ULF EM carrier wave and transmitted from the borehole to the surface and then are simultaneously detected by multiple receive sensors disbursed within the rig environment. The receive sensors include, but are not limited to, electric field and magnetic field sensors. The spacing of the surface receive elements is such that noise generators are unequally coupled to each receive element due to proximity and/or noise generator type (i.e. electric or magnetic field generators). The receiver utilizes a suite of decision metrics to reconstruct the original, non noise-corrupted data packet from the observation matrix via the estimation of individual data frames. The receiver will continue this estimation process until: 1) the message validates, or 2) a preset "confidence threshold" is reached whereby frames within the observation matrix are no longer "trusted".

  15. Hybrid receiver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M. S.; Mcadam, P. L.; Saunders, O. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a 4 month study to design a hybrid analog/digital receiver for outer planet mission probe communication links. The scope of this study includes functional design of the receiver; comparisons between analog and digital processing; hardware tradeoffs for key components including frequency generators, A/D converters, and digital processors; development and simulation of the processing algorithms for acquisition, tracking, and demodulation; and detailed design of the receiver in order to determine its size, weight, power, reliability, and radiation hardness. In addition, an evaluation was made of the receiver's capabilities to perform accurate measurement of signal strength and frequency for radio science missions.

  16. Optical superheterodyne receiver.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, K.; Lang, K.; Lucy, R. F.; Peters, C. J.

    1967-01-01

    Optical communication experiments to compare coherent and noncoherent optical detection fading characteristics in different weather conditions, using laser transmitter and optical superheterodyne receiver

  17. Effect of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) on coagulation and anticoagulation systems in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Javan, Atefeh Ordoei; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Shahroodian, Masood; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-04-01

    Saffron showed some effects on blood coagulation and platelet aggregation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In a clinical trial with a limited number volunteers, saffron tablets influenced on bleeding time. In this study, the effect of saffron on plasma level of fibrinogen, factor VII (as coagulant agent), C and S protein (as anti-coagulant agent), PT and PTT in a larger sample size was evaluated. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study consisting of 1 week treatment with 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets. Sixty healthy volunteers (age range 20-50 years) were selected for the study. The volunteers were divided into three groups of 20 each. Group 1 received placebo; Groups 2 and 3 received 200 mg and 400 mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days (1 tablet per day). Before and after 7 days treatment and also 1 month after that, blood samples were taken. The plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, C and S protein, PT and PTT were evaluated. Statistical analysis showed no difference between groups for any of evaluated factors. This study rejected any effect of saffron with dose of 200 and 400 mg for 1 week on coagulant and anticoagulant system. PMID:23733488

  18. Effects of probenecid and cimetidine on the pharmacokinetics of nemonoxacin in healthy Chinese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-fan; Dai, Xiao-jian; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xiao-yan; Wang, Ting; Tang, Yun-biao; Tsai, Cheng-yuan; Chang, Li-wen; Chang, Yu-ting; Zhong, Da-fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of probenecid and cimetidine on the pharmacokinetics of nemonoxacin in humans. Methods Two independent, open-label, randomized, crossover studies were conducted in 24 (12 per study) healthy Chinese volunteers. In Study 1, each volunteer received a single oral dose of 500 mg of nemonoxacin alone or with 1.5 g of probenecid divided into three doses within 25 hours. In Study 2, each volunteer received a single oral dose of 500 mg of nemonoxacin alone or with multiple doses of cimetidine (400 mg thrice daily for 7 days). The plasma and urine nemonoxacin concentrations were determined using validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry methods. Results Coadministration of nemonoxacin with probenecid reduced the renal clearance (CLr) of nemonoxacin by 22.6%, and increased the area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0−∞) by 26.2%. Coadministration of nemonoxacin with cimetidine reduced the CLr of nemonoxacin by 13.3% and increased AUC0−∞ by 9.4%. Coadministration of nemonoxacin with probenecid or cimetidine did not significantly affect the maximum concentration of nemonoxacin or the percentage of the administered dose recovered in the urine. Conclusion Although probenecid reduced the CLr and increased the plasma exposure of nemonoxacin, these effects are unlikely to be clinically meaningful at therapeutic doses. Cimetidine had weaker, clinically meaningless effects on the pharmacokinetics of nemonoxacin. PMID:26855561

  19. Networking for philanthropy: increasing volunteer behavior via social networking sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Wei-Na

    2014-03-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) provide a unique social venue to engage the young generation in philanthropy through their networking capabilities. An integrated model that incorporates social capital into the Theory of Reasoned Action is developed to explain volunteer behavior through social networks. As expected, volunteer behavior was predicted by volunteer intention, which was influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. In addition, social capital, an outcome of the extensive use of SNSs, was as an important driver of users' attitude and subjective norms toward volunteering via SNSs. PMID:24102569

  20. The grief experience of prison inmate hospice volunteer caregivers.

    PubMed

    Supiano, Katherine P; Cloyes, Kristin G; Berry, Patricia H

    2014-01-01

    Correctional institutions are obligated to provide end-of-life care to a population with complex medical needs. Prison hospices are increasingly being formed to address this demand. Few empirical studies have examined the impact of caring for dying inmates on the hospice inmate volunteers, who, in several prison health care systems, provide direct care. In this study, experiences of the inmate hospice volunteers with death were investigated to illuminate their grief processes. Understanding the bereavement needs of hospice volunteers and how prison hospice volunteers navigate grief and remain committed to providing excellent hospice care can inform the grief processes and practices of hospice care professionals. PMID:24628143

  1. Towards a Production Volunteer Computing Infrastructure for HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høimyr, N.; Marquina, M.; Asp, T.; Jones, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Field, L.

    2015-12-01

    Following the successful inclusion of virtualisation to volunteer computing for theory simulations back in 2011, the use of volunteer computing with BOINC and CernVM has been extended to cover simulations for the LHC experiments ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. This paper describes the status of the BOINC volunteer computing platform at CERN used for LHC@home and how it has been designed to address a heterogeneous environment of different user communities with different computing infrastructure. The aim of the recent developments is to provide a volunteer computing platform that the experiments can build upon to exploit opportunistic resources. Furthermore, new developments of common solutions to span user authentication domains are explained.

  2. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  3. Clinical Trial of an Oral Live Shigella sonnei Vaccine Candidate, WRSS1, in Thai Adults

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Dilara; Chamnanchanunt, Supat; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Khantapura, Patchariya; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Kittitrakul, Chatporn; Luvira, Viravarn; Dhitavat, Jittima; Venkatesan, Malabi M.; Mason, Carl J.; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated Shigella sonnei vaccine candidate WRSS1, previously tested in U.S. and Israeli volunteers, was evaluated in a population of adult Thai volunteers in which the organism is endemic. In a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind design, inpatient participants received a single oral dose of 1.6 × 104 CFU of WRSS1. The vaccine was generally well tolerated, with equal numbers of vaccinees and placebo controls showing mild symptoms. Only 3 of 13 vaccinees (23%) had culture-positive stools, while a total of 9 vaccinees were positive by PCR. Lack of vaccine shedding in volunteers correlated with lack of clinical symptoms and immune responses, just as the duration of fecal shedding correlated directly with stronger immune responses. Two months following immunization, 10 vaccinees and 10 newly recruited naive controls received a challenge dose of 1,670 CFU of virulent S. sonnei strain 53G. This dose had previously demonstrated a 75% attack rate for dysentery in Thai volunteers. However, in this study the attack rate for dysentery in naive controls after challenge was 20%. Based on clinical record summaries, 3 vaccinees and 5 naive controls experienced clinically relevant illness (diarrhea/dysentery/fever/shigellosis), and a 40% vaccine efficacy was calculated. When these data are compared to those for the performance of this vaccine candidate in more naive populations, it is clear that a single oral dose of WRSS1 at 104 CFU failed to achieve its full potential in a population in which the organism is endemic. Higher doses and/or repeated immunizations may contribute to improved vaccine shedding and consequent elevation of protective immune responses in a population in which the organism is endemic. (The study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01080716.) PMID:27146000

  4. Clinical Trial of an Oral Live Shigella sonnei Vaccine Candidate, WRSS1, in Thai Adults.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Islam, Dilara; Chamnanchanunt, Supat; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Khantapura, Patchariya; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Kittitrakul, Chatporn; Luvira, Viravarn; Dhitavat, Jittima; Venkatesan, Malabi M; Mason, Carl J; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn

    2016-07-01

    Live attenuated Shigella sonnei vaccine candidate WRSS1, previously tested in U.S. and Israeli volunteers, was evaluated in a population of adult Thai volunteers in which the organism is endemic. In a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind design, inpatient participants received a single oral dose of 1.6 × 10(4) CFU of WRSS1. The vaccine was generally well tolerated, with equal numbers of vaccinees and placebo controls showing mild symptoms. Only 3 of 13 vaccinees (23%) had culture-positive stools, while a total of 9 vaccinees were positive by PCR. Lack of vaccine shedding in volunteers correlated with lack of clinical symptoms and immune responses, just as the duration of fecal shedding correlated directly with stronger immune responses. Two months following immunization, 10 vaccinees and 10 newly recruited naive controls received a challenge dose of 1,670 CFU of virulent S. sonnei strain 53G. This dose had previously demonstrated a 75% attack rate for dysentery in Thai volunteers. However, in this study the attack rate for dysentery in naive controls after challenge was 20%. Based on clinical record summaries, 3 vaccinees and 5 naive controls experienced clinically relevant illness (diarrhea/dysentery/fever/shigellosis), and a 40% vaccine efficacy was calculated. When these data are compared to those for the performance of this vaccine candidate in more naive populations, it is clear that a single oral dose of WRSS1 at 10(4) CFU failed to achieve its full potential in a population in which the organism is endemic. Higher doses and/or repeated immunizations may contribute to improved vaccine shedding and consequent elevation of protective immune responses in a population in which the organism is endemic. (The study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01080716.). PMID:27146000

  5. The Experience of Being a Guide Dog Puppy Raiser Volunteer: A Longitudinal Qualitative Collective Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Chur-Hansen, Anna; Werner, Lucy-Kate; McGuiness, Clare E.; Hazel, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Guide dogs are important service animals. They cannot be trained without the input of volunteer puppy raisers, who serve as custodians for the animals for around 12 months. To date very little research has considered the experience of being a guide dog puppy raiser, including the costs and benefits to psychological, physical and social health. In this study one litter of puppies and their raisers were followed from before the animal arrived until one year had passed. Overall, less positive experiences were reported than more negative ones. This has implications for the organisations that seek volunteers to raise service animals. Abstract There are no published studies that consider the experiences of guide dog puppy raisers. As these people are volunteers, their continued willingness to participate in the training of dogs for assisting the vision impaired and blind is essential for the viability of guide dog schools around the world. Using a qualitative, longitudinal methodology, data were collected from nine guide dog puppy raisers at four time points: before receiving the puppy, one week, then three months after the puppy arrived, and 13 months after the puppy arrived (at which time all puppies had left the raisers). Participants reported more challenges than benefits in raising the puppies. Volunteering to be a guide dog puppy raiser may not be the pleasant experience that is anticipated when community members first offer their services. Understanding what it is like to be a puppy raiser and working towards ways in which to address problems is essential, given that, without volunteers to train and care for puppies, vision impaired and blind people would not have access to guide dogs. PMID:26479133

  6. Right to Receive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oborn, Richard

    The concept of a United States citizen's right to receive information is acquiring increased judicial recognition. This report traces the evolution of that right from its philosophical basis in the United States Consitution, through its interpretation by the Supreme Court, up to the current concern that the public receive certain economic…

  7. Effect of faldaprevir on raltegravir pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Joseph, David; Rose, Peter; Strelkowa, Natalja; Schultz, Armin; Garcia, Jeanette; Elgadi, Mabrouk; Huang, Fenglei

    2015-04-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor and an inhibitor of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-1A1 (UGT1A1), which is involved in raltegravir clearance. Raltegravir, an HIV integrase inhibitor, may be used in combination with HCV treatment in HCV/HIV co-infected patients. In this open-label, 2-period, fixed-sequence study, 24 healthy volunteers (12 males) received faldaprevir 240 mg and raltegravir 400 mg in 2 treatment schedules (A and B) separated by a washout phase of ≥7 days: (A) twice-daily raltegravir (Days 1-3), once-daily raltegravir (Day 4); (B) twice-daily raltegravir and twice-daily faldaprevir (loading dose, Day 1), twice-daily raltegravir and once-daily faldaprevir (Days 2-5), once-daily raltegravir and once-daily faldaprevir (Day 6). Pharmacokinetics and safety were assessed over 132 hours post-dosing. Compared with raltegravir alone, co-administration with faldaprevir led to 2.7-fold and 2.5-fold increases in raltegravir geometric mean AUC(τ,ss) and C(max,ss), respectively, and a similar increase in raltegravir glucuronide metabolite exposure. No serious adverse events (AEs) were reported and no subject discontinued due to AEs. Faldaprevir and raltegravir co-administration was well tolerated and resulted in a moderate increase in raltegravir exposure. PMID:25352040

  8. Pomelo enhances cyclosporine bioavailability in healthy male Thai volunteers.

    PubMed

    Anlamlert, Wirin; Sermsappasuk, Pakawadee; Yokubol, Dhirayudh; Jones, Sirada

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pomelo pulp on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine in healthy male Thai volunteers. The study design was an open-label, randomized, single dose, crossover study with a 2-week washout period. A single oral dose of 2 × 100 mg cyclosporine was administered with 200 mL of water. Each subject received 250 g of pomelo pulp or 250 mL of water 1 hour before drug administration and once again 10 minutes following drug administration. Blood samples were collected over a 24 hour period. The point estimates (90% confidence intervals) of the test/control ratio using logarithmic transformed data for the area under the curve (AUC) for blood concentration from time 0 to infinity (AUC(0- ∞)) and the observed maximum concentration (C(max)) were 128.8% (120.6-137.6) and 136.1% (126.0-146.8), respectively. These 90% confidence intervals were higher than the accepted bioequivalence range defined by the European Medicines Agency guidelines for narrow therapeutic index drugs (90%-111% for AUC and 80%-125% for C(max)). However, the apparent terminal half-life (t(1/2)) was not significantly different. In conclusion, co-administration of cyclosporine and pomelo pulp increased the relative bioavailability of cyclosporine. PMID:25408261

  9. Interaction between ketoconazole and almotriptan in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Fleishaker, Joseph C; Herman, Beth D; Carel, Barbara J; Azie, Nkechi E

    2003-04-01

    The interaction between almotriptan, a 5-HT1B/1D agonist, and the potent CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole was examined in 16 healthy volunteers. Subjects received (A) 12.5 mg almotriptan orally on Day 2 of a 3-day regimen of 400 mg ketoconazole once daily and (B) 12.5 mg almotriptan in a crossover design. Plasma and urine concentrations of almotriptan were measured by HPLC. Treatment effects on almotriptan pharmacokinetics were assessed by analysis of variance. Ketoconazole coadministration increased mean almotriptan AUC and Cmax from 312 to 490 ng h/mL and 52.6 to 84.5 ng/mL, respectively. Mean oral clearance was decreased from 40.7 to 26.2 L/h by ketoconazole, with an accompanying increase in the fraction of almotriptan excreted unchanged in the urine (40.6% to 53.3%) and a decrease in renal clearance (16.4 to 13.8 L/h). These effects were statistically significant. The effects of ketoconazole on almotriptan clearance were consistent with inhibition of the CYP3A4-mediated metabolism and a slight effect on the active tubular secretion of almotriptan. PMID:12723463

  10. Case Report: Successful Sporozoite Challenge Model in Human Volunteers with Plasmodium vivax Strain Derived from Human Donors

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Sócrates; Fernández, Olga; Manzano, María R.; Murrain, Bermans; Vergara, Juana; Blanco, Pedro; Palacios, Ricardo; Vélez, Juan D.; Epstein, Judith E.; Chen-Mok, Mario; Reed, Zarifah H.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    Successful establishment of a Plasmodium vivax sporozoite challenge model in humans is described. Eighteen healthy adult, malaria-naïve volunteers were randomly allocated to Groups A–C and exposed to 3 ± 1, 6 ± 1, and 9 ± 1 bites of Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes infected with P. vivax, respectively. Seventeen volunteers developed signs and symptoms consistent with malaria, and geometric mean prepatent periods of 11.1 days (9.3–11) for Group A; 10.8 days (9.8–11.9) for Group B; and 10.6 days (8.7–12.4) for Group C, with no statistically significant difference among groups (Kruskal-Wallis, P = 0.70). One volunteer exposed to eight mosquito bites did not develop a parasitemia. No differences in parasite density were observed and all individuals successfully recovered after anti-malarial treatment. None of the volunteers developed parasite relapses within an 18-month follow-up. In conclusion, malaria-naive volunteers can be safely and reproducibly infected with bites of 2–10 An. albimanus mosquitoes carrying P. vivax sporozoites. This challenge method is suitable for vaccine and anti-malarial drug testing. PMID:19861603

  11. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  12. CALUTRON RECEIVER STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Roush, J.L.

    1959-09-01

    A receiver is described for collecting isotopes in a calutron The receiver has several compartments, formed by a sertes of parallel metal plates and an open front. Each plate has flanges which space it from the other plates and a flexible extension pressing against a common supporting red to maintain the plate in assembled relation when all but the last rod is removed. The plates may be removed individualy from the front of the receiver, cleaned ard replaced without disturbing the alignment of the other plates.

  13. Presence of Clostridium difficile and antibiotic and beta-lactamase activities in feces of volunteers treated with oral cefixime, oral cefpodoxime proxetil, or placebo.

    PubMed Central

    Chachaty, E; Depitre, C; Mario, N; Bourneix, C; Saulnier, P; Corthier, G; Andremont, A

    1992-01-01

    Three groups of six healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to a treatment with 400 mg of oral cefpodoxime proxetil, oral cefixime, or placebo per day for 10 days. Informed consent was obtained from all volunteers. Clostridium difficile was not detected in the feces of any subject before treatment or at any time in the subjects in the placebo group. C. difficile was, however, detected in all subjects treated with cefpodoxime proxetil and in five of six treated with cefixime. Genomic DNA restriction patterns showed that the strains of C. difficile differed from one volunteer to another. Two subjects both shed different strains at different times during the 25-day surveillance period. All isolates were resistant to cefixime and cefpodoxime (MIC for 90% of strains, 256 and 512 mg/liter, respectively). Antibiotic activity was found in the feces of one volunteer treated with cefpodoxime proxetil and of four volunteers treated with cefixime. It was inversely correlated with the presence of fecal beta-lactamase activity. Intestinal side effects were limited to modifications of stool consistency, which occurred in only 3 of the 12 treated volunteers and did not lead to cessation of treatment. These modifications were significantly associated with the presence of fecal antibiotic activity (P less than 0.05) but not with the shedding of toxigenic or nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile or with the presence of toxin A in feces, which was detected only in one perfectly healthy treated volunteer. Images PMID:1416894

  14. Presence of Clostridium difficile and antibiotic and beta-lactamase activities in feces of volunteers treated with oral cefixime, oral cefpodoxime proxetil, or placebo.

    PubMed

    Chachaty, E; Depitre, C; Mario, N; Bourneix, C; Saulnier, P; Corthier, G; Andremont, A

    1992-09-01

    Three groups of six healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to a treatment with 400 mg of oral cefpodoxime proxetil, oral cefixime, or placebo per day for 10 days. Informed consent was obtained from all volunteers. Clostridium difficile was not detected in the feces of any subject before treatment or at any time in the subjects in the placebo group. C. difficile was, however, detected in all subjects treated with cefpodoxime proxetil and in five of six treated with cefixime. Genomic DNA restriction patterns showed that the strains of C. difficile differed from one volunteer to another. Two subjects both shed different strains at different times during the 25-day surveillance period. All isolates were resistant to cefixime and cefpodoxime (MIC for 90% of strains, 256 and 512 mg/liter, respectively). Antibiotic activity was found in the feces of one volunteer treated with cefpodoxime proxetil and of four volunteers treated with cefixime. It was inversely correlated with the presence of fecal beta-lactamase activity. Intestinal side effects were limited to modifications of stool consistency, which occurred in only 3 of the 12 treated volunteers and did not lead to cessation of treatment. These modifications were significantly associated with the presence of fecal antibiotic activity (P less than 0.05) but not with the shedding of toxigenic or nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile or with the presence of toxin A in feces, which was detected only in one perfectly healthy treated volunteer. PMID:1416894

  15. Personalised electronic messages to improve sun protection in young adults.

    PubMed

    Mair, Sarah; Soyer, H Peter; Youl, Philippa; Hurst, Cameron; Marshall, Alison; Janda, Monika

    2012-07-01

    We studied the acceptability and feasibility of delivering sun protection messages via electronic media such as short message services (SMS) to people aged 18-40 years. An online survey was conducted using a pre-established panel of volunteers. We compared the characteristics of those who indicated that they would like to be alerted to the UV index, with those who would not, using bivariate logistic regression. Characteristics found to be associated with a desire to receive such advice were entered into a multivariate logistic regression analysis. The median age of the 141 participants was 34 years. Overall, 80% of participants agreed that they would like to receive some form of sun protection advice. Of these, 20% preferred to receive it via SMS and 42% via email. Willingness to receive electronic messages about the UV index was associated with being unsure about whether a suntanned person would look healthy and greater use of sun protection in the past. Careful attention to message framing and timing of message delivery, and focus on the short-term effects of sun exposure such as sunburn and skin ageing should increase the acceptability of such messages to young people. Sun protection messages delivered to young adults via electronic media appear to be feasible and acceptable. PMID:22302765

  16. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  17. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  18. 32 CFR 1627.1 - Who may volunteer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INDUCTION § 1627.1 Who may volunteer. Any registrant who has attained the age of 17 years, who has not... Selective Service Act, when inductions are authorized, may volunteer for induction into the Armed Forces... attained the age of 18 years and does not have the consent of his parent or guardian for his induction....

  19. Connecting Volunteers and Agents: A Social Constructionist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillivan, K. D.

    2013-01-01

    Extension volunteers benefit from participation in training activities. Furthermore, Extension personnel are best positioned to provide volunteers with relevant training. However, trainers neglecting relationship building and failing to attend to the communicative process may achieve unsatisfactory results. Social constructionism, a theoretical…

  20. 76 FR 20243 - Retired and Senior Volunteer Program Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ...The Corporation for National and Community Service (Corporation) is issuing a final rule that sets forth a competitive process for selecting grant recipients for the Retired and Service Volunteer Program (RSVP), including performance measurement requirements, as required by the Domestic Volunteer Service Act (DVSA), as amended by the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act (Serve America Act)......

  1. The Impact of Institutional Mission on Student Volunteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Susan Crawford; Ludden, Alison Bryant; Singleton, Royce A., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns and predictors of volunteering among students at a liberal arts college with an institutional culture that strongly promotes community service. Results showed that predictors varied across four different types of volunteering: community service, social action, religious service, and service to the college. Year in…

  2. Sustaining Members, Volunteers, and Leaders in Community Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Ken, III

    2013-01-01

    Community organizations must be self-sustaining in order to remain active, viable, and strong. The three primary steps involved in sustaining members, volunteers, and leaders include evaluate, recognize, and either retain, redirect, or disengage. A volunteer performance evaluation will determine whether individual and organizational goals are…

  3. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

  4. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  5. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  6. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  7. Roles of the Volunteer in Development: Toolkits for Building Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Marsha; Allsman, Ava; Savage, Ron; Havens, Lani; Blohm, Judee; Raftery, Kate

    This document, which was developed to assist Peace Corps volunteers and those responsible for training them, presents an introductory booklet and six toolkits for use in the training provided to and by volunteers involved in community development. All the materials emphasize long-term participatory approaches to sustainable development and a…

  8. Eldercare Volunteer Corps Demonstration, A "Project Care" Initiative. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. for Social Services, Frankfort.

    The goal for this project was to recognize the volunteers at the beginning of the project and to focus on a program to increase the utilization of volunteers in essential service delivery to at-risk persons in the Big Sandy region of eastern Kentucky. A diverse committee made up of business, education, civil leaders, service providers, and…

  9. 11 CFR 100.147 - Volunteer activity for party committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Volunteer activity for party committees. 100.147 Section 100.147 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.147 Volunteer activity for party committees. The payment by a state or local committee of a political...

  10. 11 CFR 100.87 - Volunteer activity for party committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Volunteer activity for party committees. 100.87 Section 100.87 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.87 Volunteer activity for party committees. The payment by a state or local committee of a political party...

  11. Environmental Volunteers: Factors Influencing Their Involvement in Environmental Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liarakou, Georgia; Kostelou, Eleni; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors that influence volunteers to become involved in environmental action. The research focused on volunteers undertaking action in summer camps organised by an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) in Greece. The results suggest that the environmental issues addressed in volunteer…

  12. Reading and Rehabilitation: Literacy Volunteers of America in Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlin, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Literacy Volunteers of Virginia Institutions program (LVVI). There are LVVI programs at 22 institutions where inmate and community volunteers provide one-to-one basic reading instruction to students and are supervised by teachers from the Department of Correctional Education. (JOW)

  13. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operation of a health care facility. Volunteers may be used to supplement, but not to take the place of..., or his designee, to broaden and strengthen the delivery of health services, contribute to the comfort... Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES §...

  14. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operation of a health care facility. Volunteers may be used to supplement, but not to take the place of..., or his designee, to broaden and strengthen the delivery of health services, contribute to the comfort... Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES §...

  15. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... operation of a health care facility. Volunteers may be used to supplement, but not to take the place of..., or his designee, to broaden and strengthen the delivery of health services, contribute to the comfort... Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES §...

  16. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operation of a health care facility. Volunteers may be used to supplement, but not to take the place of..., or his designee, to broaden and strengthen the delivery of health services, contribute to the comfort... Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES §...

  17. 45 CFR 57.3 - Volunteer service programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operation of a health care facility. Volunteers may be used to supplement, but not to take the place of..., or his designee, to broaden and strengthen the delivery of health services, contribute to the comfort... Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION VOLUNTEER SERVICES §...

  18. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid in... program concepts with VISTA volunteers and supervisor/sponsor. (g) Advise supervisor on potential problem... best meet goals and objectives addressing the community's problem(s)....

  19. The Association of Childhood Personality Type with Volunteering during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Robert; Hart, Daniel; Donnelly, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Using a longitudinal design, we investigated the relation of childhood personality type to volunteering during adolescence. We hypothesized that participants with more adaptive personality functioning during childhood would be more likely to volunteer during adolescence and that membership in social organizations would mediate the relation of…

  20. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE... program concepts with VISTA volunteers and supervisor/sponsor. (g) Advise supervisor on potential...

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Volunteer Functions Inventory with Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Joseph; Lo, T. Wing; Liu, Elaine S. C.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report an evaluation of the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Volunteer Functions Inventory on a sample of university student volunteers. Reliabilities were high for four out of the six scales of the Inventory (Values, Career, Social, and Understanding) in terms of internal consistency. Items in these four scales also…

  2. Legal Barriers to Volunteer Service: A Community Service Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts, Suzanne; And Others

    This booklet is designed to help public and private community service organizations understand the applicability of wage and hour laws to volunteers used in their activities. It considers various legal interpretations of the differences between "volunteers" and "employees," and reviews the provisions of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA),…

  3. The Hidden Workforce: Volunteers' Learning in the Olympics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Comparison of volunteers at the Olympic Games in Lillehammer in 1994 (n=200) and Sydney in 2000 (n=200) showed they were strongly motivated by national pride, social contact, and friendship. Learning was an important motivator for younger volunteers. Increased job and social skills and knowledge were common outcomes. (Contains 22 references.) (SK)

  4. Involvement of Volunteers in Agricultural Education Programs in New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Brenda S.; Rosencrans, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Secondary and middle school agriculture teachers in New Mexico (n=90) considered volunteers essential program components. Volunteers served as chaperones, guest speakers, event coaches, and in student organizations. The 13% who did not use them were either new, had small programs, or found it time consuming. Benefits included exposing students to…

  5. Three Steps to Engage Volunteers in Membership Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Tony

    2011-01-01

    There is a big world out there, and volunteers can make a significant impact in helping one reach out to others and grow his/her PTA membership. In fact, word-of-mouth marketing tied for the top spot as the most effective method of new member recruitment in Marketing General's 2010 Membership Marketing Benchmarking Report. So getting volunteers'…

  6. 28 CFR 115.131 - Employee and volunteer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Employee and volunteer training. 115.131 Section 115.131 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Training and Education § 115.131 Employee and volunteer...

  7. 28 CFR 115.131 - Employee and volunteer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Employee and volunteer training. 115.131 Section 115.131 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Training and Education § 115.131 Employee and volunteer...

  8. 28 CFR 115.131 - Employee and volunteer training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Employee and volunteer training. 115.131 Section 115.131 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Training and Education § 115.131 Employee and volunteer...

  9. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  10. Ultrasonic pulser-receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steven C.

    2006-09-12

    Ultrasonic pulser-receiver circuitry, for use with an ultrasonic transducer, the circuitry comprising a circuit board; ultrasonic pulser circuitry supported by the circuit board and configured to be coupled to an ultrasonic transducer and to cause the ultrasonic transducer to emit an ultrasonic output pulse; receiver circuitry supported by the circuit board, coupled to the pulser circuitry, including protection circuitry configured to protect against the ultrasonic pulse and including amplifier circuitry configured to amplify an echo, received back by the transducer, of the output pulse; and a connector configured to couple the ultrasonic transducer directly to the circuit board, to the pulser circuitry and receiver circuitry, wherein impedance mismatches that would result if the transducer was coupled to the circuit board via a cable can be avoided.

  11. Solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Jacob

    1978-01-01

    An improved long-life design for solar energy receivers provides for greatly reduced thermally induced stress and permits the utilization of less expensive heat exchanger materials while maintaining receiver efficiencies in excess of 85% without undue expenditure of energy to circulate the working fluid. In one embodiment, the flow index for the receiver is first set as close as practical to a value such that the Graetz number yields the optimal heat transfer coefficient per unit of pumping energy, in this case, 6. The convective index for the receiver is then set as closely as practical to two times the flow index so as to obtain optimal efficiency per unit mass of material.

  12. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  13. Predicting professional quality of life among professional and volunteer caregivers.

    PubMed

    Avieli, Hila; Ben-David, Sarah; Levy, Inna

    2016-01-01

    This study is one of the few that has compared volunteers' professional quality of life (PQL), which includes secondary traumatic stress (STS), burnout, and compassion satisfaction (CS), to those of professional caregivers. In addition, the research compared the ethical behavior of volunteers with that of professional therapists and examined the connection between years of experience, ethical behavior, and PQL. One hundred eighty-three volunteers and professional caregivers filled out a sociodemographic questionnaire, an Ethical Behavior Questionnaire and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) questionnaire. The results indicated that professional caregivers report lower levels of STS and burnout, and higher levels of CS and ethical behavior compared with volunteer caregivers. Moreover, the findings suggest that ethical behavior correlates with STS, burnout, and CS. Ethical behavior has a protective value for mental health caregivers. The discussion emphasizes the value of a professional code of ethics and ethical training for professional and volunteering caregivers. PMID:26121172

  14. Volunteer Clouds and Citizen Cyberscience for LHC Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado Sanchez, Carlos; Blomer, Jakob; Buncic, Predrag; Chen, Gang; Ellis, John; Garcia Quintas, David; Harutyunyan, Artem; Grey, Francois; Lombrana Gonzalez, Daniel; Marquina, Miguel; Mato, Pere; Rantala, Jarno; Schulz, Holger; Segal, Ben; Sharma, Archana; Skands, Peter; Weir, David; Wu, Jie; Wu, Wenjing; Yadav, Rohit

    2011-12-01

    Computing for the LHC, and for HEP more generally, is traditionally viewed as requiring specialized infrastructure and software environments, and therefore not compatible with the recent trend in "volunteer computing", where volunteers supply free processing time on ordinary PCs and laptops via standard Internet connections. In this paper, we demonstrate that with the use of virtual machine technology, at least some standard LHC computing tasks can be tackled with volunteer computing resources. Specifically, by presenting volunteer computing resources to HEP scientists as a "volunteer cloud", essentially identical to a Grid or dedicated cluster from a job submission perspective, LHC simulations can be processed effectively. This article outlines both the technical steps required for such a solution and the implications for LHC computing as well as for LHC public outreach and for participation by scientists from developing regions in LHC research.

  15. Altruism, personal benefit, and anxieties: a phenomenological study of healthy volunteers' experiences in a placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Kwakye, Isaac N.; Garner, Matthew; Baldwin, David S.; Bamford, Susan; Pinkney, Verity

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to develop an in‐depth understanding of healthy volunteers' experiences of mental health trials. Methods A qualitative study was nested within a healthy volunteer placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine, a psychotropic drug used for treating patients with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder. Eight participants were interviewed, and data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results Interviewees described volunteering for the trial because they were interested in research, wanted the monetary incentive, wanted to help researchers, and wanted to be part of something. On entering the trial, participants considered the possible risks and described feeling anxious, excited, and determined; they had some clear expectations and some loosely held hopes about what would happen. During the trial, participants were curious about whether they were taking duloxetine or placebo, self‐monitored their bodies' reactions, and guessed which treatment they received. On being un‐blinded to treatment allocation after completing the trial, some participants' guesses were confirmed, but others were surprised, and a few were disappointed. Conclusions Small changes to advertising/consent materials to reflect volunteers' motivations could improve recruitment rates to similar trials; “active” placebos might be particularly useful for maintaining blinding in healthy volunteer trials; and sensitive procedures are needed for un‐blinding participants to treatment allocation. © 2016 The Authors. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27378326

  16. Examining learner-centered training with teen volunteer staff at an aquarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Raelene M.

    This research project examined the effects of a training program that focused on helping youth volunteers create a learner-centered interaction at an Aquarium. This study explored whether this learner centered training resulted in an increased ability to identify learner-centered engagement as well as reported changes in practice. Most research on training programs and professional development, that introduces learner-centered strategies examines adult teachers working in formal environments. This study examined youth volunteer staff in an informal science institution that participated in a weekly one-hour training for four weeks during their eight week long summer volunteer program. The data showed that some of topics introduced in the learner centered training, such as the importance of visitors' prior knowledge and the use of objects, were identified more often as good practice after the training. In addition, participants seemed to hold on to some of their original perceptions of good practices, such as providing positive reinforcement and modifying their physical posture to make the visitors feel comfortable. The investigation also revealed that conversation patterns changed in some participants' practice as a result of the training.

  17. Volunteering in dementia care – a Norwegian phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Söderhamn, Ulrika; Landmark, Bjørg; Aasgaard, Live; Eide, Hilde; Söderhamn, Olle

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The number of people suffering from dementia will increase dramatically in the future, and this will be a great challenge and concern for health care services. It is assumed that volunteers will strengthen community health care services more in the future than they do today. Aim The aim of this study was to elucidate lived experiences of working as a volunteer in an activity center with adapted activities for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia. Methods Qualitative interviews were implemented in a group of nine female volunteers from an activity center in southern Norway. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed with a descriptive phenomenological method. Results Volunteering in an activity center for home-dwelling people with early stage dementia was reported to provide experiences of being useful and feeling satisfied with performing a good job. It was an advantage for the volunteers to have had experiences from life in general, but also as a health professional or as being the next of kin of a dementia sufferer. It was important for the volunteers to focus on the dementia sufferer and show caring behavior, and interaction with and the appreciation of the health care professionals were also important. The volunteers were motivated by being able to have influence and participate in the planning of the work, to be a part of the social setting, and to learn. However, for some volunteers it was difficult to adjust to an appropriate role. Conclusion In order to promote volunteering in a caring context, mutual trust and freedom should be emphasized. Being conscious of important volunteer characteristics like their experiences, knowledge, and caring behavior, as well as a focus on the staff showing appreciation and providing feedback, may be the difference between success and failure. PMID:22396627

  18. [Adult twins].

    PubMed

    Charlemaine, Christiane

    2006-12-31

    This paper explores the deep roots of closeness that twins share in their youngest age and their effect on their destiny at the adult age. Psychologists believe the bond between twins begins in utero and develops throughout the twins' lives. The four patterns of twinship described show that the twin bond is determined by the quality of parenting that twins receive in their infancy and early childhood. Common problems of adult twins bring about difficulties to adapt in a non-twin world. The nature versus nurture controversy has taken on new life focusing on inter-twin differences and the importance of parent-child interaction as fundamental to the growth and development of personality. PMID:17352324

  19. Pharmacokinetics of bacmecillinam and pivmecillinam in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, K; Bergan, T; Magni, L; Pring, B G; Westerlund, D

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of bacmecillinam and pivmecillinam were studied in healthy fasting volunteers given tablets in a cross-over, randomized order. The mean (+/- SD) peak levels of plasma mecillinam were 1.43 +/- 0.34, 2.73 +/- 0.43, and 4.62 +/- 1.41 mg/l after bacmecillinam 100, 200, and 400 mg and 2.38 +/- 0.65 mg/l after pivmecillinam 400 mg. The corresponding areas under plasma Vs time curves (AUC) were 2.21 +/- 0.19, 3.99 +/- 0.63, and 7.74 +/- 1.38 mg . h. l-1 for bacmecillinam and 5.35 +/- 0.93 mg . h. l-1 for pivmecillinam. The elimination half-lives were 0.8-1.1 h for bacmecillinam and 0.7 h for pivmecillinam. The 12 h urinary recovery of unchanged mecillinam after the 400 mg doses was 41% for bacmecillinam and 30% for pivmecillinam. The 400 mg dose of bacmecillinam gave a significantly higher plasma peak (p less than 0.001), AUC (p less than 0.001) and urinary recovery (p less than 0.001) than did pivmecillinam 400 mg. The plasma peaks appeared earlier and the rate of absorption was higher after bacmecillinam than after pivmecillinam (p less than 0.05). In conclusion, bacmecillinam had a better bioavailability than pivmecillinam in the tablet formulations studied. The AUC increased linearly with increasing doses of bacmecillinam. PMID:6293834

  20. Prediction of Psilocybin Response in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Kometer, Michael; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin. PMID:22363492