Science.gov

Sample records for adult white matter

  1. White matter structure changes as adults learn a second language.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Alexander A; Rudelson, Justin J; Tse, Peter U

    2012-08-01

    Traditional models hold that the plastic reorganization of brain structures occurs mainly during childhood and adolescence, leaving adults with limited means to learn new knowledge and skills. Research within the last decade has begun to overturn this belief, documenting changes in the brain's gray and white matter as healthy adults learn simple motor and cognitive skills [Lövdén, M., Bodammer, N. C., Kühn, S., Kaufmann, J., Schütze, H., Tempelmann, C., et al. Experience-dependent plasticity of white-matter microstructure extends into old age. Neuropsychologia, 48, 3878-3883, 2010; Taubert, M., Draganski, B., Anwander, A., Müller, K., Horstmann, A., Villringer, A., et al. Dynamic properties of human brain structure: Learning-related changes in cortical areas and associated fiber connections. The Journal of Neuroscience, 30, 11670-11677, 2010; Scholz, J., Klein, M. C., Behrens, T. E. J., & Johansen-Berg, H. Training induces changes in white-matter architecture. Nature Neuroscience, 12, 1370-1371, 2009; Draganski, B., Gaser, C., Busch, V., Schuirer, G., Bogdahn, U., & May, A. Changes in grey matter induced by training. Nature, 427, 311-312, 2004]. Although the significance of these changes is not fully understood, they reveal a brain that remains plastic well beyond early developmental periods. Here we investigate the role of adult structural plasticity in the complex, long-term learning process of foreign language acquisition. We collected monthly diffusion tensor imaging scans of 11 English speakers who took a 9-month intensive course in written and spoken Modern Standard Chinese as well as from 16 control participants who did not study a language. We show that white matter reorganizes progressively across multiple sites as adults study a new language. Language learners exhibited progressive changes in white matter tracts associated with traditional left hemisphere language areas and their right hemisphere analogs. Surprisingly, the most significant changes

  2. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Farzad; Wang, Xiyue; Rosene, Douglas L.; Rockland, Kathleen S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates (NHP), white matter neurons (WMNs) persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR), temporal (TE), and parietal (Par) association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30 μm thickness), and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16 mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of putative

  3. White matter hyperintensity volume and impaired mobility among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Joshua Z.; Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Provenzano, Frank A.; Luchsinger, José A.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    Gait speed is associated with multiple adverse outcomes of aging. White matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been associated with gait speed, though few studies have examined changes in gait speed over time in population-based studies comprising participants from diverse cultural backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between a decline in gait speed and total and regional WMH volumes in a community-based study of aging. Participants (n=701) in a community-based study of older adults underwent gait speed measurement via a 4-meter walk test at the time of initial enrollment and MRI at a second time interval (mean 4.7[SD=0.5] years apart). Logistic regression was used to examine the association between large WMH volume and regional WMH volume with gait speed < 0.5 m/s (abnormal speed), and a transition to abnormal gait speed. Analyses were adjusted for demographic and clinical factors. Large WMH volume was associated with a transition to abnormal gait speed between the two visits, but not after adjustment for modifiable vascular disease risk factors. In adjusted models increased frontal lobe WMH volume was not associated with a transition to abnormal gait speed. WMH are associated with slowing of gait over time. Prevention of WMH presents a potential strategy for the prevention of gait speed decline. PMID:23128969

  4. Anomalous White Matter Morphology in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cieslak, Matthew; Ingham, Rojer J.; Ingham, Janis C.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Developmental stuttering is now generally considered to arise from genetic determinants interacting with neurologic function. Changes within speech-motor white matter (WM) connections may also be implicated. These connections can now be studied in great detail by high-angular-resolution diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. Therefore,…

  5. White matter microstructure mediates the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness and spatial working memory in older adults.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Lauren E; Verstynen, Timothy D; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Wong, Chelsea; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Gothe, Neha; Phillips, Siobhan M; Mailey, Emily; Ehlers, Diane; Olson, Erin; Wojcicki, Thomas; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F; Erickson, Kirk I

    2016-05-01

    White matter structure declines with advancing age and has been associated with a decline in memory and executive processes in older adulthood. Yet, recent research suggests that higher physical activity and fitness levels may be associated with less white matter degeneration in late life, although the tract-specificity of this relationship is not well understood. In addition, these prior studies infrequently associate measures of white matter microstructure to cognitive outcomes, so the behavioral importance of higher levels of white matter microstructural organization with greater fitness levels remains a matter of speculation. Here we tested whether cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) levels were associated with white matter microstructure and whether this relationship constituted an indirect pathway between cardiorespiratory fitness and spatial working memory in two large, cognitively and neurologically healthy older adult samples. Diffusion tensor imaging was used to determine white matter microstructure in two separate groups: Experiment 1, N=113 (mean age=66.61) and Experiment 2, N=154 (mean age=65.66). Using a voxel-based regression approach, we found that higher VO2max was associated with higher fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter microstructure, in a diverse network of white matter tracts, including the anterior corona radiata, anterior internal capsule, fornix, cingulum, and corpus callosum (PFDR-corrected<.05). This effect was consistent across both samples even after controlling for age, gender, and education. Further, a statistical mediation analysis revealed that white matter microstructure within these regions, among others, constituted a significant indirect path between VO2max and spatial working memory performance. These results suggest that greater aerobic fitness levels are associated with higher levels of white matter microstructural organization, which may, in turn, preserve spatial memory performance in older adulthood. PMID

  6. White matter structures associated with loneliness in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Seishu; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Lonely individuals may exhibit dysfunction, particularly with respect to social empathy and self-efficacy. White matter (WM) structures related to loneliness have not yet been identified. We investigated the association between regional WM density (rWMD) using the UCLA Loneliness Scale in 776 healthy young students aged 18–27 years old. Loneliness scores were negatively correlated with rWMD in eight clusters: the bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL), right anterior insula (AI), posterior temporoparietal junction (pTPJ), left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), and rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC). The bilateral IPL, right AI, left pSTS, pTPJ, and RLPFC were strongly associated with Empathy Quotient (EQ), whereas the bilateral IPL, right AI, left pTPJ, and dmPFC were associated with General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) score. The neural correlates of loneliness comprise widespread reduction in WMD in areas related to self- and social cognition as well as areas associated with empathy and self-efficacy. PMID:26585372

  7. White matter structures associated with loneliness in young adults.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Seishu; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Lonely individuals may exhibit dysfunction, particularly with respect to social empathy and self-efficacy. White matter (WM) structures related to loneliness have not yet been identified. We investigated the association between regional WM density (rWMD) using the UCLA Loneliness Scale in 776 healthy young students aged 18-27 years old. Loneliness scores were negatively correlated with rWMD in eight clusters: the bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL), right anterior insula (AI), posterior temporoparietal junction (pTPJ), left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), and rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC). The bilateral IPL, right AI, left pSTS, pTPJ, and RLPFC were strongly associated with Empathy Quotient (EQ), whereas the bilateral IPL, right AI, left pTPJ, and dmPFC were associated with General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) score. The neural correlates of loneliness comprise widespread reduction in WMD in areas related to self- and social cognition as well as areas associated with empathy and self-efficacy. PMID:26585372

  8. Cognitive Processing Speed in Older Adults: Relationship with White Matter Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kerchner, Geoffrey A.; Racine, Caroline A.; Hale, Sandra; Wilheim, Reva; Laluz, Victor; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive processing slows with age. We sought to determine the importance of white matter integrity, assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), at influencing cognitive processing speed among normal older adults, assessed using a novel battery of computerized, non-verbal, choice reaction time tasks. We studied 131 cognitively normal adults aged 55–87 using a cross-sectional design. Each participant underwent our test battery, as well as MRI with DTI. We carried out cross-subject comparisons using tract-based spatial statistics. As expected, reaction time slowed significantly with age. In diffuse areas of frontal and parietal white matter, especially the anterior corpus callosum, fractional anisotropy values correlated negatively with reaction time. The genu and body of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus were among the areas most involved. This relationship was not explained by gray or white matter atrophy or by white matter lesion volume. In a statistical mediation analysis, loss of white matter integrity mediated the relationship between age and cognitive processing speed. PMID:23185621

  9. Altered White Matter Microstructure in Adolescents and Adults with Bulimia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaofu; Stefan, Mihaela; Terranova, Kate; Steinglass, Joanna; Marsh, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    Previous data suggest structural and functional deficits in frontal control circuits in adolescents and adults with bulimia nervosa (BN), but less is known about the microstructure of white matter in these circuits early in the course of the disorder. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were acquired from 28 female adolescents and adults with BN and 28 age- and BMI-matched healthy female participants. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was used to detect group differences in white matter microstructure and explore the differential effects of age on white matter microstructure across groups. Significant reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA) were detected in the BN compared with healthy control group in multiple tracts including forceps minor and major, superior longitudinal, inferior fronto-occipital, and uncinate fasciculi, anterior thalamic radiation, cingulum, and corticospinal tract. FA reductions in forceps and frontotemporal tracts correlated inversely with symptom severity and Stroop interference in the BN group. These findings suggest that white matter microstructure is abnormal in BN in tracts extending through frontal and temporoparietal cortices, especially in those with the most severe symptoms. Age-related differences in both FA and RD in these tracts in BN compared with healthy individuals may represent an abnormal trajectory of white matter development that contributes to the persistence of functional impairments in self-regulation in BN. PMID:26647975

  10. Relationship of a variant in the NTRK1 gene to white matter microstructure in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Braskie, Meredith N; Jahanshad, Neda; Stein, Jason L; Barysheva, Marina; Johnson, Kori; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Ringman, John M; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    The NTRK1 gene (also known as TRKA) encodes a high affinity receptor for NGF, a neurotrophin involved in nervous system development and myelination. NTRK1 has been implicated in neurological function via links between the T allele at rs6336 (NTRK1-T) and schizophrenia risk. A variant in the neurotrophin gene, BDNF, was previously associated with white matter integrity in young adults, highlighting the importance of neurotrophins to white matter development. We hypothesized that NTRK1-T would relate to lower FA in healthy adults. We scanned 391 healthy adult human twins and their siblings (mean age: 23.6 ± 2.2 years; 31 NTRK1-T carriers, 360 non-carriers) using 105-gradient diffusion tensor imaging at 4 Tesla. We evaluated in brain white matter how NTRK1-T and NTRK1 rs4661063 allele A (rs4661063-A, which is in moderate linkage disequilibrium with rs6336) related to voxelwise fractional anisotropy – a common diffusion tensor imaging measure of white matter microstructure. We used mixed-model regression to control for family relatedness, age, and sex. The sample was split in half to test results reproducibility. The false discovery rate method corrected for voxelwise multiple comparisons. NTRK1-T and rs4661063-A correlated with lower white matter fractional anisotropy, independent of age and sex (multiple comparisons corrected: false discovery rate critical p = 0.038 for NTRK1-T and 0.013 for rs4661063-A). In each half-sample, the NTRK1-T effect was replicated in the cingulum, corpus callosum, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, superior corona radiata, and uncinate fasciculus. Our results suggest that NTRK1-T is important for developing white matter microstructure. PMID:22539856

  11. Pathologic staging of white matter lesions in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy/leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids.

    PubMed

    Alturkustani, Murad; Keith, Julia; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Rademakers, Rosa; Ang, Lee-Cyn

    2015-03-01

    The pathologic features of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy/leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids (ALAS) are variable, and this has led to different hypotheses as to whether primarily demyelination or axonopathy may underlie this disorder. Typical ALAS pathology is rarely accompanied by focal multiple sclerosis (MS)-like plaques. In ALAS pathology accompanied by focal multiple sclerosis (MS)-like plaques cases, the pathologic features cannot be distinguished from those of progressive MS with diffusely abnormal white matter. To clarify these issues, we examined neuropathologic features in 159 representative samples from 5 ALAS cases (3 men and 2 women aged 39-61 years) and in 95 representative samples from 3 chronic MS cases (1 man and 2 women aged 50-73 years). The white matter abnormalities in ALAS cases were characterized by 3 evolving stages: 1) white matter with numerous spheroids in a background of well-myelinated fibers; 2) moderate loss of myelinated fibers with sparse to moderate number of spheroids; and 3) leukodystrophy-like pattern of confluent axonal and myelin loss. The application of this staging system suggests that myelin loss in ALAS is preceded by axonopathy. In progressive MS cases, the diffusely abnormal white matter pathology could be attributed to both primary demyelination and axonopathy. Some cases with predominant axonopathy are difficult to distinguish from cases with ALAS. PMID:25668567

  12. Grammar learning in older adults is linked to white matter microstructure and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Daria; Meinzer, Marcus; Lindenberg, Robert; Witte, A Veronica; Flöel, Agnes

    2012-09-01

    Age-related decline in cognitive function has been linked to alterations of white matter and functional brain connectivity. With regard to language, aging has been shown to be associated with impaired syntax processing, but the underlying structural and functional correlates are poorly understood. In the present study, we used an artificial grammar learning (AGL) task to determine the ability to extract grammatical rules from new material in healthy older adults. White matter microstructure and resting-state functional connectivity (FC) of task-relevant brain regions were assessed using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). AGL performance correlated positively with fractional anisotropy (FA) underlying left and right Brodmann areas (BA) 44/45 and in tracts originating from left BA 44/45. An inverse relationship was found between task performance and FC of left and right BA 44/45, linking lower performance to stronger inter-hemispheric functional coupling. Our results suggest that white matter microstructure underlying specific prefrontal regions and their functional coupling affect acquisition of syntactic knowledge in the aging brain, offering further insight into mechanisms of functional decline in older adults. PMID:22659480

  13. White matter abnormalities in an adult patient with l-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Seiichiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Shino, Shimada; Shimojima, Keiko; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    l-2-Hydroxyglutaric aciduria (l-2-HGA) is a rare inborn error of metabolism. Mainly, patients with this disorder exhibit neurological symptoms and characteristic neuroradiological findings, such as subcortical white matter abnormalities, which are believed to be caused by the toxicity of the accumulation of l-2-hydroxyglutaric acid. A genotype-first approach of the whole exome sequence was used to identify compound heterozygous mutations, c.584A>G (p.Y195C) and c.772T>C (p.C258R), in L2HGDH, the gene responsible for this disorder, in an adult patient with intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy. A retrospective assay confirmed the increased concentrations of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid in the urine. These results suggested that neuroradiological findings of subcortical white matter abnormalities are characteristic of l-2-HGA and that clinical exome sequencing has sufficient power to compensate for insufficient clinical evaluations. PMID:25982940

  14. Clinical significance of brain white matter hyperintensities in young adults with psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Breeze, Janis L; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Hong, Xiaoni; Frazier, Jean A; Renshaw, Perry F

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides detailed images of brain anatomy, with especially clear definition of gray and white matter structures. Several brain MRI studies have suggested that adults with bipolar disorder (BD) are more likely to have "white matter hyperintensities" (WMH) than adults without BD. The disproportionately greater frequency of these lesions in otherwise physically healthy patients suggests that the illness itself, or treatments used to control the illness, may be risk factors for the development of white matter changes. Similarly, WMH may be an etiological factor for some types of BD. In addition to reviewing the relevant literature, this research study attempted to determine whether lithium treatment is associated with an increased prevalence of WMH in young adults with psychiatric illness. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated over 600 brain MRI scans from inpatients at McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts. We controlled for possible confounding variables such as age, vascular disease, substance abuse, and markers of illness severity. We found that individuals with BD were no more likely to have WMH than other psychiatric patients. Lithium use was nonsignificantly associated with the presence of WMH. A multivariate regression model for the presence of WMH showed that heart disease, female gender, and multiple psychiatric admissions were significant predictors of WMH. This study does not support previous findings that BD, compared to other psychiatric illnesses, was associated with increased risk of WMH. Lithium use may be subtly associated with WMH. Our results are consistent with previous research that found an association between cardiovascular disease, advanced age, and the presence of WMH, though our analysis appears to be unique in its inclusion of cardiovascular disease as a risk factor in young adults with psychiatric illness. PMID:14555427

  15. Parahippocampal white matter volume predicts Alzheimer's disease risk in cognitively normal old adults.

    PubMed

    Stoub, Travis R; Detoledo-Morrell, Leyla; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2014-08-01

    An in vivo marker of the underlying pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is atrophy in select brain regions detected with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although gray matter changes have been documented to be predictive of cognitive decline culminating in AD among healthy older adults, very little attention has been given to alterations in white matter as a possible MRI biomarker predictive of AD. In this investigation, we examined parahippocampal white matter (PWM) volume derived from baseline MRI scans in 2 independent samples of 65 cognitively normal older adults, followed longitudinally, to determine if it was predictive of AD risk. The average follow-up period for the 2 samples was 8.5 years. Comparisons between the stable participants (N = 50) and those who declined to AD (N = 15) over time revealed a significant difference in baseline PWM volume (p < 0.001). Furthermore, baseline PWM volume was predictive not only of time to AD (hazard ratio = 3.1, p < 0.05), but also of baseline episodic memory performance (p = 0.041). These results demonstrate that PWM atrophy provides a sensitive MRI biomarker of AD dementia risk among those with normal cognitive function. PMID:24656833

  16. Brain white matter structure and COMT gene are linked to second-language learning in adults.

    PubMed

    Mamiya, Ping C; Richards, Todd L; Coe, Bradley P; Eichler, Evan E; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-06-28

    Adult human brains retain the capacity to undergo tissue reorganization during second-language learning. Brain-imaging studies show a relationship between neuroanatomical properties and learning for adults exposed to a second language. However, the role of genetic factors in this relationship has not been investigated. The goal of the current study was twofold: (i) to characterize the relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and second-language immersion using diffusion tensor imaging, and (ii) to determine whether polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene affect the relationship. We recruited incoming Chinese students enrolled in the University of Washington and scanned their brains one time. We measured the diffusion properties of the white matter fiber tracts and correlated them with the number of days each student had been in the immersion program at the time of the brain scan. We found that higher numbers of days in the English immersion program correlated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. We show that fractional anisotropy declined once the subjects finished the immersion program. The relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and immersion varied in subjects with different COMT genotypes. Subjects with the Methionine (Met)/Valine (Val) and Val/Val genotypes showed higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity during immersion, which reversed immediately after immersion ended, whereas those with the Met/Met genotype did not show these relationships. Statistical modeling revealed that subjects' grades in the language immersion program were best predicted by fractional anisotropy and COMT genotype. PMID:27298360

  17. Brain white matter structure and COMT gene are linked to second-language learning in adults

    PubMed Central

    Mamiya, Ping C.; Richards, Todd L.; Coe, Bradley P.; Eichler, Evan E.; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Adult human brains retain the capacity to undergo tissue reorganization during second-language learning. Brain-imaging studies show a relationship between neuroanatomical properties and learning for adults exposed to a second language. However, the role of genetic factors in this relationship has not been investigated. The goal of the current study was twofold: (i) to characterize the relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and second-language immersion using diffusion tensor imaging, and (ii) to determine whether polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene affect the relationship. We recruited incoming Chinese students enrolled in the University of Washington and scanned their brains one time. We measured the diffusion properties of the white matter fiber tracts and correlated them with the number of days each student had been in the immersion program at the time of the brain scan. We found that higher numbers of days in the English immersion program correlated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. We show that fractional anisotropy declined once the subjects finished the immersion program. The relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and immersion varied in subjects with different COMT genotypes. Subjects with the Methionine (Met)/Valine (Val) and Val/Val genotypes showed higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity during immersion, which reversed immediately after immersion ended, whereas those with the Met/Met genotype did not show these relationships. Statistical modeling revealed that subjects’ grades in the language immersion program were best predicted by fractional anisotropy and COMT genotype. PMID:27298360

  18. Association of television violence exposure with executive functioning and white matter volume in young adult males.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Tom A; Kronenberger, William G; Wang, Yang; Anderson, Caitlin C; Mathews, Vincent P

    2014-07-01

    Prior research has indicated that self-reported violent media exposure is associated with poorer performance on some neuropsychological tests in adolescents. This study aimed to examine the relationship of executive functioning to violent television viewing in healthy young adult males and examine how brain structure is associated with media exposure measures. Sixty-five healthy adult males (ages 18-29) with minimal video game experience estimated their television viewing habits over the past year and, during the subsequent week, recorded television viewing time and characteristics in a daily media diary. Participants then completed a battery of neuropsychological laboratory tests quantifying executive functions and underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Aggregate measures of executive functioning were not associated with measures of overall television viewing (any content type) during the past week or year. However, the amount of television viewing of violent content only, as indicated by both past-year and daily diary measures, was associated with poorer scores on an aggregate score of inhibition, interference control and attention, with no relationship to a composite working memory score. In addition, violent television exposure, as measured with daily media diaries, was associated with reduced frontoparietal white matter volume. Future longitudinal work is necessary to resolve whether individuals with poor executive function and slower white matter growth are more drawn to violent programming, or if extensive media violence exposure modifies cognitive control mechanisms mediated primarily via prefrontal cortex. Impaired inhibitory mechanisms may be related to reported increases in aggression with higher media violence exposure. PMID:24836970

  19. White Matter Microstructural Organization Is Higher with Age in Adult Superior Cerebellar Peduncles

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Richard A.; Allin, Matthew; Picchioni, Marco M.; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; McGuire, Philip K.

    2016-01-01

    Using diffusion tensor imaging, we conducted an exploratory investigation of the relationship between white matter tract microstructure and age in 200 healthy adult subjects using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Though most tracts showed the slight decline in microstructural organization with age widely noted, in both superior cerebellar peduncles (SCP) it correlated positively with age, a result not previously reported. We confirmed this by using an alternative method, and by repeating our TBSS analysis in an additional sample of 133 healthy adults. In exploring this surprising result we considered the possibility that this might arise from the continual cognitive and motor refinement that is enacted in the cerebellum: we found that tract microstructure in both SCPs was also strongly correlated with IQ, again in contrast with all other tracts, and its relationship with age mediated by IQ, as a training model would predict. PMID:27148043

  20. White Matter Microstructural Organization Is Higher with Age in Adult Superior Cerebellar Peduncles.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Richard A; Allin, Matthew; Picchioni, Marco M; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; McGuire, Philip K

    2016-01-01

    Using diffusion tensor imaging, we conducted an exploratory investigation of the relationship between white matter tract microstructure and age in 200 healthy adult subjects using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Though most tracts showed the slight decline in microstructural organization with age widely noted, in both superior cerebellar peduncles (SCP) it correlated positively with age, a result not previously reported. We confirmed this by using an alternative method, and by repeating our TBSS analysis in an additional sample of 133 healthy adults. In exploring this surprising result we considered the possibility that this might arise from the continual cognitive and motor refinement that is enacted in the cerebellum: we found that tract microstructure in both SCPs was also strongly correlated with IQ, again in contrast with all other tracts, and its relationship with age mediated by IQ, as a training model would predict. PMID:27148043

  1. Cerebral White Matter Integrity Mediates Adult Age Differences in Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, David J.; Spaniol, Julia; Costello, Matthew C.; Bucur, Barbara; White, Leonard E.; Cabeza, Roberto; Davis, Simon W.; Dennis, Nancy A.; Provenzale, James M.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has established that age-related decline occurs in measures of cerebral white matter integrity, but the role of this decline in age-related cognitive changes is not clear. To conclude that white matter integrity has a mediating (causal) contribution, it is necessary to demonstrate that statistical control of the white…

  2. Objective Measures of Physical Activity, White Matter Integrity and Cognitive Status in Adults Over Age 80

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qu; Glynn, Nancy W.; Erickson, Kirk I.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Yaffe, Kristine; Harris, Tamara B.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Newman, Anne B.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Saxton, Judith; Rosano, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of physical activity (PA) are consistently shown in older adults, but the neural substrates, particularly in white matter (WM), are understudied, especially in very old adults with the fastest growth rate and the highest risk of dementia. This study quantified the association between PA and WM integrity in adults over 80. The moderating effects of cardiometabolic conditions, physical functional limitations and WM hyperintensities were also examined, as they can affect PA and brain integrity. Fractional anisotropy (FA) from normal-appearing WM via diffusion tensor imaging and WM hyperintensities were obtained in 90 participants (mean age=87.4, 51.1% female, 55.6% white) with concurrent objective measures of steps, active energy expenditure (AEE in kcal), duration (minutes), and intensity (Metabolic equivalents, METs) via SenseWear Armband. Clinical adjudication of cognitive status, prevalence of stroke and diabetes, systolic blood pressure, and gait speed were assessed at time of neuroimaging. Participants were on average sedentary (mean±SD/day: 1766±1345 steps, 202±311 kcal, 211±39 minutes, 1.8±1.1 METs). Higher steps, AEE and duration, but not intensity, were significantly associated with higher FA. Associations were localized in frontal and temporal areas. Moderating effects of cardiometabolic conditions, physical functional limitations, and WM hyperintensities were not significant. Neither FA nor PA was related to cognitive status. Older adults with a sedentary lifestyle and a wide range of cardiometabolic conditions and physical functional limitations, displayed higher WM integrity in relation to higher PA. Studies of very old adults to quantify the role of PA in reducing dementia burden via WM integrity are warranted. PMID:25655514

  3. White matter microstructure and the variable adult outcome of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Philip; Sudre, Gustavo; Wharton, Amy; Weingart, Daniel; Sharp, Wendy; Sarlls, Joelle

    2015-02-01

    Changes in cerebral cortical anatomy have been tied to the clinical course of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We now ask if alterations in white matter tract microstructure are likewise linked with the adult outcome of childhood ADHD. Seventy-five young adults, 32 with ADHD persisting from childhood and 43 with symptom remission were contrasted against 74 never-affected comparison subjects. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we defined fractional anisotropy, a metric related to white matter microstructure, along with measures of diffusion perpendicular (radial) and parallel (axial) to the axon. Analyses were adjusted for head motion, age and sex, and controlled for multiple comparisons and medication history. Tract-based analyses showed that greater adult inattention, but not hyperactivity-impulsivity, was associated with significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the left uncinate (standardized β=-0.37, t=3.28, p=0.002) and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (standardized β=-0.37, t=3.29, p=0.002). The ADHD group with symptoms persisting into adulthood had significantly lower fractional anisotropy than the never-affected controls in these tracts, differences associated with medium to large effect sizes. By contrast, the ADHD group that remitted by adulthood did not differ significantly from controls. The anomalies were found in tracts that connect components of neural systems pertinent to ADHD, such as attention control (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus) and emotion regulation and the processing of reward (the uncinate fasciculus). Change in radial rather than axial diffusivity was the primary driver of this effect, suggesting pathophysiological processes including altered myelination as future targets for pharmacological and behavioral interventions. PMID:25241803

  4. White Matter Microstructure and the Variable Adult Outcome of Childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Philip; Sudre, Gustavo; Wharton, Amy; Weingart, Daniel; Sharp, Wendy; Sarlls, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Changes in cerebral cortical anatomy have been tied to the clinical course of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We now ask if alterations in white matter tract microstructure are likewise linked with the adult outcome of childhood ADHD. Seventy-five young adults, 32 with ADHD persisting from childhood and 43 with symptom remission were contrasted against 74 never-affected comparison subjects. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we defined fractional anisotropy, a metric related to white matter microstructure, along with measures of diffusion perpendicular (radial) and parallel (axial) to the axon. Analyses were adjusted for head motion, age and sex, and controlled for multiple comparisons and medication history. Tract-based analyses showed that greater adult inattention, but not hyperactivity–impulsivity, was associated with significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the left uncinate (standardized β=−0.37, t=3.28, p=0.002) and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (standardized β=−0.37, t=3.29, p=0.002). The ADHD group with symptoms persisting into adulthood had significantly lower fractional anisotropy than the never-affected controls in these tracts, differences associated with medium to large effect sizes. By contrast, the ADHD group that remitted by adulthood did not differ significantly from controls. The anomalies were found in tracts that connect components of neural systems pertinent to ADHD, such as attention control (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus) and emotion regulation and the processing of reward (the uncinate fasciculus). Change in radial rather than axial diffusivity was the primary driver of this effect, suggesting pathophysiological processes including altered myelination as future targets for pharmacological and behavioral interventions. PMID:25241803

  5. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN WHITE MATTER MICROSTRUCTURE, EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS AND PROCESSING SPEED IN OLDER ADULTS: THE IMPACT OF VASCULAR HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Heidi I.L.; Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Williams, Victoria J.; Van Boxtel, Martin P.J.; van der Elst, Wim; Jolles, Jelle; Verhey, Frans R. J.; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Salat, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral white matter damage is a commonly reported consequence of healthy aging, but is also associated with cognitive decline and dementia. The aetiology of this damage is unclear, however, individuals with hypertension have a greater burden of white matter signal abnormalities (WMSA) on MR imaging than those without hypertension. It is therefore possible that elevated blood pressure (BP) impacts white matter tissue structure which in turn has a negative impact on cognition. However, little information exists about whether vascular health indexed by BP mediates the relationship between cognition and white matter tissue structure. We used diffusion tensor imaging to examine the impact of vascular health on regional associations between white matter integrity and cognition in healthy older adults spanning the normotensive to moderate-severe hypertensive BP range (43–87 years; N=128). We examined how white matter structure was associated with performance on tests of two cognitive domains, executive functioning (EF) and processing speed (PS), and how patterns of regional associations were modified by BP and WMSA. Multiple linear regression and structural equation models demonstrated associations between tissue structure, EF and PS in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital white matter regions. Radial diffusivity was more prominently associated with performance than axial diffusivity. BP only minimally influenced the relationship between white matter integrity, EF and PS. However, WMSA volume had a major impact on neurocognitive associations. This suggests that, although BP and WMSA are causally related, these differential metrics of vascular health may act via independent pathways to influence brain structure, EF and PS. PMID:21954054

  6. Association between white matter microstructure, executive functions, and processing speed in older adults: the impact of vascular health.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Heidi I L; Leritz, Elizabeth C; Williams, Victoria J; Van Boxtel, Martin P J; van der Elst, Wim; Jolles, Jelle; Verhey, Frans R J; McGlinchey, Regina E; Milberg, William P; Salat, David H

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral white matter damage is not only a commonly reported consequence of healthy aging, but is also associated with cognitive decline and dementia. The aetiology of this damage is unclear; however, individuals with hypertension have a greater burden of white matter signal abnormalities (WMSA) on MR imaging than those without hypertension. It is therefore possible that elevated blood pressure (BP) impacts white matter tissue structure which in turn has a negative impact on cognition. However, little information exists about whether vascular health indexed by BP mediates the relationship between cognition and white matter tissue structure. We used diffusion tensor imaging to examine the impact of vascular health on regional associations between white matter integrity and cognition in healthy older adults spanning the normotensive to moderate-severe hypertensive BP range (43-87 years; N = 128). We examined how white matter structure was associated with performance on tests of two cognitive domains, executive functioning (EF) and processing speed (PS), and how patterns of regional associations were modified by BP and WMSA. Multiple linear regression and structural equation models demonstrated associations between tissue structure, EF and PS in frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital white matter regions. Radial diffusivity was more prominently associated with performance than axial diffusivity. BP only minimally influenced the relationship between white matter integrity, EF and PS. However, WMSA volume had a major impact on neurocognitive associations. This suggests that, although BP and WMSA are causally related, these differential metrics of vascular health may act via independent pathways to influence brain structure, EF and PS. PMID:21954054

  7. Deviant white matter structure in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder points to aberrant myelination and affects neuropsychological performance.

    PubMed

    Onnink, A Marten H; Zwiers, Marcel P; Hoogman, Martine; Mostert, Jeanette C; Dammers, Janneke; Kan, Cornelis C; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Schene, Aart H; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood is characterized by gray and white matter abnormalities in several brain areas. Considerably less is known about white matter microstructure in adults with ADHD and its relation with clinical symptoms and cognitive performance. In 107 adult ADHD patients and 109 gender-, age- and IQ-matched controls, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate whole-skeleton changes of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean, axial, and radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD). Additionally, we studied the relation of FA and MD values with symptom severity and cognitive performance on tasks measuring working memory, attention, inhibition, and delay discounting. In comparison to controls, participants with ADHD showed reduced FA in corpus callosum, bilateral corona radiata, and thalamic radiation. Higher MD and RD were found in overlapping and even more widespread areas in both hemispheres, also encompassing internal and external capsule, sagittal stratum, fornix, and superior lateral fasciculus. Values of FA and MD were not associated with symptom severity. However, within some white matter clusters that distinguished patients from controls, worse inhibition performance was associated with reduced FA and more impulsive decision making was associated with increased MD. This study shows widespread differences in white matter integrity between adults with persistent ADHD and healthy individuals. Changes in RD suggest aberrant myelination as a pathophysiological factor in persistent ADHD. The microstructural differences in adult ADHD may contribute to poor inhibition and greater impulsivity but appear to be independent of disease severity. PMID:25956761

  8. Adaptive Modulation of Adult Brain Gray and White Matter to High Altitude: Structural MRI Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Haiyan; Li, Jinqiang; Chen, Ji; Han, Qiaoqing; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate brain structural alterations in adult immigrants who adapted to high altitude (HA). Voxel-based morphometry analysis of gray matter (GM) volumes, surface-based analysis of cortical thickness, and Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analysis of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) based on MRI images were conducted on 16 adults (20–22 years) who immigrated to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (2300–4400 m) for 2 years. They had no chronic mountain sickness. Control group consisted of 16 matched sea level subjects. A battery of neuropsychological tests was also conducted. HA immigrants showed significantly decreased GM volumes in the right postcentral gyrus and right superior frontal gyrus, and increased GM volumes in the right middle frontal gyrus, right parahippocampal gyrus, right inferior and middle temporal gyri, bilateral inferior ventral pons, and right cerebellum crus1. While there was some divergence in the left hemisphere, surface-based patterns of GM changes in the right hemisphere resembled those seen for VBM analysis. FA changes were observed in multiple WM tracts. HA immigrants showed significant impairment in pulmonary function, increase in reaction time, and deficit in mental rotation. Parahippocampal and middle frontal GM volumes correlated with vital capacity. Superior frontal GM volume correlated with mental rotation and postcentral GM correlated with reaction time. Paracentral lobule and frontal FA correlated with mental rotation reaction time. There might be structural modifications occurred in the adult immigrants during adaptation to HA. The changes in GM may be related to impaired respiratory function and psychological deficits. PMID:23874692

  9. INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN SERUM CHOLESTEROL IS ASSOCIATED WITH REGIONAL WHITE MATTER TISSUE INTEGRITY IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Victoria J.; Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Shepel, Juli; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Rudolph, James L.; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Salat, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated links among vascular health and the occurrence of stroke, mild cognitive decline, and dementia in older adults. However, little is known about whether normal variation in vascular indicators may be related to changes in neural tissue integrity. Even less is known about how the brain is affected by cholesterol levels in the normal to moderate risk range, leading up to overt disease pathology. This study examined associations between serum lipid levels and DTI indicators of white matter (WM) structural integrity in a sample of 125 generally healthy older adults aged 43–87 years. Whole-brain voxelwise analysis, controlling for age and gender, revealed low density lipoprotein levels (LDL) as the most robust correlate of regional WM structural integrity of the measured lipids. Higher LDL was associated with decreased WM integrity in right frontal and temporal regions, the superior longitudinal fasciculus and internal/external capsules. Increasing LDL was associated with increased radial and axial diffusivity; however, more widespread statistical effects were found for radial diffusivity. These findings suggest that normal inter-individual variation in lipid levels is associated with compromised regional WM integrity, even in individuals below clinical thresholds for hyperlipidemia. Given the prevalence of cholesterol-associated sequelae in older adults, and mounting evidence suggesting a vascular role in the etiology of dementia, the current data suggest that understanding the relationship between cholesterol and brain tissue microstructure may have important clinical implications for early detection of vascular-related cognitive disorders and optimal regulation of serum lipids to maintain neural health in older adults. PMID:22438182

  10. Physical activity, motor function, and white matter hyperintensity burden in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingyun; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Leurgans, Sue E.; Turner, Arlener D.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Bennett, David A.; Buchman, Aron S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that physical activity modifies the association between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden and motor function in healthy older persons without dementia. Methods: Total daily activity (exercise and nonexercise physical activity) was measured for up to 11 days with actigraphy (Actical; Philips Respironics, Bend, OR) in 167 older adults without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Eleven motor performances were summarized into a previously described global motor score. WMH volume was expressed as percent of intracranial volume. Linear regression models, adjusted for age, education, and sex, were performed with total WMH volume as the predictor and global motor score as the outcome. Terms for total daily physical activity and its interaction with WMH volume were then added to the model. Results: Higher WMH burden was associated with lower motor function (p = 0.006), and total daily activity was positively associated with motor function (p = 0.002). Total daily activity modified the association between WMH and motor function (p = 0.007). WMH burden was not associated with motor function in persons with high activity (90th percentile). By contrast, higher WMH burden remained associated with lower motor function in persons with average (50th percentile; estimate = −0.304, slope = −0.133) and low (10th percentile; estimate = −1.793, slope = −0.241) activity. Conclusions: Higher levels of physical activity may reduce the effect of WMH burden on motor function in healthy older adults. PMID:25762710

  11. Peripheral sphingolipids are associated with variation in white matter microstructure in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Christopher E; Venkatraman, Vijay K; An, Yang; Landman, Bennett A; Davatzikos, Christos; Ratnam Bandaru, Veera Venkata; Haughey, Norman J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mielke, Michelle M; Resnick, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Sphingolipids serve important structural and functional roles in cellular membranes and myelin sheaths. Plasma sphingolipids have been shown to predict cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. However, the association between plasma sphingolipid levels and brain white matter (WM) microstructure has not been examined. We investigated whether plasma sphingolipids (ceramides and sphingomyelins) were associated with magnetic resonance imaging-based diffusion measures, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity, 10.5 years later in 17 WM regions of 150 cognitively normal adults (mean age 67.2). Elevated ceramide species (C20:0, C22:0, C22:1, and C24:1) were associated with lower FA in multiple WM regions, including total cerebral WM, anterior corona radiata, and the cingulum of the cingulate gyrus. Higher sphingomyelins (C18:1 and C20:1) were associated with lower FA in regions such as the anterior corona radiata and body of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, lower sphingomyelin to ceramide ratios (C22:0, C24:0, and C24:1) were associated with lower FA or higher mean diffusivity in regions including the superior and posterior corona radiata. However, although these associations were significant at the a priori p < 0.05, only associations with some regional diffusion measures for ceramide C22:0 and sphingomyelin C18:1 survived correction for multiple comparisons. These findings suggest plasma sphingolipids are associated with variation in WM microstructure in cognitively normal aging. PMID:27255825

  12. White matter and memory in healthy adults: Coupled changes over two years.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrew R; Prindle, John J; Brandmaier, Andreas M; Raz, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Numerous cross-sectional studies have used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to link age-related differences in white matter (WM) anisotropy and concomitant decrements in cognitive ability. Due to a dearth of longitudinal evidence, the relationship between changes in diffusion properties of WM and cognitive performance remains unclear. Here we examine the relationship between two-year changes in WM organization and cognitive performance in healthy adults (N=96, age range at baseline=18-79 years). We used latent change score models (LCSM) to evaluate changes in age-sensitive cognitive abilities - fluid intelligence and associative memory. WM changes were assessed by fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in WM regions that are considered part of established memory networks and exhibited individual differences in change. In modeling change, we postulated reciprocal paths between baseline measures and change factors, within and between WM and cognition domains, and accounted for individual differences in baseline age. Although baseline cross-sectional memory performance was positively associated with FA and negatively with RD, longitudinal effects told an altogether different story. Independent of age, longitudinal improvements in associative memory were significantly associated with linear reductions in FA and increases in RD. The present findings demonstrate the sensitivity of DTI-derived indices to changes in the brain and cognition and affirm the importance of longitudinal models for evaluating brain-cognition relations. PMID:26545457

  13. White matter and task-switching in young adults: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging study.

    PubMed

    Vallesi, Antonino; Mastrorilli, Eleonora; Causin, Francesco; D'Avella, Domenico; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The capacity to flexibly switch between different task rules has been previously associated with distributed fronto-parietal networks, predominantly in the left hemisphere for phasic switching sub-processes, and in the right hemisphere for more tonic aspects of task-switching, such as rule maintenance and management. It is thus likely that the white matter (WM) connectivity between these regions is critical in sustaining the flexibility required by task-switching. This study examined the relationship between WM microstructure in young adults and task-switching performance in different paradigms: classical shape-color, spatial and grammatical tasks. The main results showed an association between WM integrity in anterior portions of the corpus callosum (genu and body) and a sustained measure of task-switching performance. In particular, a higher fractional anisotropy and a lower radial diffusivity in these WM regions were associated with smaller mixing costs both in the spatial task-switching paradigm and in the shape-color one, as confirmed by a conjunction analysis. No association was found with behavioral measures obtained in the grammatical task-switching paradigm. The switch costs, a measure of phasic switching processes, were not correlated with WM microstructure in any task. This study shows that a more efficient inter-hemispheric connectivity within the frontal lobes favors sustained task-switching processes, especially with task contexts embedding non-verbal components. PMID:27217212

  14. White matter microstructure in the executive network associated with aggression in healthy adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Bato, Angelica A; Blair, Melanie A; DeRosse, Pamela; Szeszko, Philip R; Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-09-01

    Predicting which individuals may engage in aggressive behavior is of interest in today's society; however, there is little data on the neural basis of aggression in healthy individuals. Here, we tested whether regional differences in white matter (WM) microstructure were associated with later reports of aggressive tendencies. We recontacted healthy young adults an average of 3 years after they underwent research MRI scans. Via electronic survey, we administered the Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire. We divided aggression into Aggressive Thoughts (Anger and Hostility subscales) and Aggressive Acts (Verbal and Physical subscales) and used Tract-Based Spatial Statistics to test the relationship of those measures to WM microstructure. In 45 individuals age 15-30 at baseline, we observed significant relationships between Aggressive Acts and fractional anisotropy (FA) in a parietal region consistent with the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). As the SLF has an established relationship to executive function, we performed an exploratory analysis in a subset of individuals with working memory data. Decreased FA in executive network regions, as well as working memory performance, were associated with later self-reported aggressive tendencies. This has implications for our healthy behavior understanding of as well as that of patient populations known to have executive dysfunction. PMID:25691778

  15. Physical Activity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Are Beneficial for White Matter in Low-Fit Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Burzynska, Agnieszka Zofia; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Voss, Michelle W.; Wong, Chelsea N.; Gothe, Neha P.; Olson, Erin A.; Knecht, Anya; Lewis, Andrew; Monti, Jim M.; Cooke, Gillian E.; Wojcicki, Thomas R.; Fanning, Jason; Chung, Hyondo David; Awick, Elisabeth; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with better cognitive function in late life, but the neural correlates for these relationships are unclear. To study these correlates, we examined the association of both PA and CRF with measures of white matter (WM) integrity in 88 healthy low-fit adults (age 60–78). Using accelerometry, we objectively measured sedentary behavior, light PA, and moderate to vigorous PA (MV-PA) over a week. We showed that greater MV-PA was related to lower volume of WM lesions. The association between PA and WM microstructural integrity (measured with diffusion tensor imaging) was region-specific: light PA was related to temporal WM, while sedentary behavior was associated with lower integrity in the parahippocampal WM. Our findings highlight that engaging in PA of various intensity in parallel with avoiding sedentariness are important in maintaining WM health in older age, supporting public health recommendations that emphasize the importance of active lifestyle. PMID:25229455

  16. Disruption of White Matter Integrity in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors: Correlates with Long-Term Intellectual Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Although chemotherapy and radiation treatment have contributed to increased survivorship, treatment-induced brain injury has been a concern when examining long-term intellectual outcomes of survivors. Specifically, disruption of brain white matter integrity and its relationship to intellectual outcomes in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors needs to be better understood. Methods Fifty-four participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging in addition to structural MRI and an intelligence test (IQ). Voxel-wise group comparisons of fractional anisotropy calculated from DTI data were performed using Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) on 27 survivors (14 treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy and 13 treated without radiation treatment on average over 13 years since diagnosis) and 27 healthy comparison participants. Whole brain white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) differences were explored between each group. The relationships between IQ and FA in the regions where statistically lower FA values were found in survivors were examined, as well as the role of cumulative neurological factors. Results The group of survivors treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy had lower IQ relative to the group of survivors without radiation treatment and the healthy comparison group. TBSS identified white matter regions with significantly different mean fractional anisotropy between the three different groups. A lower level of white matter integrity was found in the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated group compared to the group without radiation treatment and also the healthy control group. The group without radiation treatment had a lower mean FA relative to healthy controls. The white matter disruption of the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated survivors was positively correlated with IQ and cumulative neurological factors. Conclusions Lower long-term intellectual outcomes of childhood brain tumor survivors are

  17. Development of human white matter fiber pathways: From newborn to adult ages.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Andrew H; Wang, Rongpin; Wilkinson, Molly; MacDonald, Patrick; Lim, Ashley R; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-05-01

    Major long-range white matter pathways (cingulum, fornix, uncinate fasciculus [UF], inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus [IFOF], inferior longitudinal fasciculus [ILF], thalamocortical [TC], and corpus callosal [CC] pathways) were identified in eighty-three healthy humans ranging from newborn to adult ages. We tracked developmental changes using high-angular resolution diffusion MR tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient, number, length, and volume were measured in pathways in each subject. Newborns had fewer, and more sparse, pathways than those of the older subjects. FA, number, length, and volume of pathways gradually increased with age and reached a plateau between 3 and 5 years of age. Data were further analyzed by normalizing with mean adult values as well as with each subject's whole brain values. Comparing subjects of 3 years old and under to those over 3 years old, the studied pathways showed differential growth patterns. The CC, bilateral cingulum, bilateral TC, and the left IFOF pathways showed significant growth both in volume and length, while the bilateral fornix, bilateral ILF and bilateral UF showed significant growth only in volume. The TC and CC took similar growth patterns with the whole brain. FA values of the cingulum and IFOF, and the length of ILF showed leftward asymmetry. The fornix, ILF and UF occupied decreased space compared to the whole brain during development with higher FA values, likely corresponding to extensive maturation of the pathways compared to the mean whole brain maturation. We believe that the outcome of this study will provide an important database for future reference. PMID:26948153

  18. White matter integrity in highly traumatized adults with and without post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Fani, Negar; King, Tricia Z; Jovanovic, Tanja; Glover, Ebony M; Bradley, Bekh; Choi, Kisueng; Ely, Timothy; Gutman, David A; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-11-01

    Prior structural imaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have observed smaller volumes of the hippocampus and cingulate cortex, yet little is known about the integrity of white matter connections between these structures in PTSD samples. The few published studies using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure white matter integrity in PTSD have described individuals with focal trauma rather than chronically stressed individuals, which limits generalization of findings to this population; in addition, these studies have lacked traumatized comparison groups without PTSD. The present DTI study examined microstructural integrity of white matter tracts in a sample of highly traumatized African-American women with (n=25) and without (n=26) PTSD using a tract-based spatial statistical approach, with threshold-free cluster enhancement. Our findings indicated that, relative to comparably traumatized controls, decreased integrity (measured by fractional anisotropy) of the posterior cingulum was observed in participants with PTSD (p<0.05). These findings indicate that reduced microarchitectural integrity of the cingulum, a white matter fiber that connects the entorhinal and cingulate cortices, appears to be associated with PTSD symptomatology. The role of this pathway in problems that characterize PTSD, such as inadequate extinction of learned fear, as well as attention and explicit memory functions, are discussed. PMID:22871912

  19. Long-Term Intermittent Hypoxia Elevates Cobalt Levels in the Brain and Injures White Matter in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Sigrid C.; Lear, Jessica; Zhu, Yan; Grinspan, Judith B.; Hare, Dominic J.; Wang, SiHe; Bunch, Dustin; Doble, Philip A.; Robinson, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Exposure to the variable oxygenation patterns in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes oxidative stress within the brain. We hypothesized that this stress is associated with increased levels of redox-active metals and white matter injury. Design: Participants were randomly allocated to a control or experimental group (single independent variable). Setting: University animal house. Participants: Adult male C57BL/6J mice. Interventions: To model OSA, mice were exposed to long-term intermittent hypoxia (LTIH) for 10 hours/day for 8 weeks or sham intermittent hypoxia (SIH). Measurements and Results: Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively map the distribution of the trace elements cobalt, copper, iron, and zinc in forebrain sections. Control mice contained 62 ± 7 ng cobalt/g wet weight, whereas LTIH mice contained 5600 ± 600 ng cobalt/g wet weight (P < 0.0001). Other elements were unchanged between conditions. Cobalt was concentrated within white matter regions of the brain, including the corpus callosum. Compared to that of control mice, the corpus callosum of LTIH mice had significantly more endoplasmic reticulum stress, fewer myelin-associated proteins, disorganized myelin sheaths, and more degenerated axon profiles. Because cobalt is an essential component of vitamin B12, serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels were measured. LTIH mice had low MMA levels (P < 0.0001), indicative of increased B12 activity. Conclusions: Long-term intermittent hypoxia increases brain cobalt, predominantly in the white matter. The increased cobalt is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, myelin loss, and axonal injury. Low plasma methylmalonic acid levels are associated with white matter injury in long-term intermittent hypoxia and possibly in obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Veasey SC; Lear J; Zhu Y; Grinspan JB; Hare DJ; Wang S; Bunch D; Doble PA; Robinson SR. Long-term intermittent hypoxia elevates cobalt

  20. Prospective assessment of white matter integrity in adult stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Correa, D D; Wang, Y; West, J D; Peck, K K; Root, J C; Baser, R E; Thaler, H T; Shore, T B; Jakubowski, A; Saykin, A J; Relkin, N

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often used in the treatment of hematologic disorders. Although it can be curative, the pre-transplant conditioning regimen can be associated with neurotoxicity. In this prospective study, we examined white matter (WM) integrity with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and neuropsychological functioning before and one year after HSCT in twenty-two patients with hematologic disorders and ten healthy controls evaluated at similar intervals. Eighteen patients received conditioning treatment with high-dose (HD) chemotherapy, and four had full dose total body irradiation (fTBI) and HD chemotherapy prior to undergoing an allogeneic or autologous HSCT. The results showed a significant decrease in mean diffusivity (MD) and axial diffusivity (AD) in diffuse WM regions one year after HSCT (p-corrected <0.05) in the patient group compared to healthy controls. At baseline, patients treated with allogeneic HSCT had higher MD and AD in the left hemisphere WM than autologous HSCT patients (p-corrected <0.05). One year post-transplant, patients treated with allogeneic HSCT had lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher radial diffusivity (RD) in the right hemisphere and left frontal WM compared to patients treated with autologous HSCT (p-corrected <0.05).There were modest but significant correlations between MD values and cognitive test scores, and these were greatest for timed tests and in projection tracts. Patients showed a trend toward a decline in working memory, and had lower cognitive test scores than healthy controls at the one-year assessment. The findings suggest a relatively diffuse pattern of alterations in WM integrity in adult survivors of HSCT. PMID:26153467

  1. Gray and white matter structures in the midcingulate cortex region contribute to body mass index in Chinese young adults.

    PubMed

    He, Qinghua; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Xue, Gui; Chen, Chunhui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are rapidly becoming a central public health challenge around the world. Previous studies have suggested that elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) might be associated with structural changes in both gray and white matter, but this association is still not well understood. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between BMI and brain structure with a relatively large sample of young adults (N = 336) in a small age range (20 ± 1 years). Voxel-based morphometry results showed significant negative correlations between BMI and gray-matter volumes in the midcingulate cortex (MCC), left orbital frontal cortex, and left ventromedial prefrontal cortex. There was also a significant negative correlation between BMI and white matter integrity as indexed by fractional anisotropy in bilateral cingulum. Further tractography analysis showed a significant negative correlation between BMI and the number of fibers passing the MCC region. Regression analysis showed that gray matter and white matter in these regions both contributed to the variance of BMI. These results remained significant even when analysis was restricted to the subjects with normal weights. Finally, we found that decision-making ability (as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task) mediated the association between the structure of the MCC (a region responsible for impulse control and decision making) and BMI. These results shed light on the structural neural basis of weight variations. PMID:24146133

  2. Gray and White Matter Structures in the Midcingulate Cortex Region Contribute to Body Mass Index in Chinese Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    He, Qinghua; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Xue, Gui; Chen, Chunhui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are rapidly becoming a central public health challenge around the world. Previous studies have suggested that elevated Body Mass Index (BMI) might be associated with structural changes in both gray and white matter, but this association is still not well understood. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between BMI and brain structure with a relatively large sample of young adults (N = 336) in a small age range (20 ± 1 years). VBM results showed significant negative correlations between BMI and Gray Matter Volumes (GMV) in the MCC, left OFC, and left VMPFC. There was also a significant negative correlation between BMI and white matter integrity as indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA) in bilateral cingulum. Further tractography analysis showed a significant negative correlation between BMI and the number of fibers passing the MCC region. Regression analysis showed that gray matter and white matter in these regions both contributed to the variance of BMI. These results remained significant even when analysis was restricted to the subjects with normal-weights. Finally, we found that decision making ability (as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task) mediated the association between the structure of the MCC (a region responsible for impulse control and decision making) and BMI. These results shed light on the structural neural basis of weight variations. PMID:24146133

  3. Posterior brain white matter abnormalities in older adults with probable mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Sarah A.; Cabeen, Ryan P.; Laidlaw, David H.; Conturo, Thomas E.; Lane, Elizabeth M.; Heaps, Jodi M.; Bolzenius, Jacob D.; Baker, Laurie M.; Salminen, Lauren E.; Scott, Staci E.; Paul, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Much of the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) neuroimaging literature has exclusively focused on regions associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Little research has examined white matter abnormalities of other brain regions, including those associated with visual processing, despite evidence that other brain abnormalities appear in these regions in early disease stages. Method Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was utilized to examine participants (n = 44) that completed baseline imaging as part of a longitudinal healthy aging study. Participants were divided into two groups based on scores from the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), a brief screening tool for MCI. Participants who scored < 26 were defined as “probable MCI” while those who scored ≥ 26 were labled cognitively healthy. Two DTI indices were analyzed including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). DTI values for white matter in the lingual gyrus, cuneus, pericalcarine, fusiform gyrus and all four lobes were compared using MANOVA. Regression analyses examined the relationship between DTI indices and total MoCA score. Results Results revealed significantly lower FA in the probable MCI group in the cuneus, fusiform, pericalcarine and occipital lobe, and significantly higher MD in the temporal lobe. Fusiform FA and temporal lobe MD were significantly related to total MoCA score after accounting for age and education. Conclusions Results indicate that there are posterior white matter microstructural changes in individuals with probable MCI. These differences demonstrate that white matter abnormalities are evident among individuals with probable MCI in regions beyond those commonly associated with Alzheimer’s disease and anterior brain aging patterns. PMID:25523313

  4. Hypoxia during pregnancy in rats leads to the changes of the cerebral white matter in adult offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lingxing; Cai, Ruowei; Lv, Guorong; Huang, Ziyang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2010-05-28

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of reduced fetal oxygen supply on cerebral white matter in the adult offspring and further assess its susceptibility to postnatal hypoxia and high-fat diet. Based on a 3 x 2 full factorial design consisting of three factors of maternal hypoxia, postnatal high-fat diet, and postnatal hypoxia, the ultrastructure of myelin, axon and capillaries were observed, and the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-H+L(NF-H+L), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was analyzed in periventricular white matter of 16-month-old offspring. Demyelination, injured axon and damaged microvasculars were observed in maternal hypoxia offspring. The main effect of maternal hypoxia lead to decreased expression of MBP or NF-H+L, and increased expression of GFAP (all P < 0.05). Moreover, there was positive three-way interaction among maternal hypoxia, high-fat diet and postnatal hypoxia on MBP, NF-H+L or GFAP expression (all P < 0.05). In summary, our results indicated that maternal hypoxia during pregnancy in rats lead to changes of periventricular white matter in adult offspring, including demyelination, damaged axon and proliferated astroglia. This effect was amplified by high-fat diet and postnatal hypoxia.

  5. Neuromarkers of the common angiotensinogen polymorphism in healthy older adults: A comprehensive assessment of white matter integrity and cognition.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Lauren E; Schofield, Peter R; Pierce, Kerrie D; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Xi; Wang, Youdan; Laidlaw, David H; Cabeen, Ryan P; Conturo, Thomas E; Tate, David F; Akbudak, Erbil; Lane, Elizabeth M; Heaps, Jodi M; Bolzenius, Jacob D; Baker, Laurie M; Cagle, Lee M; Paul, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The common angiotensinogen (AGT) M268T polymorphism (rs699; historically referred to as M235T) has been identified as a significant risk factor for cerebrovascular pathologies, yet it is unclear if healthy older adults carrying the threonine amino acid variant have a greater risk for white matter damage in specific fiber tracts. Further, the impact of the threonine variant on cognitive function remains unknown. The present study utilized multiple indices of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and neuropsychological assessment to examine the integrity of specific white matter tracts and cognition between individuals with homozygous genotypes of M268T (MetMet n=27, ThrThr n=27). Differences in subcortical hyperintensity (SH) volume were also examined between groups. Results indicated that the threonine variant was associated with significantly reduced integrity in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and the cingulate gyrus segment of the cingulum bundle (cingulum CG) compared to those with the methionine variant, and poorer cognitive performance on tests of attention/processing speed and language. Despite these associations, integrity of these tracts did not significantly mediate relationships between cognition and genetic status, and SH did not differ significantly between groups. Collectively our results suggest that the threonine variant of M268T is a significant risk factor for abnormalities in specific white matter tracts and cognitive domains in healthy older adults, independent of SH burden. PMID:26318936

  6. Structural alterations of brain grey and white matter in early deaf adults.

    PubMed

    Hribar, Manja; Suput, Dušan; Carvalho, Altiere Araujo; Battelino, Saba; Vovk, Andrej

    2014-12-01

    Functional and structural brain alterations in the absence of the auditory input have been described, but the observed structural brain changes in the deaf are not uniform. Some of the previous researchers focused only on the auditory areas, while others investigated the whole brain or other selected regions of interest. Majority of studies revealed decreased white matter (WM) volume or altered WM microstructure and preserved grey matter (GM) structure of the auditory areas in the deaf. However, preserved WM and increased or decreased GM volume of the auditory areas in the deaf have also been reported. Several structural alterations in the deaf were found also outside the auditory areas, but these regions differ between the studies. The observed differences between the studies could be due to the use of different single-analysis techniques, or the diverse population sample and its size, or possibly due to the usage of hearing aids by some participating deaf subjects. To overcome the aforementioned limitations four different image-processing techniques were used to investigate changes in the brain morphology of prelingually deaf adults who have never used hearing aids. GM and WM volume of the Heschl's gyrus (HG) were measured using manual volumetry, while whole brain GM volume, thickness and surface area were assessed by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and surface-based analysis. The microstructural properties of the WM were evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The data were compared between 14 congenitally deaf adults and 14 sex- and age-matched normal hearing controls. Manual volumetry revealed preserved GM volume of the bilateral HG and significantly decreased WM volume of the left HG in the deaf. VBM showed increased cerebellar GM volume in the deaf, while no statistically significant differences were observed in the GM thickness or surface area between the groups. The results of the DTI analysis showed WM microstructural alterations between the groups in

  7. Cocaine-induced loss of white matter proteins in the adult mouse nucleus accumbens is attenuated by administration of a β-lactam antibiotic during cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Kovalevich, Jane; Corley, Gladys; Yen, William; Rawls, Scott M; Langford, Dianne

    2012-12-01

    We report significantly decreased white matter protein levels in the nucleus accumbens in an adult mouse model of chronic cocaine abuse. Previous studies from human cocaine abuse patients show disruption of white matter and myelin loss, thus supporting our observations. Understanding the neuropathological mechanisms for white matter disruption in cocaine abuse patients is complicated by polydrug use and other comorbid factors, hindering the development of effective therapeutic strategies to ameliorate damage or compliment rehabilitation programs. In this context, our data further demonstrate that cocaine-induced loss of white matter proteins is absent in mice treated with the β-lactam antibiotic, ceftriaxone, during cocaine withdrawal. Other studies report that ceftriaxone, a glutamate transporter subtype-1 activator, is neuroprotective in murine models of multiple sclerosis, thereby demonstrating potential therapeutic properties for diseases with white matter loss. Cocaine-induced white matter abnormalities likely contribute to the cognitive, motor, and psychological deficits commonly afflicting cocaine abusers, yet the underlying mechanisms responsible for these changes remain unknown. Our observations describe an adult animal model for the study of cocaine-induced myelin loss for the first time, and highlight a potential pharmacological intervention to ameliorate cocaine-induced white matter loss. PMID:23031254

  8. Cocaine-Induced Loss of White Matter Proteins in the Adult Mouse Nucleus Accumbens Is Attenuated by Administration of a β-Lactam Antibiotic during Cocaine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kovalevich, Jane; Corley, Gladys; Yen, William; Rawls, Scott M.; Langford, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    We report significantly decreased white matter protein levels in the nucleus accumbens in an adult mouse model of chronic cocaine abuse. Previous studies from human cocaine abuse patients show disruption of white matter and myelin loss, thus supporting our observations. Understanding the neuropathological mechanisms for white matter disruption in cocaine abuse patients is complicated by polydrug use and other comorbid factors, hindering the development of effective therapeutic strategies to ameliorate damage or compliment rehabilitation programs. In this context, our data further demonstrate that cocaine-induced loss of white matter proteins is absent in mice treated with the β-lactam antibiotic, ceftriaxone, during cocaine withdrawal. Other studies report that ceftriaxone, a glutamate transporter subtype-1 activator, is neuroprotective in murine models of multiple sclerosis, thereby demonstrating potential therapeutic properties for diseases with white matter loss. Cocaine-induced white matter abnormalities likely contribute to the cognitive, motor, and psychological deficits commonly afflicting cocaine abusers, yet the underlying mechanisms responsible for these changes remain unknown. Our observations describe an adult animal model for the study of cocaine-induced myelin loss for the first time, and highlight a potential pharmacological intervention to ameliorate cocaine-induced white matter loss. PMID:23031254

  9. Longitudinal Changes in White Matter Tract Integrity across the Adult Lifespan and Its Relation to Cortical Thinning

    PubMed Central

    Fjell, Anders M.; Yendiki, Anastasia; Walhovd, Kristine B.

    2016-01-01

    A causal link between decreases in white matter (WM) integrity and cortical degeneration is assumed, but there is scarce knowledge on the relationship between these changes across the adult human lifespan. We investigated changes in thickness throughout the cortical mantle and WM tract integrity derived from T1 and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in 201 healthy adults aged 23–87 years over a mean interval of 3.6 years. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean (MD), radial (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivity changes were calculated for forceps minor and major and eight major white matter tracts in each hemisphere by use of a novel automated longitudinal tractography constrained by underlying anatomy (TRACULA) approach. We hypothesized that increasing MD and decreasing FA across tracts would relate to cortical thinning, with some anatomical specificity. WM integrity decreased across tracts non-uniformly, with mean annual percentage decreases ranging from 0.20 in the Inferior Longitudinal Fasciculus to 0.65 in the Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus. For most tracts, greater MD increases and FA decreases related to more cortical thinning, in areas in part overlapping with but also outside the projected tract endings. The findings indicate a combination of global and tract-specific relationships between WM integrity and cortical thinning. PMID:27253393

  10. Microvasculature of the human cerebral white matter: arteries of the deep white matter.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michio; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2003-06-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebral deep white matter was studied using soft X-ray and diaphanized specimens, achieved by intra-arterial injection of barium and vascular stain respectively, and also by electron microscopic examination of the corrosion cast of arteries in normal adult brains. The deep white matter arteries passed through the cerebral cortex with a few branches to the cortex and ran straight through the white matter. The arteries concentrated ventriculopetally to the white matter around the lateral ventricle. Anastomoses were noted around the ventricular wall at the terminals of the deep white matter arteries. No centrifugal branches irrigating the periventricular white matter from the lenticulo-striate arteries were observed in the present study. The presence of anastomoses among the terminal branches of deep white matter arteries protects against ischemic change or infarction in this area from an occlusion of a single deep white matter artery. This may lead to development of terminal zone infarction from ischemia or vascular diseases, affecting multiple deep white matter arteries. The subcortical and deep white matter arteries had thick adventitial sheaths and large adventitial spaces in the white matter but not in the cortex. The presence or absence of the adventitial space is regarded as another characteristic difference between the arteries in the white matter and cortex. This difference may influence pathological changes in vascular lesions in these respective areas. PMID:12777099

  11. Relationship between neuropsychological impairment and grey and white matter changes in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Baldanzi, Sigrid; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Simoncini, Costanza; Angelini, Corrado; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Cosottini, Mirco; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) has a wide phenotypic spectrum and potentially may affect central nervous system with mild to severe involvement. Our aim was to investigate grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) structural alterations in a sample of adult-onset DM1 patients and to evaluate relationship with clinical and cognitive variables. Thirty DM1 patients underwent neuropsychological investigation and 3T-MRI protocol. GM and WM changes were evaluated calculating brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter lesion load (LL% and Fazekas scale) and tract based spatial statistical (TBSS). Patients showed main impairment in tests exploring executive and mnesic domains with visuo-spatial involvement, significantly related to BPF. VBM revealed clusters of widespread GM reduction and TBSS revealed areas of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and axial diffusivity (AD) in patients compared to a group of matched healthy controls. Multiple regression analyses showed areas of significant negative relationship between left temporal atrophy and verbal memory, between RD and mnesic and visuo-spatial cognitive domains, and between AD and verbal memory. TBSS results indicate that the involvement of normal appearance WM, beyond the signal changes detected with conventional MR imaging (Fazekas scale and LL%), was associated with neuropsychological deficit. These data suggest that disrupted complex neuronal networks can underlie cognitive-behavioural dysfunctions in DM1. PMID:27437180

  12. White matter of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    White matter is found in the deeper tissues of the brain (subcortical). It contains nerve fibers (axons), which are ... or covering called myelin. Myelin gives the white matter its color. It also protects the nerve fibers ...

  13. Increased coherence of white matter fiber tract organization in adults with Asperger syndrome: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Roine, Ulrika; Roine, Timo; Salmi, Juha; Nieminen-Von Wendt, Taina; Leppämäki, Sami; Rintahaka, Pertti; Tani, Pekka; Leemans, Alexander; Sams, Mikko

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether there are global white matter (WM) differences between autistic and healthy adults, we performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 14 male adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) and 19 gender-, age-, and intelligence quotient-matched controls. We focused on individuals with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), AS, to decrease heterogeneity caused by large variation in the cognitive profile. Previous DTI studies of ASD have mainly focused on finding local changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), two indexes used to characterize microstructural properties of WM. Although the local or voxel-based approaches may be able to provide detailed information in terms of location of the observed differences, such results are known to be highly sensitive to partial volume effects, registration errors, or placement of the regions of interest. Therefore, we performed global histogram analyses of (a) whole-brain tractography results and (b) skeletonized WM masks. In addition to the FA and MD, the planar diffusion coefficient (CP) was computed as it can provide more specific information of the complexity of the neural structure. Our main finding indicated that adults with AS had higher mean FA values than controls. A less complex neural structure in adults with AS could have explained the results, but no significant difference in CP was found. Our results suggest that there are global abnormalities in the WM tissue of adults with AS. PMID:24089369

  14. White Matter Integrity and Five-Factor Personality Measures in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Potenza, Marc N.

    2011-01-01

    The five-factor model organizes personality traits into five factors: Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. Measures of these personality traits predict people’s behaviors and important outcomes of their lives. Therefore, understanding the neural correlates of these personality traits is important. This study assessed the relationships between white matter (WM) integrity and personality traits among 51 healthy participants using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Neuroticism correlated positively while Openness and Agreeableness correlated negatively with DTI mean diffusivity (MD) in the corona radiata and superior longitudinal fasciculus, tracts which interconnect prefrontal cortex (PFC), parietal cortex, and subcortical structures. Furthermore, Neuroticism correlated positively with MD in the anterior cingulum and uncinate fasciculus, tracts interconnecting PFC and amygdala. Openness correlated negatively with MD of WM adjacent to the dorsolateral PFC in both hemispheres. These findings suggest that greater Neuroticism associates with worse integrity of WM interconnecting extensive cortical and subcortical structures including the PFC and amygdala and that greater Openness associates with better integrity of WM interconnecting extensive cortical and subcortical structures including the dorsolateral PFC. PMID:21840401

  15. White matter structures associated with empathizing and systemizing in young adults.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nagase, Tomomi; Nouchi, Rui; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-08-15

    Empathizing is defined as the drive to identify the mental states of others in order to predict their behavior and respond with an appropriate emotion. Systemizing is defined as the drive to analyze a system in terms of the rules that govern it to predict its behavior. We undertook voxel-by-voxel investigations of regional white matter volume (rWMV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion tensor imaging to discover the WM structural correlates of empathizing, systemizing, and their difference (D score: systemizing-empathizing). Whole brain analyses of covariance revealed that across both sexes, the D score was negatively correlated with rWMV in the WM area in the bilateral temporal lobe, near the right inferior frontal gyrus, near the ventral medial prefrontal cortex, and near the posterior cingulate cortex and positively correlated with FA in an area involving the superior longitudinal fasciculus. Post-hoc analyses revealed that these associations were generally formed by both the correlation between WM structures and empathizing as well as the opposite correlation between WM structures and systemizing. A significant effect of interaction between sex and the D score on rWMV, which was mainly observed because of a positive correlation between rWMV and empathizing in females and a negative correlation between rWMV and systemizing in females, was found in an area close to the right inferior parietal lobule and temporoparietal junction. Our results suggest that WM structures involving the default mode network and the mirror neuron system support empathizing, and that a WM structure relating to the external attention system supports systemizing. Further, our results revealed an overlap between positive/negative WM structural correlates of empathizing and negative/positive WM structural correlates of systemizing despite little correlation between empathizing and systemizing, which supports the previously held idea that there is a trade-off between empathizing and

  16. White matter structure in young adults with familial risk for psychosis - The Oulu Brain and Mind Study.

    PubMed

    Koivukangas, Jenni; Björnholm, Lassi; Tervonen, Osmo; Miettunen, Jouko; Nordström, Tanja; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Mäki, Pirjo; Jääskeläinen, Erika; Mukkala, Sari; Moilanen, Irma; Barnett, Jennifer H; Jones, Peter B; Nikkinen, Juha; Veijola, Juha

    2015-09-30

    According to the disconnectivity model, disruptions in neural connectivity play an essential role in the pathology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to determine whether these abnormalities are present in young adults with familial risk (FR) for psychosis in the general population based sample. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tract-based spatial statistics to compare whole-brain fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and axial and radial diffusion in 47 (17 males) FR subjects to 51 controls (17 males). All the participants were aged between 20 and 25 years and were members of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (Oulu Brain and Mind Study). Region of interest analyses were conducted for 12 tracts. Separately, we analysed whole-brain FA for the subgroup with FR for schizophrenia (n=13) compared with 13 gender-matched controls. Contrary to our expectations there were no differences in any of the DTI measures between FR and control groups. This suggests that white matter abnormalities may not be a genetic feature for risk of psychosis and preceding the onset of a psychotic disorder. Our findings do not support the theory of disconnectivity as a primary sign of psychosis in young adults with FR for the illness. PMID:26231121

  17. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  18. Differential Contributions of Dorso-Ventral and Rostro-Caudal Prefrontal White Matter Tracts to Cognitive Control in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Strenziok, Maren; Greenwood, Pamela M.; Santa Cruz, Sophia A.; Thompson, James C.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Prefrontal cortex mediates cognitive control by means of circuitry organized along dorso-ventral and rostro-caudal axes. Along the dorso-ventral axis, ventrolateral PFC controls semantic information, whereas dorsolateral PFC encodes task rules. Along the rostro-caudal axis, anterior prefrontal cortex encodes complex rules and relationships between stimuli, whereas posterior prefrontal cortex encodes simple relationships between stimuli and behavior. Evidence of these gradients of prefrontal cortex organization has been well documented in fMRI studies, but their functional correlates have not been examined with regard to integrity of underlying white matter tracts. We hypothesized that (a) the integrity of specific white matter tracts is related to cognitive functioning in a manner consistent with the dorso-ventral and rostro-caudal organization of the prefrontal cortex, and (b) this would be particularly evident in healthy older adults. We assessed three cognitive processes that recruit the prefrontal cortex and can distinguish white matter tracts along the dorso-ventral and rostro-caudal dimensions –episodic memory, working memory, and reasoning. Correlations between cognition and fractional anisotropy as well as fiber tractography revealed: (a) Episodic memory was related to ventral prefrontal cortex-thalamo-hippocampal fiber integrity; (b) Working memory was related to integrity of corpus callosum body fibers subserving dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; and (c) Reasoning was related to integrity of corpus callosum body fibers subserving rostral and caudal dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings confirm the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex's role in semantic control and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex's role in rule-based processing, in accordance with the dorso-ventral prefrontal cortex gradient. Reasoning-related rostral and caudal superior frontal white matter may facilitate different levels of task rule complexity. This study is the first to

  19. Bootstrapping white matter segmentation, Eve++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew; Hinton, Kendra E.; Venkatraman, Vijay; Gonzalez, Christopher; Resnick, Susan M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-atlas labeling has come in wide spread use for whole brain labeling on magnetic resonance imaging. Recent challenges have shown that leading techniques are near (or at) human expert reproducibility for cortical gray matter labels. However, these approaches tend to treat white matter as essentially homogeneous (as white matter exhibits isointense signal on structural MRI). The state-of-the-art for white matter atlas is the single-subject Johns Hopkins Eve atlas. Numerous approaches have attempted to use tractography and/or orientation information to identify homologous white matter structures across subjects. Despite success with large tracts, these approaches have been plagued by difficulties in with subtle differences in course, low signal to noise, and complex structural relationships for smaller tracts. Here, we investigate use of atlas-based labeling to propagate the Eve atlas to unlabeled datasets. We evaluate single atlas labeling and multi-atlas labeling using synthetic atlases derived from the single manually labeled atlas. On 5 representative tracts for 10 subjects, we demonstrate that (1) single atlas labeling generally provides segmentations within 2mm mean surface distance, (2) morphologically constraining DTI labels within structural MRI white matter reduces variability, and (3) multi-atlas labeling did not improve accuracy. These efforts present a preliminary indication that single atlas labels with correction is reasonable, but caution should be applied. To purse multi-atlas labeling and more fully characterize overall performance, more labeled datasets would be necessary.

  20. White matter dementia in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M; Thompson, L L; Sze, C I; Simon, J A; Paskavitz, J F; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K

    1999-03-01

    Cerebral white matter disorders may be associated with profound neurobehavioral dysfunction. We report a 62-year-old man who had a slowly progressive 25-year history of personality change, psychosis, mood disorder, and dementia. Neurologic examination disclosed abulia, impaired memory retrieval, and preserved language, with only minimal motor impairment. Neuropsychological testing found a sustained attention deficit, cognitive slowing, impaired learning with intact recognition, and perseveration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed extensive leukoencephalopathy. Right frontal brain biopsy showed ill-defined white matter pallor with hyaline narrowing of white matter arterioles. Granular osmiophilic material adjacent to vascular smooth muscle cells on electron microscopy of a skin biopsy, and an arginine for cysteine replacement at position 169 in the 4 EGF motif of the notch 3 region on chromosome 19q12 established the diagnosis of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). This case illustrates that CADASIL can manifest as an isolated neurobehavioral disorder over an extended time period. The dementia associated with CADASIL closely resembles that which may occur with other white matter disorders, and represents an example of white matter dementia. PMID:10371078

  1. Inflammation in White Matter: Clinical and Pathophysiological Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleasure, David; Soulika, Athena; Singh, Sunit K.; Gallo, Vittorio; Bannerman, Peter

    2006-01-01

    While the central nervous system (CNS) is generally thought of as an immunopriviledged site, immune-mediated CNS white matter damage can occur in both the perinatal period and in adults, and can result in severe and persistent neurological deficits. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is an inflammatory white matter disease of premature infants…

  2. Symmetric bilateral caudate, hippocampal, cerebellar, and subcortical white matter MRI abnormalities in an adult patient with heat stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schucany, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Heat stroke is the end result of excess heat stress and results in multiorgan dysfunction with a propensity for central nervous system (CNS) injury. Damage to the CNS appears to be the result of multiple mechanisms, including direct heat damage and the initiation of a sepsis-type syndrome. Only a few scattered case reports exist in the literature that document CNS damage via imaging. We present a case with symmetric bilateral magnetic resonance findings in the caudate nuclei, subcortical white matter, hippocampi, and cerebellum. To our knowledge, this is the first case to report symmetric bilateral caudate abnormality and bilateral hippocampal enhancement. PMID:18982090

  3. Age effects and sex differences in human brain white matter of young to middle-aged adults: A DTI, NODDI, and q-space study.

    PubMed

    Kodiweera, Chandana; Alexander, Andrew L; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; McAllister, Thomas W; Wu, Yu-Chien

    2016-03-01

    Microstructural changes in human brain white matter of young to middle-aged adults were studied using advanced diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI). Multiple shell diffusion-weighted data were acquired using the Hybrid Diffusion Imaging (HYDI). The HYDI method is extremely versatile and data were analyzed using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI), and q-space imaging approaches. Twenty-four females and 23 males between 18 and 55years of age were included in this study. The impact of age and sex on diffusion metrics were tested using least squares linear regressions in 48 white matter regions of interest (ROIs) across the whole brain and adjusted for multiple comparisons across ROIs. In this study, white matter projections to either the hippocampus or the cerebral cortices were the brain regions most sensitive to aging. Specifically, in this young to middle-aged cohort, aging effects were associated with more dispersion of white matter fibers while the tissue restriction and intra-axonal volume fraction remained relatively stable. The fiber dispersion index of NODDI exhibited the most pronounced sensitivity to aging. In addition, changes of the DTI indices in this aging cohort were correlated mostly with the fiber dispersion index rather than the intracellular volume fraction of NODDI or the q-space measurements. While men and women did not differ in the aging rate, men tend to have higher intra-axonal volume fraction than women. This study demonstrates that advanced dMRI using a HYDI acquisition and compartmental modeling of NODDI can elucidate microstructural alterations that are sensitive to age and sex. Finally, this study provides insight into the relationships between DTI diffusion metrics and advanced diffusion metrics of NODDI model and q-space imaging. PMID:26724777

  4. Identification of A2B5-positive putative oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and A2B5-positive astrocytes in adult human white matter.

    PubMed

    Scolding, N J; Rayner, P J; Compston, D A

    1999-03-01

    Spontaneous remyelination of previously demyelinated axons is found in a substantial minority of acute and chronic lesions in multiple sclerosis. In the rodent, central remyelination restores saltatory conduction and helps restore limb function, and it seems likely that endogenous myelin repair contributes to neurological recovery in multiple sclerosis. However, the identity of the remyelinating cell remains enigmatic. Fully differentiated oligodendrocytes have very limited capacity for recapitulating their developmental activities and re-engaging myelination pathways. Proliferative oligodendrocyte progenitors--often known as O-2A cells because of their ability to differentiate in vitro into either oligodendrocytes or ("type 2") astrocytes--are, in contrast, extremely efficient at myelin repair either spontaneously, or after transplantation into the de- or dysmyelinated CNS. Oligodendrocyte progenitors are present in both developing and adult rodent CNS. We have previously demonstrated that proliferative oligodendrocyte progenitors are present in cultures prepared from the adult human CNS. Here, using fresh tissue print preparations, we report that cells with processes and the A2B5-positive immunophenotype of proliferative oligodendrocyte progenitors are present in situ in adult human white matter. This technique also reveals the occurrence of A2B5-positive astrocytes, a cell also not previously identified in the normal adult human CNS. In the light of the rodent data showing the importance of oligodendrocyte progenitors in myelin repair, our findings suggesting the presence of progenitors in the adult human brain may have significant implications for spontaneous remyelination in multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating conditions. PMID:10051212

  5. General fluid-type intelligence is related to indices of white matter structure in middle-aged and old adults.

    PubMed

    Haász, Judit; Westlye, Erling T; Fjær, Sveinung; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Arvid; Lundervold, Astri J

    2013-12-01

    General fluid-type intelligence (gF) reflects abstract reasoning and problem solving abilities, and is an important predictor for lifetime trajectories of cognition, and physical and mental health. Structural and functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the role of parieto-frontal gray matter, but the white matter (WM) underpinnings of gF and the contribution of individual gF components to gF-WM relationship still need to be explored. The aim of this study was to characterize, in a sample of 100 healthy middle-aged and old subjects (mean=63.8 years), the relationship between gF and indices of WM structure obtained from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) (fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD)). gF was estimated by principal component analysis including measures of episodic memory, reasoning, and processing speed. Tract-based spatial statistics and permutation-based inference statistics were used to test the association between gF and WM indices, while controlling for the effect of age and sex. We hypothesized a positive relationship between gF and WM structure. Based on previous studies, we further hypothesized that this relationship was heavily influenced by the processing speed component of gF. We found a robust relationship between gF and DT-MRI measures of FA, RD and MD in all major WM tracts. Higher gF score was related to higher degree of WM integrity, in middle-aged as well as old individuals. Thus, the distributed relationship between gF and indices of WM microstructure is consistent with the notion that gF reflects efficient signaling between cortical areas. Furthermore, analysis of relationships between WM measures and gF components revealed an association with information processing speed and reasoning ability, but not with episodic memory. Thus, although all subcomponents loaded high on gF factor, the speed-related components were most strongly associated with DT

  6. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions. PMID:27090751

  7. Cerebral white matter deficiencies in pedophilic men.

    PubMed

    Cantor, James M; Kabani, Noor; Christensen, Bruce K; Zipursky, Robert B; Barbaree, Howard E; Dickey, Robert; Klassen, Philip E; Mikulis, David J; Kuban, Michael E; Blak, Thomas; Richards, Blake A; Hanratty, M Katherine; Blanchard, Ray

    2008-02-01

    The present investigation sought to identify which brain regions distinguish pedophilic from nonpedophilic men, using unbiased, automated analyses of the whole brain. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were acquired from men who demonstrated illegal or clinically significant sexual behaviors or interests (n = 65) and from men who had histories of nonsexual offenses but no sexual offenses (n = 62). Sexual interest in children was assessed by participants' admissions of pedophilic interest, histories of committing sexual offenses against children, and psychophysiological responses in the laboratory to erotic stimuli depicting children or adults. Automated parcellation of the MRIs revealed significant negative associations between pedophilia and white matter volumes of the temporal and parietal lobes bilaterally. Voxel-based morphometry corroborated the associations and indicated that the regions of lower white matter volumes followed, and were limited to, two major fiber bundles: the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus and the right arcuate fasciculus. No significant differences were found in grey matter or in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Because the superior fronto-occipital and arcuate fasciculi connect the cortical regions that respond to sexual cues, these results suggest (1) that those cortical regions operate as a network for recognizing sexually relevant stimuli and (2) that pedophilia results from a partial disconnection within that network. PMID:18039544

  8. Poorer frontolimbic white matter integrity is associated with chronic cannabis use, FAAH genotype, and increased depressive and apathy symptoms in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Shollenbarger, Skyler G.; Price, Jenessa; Wieser, Jon; Lisdahl, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Background The heaviest period of cannabis use coincides with ongoing white matter (WM) maturation. Further, cannabis-related changes may be moderated by FAAH genotype (rs324420). We examined the association between cannabis use and FAAH genotype on frontolimbic WM integrity in adolescents and emerging adults. We then tested whether observed WM abnormalities were linked with depressive or apathy symptoms. Methods Participants included 37 cannabis users and 37 healthy controls (33 female; ages 18–25). Multiple regressions examined the independent and interactive effects of variables on WM integrity. Results Regular cannabis users demonstrated reduced WM integrity in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus (UNC) (MD, right: p = .009 and left: p = .009; FA, right: p = .04 and left: p = .03) and forceps minor (fMinor) (MD, p = .03) compared to healthy controls. Marginally reduced WM integrity in the cannabis users was found in the left anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) (FA, p = .08). Cannabis group ∗ FAAH genotype interaction predicted WM integrity in bilateral ATR (FA, right: p = .05 and left: p = .001) and fMinor (FA, p = .02). In cannabis users, poorer WM integrity was correlated with increased symptoms of depression and apathy in bilateral ATR and UNC. Conclusions Consistent with prior findings, cannabis use was associated with reduced frontolimbic WM integrity. WM integrity was also moderated by FAAH genotype, in that cannabis-using FAAH C/C carriers and A carrying controls had reduced WM integrity compared to control C/C carriers. Observed frontolimbic white matter abnormalities were linked with increased depressive and apathy symptoms in the cannabis users. PMID:26106535

  9. Astrocytes and Developmental White Matter Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Ellora; Levison, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the astrocytes in the immature periventricular white matter are vulnerable to ischemia and respond to inflammation. Here we provide a synopsis of the articles that have evaluated the causes and consequences of developmental brain injuries to white matter astrocytes as well as the consequences of several…

  10. White matter microstructure alterations in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bellani, Marcella; Perlini, Cinzia; Ferro, Adele; Cerruti, Stefania; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Isola, Miriam; Cerini, Roberto; Dusi, Nicola; Andreone, Nicola; Balestrieri, Matteo; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi; Tansella, Michele; Brambilla, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Genetic, neuropathological and magnetic resonance imaging findings support the presence of diffuse white matter cytoarchitectural disruption in bipolar disorder. In this study, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was applied to study cortical white matter microstructure organisation in 24 patients with DSM-IV bipolar disorder and 35 matched normal controls. DWI images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla scanner and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were determined over regions of interest placed, bilaterally, in the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital white matter. Significantly increased ADC values were found in bipolar patients with respect to normal controls in the right temporal lobe, left parietal lobe and bilateral occipital lobes. ADC values did not associate significantly with age or with clinical variables (p>0.05). Diffuse cortical white matter alterations on DWI in bipolar disorder denote widespread disruption of white matter integrity and may be due to altered myelination and/or axonal integrity. PMID:22687164

  11. MR Imaging Evaluation of Intracerebral Hemorrhages and T2 Hyperintense White Matter Lesions Appearing after Radiation Therapy in Adult Patients with Primary Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Il Han; Choi, Seung Hong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the frequency and severity of intracerebral hemorrhages and T2 hyperintense white matter lesions (WMLs) following radiation therapy for brain tumors in adult patients. Of 648 adult brain tumor patients who received radiation therapy at our institute, magnetic resonance (MR) image data consisting of a gradient echo (GRE) and FLAIR T2-weighted image were available three and five years after radiation therapy in 81 patients. Intracerebral hemorrhage was defined as a hypointense dot lesion appearing on GRE images after radiation therapy. The number and size of the lesions were evaluated. The T2 hyperintense WMLs observed on the FLAIR sequences were graded according to the extent of the lesion. Intracerebral hemorrhage was detected in 21 (25.9%) and 35 (43.2) patients in the three- and five-year follow-up images, respectively. The number of intracerebral hemorrhages per patient tended to increase as the follow-up period increased, whereas the size of the intracerebral hemorrhages exhibited little variation over the course of follow-up. T2 hyperintense WMLs were observed in 27 (33.3%) and 32 (39.5) patients in the three and five year follow-up images, respectively. The age at the time of radiation therapy was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the patients with T2 hyperintense WMLs than in those without lesions. Intracerebral hemorrhages are not uncommon in adult brain tumor patients undergoing radiation therapy. The incidence and number of intracerebral hemorrhages increased over the course of follow-up. T2 hyperintense WMLs were observed in more than one-third of the study population. PMID:26322780

  12. Lower white matter microstructure in the superior longitudinal fasciculus is associated with increased response time variability in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wolfers, Thomas; Onnink, A. Marten H.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Hoogman, Martine; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Kan, Cornelis C.; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Franke, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Response time variability (RTV) is consistently increased in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A right-hemispheric frontoparietal attention network model has been implicated in these patients. The 3 main connecting fibre tracts in this network, the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and the cingulum bundle (CB), show microstructural abnormalities in patients with ADHD. We hypothesized that the microstructural integrity of the 3 white matter tracts of this network are associated with ADHD and RTV. Methods We examined RTV in adults with ADHD by modelling the reaction time distribution as an exponentially modified Gaussian (ex-Gaussian) function with the parameters μ, σ and τ, the latter of which has been attributed to lapses of attention. We assessed adults with ADHD and healthy controls using a sustained attention task. Diffusion tensor imaging–derived fractional anisotropy (FA) values were determined to quantify bilateral microstructural integrity of the tracts of interest. Results We included 100 adults with ADHD and 96 controls in our study. Increased τ was associated with ADHD diagnosis and was linked to symptoms of inattention. An inverse correlation of τ with mean FA was seen in the right SLF of patients with ADHD, but no direct association between the mean FA of the 6 regions of interest with ADHD could be observed. Limitations Regions of interest were defined a priori based on the attentional network model for ADHD and thus we might have missed effects in other networks. Conclusion This study suggests that reduced microstructural integrity of the right SLF is associated with elevated τ in patients with ADHD. PMID:26079698

  13. Cardiorespiratory fitness and brain volume and white matter integrity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Na; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Launer, Lenore J.; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Sidney, Stephen; Demerath, Ellen; Thomas, William; Bouchard, Claude; He, Ka; Erus, Guray; Battapady, Harsha; Bryan, R. Nick

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that greater cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with lower odds of having unfavorable brain MRI findings. Methods: We studied 565 healthy, middle-aged, black and white men and women in the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) Study. The fitness measure was symptom-limited maximal treadmill test duration (Maxdur); brain MRI was measured 5 years later. Brain MRI measures were analyzed as means and as proportions below the 15th percentile (above the 85th percentile for white matter abnormal tissue volume). Results: Per 1-minute-higher Maxdur, the odds ratio for having less whole brain volume was 0.85 (p = 0.04) and for having low white matter integrity was 0.80 (p = 0.02), adjusted for age, race, sex, clinic, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, diet, physical activity, education, blood pressure, diabetes, total cholesterol, and lung function (plus intracranial volume for white matter integrity). No significant associations were observed between Maxdur and abnormal tissue volume or blood flow in white matter. Findings were similar for associations with continuous brain MRI measures. Conclusions: Greater physical fitness was associated with more brain volume and greater white matter integrity measured 5 years later in middle-aged adults. PMID:25957331

  14. Human Brain White Matter Atlas: Identification and Assignment of Common Anatomical Structures in Superficial White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Kenichi; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Faria, Andreia; Jiang, Hangyi; Li, Xin; Akhter, Kazi; Hua, Kegang; Woods, Roger; Toga, Arthur W.; Pike, G. Bruce; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Evans, Alan; Zhang, Jiangyang; Huang, Hao; Miller, Michael I.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Mazziotta, John; Mori, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Structural delineation and assignment are the fundamental steps in understanding the anatomy of the human brain. The white matter has been structurally defined in the past only at its core regions (deep white matter). However, the most peripheral white matter areas, which are interleaved between the cortex and the deep white matter, have lacked clear anatomical definitions and parcellations. We used axonal fiber alignment information from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to delineate the peripheral white matter, and investigated its relationship with the cortex and the deep white matter. Using DTI data from 81 healthy subjects, we identified nine common, blade-like anatomical regions, which were further parcellated into 21 subregions based on the cortical anatomy. Four short association fiber tracts connecting adjacent gyri (U-fibers) were also identified reproducibly among the healthy population. We anticipate that this atlas will be useful resource for atlas-based white matter anatomical studies. PMID:18692144

  15. Cardiorespiratory fitness and white matter integrity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Perea, R D; Vidoni, E D; Morris, J K; Graves, R S; Burns, J M; Honea, R A

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiorespiratory (CR) fitness and the brain's white matter tract integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) population. We recruited older adults in the early stages of AD (n = 37; CDR = 0.5 and 1) and collected cross-sectional fitness and diffusion imaging data. We examined the association between CR fitness (peak oxygen consumption [VO2peak]) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in AD-related white matter tracts using two processing methodologies: a tract-of-interest approach and tract-based spatial statistic (TBSS). Subsequent diffusivity metrics (radial diffusivity [RD], mean diffusivity [MD], and axial diffusivity [A × D]) were also correlated with VO2peak. The tract-of-interest approach showed that higher VO2peak was associated with preserved white matter integrity as measured by increased FA in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (p = 0.035, r = 0.36). We did not find a significant correlation using TBSS, though there was a trend for a positive association between white matter integrity and higher VO2peak measures (p < 0.01 uncorrected). Our findings indicate that higher CR fitness levels in early AD participants may be related to preserved white matter integrity. However to draw stronger conclusions, further study on the relationship between fitness and white matter deterioration in AD is necessary. PMID:26239997

  16. Linked alterations in gray and white matter morphology in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: A multimodal brain imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Itahashi, Takashi; Yamada, Takashi; Nakamura, Motoaki; Watanabe, Hiromi; Yamagata, Bun; Jimbo, Daiki; Shioda, Seiji; Kuroda, Miho; Toriizuka, Kazuo; Kato, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that a broad range of behavioral anomalies in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be linked with morphological and functional alterations in the brain. However, the neuroanatomical underpinnings of ASD have been investigated using either structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and the relationships between abnormalities revealed by these two modalities remain unclear. This study applied a multimodal data-fusion method, known as linked independent component analysis (ICA), to a set of structural MRI and DTI data acquired from 46 adult males with ASD and 46 matched controls in order to elucidate associations between different aspects of atypical neuroanatomy of ASD. Linked ICA identified two composite components that showed significant between-group differences, one of which was significantly correlated with age. In the other component, participants with ASD showed decreased gray matter (GM) volumes in multiple regions, including the bilateral fusiform gyri, bilateral orbitofrontal cortices, and bilateral pre- and post-central gyri. These GM changes were linked with a pattern of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in several white matter tracts, such as the bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculi, bilateral inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi, and bilateral corticospinal tracts. Furthermore, unimodal analysis for DTI data revealed significant reductions of FA along with increased mean diffusivity in those tracts for ASD, providing further evidence of disrupted anatomical connectivity. Taken together, our findings suggest that, in ASD, alterations in different aspects of brain morphology may co-occur in specific brain networks, providing a comprehensive view for understanding the neuroanatomy of this disorder. PMID:25610777

  17. White matter injury detection in neonatal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Irene; Hajari, Nasim; Firouzmanesh, Amirhossein; Shen, Rui; Miller, Steven; Poskitt, Ken; Basu, Anup

    2013-02-01

    Early detection of white matter injury in premature newborns can facilitate timely clinical treatments reducing the potential risk of later developmental deficits. It was reported that there were more than 5% premature newborns in British Columbia, Canada, among which 5-10% exhibited major motor deficits and 25-50% exhibited significant developmental and visual deficits. With the advancement of computer assisted detection systems, it is possible to automatically identify white matter injuries, which are found inside the grey matter region of the brain. Atlas registration has been suggested in the literature to distinguish grey matter from the soft tissues inside the skull. However, our subjects are premature newborns delivered at 24 to 32 weeks of gestation. During this period, the grey matter undergoes rapid changes and differs significantly from one to another. Besides, not all detected white spots represent injuries. Additional neighborhood information and expert input are required for verification. In this paper, we propose a white matter feature identification system for premature newborns, which is composed of several steps: (1) Candidate white matter segmentation; (2) Feature extraction from candidates; (3) Validation with data obtained at a later stage on the children; and (4) Feature confirmation for automated detection. The main challenge of this work lies in segmenting white matter injuries from noisy and low resolution data. Our approach integrates image fusion and contrast enhancement together with a fuzzy segmentation technique to achieve promising results. Other applications, such as brain tumor and intra-ventricular haemorrhage detection can also benefit from our approach.

  18. Cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with white matter integrity in aging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Scott M; Salat, David H; Forman, Daniel E; Sperling, Reisa A; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aging is associated with reduced neural integrity, yet there are remarkable individual differences in brain health among older adults (OA). One factor that may attenuate age-related neural decline is cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). The primary aim of this study was to link CRF to neural white matter microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging in OA. Methods Young adults (YA; n = 32) and OA (n = 27) completed a graded maximal exercise test to evaluate CRF and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural white matter integrity. Results As expected, pervasive age-related declines in white matter integrity were observed when OA were compared to YA. Further, peak VO2 was positively associated with fractional anisotropy (FA), an indicator of white matter integrity, in multiple brain regions in OA, but not YA. In multiple posterior regions such as the splenium, sagittal stratum, posterior corona radiata, and superior parietal white matter, FA values were similar in YA and OA classified as higher fit, with both groups having greater FA than lower fit OA. However, age-related differences in FA values remained in other regions, including the body and genu of the corpus callosum, precuneus, and superior frontal gyrus. Interpretation CRF is positively associated with neural white matter microstructure in aging. The relationship between peak VO2 and FA appears to be tract-specific, as equivalent FA values were observed in higher fit OA and YA in some white matter tracts, but not others. Further, the association between peak VO2 and FA appears to be age-dependent. PMID:26125043

  19. The superficial white matter in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Owen R; Joshi, Shantanu H; Piras, Fabrizio; Orfei, Maria Donata; Iorio, Mariangela; Narr, Katherine L; Shattuck, David W; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-04-01

    White matter abnormalities have been shown in the large deep fibers of Alzheimer's disease patients. However, the late myelinating superficial white matter comprised of intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received much attention. To investigate this area, we extracted a surface corresponding to the superficial white matter beneath the cortex and then applied a cortical pattern-matching approach which allowed us to register and subsequently sample diffusivity along thousands of points at the interface between the gray matter and white matter in 44 patients with Alzheimer's disease (Age: 71.02 ± 5.84, 16M/28F) and 47 healthy controls (Age 69.23 ± 4.45, 19M/28F). In patients we found an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across most of the superficial white matter (P < 0.001) with increases in diffusivity of more than 20% in the bilateral parahippocampal regions and the temporal and frontal lobes. Furthermore, diffusivity correlated with the cognitive deficits measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination scores (P < 0.001). The superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and is critical for the integration of multimodal information during brain maturation and aging. Here we show that there are major abnormalities in patients and the deterioration of these fibers relates to clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26801955

  20. Autistic Traits in Neurotypical Adults: Correlates of Graph Theoretical Functional Network Topology and White Matter Anisotropy Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Spisak, Tamas; Szeman-Nagy, Anita; Beres, Monika; Kis, Sandor Attila; Molnar, Peter; Berenyi, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to explicate the neural abnormalities behind autism spectrum disorders frequently revealed impaired brain connectivity, yet our knowledge is limited about the alterations linked with autistic traits in the non-clinical population. In our study, we aimed at exploring the neural correlates of dimensional autistic traits using a dual approach of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and graph theoretical analysis of resting state functional MRI data. Subjects were sampled from a public neuroimaging dataset of healthy volunteers. Inclusion criteria were adult age (age: 18–65), availability of DTI and resting state functional acquisitions and psychological evaluation including the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and Autistic Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ). The final subject cohort consisted of 127 neurotypicals. Global brain network structure was described by graph theoretical parameters: global and average local efficiency. Regional topology was characterized by degree and efficiency. We provided measurements for diffusion anisotropy. The association between autistic traits and the neuroimaging findings was studied using a general linear model analysis, controlling for the effects of age, gender and IQ profile. Significant negative correlation was found between the degree and efficiency of the right posterior cingulate cortex and autistic traits, measured by the combination of ASSQ and SRS scores. Autistic phenotype was associated with the decrease of whole-brain local efficiency. Reduction of diffusion anisotropy was found bilaterally in the temporal fusiform and parahippocampal gyri. Numerous models describe the autistic brain connectome to be dominated by reduced long-range connections and excessive short-range fibers. Our finding of decreased efficiency supports this hypothesis although the only prominent effect was seen in the posterior limbic lobe, which is known to act as a connector hub. The neural correlates of the autistic trait in

  1. Autistic traits in neurotypical adults: correlates of graph theoretical functional network topology and white matter anisotropy patterns.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Andras; Emri, Miklos; Spisak, Tamas; Szeman-Nagy, Anita; Beres, Monika; Kis, Sandor Attila; Molnar, Peter; Berenyi, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to explicate the neural abnormalities behind autism spectrum disorders frequently revealed impaired brain connectivity, yet our knowledge is limited about the alterations linked with autistic traits in the non-clinical population. In our study, we aimed at exploring the neural correlates of dimensional autistic traits using a dual approach of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and graph theoretical analysis of resting state functional MRI data. Subjects were sampled from a public neuroimaging dataset of healthy volunteers. Inclusion criteria were adult age (age: 18-65), availability of DTI and resting state functional acquisitions and psychological evaluation including the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and Autistic Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ). The final subject cohort consisted of 127 neurotypicals. Global brain network structure was described by graph theoretical parameters: global and average local efficiency. Regional topology was characterized by degree and efficiency. We provided measurements for diffusion anisotropy. The association between autistic traits and the neuroimaging findings was studied using a general linear model analysis, controlling for the effects of age, gender and IQ profile. Significant negative correlation was found between the degree and efficiency of the right posterior cingulate cortex and autistic traits, measured by the combination of ASSQ and SRS scores. Autistic phenotype was associated with the decrease of whole-brain local efficiency. Reduction of diffusion anisotropy was found bilaterally in the temporal fusiform and parahippocampal gyri. Numerous models describe the autistic brain connectome to be dominated by reduced long-range connections and excessive short-range fibers. Our finding of decreased efficiency supports this hypothesis although the only prominent effect was seen in the posterior limbic lobe, which is known to act as a connector hub. The neural correlates of the autistic trait in neurotypicals

  2. White matter of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... improves the speed and transmission of electrical nerve signals. By comparison, gray matter is tissue found on the surface of the brain (cortical). It contains the cell bodies of neurons, which give gray matter its color.

  3. Alterations in White Matter Microstructure in Neurofibromatosis-1

    PubMed Central

    Karlsgodt, Katherine H.; Rosser, Tena; Lutkenhoff, Evan S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Silva, Alcino; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF1) represents the most common single gene cause of learning disabilities. NF1 patients have impairments in frontal lobe based cognitive functions such as attention, working memory, and inhibition. Due to its well–characterized genetic etiology, investigations of NF1 may shed light on neural mechanisms underlying such difficulties in the general population or other patient groups. Prior neuroimaging findings indicate global brain volume increases, consistent with neural over-proliferation. However, little is known about alterations in white matter microstructure in NF1. We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in 14 young adult NF1 patients and 12 healthy controls. We also examined brain volumetric measures in the same subjects. Consistent with prior studies, we found significantly increased overall gray and white matter volume in NF1 patients. Relative to healthy controls, NF1 patients showed widespread reductions in white matter integrity across the entire brain as reflected by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and significantly increased absolute diffusion (ADC). When radial and axial diffusion were examined we found pronounced differences in radial diffusion in NF1 patients, indicative of either decreased myelination or increased space between axons. Secondary analyses revealed that FA and radial diffusion effects were of greatest magnitude in the frontal lobe. Such alterations of white matter tracts connecting frontal regions could contribute to the observed cognitive deficits. Furthermore, although the cellular basis of these white matter microstructural alterations remains to be determined, our findings of disproportionately increased radial diffusion against a background of increased white matter volume suggest the novel hypothesis that one potential alteration contributing to increased cortical white matter in NF1 may be looser packing of axons, with or without myelination

  4. Alterations in white matter microstructure in neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Rosser, Tena; Lutkenhoff, Evan S; Cannon, Tyrone D; Silva, Alcino; Bearden, Carrie E

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF1) represents the most common single gene cause of learning disabilities. NF1 patients have impairments in frontal lobe based cognitive functions such as attention, working memory, and inhibition. Due to its well-characterized genetic etiology, investigations of NF1 may shed light on neural mechanisms underlying such difficulties in the general population or other patient groups. Prior neuroimaging findings indicate global brain volume increases, consistent with neural over-proliferation. However, little is known about alterations in white matter microstructure in NF1. We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in 14 young adult NF1 patients and 12 healthy controls. We also examined brain volumetric measures in the same subjects. Consistent with prior studies, we found significantly increased overall gray and white matter volume in NF1 patients. Relative to healthy controls, NF1 patients showed widespread reductions in white matter integrity across the entire brain as reflected by decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and significantly increased absolute diffusion (ADC). When radial and axial diffusion were examined we found pronounced differences in radial diffusion in NF1 patients, indicative of either decreased myelination or increased space between axons. Secondary analyses revealed that FA and radial diffusion effects were of greatest magnitude in the frontal lobe. Such alterations of white matter tracts connecting frontal regions could contribute to the observed cognitive deficits. Furthermore, although the cellular basis of these white matter microstructural alterations remains to be determined, our findings of disproportionately increased radial diffusion against a background of increased white matter volume suggest the novel hypothesis that one potential alteration contributing to increased cortical white matter in NF1 may be looser packing of axons, with or without myelination

  5. Defective Glial Maturation in Vanishing White Matter Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bugiani, Marianna; Boor, Ilja; van Kollenburg, Barbara; Postma, Nienke; Polder, Emiel; van Berkel, Carola; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Windrem, Martha S.; Hol, Elly M.; Scheper, Gert C.; Goldman, Steven A.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2014-01-01

    Vanishing white matter disease (VWM) is a genetic leukoencephalopathy linked to mutations in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). It is a disease of infants, children and adults, who experience a slowly progressive neurological deterioration with episodes of rapid clinical worsening triggered by stress and eventually leading to death. Characteristic neuropathological findings include cystic degeneration of the white matter with scarce reactive gliosis, dysmorphic astrocytes, and paucity of myelin despite an increase in oligodendrocytic density. To assess whether a defective maturation of macroglia may be responsible for the feeble gliosis and lack of myelin, we investigated the maturation status of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in the brains of 8 VWM patients, 4 patients with other white matter disorders and 6 age-matched controls with a combination of immunocytochemistry, histochemistry, scratch-wound assays, Western blot and quantitative PCR. We observed increased proliferation and a defect in the maturation of VWM astrocytes. They show an anomalous composition of their intermediate filament network with predominance of the δ-isoform of the glial fibrillary acidic protein and an increase in the heat shock protein αB-crystallin, supporting the possibility that a deficiency in astrocyte function may contribute to the loss of white matter in VWM. We also demonstrated a significant increase in numbers of pre-myelinating oligodendrocyte progenitors in VWM, which may explain the co-existence of oligodendrocytosis and myelin paucity in the patients’ white matter. PMID:21157376

  6. Structural neuroimaging in Altheimer's disease: do white matter hyperintensities matter?

    PubMed

    Brickman, Adam M; Muraskin, Jordan; Zimmerman, Molly E

    2009-01-01

    The targeted brain dysfunction that accompanies aging can have a devastating effect on cognitive and intellectual abilities. A significant proportion of older adults experience precipitous cognitive decline that negatively impacts functional activities. Such individuals meet clinical diagnostic criteria for dementia, which is commonly attributed to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has contributed significantly to our understanding of the morphological and pathology-related changes that may underlie normal and disease-associated cognitive change in aging. White matter hyperintensities (WMH), which are distributed patches of increased hyperintense signal on T2-weighted MRI, are among the most common structural neuroimaging findings in older adults. In recent years, WMH have emerged as robust radiological correlates of cognitive decline. Studies suggest that WMH distributed in anterior brain regions are related to decline in executive abilities that is typical of normal aging, whereas WMH distributed in more posterior brain regions are common in AD. Although epidemiological, observational, and pathological studies suggest that WMH may be ischemic in origin and caused by consistent or variable hypoperfusion, there is emerging evidence that they may also reflect vascular deposition of beta-amyloid, particularly when they are distributed in posterior areas and are present in patients with AD. Findings from the literature highlight the potential contribution of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease to the pathogenesis of AD, and suggest a mechanistic interaction, but future longitudinal studies using multiple imaging modalities are required to fully understand the complex role of WMH in AD. PMID:19585953

  7. Specific white matter tissue microstructure changes associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Callaghan, Martina F; Heni, Martin; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Scheffler, Klaus; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Veit, Ralf; Preissl, Hubert

    2016-01-15

    Obesity-related structural brain alterations point to a consistent reduction in gray matter with increasing body mass index (BMI) but changes in white matter have proven to be more complex and less conclusive. Hence, more recently diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been employed to investigate microstructural changes in white matter structure. Altogether, these studies have mostly shown a loss of white matter integrity with obesity-related factors in several brain regions. However, the variety of these obesity-related factors, including inflammation and dyslipidemia, resulted in competing influences on the DTI indices. To increase the specificity of DTI results, we explored specific brain tissue properties by combining DTI with quantitative multi-parameter mapping in lean, overweight and obese young adults. By means of multi-parameter mapping, white matter structures showed differences in MRI parameters consistent with reduced myelin, increased water and altered iron content with increasing BMI in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, internal capsule and corpus callosum. BMI-related changes in DTI parameters revealed mainly alterations in mean and axial diffusivity with increasing BMI in the corticospinal tract, anterior thalamic radiation and superior longitudinal fasciculus. These alterations, including mainly fiber tracts linking limbic structures with prefrontal regions, could potentially promote accelerated aging in obese individuals leading to an increased risk for cognitive decline. PMID:26458514

  8. Specific white matter tissue microstructure changes associated with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Callaghan, Martina F.; Heni, Martin; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Scheffler, Klaus; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Veit, Ralf; Preissl, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related structural brain alterations point to a consistent reduction in gray matter with increasing body mass index (BMI) but changes in white matter have proven to be more complex and less conclusive. Hence, more recently diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been employed to investigate microstructural changes in white matter structure. Altogether, these studies have mostly shown a loss of white matter integrity with obesity-related factors in several brain regions. However, the variety of these obesity-related factors, including inflammation and dyslipidemia, resulted in competing influences on the DTI indices. To increase the specificity of DTI results, we explored specific brain tissue properties by combining DTI with quantitative multi-parameter mapping in lean, overweight and obese young adults. By means of multi-parameter mapping, white matter structures showed differences in MRI parameters consistent with reduced myelin, increased water and altered iron content with increasing BMI in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, internal capsule and corpus callosum. BMI-related changes in DTI parameters revealed mainly alterations in mean and axial diffusivity with increasing BMI in the corticospinal tract, anterior thalamic radiation and superior longitudinal fasciculus. These alterations, including mainly fiber tracts linking limbic structures with prefrontal regions, could potentially promote accelerated aging in obese individuals leading to an increased risk for cognitive decline. PMID:26458514

  9. On describing human white matter anatomy: the white matter query language.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Demian; Makris, Nikos; Rathi, Yogesh; Shenton, Martha; Kikinis, Ron; Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The main contribution of this work is the careful syntactical definition of major white matter tracts in the human brain based on a neuroanatomist's expert knowledge. We present a technique to formally describe white matter tracts and to automatically extract them from diffusion MRI data. The framework is based on a novel query language with a near-to-English textual syntax. This query language allows us to construct a dictionary of anatomical definitions describing white matter tracts. The definitions include adjacent gray and white matter regions, and rules for spatial relations. This enables automated coherent labeling of white matter anatomy across subjects. We use our method to encode anatomical knowledge in human white matter describing 10 association and 8 projection tracts per hemisphere and 7 commissural tracts. The technique is shown to be comparable in accuracy to manual labeling. We present results applying this framework to create a white matter atlas from 77 healthy subjects, and we use this atlas in a proof-of-concept study to detect tract changes specific to schizophrenia. PMID:24505722

  10. Canavan Disease: A White Matter Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Shalini; Mattan, Natalia S.; de Vellis, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Breakdown of oligodendrocyte-neuron interactions in white matter (WM), such as the loss of myelin, results in axonal dysfunction and hence a disruption of information processing between brain regions. The major feature of leukodystrophies is the lack of proper myelin formation during early development or the onset of myelin loss late in life.…

  11. Bilirubin and its oxidation products damage brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Lakovic, Katarina; Ai, Jinglu; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Tariq, Asma; Sabri, Mohammed; Alarfaj, Abdullah K; Vasdev, Punarjot; Macdonald, Robert Loch

    2014-11-01

    Brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurs in cortex and white matter and may be mediated by blood breakdown products, including hemoglobin and heme. Effects of blood breakdown products, bilirubin and bilirubin oxidation products, have not been widely investigated in adult brain. Here, we first determined the effect of bilirubin and its oxidation products on the structure and function of white matter in vitro using brain slices. Subsequently, we determined whether these compounds have an effect on the structure and function of white matter in vivo. In all, 0.5 mmol/L bilirubin treatment significantly damaged both the function and the structure of myelinated axons but not the unmyelinated axons in brain slices. Toxicity of bilirubin in vitro was prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) may be responsible for the toxicity of bilirubin. In in vivo experiments, unmyelinated axons were found more susceptible to damage from bilirubin injection. These results suggest that unmyelinated axons may have a major role in white-matter damage in vivo. Since bilirubin and BOXes appear in a delayed manner after ICH, preventing their toxic effects may be worth investigating therapeutically. Dimethyl sulfoxide or its structurally related derivatives may have a potential therapeutic value at antagonizing axonal damage after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25160671

  12. Bilirubin and its oxidation products damage brain white matter

    PubMed Central

    Lakovic, Katarina; Ai, Jinglu; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Tariq, Asma; Sabri, Mohammed; Alarfaj, Abdullah K; Vasdev, Punarjot; Macdonald, Robert Loch

    2014-01-01

    Brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) occurs in cortex and white matter and may be mediated by blood breakdown products, including hemoglobin and heme. Effects of blood breakdown products, bilirubin and bilirubin oxidation products, have not been widely investigated in adult brain. Here, we first determined the effect of bilirubin and its oxidation products on the structure and function of white matter in vitro using brain slices. Subsequently, we determined whether these compounds have an effect on the structure and function of white matter in vivo. In all, 0.5 mmol/L bilirubin treatment significantly damaged both the function and the structure of myelinated axons but not the unmyelinated axons in brain slices. Toxicity of bilirubin in vitro was prevented by dimethyl sulfoxide. Bilirubin oxidation products (BOXes) may be responsible for the toxicity of bilirubin. In in vivo experiments, unmyelinated axons were found more susceptible to damage from bilirubin injection. These results suggest that unmyelinated axons may have a major role in white-matter damage in vivo. Since bilirubin and BOXes appear in a delayed manner after ICH, preventing their toxic effects may be worth investigating therapeutically. Dimethyl sulfoxide or its structurally related derivatives may have a potential therapeutic value at antagonizing axonal damage after hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25160671

  13. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Adult Learners' Week--which is supported by the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and the European Social Fund, amongst a raft of other organisations--is all about raising demand for learning. At its core, the campaign is about encouraging under-represented groups--including low-skilled, unemployed and low-paid adults and those…

  14. Imaging Small Vessel-Associated White Matter Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Salat, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in cerebrovascular structure and function may underlie the most common age-associated cognitive, psychiatric, and neurological conditions presented by older adults. Although much remains to understand, existing research suggests several age-associated detrimental conditions may be mediated through sometimes subtle small vessel-induced damage to the cerebral white matter. Here we review a selected portion of the vast work that demonstrates links between changes in vascular and neural health as a function of advancing age, and how even changes in low-to-moderate risk individuals, potentially beginning early in the adult age-span, may have an important impact on functional status in late life. PMID:24316059

  15. Biofidelic white matter heterogeneity decreases computational model predictions of white matter strains during rapid head rotations.

    PubMed

    Maltese, Matthew R; Margulies, Susan S

    2016-11-01

    The finite element (FE) brain model is used increasingly as a design tool for developing technology to mitigate traumatic brain injury. We developed an ultra high-definition FE brain model (>4 million elements) from CT and MRI scans of a 2-month-old pre-adolescent piglet brain, and simulated rapid head rotations. Strain distributions in the thalamus, coronal radiata, corpus callosum, cerebral cortex gray matter, brainstem and cerebellum were evaluated to determine the influence of employing homogeneous brain moduli, or distinct experimentally derived gray and white matter property representations, where some white matter regions are stiffer and others less stiff than gray matter. We find that constitutive heterogeneity significantly lowers white matter deformations in all regions compared with homogeneous properties, and should be incorporated in FE model injury prediction. PMID:27123826

  16. White Matter Integrity Reductions in Intermittent Explosive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Royce; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Evia, Arnold M; Fanning, Jennifer; Keedy, Sarah; Coccaro, Emil F

    2016-10-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder (IED), as described in DSM-5, is the categorical expression of pathological impulsive aggression. Previous work has identified neurobiological correlates of the disorder in patterns of frontal-limbic brain activity and dysregulation of serotonergic neurotransmission. Given the importance of short- and-long range white matter connections of the brain in social and emotional behavior, studies of white matter connectivity in impulsive aggression are warranted. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies in the related conditions of antisocial and borderline personality disorder have produced preliminary evidence of disturbed white matter connectivity in these disorders, but to date there have been no DTI studies in IED. A total of 132 male and female adults between the ages of 18 and 55 years underwent Turboprop-DTI on a 3-Tesla MRI scanner. Of these, 42 subjects had IED, 40 were normal controls, and 50 were clinical psychiatric controls with psychiatric disorders without IED. All subjects were free of alcohol, psychotropic medications, or drugs of abuse. The diffusion tensor was calculated in each voxel and maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) were generated. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used to compare FA along the white matter skeleton among the three subject groups. IED was associated with lower FA in two clusters located in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) when compared with the psychiatric and healthy controls. Impulsive aggression and borderline personality disorder, but not psychopathy or antisocial personality disorder, was associated with lower FA in the two clusters within the SLF. In conclusion, IED was associated with lower white matter integrity in long-range connections between the frontal and temporoparietal regions. PMID:27206265

  17. Cognitive associations of subcortical white matter lesions in older people.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, John T; Wiseman, Rebecca; Burton, Emma J; Barber, Bob; Wesnes, Keith; Saxby, Brian; Ford, Gary A

    2002-11-01

    Hyperintense lesions (HL), as visualized on T2-weighted or FLAIR MRI, are a common finding in older people, but their clinical significance and influence on cognitive function remain to be clarified. We investigated the relationship between HL in deep white and gray matter structures and cognition in older subjects. We recruited 154 nondemented (Mini-Mental State Examination > 24) subjects (79 males) over the age of 70 from primary care (103 subjects with mild hypertension and 51 normotensive subjects). All subjects underwent FLAIR and proton density and T2-weighted axial 1.5-tesla MRI scans (slice thickness: 5 mm). The scans were rated for the presence and distribution of HL in the subcortical gray matter (caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, thalamus) and associated white matter tracts (internal/external capsule). Subjects (n = 149) underwent a comprehensive cognitive assessment involving tests of attention, processing speed, episodic memory, working memory, and executive function. Partial correlations (correcting for age, systolic blood pressure, and New Adult Reading Test [NART] score) were performed to investigate the relationship between cognition and white matter change. HL were found in 49% of subjects. HL in both the gray (thalamus and caudate) and white matter were significantly associated with impaired cognitive function in tasks involving processing speed and/or executive function, but showed no associations with episodic or working memory. HL in both subcortical gray matter structures and associated fiber tracts correlate with impairments in attention, executive function and processing, and memory retrieval speed in nondemented older community-dwelling subjects. Such lesions may be an important cause of age-related attentional and executive dysfunction in the elderly, as well as temporal lobe and hippocampal changes that have previously been reported to be associated with impairments to the ability to actually store and retrieve information from memory

  18. Diffusion imaging, white matter, and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Moriah E; Thompson, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    The functional significance of the brain's white matter was not fully appreciated until new imaging methods were developed to visualize fiber pathways and connections in the living brain. Rapid advances in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have led to substantial insights into human brain development and disease processes and have thrust white matter into the focus of researchers and clinicians alike. The full clinical potential of this relatively new technique remains to be determined, but early indicators suggest that DTI will be a significant new technology in mapping mechanisms of human health and disease. Here we review brain changes that have been studied with DTI over the human lifespan and findings in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. We also suggest future areas where DTI is likely to have significant impact. PMID:21219189

  19. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Campaigning Alliance for Lifelong Learning is to lobby parliament for the restoration of the 1.5 million adult learning places lost over the past two years. The campaign has attracted supporters from an astonishingly wide range of backgrounds. In this article, Gordon Marsden, Caroline Biggins, Beth Walker, Mike Chaney, Peter Davies, Sian…

  20. White matter neuroanatomical differences in young children who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, David C.; Choo, Ai Leen; Angstadt, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The ability to express thoughts through fluent speech production is a most human faculty, one that is often taken for granted. Stuttering, which disrupts the smooth flow of speech, affects 5% of preschool-age children and 1% of the general population, and can lead to significant communication difficulties and negative psychosocial consequences throughout one’s lifetime. Despite the fact that symptom onset typically occurs during early childhood, few studies have yet examined the possible neural bases of developmental stuttering during childhood. Here we present a diffusion tensor imaging study that examined white matter measures reflecting neuroanatomical connectivity (fractional anisotropy) in 77 children [40 controls (20 females), 37 who stutter (16 females)] between 3 and 10 years of age. We asked whether previously reported anomalous white matter measures in adults and older children who stutter that were found primarily in major left hemisphere tracts (e.g. superior longitudinal fasciculus) are also present in younger children who stutter. All children exhibited normal speech, language, and cognitive development as assessed through a battery of assessments. The two groups were matched in chronological age and socioeconomic status. Voxel-wise whole brain comparisons using tract-based spatial statistics and region of interest analyses of fractional anisotropy were conducted to examine white matter changes associated with stuttering status, age, sex, and stuttering severity. Children who stutter exhibited significantly reduced fractional anisotropy relative to controls in white matter tracts that interconnect auditory and motor structures, corpus callosum, and in tracts interconnecting cortical and subcortical areas. In contrast to control subjects, fractional anisotropy changes with age were either stagnant or showed dissociated development among major perisylvian brain areas in children who stutter. These results provide first glimpses into the

  1. Longitudinal changes in white matter microstructure after heavy cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Becker, Mary P; Collins, Paul F; Lim, Kelvin O; Muetzel, R L; Luciana, M

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies of cannabis users report alterations in brain white matter microstructure, primarily based on cross-sectional research, and etiology of the alterations remains unclear. We report findings from longitudinal voxelwise analyses of DTI data collected at baseline and at a 2-year follow-up on 23 young adult (18-20 years old at baseline) regular cannabis users and 23 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched non-using controls with limited substance use histories. Onset of cannabis use was prior to age 17. Cannabis users displayed reduced longitudinal growth in fractional anisotropy in the central and parietal regions of the right and left superior longitudinal fasciculus, in white matter adjacent to the left superior frontal gyrus, in the left corticospinal tract, and in the right anterior thalamic radiation lateral to the genu of the corpus callosum, along with less longitudinal reduction of radial diffusion in the right central/posterior superior longitudinal fasciculus, corticospinal tract, and posterior cingulum. Greater amounts of cannabis use were correlated with reduced longitudinal growth in FA as was relatively impaired performance on a measure of verbal learning. These findings suggest that continued heavy cannabis use during adolescence and young adulthood alters ongoing development of white matter microstructure, contributing to functional impairment. PMID:26602958

  2. Contemplating Alzheimer's disease and the contribution of white matter hyperintensities.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Adam M

    2013-12-01

    As the older adult segment of the population increases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) has emerged as a significant public health epidemic. Over the past 3 decades, advances in the understanding of the biology of AD have led to a somewhat unified hypothesis of disease pathogenesis that emphasizes the precipitating role of beta amyloid protein. However, several lines of evidence suggest that multiple pathologies are necessary for clinical manifestation of the disease. Our focus over the past several years has been on the contribution of small vessel cerebrovascular disease, visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on magnetic resonance imaging, to AD. White matter hyperintensity volume, particularly in parietal regions, is elevated among individuals with and at risk for AD, predicts future diagnosis of AD, predicts the rate of progression of cognitive symptoms among individuals with AD, and increases over time among individuals destined to develop AD. White matter hyperintensities may represent an independent source of impairment and/or may interact more fundamentally with "primary" AD pathology. Future work should focus on more inclusive models of that better define "normal" vs "pathological" aging. PMID:24190781

  3. Interactive effects of apolipoprotein e4 and diabetes risk on later myelinating white matter regions in neurologically healthy older aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jessica M.; Salat, David H.; Stricker, Nikki H.; Zink, Tyler A.; Grande, Laura J.; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Leritz, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    Possession of the apolipoprotein e4 (APOE4) allele and diabetes risk are independently related to reduced white matter (WM) integrity that may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study is to examine the interactive effects of APOE4 and diabetes risk on later myelinating WM regions among healthy elderly at risk for AD. A sample of 107 healthy elderly (80 APOE4−/27 APOE4+) underwent structural MRI/ DTI data were prepared using TBSS and a-priori ROIs were extracted from T1-based WM parcellations. ROIs included later myelinating frontal/temporal/parietal WM regions and control regions, measured by fractional anisotropy (FA). There were no APOE group differences on DTI for any ROI. Within the APOE4 group, we found negative relationships between HAIC/fasting glucose and APOE4 on FA for all later myelinating WM regions, but not for early/middle myelinating control regions. Results also showed APOE4/diabetes risk interactions for WM underlying supramarginal, superior temporal, precuneus, superior parietal, and superior frontal regions. Results suggest interactive effects of APOE4 and diabetes risk on later myelinating WM regions, which supports preclinical detection of AD among this particularly susceptible subgroup. PMID:24381137

  4. Body mass index and brain white matter structure in young adults at risk for psychosis - The Oulu Brain and Mind Study.

    PubMed

    Koivukangas, Jenni; Björnholm, Lassi; Tervonen, Osmo; Miettunen, Jouko; Nordström, Tanja; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Mäki, Pirjo; Mukkala, Sari; Moilanen, Irma; Barnett, Jennifer H; Jones, Peter B; Nikkinen, Juha; Veijola, Juha

    2016-08-30

    Antipsychotic medications and psychotic illness related factors may affect both weight and brain structure in people with psychosis. Genetically high-risk individuals offer an opportunity to study the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and brain structure free from these potential confounds. We examined the effect of BMI on white matter (WM) microstructure in subjects with familial risk for psychosis (FR). We used diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics to explore the effect of BMI on whole brain FA in 42 (13 males) participants with FR and 46 (16 males) control participants aged 20-25 years drawn from general population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. We also measured axial, radial and mean diffusivities. Most of the participants were normal weight rather than obese. In the FR group, decrease in fractional anisotropy and increase in radial diffusivity were associated with an increase in BMI in several brain areas. In controls the opposite pattern was seen in participants with higher BMI. There was a statistically significant interaction between group and BMI on FA and radial and mean diffusivities. Our results suggest that the effect of BMI on WM differs between individuals with FR for psychosis and controls. PMID:27474847

  5. Imaging white matter in human brainstem.

    PubMed

    Ford, Anastasia A; Colon-Perez, Luis; Triplett, William T; Gullett, Joseph M; Mareci, Thomas H; Fitzgerald, David B

    2013-01-01

    The human brainstem is critical for the control of many life-sustaining functions, such as consciousness, respiration, sleep, and transfer of sensory and motor information between the brain and the spinal cord. Most of our knowledge about structure and organization of white and gray matter within the brainstem is derived from ex vivo dissection and histology studies. However, these methods cannot be applied to study structural architecture in live human participants. Tractography from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide valuable insights about white matter organization within the brainstem in vivo. However, this method presents technical challenges in vivo due to susceptibility artifacts, functionally dense anatomy, as well as pulsatile and respiratory motion. To investigate the limits of MR tractography, we present results from high angular resolution diffusion imaging of an intact excised human brainstem performed at 11.1 T using isotropic resolution of 0.333, 1, and 2 mm, with the latter reflecting resolution currently used clinically. At the highest resolution, the dense fiber architecture of the brainstem is evident, but the definition of structures degrades as resolution decreases. In particular, the inferred corticopontine/corticospinal tracts (CPT/CST), superior (SCP) and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), and medial lemniscus (ML) pathways are clearly discernable and follow known anatomical trajectories at the highest spatial resolution. At lower resolutions, the CST/CPT, SCP, and MCP pathways are artificially enlarged due to inclusion of collinear and crossing fibers not inherent to these three pathways. The inferred ML pathways appear smaller at lower resolutions, indicating insufficient spatial information to successfully resolve smaller fiber pathways. Our results suggest that white matter tractography maps derived from the excised brainstem can be used to guide the study of the brainstem architecture using diffusion MRI

  6. Microglia of Prefrontal White Matter in Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Schnieder, Tatiana P.; Trencevska, Iskra; Rosoklija, Gorazd; Stankov, Aleksandr; Mann, J. John; Smiley, John; Dwork, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Immune functions in the brain are associated with psychiatric illness and with temporary alteration of mental state. Microglia, the principal brain immunological cells, respond to changes in the internal brain milieu through a sequence of activated states, each with characteristic function and morphology. To assess a possible association of frontal white matter pathology with suicide, autopsy brain tissue samples from 11 suicide and 25 non-suicide subjects were stained for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1), CD68, and myelin. Groups were matched by age, sex, and psychiatric diagnosis. We classified Iba-1-immunoreactive cells on the basis of shape, immunoreactivity for CD68, and association with blood vessels to obtain stereologic estimates of densities of resting microglia, activated phagocytes, and perivascular cells. We found no effect of psychiatric diagnosis but 2 statistically significant effects of suicide: 1) the dorsal-ventral difference in activated microglial density was reversed such that with suicide, the density was greater in ventral than in dorsal prefrontal white matter, whereas in the absence of suicide, the opposite was true; and 2) with suicide there was a greater density of Iba-1-immunoreactive cells within or in contact with blood vessel walls in dorsal prefrontal white matter. These observations could reflect a mechanism for the stress/diathesis (state/trait) model of suicide whereby an acute stress activates a reactive process in the brain, either directly or by compromising the blood-brain barrier, and creates a suicidal state in an individual at risk. They also indicate the theoretical potential of imaging studies in live, vulnerable individuals for the assessment of suicide risk. Further studies are needed to investigate specific phenotypes of perivascular cells and blood-brain barrier changes associated with suicide. PMID:25101704

  7. Imaging White Matter in Human Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Anastasia A.; Colon-Perez, Luis; Triplett, William T.; Gullett, Joseph M.; Mareci, Thomas H.; FitzGerald, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The human brainstem is critical for the control of many life-sustaining functions, such as consciousness, respiration, sleep, and transfer of sensory and motor information between the brain and the spinal cord. Most of our knowledge about structure and organization of white and gray matter within the brainstem is derived from ex vivo dissection and histology studies. However, these methods cannot be applied to study structural architecture in live human participants. Tractography from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide valuable insights about white matter organization within the brainstem in vivo. However, this method presents technical challenges in vivo due to susceptibility artifacts, functionally dense anatomy, as well as pulsatile and respiratory motion. To investigate the limits of MR tractography, we present results from high angular resolution diffusion imaging of an intact excised human brainstem performed at 11.1 T using isotropic resolution of 0.333, 1, and 2 mm, with the latter reflecting resolution currently used clinically. At the highest resolution, the dense fiber architecture of the brainstem is evident, but the definition of structures degrades as resolution decreases. In particular, the inferred corticopontine/corticospinal tracts (CPT/CST), superior (SCP) and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), and medial lemniscus (ML) pathways are clearly discernable and follow known anatomical trajectories at the highest spatial resolution. At lower resolutions, the CST/CPT, SCP, and MCP pathways are artificially enlarged due to inclusion of collinear and crossing fibers not inherent to these three pathways. The inferred ML pathways appear smaller at lower resolutions, indicating insufficient spatial information to successfully resolve smaller fiber pathways. Our results suggest that white matter tractography maps derived from the excised brainstem can be used to guide the study of the brainstem architecture using diffusion MRI

  8. White matter connectivity and Internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bum Seok; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Sang Won; Renshaw, Perry F

    2016-05-01

    Internet use and on-line game play stimulate corticostriatal-limbic circuitry in both healthy subjects and subjects with Internet gaming disorder (IGD). We hypothesized that increased fractional anisotropy (FA) with decreased radial diffusivity (RD) would be observed in IGD subjects, compared with healthy control subjects, and that these white matter indices would be associated with clinical variables including duration of illness and executive function. We screened 181 male patients in order to recruit a large number (n = 58) of IGD subjects without psychiatric co-morbidity as well as 26 male healthy comparison subjects. Multiple diffusion-weighted images were acquired using a 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Tract-based spatial statistics was applied to compare group differences in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics between IGD and healthy comparison subjects. IGD subjects had increased FA values within forceps minor, right anterior thalamic radiation, right corticospinal tract, right inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right cingulum to hippocampus and right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) as well as parallel decreases in RD value within forceps minor, right anterior thalamic radiation and IFOF relative to healthy control subjects. In addition, the duration of illness in IGD subjects was positively correlated with the FA values (integrity of white matter fibers) and negatively correlated with RD scores (diffusivity of axonal density) of whole brain white matter. In IGD subjects without psychiatric co-morbidity, our DTI results suggest that increased myelination (increased FA and decreased RD values) in right-sided frontal fiber tracts may be the result of extended game play. PMID:25899390

  9. Age-Related White Matter Changes

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yun Yun; Mok, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Age-related white matter changes (WMC) are considered manifestation of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and are related to age and vascular risk factors. Most recent studies have shown that WMC are associated with a host of poor outcomes, including cognitive impairment, dementia, urinary incontinence, gait disturbances, depression, and increased risk of stroke and death. Although the clinical relevance of WMC has been extensively studied, to date, only very few clinical trials have evaluated potential symptomatic or preventive treatments for WMC. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding in the pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical importance, chemical biomarkers, and treatments of age-related WMC. PMID:21876810

  10. White matter 'potholes' in early-onset schizophrenia: a new approach to evaluate white matter microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    White, Tonya; Schmidt, Marcus; Karatekin, Canan

    2009-11-30

    There is considerable evidence implicating white matter abnormalities in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Many of the recent studies examining white matter have utilized diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using either region of interest (ROI) or voxel-based approaches. Both voxel-based and ROI approaches are based on the assumption that the abnormalities in white matter overlap spatially. However, this is an assumption that has not been tested, and it is possible that aberrations in white matter occur in non-overlapping regions. In order to test for the presence of non-overlapping regions of aberrant white matter, we developed a novel image processing technique that evaluates for white matter 'potholes,' referring to within-subject clusters of white matter voxels that show a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy. We applied this algorithm to a group of children and adolescents with schizophrenia compared to controls and found an increased number of 'potholes' in the patient group. These results suggest that voxel-based and ROI approaches may be missing some white matter differences that do not overlap spatially. This algorithm may be also be well suited to detect white matter abnormalities in disorders such as substance abuse, head trauma, or specific neurological conditions affecting white matter. PMID:19853414

  11. White matter involvement in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; DeArmond, Stephen J; Hess, Christopher P; Vitali, Paolo; Papinutto, Nico; Oehler, Abby; Miller, Bruce L; Lobach, Irina V; Bastianello, Stefano; Geschwind, Michael D; Henry, Roland G

    2014-12-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is considered primarily a disease of grey matter, although the extent of white matter involvement has not been well described. We used diffusion tensor imaging to study the white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease compared to healthy control subjects and to correlated magnetic resonance imaging findings with histopathology. Twenty-six patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and nine age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects underwent volumetric T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. Six patients had post-mortem brain analysis available for assessment of neuropathological findings associated with prion disease. Parcellation of the subcortical white matter was performed on 3D T1-weighted volumes using Freesurfer. Diffusion tensor imaging maps were calculated and transformed to the 3D-T1 space; the average value for each diffusion metric was calculated in the total white matter and in regional volumes of interest. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis was also performed to investigate the deeper white matter tracts. There was a significant reduction of mean (P=0.002), axial (P=0.0003) and radial (P=0.0134) diffusivities in the total white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mean diffusivity was significantly lower in most white matter volumes of interest (P<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons), with a generally symmetric pattern of involvement in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mean diffusivity reduction reflected concomitant decrease of both axial and radial diffusivity, without appreciable changes in white matter anisotropy. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis showed significant reductions of mean diffusivity within the white matter of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mainly in the left hemisphere, with a strong trend (P=0.06) towards reduced mean diffusivity in most of the white matter bilaterally. In contrast, by visual assessment there was no white matter

  12. Disconnected aging: cerebral white matter integrity and age-related differences in cognition.

    PubMed

    Bennett, I J; Madden, D J

    2014-09-12

    Cognition arises as a result of coordinated processing among distributed brain regions and disruptions to communication within these neural networks can result in cognitive dysfunction. Cortical disconnection may thus contribute to the declines in some aspects of cognitive functioning observed in healthy aging. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is ideally suited for the study of cortical disconnection as it provides indices of structural integrity within interconnected neural networks. The current review summarizes results of previous DTI aging research with the aim of identifying consistent patterns of age-related differences in white matter integrity, and of relationships between measures of white matter integrity and behavioral performance as a function of adult age. We outline a number of future directions that will broaden our current understanding of these brain-behavior relationships in aging. Specifically, future research should aim to (1) investigate multiple models of age-brain-behavior relationships; (2) determine the tract-specificity versus global effect of aging on white matter integrity; (3) assess the relative contribution of normal variation in white matter integrity versus white matter lesions to age-related differences in cognition; (4) improve the definition of specific aspects of cognitive functioning related to age-related differences in white matter integrity using information processing tasks; and (5) combine multiple imaging modalities (e.g., resting-state and task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging; fMRI) with DTI to clarify the role of cerebral white matter integrity in cognitive aging. PMID:24280637

  13. Financial literacy is associated with white matter integrity in old age.

    PubMed

    Han, S Duke; Boyle, Patricia A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Fleischman, Debra; Yu, Lei; James, Bryan D; Bennett, David A

    2016-04-15

    Financial literacy, the ability to understand, access, and utilize information in ways that contribute to optimal financial outcomes, is important for independence and wellbeing in old age. We previously reported that financial literacy is associated with greater functional connectivity between brain regions in old age. Here, we tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy would be associated with greater white matter integrity in old age. Participants included 346 persons without dementia (mean age=81.36, mean education=15.39, male/female=79/267, mean MMSE=28.52) from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Financial literacy was assessed using a series of questions imbedded as part of an ongoing decision making study. White matter integrity was assessed with diffusion anisotropy measured with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI). We tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter, adjusting for the effects of age, education, sex, and white matter hyperintense lesions. We then repeated the analysis also adjusting for cognitive function. Analyses revealed regions with significant positive associations between financial literacy and diffusion anisotropy, and many remained significant after accounting for cognitive function. White matter tracts connecting right hemisphere temporal-parietal brain regions were particularly implicated. Greater financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter of nondemented older adults after adjusting for important covariates. These results suggest that financial literacy is positively associated with white matter integrity in old age. PMID:26899784

  14. White Matter Microstructure in Idiopathic Craniocervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Giordanna L. S.; Guimarães, Rachel P.; Piovesana, Luiza G.; Campos, Brunno M.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Azevedo, Paula C.; Torres, Fabio R.; Amato-Filho, Augusto C.; França, Marcondes C.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando; D’Abreu, Anelyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystonias are hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions resulting in abnormal torsional movements and postures. Recent neuroimaging studies in idiopathic craniocervical dystonia (CCD) have uncovered the involvement of multiple areas, including cortical ones. Our goal was to evaluate white matter (WM) microstructure in subjects with CCD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis. Methods We compared 40 patients with 40 healthy controls. Patients were then divided into subgroups: cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia + cervical dystonia, using tract-based spatial statistics. We performed a region of interest-based analysis and tractography as confirmatory tests. Results There was no significant difference in the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) between the groups in any analysis. Discussion The lack of DTI changes in CCD suggests that the WM tracts are not primarily affected. PMID:26056610

  15. Decreased White Matter Integrity in Neuropsychologically-Defined Mild Cognitive Impairment is Independent of Cortical Thinning

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Nikki H.; Salat, David H.; Foley, Jessica M.; Zink, Tyler A.; Kellison, Ida L.; McFarland, Craig P.; Grande, Laura J.; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Leritz, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    Improved understanding of the pattern of white matter changes in early and prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD) states such as Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is necessary to support earlier preclinical detection of AD, and debate remains whether white matter changes in MCI are secondary to gray matter changes. We applied neuropsychologically-based MCI criteria to a sample of normally aging older adults; 32 participants met criteria for MCI and 81 participants were classified as normal control (NC) subjects. Whole-head high resolution T1 and DTI scans were completed. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics was applied and a priori selected ROIs were extracted. Hippocampal volume and cortical thickness averaged across regions with known vulnerability to AD were derived. Controlling for cortical thickness, the MCI group showed decreased average FA and decreased FA in parietal white matter and in white matter underlying the entorhinal and posterior cingulate cortices relative to the NC group. Statistically controlling for cortical thickness, medial temporal FA was related to memory and parietal FA was related to executive functioning. These results provide further support for the potential role of white matter integrity as an early biomarker for individuals at risk for AD and highlight that changes in white matter may be independent of gray matter changes. PMID:23809097

  16. White matter hyperintensities and normal-appearing white matter integrity in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Clayden, Jonathan D; Royle, Natalie A; Murray, Catherine; Morris, Zoe; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Gow, Alan J; Starr, John M; Bastin, Mark E; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-02-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin are a common finding in brain magnetic resonance imaging of older individuals and contribute to cognitive and functional decline. It is unknown how WMH form, although white matter degeneration is characterized pathologically by demyelination, axonal loss, and rarefaction, often attributed to ischemia. Changes within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in subjects with WMH have also been reported but have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we describe the in vivo imaging signatures of both NAWM and WMH in a large group of community-dwelling older people of similar age using biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging that collectively reflect white matter integrity, myelination, and brain water content. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were significantly lower, whereas mean diffusivity (MD) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1) were significantly higher, in WMH than NAWM (p < 0.0001), with MD providing the largest difference between NAWM and WMH. Receiver operating characteristic analysis on each biomarker showed that MD differentiated best between NAWM and WMH, identifying 94.6% of the lesions using a threshold of 0.747 × 10(-9) m(2)s(-1) (area under curve, 0.982; 95% CI, 0.975-0.989). Furthermore, the level of deterioration of NAWM was strongly associated with the severity of WMH, with MD and T1 increasing and FA and MTR decreasing in NAWM with increasing WMH score, a relationship that was sustained regardless of distance from the WMH. These multimodal imaging data indicate that WMH have reduced structural integrity compared with surrounding NAWM, and MD provides the best discriminator between the 2 tissue classes even within the mild range of WMH severity, whereas FA, MTR, and T1 only start reflecting significant changes in tissue microstructure as WMH become more severe. PMID:25457555

  17. Relationship Between Cortical Gyrification, White Matter Connectivity, and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, C.; Andrews, D.; Dell'Acqua, F.; Daly, E.; Murphy, C.; Catani, M.; Thiebaut de Schotten, M.; Baron-Cohen, S.; Lai, M.C.; Lombardo, M.V.; Bullmore, E.T.; Suckling, J.; Williams, S.; Jones, D.K.; Chiocchetti, A.; Murphy, D.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition, which is accompanied by differences in gray matter neuroanatomy and white matter connectivity. However, it is unknown whether these differences are linked or reflect independent aetiologies. Using a multimodal neuroimaging approach, we therefore examined 51 male adults with ASD and 48 neurotypical controls to investigate the relationship between gray matter local gyrification (lGI) and white matter diffusivity in associated fiber tracts. First, ASD individuals had a significant increase in gyrification around the left pre- and post-central gyrus. Second, white matter fiber tracts originating and/or terminating in the cluster of increased lGI had a significant increase in axial diffusivity. This increase in diffusivity was predominantly observed in tracts in close proximity to the cortical sheet. Last, we demonstrate that the increase in lGI was significantly correlated with increased diffusivity of short tracts. This relationship was not significantly modulated by a main effect of group (i.e., ASD), which was more closely associated with gray matter gyrification than white matter diffusivity. Our findings suggest that differences in gray matter neuroanatomy and white matter connectivity are closely linked, and may reflect common rather than distinct aetiological pathways. PMID:27130663

  18. Relationship Between Cortical Gyrification, White Matter Connectivity, and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ecker, C; Andrews, D; Dell'Acqua, F; Daly, E; Murphy, C; Catani, M; Thiebaut de Schotten, M; Baron-Cohen, S; Lai, M C; Lombardo, M V; Bullmore, E T; Suckling, J; Williams, S; Jones, D K; Chiocchetti, A; Murphy, D G M

    2016-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition, which is accompanied by differences in gray matter neuroanatomy and white matter connectivity. However, it is unknown whether these differences are linked or reflect independent aetiologies. Using a multimodal neuroimaging approach, we therefore examined 51 male adults with ASD and 48 neurotypical controls to investigate the relationship between gray matter local gyrification (lGI) and white matter diffusivity in associated fiber tracts. First, ASD individuals had a significant increase in gyrification around the left pre- and post-central gyrus. Second, white matter fiber tracts originating and/or terminating in the cluster of increased lGI had a significant increase in axial diffusivity. This increase in diffusivity was predominantly observed in tracts in close proximity to the cortical sheet. Last, we demonstrate that the increase in lGI was significantly correlated with increased diffusivity of short tracts. This relationship was not significantly modulated by a main effect of group (i.e., ASD), which was more closely associated with gray matter gyrification than white matter diffusivity. Our findings suggest that differences in gray matter neuroanatomy and white matter connectivity are closely linked, and may reflect common rather than distinct aetiological pathways. PMID:27130663

  19. White Matter Development during Adolescence as Shown by Diffusion MRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Yuan, Weihong

    2010-01-01

    Previous volumetric developmental MRI studies of the brain have shown white matter development continuing through adolescence and into adulthood. This review presents current findings regarding white matter development and organization from diffusion MRI studies. The general trend during adolescence (age 12-18 years) is towards increasing…

  20. Aging and large-scale functional networks: white matter integrity, gray matter volume, and functional connectivity in the resting state.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, L; Williams, M; Rich, A; Savage, G; Burianová, H

    2015-04-01

    Healthy aging is accompanied by neurobiological changes that affect the brain's functional organization and the individual's cognitive abilities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of global age-related differences in the cortical white and gray matter on neural activity in three key large-scale networks. We used functional-structural covariance network analysis to assess resting state activity in the default mode network (DMN), the fronto-parietal network (FPN), and the salience network (SN) of young and older adults. We further related this functional activity to measures of cortical thickness and volume derived from structural MRI, as well as to measures of white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], and radial diffusivity [RD]) derived from diffusion-weighted imaging. First, our results show that, in the direct comparison of resting state activity, young but not older adults reliably engage the SN and FPN in addition to the DMN, suggesting that older adults recruit these networks less consistently. Second, our results demonstrate that age-related decline in white matter integrity and gray matter volume is associated with activity in prefrontal nodes of the SN and FPN, possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms. We suggest that age-related differences in gray and white matter properties differentially affect the ability of the brain to engage and coordinate large-scale functional networks that are central to efficient cognitive functioning. PMID:25644420

  1. Non-Gaussian water diffusion in aging white matter.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Jean-Philippe; Chen, J Jean; Rosas, H Diana; Salat, David H

    2014-06-01

    Age-associated white matter degeneration has been well documented and is likely an important mechanism contributing to cognitive decline in older adults. Recent work has explored a range of noninvasive neuroimaging procedures to differentially highlight alterations in the tissue microenvironment. Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is an extension of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) that accounts for non-Gaussian water diffusion and can reflect alterations in the distribution and diffusion properties of tissue compartments. We used DKI to produce whole-brain voxel-based maps of mean, axial, and radial diffusional kurtoses, quantitative indices of the tissue microstructure's diffusional heterogeneity, in 111 participants ranging from the age of 33 to 91 years. As suggested from prior DTI studies, greater age was associated with alterations in white-matter tissue microstructure, which was reflected by a reduction in all 3 DKI metrics. Prominent effects were found in prefrontal and association white matter compared with relatively preserved primary motor and visual areas. Although DKI metrics co-varied with DTI metrics on a global level, DKI provided unique regional sensitivity to the effects of age not available with DTI. DKI metrics were additionally useful in combination with DTI metrics for the classification of regions according to their multivariate "diffusion footprint", or pattern of relative age effect sizes. It is possible that the specific multivariate patterns of age-associated changes measured are representative of different types of microstructural pathology. These results suggest that DKI provides important complementary indices of brain microstructure for the study of brain aging and neurologic disease. PMID:24378085

  2. Brain white matter abnormality in a newborn infant with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Akimune; Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kamimura, Miki; Kanno, Junko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2013-10-01

    Several studies have described brain white matter abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children and adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), while the brain MRI findings of newborn infants with CAH have not been clarified. We report a newborn boy with CAH who presented brain white matter abnormality on MRI. He was diagnosed as having salt-wasting CAH with a high 17-OHP level at neonatal screening and was initially treated with hydrocortisone at 8 days of age. On day 11 after birth, he had a generalized tonic seizure. No evidence of serum electrolyte abnormalities was observed. Brain MRI revealed white matter abnormalities that consisted of bilateral small diffuse hyperintensities on T1-weighted images with slightly low intensity on T2-weighted images in the watershed area. Several factors associated with brain white matter abnormalities in adults with CAH, such as increasing age, hypertension, diabetes and corticosteroid replacement, were not applicable. Although the cause of the phenomenon in this case is unclear, brain white matter abnormality could be observed in newborn infants with CAH as well as in adult patients. PMID:24170965

  3. White matter lesions and intra-arterial thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Simon; Mono, Marie Luise; Findling, Oliver; Fischer, Urs; Galimanis, Aekaterini; Weck, Anja; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Ballinari, Pietro; Gralla, Jan; Brekenfeld, Caspar; Schroth, Gerhard; Arnold, Marcel; Mattle, Heinrich P; El-Koussy, Marwan

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the influence of white matter lesions in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT). From September 2003 to January 2010, we treated 400 patients with IAT at our institution. Of these patients, 292 were evaluated with MRI scans and included in this observational study. Clinical data were collected prospectively. Outcome after 3 months was measured with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS); mRS 0-1 was considered as favorable outcome. White matter lesions were scored visually by two observers using the semiquantitative Scheltens and Fazekas scores. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the association of white matter lesions and clinical outcome, recanalization, and cerebral hemorrhage. The severity of white matter lesions was inversely correlated with favorable outcome, survival and successful recanalization. White matter lesions were an independent predictor of outcome (OR 0.569, p = 0.007) and survival (OR 0.550, p = 0.018) and a weak but independent predictor for recanalization (OR 0.949, p = 0.038). Asymptomatic intracerebral bleeding after IAT was associated with white matter lesions in the basal ganglia in the univariate analysis (p = 0.036), but not after multivariable analysis. The severity of white matter lesions independently predicts clinical outcome and survival in patients treated with IAT. White matter lesions are also a weak but independent predictor for recanalization. Symptomatic intracranial bleeding after IAT are not associated with white matter lesions. Therefore, white matter lesions should not be considered as a contraindication against IAT. PMID:22249288

  4. Social network diversity and white matter microstructural integrity in humans.

    PubMed

    Molesworth, Tara; Sheu, Lei K; Cohen, Sheldon; Gianaros, Peter J; Verstynen, Timothy D

    2015-09-01

    Diverse aspects of physical, affective and cognitive health relate to social integration, reflecting engagement in social activities and identification with diverse roles within a social network. However, the mechanisms by which social integration interacts with the brain are unclear. In healthy adults (N = 155), we tested the links between social integration and measures of white matter microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging. Across the brain, there was a predominantly positive association between a measure of white matter integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA), and social network diversity. This association was particularly strong in a region near the anterior corpus callosum and driven by a negative association with the radial component of the diffusion signal. This callosal region contained projections between bilateral prefrontal cortices, as well as cingulum and corticostriatal pathways. FA within this region was weakly associated with circulating levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), but IL-6 did not mediate the social network and FA relationship. Finally, variation in FA indirectly mediated the relationship between social network diversity and intrinsic functional connectivity of medial corticostriatal pathways. These findings suggest that social integration relates to myelin integrity in humans, which may help explain the diverse aspects of health affected by social networks. PMID:25605966

  5. White matter involvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Gregory; Shpaner, Marina; Watts, Richard; Andrews, Trevor; Filippi, Christopher G.; Davis, Marcia; Naylor, Magdalena R.

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that chronic musculoskeletal pain is associated with anatomical and functional abnormalities in gray matter. However, little research has investigated the relationship between chronic musculoskeletal pain and white matter (WM). In this study, we used whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics, and region-of-interest analyses of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to demonstrate that patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain exhibit several abnormal WM integrity as compared to healthy controls. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was associated with lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in the splenium of corpus callosum, and left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus. Patients also had higher radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium, right anterior and posterior limbs of internal capsule, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cerebral peduncle. Patterns of axial diffusivity (AD) varied: patients exhibited lower AD in the left cingulum adjacent to the hippocampus and higher AD bilaterally in the anterior limbs of internal capsule, and in the right cerebral peduncle. Several correlations between diffusion metrics and clinical variables were also significant at a p<0.01 level: FA in the left uncinate fasciculus correlated positively with Total Pain Experience and typical levels of pain severity. AD in the left anterior limb of internal capsule and left uncinate fasciculus were correlated with Total Pain Experience and typical pain level. Positive correlations were also found between AD in the right uncinate and both Total Pain Experience and Pain Catastrophizing. These results demonstrate that WM abnormalities play a role in chronic musculoskeletal pain; either as a cause, predisposing factor, consequence, or compensatory adaptation. PMID:25135468

  6. White Matter Hyperintensities and Hypobaric Exposure

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Stephen A.; Sherman, Paul M.; Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Rowland, Laura M.; Grogan, Patrick M.; Sladky, John H.; Robinson, Andrew Y.; Kochunov, Peter V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Demonstrate that occupational exposure to nonhypoxic hypobaria is associated with subcortical white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Eighty-three altitude chamber personnel (PHY), 105 U-2 pilots (U2P), and 148 age- controlled and health-matched doctorate degree controls (DOC) underwent high-resolution MRI. Subcortical WMH burden was quantified as count and volume of subcortical WMH lesions after transformation of images to the Talairach atlas–based stereo-tactic frame. Results Subcortical WMHs were more prevalent in PHY (volume p = 0.011/count p = 0.019) and U2P (volume p<0.001/count p<0.001) when compared to DOC, whereas PHY were not significantly different than U2P. Interpretation This study provides strong evidence that nonhypoxic hypobaric exposure may induce subcortical WMHs in a young, healthy population lacking other risk factors for WMHs and adds this occupational exposure to other environmentally related potential causes of WMHs. PMID:25164539

  7. Altered Superficial White Matter on Tractography MRI in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reginold, William; Luedke, Angela C.; Itorralba, Justine; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Superficial white matter provides extensive cortico-cortical connections. This tractography study aimed to assess the diffusion characteristics of superficial white matter tracts in Alzheimer's disease. Methods Diffusion tensor 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired in 24 controls and 16 participants with Alzheimer's disease. Neuropsychological test scores were available in some participants. Tractography was performed by the Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking (FACT) method. The superficial white matter was manually segmented and divided into frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. The mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (RD), axial diffusivity (AxD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of these tracts were compared between controls and participants with Alzheimer's disease and correlated with available cognitive tests while adjusting for age and white matter hyperintensity volume. Results Alzheimer's disease was associated with increased MD (p = 0.0011), increased RD (p = 0.0019) and increased AxD (p = 0.0017) in temporal superficial white matter. In controls, superficial white matter was associated with the performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Stroop and Trail Making Test B tests, whereas in Alzheimer's disease patients, it was not associated with the performance on cognitive tests. Conclusion Temporal lobe superficial white matter appears to be disrupted in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27489557

  8. Tryptophan Metabolism and White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Postolache, Teodor T; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Shukla, Dinesh K; Tagamets, Malle; Du, Xiaoming; Savransky, Anya; Lowry, Christopher A; Can, Adem; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in the structure and functioning of white matter, but the underlying neuropathology is unclear. We hypothesized that increased tryptophan degradation in the kynurenine pathway could be associated with white matter microstructure and biochemistry, potentially contributing to white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. To test this, fasting plasma samples were obtained from 37 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls and levels of total tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were assessed. The ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan was used as an index of tryptophan catabolic activity in this pathway. White matter structure and function were assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Tryptophan levels were significantly lower (p<0.001), and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios were correspondingly higher (p=0.018) in patients compared with controls. In patients, lower plasma tryptophan levels corresponded to lower structural integrity (DTI fractional anisotropy) (r=0.347, p=0.038). In both patients and controls, the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio was inversely correlated with frontal white matter glutamate level (r=-0.391 and -0.350 respectively, p=0.024 and 0.036). These results provide initial evidence implicating abnormal tryptophan/kynurenine pathway activity in changes to white matter integrity and white matter glutamate in schizophrenia. PMID:27143602

  9. Age-related abnormalities in white matter microstructure in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Pauley, Gregory; Richards, Todd; Neuhaus, Emily; Martin, Nathalie; Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis W.; Estes, Annette; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities in structural and functional connectivity have been reported in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) across a wide age range. However, developmental changes in white matter microstructure are poorly understood. We used a cross-sectional design to determine whether white matter abnormalities measured using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were present in adolescents and adults with ASD and whether age-related changes in white matter microstructure differed between ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals. Participants included 28 individuals with ASD and 33 TD controls matched on age and IQ and assessed at one time point. Widespread decreased fractional anisotropy (FA), and increased radial diffusivity (RaD) and mean diffusivity (MD) were observed in the ASD group compared to the TD group. In addition, significant group-by-age interactions were also observed in FA, RaD, and MD in all major tracts except the brain stem, indicating that age-related changes in white matter microstructure differed between the groups. We propose that white matter microstructural changes in ASD may reflect myelination and/or other structural differences including differences in axonal density/arborization. In addition, we suggest that white matter microstuctural impairments may be normalizing during young adulthood in ASD. Future longitudinal studies that include a wider range of ages and more extensive clinical characterization will be critical for further uncovering the neurodevelopmental processes unfolding during this dynamic time in development. PMID:22902768

  10. DCDC2 polymorphism is associated with left temporoparietal gray and white matter structures during development.

    PubMed

    Darki, Fahimeh; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Matsson, Hans; Kere, Juha; Klingberg, Torkel

    2014-10-22

    Three genes, DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319, have been previously associated with dyslexia, neuronal migration, and ciliary function. Three polymorphisms within these genes, rs3743204 (DYX1C1), rs793842 (DCDC2), and rs6935076 (KIAA0319) have also been linked to normal variability of left temporoparietal white matter volume connecting the middle temporal cortex to the angular and supramarginal gyri. Here, we assessed whether these polymorphisms are also related to the cortical thickness of the associated regions during childhood development using a longitudinal dataset of 76 randomly selected children and young adults who were scanned up to three times each, 2 years apart. rs793842 in DCDC2 was significantly associated with the thickness of left angular and supramarginal gyri as well as the left lateral occipital cortex. The cortex was significantly thicker for T-allele carriers, who also had lower white matter volume and lower reading comprehension scores. There was a negative correlation between white matter volume and cortical thickness, but only white matter volume predicted reading comprehension 2 years after scanning. These results show how normal variability in reading comprehension is related to gene, white matter volume, and cortical thickness in the inferior parietal lobe. Possibly, the variability of gray and white matter structures could both be related to the role of DCDC2 in ciliary function, which affects both neuronal migration and axonal outgrowth. PMID:25339756

  11. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: reasoning training alters structural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Allyson P; Whitaker, Kirstie J; Bunge, Silvia A

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA), have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n = 23) who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n = 22). DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD) in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD) within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination. PMID:22936899

  12. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: reasoning training alters structural connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Allyson P.; Whitaker, Kirstie J.; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA), have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n = 23) who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n = 22). DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD) in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD) within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination. PMID:22936899

  13. Magnified effects of the COMT gene on white-matter microstructure in very old age.

    PubMed

    Papenberg, Goran; Lövdén, Martin; Laukka, Erika J; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Keller, Lina; Graff, Caroline; Köhncke, Ylva; Li, Tie-Qiang; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2015-09-01

    Genetic factors may partly account for between-person differences in brain integrity in old age. Evidence from human and animal studies suggests that the dopaminergic system is implicated in the modulation of white-matter integrity. We investigated whether a genetic variation in the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism, which influences dopamine availability in prefrontal cortex, contributes to interindividual differences in white-matter microstructure, as measured with diffusion-tensor imaging. In a sample of older adults from a population-based study (60-87 years; n = 238), we found that the COMT polymorphism affects white-matter microstructure, indexed by fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity, of several white-matter tracts in the oldest age group (81-87 years), although there were no reliable associations between COMT and white-matter microstructure in the two younger age groups (60-66 and 72-78 years). These findings extend previous observations of magnified genetic effects on cognition in old age to white-matter integrity. PMID:25056932

  14. Individual differences in left parietal white matter predict math scores on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test.

    PubMed

    Matejko, Anna A; Price, Gavin R; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Ansari, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Mathematical skills are of critical importance, both academically and in everyday life. Neuroimaging research has primarily focused on the relationship between mathematical skills and functional brain activity. Comparatively few studies have examined which white matter regions support mathematical abilities. The current study uses diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test whether individual differences in white matter predict performance on the math subtest of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT). Grades 10 and 11 PSAT scores were obtained from 30 young adults (ages 17-18) with wide-ranging math achievement levels. Tract based spatial statistics was used to examine the correlation between PSAT math scores, fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial diffusivity (AD). FA in left parietal white matter was positively correlated with math PSAT scores (specifically in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, left superior corona radiata, and left corticospinal tract) after controlling for chronological age and same grade PSAT critical reading scores. Furthermore, RD, but not AD, was correlated with PSAT math scores in these white matter microstructures. The negative correlation with RD further suggests that participants with higher PSAT math scores have greater white matter integrity in this region. Individual differences in FA and RD may reflect variability in experience dependent plasticity over the course of learning and development. These results are the first to demonstrate that individual differences in white matter are associated with mathematical abilities on a nationally administered scholastic aptitude measure. PMID:23108272

  15. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Katherine E.; Golden, Neville H.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Solomon, Murray; Nguyen, Jenny; Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4) were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3). We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18) and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total). Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA) and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN. PMID:26740918

  16. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Travis, Katherine E; Golden, Neville H; Feldman, Heidi M; Solomon, Murray; Nguyen, Jenny; Mezer, Aviv; Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4) were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3). We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18) and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total). Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA) and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN. PMID:26740918

  17. Medial Frontal White and Gray Matter Contributions to General Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Bouix, Sylvain; Kubicki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) are part of a wider neural network that plays an important role in general intelligence and executive function. We used structural brain imaging to quantify magnetic resonance gray matter volume and diffusion tensor white matter integrity of the mOFC-rACC network in 26 healthy participants who also completed neuropsychological tests of intellectual abilities and executive function. Stochastic tractography, the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging method for examining white matter connections between adjacent gray matter regions, was employed to assess the integrity of mOFC-rACC pathways. Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the integrity of white matter connections, was calculated. Results indicated that higher intelligence correlated with greater gray matter volumes for both mOFC and rACC, as well as with increased FA for left posterior mOFC-rACC connectivity. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that DTI-derived FA of left posterior mOFC-rACC uniquely accounted for 29%–34% of the variance in IQ, in comparison to 11%–16% uniquely explained by gray matter volume of the left rACC. Together, left rACC gray matter volume and white matter connectivity between left posterior mOFC and rACC accounted for up to 50% of the variance in general intelligence. This study is to our knowledge the first to examine white matter connectivity between OFC and ACC, two gray matter regions of interests that are very close in physical proximity, and underscores the important independent contributions of variations in rACC gray matter volume and mOFC-rACC white matter connectivity to individual differences in general intelligence. PMID:25551572

  18. Increased White Matter Gyral Depth in Dyslexia: Implications for Corticocortical Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanova, Manuel F.; El-Baz, Ayman S.; Giedd, Jay; Rumsey, Judith M.; Switala, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies provide credence to the minicolumnar origin of several developmental conditions, including dyslexia. Characteristics of minicolumnopathies include abnormalities in how the cortex expands and folds. This study examines the depth of the gyral white matter measured in an MRI series of 15 dyslexic adult men and eleven age-matched…

  19. Major Superficial White Matter Abnormalities in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Owen R.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Sanchez-Castaneda, Cristina; Narr, Katherine; Shattuck, David W.; Caltagirone, Carlo; Sabatini, Umberto; Di Paola, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The late myelinating superficial white matter at the juncture of the cortical gray and white matter comprising the intracortical myelin and short-range association fibers has not received attention in Huntington's disease. It is an area of the brain that is late myelinating and is sensitive to both normal aging and neurodegenerative disease effects. Therefore, it may be sensitive to Huntington's disease processes. Methods: Structural MRI data from 25 Pre-symptomatic subjects, 24 Huntington's disease patients and 49 healthy controls was run through a cortical pattern-matching program. The surface corresponding to the white matter directly below the cortical gray matter was then extracted. Individual subject's Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data was aligned to their structural MRI data. Diffusivity values along the white matter surface were then sampled at each vertex point. DTI measures with high spatial resolution across the superficial white matter surface were then analyzed with the General Linear Model to test for the effects of disease. Results: There was an overall increase in the axial and radial diffusivity across much of the superficial white matter (p < 0.001) in Pre-symptomatic subjects compared to controls. In Huntington's disease patients increased diffusivity covered essentially the whole brain (p < 0.001). Changes are correlated with genotype (CAG repeat number) and disease burden (p < 0.001). Conclusions: This study showed broad abnormalities in superficial white matter even before symptoms are present in Huntington's disease. Since, the superficial white matter has a unique microstructure and function these abnormalities suggest it plays an important role in the disease. PMID:27242403

  20. Maturation of normal primate white matter: computed tomographic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Quencer, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    Five infant baboons were examined with computed tomography (CT) during the first year of their lives to determine the rate and degree of normal white matter maturation in frontal, occipital, and parietal areas. The increase in CT numbers with age was correlated with gross and histologic specimens. Two phases of maturation were identified: a rapid phase (first 8-12 weeks) and a gradual phase (after 12 weeks). Frontal white matter was the most immature in the immediate postnatal period but it became equal in attenuation to the other regions by 4 weeks of age. Knowledge of white matter maturation rates may be particularly useful in cases of neonatal hypoxia/ischemia where zones of periventricular hypodensity are identified. The failure of such regions to follow a normal rate of maturation may indicate damage to the white matter and have significant prognostic implications.

  1. Structure-specific statistical mapping of white matter tracts.

    PubMed

    Yushkevich, Paul A; Zhang, Hui; Simon, Tony J; Gee, James C

    2008-06-01

    We present a new model-based framework for the statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data associated with specific white matter tracts. The framework takes advantage of the fact that several of the major white matter tracts are thin sheet-like structures that can be effectively modeled by medial representations. The approach involves segmenting major tracts and fitting them with deformable geometric medial models. The medial representation makes it possible to average and combine tensor-based features along directions locally perpendicular to the tracts, thus reducing data dimensionality and accounting for errors in normalization. The framework enables the analysis of individual white matter structures, and provides a range of possibilities for computing statistics and visualizing differences between cohorts. The framework is demonstrated in a study of white matter differences in pediatric chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:18407524

  2. Structure-Specific Statistical Mapping of White Matter Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Yushkevich, Paul A.; Zhang, Hui; Simon, Tony; Gee, James C.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new model-based framework for the statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data associated with specific white matter tracts. The framework takes advantage of the fact that several of the major white matter tracts are thin sheet-like structures that can be effectively modeled by medial representations. The approach involves segmenting major tracts and fitting them with deformable geometric medial models. The medial representation makes it possible to average and combine tensor-based features along directions locally perpendicular to the tracts, thus reducing data dimensionality and accounting for errors in normalization. The framework enables the analysis of individual white matter structures, and provides a range of possibilities for computing statistics and visualizing differences between cohorts. The framework is demonstrated in a study of white matter differences in pediatric chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. PMID:18407524

  3. Accumulation of reactivity to MBP sensitizes TRAIL mediated oligodendrocyte apoptosis in adult sub cortical white matter in a model for human multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sajad; Ali, Farrah; Chauhan, Deepika; Arora, Rajesh; Khan, Haider A

    2016-04-01

    Reactivity to myelin associated proteins is the hallmark of human multiple sclerosis (M.S) and its experimental counterparts. However, the nature of such reactivity has not been described fully. Herein, we report that myelin basic protein (MBP) reactivity accumulates in a rat model for M.S. over a period of time and sensitizes TRAIL mediated progressive oligodendrocyte apoptosis. We used active immunization by Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG, 50 μg) to study chronic remitting relapsing encephalomyelitis in rats. A time point analysis of the progressive disease revealed cumulative accumulation of anti myelin basic protein antibodies during the disease progression with minimal change in the anti-MOG antibodies. Increased reactivity to MBP was studied to sensitize TNF related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and other proinflammatory cytokines in a cumulative fashion leading to the Caspase dependent apoptosis of oligodendrocytes and myelin loss. In a rescue experiment, we could limit the demyelination and prevent disease progression by neutralizing the effector, TRAIL in an early stage of the disease. This is the first study to identify the accumulation of MBP antibodies in MOG induced EAE which possibly leads to TRAIL sensitized oligodendrocyte apoptosis in the white mater of EAE rats. This finding stresses on the need to study MBP antibody titers in M.S. patients and therefore might serve as an alternate marker for progressive demyelination. PMID:26477945

  4. Synergistic Effects of Age on Patterns of White and Gray Matter Volume across Childhood and Adolescence1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Krongold, Mark; Cooper, Cassandra; Lebel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The human brain develops with a nonlinear contraction of gray matter across late childhood and adolescence with a concomitant increase in white matter volume. Across the adult population, properties of cortical gray matter covary within networks that may represent organizational units for development and degeneration. Although gray matter covariance may be strongest within structurally connected networks, the relationship to volume changes in white matter remains poorly characterized. In the present study we examined age-related trends in white and gray matter volume using T1-weighted MR images from 360 human participants from the NIH MRI study of Normal Brain Development. Images were processed through a voxel-based morphometry pipeline. Linear effects of age on white and gray matter volume were modeled within four age bins, spanning 4-18 years, each including 90 participants (45 male). White and gray matter age-slope maps were separately entered into k-means clustering to identify regions with similar age-related variability across the four age bins. Four white matter clusters were identified, each with a dominant direction of underlying fibers: anterior–posterior, left–right, and two clusters with superior–inferior directions. Corresponding, spatially proximal, gray matter clusters encompassed largely cerebellar, fronto-insular, posterior, and sensorimotor regions, respectively. Pairs of gray and white matter clusters followed parallel slope trajectories, with white matter changes generally positive from 8 years onward (indicating volume increases) and gray matter negative (decreases). As developmental disorders likely target networks rather than individual regions, characterizing typical coordination of white and gray matter development can provide a normative benchmark for understanding atypical development. PMID:26464999

  5. Multi-parametric evaluation of the white matter maturation.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, S; Hertz-Pannier, L; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Buzmakov, A; Poupon, C; Dubois, J

    2015-11-01

    In vivo evaluation of the brain white matter maturation is still a challenging task with no existing gold standards. In this article we propose an original approach to evaluate the early maturation of the white matter bundles, which is based on comparison of infant and adult groups using the Mahalanobis distance computed from four complementary MRI parameters: quantitative qT1 and qT2 relaxation times, longitudinal λ║ and transverse λ⊥ diffusivities from diffusion tensor imaging. Such multi-parametric approach is expected to better describe maturational asynchrony than conventional univariate approaches because it takes into account complementary dependencies of the parameters on different maturational processes, notably the decrease in water content and the myelination. Our approach was tested on 17 healthy infants (aged 3- to 21-week old) for 18 different bundles. It finely confirmed maturational asynchrony across the bundles: the spino-thalamic tract, the optic radiations, the cortico-spinal tract and the fornix have the most advanced maturation, while the superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi, the anterior limb of the internal capsule and the external capsule have the most delayed maturation. Furthermore, this approach was more reliable than univariate approaches as it revealed more maturational relationships between the bundles and did not violate a priori assumptions on the temporal order of the bundle maturation. Mahalanobis distances decreased exponentially with age in all bundles, with the only difference between them explained by different onsets of maturation. Estimation of these relative delays confirmed that the most dramatic changes occur during the first post-natal year. PMID:25183543

  6. Automatic clustering and population analysis of white matter tracts using maximum density paths.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Gautam; Joshi, Shantanu H; Jahanshad, Neda; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Aganj, Iman; Lenglet, Christophe; Sapiro, Guillermo; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-08-15

    We introduce a framework for population analysis of white matter tracts based on diffusion-weighted images of the brain. The framework enables extraction of fibers from high angular resolution diffusion images (HARDI); clustering of the fibers based partly on prior knowledge from an atlas; representation of the fiber bundles compactly using a path following points of highest density (maximum density path; MDP); and registration of these paths together using geodesic curve matching to find local correspondences across a population. We demonstrate our method on 4-Tesla HARDI scans from 565 young adults to compute localized statistics across 50 white matter tracts based on fractional anisotropy (FA). Experimental results show increased sensitivity in the determination of genetic influences on principal fiber tracts compared to the tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. Our results show that the MDP representation reveals important parts of the white matter structure and considerably reduces the dimensionality over comparable fiber matching approaches. PMID:24747738

  7. Regional Grey and White Matter Changes in Heavy Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rongjun; Zhao, Liyan; Lu, Lin

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is highly prevalent in the general population but the effects of chronic smoking on brain structures are still unclear. Previous studies have found mixed results regarding regional grey matter abnormalities in smokers. To characterize both grey and white matter changes in heavy male smokers, we investigated 16 heavy smokers and 16 matched healthy controls, using both univariate voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and multivariate pattern classification analysis. Compared with controls, heavy smokers exhibited smaller grey matter volume in cerebellum, as well as larger white matter volume in putamen, anterior and middle cingulate cortex. Further, the spatial patterns of grey matter or white matter both discriminated smokers from controls in these regions as well as in other brain regions. Our findings demonstrated volume abnormalities not only in the grey matter but also in the white matter in heavy male smokers. The multivariate analysis suggests that chronic smoking may be associated with volume alternations in broader brain regions than those identified in VBM analysis. These results may better our understanding of the neurobiological consequence of smoking and inform smoking treatment. PMID:22076160

  8. Plasticity of left perisylvian white-matter tracts is associated with individual differences in math learning.

    PubMed

    Jolles, Dietsje; Wassermann, Demian; Chokhani, Ritika; Richardson, Jennifer; Tenison, Caitlin; Bammer, Roland; Fuchs, Lynn; Supekar, Kaustubh; Menon, Vinod

    2016-04-01

    Plasticity of white matter tracts is thought to be essential for cognitive development and academic skill acquisition in children. However, a dearth of high-quality diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data measuring longitudinal changes with learning, as well as methodological difficulties in multi-time point tract identification have limited our ability to investigate plasticity of specific white matter tracts. Here, we examine learning-related changes of white matter tracts innervating inferior parietal, prefrontal and temporal regions following an intense 2-month math tutoring program. DTI data were acquired from 18 third grade children, both before and after tutoring. A novel fiber tracking algorithm based on a White Matter Query Language (WMQL) was used to identify three sections of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) linking frontal and parietal (SLF-FP), parietal and temporal (SLF-PT) and frontal and temporal (SLF-FT) cortices, from which we created child-specific probabilistic maps. The SLF-FP, SLF-FT, and SLF-PT tracts identified with the WMQL method were highly reliable across the two time points and showed close correspondence to tracts previously described in adults. Notably, individual differences in behavioral gains after 2 months of tutoring were specifically correlated with plasticity in the left SLF-FT tract. Our results extend previous findings of individual differences in white matter integrity, and provide important new insights into white matter plasticity related to math learning in childhood. More generally, our quantitative approach will be useful for future studies examining longitudinal changes in white matter integrity associated with cognitive skill development. PMID:25604464

  9. CSF markers of Alzheimer’s pathology and microglial activation are associated with altered white matter microstructure in asymptomatic adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Melah, Kelsey E; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Alexander, Andrew L; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Gleason, Carey E; Dowling, N Maritza; Bratzke, Lisa C; Rowley, Howard A; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2015-01-01

    Background The immune response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves activation of microglia which may remove β-amyloid. However, overproduction of inflammatory compounds may exacerbate neural damage in Alzheimer’s disease. AD pathology accumulates years before diagnosis, yet the extent to which neuroinflammation is involved in the earliest disease stages is unknown. Objective To determine whether neuroinflammation exacerbates neural damage in preclinical AD. Methods We utilized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging collected in 192 asymptomatic late-middle-aged adults (mean age=60.98 years). Neuroinflammatory markers chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in CSF were utilized as markers of neuroinflammation. Neural cell damage was assessed using CSF neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), CSF total tau (T-Tau), and neural microstructure assessed with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). With regard to AD pathology, CSF Aβ42 and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-Tau181) were used as markers of amyloid and tau pathology, respectively. We hypothesized that higher YKL-40 and MCP-1 in the presence of AD pathology would be associated with higher NFL, T-Tau, and altered microstructure on DTI. Results Neuroinflammation was associated with markers of neural damage. Higher CSF YKL-40 was associated with both higher CSF NFL and T-Tau. Inflammation interacted with AD pathology, such that greater MCP-1 and lower Aβ42 was associated with altered microstructure in bilateral frontal and right temporal lobe and that greater MCP-1 and greater P-Tau181 was associated with altered microstructure in precuneus. Conclusion Inflammation may play a role in neural damage in preclinical AD. PMID:26836182

  10. Dopamine transporter availability in clinically normal aging is associated with individual differences in white matter integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, Anna; Hedden, Trey; Younger, Alayna P.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-related differences in white matter integrity, the presence of amyloid plaques, and density of biomarkers indicative of dopamine functions can be detected and quantified with in vivo human imaging. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate whether these imaging-based measures constitute independent imaging biomarkers in older adults, which would speak to the hypothesis that the aging brain is characterized by multiple independent neurobiological cascades. We assessed MRI-based markers of white matter integrity and PET-based marker of dopamine transporter density and amyloid deposition in the same set of 53 clinically normal individuals (age 65–87). A multiple regression analysis demonstrated that dopamine transporter availability is predicted by white matter integrity, which was detectable even after controlling for chronological age. Further post-hoc exploration revealed that dopamine transporter availability was further associated with systolic blood pressure, mirroring the established association between cardiovascular health and white matter integrity. Dopamine transporter availability was not associated with the presence of amyloid burden. Neurobiological correlates of dopamine transporter measures in aging are therefore likely unrelated to Alzheimer’s disease but are aligned with white matter integrity and cardiovascular risk. More generally, these results suggest that two common imaging markers of the aging brain that are typically investigated separately do not reflect independent neurobiological processes. PMID:26542307

  11. Reciprocal white matter alterations due to 16p11.2 chromosomal deletions versus duplications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi Shin; Owen, Julia P; Pojman, Nicholas J; Thieu, Tony; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari L J; Marco, Elysa J; Berman, Jeffrey I; Spiro, John E; Chung, Wendy K; Buckner, Randy L; Roberts, Timothy P L; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Sherr, Elliott H; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2016-08-01

    Copy number variants at the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus are associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and speech and language disorders. A gene dosage dependence has been suggested, with 16p11.2 deletion carriers demonstrating higher body mass index and head circumference, and 16p11.2 duplication carriers demonstrating lower body mass index and head circumference. Here, we use diffusion tensor imaging to elucidate this reciprocal relationship in white matter organization, showing widespread increases of fractional anisotropy throughout the supratentorial white matter in pediatric deletion carriers and, in contrast, extensive decreases of white matter fractional anisotropy in pediatric and adult duplication carriers. We find associations of these white matter alterations with cognitive and behavioral impairments. We further demonstrate the value of imaging metrics for characterizing the copy number variant phenotype by employing linear discriminant analysis to predict the gene dosage status of the study subjects. These results show an effect of 16p11.2 gene dosage on white matter microstructure, and further suggest that opposite changes in diffusion tensor imaging metrics can lead to similar cognitive and behavioral deficits. Given the large effect sizes found in this study, our results support the view that specific genetic variations are more strongly associated with specific brain alterations than are shared neuropsychiatric diagnoses. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2833-2848, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27219475

  12. Impaired empathic abilities and reduced white matter integrity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Junya; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Miyata, Jun; Sugihara, Genichi; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Aso, Toshihiko; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Empathic abilities are impaired in schizophrenia. Although the pathology of schizophrenia is thought to involve disrupted white matter integrity, the relationship between empathic disabilities and altered white matter in the disorder remains unclear. The present study tested associations between empathic disabilities and white matter integrity in order to investigate the neural basis of impaired empathy in schizophrenia. Sixty-nine patients with schizophrenia and 69 age-, gender-, handedness-, education- and IQ level-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion-weighted imaging. Empathic abilities were assessed using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), the associations between empathic abilities and white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter integrity, were examined in the patient group within brain areas that showed a significant FA reduction compared with the controls. The patients with schizophrenia reported lower perspective taking and higher personal distress according to the IRI. The patients showed a significant FA reduction in bilateral deep white matter in the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes, a large portion of the corpus callosum, and the corona radiata. In schizophrenia patients, fantasy subscales positively correlated with FA in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi and anterior thalamic radiation, and personal distress subscales negatively correlated with FA in the splenium of the corpus callosum. These results suggest that disrupted white matter integrity in these regions constitutes a pathology underpinning specific components of empathic disabilities in schizophrenia, highlighting that different aspects of empathic impairments in the disorder would have, at least partially, distinct neuropathological bases. PMID:24099786

  13. Assessment Matters in Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, Jan; Napper, Rosemary

    This handbook was developed to give tutors of adult education information and ideas about assessing adult learning. It can be used as a reference for information about assessment and as a practical tool for tutors. Section 1, Introduction to Assessment in Adult Learning, includes information on these topics: what assessment is, how to assess, why…

  14. Aerobic Fitness is Associated with Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Snook, Erin M.; Motl, Robert W.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gray and white matter have been well documented in individuals with multiple sclerosis. Severity and extent of such brain tissue damage have been associated with cognitive impairment, disease duration and neurological disability, making quantitative indices of tissue damage important markers of disease progression. In this study, we investigated the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and measures of gray matter atrophy and white matter integrity. Employing a voxel-based approach to analyses of gray matter and white matter, we specifically examined whether higher levels of fitness in multiple sclerosis participants were associated with preserved gray matter volume and integrity of white matter. We found a positive association between cardiorespiratory fitness and regional gray matter volumes and higher focal fractional anisotropy values. Statistical mapping revealed that higher levels of fitness were associated with greater gray matter volume in the midline cortical structures including the medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus. Further, we also found increasing levels of fitness were associated with higher fractional anisotropy in the left thalamic radiation and right anterior corona radiata. Both preserved gray matter volume and white-matter tract integrity were associated with better performance on measures of processing speed. Taken together, these results suggest that fitness exerts a prophylactic influence on the cerebral atrophy observed early on preserving neuronal integrity in multiple sclerosis, thereby reducing long-term disability. PMID:19560443

  15. Aerobic fitness is associated with gray matter volume and white matter integrity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Snook, Erin M; Motl, Robert W; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-06-23

    Alterations in gray and white matter have been well documented in individuals with multiple sclerosis. Severity and extent of such brain tissue damage have been associated with cognitive impairment, disease duration and neurological disability, making quantitative indices of tissue damage important markers of disease progression. In this study, we investigated the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and measures of gray matter atrophy and white matter integrity. Employing voxel-based approaches to analysis of gray matter and white matter, we specifically examined whether higher levels of fitness in multiple sclerosis participants were associated with preserved gray matter volume and integrity of white matter. We found a positive association between cardiorespiratory fitness and regional gray matter volumes and higher focal fractional anisotropy values. Statistical mapping revealed that higher levels of fitness were associated with greater gray matter volume in the midline cortical structures including the medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus. Further, we also found that increasing levels of fitness were associated with higher fractional anisotropy in the left thalamic radiation and right anterior corona radiata. Both preserved gray matter volume and white matter tract integrity were associated with better performance on measures of processing speed. Taken together, these results suggest that fitness exerts a prophylactic influence on the structural decline observed early on, preserving neuronal integrity in multiple sclerosis, thereby reducing long-term disability. PMID:19560443

  16. Evidence for White Dwarfs with Strange-Matter Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant J.; Suh, Insaeng; Lan, Nguyen Q.; Otsuki, Kaori; Weber, Fridolin

    2008-09-01

    We summarize masses and radii for a number of white dwarfs as deduced from a combination of proper motion studies, Hipparcos parallax distances, effective temperatures, and binary or spectroscopic masses. A puzzling feature of these data, however, is that some stars appear to have radii which are significantly smaller than that expected for a standard electron-degenerate white-dwarf equations of state. We construct a projection of white-dwarf radii for fixed effective mass and conclude that there is at least marginal evidence for bimodality in the radius distribution for white dwarfs. We argue that if such compact white dwarfs exist it is unlikely that they contain an iron core. We propose an alternative of strange-quark matter within the white-dwarf core. We also discuss the impact of the so-called color-flavor locked (CFL) state in strange-matter core associated with color superconductivity. We show that the data exhibit several features consistent with the expected mass-radius relation of strange dwarfs. We identify eight nearby white dwarfs which are possible candidates for strange matter cores and suggest observational tests of this hypothesis.

  17. Evidence for White Dwarfs with Strange-Matter Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant; Suh, Insaeng; Lan, Nguyen; Zech, William; Otsuki, Kaori; Weber, Friedolin

    2006-10-01

    We summarize masses and radii for a number of white dwarfs as deduced from a combination of proper motion studies, Hipparcos parallax distances, effective temperatures, and binary or spectroscopic masses. A puzzling feature of these data, however, is that some stars appear to have radii which are significantly smaller than that expected for a standard electron-degenerate white-dwarf equations of state. We construct a projection of white-dwarf radii for fixed effective mass and conclude that there is at least marginal evidence for bimodality in the radius distribution for white dwarfs. We argue that if such compact white dwarfs exist it is unlikely that they contain an iron core. We propose an alternative of strange-quark matter within the white-dwarf core. We also discuss the impact of the so-called color-flavor locked (CFL) state in strange-matter core associated with color superconductivity. We show that the data exhibit several features consistent with the expected mass-radius relation of strange dwarfs. We identify eight nearby white dwarfs which are possible candidates for strange matter cores and suggest observational tests of this hypothesis.

  18. Analysis of white dwarfs with strange-matter cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, G. J.; Suh, I.-S.; O'Gorman, B.; Lan, N. Q.; Zech, W.; Otsuki, K.; Weber, F.

    2006-06-01

    We summarize masses and radii for a number of white dwarfs as deduced from a combination of proper motion studies, Hipparcos parallax distances, effective temperatures and binary or spectroscopic masses. A puzzling feature of these data, however, is that some stars appear to have radii which are significantly smaller than that expected for a standard electron-degenerate white-dwarf equations of state. We construct a projection of white-dwarf radii for fixed effective mass and conclude that there is at least marginal evidence for bimodality in the radius distribution for white dwarfs. We argue that if such compact white dwarfs exist it is unlikely that they contain an iron core. We propose an alternative of strange-quark matter within the white-dwarf core. We also discuss the impact of the so-called color-flavour-locked (CFL) state in strange-matter core associated with color superconductivity. We show that the data exhibit several features consistent with the expected mass-radius relation of strange dwarfs. We identify eight nearby white dwarfs which are possible candidates for strange-matter cores and suggest observational tests of this hypothesis.

  19. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  20. Characterization of T2* Heterogeneity in Human Brain White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tie-Qiang; Yao, Bing; van Gelderen, Peter; Merkle, Hellmut; Dodd, Stephen; Talagala, Lalith; Koretsky, Alan P.; Duyn, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Recent in vivo MRI studies at 7.0 T have demonstrated extensive heterogeneity of T2* relaxation in white matter of the human brain. In order to study the origin of this heterogeneity, we performed T2* measurements at 1.5, 3.0, and 7.0 T in normal volunteers. Formalin-fixed brain tissue specimens were also studied using T2*-weighted MRI, histological staining, chemical analysis, and electron microscopy. We found that T2* relaxation rate (R2*=1/ T2*) in white matter in living human brain is linearly dependent on the main magnetic field strength and the T2* heterogeneity in white matter observed at 7.0 T can also be detected, albeit weaker, at 1.5 and 3.0 T. The T2* heterogeneity exists also in white matter of the formalin fixed brain tissue specimens, with prominent differences between the major fiber bundles such as the cingulum and the superior corona radiada. The white matter specimen with substantial difference in T2*have no significant difference in the total iron content as determined by chemical analysis. On the other hand, evidence from histological staining and electron microscopy demonstrate these tissue specimen have apparent difference in myelin content and microstructure. PMID:19859939

  1. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  2. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  3. Astrocytes Promote Oligodendrogenesis after White Matter Damage via Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Liang, Anna C.; Maeda, Mitsuyo; Egawa, Naohiro; Itoh, Kanako; Lo, Evan K.; Lok, Josephine; Ihara, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in the adult brain contribute to white matter homeostasis. After white matter damage, OPCs compensate for oligodendrocyte loss by differentiating into mature oligodendrocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Here, we test the hypothesis that, during endogenous recovery from white matter ischemic injury, astrocytes support the maturation of OPCs by secreting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). For in vitro experiments, cultured primary OPCs and astrocytes were prepared from postnatal day 2 rat cortex. When OPCs were subjected to chemical hypoxic stress by exposing them to sublethal CoCl2 for 7 d, in vitro OPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes was significantly suppressed. Conditioned medium from astrocytes (astro-medium) restored the process of OPC maturation even under the stressed conditions. When astro-medium was filtered with TrkB-Fc to remove BDNF, the BDNF-deficient astro-medium no longer supported OPC maturation. For in vivo experiments, we analyzed a transgenic mouse line (GFAPcre/BDNFwt/fl) in which BDNF expression is downregulated specifically in GFAP+ astrocytes. Both wild-type (GFAPwt/BDNFwt/fl mice) and transgenic mice were subjected to prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion by bilateral common carotid artery stenosis. As expected, compared with wild-type mice, the transgenic mice exhibited a lower number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and larger white matter damage. Together, these findings demonstrate that, during endogenous recovery from white matter damage, astrocytes may promote oligodendrogenesis by secreting BDNF. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The repair of white matter after brain injury and neurodegeneration remains a tremendous hurdle for a wide spectrum of CNS disorders. One potentially important opportunity may reside in the response of residual oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). OPCs may serve as a back-up for generating mature oligodendrocytes in damaged white

  4. White matter morphometric changes uniquely predict children's reading acquisition.

    PubMed

    Myers, Chelsea A; Vandermosten, Maaike; Farris, Emily A; Hancock, Roeland; Gimenez, Paul; Black, Jessica M; Casto, Brandi; Drahos, Miroslav; Tumber, Mandeep; Hendren, Robert L; Hulme, Charles; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2014-10-01

    This study examined whether variations in brain development between kindergarten and Grade 3 predicted individual differences in reading ability at Grade 3. Structural MRI measurements indicated that increases in the volume of two left temporo-parietal white matter clusters are unique predictors of reading outcomes above and beyond family history, socioeconomic status, and cognitive and preliteracy measures at baseline. Using diffusion MRI, we identified the left arcuate fasciculus and superior corona radiata as key fibers within the two clusters. Bias-free regression analyses using regions of interest from prior literature revealed that volume changes in temporo-parietal white matter, together with preliteracy measures, predicted 56% of the variance in reading outcomes. Our findings demonstrate the important contribution of developmental differences in areas of left dorsal white matter, often implicated in phonological processing, as a sensitive early biomarker for later reading abilities, and by extension, reading difficulties. PMID:25212581

  5. Genetic variation in homocysteine metabolism, cognition, and white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    de Lau, Lonneke M L; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Uitterlinden, André G; Smith, A David; Refsum, Helga; Johnston, Carole; Breteler, Monique M B

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have shown an association between homocysteine concentration and cognitive performance or cerebral white matter lesions. However, variations in genes encoding for enzymes and other proteins that play a role in homocysteine metabolism have hardly been evaluated in relation to these outcome measures. In the population-based Rotterdam Scan Study, we examined the association of seven polymorphisms of genes involved in homocysteine metabolism (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, RFC 80G>A, TC 776C>G, MTR 2756A>G, MTRR 66A>G, and CBS 844ins68) with plasma total homocysteine, cognitive performance, and cerebral white matter lesions among 1011 non-demented elderly participants. Of all the studied polymorphisms, only MTHFR 677C>T was associated with homocysteine concentration. No significant relationship was observed for any of the polymorphisms with cognitive performance or severity of cerebral white matter lesions. PMID:19019492

  6. Snake-based brain white matter fiber reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng; Di, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a tractography algorithm that provides the only means of mapping white matter fibers. Furthermore, because of its wealth of applications, diffusion MRI tractography is gaining importance in clinical and neuroscience research. This paper presents a novel brain white matter fiber reconstruction method based on the snake model by minimizing the energy function, which is composed of both external energy and internal energy. Internal energy represents the assembly of the interaction potential between connected segments, whereas external energy represents the differences between predicted DTI signals and measured DTI signals. Through comparing the proposed method with other tractography algorithms in the Fiber Cup test, the present method was shown to perform superiorly to the majority of the other methods. In fact, the proposed test performed the third best out of the ten available methods, which demonstrates that present method can accurately formulate the brain white matter fiber reconstruction. PMID:25227001

  7. Sexually Dimorphic White Matter Geometry Abnormalities in Adolescent Onset Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Savadjiev, P.; Whitford, T.J.; Hough, M.E.; Clemm von Hohenberg, C.; Bouix, S.; Westin, C.-F.; Shenton, M.E.; Crow, T.J.; James, A.C.; Kubicki, M.

    2014-01-01

    The normal human brain is characterized by a pattern of gross anatomical asymmetry. This pattern, known as the “torque”, is associated with a sexual dimorphism: The male brain tends to be more asymmetric than that of the female. This fact, along with well-known sex differences in brain development (faster in females) and onset of psychosis (earlier with worse outcome in males), has led to the theory that schizophrenia is a disorder in which sex-dependent abnormalities in the development of brain torque, the correlate of the capacity for language, cause alterations in interhemispheric connectivity, which are causally related to psychosis (Crow TJ, Paez P, Chance SE. 2007. Callosal misconnectivity and the sex difference in psychosis. Int Rev Psychiatry. 19(4):449–457.). To provide evidence toward this theory, we analyze the geometry of interhemispheric white matter connections in adolescent-onset schizophrenia, with a particular focus on sex, using a recently introduced framework for white matter geometry computation in diffusion tensor imaging data (Savadjiev P, Kindlmann GL, Bouix S, Shenton ME, Westin CF. 2010. Local white geometry from diffusion tensor gradients. Neuroimage. 49(4):3175–3186.). Our results reveal a pattern of sex-dependent white matter geometry abnormalities that conform to the predictions of Crow's torque theory and correlate with the severity of patients' symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to associate geometrical differences in white matter connectivity with torque in schizophrenia. PMID:23307635

  8. Mechanisms of white matter change induced by meditation training

    PubMed Central

    Posner, Michael I.; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Lynch, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Training can induce changes in specific brain networks and changes in brain state. In both cases it has been found that the efficiency of white matter as measured by diffusion tensor imaging is increased, often after only a few hours of training. In this paper we consider a plausible molecular mechanism for how state change produced by meditation might lead to white matter change. According to this hypothesis frontal theta induced by meditation produces a molecular cascade that increases myelin and improves connectivity. PMID:25386155

  9. Scalable brain network construction on white matter fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Moo K.; Adluru, Nagesh; Dalton, Kim M.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2011-03-01

    DTI offers a unique opportunity to characterize the structural connectivity of the human brain non-invasively by tracing white matter fiber tracts. Whole brain tractography studies routinely generate up to half million tracts per brain, which serves as edges in an extremely large 3D graph with up to half million edges. Currently there is no agreed-upon method for constructing the brain structural network graphs out of large number of white matter tracts. In this paper, we present a scalable iterative framework called the ɛ-neighbor method for building a network graph and apply it to testing abnormal connectivity in autism.

  10. Whole exome sequencing in patients with white matter abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vanderver, Adeline; Simons, Cas; Helman, Guy; Crawford, Joanna; Wolf, Nicole I; Bernard, Geneviève; Pizzino, Amy; Schmidt, Johanna L; Takanohashi, Asako; Miller, David; Khouzam, Amirah; Rajan, Vani; Ramos, Erica; Chowdhury, Shimul; Hambuch, Tina; Ru, Kelin; Baillie, Gregory J; Grimmond, Sean M; Caldovic, Ljubica; Devaney, Joseph; Bloom, Miriam; Evans, Sarah H; Murphy, Jennifer L P; McNeill, Nathan; Fogel, Brent L; Schiffmann, Raphael; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Taft, Ryan J

    2016-06-01

    Here we report whole exome sequencing (WES) on a cohort of 71 patients with persistently unresolved white matter abnormalities with a suspected diagnosis of leukodystrophy or genetic leukoencephalopathy. WES analyses were performed on trio, or greater, family groups. Diagnostic pathogenic variants were identified in 35% (25 of 71) of patients. Potentially pathogenic variants were identified in clinically relevant genes in a further 7% (5 of 71) of cases, giving a total yield of clinical diagnoses in 42% of individuals. These findings provide evidence that WES can substantially decrease the number of unresolved white matter cases. Ann Neurol 2016;79:1031-1037. PMID:27159321

  11. Mapping White Matter Integrity in Elderly People with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Nir, Talia M.; Jahanshad, Neda; Busovaca, Edgar; Wendelken, Lauren; Nicolas, Krista; Thompson, Paul M.; Valcour, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    People with HIV are living longer as combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) becomes more widely available. However, even when plasma viral load is reduced to untraceable levels, chronic HIV infection is associated with neurological deficits and brain atrophy beyond that of normal aging. HIV is often marked by cortical and subcortical atrophy, but the integrity of the brain’s white matter (WM) pathways also progressively declines. Few studies focus on older cohorts where normal aging may be compounded with HIV infection to influence deficit patterns. In this relatively large diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study, we investigated abnormalities in WM fiber integrity in 56 HIV+ adults with access to cART (mean age: 63.9 ± 3.7 years), compared to 31 matched healthy controls (65.4 ± 2.2 years). Statistical 3D maps revealed the independent effects of HIV diagnosis and age on fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity, but we did not find any evidence for an age by diagnosis interaction in our current sample. Compared to healthy controls, HIV patients showed pervasive FA decreases and diffusivity increases throughout WM. We also assessed neuropsychological (NP) summary z-score associations. In both patients and controls, fiber integrity measures were associated with NP summary scores. The greatest differences were detected in the corpus callosum and in the projection fibers of the corona radiata. These deficits are consistent with published NP deficits and cortical atrophy patterns in elderly people with HIV. PMID:23362139

  12. White Matter Consequences of Retinal Receptor and Ganglion Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Shumpei; Takemura, Hiromasa; Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Terao, Masahiko; Haji, Tomoki; Pestilli, Franco; Yeatman, Jason D.; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Wandell, Brian A.; Masuda, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) have central vision loss; but CRD damages the retinal photoreceptor layer, and LHON damages the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer. Using diffusion MRI, we measured how these two types of retinal damage affect the optic tract (ganglion cell axons) and optic radiation (geniculo-striate axons). Methods. Adult onset CRD (n = 5), LHON (n = 6), and healthy controls (n = 14) participated in the study. We used probabilistic fiber tractography to identify the optic tract and the optic radiation. We compared axial and radial diffusivity at many positions along the optic tract and the optic radiation. Results. In both types of patients, diffusion measures within the optic tract and the optic radiation differ from controls. The optic tract change is principally a decrease in axial diffusivity; the optic radiation change is principally an increase in radial diffusivity. Conclusions. Both photoreceptor layer (CRD) and retinal ganglion cell (LHON) retinal disease causes substantial change in the visual white matter. These changes can be measured using diffusion MRI. The diffusion changes measured in the optic tract and the optic radiation differ, suggesting that they are caused by different biological mechanisms. PMID:25257055

  13. Fronto-temporal white matter connectivity predicts reversal learning errors

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Kylie H.; Rolheiser, Tyler; Mohamed, Feroze B.; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2015-01-01

    Each day, we make hundreds of decisions. In some instances, these decisions are guided by our innate needs; in other instances they are guided by memory. Probabilistic reversal learning tasks exemplify the close relationship between decision making and memory, as subjects are exposed to repeated pairings of a stimulus choice with a reward or punishment outcome. After stimulus–outcome associations have been learned, the associated reward contingencies are reversed, and participants are not immediately aware of this reversal. Individual differences in the tendency to choose the previously rewarded stimulus reveal differences in the tendency to make poorly considered, inflexible choices. Lesion studies have strongly linked reversal learning performance to the functioning of the orbitofrontal cortex, the hippocampus, and in some instances, the amygdala. Here, we asked whether individual differences in the microstructure of the uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract that connects anterior and medial temporal lobe regions to the orbitofrontal cortex, predict reversal learning performance. Diffusion tensor imaging and behavioral paradigms were used to examine this relationship in 33 healthy young adults. The results of tractography revealed a significant negative relationship between reversal learning performance and uncinate axial diffusivity, but no such relationship was demonstrated in a control tract, the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Our findings suggest that the uncinate might serve to integrate associations stored in the anterior and medial temporal lobes with expectations about expected value based on feedback history, computed in the orbitofrontal cortex. PMID:26150776

  14. Anaerobic function of CNS white matter declines with age.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Margaret A; Möller, Thomas; Ransom, Bruce R

    2011-04-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is generally believed to be completely dependent on the presence of oxygen (O(2)) to maintain energy levels necessary for excitability. However, previous studies on CNS white matter (WM) have shown that a large subset of CNS-myelinated axons of mice aged 4 to 6 weeks remains excitable in the absence of O(2). We investigated whether this surprising WM tolerance to anoxia varied with age. Acutely isolated mouse optic nerve (MON), a purely myelinated WM tract, was studied electrophysiologically. Excitability in the MONs from 1-month-, 4-month-, and 8-month-old mice was assessed quantitatively as the area under the supramaximal compound action potential (CAP). Anoxia-resistant WM function declined with age. After 60  minutes of anoxia, ∼23% of the CAP remained in 1-month-old mice, 8% in 4-month-old mice, and ∼0 in the 8-month-old group. Our results indicated that although some CNS axons function anaerobically in young adult animals, they lose this ability in later adulthood. This finding may help explain the clinical impression that favorable outcome after stroke and other brain injuries declines with age. PMID:21179073

  15. Cerebral white matter correlates of delay discounting in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ho, Beng-Choon; Koeppel, Julie A; Barry, Amy B

    2016-05-15

    The adolescent brain undergoes extensive structural white matter (WM) changes. Adolescence is also a critical time period during which cognitive, emotional and social maturation occurs in transition into adulthood. Compared to adults, adolescents are generally more impulsive with increased risk-taking behaviors. The goal of this study is to examine whether adolescent impulsivity may be related to cerebral WM maturation. In 89 healthy adolescents, we assessed impulsivity using the delay discounting task, and MRI WM volumes in brain regions previously implicated in delay discounting behaviors. We found that smaller delay discounting AUC (area under the curve) was associated with larger WM volumes in orbitofrontal, dorsolateral and medial prefrontal cortices (PFC) and motor cortex. There were no significant effects of AUC on WM volumes within somatosensory brain regions. In our sample, younger age was significantly associated with greater WM volumes in orbitofrontal and dorsolateral PFC subregions. Even after accounting for age-related effects, preference for immediate rewards (or greater impulsivity) still correlated with larger WM volumes in prefrontal regions known to mediate cognitive control. Our findings lend further support to the notion that reduced brain WM maturity may limit the ability in adolescents to forgo immediate rewards leading to greater impulsivity. PMID:26946275

  16. MR volume segmentation of gray matter and white matter using manual thresholding: Dependence on image brightness

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, G.J.; Barta, P.E.; Peng, L.W.; Lee, S.; Brettschneider, P.D.; Shah, A.; Henderer, J.D.; Schlaepfer, T.E.; Pearlson, G.D. Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA )

    1994-02-01

    To describe a quantitative MR imaging segmentation method for determination of the volume of cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter in living human brain, and to determine the method's reliability. We developed a computer method that allows rapid, user-friendly determination of cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter, and white matter volumes in a reliable manner, both globally and regionally. This method was applied to a large control population (N = 57). Initially, image brightness had a strong correlation with the gray-white ratio (r = .78). Bright images tended to overestimate, dim images to underestimate gray matter volumes. This artifact was corrected for by offsetting each image to an approximately equal brightness. After brightness correction, gray-white ratio was correlated with age (r = -.35). The age-dependent gray-white ratio was similar to that for the same age range in a prior neuropathology report. Interrater reliability was high (.93 intraclass correlation coefficient). The method described here for gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volume calculation is reliable and valid. A correction method for an artifact related to image brightness was developed. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  17. [What matters more in the white matter: thinking inside of the brain].

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Toshiki; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko

    2015-04-01

    The proportion of white matter in the brain has increased during evolution, and white matter comprises approximately half of the human brain. Its macroscopic as well as microscopic structures change during development, aging, and disease progression as well as following physical or mental training. Knowledge about the structural plasticity of the white matter may alter our cortex-oriented view of brain functions and expand our strategies for diagnosis and treatment, including rehabilitation, since the gray and white matter are complementary. Although the presence of white matter lesions is easy to detect with magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, their qualitative differentiation requires vast knowledge about the underlying processes. Examples from multiple ischemic lesions caused by different disease processes affecting the cerebral arteries are presented for comparison. It is worth considering "what matters more in the white matter" by taking into account the basic structures of the brain as well as their plasticity. Such "thinking inside of the brain" may further expand our understanding of the brain to improve our clinical interpretations and treatments. PMID:25846587

  18. Body Mass and White Matter Integrity: The Influence of Vascular and Inflammatory Markers

    PubMed Central

    Bettcher, Brianne Magouirk; Walsh, Christine M.; Watson, Christa; Miller, Joshua W.; Green, Ralph; Patel, Nihar; Miller, Bruce L.; Neuhaus, John; Yaffe, Kristine; Kramer, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    High adiposity is deleteriously associated with brain health, and may disproportionately affect white matter integrity; however, limited information exists regarding the mechanisms underlying the association between body mass (BMI) and white matter integrity. The present study evaluated whether vascular and inflammatory markers influence the relationship between BMI and white matter in healthy aging. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of white matter integrity, BMI, and vascular/inflammatory factors in a cohort of 138 healthy older adults (mean age: 71.3 years). Participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging, provided blood samples, and participated in a health evaluation. Vascular risk factors and vascular/inflammatory blood markers were assessed. The primary outcome measure was fractional anisotropy (FA) of the genu, body, and splenium (corpus callosum); exploratory measures included additional white matter regions, based on significant associations with BMI. Regression analyses indicated that higher BMI was associated with lower FA in the corpus callosum, cingulate, and fornix (p<.001). Vascular and inflammatory factors influenced the association between BMI and FA. Specifically, BMI was independently associated with the genu [β=-.21; B=-.0024; 95% CI, -.0048 to -.0000; p=.05] and cingulate fibers [β=-.39; B=-.0035; 95% CI,-.0056 to -.0015; p<.001], even after controlling for vascular/inflammatory risk factors and blood markers. In contrast, BMI was no longer significantly associated with the fornix and middle/posterior regions of the corpus callosum after controlling for these markers. Results partially support a vascular/inflammatory hypothesis, but also suggest a more complex relationship between BMI and white matter characterized by potentially different neuroanatomic vulnerability. PMID:24147070

  19. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  20. Functionally defined white matter reveals segregated pathways in human ventral temporal cortex associated with category-specific processing.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Jesse; Pestilli, Franco; Witthoft, Nathan; Golarai, Golijeh; Liberman, Alina; Poltoratski, Sonia; Yoon, Jennifer; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if the white-matter properties associated with specific visual networks selectively affect category-specific processing. In a novel protocol we combined measurements of white-matter structure, functional selectivity, and behavior in the same subjects. We find two parallel white-matter pathways along the ventral temporal lobe connecting to either face-selective or place-selective regions. Diffusion properties of portions of these tracts adjacent to face- and place-selective regions of ventral temporal cortex correlate with behavioral performance for face or place processing, respectively. Strikingly, adults with developmental prosopagnosia (face blindness) express an atypical structure-behavior relationship near face-selective cortex, suggesting that white-matter atypicalities in this region may have behavioral consequences. These data suggest that examining the interplay between cortical function, anatomical connectivity, and visual behavior is integral to understanding functional networks and their role in producing visual abilities and deficits. PMID:25569351

  1. Functionally defined white matter reveals segregated pathways in human ventral temporal cortex associated with category-specific processing

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Jesse; Pestilli, Franco; Witthoft, Nathan; Golarai, Golijeh; Liberman, Alina; Poltoratski, Sonia; Yoon, Jennifer; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2014-01-01

    Summary It is unknown if the white matter properties associated with specific visual networks selectively affect category-specific processing. In a novel protocol we combined measurements of white matter structure, functional selectivity, and behavior in the same subjects. We find two parallel white matter pathways along the ventral temporal lobe connecting to either face-selective or place-selective regions. Diffusion properties of portions of these tracts adjacent to face- and place-selective regions of ventral temporal cortex correlate with behavioral performance for face or place processing, respectively. Strikingly, adults with developmental prosopagnosia (face blindness) express an atypical structure-behavior relationship near face-selective cortex, suggesting that white matter atypicalities in this region may have behavioral consequences. These data suggest that examining the interplay between cortical function, anatomical connectivity, and visual behavior is integral to understanding functional networks and their role in producing visual abilities and deficits. PMID:25569351

  2. Contributions of bilateral white matter to chronic aphasia symptoms as assessed by diffusion tensor MRI

    PubMed Central

    Geva, Sharon; Correia, Marta M.; Warburton, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Language reorganisation following stroke has been studied widely. However, while studies of brain activation and grey matter examined both hemispheres, studies of white matter changes have mostly focused on the left hemisphere. Here we examined the relationship between bilateral hemispheric white matter and aphasia symptoms. 15 chronic stroke patients with aphasia and 18 healthy adults were studied using Diffusion Weighted Imaging data. By applying histogram analysis, Tract-Based Spatial Statistics, tractography and lesion-tract overlap methods, it was found that damage to the left hemisphere in general, and to the arcuate fasciculus in particular, correlated with impairments on word repetition, object naming, sentence comprehension and homophone and rhyme judgement. However, no such relationship was found in the right hemisphere. It is suggested that while some language function in aphasia can be explained by damage to the left arcuate fasciculus, it cannot be explained by looking at the contra-lesional tract. PMID:26401977

  3. Critical Conversations on Whiteness with Young Adult Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieble, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that whiteness remains an overwhelmingly absent dimension in literacy teaching that addresses systems of power from a critical perspective. One way literacy teachers may bring this dimension more explicitly into the classroom is by facilitating critical conversations on whiteness with young adult literature. As…

  4. SOX2+ Cell Population from Normal Human Brain White Matter Is Able to Generate Mature Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver-De La Cruz, Jorge; Carrión-Navarro, Josefa; García-Romero, Noemí; Gutiérrez-Martín, Antonio; Lázaro-Ibáñez, Elisa; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Perona, Rosario; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A number of neurodegenerative diseases progress with a loss of myelin, which makes them candidate diseases for the development of cell-replacement therapies based on mobilisation or isolation of the endogenous neural/glial progenitor cells, in vitro expansion, and further implantation. Cells expressing A2B5 or PDGFRA/CNP have been isolated within the pool of glial progenitor cells in the subcortical white matter of the normal adult human brain, all of which demonstrate glial progenitor features. However, the heterogeneity and differentiation potential of this pool of cells is not yet well established. Methods We used diffusion tensor images, histopathology, and immunostaining analysis to demonstrate normal cytoarchitecture and the absence of abnormalities in human temporal lobe samples from patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. These samples were used to isolate and enrich glial progenitor cells in vitro, and later to detect such cells in vivo. Results We have identified a subpopulation of SOX2+ cells, most of them co-localising with OLIG2, in the white matter of the normal adult human brain in vivo. These cells can be isolated and enriched in vitro, where they proliferate and generate immature (O4+) and mature (MBP+) oligodendrocytes and, to a lesser extent, astrocytes (GFAP+). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the existence of a new glial progenitor cell subpopulation that expresses SOX2 in the white matter of the normal adult human brain. These cells might be of use for tissue regeneration procedures. PMID:24901457

  5. Improved Segmentation of White Matter Tracts with Adaptive Riemannian Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiang; Zygmunt, Kristen; Whitaker, Ross T.; Fletcher, P. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel geodesic approach to segmentation of white matter tracts from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Compared to deterministic and stochastic tractography, geodesic approaches treat the geometry of the brain white matter as a manifold, often using the inverse tensor field as a Riemannian metric. The white matter pathways are then inferred from the resulting geodesics, which have the desirable property that they tend to follow the main eigenvectors of the tensors, yet still have the flexibility to deviate from these directions when it results in lower costs. While this makes such methods more robust to noise, the choice of Riemannian metric in these methods is ad hoc. A serious drawback of current geodesic methods is that geodesics tend to deviate from the major eigenvectors in high-curvature areas in order to achieve the shortest path. In this paper we propose a method for learning an adaptive Riemannian metric from the DTI data, where the resulting geodesics more closely follow the principal eigenvector of the diffusion tensors even in high-curvature regions. We also develop a way to automatically segment the white matter tracts based on the computed geodesics. We show the robustness of our method on simulated data with different noise levels. We also compare our method with tractography methods and geodesic approaches using other Riemannian metrics and demonstrate that the proposed method results in improved geodesics and segmentations using both synthetic and real DTI data. PMID:24211814

  6. White matter microstructure correlates of mathematical giftedness and intelligence quotient.

    PubMed

    Navas-Sánchez, Francisco J; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Sánchez-Gonzalez, Javier; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Franco, Carolina; Robles, Olalla; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown differences in brain activation between mathematically gifted adolescents and controls. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mathematical giftedness, intelligent quotient (IQ), and the microstructure of white matter tracts in a sample composed of math-gifted adolescents and aged-matched controls. Math-gifted subjects were selected through a national program based on detecting enhanced visuospatial abilities and creative thinking. We used diffusion tensor imaging to assess white matter microstructure in neuroanatomical connectivity. The processing included voxel-wise and region of interest-based analyses of the fractional anisotropy (FA), a parameter which is purportedly related to white matter microstructure. In a whole-sample analysis, IQ showed a significant positive correlation with FA, mainly in the corpus callosum, supporting the idea that efficient information transfer between hemispheres is crucial for higher intellectual capabilities. In addition, math-gifted adolescents showed increased FA (adjusted for IQ) in white matter tracts connecting frontal lobes with basal ganglia and parietal regions. The enhanced anatomical connectivity observed in the forceps minor and splenium may underlie the greater fluid reasoning, visuospatial working memory, and creative capabilities of these children. PMID:24038774

  7. Astrocytes are central in the pathomechanisms of vanishing white matter

    PubMed Central

    Dooves, Stephanie; Bugiani, Marianna; Postma, Nienke L.; Polder, Emiel; Land, Niels; Horan, Stephen T.; van Deijk, Anne-Lieke F.; van de Kreeke, Aleid; Jacobs, Gerbren; Vuong, Caroline; Klooster, Jan; Kamermans, Maarten; Wortel, Joke; Wisse, Lisanne E.; Scheper, Gert C.; Abbink, Truus E.M.; Heine, Vivi M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2016-01-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) is a fatal leukodystrophy that is caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). Disease onset and severity are codetermined by genotype. White matter astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are almost exclusively affected; however, the mechanisms of VWM development remain unclear. Here, we used VWM mouse models, patients’ tissue, and cell cultures to investigate whether astrocytes or oligodendrocytes are the primary affected cell type. We generated 2 mouse models with mutations (Eif2b5Arg191His/Arg191His and Eif2b4Arg484Trp/Arg484Trp) that cause severe VWM in humans and then crossed these strains to develop mice with various mutation combinations. Phenotypic severity was highly variable and dependent on genotype, reproducing the clinical spectrum of human VWM. In all mutant strains, impaired maturation of white matter astrocytes preceded onset and paralleled disease severity and progression. Bergmann glia and retinal Müller cells, nonforebrain astrocytes that have not been associated with VWM, were also affected, and involvement of these cells was confirmed in VWM patients. In coculture, VWM astrocytes secreted factors that inhibited oligodendrocyte maturation, whereas WT astrocytes allowed normal maturation of VWM oligodendrocytes. These studies demonstrate that astrocytes are central in VWM pathomechanisms and constitute potential therapeutic targets. Importantly, astrocytes should also be considered in the pathophysiology of other white matter disorders. PMID:26974157

  8. White Matter Integrity and Executive Abilities in Individuals with Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Hershey, Tamara; Rutlin, Jerrel; Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Christ, Shawn E.; White, Desirée A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed white matter abnormalities in the brains of individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU), but the microstructural nature of these abnormalities and their relationship to phenylalanine (Phe) levels and cognitive outcomes is poorly understood. In the current study, the microstructural integrity of white matter in 29 individuals with early-treated PKU and 12 healthy controls was examined using two complementary diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) approaches: region-of-interest (ROI) based analysis and voxel-wise tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis. Relationships among DTI, executive abilities, and Phe level findings were explored. DTI revealed widespread lowering of mean diffusivity (MD) in the white matter of the PKU group in comparison with the control group. Executive abilities were also poorer for individuals with PKU than controls. Within the PKU group, lower MD was associated with higher Phe level and poorer executive abilities. These findings are the first to demonstrate the interplay among microstructural white matter integrity, executive abilities, and Phe control in individuals with PKU. PMID:23608077

  9. Genetics Home Reference: leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... the unfolded protein response in vanishing white matter disease. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2006 Jul;65(7):707-15. Citation on PubMed van der Voorn JP, van Kollenburg B, Bertrand G, Van Haren K, Scheper GC, Powers JM, van der Knaap MS. The unfolded protein ...

  10. White Matter Damage and Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria; Greenwood, Richard; Powell, Jane Hilary; Leech, Robert; Hawkins, Peter Charlie; Bonnelle, Valerie; Patel, Maneesh Chandrakant; Counsell, Serena Jane; Sharp, David James

    2011-01-01

    White matter disruption is an important determinant of cognitive impairment after brain injury, but conventional neuroimaging underestimates its extent. In contrast, diffusion tensor imaging provides a validated and sensitive way of identifying the impact of axonal injury. The relationship between cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury…

  11. Neurocognitive Correlates of White Matter Quality in Adolescent Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bava, Sunita; Jacobus, Joanna; Mahmood, Omar; Yang, Tony T.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Progressive myelination during adolescence implicates an increased vulnerability to neurotoxic substances and enduring neurocognitive consequences. This study examined the cognitive manifestations of altered white matter microstructure in chronic marijuana and alcohol-using (MJ + ALC) adolescents. Methods: Thirty-six MJ + ALC…

  12. Impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics are associated with cerebral white matter damage

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fadar, Otite; Mehregan, Aujan; Salat, David H; Moscufo, Nicola; Meier, Dominik S; Guttmann, Charles RG; Fisher, Naomi DL; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Sorond, Farzaneh A

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) in elderly individuals with vascular diseases are presumed to be due to ischemic small vessel diseases; however, their etiology is unknown. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between cerebrovascular hemodynamics and white matter structural integrity in elderly individuals with vascular risk factors. White matter hyperintensity volumes, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) were obtained from MRI in 48 subjects (75±7years). Pulsatility index (PI) and dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the middle cerebral artery. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was calculated from transfer function analysis (phase and gain) of spontaneous blood pressure and flow velocity oscillations in the low (LF, 0.03 to 0.15 Hz) and high (HF, 0.16 to 0.5 Hz) frequency ranges. Higher PI was associated with greater WMH (P<0.005). Higher phase across all frequency ranges was associated with greater FA and lower MD (P<0.005). Lower gain was associated with higher FA in the LF range (P=0.001). These relationships between phase and FA were significant in the territories limited to the middle cerebral artery as well as across the entire brain. Our results show a strong relationship between impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics (PI and dCA) and loss of cerebral white matter structural integrity (WMH and DTI metrics) in elderly individuals. PMID:24129749

  13. Tract-specific white matter microstructure and gait in humans.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Vincentius J A; de Groot, Marius; Cremers, Lotte G M; van der Geest, Jos N; Hofman, Albert; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Lugt, Aad; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-07-01

    Gait is a complex sequence of movements, requiring cooperation of many brain areas, such as the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum. However, it is unclear which connecting white matter tracts are essential for communication across brain areas to facilitate proper gait. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we investigated associations of microstructural organization in 14 brain white matter tracts with gait, among 2330 dementia- and stroke-free community-dwelling individuals. Gait was assessed by electronic walkway and summarized into Global Gait, and 7 gait domains. Higher white matter microstructure associated with higher Global Gait, Phases, Variability, Pace, and Turning. Microstructure in thalamic radiations, followed by association tracts and the forceps major, associated most strongly with gait. Hence, in community-dwelling individuals, higher white matter microstructure associated with better gait, including larger strides, more single support, less stride-to-stride variability, and less turning steps. Our findings suggest that intact thalamocortical communication, cortex-to-cortex communication, and interhemispheric visuospatial integration are most essential in human gait. PMID:27255826

  14. White Matter Diseases with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Shih, Robert Y; Jones, Robert V; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Oleaga, Laura; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    White matter diseases include a wide spectrum of disorders that have in common impairment of normal myelination, either by secondary destruction of previously myelinated structures (demyelinating processes) or by primary abnormalities of myelin formation (dysmyelinating processes). The pathogenesis of many white matter diseases remains poorly understood. Demyelinating disorders are the object of this review and will be further divided into autoimmune, infectious, vascular, and toxic-metabolic processes. Autoimmune processes include multiple sclerosis and related diseases: tumefactive demyelinating lesions, Balo concentric sclerosis, Marburg and Schilder variants, neuromyelitis optica (Devic disease), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy (Hurst disease). Infectious processes include Lyme disease (neuroborreliosis), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy. Vascular processes include different types of small-vessel disease: arteriolosclerosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), primary angiitis of the central nervous system, Susac syndrome, and neurolupus. Toxic-metabolic processes include osmotic myelinolysis, methotrexate leukoencephalopathy, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The imaging spectrum can vary widely from small multifocal white matter lesions to confluent or extensive white matter involvement. Understanding the pathologic substrate is fundamental for understanding the radiologic manifestations, and a systematic approach to the radiologic findings, in correlation with clinical and laboratory data, is crucial for narrowing the differential diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618323

  15. White Matter Microstructural Integrity in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Meyer, Erin; Rutlin, Jerrel; Perantie, Dana C.; White, Neil H.; Arbelaez, Ana Maria; Shimony, Joshua S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Decreased white and gray matter volumes have been reported in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but the effects of hyperglycemia on white matter integrity have not been quantitatively assessed during brain development. We performed diffusion tensor imaging, using two complimentary approaches—region-of-interest and voxelwise tract-based spatial statistics—to quantify white matter integrity in a large retrospective study of T1DM youth and control participants. Exposure to chronic hyperglycemia, severe hyperglycemic episodes, and severe hypoglycemia, as defined in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), were estimated through medical records review, HbA1c levels, and interview of parents and youth. We found lower fractional anisotropy in the superior parietal lobule and reduced mean diffusivity in the thalamus in the T1DM group. A history of three or more severe hyperglycemic episodes was associated with reduced anisotropy and increased diffusivity in the superior parietal lobule and increased diffusivity in the hippocampus. These results add microstructural integrity of white matter to the range of structural brain alterations seen in T1DM youth and suggest vulnerability of the superior parietal lobule, hippocampus, and thalamus to glycemic extremes during brain development. Longitudinal analyses will be necessary to determine how these alterations change with age or additional glycemic exposure. PMID:23139349

  16. Maternal adiposity negatively influences infant brain white matter development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To study potential effects of maternal body composition on central nervous system (CNS) development of newborn infants. Methods: Diffusion tensor imaging was used to evaluate brain white matter development in 2-week-old, full-term, appropriate for gestational age infants from uncomplicat...

  17. Linking white matter and deep gray matter alterations in premanifest Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Andreia V.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Tward, Daniel J.; Lee, David Soobin; van den Noort, Frieda; Wu, Dan; Brown, Timothy; Johnson, Hans; Paulsen, Jane S.; Ross, Christopher A.; Younes, Laurent; Miller, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which only symptomatic treatment is available. A better understanding of the pathology, and identification of biomarkers will facilitate the development of disease-modifying treatments. HD is potentially a good model of a neurodegenerative disease for development of biomarkers because it is an autosomal-dominant disease with complete penetrance, caused by a single gene mutation, in which the neurodegenerative process can be assessed many years before onset of signs and symptoms of manifest disease. Previous MRI studies have detected abnormalities in gray and white matter starting in premanifest stages. However, the understanding of how these abnormalities are related, both in time and space, is still incomplete. In this study, we combined deep gray matter shape diffeomorphometry and white matter DTI analysis in order to provide a better mapping of pathology in the deep gray matter and subcortical white matter in premanifest HD. We used 296 MRI scans from the PREDICT-HD database. Atrophy in the deep gray matter, thalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens was analyzed by surface based morphometry, and while white matter abnormalities were analyzed in (i) regions of interest surrounding these structures, using (ii) tractography-based analysis, and using (iii) whole brain atlas-based analysis. We detected atrophy in the deep gray matter, particularly in putamen, from early premanifest stages. The atrophy was greater both in extent and effect size in cases with longer exposure to the effects of the CAG expansion mutation (as assessed by greater CAP-scores), and preceded detectible abnormalities in the white matter. Near the predicted onset of manifest HD, the MD increase was widespread, with highest indices in the deep and posterior white matter. This type of in-vivo macroscopic mapping of HD brain abnormalities can potentially indicate when and where therapeutics could be targeted to delay

  18. Frontal white matter hyperintensities, clasmatodendrosis and gliovascular abnormalities in ageing and post-stroke dementia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqing; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Hase, Yoshiki; Firbank, Michael J; Ndung'u, Michael N; Foster, Vincent; Craggs, Lucy J L; Washida, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoko; Thomas, Alan J; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Allan, Louise M; Oakley, Arthur E; O'Brien, John T; Horsburgh, Karen; Ihara, Masafumi; Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-01-01

    disrupted end-feet juxtaposed to microvessels. To explore whether this was associated with the disrupted gliovascular interactions or blood-brain barrier damage, we assessed the co-localization of GFAP and AQP4 immunoreactivities in post-mortem brains from adult baboons with cerebral hypoperfusive injury, induced by occlusion of three major vessels supplying blood to the brain. Analysis of the frontal white matter in perfused brains from the animals surviving 1-28 days after occlusion revealed that the highest intensity of fibrinogen immunoreactivity was at 14 days. At this survival time point, we also noted strikingly similar redistribution of AQP4 and GFAP+ astrocytes transformed into clasmatodendrocytes. Our findings suggest novel associations between irreversible astrocyte injury and disruption of gliovascular interactions at the blood-brain barrier in the frontal white matter and cognitive impairment in elderly post-stroke survivors. We propose that clasmatodendrosis is another pathological substrate, linked to white matter hyperintensities and frontal white matter changes, which may contribute to post-stroke or small vessel disease dementia. PMID:26667280

  19. Frontal white matter hyperintensities, clasmatodendrosis and gliovascular abnormalities in ageing and post-stroke dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiqing; Akinyemi, Rufus O.; Hase, Yoshiki; Firbank, Michael J.; Ndung’u, Michael N.; Foster, Vincent; Craggs, Lucy J. L.; Washida, Kazuo; Okamoto, Yoko; Thomas, Alan J.; Polvikoski, Tuomo M.; Allan, Louise M.; Oakley, Arthur E.; O’Brien, John T.; Horsburgh, Karen; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    disrupted end-feet juxtaposed to microvessels. To explore whether this was associated with the disrupted gliovascular interactions or blood–brain barrier damage, we assessed the co-localization of GFAP and AQP4 immunoreactivities in post-mortem brains from adult baboons with cerebral hypoperfusive injury, induced by occlusion of three major vessels supplying blood to the brain. Analysis of the frontal white matter in perfused brains from the animals surviving 1–28 days after occlusion revealed that the highest intensity of fibrinogen immunoreactivity was at 14 days. At this survival time point, we also noted strikingly similar redistribution of AQP4 and GFAP+ astrocytes transformed into clasmatodendrocytes. Our findings suggest novel associations between irreversible astrocyte injury and disruption of gliovascular interactions at the blood–brain barrier in the frontal white matter and cognitive impairment in elderly post-stroke survivors. We propose that clasmatodendrosis is another pathological substrate, linked to white matter hyperintensities and frontal white matter changes, which may contribute to post-stroke or small vessel disease dementia. PMID:26667280

  20. Accelerated decline in white matter integrity in clinically normal individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, Anna; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Buckner, Randy L; Hedden, Trey

    2016-06-01

    Prior studies have identified white matter abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Yet, cross-sectional studies in normal older individuals show little evidence for an association between markers of AD risk (APOE4 genotype and amyloid deposition), and white matter integrity. Here, 108 normal older adults (age, 66-87) with assessments of apolipoprotein e4 (APOE4) genotype and assessment of amyloid burden by positron emission tomography underwent diffusion tensor imaging scans for measuring white matter integrity at 2 time points, on average 2.6 years apart. Linear mixed-effects models showed that amyloid burden at baseline was associated with steeper decline in fractional anisotropy in the parahippocampal cingulum (p < 0.05). This association was not significant between baseline measures suggesting that longitudinal analyses can provide novel insights that are not detectable in cross-sectional designs. Amyloid-related changes in hippocampus volume did not explain the association between amyloid burden and change in fractional anisotropy. The results suggest that accumulation of cortical amyloid and white matter changes in parahippocampal cingulum are not independent processes in individuals at increased risk for AD. PMID:27143434

  1. Chronic Post-Concussion Neurocognitive Deficits. I. Relationship with White Matter Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Jun; Palacios, Eva M.; Zimmerman, Robert D.; Ghajar, Jamshid; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified visual tracking deficits and associated degradation of integrity in specific white matter tracts as characteristics of concussion. We re-explored these characteristics in adult patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms using independent new data acquired during 2009–2012. Thirty-two patients and 126 normal controls underwent cognitive assessments and MR-DTI. After data collection, a subset of control subjects was selected to be individually paired with patients based on gender and age. We identified patients’ cognitive deficits through pairwise comparisons between patients and matched control subjects. Within the remaining 94 normal subjects, we identified white matter tracts whose integrity correlated with metrics that indicated performance degradation in patients. We then tested for reduced integrity in these white matter tracts in patients relative to matched controls. Most patients showed no abnormality in MR images unlike the previous study. Patients’ visual tracking was generally normal. Patients’ response times in an attention task were slowed, but could not be explained as reduced integrity of white matter tracts relating to normal response timing. In the present patient cohort, we did not observe behavioral or anatomical deficits that we previously identified as characteristic of concussion. The recent cohort likely represented those with milder injury compared to the earlier cohort. The discrepancy may be explained by a change in the patient recruitment pool circa 2007 associated with an increase in public awareness of concussion. PMID:26903842

  2. White Matter Fiber Degradation Attenuates Hemispheric Asymmetry When Integrating Visuomotor Information

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, T; Müller-Oehring, EM; Rohlfing, T; Pfefferbaum, A; Sullivan, EV

    2010-01-01

    Degradation of white matter fibers can affect the transmission of signals in brain circuits that normally enable integration of highly lateralized visual and motor processes. Here, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the specific contributions of interhemispheric and intrahemispheric white matter fibers to functional measures of hemispheric transfer and parallel information processing using bilateral and unilateral left and right visual field stimulation in normal and compromised systems. In healthy adults, a greater degree of bilateral processing advantage with the left (nondominant) hand correlated with higher integrity of callosal fibers connecting occipital cortices, whereas less unilateral processing advantage with the right hand correlated with higher integrity of left-hemispheric posterior cingulate fibers. By contrast, alcoholics who have compromised callosal integrity showed less bilateral processing advantage than controls when responding with the left hand and greater unilateral processing advantage when responding with the right hand. We also found degraded left posterior cingulate and posterior callosal fibers in chronic alcoholics, which is consistent with functional imaging results of less left posterior cingulate and extrastriate cortex activation in alcoholics than controls when processing bilateral compared with unilateral visual field stimulation. Together, our results demonstrated that inter- and intrahemispheric white matter fiber pathways mediate visuomotor integration asymmetrically, and that subtle white matter fiber degradation in alcoholism attenuated the normal pattern of hemispheric asymmetry, which may have ramifications for the efficiency of visual information processing and fast response execution. PMID:20826679

  3. Effects of aging and calorie restriction on white matter in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bendlin, B.B.; Canu, E.; Willette, A.A.; Kastman, E.K.; McLaren, D.G.; Kosmatka, K.J.; Xu, G.; Field, A.S.; Colman, R.J.; Coe, C.L.; Weindruch, R.H.; Alexander, A.L.; Johnson, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Rhesus macaques on a calorie restricted diet (CR) develop less age-related disease, have virtually no indication of diabetes, are protected against sarcopenia, and potentially live longer. Beneficial effects of CR likely include reductions in age-related inflammation and oxidative damage. Oligodendrocytes are particularly susceptible to inflammation and oxidative stress, therefore, we hypothesized that CR would have a beneficial effect on brain white matter and would attenuate age-related decline in this tissue. CR monkeys and controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A beneficial effect of CR indexed by DTI was observed in superior longitudinal fasciculus, fronto-occipital fasciculus, external capsule, and brainstem. Aging effects were observed in several regions, although CR appeared to attenuate age-related alterations in superior longitudinal fasciculus, frontal white matter, external capsule, right parahippocampal white matter and dorsal occipital bundle. The results, however, were regionally specific and also suggested that CR is not salutary across all white matter. Further evaluation of this unique cohort of elderly primates to mortality will shed light on the ultimate benefits of an adult-onset, moderate CR diet for deferring brain aging. PMID:20541839

  4. White matter maturation profiles through early childhood predict general cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Deoni, Sean C L; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Elison, Jed T; Walker, Lindsay; Doernberg, Ellen; Waskiewicz, Nicole; Dirks, Holly; Piryatinsky, Irene; Dean, Doug C; Jumbe, N L

    2016-03-01

    Infancy and early childhood are periods of rapid brain development, during which brain structure and function mature alongside evolving cognitive ability. An important neurodevelopmental process during this postnatal period is the maturation of the myelinated white matter, which facilitates rapid communication across neural systems and networks. Though prior brain imaging studies in children (4 years of age and above), adolescents, and adults have consistently linked white matter development with cognitive maturation and intelligence, few studies have examined how these processes are related throughout early development (birth to 4 years of age). Here, we show that the profile of white matter myelination across the first 5 years of life is strongly and specifically related to cognitive ability. Using a longitudinal design, coupled with advanced magnetic resonance imaging, we demonstrate that children with above-average ability show differential trajectories of myelin development compared to average and below average ability children, even when controlling for socioeconomic status, gestation, and birth weight. Specifically, higher ability children exhibit slower but more prolonged early development, resulting in overall increased myelin measures by ~3 years of age. These results provide new insight into the early neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive ability, and suggest an early period of prolonged maturation with associated protracted white matter plasticity may result in strengthened neural networks that can better support later development. Further, these results reinforce the necessity of a longitudinal perspective in investigating typical or suspected atypical cognitive maturation. PMID:25432771

  5. White matter development and early cognition in babies and toddlers

    PubMed Central

    O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dean III, Douglas C; Ginestet, Cedric E; Walker, Lindsay; Waskiewicz, Nicole; Lehman, Katie; Dirks, Holly; Piryatinsky, Irene; Deoni, Sean CL

    2014-01-01

    The normal myelination of neuronal axons is essential to neurodevelopment, allowing fast inter-neuronal communication. The most dynamic period of myelination occurs in the first few years of life, in concert with a dramatic increase in cognitive abilities. How these processes relate, however, is still unclear. Here we aimed to use a data-driven technique to parcellate developing white matter into regions with consistent white matter growth trajectories and investigate how these regions related to cognitive development. In a large sample of 183 children aged 3 months to 4 years, we calculated whole brain myelin volume fraction (VFM) maps using quantitative multicomponent relaxometry. We used spatial independent component analysis (ICA) to blindly segment these quantitative VFM images into anatomically meaningful parcels with distinct developmental trajectories. We further investigated the relationship of these trajectories with standardized cognitive scores in the same children. The resulting components represented a mix of unilateral and bilateral white matter regions (e.g., cortico-spinal tract, genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, white matter underlying the inferior frontal gyrus) as well as structured noise (misregistration, image artifact). The trajectories of these regions were associated with individual differences in cognitive abilities. Specifically, components in white matter underlying frontal and temporal cortices showed significant relationships to expressive and receptive language abilities. Many of these relationships had a significant interaction with age, with VFM becoming more strongly associated with language skills with age. These data provide evidence for a changing coupling between developing myelin and cognitive development. Hum Brain Mapp 35:4475–4487, 2014. PMID:24578096

  6. Age exacerbates HIV-associated white matter abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Seider, Talia R; Gongvatana, Assawin; Woods, Adam J; Chen, Huaihou; Porges, Eric C; Cummings, Tiffany; Correia, Stephen; Tashima, Karen; Cohen, Ronald A

    2016-04-01

    Both HIV disease and advanced age have been associated with alterations to cerebral white matter, as measured with white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and more recently with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). This study investigates the combined effects of age and HIV serostatus on WMH and DTI measures, as well as the relationships between these white matter measures, in 88 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 49 seronegative (HIV-) individuals aged 23-79 years. A whole-brain volumetric measure of WMH was quantified from FLAIR images using a semi-automated process, while fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated for 15 regions of a whole-brain white matter skeleton generated using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). An age by HIV interaction was found indicating a significant association between WMH and older age in HIV+ participants only. Similarly, significant age by HIV interactions were found indicating stronger associations between older age and decreased FA in the posterior limbs of the internal capsules, cerebral peduncles, and anterior corona radiata in HIV+ vs. HIV- participants. The interactive effects of HIV and age were stronger with respect to whole-brain WMH than for any of the FA measures. Among HIV+ participants, greater WMH and lower anterior corona radiata FA were associated with active hepatitis C virus infection, a history of AIDS, and higher current CD4 cell count. Results indicate that age exacerbates HIV-associated abnormalities of whole-brain WMH and fronto-subcortical white matter integrity. PMID:26446690

  7. The Association of Aging with White Matter Integrity and Functional Connectivity Hubs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Albert C.; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Liu, Mu-En; Huang, Chu-Chung; Lin, Ching-Po

    2016-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with reduced cerebral structural integrity and altered functional brain activity, yet the association of aging with the relationship between structural and functional brain changes remains unclear. Using combined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) modalities, we hypothesized that aging-related changes in white matter integrity (i.e., fractional anisotropy) was associated with the short- or long-range functional connectivity density (FCD) in hub regions. We tested this hypothesis by using a healthy aging cohort comprised of 140 younger adults aged 20–39 years and 109 older adults aged 60–79 years. Compared with the younger group, older adults exhibited widespread reductions in white matter integrity with selective preservation in brain stem tracts and the cingulum connected to the hippocampus and cingulate cortex, whereas FCD mapping in older adults showed a reduced FCD in the visual, somatosensory, and motor functional networks and an increased FCD in the default mode network. The older adults exhibited significantly increased short- or long-range FCD in functional hubs of the precuneus, posterior, and middle cingulate, and thalamus, hippocampus, fusiform, and inferior temporal cortex. Furthermore, DTI-fMRI relationship were predominantly identified in older adults in whom short- and long-range FCD in the left precuneus was negatively correlated to structural integrity of adjacent and nonadjacent white matter tracts, respectively. We also found that long-range FCD in the left precuneus was positively correlated to cognitive function. These results support the compensatory hypothesis of neurocognitive aging theory and reveal the DTI-fMRI relationship associated with normal aging. PMID:27378915

  8. White matter ‘potholes’ in early-onset schizophrenia: a new approach to evaluate white matter microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    White, Tonya; Schmidt, Marcus; Karatekin, Canan

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable evidence implicating white matter abnormalities in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Many of the recent studies examining white matter have utilized diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using either region of interest (ROI) or voxel based approaches. Both voxel-based and ROI approaches are based on the assumption that the abnormalities in white matter overlap spatially. However, this is an assumption that has not been tested and it is possible that aberrations in white matter occur in non-overlapping regions. In order to test for the presence of non-overlapping regions of aberrant white matter, we developed a novel image processing technique that evaluates for white matter ‘potholes,’ referring to within-subject clusters of white matter voxels that show a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy. We applied this algorithm to a group of children and adolescents with schizophrenia compared to controls and found an increased number of ‘potholes’ in the patient group. These results suggest that voxel-based and ROI approaches may be missing some white matter differences that do not overlap spatially. This algorithm may be also be well suited to detect white matter abnormalities in disorders such as substance abuse, head trauma, or specifc neurological conditions affecting white matter. PMID:19853414

  9. White and grey matter relations to simple, choice, and cognitive reaction time in spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Maureen; Cirino, Paul T; Simic, Nevena; Juranek, Jenifer; Taylor, W Pat; Fletcher, Jack M

    2016-03-01

    Elevated reaction time (RT) is common in brain disorders. We studied three forms of RT in a neurodevelopmental disorder, spina bifida myelomeningocele (SBM), characterized by regional alterations of both white and grey matter, and typically developing individuals aged 8 to 48 years, in order to establish the nature of the lifespan-relations of RT and brain variables. Cognitive accuracy and RT speed and variability were all impaired in SBM relative to the typically developing group, but the most important effects of SBM on RT are seen on tasks that require a cognitive decision rule. Individuals with SBM are impaired not only in speeded performance, but also in the consistency of their performance on tasks that extend over time, which may contribute to poor performance on a range of cognitive tasks. The group with SBM showed smaller corrected corpus callosum proportions, larger corrected cerebellar white matter proportions, and larger corrected proportions for grey matter in the Central Executive and Salience networks. There were clear negative relations between RT measures and corpus callosum, Central Executive, and Default Mode networks in the group with SBM; relations were not observed in typically developing age peers. Statistical mediation analyses indicated that corpus callosum and Central Executive Network were important mediators. While RT is known to rely heavily on white matter under conditions of typical development and in individuals with adult-onset brain injury, we add the new information that additional involvement of grey matter may be important for a key neuropsychological function in a common neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26040977

  10. Cerebral white matter integrity during primary HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Patrick W.; Vaida, Florin F.; Fernández, Ricardo J.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Price, Richard W.; Lee, Evelyn; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shimony, Joshua S.; Robertson, Kevin R.; Walter, Rudolph; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Spudich, Serena; Ances, Beau M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Inflammation and infection within the central nervous system is initiated during primary HIV infection (PHI), but the association of these processes with the integrity of brain white matter during PHI is unknown. Design We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in this prospective cross-sectional neuroimaging study to determine the extent of white matter involvement in early HIV infection. Methods Antiretroviral-naive PHI (defined as <1 year after infection, n = 62), chronic HIV infection (CHI, n = 16), and HIV-uninfected (n = 19) participants had DTI, laboratory, and neuropsychometric performance assessments. DTI metrics were examined using region of interest and whole brain voxelwise analyses. Linear mixed-effects models assessed correlations between DTI measures and laboratory and neuropsychometric performance values. Results PHI participants were assessed at a median 4.1 months after estimated infection, and had median CD4+ cell count of 573 cells/µl, and HIV-1 RNA viral load of 4.5 log10 copies/ml in plasma and 2.6 log10 copies/ml in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). DTI metrics in PHI individuals were similar to HIV— participants and correlated with disruptions in the blood-brain barrier (indicated by CSF/plasma albumin ratio and CSF protein). CHI participants had significant loss of white matter integrity that correlated with biomarkers of infection and inflammation (blood viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and neopterin, and CSF white blood cell). Within the PHI group, DTI metrics inversely correlated with increasing days since infection. Conclusion In individuals assessed during PHI, group DTI measures suggested relative preservation of white matter microstructural integrity, but were associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier and estimated duration of infection. PMID:25513818

  11. Reduced white matter integrity is related to cognitive instability.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Anders M; Westlye, Lars T; Amlien, Inge K; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2011-12-01

    Increased performance variability has been demonstrated in several groups and conditions, including aging and cognitive decline. Structural brain characteristics underlying this phenomenon have so far been elusive. However, there is reason to expect that disconnectivity in associative pathways, whether caused by immature or degraded white matter (WM) tracts, will increase performance variability by neural noise. The aim of this study was to test whether the quality of WM, measured by diffusion tensor imaging, is related to performance variability in healthy adults. Intraindividual standard deviation of the reaction time (sdRT) across trials and median reaction time (mRT) from 270 participants were obtained from a speeded continuous performance task (Eriksen flanker task) with two conditions (congruent, incongruent). Tract-based spatial statistics was used to test the relationship with diffusion characteristics [fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusion (MD), radial diffusion (RD), axial diffusion (AD)]. Robust relationships between sdRT and all diffusion measures were found in most WM areas, independently of mRT, age, and sex. The effects were anatomically more widespread in the congruent than the incongruent condition, covering almost 50% of the voxels for RD and MD, and >25% of the voxels for FA and AD. Partial betas were in the range 0.45-0.55, and the strength of the relationships increased significantly with age. For mRT, the effects were smaller and unstable across condition. We concluded that performance variability is a likely consequence of individual differences in WM integrity, and that it is a promising behavioral correlate of individual differences in WM microstructure. PMID:22159119

  12. A case of Jacobsen syndrome with multifocal white matter lesions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Carter, John E; Bazan, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare disorder caused by partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 11. The phenotype is variable with involvement of multiple organ systems, resulting in congenital heart defects, blood dyscrasias, and impaired growth. We describe a case of a 30-year-old man with multiple ophthalmic manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that was remarkable for multiple T2-hyperintense subcortical white matter lesions. It is important to be aware that patients with Jacobsen syndrome may have nonspecific white changes seen on MRI. PMID:27317214

  13. Early life trauma is associated with altered white matter integrity and affective control.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Vincent; Amick, Melissa A; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2016-08-01

    Early life trauma (ELT) has been shown to impair affective control and attention well into adulthood. Neuroimaging studies have further shown that ELT was associated with decreased white matter integrity in the prefrontal areas in children and adults. However, no study to date has looked at the relationship between white matter integrity and affective control in individuals with and without a history of ELT. To examine this, we tested 240 Veterans with (ELT N = 80) and without (NoELT N = 160) a history of childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse or family violence. Affective control was measured with the Affective Go/No-Go (AGN) and attention was indexed with the Test of Variable Attention (TOVA). White matter integrity was measured using fractional anisotropy (FA). Results showed greater number of errors on the AGN in ELT compared to NoELT. There was no difference on the TOVA. While there were no mean differences in FA, there was an interaction between FA and reaction time to positive stimuli on the AGN where the ELT group showed a positive relationship between FA and reaction time in right frontal and prefrontal areas, whereas the NoELT group showed a negative or no association between FA and reaction time. This suggests that ELT may be associated with a distinct brain-behavior relationship that could be related to other determinants of FA than those present in healthy adults. PMID:27214523

  14. Exploring Heavy Drinking Patterns Among Black and White Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Tali; Skinner, Martie L; Haggerty, Kevin P; Crutchfield, Robert D; Catalano, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This investigation examined patterns of heavy drinking among Black and White young adults from a person-centered perspective and linked family and individual factors in adolescence to young adult drinking patterns. Method: The analysis focuses on 331 10th-grade students (168 Whites, 163 Blacks; 51% males) who were followed into young adulthood (ages 20 and 22). Cluster analyses using heavy episodic drinking, drunkenness, and alcohol problems in young adulthood resulted in groups of drinkers with different patterns. Groups were examined across and within race. Associations between young adult drinking groups and adolescent family and individual factors were tested. Results: Groups followed well-established race differences, with Whites clustering into frequent drinking groups more than Blacks, and Blacks clustering into non–heavy drinking groups more than Whites. Further, Black heavy drinkers reported fewer alcohol problems than White counterparts. Parental monitoring, consistent discipline, ethnic identity, and delinquency were associated with adult heavy episodic drinking groups for both races. Monitoring and delinquency, along with parental norms, were associated with drunkenness groups for both races. However, race differences were observed for drunkenness clusters such that attachment was predictive for White clusters, and parental guidelines and discipline were predictive for Black clusters. Conclusions: Large race differences in heavy drinking at young adulthood were confirmed. Family dynamics in 10th grade were identified as important for the development of different drinking patterns in the early 20s, when many individuals have left home, which suggests a key target for substance use prevention programs. PMID:25208202

  15. Vanishing White Matter Disease: A Review with Focus on Its Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronk, Jan C.; van Kollenburg, Barbara; Scheper, Gert C.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2006-01-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter (VWM) is an autosomal recessive brain disorder, most often with a childhood onset. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy indicate that, with time, increasing amounts of cerebral white matter vanish and are replaced by fluid. Autopsy confirms white matter rarefaction and cystic degeneration. The…

  16. Lower Orbital Frontal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafantaris, Vivian; Kingsley, Peter; Ardekani, Babak; Saito, Ema; Lencz, Todd; Lim, Kelvin; Szeszko, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Patients with bipolar I disorder demonstrated white matter abnormalities in white matter regions as seen through the use of diffusion tensor imaging. The findings suggest that white matter abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder may be useful in constructing neurobiological models of the disorder.

  17. Whole-brain grey matter density predicts balance stability irrespective of age and protects older adults from falling.

    PubMed

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P; Cheval, Boris; van Ruitenbeek, Peter; Levin, Oron; Renaud, Olivier; Chanal, Julien; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2016-03-01

    Functional and structural imaging studies have demonstrated the involvement of the brain in balance control. Nevertheless, how decisive grey matter density and white matter microstructural organisation are in predicting balance stability, and especially when linked to the effects of ageing, remains unclear. Standing balance was tested on a platform moving at different frequencies and amplitudes in 30 young and 30 older adults, with eyes open and with eyes closed. Centre of pressure variance was used as an indicator of balance instability. The mean density of grey matter and mean white matter microstructural organisation were measured using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging, respectively. Mixed-effects models were built to analyse the extent to which age, grey matter density, and white matter microstructural organisation predicted balance instability. Results showed that both grey matter density and age independently predicted balance instability. These predictions were reinforced when the level of difficulty of the conditions increased. Furthermore, grey matter predicted balance instability beyond age and at least as consistently as age across conditions. In other words, for balance stability, the level of whole-brain grey matter density is at least as decisive as being young or old. Finally, brain grey matter appeared to be protective against falls in older adults as age increased the probability of losing balance in older adults with low, but not moderate or high grey matter density. No such results were observed for white matter microstructural organisation, thereby reinforcing the specificity of our grey matter findings. PMID:26979897

  18. Multimodal neuroimaging of frontal white matter microstructure in early phase schizophrenia: the impact of early adolescent cannabis use

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A disturbance in connectivity between different brain regions, rather than abnormalities within the separate regions themselves, could be responsible for the clinical symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions observed in schizophrenia. White matter, which comprises axons and their myelin sheaths, provides the physical foundation for functional connectivity in the brain. Myelin sheaths are located around the axons and provide insulation through the lipid membranes of oligodendrocytes. Empirical data suggests oligodendroglial dysfunction in schizophrenia, based on findings of abnormal myelin maintenance and repair in regions of deep white matter. The aim of this in vivo neuroimaging project is to assess the impact of early adolescent onset of regular cannabis use on brain white matter tissue integrity, and to differentiate this impact from the white matter abnormalities associated with schizophrenia. The ultimate goal is to determine the liability of early adolescent use of cannabis on brain white matter, in a vulnerable brain. Methods/Design Young adults with schizophrenia at the early stage of the illness (less than 5 years since diagnosis) will be the focus of this project. Four magnetic resonance imaging measurements will be used to assess different cellular aspects of white matter: a) diffusion tensor imaging, b) localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with a focus on the neurochemical N-acetylaspartate, c) the transverse relaxation time constants of regional tissue water, d) and of N-acetylaspartate. These four neuroimaging indices will be assessed within the same brain region of interest, that is, a large white matter fibre bundle located in the frontal region, the left superior longitudinal fasciculus. Discussion We will expand our knowledge regarding current theoretical models of schizophrenia with a more comprehensive multimodal neuroimaging approach to studying the underlying cellular abnormalities of white matter, while taking into

  19. Anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analysis of grey and white matter anomalies in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    DeRamus, Thomas P.; Kana, Rajesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impairments in social communication and restrictive, repetitive behaviors. While behavioral symptoms are well-documented, investigations into the neurobiological underpinnings of ASD have not resulted in firm biomarkers. Variability in findings across structural neuroimaging studies has contributed to difficulty in reliably characterizing the brain morphology of individuals with ASD. These inconsistencies may also arise from the heterogeneity of ASD, and wider age-range of participants included in MRI studies and in previous meta-analyses. To address this, the current study used coordinate-based anatomical likelihood estimation (ALE) analysis of 21 voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies examining high-functioning individuals with ASD, resulting in a meta-analysis of 1055 participants (506 ASD, and 549 typically developing individuals). Results consisted of grey, white, and global differences in cortical matter between the groups. Modeled anatomical maps consisting of concentration, thickness, and volume metrics of grey and white matter revealed clusters suggesting age-related decreases in grey and white matter in parietal and inferior temporal regions of the brain in ASD, and age-related increases in grey matter in frontal and anterior-temporal regions. White matter alterations included fiber tracts thought to play key roles in information processing and sensory integration. Many current theories of pathobiology ASD suggest that the brains of individuals with ASD may have less-functional long-range (anterior-to-posterior) connections. Our findings of decreased cortical matter in parietal–temporal and occipital regions, and thickening in frontal cortices in older adults with ASD may entail altered cortical anatomy, and neurodevelopmental adaptations. PMID:25844306

  20. Age-related slowing of memory retrieval: Contributions of perceptual speed and cerebral white matter integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Barbara; Madden, David J.; Spaniol, Julia; Provenzale, James M.; Cabeza, Roberto; White, Leonard E.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research suggests that, in reaction time (RT) measures of episodic memory retrieval, the unique effects of adult age are relatively small compared to the effects aging shares with more elementary abilities such as perceptual speed. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanisms of perceptual speed. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test the hypothesis that white matter integrity, as indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA), serves as one mechanism of perceptual slowing in episodic memory retrieval. Results indicated that declines in FA in the pericallosal frontal region and in the genu of the corpus callosum, but not in other regions, mediated the relationship between perceptual speed and episodic retrieval RT. This relation held, though to a different degree, for both hits and correct rejections. These findings suggest that white matter integrity in prefrontal regions is one mechanism underlying the relation between individual differences in perceptual speed and episodic retrieval. PMID:17383774

  1. Minocycline treatment reduces white matter damage after excitotoxic striatal injury.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Joanilson S; Freire, Marco Aurelio M; Lima, Rafael R; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam W; Pereira, Antonio; Gomes-Leal, Walace

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the protective effects of minocycline following white matter damage (WMD) in the rat striatum. Excitotoxic lesions were induced by N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) microinjections and caused striatal damage, concomitant with microglial/macrophage activation. The excitotoxic lesion both damaged oligodendrocytes (Tau-1(+) cells) and caused a decrease in tissue reactivity for myelin basic protein (MBP) after post-lesional day 3 (PLD). Treatment with the semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic minocycline, however, led to oligodendrocyte preservation and decreased myelin impairment. Taken together, these results suggest that white matter damage (WMD) is an important component of the physiopathology of acute striatal damage and that microglial/macrophage activation contributes to this pathological phenomenon. PMID:20226770

  2. White matter changes in Wilson's disease: A radiological enigma

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Soumava; Solanki, Bhavesh; Guha, Goutam; Saha, Shankar Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a metabolic disorder which presents with hepatitis or hepatic decompensation commonly. Neurologic manifestations are late and include movement disorders, personality changes, and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain shows high signal changes in putamen, lentiform nucleus, thalamus, and brainstem. White matter lesions are rare. We report a child of Wilson's disease who presented to us with dystonia, rigidity, myoclonus and had symmetrical white matter changes in the fronto-parietooccipital region. Diffusion restriction in bilateral frontoparietal areas was also seen which is rare in chronic cases like ours. Atypical MRI characteristics should be considered in patients with clinical signs of neurological involvement in Wilson's disease as it is a devastating but treatable disease. PMID:27365966

  3. White matter stimulation for the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    Electrical stimulation in the treatment of epilepsy has been tried in numerous forms and with a variety of targets. Some of these, such as anterior thalamic stimulation, responsive cortical stimulation, and vagal nerve stimulation, have shown promise. A relatively novel concept, that of white matter stimulation, offers a different mechanism in that a small population of stimulated axons can transmit current to a large population of epileptogenic neurons. In theory, this allows for the modulation of seizure circuits and neural networks using lower stimulation volumes. Although clinical data is currently sparse, we review the relevant studies pertaining to white matter stimulation in epilepsy thus far, and offer explanations as to its effects, potential advantages, and utility. PMID:26926734

  4. Tract-Specific Analyses of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Show Widespread White Matter Compromise in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukla, Dinesh K.; Keehn, Brandon; Muller, Ralph-Axel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have shown white matter compromise in children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may relate to reduced connectivity and impaired function of distributed networks. However, tract-specific evidence remains limited in ASD. We applied tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS)…

  5. Altered Development of White Matter in Youth at High Familial Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versace, Amelia; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Romero, Soledad; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study white matter (WM) development in youth at high familial risk for bipolar disorder (BD). WM alterations are reported in youth and adults with BD. WM undergoes important maturational changes in adolescence. Age-related changes in WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics in healthy…

  6. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  7. Polygenic determinants of white matter volume derived from GWAS lack reproducibility in a replicate sample

    PubMed Central

    Papiol, S; Mitjans, M; Assogna, F; Piras, F; Hammer, C; Caltagirone, C; Arias, B; Ehrenreich, H; Spalletta, G

    2014-01-01

    A recent publication reported an exciting polygenic effect of schizophrenia (SCZ) risk variants, identified by a large genome-wide association study (GWAS), on total brain and white matter volumes in schizophrenic patients and, even more prominently, in healthy subjects. The aim of the present work was to replicate and then potentially extend these findings. According to the original publication, polygenic risk scores—using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information of SCZ GWAS—(polygenic SCZ risk scores; PSS) were calculated in 122 healthy subjects, enrolled in a structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. These scores were computed based on P-values and odds ratios available through the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium. In addition, polygenic white matter scores (PWM) were calculated, using the respective SNP subset in the original publication. None of the polygenic scores, either PSS or PWM, were found to be associated with total brain, white matter or gray matter volume in our replicate sample. Minor differences between the original and the present study that might have contributed to lack of reproducibility (but unlikely explain it fully), are number of subjects, ethnicity, age distribution, array technology, SNP imputation quality and MRI scanner type. In contrast to the original publication, our results do not reveal the slightest signal of association of the described sets of GWAS-identified SCZ risk variants with brain volumes in adults. Caution is indicated in interpreting studies building on polygenic risk scores without replication sample. PMID:24548877

  8. Trait conscientiousness and the personality meta-trait stability are associated with regional white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gary J; Cox, Simon R; Booth, Tom; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Royle, Natalie A; Valdés Hernández, Maria; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Bastin, Mark E; Deary, Ian J

    2016-08-01

    Establishing the neural bases of individual differences in personality has been an enduring topic of interest. However, while a growing literature has sought to characterize grey matter correlates of personality traits, little attention to date has been focused on regional white matter correlates of personality, especially for the personality traits agreeableness, conscientiousness and openness. To rectify this gap in knowledge we used a large sample (n > 550) of older adults who provided data on both personality (International Personality Item Pool) and white matter tract-specific fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion tensor MRI. Results indicated that conscientiousness was associated with greater FA in the left uncinate fasciculus (β = 0.17, P < 0.001). We also examined links between FA and the personality meta-trait 'stability', which is defined as the common variance underlying agreeableness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism/emotional stability. We observed an association between left uncinate fasciculus FA and stability (β = 0.27, P < 0.001), which fully accounted for the link between left uncinate fasciculus FA and conscientiousness. In sum, these results provide novel evidence for links between regional white matter microstructure and key traits of human personality, specifically conscientiousness and the meta-trait, stability. Future research is recommended to replicate and address the causal directions of these associations. PMID:27013101

  9. Trait conscientiousness and the personality meta-trait stability are associated with regional white matter microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Simon R.; Booth, Tom; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Royle, Natalie A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Bastin, Mark E.; Deary, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the neural bases of individual differences in personality has been an enduring topic of interest. However, while a growing literature has sought to characterize grey matter correlates of personality traits, little attention to date has been focused on regional white matter correlates of personality, especially for the personality traits agreeableness, conscientiousness and openness. To rectify this gap in knowledge we used a large sample (n > 550) of older adults who provided data on both personality (International Personality Item Pool) and white matter tract-specific fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion tensor MRI. Results indicated that conscientiousness was associated with greater FA in the left uncinate fasciculus (β = 0.17, P < 0.001). We also examined links between FA and the personality meta-trait ‘stability’, which is defined as the common variance underlying agreeableness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism/emotional stability. We observed an association between left uncinate fasciculus FA and stability (β = 0.27, P < 0.001), which fully accounted for the link between left uncinate fasciculus FA and conscientiousness. In sum, these results provide novel evidence for links between regional white matter microstructure and key traits of human personality, specifically conscientiousness and the meta-trait, stability. Future research is recommended to replicate and address the causal directions of these associations. PMID:27013101

  10. The effects of puberty on white matter development in boys.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Lara; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Whitaker, Kirstie J; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Viner, Russell M

    2015-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies demonstrate considerable changes in white matter volume and microstructure during adolescence. Most studies have focused on age-related effects, whilst puberty-related changes are not well understood. Using diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated the effects of pubertal status on white matter mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in 61 males aged 12.7-16.0 years. Participants were grouped into early-mid puberty (≤Tanner Stage 3 in pubic hair and gonadal development; n=22) and late-post puberty (≥Tanner Stage 4 in pubic hair or gonadal development; n=39). Salivary levels of pubertal hormones (testosterone, DHEA and oestradiol) were also measured. Pubertal stage was significantly related to MD in diverse white matter regions. No relationship was observed between pubertal status and FA. Regression modelling of MD in the significant regions demonstrated that an interaction model incorporating puberty, age and puberty×age best explained our findings. In addition, testosterone was correlated with MD in these pubertally significant regions. No relationship was observed between oestradiol or DHEA and MD. In conclusion, pubertal status was significantly related to MD, but not FA, and this relationship cannot be explained by changes in chronological age alone. PMID:25454416

  11. EEG functional connectivity, axon delays and white matter disease

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Paul L.; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Fields, R. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Both structural and functional brain connectivities are closely linked to white matter disease. We discuss several such links of potential interest to neurologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and non-clinical neuroscientists. Methods Treatment of brains as genuine complex systems suggests major emphasis on the multi-scale nature of brain connectivity and dynamic behavior. Cross-scale interactions of local, regional, and global networks are apparently responsible for much of EEG's oscillatory behaviors. Finite axon propagation speed, often assumed to be infinite in local network models, is central to our conceptual framework. Results Myelin controls axon speed, and the synchrony of impulse traffic between distant cortical regions appears to be critical for optimal mental performance and learning. Results Several experiments suggest that axon conduction speed is plastic, thereby altering the regional and global white matter connections that facilitate binding of remote local networks. Conclusions Combined EEG and high resolution EEG can provide distinct multi-scale estimates of functional connectivity in both healthy and diseased brains with measures like frequency and phase spectra, covariance, and coherence. Significance White matter disease may profoundly disrupt normal EEG coherence patterns, but currently these kinds of studies are rare in scientific labs and essentially missing from clinical environments. PMID:24815984

  12. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C.; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections. PMID:26587289

  13. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections. PMID:26587289

  14. Segmentation of MRI brain scans into gray matter, white matter, and CSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Tamas; Ong, Hoo-Tee; Valtchinov, Vladimir I.; Albert, Marilyn; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1997-04-01

    An algorithm is described that can separate gray matter, white matter and CSF in brain scans taken with 3DFFT T1- weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging. Although the algorithm is fully automated, it requires brain contours as input that utilize user-defined features. The inter- and intra-operator errors stemming from the variability of the contour definition and affecting the segmentation were assessed by using coronal brain scans of 19 subjects. The inter-operator errors were (1.61 plus or minus 2.38)% (P equals 0.01) for gray matter, (0.31 plus or minus 2.06)% (P equals 0.53) for white matter and (0.28 plus or minus 3.84)% (P equals 0.76) for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). the intra- operator error was (0.28 plus or minus 0.55)% (P greater than 0.04) for gray matter, (0.40 plus or minus 0.37)% (P equals 0.0002) for white matter and (0.26 plus or minus 1.31)% (P equals 0.39) for CSF.

  15. APOE/TOMM 40 genetic loci, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds

    PubMed Central

    Lyall, Donald M.; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Harris, Sarah E.; Bastin, Mark E.; Murray, Catherine; Lutz, Michael W.; Saunders, Ann M.; Roses, Allen D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David J.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Two markers of cerebral small vessel disease are white matter hyperintensities and cerebral microbleeds, which commonly occur in people with Alzheimer's disease. Aim and/or hypothesis To test for independent associations between two Alzheimer's disease‐susceptibility gene loci – APOE ε and the TOMM 40 ‘523’ poly‐T repeat – and white matter hyperintensities/cerebral microbleed burden in community‐dwelling older adults. Methods Participants in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 underwent genotyping for APOE ε and TOMM 40 523, and detailed structural brain magnetic resonance imaging at a mean age of 72·70 years (standard deviation = 0·7; range = 71–74). Results No significant effects of APOE ε or TOMM 40 523 genotypes on white matter hyperintensities or cerebral microbleed burden were found amongst 624 participants. Conclusions Lack of association between two Alzheimer's disease susceptibility gene loci and markers of cerebral small vessel disease may reflect the relative health of this population compared with those in other studies in the literature. PMID:26310205

  16. Serum cholesterol and variant in cholesterol-related gene CETP predict white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Warstadt, Nicholus M; Dennis, Emily L; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Nir, Talia M; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Montgomery, Grant W; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Weiner, Michael W; Toga, Arthur W; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Several common genetic variants influence cholesterol levels, which play a key role in overall health. Myelin synthesis and maintenance are highly sensitive to cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal cholesterol levels increase the risk for various brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We report significant associations between higher serum cholesterol (CHOL) and high-density lipoprotein levels and higher fractional anisotropy in 403 young adults (23.8 ± 2.4 years) scanned with diffusion imaging and anatomic magnetic resonance imaging at 4 Tesla. By fitting a multi-locus genetic model within white matter areas associated with CHOL, we found that a set of 18 cholesterol-related, single-nucleotide polymorphisms implicated in Alzheimer's disease risk predicted fractional anisotropy. We focused on the single-nucleotide polymorphism with the largest individual effects, CETP (rs5882), and found that increased G-allele dosage was associated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial and mean diffusivities in voxel-wise analyses of the whole brain. A follow-up analysis detected white matter associations with rs5882 in the opposite direction in 78 older individuals (74.3 ± 7.3 years). Cholesterol levels may influence white matter integrity, and cholesterol-related genes may exert age-dependent effects on the brain. PMID:24997672

  17. Physical activity and white matter hyperintensities: A systematic review of quantitative studies

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Elisa R.; Strack, Emily F.; Fernandez, Claire E.; Tumey, Tyler A.; Hitchcock, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are markers of brain white matter injury seen on magnetic resonance imaging. WMH increase with age and are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. WMH progression can be slowed by controlling vascular risk factors in individuals with advanced disease. Since physical activity can decrease vascular risk factors, physical activity may slow the progression of WMH in individuals without advanced disease, thereby preventing neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the association between physical activity and WMH in individuals without advanced disease. Methods Articles published in English through March 18, 2014 were searched using PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and EBSCOhost. Results Six studies found that more physical activity was associated with less WMH, while 6 found no association. Physical activity is associated with less WMH in individuals without advanced disease when studies are longitudinal or take into consideration physical activity across the lifespan, have a younger sample of older adults, measure different types of physical activity beyond leisure or objectively measure fitness via VO2 max, measure WMH manually or semi-automatically, and control for risk factors associated with WMH. Conclusion More physical activity was associated with less white matter hyperintensities in individuals without advanced disease. PMID:26046015

  18. The Structural Properties of Major White Matter Tracts in Strabismic Amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yiran; Norcia, Anthony M.; Yeatman, Jason D.; Mezer, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In order to better understand whether white matter structural deficits are present in strabismic amblyopia, we performed a survey of the tissue properties of 28 major white matter tracts using diffusion and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging approaches. Methods We used diffusion-based tensor modeling and a new quantitative T1 protocol to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and myelin-sensitive T1 values. We surveyed tracts in the occipital lobe, including the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF)—a newly rediscovered tract that bridges dorsal and ventral areas of the occipital lobe, as well as tracts across the rest of the brain. Results Adults with long-standing strabismic amblyopia show tract-specific elevations in MD. We rank-ordered the tracts on the basis of their MD effect-size. The four most affected tracts were the anterior frontal corpus callosum (ACC), the right VOF, the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and the left optic radiation. Conclusions The results suggest that most white matter tissue properties are relatively robust to the early visual insult caused by strabismus. However, strabismic amblyopia does affect MD, not only in occipital tracts, such as the VOF and optic radiation, but also in long range association tracts connecting visual cortex to the frontal and temporal lobes (ILF) and connecting the two hemispheres (ACC). PMID:26241402

  19. Melatonin promotes myelination by decreasing white matter inflammation after neonatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Fau, Sébastien; Renolleau, Sylvain; Biran, Valérie; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane; Baud, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin demonstrates neuroprotective properties in adult models of cerebral ischemia, acting as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. We investigated the effect of melatonin in a 7-d-old rat model of ischemia-reperfusion, leading to both cortical infarct and injury in the underlying white matter observed using MRI and immunohistochemistry. Melatonin was given i.p. as either a single dose before ischemia or a double-dose regimen, combining one before ischemia and one 24 h after reperfusion. At 48 h after injury, neither a significant reduction in cortical infarct volume nor a variation in the number of TUNEL- and nitrotyrosine-positive cells within the ipsilateral lesion was observed in melatonin-treated animals compared with controls. However, a decrease in the density of tomato lectin-positive cells after melatonin treatment was found in the white matter underlying cortical lesion. Furthermore, we showed a marked increase in the myelin basic protein-immunoreactivity in the cingulum and in the density of mature oligodendrocytes (APC-immunoreactive) in both the ipsilateral cingulum and external capsule. These results suggest that melatonin is not able to reduce cortical infarct volume in a neonatal stroke model but strongly reduces inflammation and promotes subsequent myelination in the white matter. PMID:20856166

  20. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI.

    PubMed

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration. PMID:27570507

  1. Exploring connectivity of the brain's white matter with dynamic queries.

    PubMed

    Sherbondy, Anthony; Akers, David; Mackenzie, Rachel; Dougherty, Robert; Wandell, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is a magnetic resonance imaging method that can be used to measure local information about the structure of white matter within the human brain. Combining DTI data with the computational methods of MR tractography, neuroscientists can estimate the locations and sizes of nerve bundles (white matter pathways) that course through the human brain. Neuroscientists have used visualization techniques to better understand tractography data, but they often struggle with the abundance and complexity of the pathways. In this paper, we describe a novel set of interaction techniques that make it easier to explore and interpret such pathways. Specifically, our application allows neuroscientists to place and interactively manipulate box or ellipsoid-shaped regions to selectively display pathways that pass through specific anatomical areas. These regions can be used in coordination with a simple and flexible query language which allows for arbitrary combinations of these queries using Boolean logic operators. A representation of the cortical surface is provided for specifying queries of pathways that may be relevant to gray matter structures and for displaying activation information obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging. By precomputing the pathways and their statistical properties, we obtain the speed necessary for interactive question-and-answer sessions with brain researchers. We survey some questions that researchers have been asking about tractography data and show how our system can be used to answer these questions efficiently. PMID:16138552

  2. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration. PMID:27570507

  3. Frontoparietal white matter integrity predicts haptic performance in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Borstad, Alexandra L.; Choi, Seongjin; Schmalbrock, Petra; Nichols-Larsen, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    Frontoparietal white matter supports information transfer between brain areas involved in complex haptic tasks such as somatosensory discrimination. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the relationship between microstructural integrity of frontoparietal network white matter and haptic performance in persons with chronic stroke and to compare frontoparietal network integrity in participants with stroke and age matched control participants. Nineteen individuals with stroke and 16 controls participated. Haptic performance was quantified using the Hand Active Sensation Test (HASTe), an 18-item match-to-sample test of weight and texture discrimination. Three tesla MRI was used to obtain diffusion-weighted and high-resolution anatomical images of the whole brain. Probabilistic tractography was used to define 10 frontoparietal tracts total; Four intrahemispheric tracts measured bilaterally 1) thalamus to primary somatosensory cortex (T–S1), 2) thalamus to primary motor cortex (T–M1), 3) primary to secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 to SII) and 4) primary somatosensory cortex to middle frontal gyrus (S1 to MFG) and, 2 interhemispheric tracts; S1–S1 and precuneus interhemispheric. A control tract outside the network, the cuneus interhemispheric tract, was also examined. The diffusion metrics fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were quantified for each tract. Diminished FA and elevated MD values are associated with poorer white matter integrity in chronic stroke. Nine of 10 tracts quantified in the frontoparietal network had diminished structural integrity poststroke compared to the controls. The precuneus interhemispheric tract was not significantly different between groups. Principle component analysis across all frontoparietal white matter tract MD values indicated a single factor explained 47% and 57% of the variance in tract mean diffusivity in stroke and control groups respectively. Age

  4. Frontoparietal white matter integrity predicts haptic performance in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Borstad, Alexandra L; Choi, Seongjin; Schmalbrock, Petra; Nichols-Larsen, Deborah S

    2016-01-01

    Frontoparietal white matter supports information transfer between brain areas involved in complex haptic tasks such as somatosensory discrimination. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the relationship between microstructural integrity of frontoparietal network white matter and haptic performance in persons with chronic stroke and to compare frontoparietal network integrity in participants with stroke and age matched control participants. Nineteen individuals with stroke and 16 controls participated. Haptic performance was quantified using the Hand Active Sensation Test (HASTe), an 18-item match-to-sample test of weight and texture discrimination. Three tesla MRI was used to obtain diffusion-weighted and high-resolution anatomical images of the whole brain. Probabilistic tractography was used to define 10 frontoparietal tracts total; Four intrahemispheric tracts measured bilaterally 1) thalamus to primary somatosensory cortex (T-S1), 2) thalamus to primary motor cortex (T-M1), 3) primary to secondary somatosensory cortex (S1 to SII) and 4) primary somatosensory cortex to middle frontal gyrus (S1 to MFG) and, 2 interhemispheric tracts; S1-S1 and precuneus interhemispheric. A control tract outside the network, the cuneus interhemispheric tract, was also examined. The diffusion metrics fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were quantified for each tract. Diminished FA and elevated MD values are associated with poorer white matter integrity in chronic stroke. Nine of 10 tracts quantified in the frontoparietal network had diminished structural integrity poststroke compared to the controls. The precuneus interhemispheric tract was not significantly different between groups. Principle component analysis across all frontoparietal white matter tract MD values indicated a single factor explained 47% and 57% of the variance in tract mean diffusivity in stroke and control groups respectively. Age

  5. Age-related differences in white matter integrity and cognitive function are related to APOE status

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lee; Walther, Katrin; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Lue, Lih-Fen; Walker, Douglas G.; Glisky, Elizabeth L.

    2010-01-01

    While an extensive literature is now available on age-related differences in white matter integrity measured by diffusion MRI, relatively little is known about the relationships between diffusion and cognitive functions in older adults. Even less is known about whether these relationships are influenced by the apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele, despite growing evidence that ε4 increases cognitive impairment in older adults. The purpose of the present study was to examine these relationships in a group of community-dwelling cognitively normal older adults. Data were obtained from a sample of 126 individuals (ages 52–92) that included 32 ε4 heterozygotes, 6 ε4 homozygotes, and 88 non-carriers. Two measures of diffusion, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA), were obtained from six brain regions – frontal white matter, lateral parietal white matter, the centrum semiovale, the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, and the temporal stem white matter – and were used to predict composite scores of cognitive function in two domains, executive function and memory function. Results indicated that ADC and FA differed with increasing age in all six brain regions, and these differences were significantly greater for ε4 carriers compared to noncarriers. Importantly, after controlling for age, diffusion measures predicted cognitive function in a region-specific way that was also influenced by ε4 status. Regardless of APOE status, frontal ADC and FA independently predicted executive function scores for all participants, while temporal lobe ADC additionally predicted executive function for ε4 carriers, but not noncarriers. Memory scores were predicted by temporal lobe ADC but not frontal diffusion for all participants, and this relationship was significantly stronger in ε4 carriers compared to noncarriers. Taken together, age and temporal lobe ADC accounted for a striking 53% of the variance in memory scores within the ε4 carrier

  6. Temperature dependence of water diffusion pools in brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Bibek; Labadie, Christian; Stallmach, Frank; Möller, Harald E; Turner, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Water diffusion in brain tissue can now be easily investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, providing unique insights into cellular level microstructure such as axonal orientation. The diffusive motion in white matter is known to be non-Gaussian, with increasing evidence for more than one water-containing tissue compartment. In this study, freshly excised porcine brain white matter was measured using a 125-MHz MR spectrometer (3T) equipped with gradient coils providing magnetic field gradients of up to 35,000 mT/m. The sample temperature was varied between -14 and +19 °C. The hypothesis tested was that white matter contains two slowly exchanging pools of water molecules with different diffusion properties. A Stejskal-Tanner diffusion sequence with very short gradient pulses and b-factors up to 18.8 ms/μm(2) was used. The dependence on b-factor of the attenuation due to diffusion was robustly fitted by a biexponential function, with comparable volume fractions for each component. The diffusion coefficient of each component follows Arrhenius behavior, with significantly different activation energies. The measured volume fractions are consistent with the existence of three water-containing compartments, the first comprising relatively free cytoplasmic and extracellular water molecules, the second of water molecules in glial processes, and the third comprising water molecules closely associated with membranes, as for example, in the myelin sheaths and elsewhere. The activation energy of the slow diffusion pool suggests proton hopping at the surface of membranes by a Grotthuss mechanism, mediated by hydrating water molecules. PMID:26658929

  7. Neuropathologic basis of white matter hyperintensity accumulation with advanced age

    PubMed Central

    Woltjer, Randall; Kaye, Jeffrey; Mattek, Nora; Dodge, Hiroko H.; Green, Sarah; Tran, Huong; Howieson, Diane B.; Wild, Katherine; Silbert, Lisa C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine which vascular pathology measure most strongly correlates with white matter hyperintensity (WMH) accumulation over time, and whether Alzheimer disease (AD) neuropathology correlates with WMH accumulation. Methods: Sixty-six older persons longitudinally followed as part of an aging study were included for having an autopsy and >1 MRI scan, with last MRI scan within 36 months of death. Mixed-effects models were used to examine the associations between longitudinal WMH accumulation and the following neuropathologic measures: myelin pallor, arteriolosclerosis, microvascular disease, microinfarcts, lacunar infarcts, large-vessel infarcts, atherosclerosis, neurofibrillary tangle rating, and neuritic plaque score. Each measure was included one at a time in the model, adjusted for duration of follow-up and age at death. A final model included measures showing an association with p < 0.1. Results: Mean age at death was 94.5 years (5.5 SD). In the final mixed-effects models, arteriolosclerosis, myelin pallor, and Braak score remained significantly associated with increased WMH accumulation over time. In post hoc analysis, we found that those with Braak score 5 or 6 were more likely to also have high atherosclerosis present compared with those with Braak score 1 or 2 (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Accumulating white matter changes in advanced age are likely driven by small-vessel ischemic disease. Additionally, these results suggest a link between AD pathology and white matter integrity disruption. This may be due to wallerian degeneration secondary to neurodegenerative changes. Alternatively, a shared mechanism, for example ischemia, may lead to both vascular brain injury and neurodegenerative changes of AD. The observed correlation between atherosclerosis and AD pathology supports the latter. PMID:23935177

  8. Evaluating the accuracy of diffusion MRI models in white matter.

    PubMed

    Rokem, Ariel; Yeatman, Jason D; Pestilli, Franco; Kay, Kendrick N; Mezer, Aviv; van der Walt, Stefan; Wandell, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Models of diffusion MRI within a voxel are useful for making inferences about the properties of the tissue and inferring fiber orientation distribution used by tractography algorithms. A useful model must fit the data accurately. However, evaluations of model-accuracy of commonly used models have not been published before. Here, we evaluate model-accuracy of the two main classes of diffusion MRI models. The diffusion tensor model (DTM) summarizes diffusion as a 3-dimensional Gaussian distribution. Sparse fascicle models (SFM) summarize the signal as a sum of signals originating from a collection of fascicles oriented in different directions. We use cross-validation to assess model-accuracy at different gradient amplitudes (b-values) throughout the white matter. Specifically, we fit each model to all the white matter voxels in one data set and then use the model to predict a second, independent data set. This is the first evaluation of model-accuracy of these models. In most of the white matter the DTM predicts the data more accurately than test-retest reliability; SFM model-accuracy is higher than test-retest reliability and also higher than the DTM model-accuracy, particularly for measurements with (a) a b-value above 1000 in locations containing fiber crossings, and (b) in the regions of the brain surrounding the optic radiations. The SFM also has better parameter-validity: it more accurately estimates the fiber orientation distribution function (fODF) in each voxel, which is useful for fiber tracking. PMID:25879933

  9. White matter tractography in early psychosis: clinical and neurocognitive associations

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Sean N.; Lagopoulos, Jim; Hermens, Daniel F.; Hickie, Ian B.; Scott, Elizabeth; Bennett, Maxwell R.

    2014-01-01

    Background While many diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) investigations have noted disruptions to white matter integrity in individuals with chronic psychotic disorders, fewer studies have been conducted in young people at the early stages of disease onset. Using whole tract reconstruction techniques, the aim of this study was to identify the white matter pathology associated with the common clinical symptoms and executive function impairments observed in young people with psychosis. Methods We obtained MRI scans from young people with psychosis and healthy controls. Eighteen major white matter tracts were reconstructed to determine group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) and then were subsequently correlated with symptomatology and neurocognitive performance. Results Our study included 42 young people with psychosis (mean age 23 yr) and 45 healthy controls (mean age 25 yr). Compared with the control group, the psychosis group had reduced FA and AD in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and forceps major indicative of axonal disorganization, reduction and/or loss. These changes were associated with worse overall psychiatric symptom severity, increases in positive and negative symptoms, and worse current levels of depression. The psychosis group also showed FA reductions in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus that were associated with impaired neurocognitive performance in attention and semantic fluency. Limitations Our analysis grouped 4 subcategories of psychosis together, and a larger follow-up study comparing affective and nonaffective psychoses is warranted. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impaired axonal coherence in the left ILF and forceps major underpin psychiatric symptoms in young people in the early stages of psychosis. PMID:25111788

  10. White Matter Neuron Alterations in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Caroline M; Crawford, Benjamin C; Akbarian, Schahram

    2010-01-01

    Increased density and altered spatial distribution of subcortical white matter neurons (WMN) represents one of the more well replicated cellular alterations found in schizophrenia and related disease. In many of the affected cases, the underlying genetic risk architecture for these WMN abnormalities remains unknown. Increased density of neurons immunoreactive for Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 (MAP2) and Neuronal Nuclear Antigen (NeuN) have been reported by independent studies, though there are negative reports as well; additionally, group differences in some of the studies appear to be driven by a small subset of cases. Alterations in markers for inhibitory (GABAergic) neurons have also been described. For example, downregulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) in inhibitory WMN positioned at the gray/white matter border, as well as altered spatial distribution, have been reported. While increased density of WMN has been suggested to reflect disturbance of neurodevelopmental processes, including neuronal migration, neurogenesis, and cell death, alternative hypotheses—such as an adaptive response to microglial activation in mature CNS, as has been described in multiple sclerosis—should also be considered. We argue that larger scale studies involving hundreds of postmortem specimens will be necessary in order to clearly establish the subset of subjects affected. Additionally, these larger cohorts could make it feasible to connect the cellular pathology to environmental and genetic factors implicated in schizophrenia and some cases with bipolar disorder or autism. These could include the 22q11 deletion (Velocardiofacial/ DiGeorge) syndrome, which in some cases is associated with neuronal ectopias in white matter. PMID:20691252

  11. Evaluating the Accuracy of Diffusion MRI Models in White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Rokem, Ariel; Yeatman, Jason D.; Pestilli, Franco; Kay, Kendrick N.; Mezer, Aviv; van der Walt, Stefan; Wandell, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Models of diffusion MRI within a voxel are useful for making inferences about the properties of the tissue and inferring fiber orientation distribution used by tractography algorithms. A useful model must fit the data accurately. However, evaluations of model-accuracy of commonly used models have not been published before. Here, we evaluate model-accuracy of the two main classes of diffusion MRI models. The diffusion tensor model (DTM) summarizes diffusion as a 3-dimensional Gaussian distribution. Sparse fascicle models (SFM) summarize the signal as a sum of signals originating from a collection of fascicles oriented in different directions. We use cross-validation to assess model-accuracy at different gradient amplitudes (b-values) throughout the white matter. Specifically, we fit each model to all the white matter voxels in one data set and then use the model to predict a second, independent data set. This is the first evaluation of model-accuracy of these models. In most of the white matter the DTM predicts the data more accurately than test-retest reliability; SFM model-accuracy is higher than test-retest reliability and also higher than the DTM model-accuracy, particularly for measurements with (a) a b-value above 1000 in locations containing fiber crossings, and (b) in the regions of the brain surrounding the optic radiations. The SFM also has better parameter-validity: it more accurately estimates the fiber orientation distribution function (fODF) in each voxel, which is useful for fiber tracking. PMID:25879933

  12. White Matter Damage and Systemic Inflammation in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Hsin-Ching; Chen, Pei-Chin; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Lin, Wei-Ming; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Su, Yu-Jih; Friedman, Michael; Lin, Ching-Po; Lin, Wei-Che

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate white matter integrity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and to assess its relationship with systemic inflammation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: One tertiary medical center research institute. Patients or Participants: Twenty patients with severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] > 30, 18 men and 2 women) and 14 healthy volunteers (AHI < 5, 11 men and 3 women). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Patients with severe OSA and healthy volunteers underwent polysomnography to determine the severity of sleep apnea, and DTI scanning to determine fiber integrity. Early or late phase changes in leukocyte apoptosis and its subsets were determined by flow cytometry. DTI-related indices (including fractional anisotropy [FA], axial diffusivity [AD], radial diffusivity [RD], and mean diffusivity [MD]) were derived from DTI. The FA maps were compared using voxel-based statistics to determine differences between the severe OSA and control groups. The differences in DTI indices, clinical severity, and leukocyte apoptosis were correlated after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure. Exploratory group-wise comparison between the two groups revealed that patients with OSA exhibited low FA accomplished by high RD in several brain locations, without any differences in AD and MD. The FA values were negatively correlated with clinical disease severity and leukocyte early apoptosis. Conclusions: Obstructive sleep apnea impairs white matter integrity in vulnerable regions, and this impairment is associated with increased disease severity. The possible interactions between systemic inflammation and central nervous system microstructural damage may represent variant hypoxic patterns and their consequent processes in obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Chen HL, Lu CH, Lin HC, Chen PC, Chou KH, Lin WM, Tsai NW, Su YJ, Friedman M, Lin CP, Lin WC. White matter damage

  13. White Matter Microstructure and Cognition in Adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Caitlin K.; Watson, Christopher G.; Asaro, Lisa A.; Wypij, David; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Bellinger, David C.; DeMaso, David R.; Robertson, Richard L.; Newburger, Jane W.; Rivkin, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the relationship between altered white matter microstructure and neurodevelopment in children with d-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA). Study design We report correlations between regional white matter microstructure as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) and cognitive outcome in a homogeneous group of adolescents with d-TGA. Subjects with d-TGA (n=49) and controls (n=29) underwent diffusion tensor imaging and neurocognitive testing. In the group with d-TGA, we correlated neurocognitive scores with FA in 14 composite regions of interest in which subjects with d-TGA had lower FA than controls. Results Among the patients with d-TGA, mathematics achievement correlated with left parietal FA (r=0.39, p=0.006), inattention/hyperactivity symptoms with right precentral FA (r=−0.39, p=0.006) and left parietal FA (r=−0.30, p=0.04), executive function with right precentral FA (r=−0.30, p=0.04), and visual-spatial skills with right frontal FA(r=0.30, p=0.04). We also found an unanticipated correlation between memory and right posterior limb of the internal capsule FA (r=0.29, p=0.047). Conclusion Within the group with d-TGA, regions of reduced white matter microstructure are associated with cognitive performance in a pattern similar to healthy adolescents and adults. Diminished white matter microstructure may contribute to cognitive compromise in adolescents who underwent open-heart surgery in infancy. PMID:25217200

  14. White and Gray Matter Abnormalities in Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Scherfler, Christoph; Frauscher, Birgit; Schocke, Michael; Nocker, Michael; Gschliesser, Viola; Ehrmann, Laura; Niederreiter, Markus; Esterhammer, Regina; Seppi, Klaus; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: The authors applied diffusion-tensor imaging including measurements of mean diffusivity (MD), which is a parameter of brain tissue integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA), which is a parameter of neuronal fiber integrity, and voxel-based morphometry, which is a measure of gray and white matter volume, to detect brain tissue changes in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy. Design: N/A. Patients: Patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy (n = 16) and age-matched healthy control subjects (n = 12) were studied. Interventions: Whole cerebral MD, FA measures, and the volumes of the gray and white matter compartments were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping. Measurement and Results: Significant MD increases and concomitant FA decreases were localized in the fronto-orbital cortex (P < 0.001) and the anterior cingulate (FA, P < 0.001; MD, P = 0.03) in narcolepsy-cataplexy. Additional MD increases without FA changes were detected in the ventral tegmental area, the dorsal raphe nuclei (P < 0.001), and the hypothalamus (P < 0.01). FA signal decreases were observed in the white matter tracts of the inferior frontal and inferior temporal cortices of narcolepsy-cataplexy patients (P < 0.001). Brain volume loss was evident in focal areas of the inferior and superior temporal cortices (P < 0.001) and the cingulate (P = 0.038). Conclusions: Areas of increased diffusivity in the hypothalamus appear consistent with hypocretinergic cell loss reported in narcolepsy-cataplexy. Signal abnormalities in the ventral tegmental area and the dorsal raphe nuclei correspond to major synaptic targets of hypocretin neurons that were associated with the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Brain tissue alterations identified in the frontal cortex and cingulate are crucial in the maintenance of attention and reward-dependent decision making, both known to be impaired in narcolepsy-cataplexy. Citation: Scherfler C; Frauscher B; Schocke M; Nocker M; Gschliesser V; Ehrmann L

  15. A structural equation modeling investigation of age-related variance in executive function and DTI measured white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Charlton, R A; Landau, S; Schiavone, F; Barrick, T R; Clark, C A; Markus, H S; Morris, R G

    2008-10-01

    Cognitive changes in normal aging have been explained by the frontal-executive hypothesis, but the assumptions made by this hypothesis concerning the neurobiological causes are still a matter of debate. Executive functions (EF) may activate neural networks that include disparate grey matter regions, and rely on the integrity of white matter connections. In 118 adults (50-90 years old) from the GENIE study, white matter integrity was measured using diffusion tensor imaging, and information processing speed, fluid intelligence and EF were assessed. A theory-driven structural equation model was developed to test associations between variables. The model was revised, removing non-significant paths. The adjusted model explained well the covariance in our data; and suggested that the reduction in white matter integrity associated with age directly affected only working memory. Fluid intelligence was mediated by all measured cognitive variables. The results suggest that white matter integrity may be particularly important for abilities activating complex neural networks, as occurs in working memory. Integration of the information processing speed and frontal-executive hypotheses may provide important information regarding common, unique, and mediating factors in cognitive aging. PMID:17451845

  16. Age Differences in Periventricular and Deep White Matter Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nyquist, Paul A.; Bilgel, Murat; Gottesman, Rebecca; Yanek, Lisa R.; Moy, Taryn F.; Becker, Lewis C.; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Prince, Jerry; Wasserman, Bruce A.; Yousem, David M.; Becker, Diane M.; Kral, Brian G.; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2015-01-01

    Deep white matter hyperintensity (DWMH) and periventricular white matter lesion volumes (PV) are associated with age and subsequent stroke. We studied age differences in these volumes accounting for collinearity and risk factors. Subjects were 563 healthy family members of early-onset coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Using 3T MRI, lesions were classified as DWMH or PV. Age association with lesion classification was analyzed using random effects Tobit regression, adjusting for intracranial volume (ICV), and risk factors. Subjects were 60% women, 36% African-American, mean age 51 ± 11 years. In multivariable analysis adjusted for PV and ICV, DWMH was associated with age (p<0.001), and female sex (p = 0.003) . PV, adjusted for DWMH and ICV, was age associated (p<0.001). For each age decade, DWMH showed 0.07 log units/decade greater volume (95% CI = 0.04-0.11); PV was 0.18 log units/decade greater (95% CI 0.14 – 0.23); slope differences (p < 0.001). In people with a family history of CAD, PV and DWMH are independently and differentially associated with age controlling for traditional risk factors. PMID:25659858

  17. Neuropsychiatry and white matter microstructure in Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Sarah; Scahill, Rachael I; Seunarine, Kiran K; Stopford, Cheryl; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Jiaying; Orth, Michael; Durr, Alexandra; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Hans; Rees, Geraint; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Craufurd, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Huntington’s disease (HD) are often evident prior to clinical diagnosis. Apathy is highly correlated with disease progression, while depression and irritability occur at different stages of the disease, both before and after clinical onset. Little is understood about the neural bases of these neuropsychiatric symptoms and to what extent those neural bases are analogous to neuropsychiatric disorders in the general population. OBJECTIVE We used Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) to investigate structural connectivity between brain regions and any putative microstructural changes associated with depression, apathy and irritability in HD. METHODS DTI data were collected from 39 premanifest and 45 early-HD participants in the TrackHD study and analysed using whole-brain Tract-Based Spatial Statistics. We used regression analyses to identify white matter tracts whose structural integrity (as measured by fractional anisotropy, FA) was correlated with HADS-depression, PBA-apathy or PBA-irritability scores in gene-carriers and related to cumulative probability to onset (CPO). RESULTS For those with the highest CPO, we found significant correlations between depression scores and reduced FA in the splenium of the corpus callosum. In contrast, those with lowest CPO demonstrated significant correlations between irritability scores and widespread FA reductions. There was no significant relationship between apathy and FA throughout the whole brain. CONCLUSIONS We demonstrate that white matter changes associated with both depression and irritability in HD occur at different stages of disease progression concomitant with their clinical presentation. PMID:26443926

  18. Lifespan maturation and degeneration of human brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Jason D; Wandell, Brian A; Mezer, Aviv A

    2014-01-01

    Properties of human brain tissue change across the lifespan. Here we model these changes in the living human brain by combining quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of R1 (1/T1) with diffusion MRI and tractography (N=102, ages 7-85). The amount of R1 change during development differs between white-matter fascicles, but in each fascicle the rate of development and decline are mirror-symmetric; the rate of R1 development as the brain approaches maturity predicts the rate of R1 degeneration in aging. Quantitative measurements of macromolecule tissue volume (MTV) confirm that R1 is an accurate index of the growth of new brain tissue. In contrast to R1, diffusion development follows an asymmetric time-course with rapid childhood changes but a slow rate of decline in old age. Together, the time-courses of R1 and diffusion changes demonstrate that multiple biological processes drive changes in white-matter tissue properties over the lifespan. PMID:25230200

  19. White matter changes linked to visual recovery after nerve decompression

    PubMed Central

    Paul, David A.; Gaffin-Cahn, Elon; Hintz, Eric B.; Adeclat, Giscard J.; Zhu, Tong; Williams, Zoë R.; Vates, G. Edward; Mahon, Bradford Z.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the integrity of white matter tracts and cortical function in the human brain remains poorly understood. Here we use a model of reversible white matter injury, compression of the optic chiasm by tumors of the pituitary gland, to study the structural and functional changes that attend spontaneous recovery of cortical function and visual abilities after surgical tumor removal and subsequent decompression of the nerves. We show that compression of the optic chiasm leads to demyelination of the optic tracts, which reverses as quickly as 4 weeks after nerve decompression. Furthermore, variability across patients in the severity of demyelination in the optic tracts predicts visual ability and functional activity in early cortical visual areas, and pre-operative measurements of myelination in the optic tracts predicts the magnitude of visual recovery after surgery. These data indicate that rapid regeneration of myelin in the human brain is a significant component of the normalization of cortical activity, and ultimately the recovery of sensory and cognitive function, after nerve decompression. More generally, our findings demonstrate the utility of diffusion tensor imaging as an in vivo measure of myelination in the human brain. PMID:25504884

  20. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  1. White Matter Integrity is Reduced in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Mettler, Lisa N.; Shott, Megan E.; Pryor, Tamara; Yang, Tony T.; Frank, Guido K.W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate brain white matter (WM) functionality in bulimia nervosa (BN) in relation to anxiety. Method Twenty-one control (CW, mean age 27±7 years) and 20 BN women (mean age 25±5 years) underwent brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure fractional anisotropy (FA; an indication of WM axon integrity) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC; reflecting WM cell damage). Results FA was decreased in BN in the bilateral corona radiata extending into the posterior limb of the internal capsule, the corpus callosum, the right sub-insular white matter and right fornix. In CW but not BN trait anxiety correlated negatively with fornix, corpus callosum and left corona radiata FA. ADC was increased in BN compared to CW in the bilateral corona radiata, corpus callosum, inferior fronto-occipital and uncinate fasciculus. Alterations in BN WM functionality were not due to structural brain alterations. Discussion WM integrity is disturbed in BN, especially in the corona radiate, which has been associated with taste and brain reward processing. Whether this is a premorbid condition or an effect from the illness is yet uncertain. The relationships between WM FA and trait anxiety in CW but not BN may suggest that altered WM functionality contributes to high anxious traits in BN. PMID:23354827

  2. Vanishing White Matter Disease in a Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    Turón-Viñas, Eulàlia; Pineda, Mercè; Cusí, Victòria; López-Laso, Eduardo; del Pozo, Rebeca Losada; Gutiérrez-Solana, Luis González; Moreno, David Conejo; Sierra-Córcoles, Concha; Olabarrieta-Hoyos, Naiara; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Aguirre-Rodríguez, Javier; González-Álvarez, Verónica; O’Callaghan, Mar; Muchart, Jordi; Armstrong-Moron, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) leukoencephalopathy is one of the most prevalent hereditary white matter diseases. It has been associated with mutations in genes encoding eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF2B). We have compiled a list of all the patients diagnosed with VWM in Spain; we found 21 children. The first clinical manifestation in all of them was spasticity, with severe ataxia in six patients, hemiparesis in one child, and dystonic movements in another. They suffered from progressive cognitive deterioration and nine of them had epilepsy too. In four children, we observed optic atrophy and three also had progressive macrocephaly, which is not common in VWM disease. The first two cases were diagnosed before the 1980s. Therefore, they were diagnosed by necropsy studies. The last 16 patients were diagnosed according to genetics: we found mutations in the genes eIF2B5 (13 cases), eIF2B3 (2 cases), and eIF2B4 (1 case). In our report, the second mutation in frequency was c.318A>T; patients with this mutation all followed a slow chronic course, both in homozygous and heterozygous states. Previously, there were no other reports to confirm this fact. We also found some mutations not described in previous reports: c.1090C>T in eIF2B4, c.314A>G in eIF2B5, and c.877C>T in eIF2B5. PMID:25089094

  3. Further Validation of the Psychosocial Costs of Racism to Whites Scale among Employed Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poteat, V. Paul; Spanierman, Lisa B.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the validity and test the generalizability of the Psychosocial Costs of Racism to Whites Scale (PCRW) beyond the original college student sample, a geographically dispersed sample of employed White adults (N = 284) in eight states completed the measure to assess for White empathic reactions toward racism, White guilt, and White fear of…

  4. The Relationship between Processing Speed and Regional White Matter Volume in Healthy Young People

    PubMed Central

    Magistro, Daniele; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nejad, Keyvan Kashkouli; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Processing speed is considered a key cognitive resource and it has a crucial role in all types of cognitive performance. Some researchers have hypothesised the importance of white matter integrity in the brain for processing speed; however, the relationship at the whole-brain level between white matter volume (WMV) and processing speed relevant to the modality or problem used in the task has never been clearly evaluated in healthy people. In this study, we used various tests of processing speed and Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses, it is involves a voxel-wise comparison of the local volume of gray and white, to assess the relationship between processing speed and regional WMV (rWMV). We examined the association between processing speed and WMV in 887 healthy young adults (504 men and 383 women; mean age, 20.7 years, SD, 1.85). We performed three different multiple regression analyses: we evaluated rWMV associated with individual differences in the simple processing speed task, word–colour and colour–word tasks (processing speed tasks with words) and the simple arithmetic task, after adjusting for age and sex. The results showed a positive relationship at the whole-brain level between rWMV and processing speed performance. In contrast, the processing speed performance did not correlate with rWMV in any of the regions examined. Our results support the idea that WMV is associated globally with processing speed performance regardless of the type of processing speed task. PMID:26397946

  5. The effect of lifelong bilingualism on regional grey and white matter volume.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rosanna K; Pangelinan, Melissa M; Bogulski, Cari; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Luk, Gigi; Grady, Cheryl L; Bialystok, Ellen

    2015-07-01

    Lifelong bilingualism is associated with the delayed diagnosis of dementia, suggesting bilingual experience is relevant to brain health in aging. While the effects of bilingualism on cognitive functions across the lifespan are well documented, less is known about the neural substrates underlying differential behaviour. It is clear that bilingualism affects brain regions that mediate language abilities and that these regions are at least partially overlapping with those that exhibit age-related decline. Moreover, the behavioural advantages observed in bilingualism are generally found in executive function performance, suggesting that the frontal lobes may also be sensitive to bilingualism, which exhibit volume reductions with age. The current study investigated structural differences in the brain of lifelong bilingual older adults (n=14, mean age=70.4) compared with older monolinguals (n=14, mean age=70.6). We employed two analytic approaches: 1) we examined global differences in grey and white matter volumes; and, 2) we examined local differences in volume and cortical thickness of specific regions of interest previously implicated in bilingual/monolingual comparisons (temporal pole) or in aging (entorhinal cortex and hippocampus). We expected bilinguals would exhibit greater volume of the frontal lobe and temporal lobe (grey and white matter), given the importance of these regions in executive and language functions, respectively. We further hypothesized that regions in the medial temporal lobe, which demonstrate early changes in aging and exhibit neural pathology in dementia, would be more preserved in the bilingual group. As predicted, bilinguals exhibit greater frontal lobe white matter compared with monolinguals. Moreover, increasing age was related to decreasing temporal pole cortical thickness in the monolingual group, but no such relationship was observed for bilinguals. Finally, Stroop task performance was positively correlated with frontal lobe white

  6. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Samadi-Bahrami, Zahra; Pavlov, Vlady; Stys, Peter K; Moore, G R Wayne

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate is the key excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS). Its role in human grey matter transmission is well understood, but this is less clear in white matter (WM). Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR) are found on both neuronal cell bodies and glia as well as on myelinated axons in rodents, and rodent WM tissue is capable of glutamate release. Thus, rodent WM expresses many of the components of the traditional grey matter neuron-to-neuron synapse, but to date this has not been shown for human WM. We demonstrate the presence of iGluRs in human WM by immunofluorescence employing high-resolution spectral confocal imaging. We found that the obligatory N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit GluN1 and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA4 co-localized with myelin, oligodendroglial cell bodies and processes. Additionally, GluA4 colocalized with axons, often in distinct clusters. These findings may explain why human WM is vulnerable to excitotoxic events following acute insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury and in more chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Further exploration of human WM glutamate signalling could pave the way for developing future therapies modulating the glutamate-mediated damage in these and other CNS disorders. PMID:27443784

  7. Military blast exposure, ageing and white matter integrity.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Benjamin B; Robinson, Meghan E; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2015-08-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, is associated with a range of neural changes including altered white matter structure. There is emerging evidence that blast exposure-one of the most pervasive causes of casualties in the recent overseas conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan-is accompanied by a range of neurobiological events that may result in pathological changes to brain structure and function that occur independently of overt concussion symptoms. The potential effects of brain injury due to blast exposure are of great concern as a history of mild traumatic brain injury has been identified as a risk factor for age-associated neurodegenerative disease. The present study used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate whether military-associated blast exposure influences the association between age and white matter tissue structure integrity in a large sample of veterans of the recent conflicts (n = 190 blast-exposed; 59 without exposure) between the ages of 19 and 62 years. Tract-based spatial statistics revealed a significant blast exposure × age interaction on diffusion parameters with blast-exposed individuals exhibiting a more rapid cross-sectional age trajectory towards reduced tissue integrity. Both distinct and overlapping voxel clusters demonstrating the interaction were observed among the examined diffusion contrast measures (e.g. fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity). The regions showing the effect on fractional anisotropy included voxels both within and beyond the boundaries of the regions exhibiting a significant negative association between fractional anisotropy and age in the entire cohort. The regional effect was sensitive to the degree of blast exposure, suggesting a 'dose-response' relationship between the number of blast exposures and white matter integrity. Additionally, there was an age-independent negative association between fractional anisotropy and years since most severe blast exposure in a subset of the blast-exposed group

  8. Military blast exposure, ageing and white matter integrity

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Benjamin B.; Robinson, Meghan E.; Milberg, William P.; McGlinchey, Regina E.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, is associated with a range of neural changes including altered white matter structure. There is emerging evidence that blast exposure—one of the most pervasive causes of casualties in the recent overseas conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan—is accompanied by a range of neurobiological events that may result in pathological changes to brain structure and function that occur independently of overt concussion symptoms. The potential effects of brain injury due to blast exposure are of great concern as a history of mild traumatic brain injury has been identified as a risk factor for age-associated neurodegenerative disease. The present study used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate whether military-associated blast exposure influences the association between age and white matter tissue structure integrity in a large sample of veterans of the recent conflicts (n = 190 blast-exposed; 59 without exposure) between the ages of 19 and 62 years. Tract-based spatial statistics revealed a significant blast exposure × age interaction on diffusion parameters with blast-exposed individuals exhibiting a more rapid cross-sectional age trajectory towards reduced tissue integrity. Both distinct and overlapping voxel clusters demonstrating the interaction were observed among the examined diffusion contrast measures (e.g. fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity). The regions showing the effect on fractional anisotropy included voxels both within and beyond the boundaries of the regions exhibiting a significant negative association between fractional anisotropy and age in the entire cohort. The regional effect was sensitive to the degree of blast exposure, suggesting a ‘dose-response’ relationship between the number of blast exposures and white matter integrity. Additionally, there was an age-independent negative association between fractional anisotropy and years since most severe blast exposure in a subset of the blast

  9. Progressive Volume Loss and White Matter Degeneration in Cstb-Deficient Mice: A Diffusion Tensor and Longitudinal Volumetry MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Manninen, Otto; Laitinen, Teemu; Lehtimäki, Kimmo K.; Tegelberg, Saara; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gröhn, Olli; Kopra, Outi

    2014-01-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg type progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1, OMIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset at the age of 6 to 16 years, incapacitating stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding cystatin B. Previously, widespread white matter changes and atrophy has been detected both in adult EPM1 patients and in 6-month-old cystatin B–deficient mice, a mouse model for the EPM1 disease. In order to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of the brain atrophy and white matter changes in EPM1, we conducted longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging accompanied with tract-based spatial statistics analysis to compare volumetric changes and fractional anisotropy in the brains of 1 to 6 months of age cystatin B–deficient and control mice. The results reveal progressive but non-uniform volume loss of the cystatin B–deficient mouse brains, indicating that different neuronal populations possess distinct sensitivity to the damage caused by cystatin B deficiency. The diffusion tensor imaging data reveal early and progressive white matter alterations in cystatin B–deficient mice affecting all major tracts. The results also indicate that the white matter damage in the cystatin B–deficient brain is most likely secondary to glial activation and neurodegenerative events rather than a primary result of CSTB deficiency. The data also show that diffusion tensor imaging combined with TBSS analysis provides a feasible approach not only to follow white matter damage in neurodegenerative mouse models but also to detect fractional anisotropy changes related to normal white matter maturation and reorganisation. PMID:24603771

  10. Ischemic Preconditioning in White Matter: Magnitude and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hamner, Margaret A.; Ye, Zucheng; Lee, Richard V.; Colman, Jamie R.; Le, Thu; Gong, Davin C.; Weinstein, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a robust neuroprotective phenomenon whereby brief ischemic exposure confers tolerance to a subsequent ischemic challenge. IPC has not been studied selectively in CNS white matter (WM), although stroke frequently involves WM. We determined whether IPC is present in WM and, if so, its mechanism. We delivered a brief in vivo preconditioning ischemic insult (unilateral common carotid artery ligation) to 12- to 14-week-old mice and determined WM ischemic vulnerability [oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD)] 72 h later, using acutely isolated optic nerves (CNS WM tracts) from the preconditioned (ipsilateral) and control (contralateral) hemispheres. Functional and structural recovery was assessed by quantitative measurement of compound action potentials (CAPs) and immunofluorescent microscopy. Preconditioned mouse optic nerves (MONs) showed better functional recovery after OGD than the non-preconditioned MONs (31 ± 3 vs 17 ± 3% normalized CAP area, p < 0.01). Preconditioned MONs also showed improved axon integrity and reduced oligodendrocyte injury compared with non-preconditioned MONs. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and type 1 interferon receptor (IFNAR1), key receptors in innate immune response, are implicated in gray matter preconditioning. Strikingly, IPC-mediated WM protection was abolished in both TLR4−/− and IFNAR1−/− mice. In addition, IPC-mediated protection in WM was also abolished in IFNAR1fl/fl LysMcre, but not in IFNAR1fl/fl control, mice. These findings demonstrated for the first time that IPC was robust in WM, the phenomenon being intrinsic to WM itself. Furthermore, WM IPC was dependent on innate immune cell signaling pathways. Finally, these data demonstrated that microglial-specific expression of IFNAR1 plays an indispensable role in WM IPC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has been studied predominantly in gray matter, but stroke in humans frequently involves white matter (WM) as well. Here we

  11. Abnormal gray matter and white matter volume in 'Internet gaming addicts'.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Dong, Guangheng; Wang, Qiandong; Du, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is usually defined as the inability of an individual to control his/her use of the Internet with serious negative consequences. It is becoming a prevalent mental health concern around the world. To understand whether Internet gaming addiction contributes to cerebral structural changes, the present study examined the brain gray matter density and white matter density changes in participants suffering IGA using voxel-based morphometric analysis. Compared with the healthy controls (N=36, 22.2 ± 3.13 years), IGA participants (N=35, 22.28 ± 2.54 years) showed significant lower gray matter density in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, left cingulate gyrus, insula, right precuneus, and right hippocampus (all p<0.05). IGA participants also showed significant lower white matter density in the inferior frontal gyrus, insula, amygdala, and anterior cingulate than healthy controls (all p<0.05). Previous studies suggest that these brain regions are involved in decision-making, behavioral inhibition and emotional regulation. Current findings might provide insight in understanding the biological underpinnings of IGA. PMID:25260201

  12. Systemic inflammation, intraventricular hemorrhage, and white matter injury

    PubMed Central

    LEVITON, Alan; ALLRED, Elizabeth N.; DAMMANN, Olaf; ENGELKE, Stephen; FICHOROVA, Raina N.; HIRTZ, Deborah; KUBAN, Karl C. K.; MENT, Laura R.; O'SHEA, T. Michael; PANETH, Nigel; SHAH, Bhavesh; SCHREIBER, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    To see if the systemic inflammation profile of 123 infants born before the 28th week of gestation who had intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) without white matter injury (WMI) differed from that of 68 peers who had both IVH and WMI, we compared both groups to 677 peers who had neither. Cranial ultrasound scans were read independently by multiple readers until concordance. The concentrations of 25 proteins were measured with multiplex arrays using an electrochemiluminescence system. Infants who had IVH and WMI were more likely than others to have elevated concentrations of CRP and IL-8 on days 1, 7, and 14, and elevated concentrations of SAA and TNF-alpha on 2 of these days. IVH should probably be viewed as two entities, IVH unaccompanied by WMI, and IVH accompanied by WMI. Each entity is associated with inflammation, but IVH accompanied by WMI has a stronger inflammatory signal than IVH unaccompanied by WMI. PMID:23112243

  13. Detection of white matter lesions in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riad, Medhat M.; Platel, Bram; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-02-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are diffuse white matter abnormalities commonly found in older subjects and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other disorders. We present an automated WML detection method and evaluate it on a dataset of small vessel disease (SVD) patients. In early SVD, small WMLs are expected to be of importance for the prediction of disease progression. Commonly used WML segmentation methods tend to ignore small WMLs and are mostly validated on the basis of total lesion load or a Dice coefficient for all detected WMLs. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method that is designed to detect individual lesions, large or small, and we validate the detection performance of our system with FROC (free-response ROC) analysis. For the automated detection, we use supervised classification making use of multimodal voxel based features from different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including intensities, tissue probabilities, voxel locations and distances, neighborhood textures and others. After preprocessing, including co-registration, brain extraction, bias correction, intensity normalization, and nonlinear registration, ventricle segmentation is performed and features are calculated for each brain voxel. A gentle-boost classifier is trained using these features from 50 manually annotated subjects to give each voxel a probability of being a lesion voxel. We perform ROC analysis to illustrate the benefits of using additional features to the commonly used voxel intensities; significantly increasing the area under the curve (Az) from 0.81 to 0.96 (p<0.05). We perform the FROC analysis by testing our classifier on 50 previously unseen subjects and compare the results with manual annotations performed by two experts. Using the first annotator results as our reference, the second annotator performs at a sensitivity of 0.90 with an average of 41 false positives per subject while our automated method reached the same

  14. White matter microstructure from nonparametric axon diameter distribution mapping.

    PubMed

    Benjamini, Dan; Komlosh, Michal E; Holtzclaw, Lynne A; Nevo, Uri; Basser, Peter J

    2016-07-15

    We report the development of a double diffusion encoding (DDE) MRI method to estimate and map the axon diameter distribution (ADD) within an imaging volume. A variety of biological processes, ranging from development to disease and trauma, may lead to changes in the ADD in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Unlike previously proposed methods, this ADD experimental design and estimation framework employs a more general, nonparametric approach, without a priori assumptions about the underlying form of the ADD, making it suitable to analyze abnormal tissue. In the current study, this framework was used on an ex vivo ferret spinal cord, while emphasizing the way in which the ADD can be weighted by either the number or the volume of the axons. The different weightings, which result in different spatial contrasts, were considered throughout this work. DDE data were analyzed to derive spatially resolved maps of average axon diameter, ADD variance, and extra-axonal volume fraction, along with a novel sub-micron restricted structures map. The morphological information contained in these maps was then used to segment white matter into distinct domains by using a proposed k-means clustering algorithm with spatial contiguity and left-right symmetry constraints, resulting in identifiable white matter tracks. The method was validated by comparing histological measures to the estimated ADDs using a quantitative similarity metric, resulting in good agreement. With further acquisition acceleration and experimental parameters adjustments, this ADD estimation framework could be first used preclinically, and eventually clinically, enabling a wide range of neuroimaging applications for improved understanding of neurodegenerative pathologies and assessing microstructural changes resulting from trauma. PMID:27126002

  15. Relationship Between White Matter Hyperintensities Penumbra and Cavity Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Ding, Lingling; Yang, Lei; Qin, Wei; Li, Yue; Li, Shujuan; Hu, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    Background Penumbra has been detected on the edge of white matter hyperintensities (WMH). The aim of our study was to investigate whether cavity formation is different between acute infarcts on the edge of WMH and those away from the edge. Material/Methods Ninety-six subjects with acute lacunar infarct ≤25 mm in diameter were recruited. Subjects with infarct contacting or overlapping with WMH (on axial T2 or coronal FLAIR) were defined as the Edge Group (on the edge of the WMH). Those outside the edge of the WMH were the Non-edge Group. Vascular risk factors, clinical data, baseline infarct size, infarct sites, and severity of WMH (by Fazekas scale) were recorded. Cavity formation was identified by MR follow-up imaging. Risk factors for cavity formation were also investigated. Results There were 37 (38.5%) subjects in the Edge Group and 59 (61.5%) in the Non-edge Group; 55 (57.3%) subjects had cavity formation in follow-up imaging. Subjects in the Edge Group had higher risk of developing cavities than those in the Non-edge Group (78.4% vs. 44.1%, p<0.05). In univariate analysis, subjects with cavity formation had larger infarct size and their infarcts were more often located in subcortical white matter. Vascular risk factors, clinical data, and WMH did not differ between subjects with cavity formation and those without. In logistic regression analysis, DWI infarct size and being in the Edge Group were independent risk factors for cavity formation. Conclusions Lacunar infarcts on the edge of WMH are more likely to develop cavities, suggesting that WMH penumbra affects cavity formation. PMID:26729408

  16. [Cerebral white matter bundle measurements by magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Yoshii, F; Duara, R

    1989-04-01

    The width of the anterior whole white matter bundle (AWM), interhemispheric (AWM-TER), and intrahemispheric (AWM-TRA) components at the level of the foramen of Monro on horizontal inversion recovery (IR) magnetic resonance (MR) scans were measured in 32 healthy males. The mean age of subjects were 54.4 +/- 18.8, ranged 25 to 83 years old. MR scans were performed using a 0.5 Tesla superconductive magnet, with inversion time of 400 msec, repetition time of 2.1 sec and echo time of 35 msec. The slice thickness was 10mm. Horizontal maximum internal skull diameter (HISD) at the same level was also measured and normalized values of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA were calculated by dividing the width of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA by the width of HISD. When absolute values of each AWM width were compared between right and left sides, there were no differences in AWM and AWM-TER. However, AWM-TRA of the right side was significantly wider than that of the left side (t = 4.28, p less than 0.001). The width of AWM was not correlated with age, but the width of AWM-TER showed a significant decline in the left (r = -0.36, p = 0.04) and non-significant trend to decline in the right side (r = -0.33, p = 0.07). The width of AWM-TRA of the left side was tended to decrease with age. Normalized values of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA showed a similar results as that of the absolute values. The measurement of the white matter bundle width provide some insights into the connectivity of the brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2612107

  17. Modeling the Relationship among Gray Matter Atrophy, Abnormalities in Connecting White Matter, and Cognitive Performance in Early Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuceyeski, A.F.; Vargas, W.; Dayan, M.; Monohan, E.; Blackwell, C.; Raj, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Gauthier, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Quantitative assessment of clinical and pathologic consequences of white matter abnormalities in multiple sclerosis is critical in understanding the pathways of disease. This study aimed to test whether gray matter atrophy was related to abnormalities in connecting white matter and to identify patterns of imaging biomarker abnormalities that were related to patient processing speed. Materials and Methods Image data and Symbol Digit Modalities Test scores were collected from a cohort of patients with early multiple sclerosis. The Network Modification Tool was used to estimate connectivity irregularities by projecting white matter abnormalities onto connecting gray matter regions. Partial least-squares regression quantified the relationship between imaging biomarkers and processing speed as measured by the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Results Atrophy in deep gray matter structures of the thalami and putamen had moderate and significant correlations with abnormalities in connecting white matter (r = 0.39–0.41, P < .05 corrected). The 2 models of processing speed, 1 for each of the WM imaging biomarkers, had goodness-of-fit (R2) values of 0.42 and 0.30. A measure of the impact of white matter lesions on the connectivity of occipital and parietal areas had significant nonzero regression coefficients. Conclusions We concluded that deep gray matter regions may be susceptible to inflammation and/or demyelination in white matter, possibly having a higher sensitivity to remote degeneration, and that lesions affecting visual processing pathways were related to processing speed. The Network Modification Tool may be used to quantify the impact of early white matter abnormalities on both connecting gray matter structures and processing speed. PMID:25414004

  18. Microstructural white matter changes mediate age-related cognitive decline on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA).

    PubMed

    Jolly, Todd A D; Cooper, Patrick S; Badwi, Syarifah Azizah Wan Ahmadul; Phillips, Natalie A; Rennie, Jaime L; Levi, Christopher R; Drysdale, Karen A; Parsons, Mark W; Michie, Patricia T; Karayanidis, Frini

    2016-02-01

    Although the relationship between aging and cognitive decline is well established, there is substantial individual variability in the degree of cognitive decline in older adults. The present study investigates whether variability in cognitive performance in community-dwelling older adults is related to the presence of whole brain or tract-specific changes in white matter microstructure. Specifically, we examine whether age-related decline in performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), a cognitive screening tool, is mediated by the white matter microstructural decline. We also examine if this relationship is driven by the presence of cardiovascular risk factors or variability in cerebral arterial pulsatility, an index of cardiovascular risk. Sixty-nine participants (aged 43-87) completed behavioral and MRI testing including T1 structural, T2-weighted FLAIR, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences. Measures of white matter microstructure were calculated using diffusion tensor imaging analyses on the DWI sequence. Multiple linear regression revealed that MoCA scores were predicted by radial diffusivity (RaD) of white matter beyond age or other cerebral measures. While increasing age and arterial pulsatility were associated with increasing RaD, these factors did not mediate the relationship between total white matter RaD and MoCA. Further, the relationship between MoCA and RaD was specific to participants who reported at least one cardiovascular risk factor. These findings highlight the importance of cardiovascular risk factors in the presentation of cognitive decline in old age. Further work is needed to establish whether medical or lifestyle management of these risk factors can prevent or reverse cognitive decline in old age. PMID:26511789

  19. Gray and white matter structural changes in corticobasal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Neeraj; Suppa, Antonio; Piattella, Maria Cristina; Di Stasio, Flavio; Petsas, Nikolaos; Colonnese, Claudio; Colosimo, Carlo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Pantano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    We investigated gray matter and white matter (WM) changes in corticobasal syndrome (CBS). T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images (3T-magnet) were obtained in 11 patients and 11 healthy subjects (HS). Magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed using FreeSurfer and Tracts Constrained by Underlying Anatomy to evaluate cortical thickness (CTh), surface area, and subcortical volumes as well as diffusion tensor image parameters along the major WM tracts. Compared with HS, the whole patient group showed decreased CTh in the prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area, insula, and temporal pole bilaterally. When we divided patients into 2 subgroups (left: L-CBS, right: R-CBS) on the basis of the clinically more affected upper limb, the most prominent decrease in CTh occurred in the hemisphere contralateral to the more affected side. The whole patient group also had volume loss in the putamen, hippocampus, and accumbens bilaterally, in the corpus callosum and right amygdala. Finally, we found diffusion changes in several WM tracts with axial diffusivity being altered more than radial diffusivity. The upper limb motor severity negatively correlated with the contralateral CTh in the precentral and/or postcentral gyri and contralateral volumes of putamen and accumbens. The CTh asymmetry in postcentral and/or paracentral gyri also negatively correlated with disease duration. Cortical thinning, volume loss, and fiber tract degeneration in specific brain regions are important pathophysiological abnormalities in CBS. PMID:26545629

  20. White matter plasticity in the cerebellum of elite basketball athletes

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Ye Na; Kwon, Soonwook; Lee, Nam Joon

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning a novel motor skill induces plastic changes in the brain structures of both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that are associated with a specific practice. We previously reported an increased volume of vermian lobules VI-VII (declive, folium, and tuber) in elite basketball athletes who require coordination for dribbling and shooting a ball, which awakened the central role of the cerebellum in motor coordination. However, the precise factor contributing to the increased volume was not determined. In the present study, we compared the volumes of the GM and WM in the sub-regions of the cerebellar vermis based on manual voxel analysis with the ImageJ program. We found significantly larger WM volumes of vermian lobules VI-VII (declive, folium, and tuber) in elite basketball athletes in response to long-term intensive motor learning. We suggest that the larger WM volumes of this region in elite basketball athletes represent a motor learning-induced plastic change, and that the WM of this region likely plays a critical role in coordination. This finding will contribute to gaining a deeper understanding of motor learning-evoked WM plasticity. PMID:26770877

  1. White matter plasticity in the cerebellum of elite basketball athletes.

    PubMed

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Ye Na; Kwon, Soonwook; Lee, Nam Joon; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2015-12-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning a novel motor skill induces plastic changes in the brain structures of both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) that are associated with a specific practice. We previously reported an increased volume of vermian lobules VI-VII (declive, folium, and tuber) in elite basketball athletes who require coordination for dribbling and shooting a ball, which awakened the central role of the cerebellum in motor coordination. However, the precise factor contributing to the increased volume was not determined. In the present study, we compared the volumes of the GM and WM in the sub-regions of the cerebellar vermis based on manual voxel analysis with the ImageJ program. We found significantly larger WM volumes of vermian lobules VI-VII (declive, folium, and tuber) in elite basketball athletes in response to long-term intensive motor learning. We suggest that the larger WM volumes of this region in elite basketball athletes represent a motor learning-induced plastic change, and that the WM of this region likely plays a critical role in coordination. This finding will contribute to gaining a deeper understanding of motor learning-evoked WM plasticity. PMID:26770877

  2. Gray- and white-matter anatomy of absolute pitch possessors.

    PubMed

    Dohn, Anders; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Hansen, Mads; Lerch, Jason P; Vuust, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Absolute pitch (AP), the ability to identify a musical pitch without a reference, has been examined behaviorally in numerous studies for more than a century, yet only a few studies have examined the neuroanatomical correlates of AP. Here, we used MRI and diffusion tensor imaging to investigate structural differences in brains of musicians with and without AP, by means of whole-brain vertex-wise cortical thickness (CT) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis. APs displayed increased CT in a number of areas including the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the right supramarginal gyrus. Furthermore, we found higher fractional anisotropy in APs within the path of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The findings in gray matter support previous studies indicating an increased left lateralized posterior STG in APs, yet they differ from previous findings of thinner cortex for a number of areas in APs. Finally, we found a relation between the white-matter results and the CT in the right parahippocampal gyrus. In this study, we present novel findings in AP research that may have implications for the understanding of the neuroanatomical underpinnings of AP ability. PMID:24304583

  3. Perinatal White Matter Injury: The Changing Spectrum of Pathology and Emerging Insights into Pathogenetic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Stephen A.

    2006-01-01

    Perinatal brain injury in survivors of premature birth has a unique and unexplained predilection for periventricular cerebral white matter. Periventricular white-matter injury (PWMI) is now the most common cause of brain injury in preterm infants and the leading cause of chronic neurological morbidity. The spectrum of chronic PWMI includes focal…

  4. White Matter Integrity and Pictorial Reasoning in High-Functioning Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyoun, Cherif P.; Belliveau, John W.; Mody, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the neurobiological role of white matter in visuospatial versus linguistic processing abilities in autism using diffusion tensor imaging. We examined differences in white matter integrity between high-functioning children with autism (HFA) and typically developing controls (CTRL), in relation to the groups' response…

  5. White Matter Abnormalities in Major Depression: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics and Rumination Study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xueyu; Zhou, Yuan; Hong, Yang; Li, Tao; Tong, Haibing; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Weidong; Jiang, Tianzi

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that major depressive disorder (MDD) is usually accompanied by altered white matter in the prefrontal cortex, the parietal lobe and the limbic system. As a behavioral abnormity of MDD, rumination has been believed to be a substantial indicator of the mental state of the depressive state. So far, however, no report that we are aware of has evaluated the relationship between white matter alterations and the ruminative state. In this study, we first explored the altered white matter using a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method based on diffusion tensor imaging of 19 healthy and 16 depressive subjects. We then investigated correlations between the altered white matter microstructure in the identified altered regions and the severity of ruminations measured by the ruminative response scale. Our results demonstrated altered white matter microstructure in circuits connecting the prefrontal lobe, the parietal lobe and the limbic system (p<0.005, uncorrected), findings which support previous research. More importantly, the result also indicated that a greater alteration in the white matter is associated with a more ruminative state (p<0.05, Bonferroni corrected). The detected abnormalities in the white matter should be interpreted cautiously because of the small sample size in this study. This finding supports the psychometric significance of white matter deficits in MDD. PMID:22666366

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging, white matter lesions, the corpus callosum, and gait in the elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gait impairment is common in the elderly, especially affected by stroke and white matter hyper intensities found in conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is more sensitive to white matter damage than conventional MRI. The relationship between DTI measure...

  7. Growth of White Matter in the Adolescent Brain: Myelin or Axon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paus, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    White matter occupies almost half of the human brain. It contains axons connecting spatially segregated modules and, as such, it is essential for the smooth flow of information in functional networks. Structural maturation of white matter continues during adolescence, as reflected in age-related changes in its volume, as well as in its…

  8. White Matter Maturation Supports the Development of Reasoning Ability through Its Influence on Processing Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Emilio; Whitaker, Kirstie J.; Steele, Joel S.; Green, Chloe T.; Wendelken, Carter; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the human brain changes in several ways throughout childhood and adolescence. Perhaps the most salient of these changes is the strengthening of white matter tracts that enable distal brain regions to communicate with one another more quickly and efficiently. Here, we sought to understand whether and how white matter changes…

  9. Microstructural Abnormalities of Short-Distance White Matter Tracts in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukla, Dinesh K.; Keehn, Brandon; Smylie, Daren M.; Muller, Ralph-Axel

    2011-01-01

    Recent functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have suggested atypical functional connectivity and reduced integrity of long-distance white matter fibers in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, evidence for short-distance white matter fibers is still limited, despite some speculation of…

  10. Understanding Neuronal Architecture in Obesity through Analysis of White Matter Connection Strength

    PubMed Central

    Riederer, Justin W.; Shott, Megan E.; Deguzman, Marisa; Pryor, Tamara L.; Frank, Guido K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of obesity, our understanding of its neurobiological underpinnings is insufficient. Diffusion weighted imaging and calculation of white matter connection strength are methods to describe the architecture of anatomical white matter tracts. This study is aimed to characterize white matter architecture within taste-reward circuitry in a population of obese individuals. Obese (n = 18, age = 28.7 ± 8.3 years) and healthy control (n = 24, age = 27.4 ± 6.3 years) women underwent diffusion weighted imaging. Using probabilistic fiber tractography (FSL PROBTRACKX2 toolbox) we calculated connection strength within 138 anatomical white matter tracts. Obese women (OB) displayed lower and greater connectivity within taste-reward circuitry compared to controls (Wilks’ λ < 0.001; p < 0.001). Connectivity was lower in white matter tracts connecting insula, amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and striatum. Connectivity was greater between the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). This study indicates that lower white matter connectivity within white matter tracts of insula-fronto-striatal taste-reward circuitry are associated with obesity as well as greater connectivity within white matter tracts connecting the amygdala and ACC. The specificity of regions suggests sensory integration and reward processing are key associations that are altered in and might contribute to obesity. PMID:27375463

  11. Altered White Matter Microstructure in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Bonnie J.; Bathula, Deepti; Herting, Megan; Schmitt, Colleen; Kroenke, Christopher D.; Fair, Damien; Nigg, Joel T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Identification of biomarkers is a priority for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Studies have documented macrostructural brain alterations in ADHD, but few have examined white matter microstructure, particularly in preadolescent children. Given dramatic white matter maturation across childhood, microstructural differences…

  12. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter? A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Gawryluk, Jodie R.; Mazerolle, Erin L.; D'Arcy, Ryan C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that allows for visualization of activated brain regions. Until recently, fMRI studies have focused on gray matter. There are two main reasons white matter fMRI remains controversial: (1) the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal depends on cerebral blood flow and volume, which are lower in white matter than gray matter and (2) fMRI signal has been associated with post-synaptic potentials (mainly localized in gray matter) as opposed to action potentials (the primary type of neural activity in white matter). Despite these observations, there is no direct evidence against measuring fMRI activation in white matter and reports of fMRI activation in white matter continue to increase. The questions underlying white matter fMRI activation are important. White matter fMRI activation has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of brain connectivity research, as well as improve the assessment and diagnosis of white matter and connectivity disorders. The current review provides an overview of the motivation to investigate white matter fMRI activation, as well as the published evidence of this phenomenon. We speculate on possible neurophysiologic bases of white matter fMRI signals, and discuss potential explanations for why reports of white matter fMRI activation are relatively scarce. We end with a discussion of future basic and clinical research directions in the study of white matter fMRI. PMID:25152709

  13. Recreational marijuana use impacts white matter integrity and subcortical (but not cortical) morphometry.

    PubMed

    Orr, Joseph M; Paschall, Courtnie J; Banich, Marie T

    2016-01-01

    A recent shift in legal and social attitudes toward marijuana use has also spawned a surge of interest in understanding the effects of marijuana use on the brain. There is considerable evidence that an adolescent onset of marijuana use negatively impacts white matter coherence. On the other hand, a recent well-controlled study demonstrated no effects of marijuana use on the morphometry of subcortical or cortical structures when users and non-users were matched for alcohol use. Regardless, most studies have involved small, carefully selected samples, so the ability to generalize to larger populations is limited. In an attempt to address this issue, we examined the effects of marijuana use on white matter integrity and cortical and subcortical morphometry using data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) consortium. The HCP data consists of ultra-high resolution neuroimaging data from a large community sample, including 466 adults reporting recreational marijuana use. Rather than just contrasting two groups of individuals who vary significantly in marijuana usage as typifies prior studies, we leveraged the large sample size provided by the HCP data to examine parametric effects of recreational marijuana use. Our results indicate that the earlier the age of onset of marijuana use, the lower was white matter coherence. Age of onset also also affected the shape of the accumbens, while the number of lifetime uses impacted the shape of the amygdala and hippocampus. Marijuana use had no effect on cortical volumes. These findings suggest subtle but significant effects of recreational marijuana use on brain structure. PMID:27408790

  14. Widespread Changes in White Matter Microstructure after a Day of Waking and Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Norbom, Linn B.; Pedersen, Per Ø.; Quraishi, Sophia H.; Bjørnerud, Atle; Malt, Ulrik F.; Groote, Inge R.; Westlye, Lars T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Elucidating the neurobiological effects of sleep and waking remains an important goal of the neurosciences. Recently, animal studies indicated that sleep is important for cell membrane and myelin maintenance in the brain and that these structures are particularly susceptible to insufficient sleep. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a day of waking and sleep deprivation would be associated with changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices of white matter microstructure sensitive to axonal membrane and myelin alterations. Methods Twenty-one healthy adult males underwent DTI in the morning [7:30AM; time point (TP)1], after 14 hours of waking (TP2), and then after another 9 hours of waking (TP3). Whole brain voxel-wise analysis was performed with tract based spatial statistics. Results A day of waking was associated with widespread increases in white matter fractional anisotropy, which were mainly driven by radial diffusivity reductions, and sleep deprivation was associated with widespread fractional anisotropy decreases, which were mainly explained by reductions in axial diffusivity. In addition, larger decreases in axial diffusivity after sleep deprivation were associated with greater sleepiness. All DTI changes remained significant after adjusting for hydration measures. Conclusions This is the first DTI study of sleep deprivation in humans. Although previous studies have observed localized changes in DTI indices of cerebral microstructure over the course of a few hours, further studies are needed to confirm widespread DTI changes within hours of waking and to clarify whether such changes in white matter microstructure serve as neurobiological substrates of sleepiness. PMID:26020651

  15. White Matter Correlates of Adolescent Depression: Structural Evidence for Frontolimbic Disconnectivity

    PubMed Central

    LeWinn, Kaja Z.; Connolly, Colm G.; Wu, Jing; Drahos, Miroslav; Hoeft, Fumiko; Ho, Tiffany C.; Simmons, Alan N.; Yang, Tony T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the significant prevalence of adolescent depression, little is known about the neuroanatomical basis of this disorder. Functional dysregulation in frontolimbic circuitry has been suggested as a key neural correlate of adult and adolescent depression impeding emotional regulation. However, less is known about whether this dysregulation is overlaid on impaired white matter microstructure. Guided by neuroimaging findings, we test the a priori hypotheses that adolescent depression is associated with alterations in white matter microstructure in the 1) uncinate fasciculus (UF) and 2) cingulum bundles. Method Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) data were obtained on 52 unmedicated adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 42 matched controls. We calculated fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD) for bilateral UF and cingulum. We also completed a voxelwise comparison of participants with depression and control participants using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Results Adolescents with depression had significantly lower FA and higher RD in bilateral UF; no significant differences were observed in cingulum. TBSS results additionally revealed lower FA values in the white matter associated with the limbic-cortical-striatal-thalamic circuit, corpus callosum, and anterior and superior corona radiata. Conclusion Unmedicated adolescent depression is associated with reduced fractional anisotropy in emotion regulatory networks, which may underlie the functional differences in frontolimbic circuitry characterizing depressive disorder. Given the relatively recent onset of depression in our sample, our findings in the context of the current literature provide preliminary evidence that reduced fractional anisotropy in the UF could be a predisposing risk factor for depression. PMID:25062597

  16. White Matter Integrity on DTI, Amyloid Load, and Neurodegeneration in Non-demented Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kantarci, Kejal; Schwarz, Christopher G.; Reid, Robert; Przybelski, Scott A.; Lesnick, Timothy; Zuk, Samantha M.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Lowe, Val; Machulda, Mary M.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to loss of white matter (WM) integrity and the temporal positioning of biomarkers of WM integrity relative to the biomarkers of gray matter (GM) neurodegeneration and amyloid load in the course of AD are poorly understood. Objective To investigate the effects of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related GM neurodegeneration and high β-amyloid on white matter (WM) microstructure in non-demented older adults. Design Longitudinal cohort study Setting Population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Participants Participants (n=701) with MRI/DTI and PET studies diagnosed as cognitively normal (CN; n=570) or mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n=131) were included. CN and MCI subjects were divided into biomarker-negative, amyloid- positive only, neurodegeneration- positive only, and amyloid plus neurodegeneration-positive groups based on their amyloid load on 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B PET, AD hypometabolic pattern on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET and/or hippocampal atrophy on MRI. Main Outcome Measure Fractional anisotrophy (FA) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) Results No FA alterations were observed in biomarker-negative MCI, and amyloid-positive only CN and MCI groups. Conversely, neurodegeneration-positive only and amyloid plus neurodegeneration- positive CN and MCI groups consistently had decreased FA in the fornix, which correlated with cognitive performance (Rho=0.38; p<0.001). Patients with MCI had more extensive WM involvement than CN subjects, and greatest FA decreases were observed in the amyloid plus neurodegeneration-positive MCI group. Conclusions and Relevance High amyloid load does not influence DTI-based measures of WM integrity in the absence of co-existent GM neurodegeneration in non-demented older adults. PMID:25347157

  17. Selective effect of mannitol-induced hyperosmolality on brain interstitial fluid and water content in white matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, G.A.; Barrett, J.; Estrada, E.; Brayer, J.; Kyner, W.T.

    1988-09-01

    We studied the effect of mannitol-induced hyperosmolality on brain interstitial fluid (ISF) by autoradiography. Adult cats underwent intracerebral infusion of the extracellular marker, /sup 14/C-sucrose. Nine animals were given 2g/kg of mannitol intravenously, and another nine animals without mannitol were controls. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) osmolalities were measured. After 2 hr the brains were removed for determination of water and electrolyte content and for preparation of the autoradiograms. Diffusion coefficients were calculated for intracerebral transport with equations for radial diffusion. We found that mannitol increased the plasma osmolality but did not affect that of the CSF. Water and potassium contents were significantly lower in the white matter of mannitol-treated animals than in controls. Diffusion was reduced in the direction of gray matter into the white matter. We conclude that lower doses of mannitol control CSF pressure by selectively removing water from white matter, reducing the CSF volume, and affecting molecular transport at the gray/white interface.

  18. White Matter Hemodynamic Abnormalities precede Sub-cortical Gray Matter Changes in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Andrew W.; Johnson, Glyn; Babb, James S.; Herbert, Joseph; Grossman, Robert I.; Inglese, Matilde

    2009-01-01

    Background Hypoperfusion has been reported in lesions, normal-appearing white (NAWM) and gray matter (NAGM) of patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) by using perfusion MRI. However, it is still unknown how early such changes in perfusion occur. The aim of our study was to assess the presence of hemodynamic changes in the NAWM and subcortical NAGM of patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) in comparison to healthy controls and to patients with early relapsing-remitting (RR) MS. Methods Absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) were measured in the periventricular and frontal NAWM, thalamus and putamen nuclei of 12 patients with CIS, 12 with early RR-MS and 12 healthy controls using dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced (DSC) T2*-weighted MRI. Results Compared to controls, CBF was significantly decreased in the periventricular NAWM of CIS patients and in the periventricular NAWM and putamen of RR-MS patients. Compared to CIS, RR-MS patients showed a significant CBF decrease in the putamen. Conclusions CBF was decreased in the NAWM of both CIS and RR-MS patients and in the subcortical NAGM of RR-MS patients suggesting a continuum of tissue perfusion decreases beginning in white matter and spreading to gray matter, as the disease progresses. PMID:19181347

  19. HLA ASSOCIATIONS IN OBESE WHITE AND BLACK ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Walton, Dominique; Zhu, Weitong; Niblack, Gary

    2016-01-01

    We summarized HLA-A and -B data from 1095 black and white adult men and women with or without obesity to determine if specific HLA tissue types are overrepresented in obese individuals compared with nonobese. None of the three HLA types (Aw30, B18, Bw35) previously reported to relate to obesity was overrepresented in obese subjects in our study. However, B14 and B41 haplotypes were overrepresented in obese white men compared with nonobese men, and B7 was overrepresented in obese black men compared with nonobese men. Additional research will be required to confirm the HLA associations we found and to determine if methodologic differences could account for the differences among the previous studies.

  20. The Nature of White Privilege in the Teaching and Training of Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Carole L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes white privilege and how it impacts the learning environment. Included are actual examples of white privilege from practice and how enforcing white privilege results in racism. The author hopes this chapter will provide a foundation and increase awareness of white privilege and the adult and continuing educators' role in…

  1. White matter changes in chronic alcoholic liver disease: Hypothesized association and putative biochemical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Leith; Huang, Jimmy; Zamani, Amir; Morioka, Craig; El-Saden, Suzie

    2015-12-01

    Advanced liver disease has long been associated with cerebral abnormalities. These abnormalities, termed acquired hepatocerebral degeneration, are typically visualized as T1 weighted hyperintensity on MRI in the deep gray matter of the basal ganglia. Recent reports, however, have demonstrated that a subset of patients with chronic alcoholic liver disease may also develop white matter abnormalities. Thus far, the morphology of these changes is not well characterized. Previous studies have described these changes as patchy, sporadic white matter abnormalities but have not posited localization of these changes to any particular white matter tracts. This paper hypothesizes that the white matter findings associated with advanced alcoholic liver disease localize to the corticocerebellar tracts. As an initial investigation of this hypothesis, 78 patients with a diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and an MRI showing clearly abnormal T1 weighted hyperintensity in the bilateral globus pallidus, characteristic of chronic liver disease, were examined for white matter signal abnormalities in the corticocerebellar tracts using FLAIR and T2 weighted images. The corticocerebellar tracts were subdivided into two regions: periventricular white matter (consisting of the sum of the centrum-semiovale and corona radiata), and lower white matter (consisting of the corona radiata, internal capsules, middle cerebral peduncles, middle cerebellar peduncles and cerebellum). As compared to matched controls, significantly greater signal abnormalities in both the periventricular white matter and lower white matter regions of the corticocerebellar tracts were observed in patients with known liver cirrhosis and abnormal T1 W hyperintensity in the globi pallidi. This difference was most pronounced in the lower white matter region of the corticocerebellar tract, with statistical significance of p<0.0005. Furthermore, the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying these changes remains unknown. This paper

  2. White matter hyperintensities and geriatric syndrome: An important role of arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Saji, Naoki; Ogama, Noriko; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are defined as cerebral white matter changes presumed to be of vascular origin, bilateral and mostly symmetrical. They can appear as hyperintense on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences, and as isointense or hypointense on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. WMH have been focused on because of their clinical importance as a risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases and cognitive impairment. WMH are associated with geriatric syndrome, which is defined by clinical symptoms characteristic of older adults, including cognitive and functional impairment and falls. Cerebral small vessel diseases, such as WMH, might play an important role as risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases, cognitive impairment and geriatric syndrome through the mechanism of arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness remain unclear. Basically, arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. These changes might arise from hemodynamic stress as a result of a "tsunami effect" on cerebral parenchyma. In the present article, we review the clinical characteristics of WMH, focusing particularly on two associations: (i) those between cerebral small vessel diseases including WMH and arterial stiffness; and (ii) those between WMH and geriatric syndrome. PMID:26671153

  3. Reduced white matter connectivity in the corpus callosum of children with Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Plessen, Kerstin J.; Grüner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid; Hirsch, Jochen G.; Xu, Dongrong; Bansal, Ravi; Hammar, Åsa; Lundervold, Astri J.; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Lie, Stein Atle; Gass, Achim; Peterson, Bradley S.; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Background Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects, and these anatomical features have been understood to reflect neural plasticity that helps to attenuate the severity of tics. Method CC white matter connectivity, as measured by the Fractional Anisotropy (FA) index from diffusion tensor images, was assessed in 20 clinically well-defined boys with Tourette syndrome and 20 age- and gender-matched controls. Results The hypothesis that children with TS would show reduced measures of connectivity in CC fibers was confirmed for all subregions of the CC. There was no significant interaction of TS and region. Reductions in FA in CC regions may reflect either fewer interhemispheric fibers or reduced axonal myelination. FA values did not correlate significantly with the severity of tic symptoms. Group differences in measures of connectivity did not seem to be attributable to the presence of comorbid ADHD or OCD, to medication exposure, or group differences in IQ. Conclusion Our findings of a reduced interhemispheral white matter connectivity add to the understanding of neural connectivity and plasticity in the brains of children who have TS. PMID:17073980

  4. A Preliminary Study of White Matter in Adolescent Depression: Relationships with Illness Severity, Anhedonia, and Irritability

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Johnson, Amy R.; Vallejo, Ana I.; Katz, Lev; Wong, Edmund; Gabbay, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) during adolescence is a common and disabling psychiatric condition; yet, little is known about its neurobiological underpinning. Evidence indicates that MDD in adults involves alterations in white and gray matter; however, sparse research has focused on adolescent MDD. Similarly, little research has accounted for the wide variability of symptom severity among depressed teens. Here, we aimed to investigate white matter (WM) microstructure between 17 adolescents with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls (HC) using diffusion tensor imaging. We further assessed within the MDD group relationships between WM integrity and depression severity, as well as anhedonia and irritability – two core symptoms of adolescent MDD. As expected, adolescents with MDD manifested decreased WM integrity compared to HC in the anterior cingulum and anterior corona radiata. Within the MDD group, greater depression severity was correlated with reduced WM integrity in the genu of corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiation, anterior cingulum, and sagittal stratum. However, anhedonia and irritability were associated with alterations in distinct WM tracts. Specifically, anhedonia was associated with disturbances in tracts related to reward processing, including the anterior limb of the internal capsule and projection fibers to the orbitofrontal cortex. Irritability was associated with decreased integrity in the sagittal stratum, anterior corona radiata, and tracts leading to prefrontal and temporal cortices. Overall, these preliminary findings provide further support for the hypotheses that there is a disconnect between prefrontal and limbic emotional regions in depression, and that specific clinical symptoms involve distinct alterations in WM tracts. PMID:24324445

  5. A preliminary study of white matter in adolescent depression: relationships with illness severity, anhedonia, and irritability.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sarah E; Johnson, Amy R; Vallejo, Ana I; Katz, Lev; Wong, Edmund; Gabbay, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) during adolescence is a common and disabling psychiatric condition; yet, little is known about its neurobiological underpinning. Evidence indicates that MDD in adults involves alterations in white and gray matter; however, sparse research has focused on adolescent MDD. Similarly, little research has accounted for the wide variability of symptom severity among depressed teens. Here, we aimed to investigate white matter (WM) microstructure between 17 adolescents with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls (HC) using diffusion tensor imaging. We further assessed within the MDD group relationships between WM integrity and depression severity, as well as anhedonia and irritability - two core symptoms of adolescent MDD. As expected, adolescents with MDD manifested decreased WM integrity compared to HC in the anterior cingulum and anterior corona radiata. Within the MDD group, greater depression severity was correlated with reduced WM integrity in the genu of corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiation, anterior cingulum, and sagittal stratum. However, anhedonia and irritability were associated with alterations in distinct WM tracts. Specifically, anhedonia was associated with disturbances in tracts related to reward processing, including the anterior limb of the internal capsule and projection fibers to the orbitofrontal cortex. Irritability was associated with decreased integrity in the sagittal stratum, anterior corona radiata, and tracts leading to prefrontal and temporal cortices. Overall, these preliminary findings provide further support for the hypotheses that there is a disconnect between prefrontal and limbic emotional regions in depression, and that specific clinical symptoms involve distinct alterations in WM tracts. PMID:24324445

  6. Quantification of white matter and gray matter volumes from T1 parametric images using fuzzy classifiers.

    PubMed

    Herndon, R C; Lancaster, J L; Toga, A W; Fox, P T

    1996-01-01

    White matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) were accurately measured using a technique based on a single standardized fuzzy classifier (FC) for each tissue. Fuzzy classifier development was based on experts' visual assessments of WM and GM boundaries from a set of T1 parametric MR images. The fuzzy classifier method's accuracy was validated and optimized by a set of T1 phantom images that were based on hand-detailed human brain cryosection images. Nine sets of axial T1 images of varying thickness equally distributed throughout the brain were simulated. All T1 data sets were mapped to the standardized FCs and rapidly segmented into WM and GM voxel fraction images. Resulting volumes revealed that, in most cases, the difference between measured and actual volumes was less than 5%. This was consistent throughout most of the brain, and as expected, the accuracy improved to generally less than 2% for the 1-mm simulated brain slices. PMID:8724407

  7. Home Remedy Use Among African American and White Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Sandberg, Joanne C.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Altizer, Kathryn P.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Home remedy use is an often overlooked component of health self-management, with a rich tradition, particularly among African Americans and others who have experienced limited access to medical care or discrimination by the health care system. Home remedies can potentially interfere with biomedical treatments. This study documented the use of home remedies among older rural adults, and compared use by ethnicity (African American and white) and gender. A purposeful sample of 62 community-dwelling adults ages 65+ from rural North Carolina was selected. Each completed an in-depth interview, which probed current use of home remedies, including food and non-food remedies, and the symptoms or conditions for use. Systematic, computer-assisted analysis was used to identify usage patterns. Five food and five non-food remedies were used by a large proportion of older adults. African American elders reported greater use than white elders; women reported more use for a greater number of symptoms than men. Non-food remedies included long-available, over-the-counter remedies (e.g., Epsom salts) for which “off-label” uses were reported. Use focused on alleviating common digestive, respiratory, skin, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Some were used for chronic conditions in lieu of prescription medications. Home remedy use continues to be a common feature of the health self-management of older adults, particularly among African Americans, though at lower levels than previously reported. While some use is likely helpful or benign, other use has the potential to interfere with medical management of disease. Health care providers should be aware of the use of remedies by their patients. PMID:26543255

  8. Longitudinal changes in grey and white matter during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, A; Watkins, K E; Chadwick, M; James, S; Winmill, L; Douaud, G; De Stefano, N; Matthews, P M; Smith, S M; Johansen-Berg, H; James, A C

    2010-01-01

    Brain development continues actively during adolescence. Previous MRI studies have shown complex patterns of apparent loss of grey matter (GM) volume and increases in white matter (WM) volume and fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of WM microstructure. In this longitudinal study (mean follow-up=2.5+/-0.5 years) of 24 adolescents, we used a voxel-based morphometry (VBM)-style analysis with conventional T1-weighted images to test for age-related changes in GM and WM volumes. We also performed tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to test for age-related WM changes across the whole brain. Probabilistic tractography was used to carry out quantitative comparisons across subjects in measures of WM microstructure in two fiber tracts important for supporting speech and motor functions (arcuate fasciculus [AF] and corticospinal tract [CST]). The whole-brain analyses identified age-related increases in WM volume and FA bilaterally in many fiber tracts, including AF and many parts of the CST. FA changes were mainly driven by increases in parallel diffusivity, probably reflecting increases in the diameter of the axons forming the fiber tracts. FA values of both left and right AF (but not of the CST) were significantly higher at the end of the follow-up than at baseline. Over the same period, widespread reductions in the cortical GM volume were found. These findings provide imaging-based anatomical data suggesting that brain maturation in adolescence is associated with structural changes enhancing long-distance connectivities in different WM tracts, specifically in the AF and CST, at the same time that cortical GM exhibits synaptic "pruning". PMID:19679191

  9. White matter microstructural changes in psychogenic erectile dysfunction patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Liu, J; Li, G; Pan, J; Li, Z; Liu, Q; Qin, W; Dong, M; Sun, J; Huang, X; Wu, T; Chang, D

    2014-05-01

    Brain dysfunction in erectile dysfunction (ED) has been identified by multiple neuroimaging studies. A recent MRI study indicated grey matter alterations in ED patients. This study aims to investigate the microstructural changes of cerebral white matter (WM) in psychological ED patients and their possible correlations with clinical variables. Twenty-seven psychological ED patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS) were included and underwent a magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan. The tract-based spatial statistics were employed to identify the WM structure alterations in psychological ED patients. The multiple DTI-derived indices' [fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD) and mean diffusivity (MD)] correlations with the symptoms and their durations, respectively, were analysed. The IIEF-5, quality of erection questionnaire (QEQ) and the self-esteem and relationship (SEAR) questionnaire were used to assess the symptoms of psychological ED patients. Compared with HS, the psychological ED patients showed increased FA values, reduced MD values and reduced AD values in multiple WM tracts including the corpus callosum (genu, body and splenium), corticospinal tract, internal capsule, corona radiata, external capsule and superior longitudinal fasciculus (p < 0.05, threshold-free cluster enhancement corrected). Both of the IIEF scores and QEQ scores of ED patients showed a significantly negative correlation with the average FA values, and positive correlation with average AD values and MD values in the splenium of the corpus callosum (p < 0.05). The results provided preliminary evidence of WM microstructural changes in patients with psychological ED. The morphological alterations in the splenium of the corpus callosum were related to the symptom severity. PMID:24711250

  10. Comparison of the Relationship between Cerebral White Matter and Grey Matter in Normal Dogs and Dogs with Lateral Ventricular Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin J; Laubner, Steffi; Kolecka, Malgorzata; Failing, Klaus; Moritz, Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Ondreka, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Large cerebral ventricles are a frequent finding in brains of dogs with brachycephalic skull conformation, in comparison with mesaticephalic dogs. It remains unclear whether oversized ventricles represent a normal variant or a pathological condition in brachycephalic dogs. There is a distinct relationship between white matter and grey matter in the cerebrum of all eutherian mammals. The aim of this study was to determine if this physiological proportion between white matter and grey matter of the forebrain still exists in brachycephalic dogs with oversized ventricles. The relative cerebral grey matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid volume in dogs were determined based on magnetic-resonance-imaging datasets using graphical software. In an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using body mass as the covariate, the adjusted means of the brain tissue volumes of two groups of dogs were compared. Group 1 included 37 mesaticephalic dogs of different sizes with no apparent changes in brain morphology, and subjectively normal ventricle size. Group 2 included 35 brachycephalic dogs in which subjectively enlarged cerebral ventricles were noted as an incidental finding in their magnetic-resonance-imaging examination. Whereas no significant different adjusted means of the grey matter could be determined, the group of brachycephalic dogs had significantly larger adjusted means of lateral cerebral ventricles and significantly less adjusted means of relative white matter volume. This indicates that brachycephalic dogs with subjective ventriculomegaly have less white matter, as expected based on their body weight and cerebral volume. Our study suggests that ventriculomegaly in brachycephalic dogs is not a normal variant of ventricular volume. Based on the changes in the relative proportion of WM and CSF volume, and the unchanged GM proportions in dogs with ventriculomegaly, we rather suggest that distension of the lateral ventricles might be the underlying cause of pressure

  11. Comparison of the Relationship between Cerebral White Matter and Grey Matter in Normal Dogs and Dogs with Lateral Ventricular Enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Martin J.; Laubner, Steffi; Kolecka, Malgorzata; Failing, Klaus; Moritz, Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Ondreka, Nele

    2015-01-01

    Large cerebral ventricles are a frequent finding in brains of dogs with brachycephalic skull conformation, in comparison with mesaticephalic dogs. It remains unclear whether oversized ventricles represent a normal variant or a pathological condition in brachycephalic dogs. There is a distinct relationship between white matter and grey matter in the cerebrum of all eutherian mammals. The aim of this study was to determine if this physiological proportion between white matter and grey matter of the forebrain still exists in brachycephalic dogs with oversized ventricles. The relative cerebral grey matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid volume in dogs were determined based on magnetic-resonance-imaging datasets using graphical software. In an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using body mass as the covariate, the adjusted means of the brain tissue volumes of two groups of dogs were compared. Group 1 included 37 mesaticephalic dogs of different sizes with no apparent changes in brain morphology, and subjectively normal ventricle size. Group 2 included 35 brachycephalic dogs in which subjectively enlarged cerebral ventricles were noted as an incidental finding in their magnetic-resonance-imaging examination. Whereas no significant different adjusted means of the grey matter could be determined, the group of brachycephalic dogs had significantly larger adjusted means of lateral cerebral ventricles and significantly less adjusted means of relative white matter volume. This indicates that brachycephalic dogs with subjective ventriculomegaly have less white matter, as expected based on their body weight and cerebral volume. Our study suggests that ventriculomegaly in brachycephalic dogs is not a normal variant of ventricular volume. Based on the changes in the relative proportion of WM and CSF volume, and the unchanged GM proportions in dogs with ventriculomegaly, we rather suggest that distension of the lateral ventricles might be the underlying cause of pressure

  12. Small white matter lesion detection in cerebral small vessel disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoorian, Mohsen; Karssemeijer, Nico; van Uden, Inge; de Leeuw, Frank E.; Heskes, Tom; Marchiori, Elena; Platel, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common finding on magnetic resonance images of elderly people. White matter lesions (WML) are important markers for not only the small vessel disease, but also neuro-degenerative diseases including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Volumetric measurements such as the "total lesion load", have been studied and related to these diseases. With respect to SVD we conjecture that small lesions are important, as they have been observed to grow over time and they form the majority of lesions in number. To study these small lesions they need to be annotated, which is a complex and time-consuming task. Existing (semi) automatic methods have been aimed at volumetric measurements and large lesions, and are not suitable for the detection of small lesions. In this research we established a supervised voxel classification CAD system, optimized and trained to exclusively detect small WMLs. To achieve this, several preprocessing steps were taken, which included a robust standardization of subject intensities to reduce inter-subject intensity variability as much as possible. A number of features that were found to be well identifying small lesions were calculated including multimodal intensities, tissue probabilities, several features for accurate location description, a number of second order derivative features as well as multi-scale annular filter for blobness detection. Only small lesions were used to learn the target concept via Adaboost using random forests as its basic classifiers. Finally the results were evaluated using Free-response receiver operating characteristic.

  13. Profiles of aberrant white matter microstructure in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Scott S.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies attempting to quantify white matter (WM) microstructure in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS) have produced inconsistent findings, most likely due to the various control groups employed, differing analysis methods, and failure to examine for potential motion artifact. In addition, analyses have heretofore lacked sufficient specificity to provide regional information. In this study, we used Automated Fiber-tract Quantification (AFQ) to identify specific regions of aberrant WM microstructure along WM tracts in patients with FXS that differed from controls who were matched on age, IQ and degree of autistic symptoms. Participants were 20 patients with FXS, aged 10 to 23 years, and 20 matched controls. Using Automated Fiber-tract Quantification (AFQ), we created Tract Profiles of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity along 18 major WM fascicles. We found that fractional anisotropy was significantly increased in the left and right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), right uncinate fasciculus, and left cingulum hippocampus in individuals with FXS compared to controls. Conversely, mean diffusivity was significantly decreased in the right ILF in patients with FXS compared to controls. Age was significantly negatively associated with MD values across both groups in 11 tracts. Taken together, these findings indicate that FXS results in abnormal WM microstructure in specific regions of the ILF and uncinate fasciculus, most likely caused by inefficient synaptic pruning as a result of decreased or absent Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26937381

  14. White matter degeneration in schizophrenia: a comparative diffusion tensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura A.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Kim, Jinsuh; Alexander, Andrew L.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2010-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious and disabling mental disorder. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies performed on schizophrenia have demonstrated white matter degeneration either due to loss of myelination or deterioration of fiber tracts although the areas where the changes occur are variable across studies. Most of the population based studies analyze the changes in schizophrenia using scalar indices computed from the diffusion tensor such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and relative anisotropy (RA). The scalar measures may not capture the complete information from the diffusion tensor. In this paper we have applied the RADTI method on a group of 9 controls and 9 patients with schizophrenia. The RADTI method converts the tensors to log-Euclidean space where a linear regression model is applied and hypothesis testing is performed between the control and patient groups. Results show that there is a significant difference in the anisotropy between patients and controls especially in the parts of forceps minor, superior corona radiata, anterior limb of internal capsule and genu of corpus callosum. To check if the tensor analysis gives a better idea of the changes in anisotropy, we compared the results with voxelwise FA analysis as well as voxelwise geodesic anisotropy (GA) analysis.

  15. White Matter Compromise in Veterans Exposed to Primary Blast Forces

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Katherine H.; Hurley, Robin A.; Haswell, Courtney C.; Rowland, Jared A.; Hurt, Susan D.; Lamar, Cory D.; Morey, Rajendra A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Use Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) to investigate white matter alterations associated with blast exposure with or without acute symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants Forty-five veterans of the recent military conflicts included twenty-three exposed to primary blast without TBI symptoms, six having primary blast mild TBI, and sixteen unexposed to blast. Design Cross-sectional case control study. Main Measures Neuropsychological testing and DTI metrics that quantified the number of voxel clusters with altered fractional anisotropy (FA) radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD), regardless of their spatial location. Results Significantly lower FA and higher RD was observed in veterans exposed to primary blast with and without mild TBI relative to blast unexposed veterans. Voxel clusters of lower FA were spatially dispersed and heterogeneous across affected individuals. Conclusion These results suggest that lack of clear TBI symptoms following primary blast exposure may not accurately reflect the extent of brain injury. If confirmed, our findings would argue for supplementing the established approach of making diagnoses based purely on clinical history and observable acute symptoms with novel neuroimaging-based diagnostic criteria that “look below the surface” for pathology. PMID:24590156

  16. Automated localization of periventricular and subcortical white matter lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lijn, Fedde; Vernooij, Meike W.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Vrooman, Henri A.; Rueckert, Daniel; Hammers, Alexander; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2007-03-01

    It is still unclear whether periventricular and subcortical white matter lesions (WMLs) differ in etiology or clinical consequences. Studies addressing this issue would benefit from automated segmentation and localization of WMLs. Several papers have been published on WML segmentation in MR images. Automated localization however, has not been investigated as much. This work presents and evaluates a novel method to label segmented WMLs as periventricular and subcortical. The proposed technique combines tissue classification and registration-based segmentation to outline the ventricles in MRI brain data. The segmented lesions can then be labeled into periventricular WMLs and subcortical WMLs by applying region growing and morphological operations. The technique was tested on scans of 20 elderly subjects in which neuro-anatomy experts manually segmented WMLs. Localization accuracy was evaluated by comparing the results of the automated method with a manual localization. Similarity indices and volumetric intraclass correlations between the automated and the manual localization were 0.89 and 0.95 for periventricular WMLs and 0.64 and 0.89 for subcortical WMLs, respectively. We conclude that this automated method for WML localization performs well to excellent in comparison to the gold standard.

  17. Modeling blast induced neurotrauma in isolated spinal cord white matter.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sean; Ouyang, Hui; Shi, Riyi

    2011-10-01

    Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a common injury associated with the present military conflicts. Exposure to the shock-wave produced from exploding ordnances leads to significant neurological deficits throughout the brain and spinal cord. Prevention and treatment of this injury requires an appropriate understanding of the mechanisms governing the neurological response. Here, we present a novel ex-vivo BINT model where an isolated section of guinea pig spinal cord white matter is exposed to the shock-wave produced from a small scale explosive event. Additionally, we define the relationship between shock-wave impact, tissue deformation and resulting anatomical and functional deficits associated with BINT. Our findings suggest an inverse relationship between the magnitude of the shock-wave overpressure and the degree of functional deficits using a double sucrose gap recording chamber. Similar correlations are drawn between overpressure and degree of anatomical damage of neuronal processes using a dye-exclusion assay. The following approach is expected to significantly contribute to the detection, mitigation and eventual treatment of BINT. PMID:20703730

  18. Brain asymmetry in the white matter making and globularity

    PubMed Central

    Theofanopoulou, Constantina

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies from the field of language genetics and evolutionary anthropology have put forward the hypothesis that the emergence of our species-specific brain is to be understood not in terms of size, but in light of developmental changes that gave rise to a more globular braincase configuration after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans. On the grounds that (i) white matter myelination is delayed relative to other brain structures and, in humans, is protracted compared with other primates and that (ii) neural connectivity is linked genetically to our brain/skull morphology and language-ready brain, I argue that one significant evolutionary change in Homo sapiens’ lineage is the interhemispheric connectivity mediated by the Corpus Callosum. The size, myelination and fiber caliber of the Corpus Callosum present an anterior-to-posterior increase, in a way that inter-hemispheric connectivity is more prominent in the sensory motor areas, whereas “high- order” areas are more intra-hemispherically connected. Building on evidence from language-processing studies that account for this asymmetry (‘lateralization’) in terms of brain rhythms, I present an evo-devo hypothesis according to which the myelination of the Corpus Callosum, Brain Asymmetry, and Globularity are conjectured to make up the angles of a co-evolutionary triangle that gave rise to our language-ready brain. PMID:26441731

  19. White Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia and Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lener, Marc S.; Wong, Edmund; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Byne, William; Goldstein, Kim E.; Blair, Nicholas J.; Haznedar, M. Mehmet; New, Antonia S.; Chemerinski, Eran; Chu, King-Wai; Rimsky, Liza S.; Siever, Larry J.; Koenigsberg, Harold W.; Hazlett, Erin A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies examining schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) and schizophrenia, separately have shown that compared with healthy controls (HCs), patients show frontotemporal white matter (WM) abnormalities. This is the first DTI study to directly compare WM tract coherence with tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA) across the schizophrenia spectrum in a large sample of demographically matched HCs (n = 55), medication-naive SPD patients (n = 49), and unmedicated/never-medicated schizophrenia patients (n = 22) to determine whether (a) frontal-striatal-temporal WM tract abnormalities in schizophrenia are similar to, or distinct from those observed in SPD; and (b) WM tract abnormalities are associated with clinical symptom severity indicating a common underlying pathology across the spectrum. Compared with both the HC and SPD groups, schizophrenia patients showed WM abnormalities, as indexed by lower FA in the temporal lobe (inferior longitudinal fasciculus) and cingulum regions. SPD patients showed lower FA in the corpus callosum genu compared with the HC group, but this regional abnormality was more widespread in schizophrenia patients. Across the schizophrenia spectrum, greater WM disruptions were associated with greater symptom severity. Overall, frontal-striatal-temporal WM dysconnectivity is attenuated in SPD compared with schizophrenia patients and may mitigate the emergence of psychosis. PMID:24962608

  20. White matter hyperintensities characterize monogenic frontotemporal dementia with granulin mutations.

    PubMed

    Paternicò, Donata; Premi, Enrico; Gazzina, Stefano; Cosseddu, Maura; Alberici, Antonella; Archetti, Silvana; Cotelli, Maria S; Micheli, Anna; Turla, Marinella; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    No study but one has suggested the presence of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in frontotemporal dementia (FTD), limited to 4 cases carrying pathogenic Granulin (GRN) gene mutations. We investigated the presence of WMHs in a cohort of 14 FTD patients with pathogenic GRN mutations (GRN+), 28 patients without GRN mutations (GRN-) and 18 healthy controls (HC). We further considered 11 asymptomatic GRN+ subjects and 11 young age-matched healthy controls (yHC). The WMH burden was automatically computed and a voxelwise-based analysis was carried out to explore the differences in WMH brain spatial distribution. FTD-GRN+ patients had increased total WMH burden than both HC (p < 0.001) and FTD-GRN-(p = 0.01) groups. WMHs were mainly localized in the right middle frontal and superior temporal gyri, in the left superior frontal in the left parietal gyri. No significant differences of WMH burden between asymptomatic GRN+ and yHC were observed. The presence of WMHs in cases of FTD may suggest a novel mechanism of GRN disease-related neurodegeneration, may be of help in the differential diagnosis, and in guiding genetic screening. PMID:26827655

  1. Brain asymmetry in the white matter making and globularity.

    PubMed

    Theofanopoulou, Constantina

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies from the field of language genetics and evolutionary anthropology have put forward the hypothesis that the emergence of our species-specific brain is to be understood not in terms of size, but in light of developmental changes that gave rise to a more globular braincase configuration after the split from Neanderthals-Denisovans. On the grounds that (i) white matter myelination is delayed relative to other brain structures and, in humans, is protracted compared with other primates and that (ii) neural connectivity is linked genetically to our brain/skull morphology and language-ready brain, I argue that one significant evolutionary change in Homo sapiens' lineage is the interhemispheric connectivity mediated by the Corpus Callosum. The size, myelination and fiber caliber of the Corpus Callosum present an anterior-to-posterior increase, in a way that inter-hemispheric connectivity is more prominent in the sensory motor areas, whereas "high- order" areas are more intra-hemispherically connected. Building on evidence from language-processing studies that account for this asymmetry ('lateralization') in terms of brain rhythms, I present an evo-devo hypothesis according to which the myelination of the Corpus Callosum, Brain Asymmetry, and Globularity are conjectured to make up the angles of a co-evolutionary triangle that gave rise to our language-ready brain. PMID:26441731

  2. Are white matter abnormalities associated with “unexplained dizziness”?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hena; Cerchiai, Niccolò; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Casani, Augusto P.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although cerebral small vessel disease is a significant contributor to the development of imbalance and falls in the elderly, whether it causes dizziness is not known. Methods A retrospective case analysis was conducted for 122 dizzy patients referred to two neuro-otology tertiary centres in London and Pisa. Patients were divided into ‘explained’ causes of dizziness (e.g. benign positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, orthostatic hypotension, cerebellar ataxias) and ‘unexplained’ dizziness. White matter hyperintensities (WMH) in MRI (T2 weighted and FLAIR sequences) were blindly rated according to the Fazekas scale. Results 122 patients; 58 (mean age = 72, SD = 7.95 years) in the ‘unexplained’ group and 64 (mean age = 72.01, SD = 8.28 years) in the ‘explained’ group were recruited. The overall frequency of lesions (Fazekas 1–3) significantly differed between groups (p = 0.011). The frequency of severe lesions (Fazekas 3) was significantly higher in the ‘unexplained’ group (22%) than in the ‘explained’ group (5%; p = 0.003). Conclusion Increased severity of WMH in cases of unexplained dizziness suggests that such abnormalities are likely contributory to the development of dizziness. WM lesions may induce dizziness either because patients perceive a degree of objective unsteadiness or by a disconnection syndrome involving vestibular or locomotor areas of the brain. PMID:26412160

  3. Orientation dependence of magnetization transfer parameters in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Pampel, André; Müller, Dirk K; Anwander, Alfred; Marschner, Henrik; Möller, Harald E

    2015-07-01

    Quantification of magnetization-transfer (MT) experiments is typically based on a model comprising a liquid pool "a" of free water and a semisolid pool "b" of motionally restricted macromolecules or membrane compounds. By a comprehensive fitting approach, high quality MT parameter maps of the human brain are obtained. In particular, a distinct correlation between the diffusion-tensor orientation with respect to the B0-magnetic field and the apparent transverse relaxation time, T2(b), of the semisolid pool (i.e., the width of its absorption line) is observed. This orientation dependence is quantitatively explained by a refined dipolar lineshape for pool b that explicitly considers the specific geometrical arrangement of lipid bilayers wrapped around a cylindrical axon. The model inherently reduces the myelin membrane to its lipid constituents, which is motivated by previous studies on efficient interaction sites (e.g., cholesterol or galactocerebrosides) in the myelin membrane and on the origin of ultrashort T2 signals in cerebral white matter. The agreement between MT orientation effects and corresponding forward simulations using empirical diffusion imaging results as input as well as results from fits employing the novel lineshape support previous suggestions that the fiber orientation distribution in a voxel can be modeled as a scaled Bingham distribution. PMID:25862261

  4. Altered white matter architecture in BDNF met carriers.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Erik; Foret, Ariane; Mascetti, Laura; Muto, Vincenzo; Le Bourdiec-Shaffii, Anahita; Stender, Johan; Balteau, Evelyne; Dideberg, Vinciane; Bours, Vincent; Maquet, Pierre; Phillips, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates the pruning of synaptically silent axonal arbors. The Met allele of the BDNF gene is associated with a reduction in the neurotrophin's activity-dependent release. We used diffusion-weighted imaging to construct structural brain networks for 36 healthy subjects with known BDNF genotypes. Through permutation testing we discovered clear differences in connection strength between subjects carrying the Met allele and those homozygotic for the Val allele. We trained a Gaussian process classifier capable of identifying the subjects' allelic group with 86% accuracy and high predictive value. In Met carriers structural connectivity was greatly increased throughout the forebrain, particularly in connections corresponding to the anterior and superior corona radiata as well as corticothalamic and corticospinal projections from the sensorimotor, premotor, and prefrontal portions of the internal capsule. Interhemispheric connectivity was also increased via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure, and extremely high connectivity values were found between inferior medial frontal polar regions via the anterior forceps. We propose that the decreased availability of BDNF leads to deficits in axonal maintenance in carriers of the Met allele, and that this produces mesoscale changes in white matter architecture. PMID:23935975

  5. Myelin vs Axon Abnormalities in White Matter in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E; Ongür, Dost; Sperry, Sarah H; Cohen, Bruce M; Sehovic, Selma; Goldbach, Jacqueline R; Du, Fei

    2015-01-01

    White matter (WM) abnormalities are among the most commonly reported neuroimaging findings in bipolar disorder. Nonetheless, the specific nature and pathophysiology of these abnormalities remain unclear. Use of a combination of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and diffusion tensor spectroscopy (DTS) permits examination of myelin and axon abnormalities separately. We aimed to examine myelination and axon geometry in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder with psychosis (BDP) by combining these two complementary noninvasive MRI techniques. We applied a combined MRI approach using MTR to study myelin content and DTS to study metabolite (N-acetylaspartate, NAA) diffusion within axons in patients with BDP (n=21) and healthy controls (n=24). Data were collected from a 1 × 3 × 3-cm voxel within the right prefrontal cortex WM at 4 Tesla. Clinical and cognitive data were examined in association with MTR and DTS data. MTR was significantly reduced in BDP, suggesting reduced myelin content. The apparent diffusion coefficient of NAA did not differ from healthy controls, suggesting no changes in axon geometry in patients with BDP. These findings suggest that patients with BDP exhibit reduced myelin content, but no changes in axon geometry compared with controls. These findings are in contrast with our recent findings, using the same techniques, in patients with schizophrenia (SZ), which suggest both myelination and axon abnormalities in SZ. This difference may indicate that alterations in WM in BDP may have unique causes and may be less extensive than WM abnormalities seen in SZ. PMID:25409595

  6. Spatial characteristics of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    White, Tonya; Ehrlich, Stefan; Ho, Beng-Choon; Manoach, Dara S; Caprihan, Arvind; Schulz, S Charles; Andreasen, Nancy C; Gollub, Randy L; Calhoun, Vince D; Magnotta, Vincent A

    2013-09-01

    There is considerable evidence implicating brain white matter (WM) abnormalities in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; however, the spatial localization of WM abnormalities reported in the existing studies is heterogeneous. Thus, the goal of this study was to quantify the spatial characteristics of WM abnormalities in schizophrenia. One hundred and fourteen patients with schizophrenia and 138 matched controls participated in this multisite study involving the Universities of Iowa, Minnesota, and New Mexico, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. We measured fractional anisotropy (FA) in brain WM regions extracted using 3 different image-processing algorithms: regions of interest, tract-based spatial statistics, and the pothole approach. We found that FA was significantly lower in patients using each of the 3 image-processing algorithms. The region-of-interest approach showed multiple regions with lower FA in patients with schizophrenia, with overlap at all 4 sites in the corpus callosum and posterior thalamic radiation. The tract-based spatial statistic approach showed (1) global differences in 3 of the 4 cohorts and (2) lower frontal FA at the Iowa site. Finally, the pothole approach showed a significantly greater number of WM potholes in patients compared to controls at each of the 4 sites. In conclusion, the spatial characteristics of WM abnormalities in schizophrenia reflect a combination of a global low-level decrease in FA, suggesting a diffuse process, coupled with widely dispersed focal reductions in FA that vary spatially among individuals (ie, potholes). PMID:22987296

  7. Sexual dimorphism in the white matter of rodents

    PubMed Central

    Cerghet, Mirela; Skoff, Robert P.; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Bessert, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism of astrocytes and neurons is well documented in many brain and spinal cord structures. Sexual dimorphism of oligodendrocytes (Olgs) and myelin has received less attention. We recently showed that density of Olgs in corpus callosum, fornix, and spinal cord of wild-type male rodents are more densely packed than in females; myelin proteins and myelin gene expression is likewise greater in males than in female rodents. However, glial cell proliferation and cell death were two times greater in female corpus callosum. Endogenous sex hormones, specifically lack of androgens, produce an Olg female phenotype in castrated male mouse. In vitro studies using Olgs culture also showed differences between males and females Olg survival and signaling pathways in response to sexual hormones. Sexual dimorphism of white matter tracts and glia in rodents indicates the necessity for controlling gender in experimental studies of neurodegenerative disorders. Most importantly, our studies suggest that hormones may contribute to sexual dimorphism observed in certain human diseases including multiple sclerosis. PMID:19625027

  8. The Classical Pathways of Occipital Lobe Epileptic Propagation Revised in the Light of White Matter Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Francesco; Hjortberg, Mats; Aldskogius, Håkan; Ryttlefors, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The clinical evidences of variable epileptic propagation in occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) have been demonstrated by several studies. However the exact localization of the epileptic focus sometimes represents a problem because of the rapid propagation to frontal, parietal, or temporal regions. Each white matter pathway close to the supposed initial focus can lead the propagation towards a specific direction, explaining the variable semiology of these rare epilepsy syndromes. Some new insights in occipital white matter anatomy are herein described by means of white matter dissection and compared to the classical epileptic patterns, mostly based on the central position of the primary visual cortex. The dissections showed a complex white matter architecture composed by vertical and longitudinal bundles, which are closely interconnected and segregated and are able to support specific high order functions with parallel bidirectional propagation of the electric signal. The same sublobar lesions may hyperactivate different white matter bundles reemphasizing the importance of the ictal semiology as a specific clinical demonstration of the subcortical networks recruited. Merging semiology, white matter anatomy, and electrophysiology may lead us to a better understanding of these complex syndromes and tailored therapeutic options based on individual white matter connectivity. PMID:26063964

  9. White matter integrity in older females is altered by increased body fat

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lee; Walther, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the pattern of diffusion changes among a cohort of individuals showing BMI-related increases in white matter volume reflects healthy expansion of myelin or damaged white matter. Design and Methods Diffusion MRI measures (axial, radial, and fractional anisotropy) were obtained from 94 females, ages 52–92. Relationships between BMI and diffusion measures were assessed controlling for age, hypertension, and diabetes status using general linear modelling. Associations between diffusion measures and cognitive status (memory, executive functions, and visuomotor speed) were assessed using multiple regressions, controlling for age, education, hypertension, and diabetes status. Results Higher levels of BMI were associated with lower axial diffusion in frontal, temporal, parietal, internal capsule, and cerebellar white matter. Lower fractional anisotropy was observed in bilateral temporal white matter and the right corticospinal tract, with high radial diffusion in temporal and temporoparietal white matter. Importantly, diffusion measures predicted reductions in executive functioning, memory, and visuomotor speed. Conclusions The pattern of diffusion changes in regions of white matter showing BMI-related volume increases are not due to expansion of normal myelin, but instead suggest damage to white matter that has important consequences for cognitive functioning. PMID:24957741

  10. White Matter Changes in Tinnitus: Is It All Age and Hearing Loss?

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hye Bin; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-02-01

    Tinnitus is a condition characterized by the perception of auditory phantom sounds. It is known as the result of complex interactions between auditory and nonauditory regions. However, previous structural imaging studies on tinnitus patients showed evidence of significant white matter changes caused by hearing loss that are positively correlated with aging. Current study focused on which aspects of tinnitus pathologies affect the white matter integrity the most. We used the diffusion tensor imaging technique to acquire images that have higher contrast in brain white matter to analyze how white matter is influenced by tinnitus-related factors using voxel-based methods, region of interest analysis, and deterministic tractography. As a result, white matter integrity in chronic tinnitus patients was both directly affected by age and also mediated by the hearing loss. The most important changes in white matter regions were found bilaterally in the anterior corona radiata, anterior corpus callosum, and bilateral sagittal strata. In the tractography analysis, the white matter integrity values in tracts of right parahippocampus were correlated with the subjective tinnitus loudness. PMID:26477359

  11. Frontal White Matter Volume Is Associated with Brain Enlargement and Higher Structural Connectivity in Anthropoid Primates

    PubMed Central

    Smaers, Jeroen Bert; Schleicher, Axel; Zilles, Karl; Vinicius, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated the importance of the frontal lobe and its ‘executive’ connections to other brain structures as crucial in explaining primate neocortical adaptations. However, a representative sample of volumetric measurements of frontal connective tissue (white matter) has not been available. In this study, we present new volumetric measurements of white and grey matter in the frontal and non-frontal neocortical lobes from 18 anthropoid species. We analyze this data in the context of existing theories of neocortex, frontal lobe and white versus grey matter hyperscaling. Results indicate that the ‘universal scaling law’ of neocortical white to grey matter applies separately for frontal and non-frontal lobes; that hyperscaling of both neocortex and frontal lobe to rest of brain is mainly due to frontal white matter; and that changes in frontal (but not non-frontal) white matter volume are associated with changes in rest of brain and basal ganglia, a group of subcortical nuclei functionally linked to ‘executive control’. Results suggest a central role for frontal white matter in explaining neocortex and frontal lobe hyperscaling, brain size variation and higher neural structural connectivity in anthropoids. PMID:20161758

  12. Investigating the Microstructural Correlation of White Matter in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Dean, Douglas C; Travers, Brittany G; Adluru, Nagesh; Tromp, Do P M; Destiche, Daniel J; Samsin, Danica; Prigge, Molly B; Zielinski, Brandon A; Fletcher, P Thomas; Anderson, Jeffrey S; Froehlich, Alyson L; Bigler, Erin D; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E; Alexander, Andrew L

    2016-06-01

    White matter microstructure forms a complex and dynamical system that is critical for efficient and synchronized brain function. Neuroimaging findings in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggest this condition is associated with altered white matter microstructure, which may lead to atypical macroscale brain connectivity. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging measures to examine the extent that white matter tracts are interrelated within ASD and typical development. We assessed the strength of inter-regional white matter correlations between typically developing and ASD diagnosed individuals. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, clustering patterns of the pairwise white matter correlations were constructed and revealed to be different between the two groups. Additionally, we explored the use of graph theory analysis to examine the characteristics of the patterns formed by inter-regional white matter correlations and compared these properties between ASD and typical development. We demonstrate that the ASD sample has significantly less coherence in white matter microstructure across the brain compared to that in the typical development sample. The ASD group also presented altered topological characteristics, which may implicate less efficient brain networking in ASD. These findings highlight the potential of graph theory based network characteristics to describe the underlying networks as measured by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and furthermore indicates that ASD may be associated with altered brain network characteristics. Our findings are consistent with those of a growing number of studies and hypotheses that have suggested disrupted brain connectivity in ASD. PMID:27021440

  13. Altered tract-specific white matter microstructure is related to poorer cognitive performance: The Rotterdam Study.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Lotte G M; de Groot, Marius; Hofman, Albert; Krestin, Gabriel P; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-03-01

    White matter microstructural integrity has been related to cognition. Yet, the potential role of specific white matter tracts on top of a global white matter effect remains unclear, especially when considering specific cognitive domains. Therefore, we determined the tract-specific effect of white matter microstructure on global cognition and specific cognitive domains. In 4400 nondemented and stroke-free participants (mean age 63.7 years, 55.5% women), we obtained diffusion magnetic resonance imaging parameters (fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity) in 14 white matter tracts using probabilistic tractography and assessed cognitive performance with a cognitive test battery. Tract-specific white matter microstructure in all supratentorial tracts was associated with poorer global cognition. Lower fractional anisotropy in association tracts, primarily the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and higher mean diffusivity in projection tracts, in particular the posterior thalamic radiation, most strongly related to poorer cognition. Altered white matter microstructure related to poorer information processing speed, executive functioning, and motor speed, but not to memory. Tract-specific microstructural changes may aid in better understanding the mechanism of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26923407

  14. White Matter Integrity and Pictorial Reasoning in High-Functioning Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, Chérif P.; Belliveau, John W.; Mody, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the neurobiological role of white matter in visuospatial versus linguistic processing abilities in autism using diffusion tensor imaging. We examined differences in white matter integrity between high-functioning children with autism (HFA) and typically developing controls (CTRL), in relation to the groups’ response times (RT) on a pictorial reasoning task under three conditions: visuospatial, V, semantic, S, and V+S, a hybrid condition allowing language use to facilitate visuospatial transformations. Diffusion-weighted images were collected from HFA and CTRL participants, matched on age and IQ, and significance maps were computed for group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) and in RT-FA association for each condition. Typically developing children showed increased FA within frontal white matter and the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). HFA showed increased FA within peripheral white matter, including the ventral temporal lobe. Additionally, RT-FA relationships in the semantic condition (S) implicated white matter near the STG and in the SLF within the temporal and frontal lobes to a greater extent in CTRL. Performance in visuospatial reasoning (V, V+S), in comparison, was related to peripheral parietal and superior precentral white matter in HFA, but to the SLF, callosal, and frontal white matter in CTRL. Our results appear to support a preferential use of linguistically-mediated pathways in reasoning by typically-developing children, whereas autistic cognition may rely more on visuospatial processing networks. PMID:20542370

  15. REGIONAL WHITE MATTER VOLUME DIFFERENCES IN NONDEMENTED AGING AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Salat, David H.; Greve, Douglas N.; Pacheco, Jennifer L.; Quinn, Brian T.; Helmer, Karl G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Fischl, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that altered cerebral white matter (WM) influences normal aging, and further that WM degeneration may modulate the clinical expression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we conducted a study of differences in WM volume across the adult age span and in AD employing a newly developed, automated method for regional parcellation of the subcortical WM that uses curvature landmarks and gray matter (GM)/WM surface boundary information. This procedure measures the volume of gyral WM, utilizing a distance constraint to limit the measurements from extending into the centrum semiovale. Regional estimates were first established to be reliable across two scan sessions in 20 young healthy individuals. Next, the method was applied to a large clinically-characterized sample of 299 individuals including 73 normal older adults and 91 age-matched participants with very mild to mild AD. The majority of measured regions showed a decline in volume with increasing age, with strong effects found in bilateral fusiform, lateral orbitofrontal, superior frontal, medial orbital frontal, inferior temporal, and middle temporal WM. The association between WM volume and age was quadratic in many regions suggesting that WM volume loss accelerates in advanced aging. A number of WM regions were further reduced in AD with parahippocampal, entorhinal, inferior parietal and rostral middle frontal WM showing the strongest AD-associated reductions. There were minimal sex effects after correction for intracranial volume, and there were associations between ventricular volume and regional WM volumes in the older adults and AD that were not apparent in the younger adults. Certain results, such as the loss of WM in the fusiform region with aging, were unexpected and provide novel insight into patterns of age associated neural and cognitive decline. Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of automated regional WM measures in revealing the distinct patterns of age and AD

  16. White matter alterations in narcolepsy patients with cataplexy: tract-based spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Park, Yun K; Kwon, Oh-Hun; Joo, Eun Yeon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Jong M; Kim, Sung T; Hong, Seung B

    2016-04-01

    Functional imaging studies and voxel-based morphometry analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormalities in the hypothalamus-thalamus-orbitofrontal pathway, demonstrating altered hypocretin pathway in narcolepsy. Those distinct morphometric changes account for problems in wake-sleep control, attention and memory. It also raised the necessity to evaluate white matter changes. To investigate brain white matter alterations in drug-naïve narcolepsy patients with cataplexy and to explore relationships between white matter changes and patient clinical characteristics, drug-naïve narcolepsy patients with cataplexy (n = 22) and healthy age- and gender-matched controls (n = 26) were studied. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity images were obtained from whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging, and tract-based spatial statistics were used to localize white matter abnormalities. Compared with controls, patients showed significant decreases in fractional anisotropy of white matter of the bilateral anterior cingulate, fronto-orbital area, frontal lobe, anterior limb of the internal capsule and corpus callosum, as well as the left anterior and medial thalamus. Patients and controls showed no differences in mean diffusivity. Among patients, mean diffusivity values of white matter in the bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral fronto-orbital gyri and right superior parietal gyrus were positively correlated with depressive mood. This tract-based spatial statistics study demonstrated that drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy had reduced fractional anisotropy of white matter in multiple brain areas and significant relationship between increased mean diffusivity of white matter in frontal/cingulate and depression. It suggests the widespread disruption of white matter integrity and prevalent brain degeneration of frontal lobes according to a depressive symptom in narcolepsy. PMID:26610427

  17. White matter microstructure alterations: a study of alcoholics with and without post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Durkee, Caitlin A; Sarlls, Joelle E; Hommer, Daniel W; Momenan, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Many brain imaging studies have demonstrated reductions in gray and white matter volumes in alcoholism, with fewer investigators using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine the integrity of white matter pathways. Among various medical conditions, alcoholism and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are two comorbid diseases that have similar degenerative effects on the white matter integrity. Therefore, understanding and differentiating these effects would be very important in characterizing alcoholism and PTSD. Alcoholics are known to have neurocognitive deficits in decision-making, particularly in decisions related to emotionally-motivated behavior, while individuals with PTSD have deficits in emotional regulation and enhanced fear response. It is widely believed that these types of abnormalities in both alcoholism and PTSD are related to fronto-limbic dysfunction. In addition, previous studies have shown cortico-limbic fiber degradation through fiber tracking in alcoholism. DTI was used to measure white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), which provides information about tissue microstructure, possibly indicating white matter integrity. We quantitatively investigated the microstructure of white matter through whole brain DTI analysis in healthy volunteers (HV) and alcohol dependent subjects without PTSD (ALC) and with PTSD (ALC+PTSD). These data show significant differences in FA between alcoholics and non-alcoholic HVs, with no significant differences in FA between ALC and ALC+PTSD in any white matter structure. We performed a post-hoc region of interest analysis that allowed us to incorporate multiple covariates into the analysis and found similar results. HV had higher FA in several areas implicated in the reward circuit, emotion, and executive functioning, suggesting that there may be microstructural abnormalities in white matter pathways that contribute to neurocognitive and executive functioning deficits observed in alcoholics. Furthermore, our data do

  18. White matter hyperintensities, systemic inflammation, brain growth, and cognitive functions in children exposed to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Styner, Martin; Gómez-Garza, Gilberto; Zhu, Hongtu; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Carlos, Esperanza; Solorio-López, Edelmira; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Kavanaugh, Michael; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures are linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology in young urbanites. Forty percent of exposed children and young adults exhibit frontal tau hyperphosphorylation and 51% have amyloid-β diffuse plaques compared to 0% in low pollution controls. In older adults, white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with cognitive deficits while inflammatory markers correlate with greater atrophy than expected for age. We investigated patterns of WMH, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volume growth, blood inflammatory mediators, and cognition in matched children from two urban cohorts: one severely and one minimally exposed to air pollution. Baseline and one year follow-up measurements of cognitive abilities, brain MRI volumes, and blood were collected in 20 Mexico City (MC) children (10 with WMH+, and 10 without WMH-) and 10 matched controls (WMH-). MC WMH- children display the profile of classical pro-inflammatory defensive responses: high interleukin 12, production of powerful pro-inflammatory cytokines, and low concentrations of key cytokines and chemokines associated with neuroprotection. MC WMH+ children exhibit a response involved in resolution of inflammation, immunoregulation, and tissue remodeling. The MC WMH+ group responded to the air pollution-associated brain volumetric alterations with white and grey matter volume increases in temporal, parietal, and frontal regions and better cognitive performance compared to MC WMH-. We conclude that complex modulation of cytokines and chemokines influences children's central nervous system structural and volumetric responses and cognitive correlates resulting from environmental pollution exposures. Identification of biomarkers associating systemic inflammation to brain growth is critical for detecting children at higher risk for cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration, thereby warranting early implementation of neuroprotective measures. PMID:22531421

  19. A voxel-based morphometric study of age- and sex-related changes in white matter volume in the normal aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haijing; Wang, Lixin; Geng, Zuojun; Zhu, Qingfeng; Song, Zhenhu; Chang, Ruiting; Lv, Huandi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To carry out a cross-sectional study of 187 cognitively normal Chinese adults using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) approach to delineate age-related changes in the white matter volume of regions of interest in the brain and further analyze their correlation with age. Materials and methods A total of 187 cognitively normal adults were divided into the young, middle, and old age-groups. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with the Achieva 3.0 T system. Structural images were processed using VBM8 and statistical parametric mapping 8. Regions of interest were obtained by WFU PickAtlas, and all realigned images were spatially normalized. Results Females showed significantly greater total white matter volume than males (t=2.36, P=0.0096, false-discovery rate [FDR] corrected). VBM demonstrated statistically significant age-related differences in white matter volume between the young age-group and the middle age-group (P<0.05, FDR corrected) and between the middle age-group and the old age-group (P<0.05, FDR corrected). No interaction was found between age and sex on white matter volume (P<0.05, FDR corrected). Logistic regression analysis revealed nonlinear correlation between total white matter volume and age (R2=0.124, P<0.001). White matter volume gradually increased before 40 years of age, peaked around 50 years of age, and rapidly declined after 60 years of age. Conclusion Significant age-related differences are present in white matter volume across multiple brain regions during aging. The VBM approach may help differentiate underlying normal neurobiological aging changes of specific brain regions from neurodegenerative impairments. PMID:26966366

  20. Periventricular white matter abnormalities and restricted repetitive behavior in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, Karen; Ben-Avi, Emma; Wang, Xiuyuan; Pardoe, Heath R.; Di Martino, Adriana; Halgren, Eric; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas; Kuzniecky, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are found at higher rates in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) than in healthy controls on postmortem neuropathological evaluation but are more variably observed on visual review of in-vivo MRI brain scans. This may be due to the visually elusive nature of many malformations on MRI. Here, we utilize a quantitative approach to determine whether a volumetric measure of heterotopic gray matter in the white matter is elevated in people with ASD, relative to typically developing controls (TDC). Data from a primary sample of 48 children/young adults with ASD and 48 age-, and gender-matched TDCs, selected from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) open-access database, were analyzed to compare groups on (1) blinded review of high-resolution T1-weighted research sequences; and (2) quantitative measurement of white matter hypointensity (WMH) volume calculated from the same T1-weighted scans. Groupwise WMH volume comparisons were repeated in an independent, multi-site sample (80 ASD/80 TDC), also selected from ABIDE. Visual review resulted in equivalent proportions of imaging abnormalities in the ASD and TDC group. However, quantitative analysis revealed elevated periventricular and deep subcortical WMH volumes in ASD. This finding was replicated in the independent, multi-site sample. Periventricular WMH volume was not associated with age but was associated with greater restricted repetitive behaviors on both parent-reported and clinician-rated assessment inventories. Thus, findings demonstrate that periventricular WMH volume is elevated in ASD and associated with a higher degree of repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. Although the etiology of focal WMH clusters is unknown, the absence of age effects suggests that they may reflect a static anomaly. PMID:26693400

  1. DTI and VBM reveal white matter changes without associated gray matter changes in patients with idiopathic restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Belke, Marcus; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Keil, Boris; Rosenow, Felix; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Stiasny-Kolster, Karin; Knake, Susanne; Menzler, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We evaluated cerebral white and gray matter changes in patients with iRLS in order to shed light on the pathophysiology of this disease. Methods Twelve patients with iRLS were compared to 12 age- and sex-matched controls using whole-head diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) techniques. Evaluation of the DTI scans included the voxelwise analysis of the fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). Results Diffusion tensor imaging revealed areas of altered FA in subcortical white matter bilaterally, mainly in temporal regions as well as in the right internal capsule, the pons, and the right cerebellum. These changes overlapped with changes in RD. Voxel-based morphometry did not reveal any gray matter alterations. Conclusions We showed altered diffusion properties in several white matter regions in patients with iRLS. White matter changes could mainly be attributed to changes in RD, a parameter thought to reflect altered myelination. Areas with altered white matter microstructure included areas in the internal capsule which include the corticospinal tract to the lower limbs, thereby supporting studies that suggest changes in sensorimotor pathways associated with RLS. PMID:26442748

  2. Unsupervised white matter fiber clustering and tract probability map generation: applications of a Gaussian process framework for white matter fibers.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, D; Bloy, L; Kanterakis, E; Verma, R; Deriche, R

    2010-05-15

    With the increasing importance of fiber tracking in diffusion tensor images for clinical needs, there has been a growing demand for an objective mathematical framework to perform quantitative analysis of white matter fiber bundles incorporating their underlying physical significance. This article presents such a novel mathematical framework that facilitates mathematical operations between tracts using an inner product between fibres. Such inner product operation, based on Gaussian processes, spans a metric space. This metric facilitates combination of fiber tracts, rendering operations like tract membership to a bundle or bundle similarity simple. Based on this framework, we have designed an automated unsupervised atlas-based clustering method that does not require manual initialization nor an a priori knowledge of the number of clusters. Quantitative analysis can now be performed on the clustered tract volumes across subjects, thereby avoiding the need for point parameterization of these fibers, or the use of medial or envelope representations as in previous work. Experiments on synthetic data demonstrate the mathematical operations. Subsequently, the applicability of the unsupervised clustering framework has been demonstrated on a 21-subject dataset. PMID:20079439

  3. Age-Related Modifications of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters and White Matter Hyperintensities as Inter-Dependent Processes

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Periot, Olivier; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Hiba, Bassem; Bordessoules, Martine; Chanraud, Sandra; Pérès, Karine; Amieva, Hélène; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2016-01-01

    Microstructural changes of White Matter (WM) associated with aging have been widely described through Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) parameters. In parallel, White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH) as observed on a T2-weighted MRI are extremely common in older individuals. However, few studies have investigated both phenomena conjointly. The present study investigates aging effects on DTI parameters in absence and in presence of WMH. Diffusion maps were constructed based on 21 directions DTI scans of young adults (n = 19, mean age = 33 SD = 7.4) and two age-matched groups of older adults, one presenting low-level-WMH (n = 20, mean age = 78, SD = 3.2) and one presenting high-level-WMH (n = 20, mean age = 79, SD = 5.4). Older subjects with low-level-WMH presented modifications of DTI parameters in comparison to younger subjects, fitting with the DTI pattern classically described in aging, i.e., Fractional Anisotropy (FA) decrease/Radial Diffusivity (RD) increase. Furthermore, older subjects with high-level-WMH showed higher DTI modifications in Normal Appearing White Matter (NAWM) in comparison to those with low-level-WMH. Finally, in older subjects with high-level-WMH, FA, and RD values of NAWM were associated with to WMH burden. Therefore, our findings suggest that DTI modifications and the presence of WMH would be two inter-dependent processes but occurring within different temporal windows. DTI changes would reflect the early phase of white matter changes and WMH would appear as a consequence of those changes. PMID:26834625

  4. Do Inequalities in Adult Learning Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Fiona; Iain Murray; Berry, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) Adult Participation in Learning Survey 10 years ago showed that two-fifths of the adult population said that they had taken part in learning in the last three years. A decade later, the 2012 survey shows that little has changed--active participation in learning remains a minority…

  5. The role of pre-treatment white matter abnormalities in developing white matter changes following whole brain radiation: a volumetric study.

    PubMed

    Sabsevitz, David S; Bovi, Joseph A; Leo, Peter D; Laviolette, Peter S; Rand, Scott D; Mueller, Wade M; Schultz, Christopher J

    2013-09-01

    White matter injury is a known complication of whole brain radiation (WBRT). Little is known about the factors that predispose a patient to such injury. The current study used MR volumetrics to examine risk factors, in particular the influence of pre-treatment white matter health, in developing white matter change (WMC) following WBRT. Thirty-four patients with unilateral metastatic disease underwent FLAIR MRI pre-treatment and at several time points following treatment. The volume of abnormal FLAIR signal in the white matter was measured in the hemisphere contralateral to the diseased hemisphere at each time point. Analyses were restricted to the uninvolved hemisphere to allow for the measurement of WBRT effects without the potential confounding effects of the disease on imaging findings. The relationship between select pre-treatment clinical variables and the degree of WMC following treatment was examined using correlational and regression based analyses. Age when treated and volume of abnormal FLAIR prior to treatment were significantly associated with WMC following WBRT; however, pre-treatment FLAIR volume was the strongest predictor of post-treatment WMCs. Age did not add any predictive value once white matter status was considered. No significant relationships were found between biological equivalent dose and select cerebrovascular risk factors (total glucose, blood pressure, BMI) and development of WMCs. The findings from this study identify pre-treatment white matter health as an important risk factor in developing WMC following WBRT. This information can be used to make more informed decisions and counsel patients on their risk for treatment effects. PMID:23813291

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Volumetric Analysis: Novel Tools to Study the Effects of Thyroid Hormone Disruption on White Matter Development

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Michael H.; Van Nguyen, Hao; Gilbert, Mary; Parekh, Mansi; Colon-Perez, Luis M.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Montie, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Humans and wildlife are exposed to environmental pollutants that have been shown to interfere with the thyroid hormone system and thus may affect brain development. Our goal was to expose pregnant rats to propylthiouracil (PTU) to measure the effects of a goitrogen on white matter development in offspring using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and volumetric analysis. We exposed pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD) rats to 3 or 10 ppm PTU from gestation day 7 (GD7) until postnatal day 25 (P25) to determine the effects on white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and hippocampus volumes in offspring. We sacrificed offspring at P25 but continued the life of some offspring to P90 to measure persistent effects in adult animals. P25 offspring exposed to 10 ppm PTU displayed lowered levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4); cerebral WM, GM, and total brain volumes were significantly lower than the volumes in control animals. P90 adults exposed to 10 ppm PTU displayed normal T3 levels but lowered T4 levels; WM, GM, total brain, and hippocampal volumes were significantly lower than the volumes in control adults. Both P25 and P90 rats exposed to 10 ppm PTU displayed significant reductions in percent WM as well as heterotopias in the corpus callosum. Exposure to 3 ppm PTU did not produce any significant effects. These results suggest that MRI coupled with volumetric analysis is a powerful tool in assessing the effects of thyroid hormone disruption on white matter development and brain structure. This approach holds great promise in assessing neurotoxicity of xenobiotics in humans and wildlife. PMID:22975424

  7. Breastfeeding and early white matter development: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Piryatinsky, Irene; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Waskiewicz, Nicole; Lehman, Katie; Han, Michelle; Dirks, Holly

    2013-11-15

    Does breastfeeding alter early brain development? The prevailing consensus from large epidemiological studies posits that early exclusive breastfeeding is associated with improved measures of IQ and cognitive functioning in later childhood and adolescence. Prior morphometric brain imaging studies support these findings, revealing increased white matter and sub-cortical gray matter volume, and parietal lobe cortical thickness, associated with IQ, in adolescents who were breastfed as infants compared to those who were exclusively formula-fed. Yet it remains unknown when these structural differences first manifest and when developmental differences that predict later performance improvements can be detected. In this study, we used quiet magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to compare measures of white matter microstructure (mcDESPOT measures of myelin water fraction) in 133 healthy children from 10 months through 4 years of age, who were either exclusively breastfed a minimum of 3 months; exclusively formula-fed; or received a mixture of breast milk and formula. We also examined the relationship between breastfeeding duration and white matter microstructure. Breastfed children exhibited increased white matter development in later maturing frontal and association brain regions. Positive relationships between white matter microstructure and breastfeeding duration are also exhibited in several brain regions, that are anatomically consistent with observed improvements in cognitive and behavioral performance measures. While the mechanisms underlying these structural differences remains unclear, our findings provide new insight into the earliest developmental advantages associated with breastfeeding, and support the hypothesis that breast milk constituents promote healthy neural growth and white matter development. PMID:23721722

  8. Probing dark matter crests with white dwarfs and IMBHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, P.; Casanellas, J.; Schödel, R.; Davidson, E.; Cuadra, J.

    2016-06-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) are the most promising captors of dark matter (DM) particles in the crests that are expected to build up in the cores of dense stellar clusters. The DM particles could reach sufficient densities in WD cores to liberate energy through self-annihilation. The extinction associated with our Galactic Centre makes it impossible to detect the potential-associated luminosities, contrary to smaller stellar systems which are close enough to us and not heavily extincted, such as -Cen. We investigate the prospects of detection of DM-burning WDs in a stellar cluster harbouring an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH), which leads to higher densities of DM at the centre. We calculate the capture rate and estimate the luminosity that a WD would emit depending on its distance to the centre of the cluster. Direct-summation N-body simulations of -Cen yield a non-negligible number of WDs in the range of radii of interest. We apply our assumption to published Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of stars in the centre of -Cen and, although we are not able to identify any evident candidate, we proof that their bunching up at high luminosities would be unique. We predict that DM burning will lead to a truncation of the cooling sequence at the faint end. The detection of DM burning in future observations of dense stellar clusters could allow us to probe different models of DM distributions and characteristics. On the other hand, if DM-burning WDs really exist, their number and properties could give hints to the existence of IMBHs.

  9. Candidate-gene analysis of white matter hyperintensities on neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Theresa; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Yadav, Sunaina; Hasan, Nazeeha; Bentley, Paul; Levi, Christopher; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F; Rost, Natalia; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are a common radiographic finding and may be a useful endophenotype for small vessel diseases. Given high heritability of WMH, we hypothesised that certain genotypes may predispose individuals to these lesions and consequently, to an increased risk of stroke, dementia and death. We performed a meta-analysis of studies investigating candidate genes and WMH to elucidate the genetic susceptibility to WMH and tested associated variants in a new independent WMH cohort. We assessed a causal relationship of WMH to methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Methods Database searches through March 2014 were undertaken and studies investigating candidate genes in WMH were assessed. Associated variants were tested in a new independent ischaemic cohort of 1202 WMH patients. Mendelian randomization was undertaken to assess a causal relationship between WMH and MTHFR. Results We identified 43 case-control studies interrogating eight polymorphisms in seven genes covering 6,314 WMH cases and 15,461 controls. Fixed-effects meta-analysis found that the C-allele containing genotypes of the aldosterone synthase CYP11B2 T(−344)C gene polymorphism were associated with a decreased risk of WMH (OR=0.61; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.84; p=0.003). Using mendelian randomisation the association among MTHFR C677T, homocysteine levels and WMH, approached, but did not reach, significance (expected OR=1.75; 95% CI, 0.90−3.41; observed OR=1.68; 95% CI, 0.97−2.94). Neither CYP11B2 T(−344)C nor MTHFR C677T were significantly associated when tested in a new independent cohort of 1202 patients with WMH. Conclusions There is a genetic basis to WMH but anonymous genome wide and exome studies are more likely to provide novel loci of interest. PMID:25835038

  10. Initial Incidence of White Matter Hyperintensities on MRI in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Jason; Sherman, Paul; McGuire, Steve; Kochunov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has described the increase in white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden associated with hypobaric exposure in the U-2 and altitude chamber operating personnel. Although astronauts have similar hypobaric exposure pressures to the U2 pilot population, astronauts have far fewer exposures and each exposure would be associated with a much lower level of decompression stress due to rigorous countermeasures to prevent decompression sickness. Therefore, we postulated that the WMH burden in the astronaut population would be less than in U2 pilots. Methods: Twenty-one post-flight de-identified astronaut MRIs (5 mm slice thickness FLAIR sequences) were evaluated for WMH count and volume. The only additional data provided was an age range of the astronauts (43-57) and if they had ever performed an EVA (13 yes, 8 no). Results: WMH count in these 21 astronaut MRI was 21.0 +/- 24.8 (mean+/- SD) and volume was 0.382 +/- 0.602 ml, which was significantly higher than previously published results for the U2 pilots. No significant differences between EVA and no EVA groups existed. Age range of astronaut population is not directly comparable to the U2 population. Discussion: With significantly less frequent (sometimes none) and less stressful hypobaric exposures, yet a much higher incidence of increased WMH, this indicates the possibility of additional mechanisms beyond hypobaric exposure. This increase unlikely to be attributable just to the differences in age between astronauts and U2 pilots. Forward work includes continuing review of post-flight MRI and evaluation of pre to post flight MRI changes if available. Data mining for potential WMH risk factors includes collection of age, sex, spaceflight experience, EVA hours, other hypobaric exposures, hyperoxic exposures, radiation, high performance aircraft experience and past medical history. Finally, neurocognitive and vision/eye results will be evaluated for any evidence of impairment linked to

  11. Clinical Prediction of Fall Risk and White Matter Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bang-Bon; Bergethon, Peter; Qiu, Wei Qiao; Scott, Tammy; Hussain, Mohammed; Rosenberg, Irwin; Caplan, Louis R.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as determined by the Tinetti scale, have specific patterns of WM abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging. Design, Setting, and Patients Community-based cohort of 125 homebound elderly individuals. Main Outcome Measures Diffusion tensor imaging scans were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics analysis to determine the location of WM abnormalities in subjects with Tinetti scale scores of 25 or higher (without risk of falls) and lower than 25 (with risk of falls). Multivariate linear least squares correlation analysis was performed to determine the association between Tinetti scale scores and local fractional anisotropy values on each skeletal voxel controlling for possible confounders. Results In subjects with risk of falls (Tinetti scale score <25), clusters of abnormal WM were seen in the medial frontal and parietal subcortical pathways, genu and splenium of corpus callosum, posterior cingulum, prefrontal and orbitofrontal pathways, and longitudinal pathways that connect frontal-parietal-temporal lobes. Among these abnormalities, those in medial frontal and parietal subcortical pathways correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores, while the other locations were unrelated to these scores. Conclusions Elderly individuals at risk for falls as determined by the Tinetti scale have WM abnormalities in specific locations on diffusion tensor imaging, some of which correlate with cognitive function scores. PMID:22332181

  12. White matter microstructural properties correlate with sensorimotor synchronization abilities.

    PubMed

    Blecher, Tal; Tal, Idan; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Sensorimotor synchronization (SMS) to an external auditory rhythm is a developed ability in humans, particularly evident in dancing and singing. This ability is typically measured in the lab via a simple task of finger tapping to an auditory beat. While simplistic, there is some evidence that poor performance on this task could be related to impaired phonological and reading abilities in children. Auditory-motor synchronization is hypothesized to rely on a tight coupling between auditory and motor neural systems, but the specific pathways that mediate this coupling have not been identified yet. In this study, we test this hypothesis and examine the contribution of fronto-temporal and callosal connections to specific measures of rhythmic synchronization. Twenty participants went through SMS and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) measurements. We quantified the mean asynchrony between an auditory beat and participants' finger taps, as well as the time to resynchronize (TTR) with an altered meter, and examined the correlations between these behavioral measures and diffusivity in a small set of predefined pathways. We found significant correlations between asynchrony and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left (but not right) arcuate fasciculus and in the temporal segment of the corpus callosum. On the other hand, TTR correlated with FA in the precentral segment of the callosum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that relates these particular white matter tracts with performance on an auditory-motor rhythmic synchronization task. We propose that left fronto-temporal and temporal-callosal fibers are involved in prediction and constant comparison between auditory inputs and motor commands, while inter-hemispheric connections between the motor/premotor cortices contribute to successful resynchronization of motor responses with a new external rhythm, perhaps via inhibition of tapping to the previous rhythm. Our results indicate that auditory

  13. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Joy T; Vaidya, Jatin G; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3717-3732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179962

  14. Mechanical properties of gray and white matter brain tissue by indentation

    PubMed Central

    Budday, Silvia; Nay, Richard; de Rooij, Rijk; Steinmann, Paul; Wyrobek, Thomas; Ovaert, Timothy C.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian brain is composed of an outer layer of gray matter, consisting of cell bodies, dendrites, and unmyelinated axons, and an inner core of white matter, consisting primarily of myelinated axons. Recent evidence suggests that microstructural differences between gray and white matter play an important role during neurodevelopment. While brain tissue as a whole is rheologically well characterized, the individual features of gray and white matter remain poorly understood. Here we quantify the mechanical properties of gray and white matter using a robust, reliable, and repeatable method, flat-punch indentation. To systematically characterize gray and white matter moduli for varying indenter diameters, loading rates, holding times, post-mortem times, and locations we performed a series of n=192 indentation tests. We found that indenting thick, intact coronal slices eliminates the common challenges associated with small specimens: it naturally minimizes boundary effects, dehydration, swelling, and structural degradation. When kept intact and hydrated, brain slices maintained their mechanical characteristics with standard deviations as low as 5% throughout the entire testing period of five days post mortem. White matter, with an average modulus of 1.895kPa±0.592kPa, was on average 39% stiffer than gray matter, p<0.01, with an average modulus of 1.389kPa±0.289kPa, and displayed larger regional variations. It was also more viscous than gray matter and responded less rapidly to mechanical loading. Understanding the rheological differences between gray and white matter may have direct implications on diagnosing and understanding the mechanical environment in neurodevelopment and neurological disorders. PMID:25819199

  15. Relationship between age and white matter integrity in children with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Wesonga, Erika; Shimony, Joshua S; Rutlin, Jerrel; Grange, Dorothy K; White, Desiree A

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown poorer microstructural white matter integrity in children with phenylketonuria (PKU), specifically decreases in mean diffusivity (MD), in comparison with healthy children. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the relationship between age and white matter integrity in this population. The present study examined group differences in the relationship between age and MD across a range of brain regions in 31 children with early- and continuously-treated PKU and 51 healthy control children. Relationships among MD, age, and group were explored using hierarchical linear regression and Pearson correlation. Results indicated a stronger age-related decrease in MD for children with PKU in comparison with healthy children in 4 of the 10 brain regions examined, suggesting that the trajectory of white matter development is abnormal in children with PKU. Further research using longitudinal methodology is needed to fully elucidate our understanding of white matter development in children with PKU. PMID:27114916

  16. Relationship between age and white matter integrity in children with phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Wesonga, Erika; Shimony, Joshua S.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Grange, Dorothy K.; White, Desiree A.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown poorer microstructural white matter integrity in children with phenylketonuria (PKU), specifically decreases in mean diffusivity (MD), in comparison with healthy children. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the relationship between age and white matter integrity in this population. The present study examined group differences in the relationship between age and MD across a range of brain regions in 31 children with early- and continuously-treated PKU and 51 healthy control children. Relationships among MD, age, and group were explored using hierarchical linear regression and Pearson correlation. Results indicated a stronger age-related decrease in MD for children with PKU in comparison with healthy children in 4 of the 10 brain regions examined, suggesting that the trajectory of white matter development is abnormal in children with PKU. Further research using longitudinal methodology is needed to fully elucidate our understanding of white matter development in children with PKU. PMID:27114916

  17. Cocaine addiction: diffusion tensor imaging study of the inferior frontal and anterior cingulate white matter.

    PubMed

    Romero, Maria J; Asensio, Samuel; Palau, Carmina; Sanchez, Amparo; Romero, Francisco J

    2010-01-30

    Inferior frontal and anterior cingulate white matter integrity in 32 cocaine-dependent subjects was compared with that in 33 age-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging data were acquired with a 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging system. Cocaine-dependent subjects presented significantly lower fractional anisotropy values in inferior frontal white matter at the anterior-posterior commissure plane and higher anterior cingulate white matter values than control subjects. White matter integrity was also associated with impulsivity and motivation to change (Readiness to Change Questionnaire). These findings support the hypothesis that cocaine dependence involves a disruption of orbitofrontal connectivity and suggest that the anterior cingulate brain area might play a role in the motivation to change. PMID:19959341

  18. White matter diffusion alterations in normal women at risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Charles D; Chebrolu, Himachandra; Andersen, Anders H; Powell, David A; Lovell, Mark A; Xiong, Shuling; Gold, Brian T

    2010-07-01

    Increased white matter mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) has been observed in subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to determine whether similar alterations of white matter occur in normal individuals at risk of AD. Diffusion tensor images were acquired in 42 cognitively normal right-handed women with both a family history of dementia and at least one apolipoprotein E4 allele. These were compared with images from 23 normal women without either AD risk factor. Group analyses were performed using tract-based spatial statistics. Reduced FA was observed in the fronto-occipital and inferior temporal fasciculi (particularly posteriorly), the splenium of the corpus callosum, subcallosal white matter and the cingulum bundle. These findings demonstrate that specific white matter pathways are altered in normal women at increased risk of AD years before the expected onset of cognitive symptoms. PMID:18801597

  19. Etiology-based classification of brain white matter hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Mariana; Rittner, Letícia; Appenzeller, Simone; Ruocco, Heloísa Helena; Lotufo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Brain white matter lesions found upon magnetic resonance imaging are often observed in psychiatric or neurological patients. Individuals with these lesions present a more significant cognitive impairment when compared with individuals without them. We propose a computerized method to distinguish tissue containing white matter lesions of different etiologies (e.g., demyelinating or ischemic) using texture-based classifiers. Texture attributes were extracted from manually selected regions of interest and used to train and test supervised classifiers. Experiments were conducted to evaluate texture attribute discrimination and classifiers’ performances. The most discriminating texture attributes were obtained from the gray-level histogram and from the co-occurrence matrix. The best classifier was the support vector machine, which achieved an accuracy of 87.9% in distinguishing lesions with different etiologies and an accuracy of 99.29% in distinguishing normal white matter from white matter lesions. PMID:26158080

  20. Etiology-based classification of brain white matter hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Leite, Mariana; Rittner, Letícia; Appenzeller, Simone; Ruocco, Heloísa Helena; Lotufo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Brain white matter lesions found upon magnetic resonance imaging are often observed in psychiatric or neurological patients. Individuals with these lesions present a more significant cognitive impairment when compared with individuals without them. We propose a computerized method to distinguish tissue containing white matter lesions of different etiologies (e.g., demyelinating or ischemic) using texture-based classifiers. Texture attributes were extracted from manually selected regions of interest and used to train and test supervised classifiers. Experiments were conducted to evaluate texture attribute discrimination and classifiers' performances. The most discriminating texture attributes were obtained from the gray-level histogram and from the co-occurrence matrix. The best classifier was the support vector machine, which achieved an accuracy of 87.9% in distinguishing lesions with different etiologies and an accuracy of 99.29% in distinguishing normal white matter from white matter lesions. PMID:26158080

  1. Overlapping and Distinct Gray and White Matter Abnormalities in Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Dana; Ardekani, Babak A.; Burdick, Katherine E.; Robinson, Delbert G.; John, Majnu; Malhotra, Anil K.; Szeszko, Philip R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may share common neurobiological mechanisms, but few studies have directly compared gray and white matter structure in these disorders. We used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a region-of-interest based analysis to identify overlapping and distinct gray and white matter abnormalities in 35 patients with schizophrenia and 20 patients with bipolar I disorder in comparison to 56 healthy volunteers. Methods We examined fractional anisotropy within the white matter and mean diffusivity within the gray matter in 42 regions-of-interest defined on a probabilistic atlas following non-linear registration of the images to atlas space. Results Patients with schizophrenia had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in temporal (superior temporal and parahippocampal) and occipital (superior and middle occipital) white matter compared to patients with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers. In contrast, both patient groups demonstrated significantly higher mean diffusivity in frontal (inferior frontal and lateral orbitofrontal) and temporal (superior temporal and parahippocampal) gray matter compared to healthy volunteers, but did not differ from each other. Discussion Our study implicates overlapping gray matter frontal and temporal lobe structural alterations in the neurobiology of schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder, but suggests that temporal and occipital lobe white matter deficits may be an additional risk factor for schizophrenia. Our findings may have relevance for future diagnostic classification systems and the identification of susceptibility genes for these disorders. PMID:23796123

  2. White Matter Integrity Supports BOLD Signal Variability and Cognitive Performance in the Aging Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Burzynska, Agnieszka Z.; Wong, Chelsea N.; Voss, Michelle W.; Cooke, Gillian E.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Decline in cognitive performance in old age is linked to both suboptimal neural processing in grey matter (GM) and reduced integrity of white matter (WM), but the whole-brain structure-function-cognition associations remain poorly understood. Here we apply a novel measure of GM processing–moment-to-moment variability in the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal (SDBOLD)—to study the associations between GM function during resting state, performance on four main cognitive domains (i.e., fluid intelligence, perceptual speed, episodic memory, vocabulary), and WM microstructural integrity in 91 healthy older adults (aged 60-80 years). We modeled the relations between whole-GM SDBOLD with cognitive performance using multivariate partial least squares analysis. We found that greater SDBOLD was associated with better fluid abilities and memory. Most of regions showing behaviorally relevant SDBOLD (e.g., precuneus and insula) were localized to inter- or intra-network “hubs” that connect and integrate segregated functional domains in the brain. Our results suggest that optimal dynamic range of neural processing in hub regions may support cognitive operations that specifically rely on the most flexible neural processing and complex cross-talk between different brain networks. Finally, we demonstrated that older adults with greater WM integrity in all major WM tracts had also greater SDBOLD and better performance on tests of memory and fluid abilities. We conclude that SDBOLD is a promising functional neural correlate of individual differences in cognition in healthy older adults and is supported by overall WM integrity. PMID:25853882

  3. White Matter Abnormalities in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Genetic Generalized Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Lee, Seongtaek; Allendorfer, Jane B; Gaston, Tyler E; Knowlton, Robert C; Pati, Sandipan; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W; Deutsch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) are associated with microstructural brain abnormalities that can be evaluated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Available studies on GGEs have conflicting results. Our primary goal was to compare the white matter structure in a cohort of patients with video/EEG-confirmed GGEs to healthy controls (HCs). Our secondary goal was to assess the potential effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter structure. MATERIAL AND METHODS A convenience sample of 23 patients with well-characterized treatment-resistant GGEs (13 female) was compared to 23 HCs. All participants received MRI at 3T. DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), were compared between groups using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). RESULTS After controlling for differences between groups, abnormalities in DTI parameters were observed in patients with GGEs, including decreases in functional anisotropy (FA) in the hemispheric (left>right) and brain stem white matter. The examination of the effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter integrity revealed a significant negative correlation in the left parietal white matter region FA (R=-0.504; p=0.017); similar trends were observed in the white matter underlying left motor cortex (R=-0.357; p=0.103) and left posterior limb of the internal capsule (R=-0.319; p=0.148). CONCLUSIONS Our study confirms the presence of widespread white matter abnormalities in patients with GGEs and provides evidence that the age at GGE onset may have an important effect on white matter integrity. PMID:27283395

  4. Alterations in white matter volume and integrity in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    van Bloemendaal, Liselotte; Ijzerman, Richard G; Ten Kulve, Jennifer S; Barkhof, Frederik; Diamant, Michaela; Veltman, Dick J; van Duinkerken, Eelco

    2016-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by obesity, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Both T2DM and obesity are associated with cerebral complications, including an increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, however the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In the current study, we aimed to determine the relative contributions of obesity and the presence of T2DM to altered white matter structure. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to measure white matter integrity and volume in obese T2DM patients without micro- or macrovascular complications, age- gender- and BMI-matched normoglycemic obese subjects and age- and gender-matched normoglycemic lean subjects. We found that obese T2DM patients compared with lean subjects had lower axial diffusivity (in the right corticospinal tract, right inferior fronto-occipital tract, right superior longitudinal fasciculus and right forceps major) and reduced white matter volume (in the right inferior parietal lobe and the left external capsule region). In normoglycemic obese compared with lean subjects axial diffusivity as well as white matter volume tended to be reduced, whereas there were no significant differences between normoglycemic obese subjects and T2DM patients. Decreased white matter integrity and volume were univariately related to higher age, being male, higher BMI, HbA1C and fasting glucose and insulin levels. However, multivariate analyses demonstrated that only BMI was independently related to white matter integrity, and age, gender and BMI to white matter volume loss. Our data indicate that obese T2DM patients have reduced white matter integrity and volume, but that this is largely explained by BMI, rather than T2DM per se. PMID:26815786

  5. Neonatal White Matter Abnormalities an Important Predictor of Neurocognitive Outcome for Very Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Lianne J.; Clark, Caron A. C.; Bora, Samudragupta; Inder, Terrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter abnormalities on term MRI are a strong predictor of motor disability in children born very preterm. However, their contribution to cognitive impairment is less certain. Objective Examine relationships between the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities on neonatal MRI and a range of neurocognitive outcomes assessed at ages 4 and 6 years. Design/Methods The study sample consisted of a regionally representative cohort of 104 very preterm (≤32 weeks gestation) infants born from 1998–2000 and a comparison group of 107 full-term infants. At term equivalent, all preterm infants underwent a structural MRI scan that was analyzed qualitatively for the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities, including cysts, signal abnormalities, loss of white matter volume, ventriculomegaly, and corpus callosal thinning/myelination. At corrected ages 4 and 6 years, all children underwent a comprehensive neurodevelopmental assessment that included measures of general intellectual ability, language development, and executive functioning. Results At 4 and 6 years, very preterm children without cerebral white matter abnormalities showed no apparent neurocognitive impairments relative to their full-term peers on any of the domain specific measures of intelligence, language, and executive functioning. In contrast, children born very preterm with mild and moderate-to-severe white matter abnormalities were characterized by performance impairments across all measures and time points, with more severe cerebral abnormalities being associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment. These associations persisted after adjustment for gender, neonatal medical risk factors, and family social risk. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of cerebral white matter connectivity for later intact cognitive functioning amongst children born very preterm. Preterm born children without cerebral white matter abnormalities on

  6. Genetic Underpinnings of White Matter ‘Connectivity’: Heritability, Risk, and Heterogeneity in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, Aristotle N.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Thus, the combination of genetics and brain imaging may be a useful strategy to investigate the effects of risk genes on anatomical connectivity, and for gene discovery, i.e. discovering the genetic correlates of white matter phenotypes. Following a database search, I review evidence for heritability of white matter phenotypes. I also review candidate gene investigations, examining association of putative risk variants with white matter phenotypes, as well as the recent flurry of research exploring relationships of genome-wide significant risk loci with white matter phenotypes. Finally, I review multivariate and polygene approaches, which constitute a new wave of imaging-genetics research, including large collaborative initiatives aiming to discover new genes that may predict aspects of white matter microstructure. The literature supports the heritability of white matter phenotypes. Loci in genes intimately implicated in oligodendrocyte and myelin development, growth and maintenance, and neurotrophic systems are associated with white matter microstructure. GWAS variants have not yet sufficiently been explored using DTI-based evaluation of white matter to draw conclusions, although micro-RNA 137 is promising due to its potential regulation of other GWAS schizophrenia genes. Many imaging-genetic studies only include healthy participants, which, while helping control for certain confounds, cannot address questions related to disease heterogeneity or symptom expression, and thus more studies should include participants with schizophrenia. With sufficiently large sample sizes, the future of this field lies in polygene strategies aimed at risk prediction and heterogeneity dissection of schizophrenia that can translate to personalized interventions. PMID:24893906

  7. White Matter Abnormalities in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Genetic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Lee, Seongtaek; Allendorfer, Jane B.; Gaston, Tyler E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Pati, Sandipan; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W.; Deutsch, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) are associated with microstructural brain abnormalities that can be evaluated with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Available studies on GGEs have conflicting results. Our primary goal was to compare the white matter structure in a cohort of patients with video/EEG-confirmed GGEs to healthy controls (HCs). Our secondary goal was to assess the potential effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter structure. Material/Methods A convenience sample of 23 patients with well-characterized treatment-resistant GGEs (13 female) was compared to 23 HCs. All participants received MRI at 3T. DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), were compared between groups using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). Results After controlling for differences between groups, abnormalities in DTI parameters were observed in patients with GGEs, including decreases in functional anisotropy (FA) in the hemispheric (left>right) and brain stem white matter. The examination of the effect of age at GGE onset on the white matter integrity revealed a significant negative correlation in the left parietal white matter region FA (R=−0.504; p=0.017); similar trends were observed in the white matter underlying left motor cortex (R=−0.357; p=0.103) and left posterior limb of the internal capsule (R=−0.319; p=0.148). Conclusions Our study confirms the presence of widespread white matter abnormalities in patients with GGEs and provides evidence that the age at GGE onset may have an important effect on white matter integrity. PMID:27283395

  8. White matter abnormalities and structural hippocampal disconnections in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Jared; Fonov, Vladimir; Wu, Ona; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Schoemaker, Dorothee; Wu, Liyong; Mohades, Sara; Shin, Monica; Sziklas, Viviane; Cheewakriengkrai, Laksanun; Shmuel, Amir; Dagher, Alain; Gauthier, Serge; Rosa-Neto, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate white matter degeneration and its impact on hippocampal structural connectivity in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. We estimated white matter fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity and hippocampal structural connectivity in two independent cohorts. The ADNI cohort included 108 subjects [25 cognitively normal, 21 amnestic mild cognitive impairment, 47 non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment and 15 Alzheimer's disease]. A second cohort included 34 subjects [15 cognitively normal and 19 amnestic mild cognitive impairment] recruited in Montreal. All subjects underwent clinical and neuropsychological assessment in addition to diffusion and T1 MRI. Individual fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity maps were generated using FSL-DTIfit. In addition, hippocampal structural connectivity maps expressing the probability of connectivity between the hippocampus and cortex were generated using a pipeline based on FSL-probtrackX. Voxel-based group comparison statistics of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity and hippocampal structural connectivity were estimated using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics. The proportion of abnormal to total white matter volume was estimated using the total volume of the white matter skeleton. We found that in both cohorts, amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients had 27-29% white matter volume showing higher mean diffusivity but no significant fractional anisotropy abnormalities. No fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity differences were observed between non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients and cognitively normal subjects. Alzheimer's disease patients had 66.3% of normalized white matter volume with increased mean diffusivity and 54.3% of the white matter had reduced fractional anisotropy. Reduced structural connectivity was found in the hippocampal connections to temporal, inferior parietal, posterior

  9. Assessing the effects of age on long white matter tracts using diffusion tensor tractography

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Simon W.; Dennis, Nancy A.; Buchler, Norbou G.; White, Leonard E.; Madden, David J.; Cabeza, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Aging is associated with significant white matter deterioration and this deterioration is assumed to be at least partly a consequence of myelin degeneration. The present study investigated specific predictions of the myelodegeneration hypothesis using diffusion tensor tractography. This technique has several advantages over other methods of assessing white matter architecture, including the possibility of isolating individual white matter tracts and measuring effects along the whole extent of each tract. The study yielded three main findings. First, age-related white matter deficits increased gradually from posterior to anterior segments within specific fiber tracts traversing frontal and parietal, but not temporal cortex. This pattern inverts the sequence of myelination during childhood and early development observed in previous studies and lends support to a “last-in-first-out” theory of the white matter health across the lifespan. Second, both the effects aging on white matter and their impact on cognitive performance were stronger for radial diffusivity (RD) than for axial diffusivity (AD). Given that RD has previously been shown to be more sensitive to myelin integrity than AD, this second finding is also consistent with the myelodegeneration hypothesis. Finally, the effects of aging on select white matter tracts were associated with age difference in specific cognitive functions. Specifically, FA in anterior tracts was shown to be primarily associated with executive tasks and FA in posterior tracts mainly associated with visual memory tasks. Furthermore, these correlations were mirrored in RD, but not AD, suggesting that RD is more sensitive to age-related changes in cognition. Taken together, the results help to clarify how age-related white matter decline impairs cognitive performance. PMID:19385018

  10. Associations of White Matter Microstructure with Clinical and Demographic Characteristics in Heavy Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Monnig, Mollie A.; Yeo, Ronald A.; Tonigan, J. Scott; McCrady, Barbara S.; Thoma, Robert J.; Sabbineni, Amithrupa; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the brain’s white matter is a signature injury of alcohol use disorders (AUDs), yet understanding of risks associated with clinical and demographic characteristics is incomplete. This study investigated alcohol problem severity, recent drinking behavior, and demographic factors in relation to white matter microstructure in heavy drinkers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), were collected from 324 participants (mean age = 30.9 ± 9.1 years; 30% female) who reported five or more heavy drinking episodes in the past 30 days. Drinking history and alcohol problem severity were assessed. A common white matter factor was created from fractional anisotropy (FA) values of five white matter tracts: body of corpus callosum, fornix, external capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cingulate gyrus. Previous research has implicated these tracts in heavy drinking. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses tested the hypothesis that, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure, clinical and behavioral measures of alcohol use severity would be associated with lower white matter factor scores. Potential interactions with smoking status, gender, age, treatment-seeking status, and depression or anxiety symptoms also were tested. Controlling for number of years drinking, greater alcohol problem severity and recent drinking frequency were significantly associated with lower white matter factor scores. The effect of drinking frequency differed significantly for men and women, such that higher drinking frequency was linked to lower white matter factor scores in women but not in men. In conclusion, alcohol problem severity was a significant predictor of lower white matter FA in heavy drinkers, after controlling for duration of alcohol exposure. In addition, more frequent drinking contributed to lower FA in women but not men, suggesting gender-specific vulnerability to alcohol neurotoxicity. PMID:26529515

  11. Brain-peripheral cell crosstalk in white matter damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Lo, Eng H

    2016-05-01

    White matter damage is an important part of cerebrovascular disease and may be a significant contributing factor in vascular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. It is well accepted that white matter homeostasis involves multifactorial interactions between all cells in the axon-glia-vascular unit. But more recently, it has been proposed that beyond cell-cell signaling within the brain per se, dynamic crosstalk between brain and systemic responses such as circulating immune cells and stem/progenitor cells may also be important. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that peripheral cells contribute to damage and repair after white matter damage. Depending on timing, phenotype and context, monocyte/macrophage can possess both detrimental and beneficial effects on oligodendrogenesis and white matter remodeling. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be activated after CNS injury and the response may also influence white matter repair process. These emerging findings support the hypothesis that peripheral-derived cells can be both detrimental or beneficial in white matter pathology in cerebrovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26277436

  12. Effects of White Matter Injury on Resting State fMRI Measures in Prematurely Born Infants

    PubMed Central

    Smyser, Christopher D.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Blazey, Tyler M.; Inder, Terrie E.; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebral white matter is vulnerable to injury in very preterm infants (born prior to 30 weeks gestation), resulting in a spectrum of lesions. These range from severe forms, including cystic periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular hemorrhagic infarction, to minor focal punctate lesions. Moderate to severe white matter injury in preterm infants has been shown to predict later neurodevelopmental disability, although outcomes can vary widely in infants with qualitatively comparable lesions. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly utilized in neurodevelopmental investigations and may provide complementary information regarding the impact of white matter injury on the developing brain. We performed resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent postmenstrual age in fourteen preterm infants with moderate to severe white matter injury secondary to periventricular hemorrhagic infarction. In these subjects, resting state networks were identifiable throughout the brain. Patterns of aberrant functional connectivity were observed and depended upon injury severity. Comparisons were performed against data obtained from prematurely-born infants with mild white matter injury and healthy, term-born infants and demonstrated group differences. These results reveal structural-functional correlates of preterm white matter injury and carry implications for future investigations of neurodevelopmental disability. PMID:23874510

  13. Altered White Matter Integrity in the Congenital and Late Blind People

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dawei; Qin, Wen; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yunting; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    The blind subjects have experienced a series of brain structural and functional alterations due to the visual deprivation. It remains unclear as to whether white matter changes differ between blind subjects with visual deprivation before and after a critical developmental period. The present study offered a direct comparison in changes of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) between congenital blind (CB) and late blind (LB) individuals. Twenty CB, 21 LB (blindness onset after 18 years old), and 40 sight control (SC) subjects were recruited. Both the tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and voxel-based analysis (VBA) showed lower FA in the bilateral optic radiations in both blind groups, suggesting that the loss of white matter integrity was the prominent hallmark in the blind people. The LB group showed more extensive white matter impairment than the CB group, indicating the mechanisms of white matter FA changes are different between the CB and LB groups. Using a loose threshold, a trend of an increased FA was found in the bilateral corticospinal tracts in the LB but with a smaller spatial extent relative to the CB. These results suggest that white matter FA changes in the blind subjects are the reflection of multiple mechanisms, including the axonal degeneration, deafferentation, and plasticity. PMID:23710371

  14. Pathological and biochemical studies on a case of Pick disease with severe white matter atrophy.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Kazuo; Takanashi, Masashi; Watanabe, Masao; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Hasegawa, Masato; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Tanaka, Shigeki; Mori, Hideo

    2006-12-01

    We report on a male patient with Pick disease who had shown severe white matter atrophy and dilatation of the lateral ventricle in the frontal lobe from an early stage. Upon admission to our hospital 2 years after disease onset, the patient showed apathy, and MRI revealed severe atrophy of the cortex and white matter of the frontal lobe. He died at age 74, 11 years after disease onset. Autopsy revealed severe atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, severe loss of white matter in the frontal lobe, dilatation of the lateral ventricles, and cortical thinning. Histopathological examination showed severe loss of myelinated fibers in the frontal white matter and severe neuronal loss with gliosis in the frontal and temporal cortices. Many Pick bodies were seen. Our patient had a rare case of Pick disease predominantly affecting the frontal lobe with severe involvement of the white matter from an early stage. This case suggests that myelinated fibers in the white matter as well as cerebral neurons are primarily affected in Pick disease. PMID:17203597

  15. A tract-specific framework for white matter morphometry combining macroscopic and microscopic tract features

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Awatea, Suyash P; Das, Sandhitsu R; Woo, John H; Melhem, Elias R; Gee, James C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging plays a key role in our understanding of white matter both in normal populations and in populations with brain disorders. Existing techniques focus primarily on using diffusivity-based quantities derived from diffusion tensor as surrogate measures of microstructural tissue properties of white matter. In this paper, we describe a novel tract-specific framework that enables the examination of white matter morphometry at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales. The framework leverages the skeleton-based modeling of sheet-like white matter fasciculi using the continuous medial representation, which gives a natural definition of thickness and supports its comparison across subjects. The thickness measure provides a macroscopic characterization of white matter fasciculi that complements existing analysis of microstructural features. The utility of the framework is demonstrated in quantifying white matter atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. We show that, compared to using microscopic features alone, combining the macroscopic and microscopic features gives a more complete characterization of the disease. PMID:20547469

  16. MELAS with diffuse degeneration of the cerebral white matter: report of an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Teruo; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Obama, Runko; Ishihara, Tadayuki; Yagishita, Saburou

    2010-02-01

    Up to now diffuse white matter demyelination of the cerebrum has been reported in only a few cases of mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Here we document an autopsy case with this rare neuropathology. Most MELAS cases are diagnosed antemortem by A3243G transition of mitochondrial DNA. While cerebral damage including necrotic foci in the cerebral cortex are common findings in MELAS, prominent white matter involvement best characterizes this MELAS case. There were numerous necrotic foci, varying in size and chronological stage, in the cerebral white matter. In the areas of the white matter without necrotic foci, there was diffuse fibrillary gliosis with the loss of axons and oligodendrocytes. The gliosis was dominant in the deep white matter, sparing the U-fiber. The cerebral cortex showed diffuse cortical atrophy with few scattered necrotic foci. Distribution of the cerebral lesions does not coincide with the territory of blood supply. The vascular wall presented only slight to mild hyalinosis. We assumed a common pathogenesis to the cortical lesions and the white matter change. The pathogenesis of the present diffuse cerebral lesions may not be just secondary to circulatory disturbance but partly due to metabolic abnormality. PMID:19496942

  17. Developing Conceptions of Racism among Young White Adults in the Context of Cultural Diversity Coursework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidell, Thomas R.; And Others

    An exploratory study was conducted to evaluate a model that predicts a five-step developmental sequence from dualistic to systematic conceptions of racism among young white adults. The model predicts developmental changes for white middle-class young adults within the context of a college cultural-diversity course. The following steps in…

  18. Prestroke statins, progression of white matter hyperintensities, and cognitive decline in stroke patients with confluent white matter hyperintensities.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yunyun; Wong, Adrian; Cavalieri, Margherita; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chu, Winnie W C; Liu, Xinfeng; Wong, Ka Sing; Mok, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are a consequence of cerebral small vessel disease. Statins have been shown to reduce recurrent stroke among patients with various stroke subtypes, including lacunar stroke, which also arises from small vessel disease. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that prestroke statin use would reduce the progression of WMH and/or cognitive decline among stroke patients with confluent WMH. Patients (n = 100) were participants of the VITAmins To Prevent Stroke magnetic resonance imaging substudy. All patients had confluent WMH on magnetic resonance imaging at baseline. Eighty-one patients completed the 2-year follow-up. We assessed general cognition and executive function using the mini-mental state examination and Mattis dementia rating scale-initiation/perseveration subscale, respectively. We compared the change in volume of WMH and cognition between prestroke statin use and prestroke nonstatin use groups. We also evaluated the effects of prestroke statin use on incident lacunes and microbleeds. The prestroke statin use group (n = 51) had less WMH volume progression (1.54 ± 4.52 cm(3) vs 5.01 ± 6.00 cm(3), p = 0.02) compared with the prestroke nonstatin use group (n = 30). Multivariate linear regression modeling identified prestroke statin use as an independent predictor of WMH progression (β = -0.31, p = 0.008). Prestroke statin use was also associated with less decline (Mattis dementia rating scale-initiation/perseveration subscale; β = 0.47, p = 0.001). No association was observed with changes in mini-mental state examination scores. There were no between group differences on incident lacunes or incident microbleeds. Prestroke statin use may reduce WMH progression and decline in executive function in stroke patients with confluent WMH. PMID:24692001

  19. High-affinity choline uptake and acetylcholine-metabolizing enzymes in CNS white matter. A quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Solyga, Volker; Lossius, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The presence of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors suggests the occurrence of cholinergic neurotransmission in white matter; however no quantitative information exists on acetylcholine formation and breakdown in white matter. We compared white structures of pig brain (fimbria, corpus callosum, pyramidal tracts, and occipital white matter) to gray structures (temporal, parietal and cerebellar cortices, hippocampus, and caudate) and found that sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in white structures was 25-31% of that in hippocampus. White matter choline acetyltransferase activity was 10-50% of the hippocampal value; the highest activity was found in fimbria. Acetylcholine esterase activity in white structures was 20-25% of that in hippocampus. The caudate, which is rich in cholinergic interneurons, gave values for all three parameters that were 2.8-4 times higher than in hippocampus. The results suggest a certain capacity for cholinergic neurotransmission in central nervous white matter. The white matter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which provides acetyl-CoA for acetylcholine synthesis, ranged between 33 and 50% of the hippocampal activity; the activity in the caudate was similar to that in hippocampus and the other gray structures, which was true also for other enzymes of glucose metabolism: hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Acetylcholine esterase activity in white matter was inhibited by the nerve agent soman, which may help explain the reported deleterious effect of soman on white matter. Further, this finding suggests that acetylcholine esterase inhibitors used in Alzheimer's disease may have an effect in white matter. PMID:18674580

  20. White matter hyperintensities and imaging patterns of brain ageing in the general population.

    PubMed

    Habes, Mohamad; Erus, Guray; Toledo, Jon B; Zhang, Tianhao; Bryan, Nick; Launer, Lenore J; Rosseel, Yves; Janowitz, Deborah; Doshi, Jimit; Van der Auwera, Sandra; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Hosten, Norbert; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Schminke, Ulf; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Grabe, Hans J; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    White matter hyperintensities are associated with increased risk of dementia and cognitive decline. The current study investigates the relationship between white matter hyperintensities burden and patterns of brain atrophy associated with brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease in a large populatison-based sample (n = 2367) encompassing a wide age range (20-90 years), from the Study of Health in Pomerania. We quantified white matter hyperintensities using automated segmentation and summarized atrophy patterns using machine learning methods resulting in two indices: the SPARE-BA index (capturing age-related brain atrophy), and the SPARE-AD index (previously developed to capture patterns of atrophy found in patients with Alzheimer's disease). A characteristic pattern of age-related accumulation of white matter hyperintensities in both periventricular and deep white matter areas was found. Individuals with high white matter hyperintensities burden showed significantly (P < 0.0001) lower SPARE-BA and higher SPARE-AD values compared to those with low white matter hyperintensities burden, indicating that the former had more patterns of atrophy in brain regions typically affected by ageing and Alzheimer's disease dementia. To investigate a possibly causal role of white matter hyperintensities, structural equation modelling was used to quantify the effect of Framingham cardiovascular disease risk score and white matter hyperintensities burden on SPARE-BA, revealing a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) causal relationship between them. Structural equation modelling showed that the age effect on SPARE-BA was mediated by white matter hyperintensities and cardiovascular risk score each explaining 10.4% and 21.6% of the variance, respectively. The direct age effect explained 70.2% of the SPARE-BA variance. Only white matter hyperintensities significantly mediated the age effect on SPARE-AD explaining 32.8% of the variance. The direct age effect explained 66.0% of the SPARE

  1. Impaired functional but preserved structural connectivity in limbic white matter tracts in youth with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Elizabeth Carrie; Marsh, Abigail; Blair, Karina Simone; Majestic, Catherine; Evangelou, Iordanis; Gupta, Karan; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Sims, Courtney; Pope, Kayla; Fowler, Katherine; Sinclair, Stephen; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Pine, Daniel; Blair, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder and psychopathic traits (CD/ODD+PT) are at high risk of adult anti-social behaviour and psychopathy. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate functional abnormalities in orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala in both youths and adults with psychopathic traits. Diffusion tensor imaging in psychopathic adults demonstrates disrupted structural connectivity between these regions (uncinate fasiculus). The current study examined whether functional neural abnormalities present in youths with CD/ODD+PT are associated with similar white matter abnormalities. Youths with CD/ODD+PT and comparison participants completed 3.0 T diffusion tensor scans and functional MRI scans. Diffusion tensor imaging did not reveal disruption in structural connections within the uncinate fasiculus or other white matter tracts in youths with CD/ODD+PT, despite the demonstration of disrupted amygdala-prefrontal functional connectivity in these youths. These results suggest that disrupted amygdala-frontal white matter connectivity as measured by fractional anisotropy is less sensitive than imaging measurements of functional perturbations in youths with psychopathic traits. If white matter tracts are intact in youths with this disorder, childhood may provide a critical window for intervention and treatment, before significant structural brain abnormalities solidify. PMID:22819939

  2. Fingolimod protects against neonatal white matter damage and long-term cognitive deficits caused by hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Serdar, Meray; Herz, Josephine; Kempe, Karina; Lumpe, Katharina; Reinboth, Barbara S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Hou, Xinlin; Herrmann, Ralf; Hadamitzky, Martin; Heumann, Rolf; Hansen, Wiebke; Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Bendix, Ivo

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral white matter injury is a leading cause of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in prematurely born infants involving cognitive deficits in later life. Despite increasing knowledge about the pathophysiology of perinatal brain injury, therapeutic options are limited. In the adult demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulating substance fingolimod (FTY720) has beneficial effects. Herein, we evaluated the neuroprotective potential of FTY720 in a neonatal model of oxygen-toxicity, which is associated with hypomyelination and impaired neuro-cognitive outcome. A single dose of FTY720 (1mg/kg) at the onset of neonatal hyperoxia (24h 80% oxygen on postnatal day 6) resulted in improvement of neuro-cognitive development persisting into adulthood. This was associated with reduced microstructural white matter abnormalities 4 months after the insult. In search of the underlying mechanisms potential non-classical (i.e. lymphocyte-independent) pathways were analysed shortly after the insult, comprising modulation of oxidative stress and local inflammatory responses as well as myelination, oligodendrocyte degeneration and maturation. Treatment with FTY720 reduced hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress, microglia activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In vivo and in vitro analyses further revealed that oxygen-induced hypomyelination is restored to control levels, which was accompanied by reduced oligodendrocyte degeneration and enhanced maturation. Furthermore, hyperoxia-induced elevation of S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) protein expression on in vitro cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells was reduced by activated FTY720 and protection from degeneration is abrogated after selective S1P1 blockade. Finally, FTY720s' classical mode of action (i.e. retention of immune cells within peripheral lymphoid organs) was analysed demonstrating that FTY720 diminished circulating lymphocyte counts independent from hyperoxia

  3. White matter signal abnormality quality differentiates mild cognitive impairment that converts to Alzheimer's disease from nonconverters.

    PubMed

    Lindemer, Emily R; Salat, David H; Smith, Eric E; Nguyen, Khoa; Fischl, Bruce; Greve, Douglas N

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess how longitudinal change in the quantity and quality of white matter signal abnormalities (WMSAs) contributes to the progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Mahalanobis distance of WMSA from normal-appearing white matter using T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted MRI was defined as a quality measure for WMSA. Cross-sectional analysis of WMSA volume in 104 cognitively healthy older adults, 116 individuals with MCI who converted to AD within 3 years (mild cognitive impairment converter [MCI-C]), 115 individuals with MCI that did not convert in that time (mild cognitive impairment nonconverter [MCI-NC]), and 124 individuals with AD from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative revealed that WMSA volume was substantially greater in AD relative to the other groups but did not differ between MCI-NC and MCI-C. Longitudinally, MCI-C exhibited faster WMSA quality progression but not volume compared with matched MCI-NC beginning 18 months before MCI-C conversion to AD. The strongest difference in rate of change was seen in the time period starting 6 months before MCI-C conversion to AD and ending 6 months after conversion (p < 0.001). The relatively strong effect in this time period relative to AD conversion in the MCI-C was similar to the relative rate of change in hippocampal volume, a traditional imaging marker of AD pathology. These data demonstrate changes in white matter tissue properties that occur within WMSA in individuals with MCI that will subsequently obtain a clinical diagnosis of AD within 18 months. Individuals with AD have substantially greater WMSA volume than all MCI suggesting that there is a progressive accumulation of WMSA with progressive disease severity, and that quality change predates changes in this total volume. Given the timing of the changes in WMSA tissue quality relative to the clinical diagnosis of AD, these findings suggest that WMSAs are a critical

  4. Effect of Simulated Microgravity on Human Brain Gray Matter and White Matter – Evidence from MRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Guo, Xiaojuan; Jin, Zhen; Ouyang, Xin; Zeng, Yawei; Feng, Jinsheng; Wang, Yu; Yao, Li; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited and inconclusive evidence that space environment, especially microgravity condition, may affect microstructure of human brain. This experiment hypothesized that there would be modifications in gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the brain due to microgravity. Method Eighteen male volunteers were recruited and fourteen volunteers underwent -6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 30 days simulated microgravity. High-resolution brain anatomical imaging data and diffusion tensor imaging images were collected on a 3T MR system before and after HDBR. We applied voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics analysis to investigate the structural changes in GM and WM of brain. Results We observed significant decreases of GM volume in the bilateral frontal lobes, temporal poles, parahippocampal gyrus, insula and right hippocampus, and increases of GM volume in the vermis, bilateral paracentral lobule, right precuneus gyrus, left precentral gyrus and left postcentral gyrus after HDBR. Fractional anisotropy (FA) changes were also observed in multiple WM tracts. Conclusion These regions showing GM changes are closely associated with the functional domains of performance, locomotion, learning, memory and coordination. Regional WM alterations may be related to brain function decline and adaption. Our findings provide the neuroanatomical evidence of brain dysfunction or plasticity in microgravity condition and a deeper insight into the cerebral mechanisms in microgravity condition. PMID:26270525

  5. Targeting Kv1.3 channels to reduce white matter pathology after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Thomas M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Colley, Beverly S; Phillips, Linda L

    2016-09-01

    Axonal injury is present in essentially all clinically significant cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While no effective treatment has been identified to date, experimental TBI models have shown promising axonal protection using immunosuppressants FK506 and Cyclosporine-A, with treatment benefits attributed to calcineurin inhibition or protection of mitochondrial function. However, growing evidence suggests neuroprotective efficacy of these compounds may also involve direct modulation of ion channels, and in particular Kv1.3. The present study tested whether blockade of Kv1.3 channels, using Clofazimine (CFZ), would alleviate TBI-induced white matter pathology in rodents. Postinjury CFZ administration prevented suppression of compound action potential (CAP) amplitude in the corpus callosum of adult rats following midline fluid percussion TBI, with injury and treatment effects primarily expressed in unmyelinated CAPs. Kv1.3 protein levels in callosal tissue extracts were significantly reduced postinjury, but this loss was prevented by CFZ treatment. In parallel, CFZ also attenuated the injury-induced elevation in pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1-β. The effects of CFZ on glial function were further studied using mixed microglia/astrocyte cell cultures derived from P3-5 mouse corpus callosum. Cultures of callosal glia challenged with lipopolysaccharide exhibited a dramatic increase in IL1-β levels, accompanied by reactive morphological changes in microglia, both of which were attenuated by CFZ treatment. These results support a cell specific role for Kv1.3 signaling in white matter pathology after TBI, and suggest a treatment approach based on the blockade of these channels. This therapeutic strategy may be especially efficacious for normalizing neuro-glial interactions affecting unmyelinated axons after TBI. PMID:27302680

  6. Cerebral White Matter Lesions and Affective Episodes Correlate in Male Individuals with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Birner, Armin; Seiler, Stephan; Lackner, Nina; Bengesser, Susanne A.; Queissner, Robert; Fellendorf, Frederike T.; Platzer, Martina; Ropele, Stefan; Enzinger, Christian; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Mangge, Harald; Pirpamer, Lukas; Deutschmann, Hannes; McIntyre, Roger S.; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Reininghaus, Bernd; Reininghaus, Eva Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter lesions (WML) have been found in normal aging, vascular disease and several neuropsychiatric conditions. Correlations of WML with clinical parameters in BD have been described, but not with the number of affective episodes, illness duration, age of onset and Body Mass Index in a well characterized group of euthymic bipolar adults. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the associations between bipolar course of illness parameters and WML measured with volumetric analysis. Methods In a cross-sectional study 100 euthymic individuals with BD as well as 54 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled to undergo brain magnetic resonance imaging using 3T including a FLAIR sequence for volumetric assessment of WML-load using FSL-software. Additionally, clinical characteristics and psychometric measures including Structured Clinical Interview according to DSM-IV, Hamilton-Depression, Young Mania Rating Scale and Beck’s Depression Inventory were evaluated. Results Individuals with BD had significantly more (F = 3.968, p < .05) WML (Mdn = 3710mm3; IQR = 2961mm3) than HC (Mdn = 2185mm3; IQR = 1665mm3). BD men (Mdn = 4095mm3; IQR = 3295mm3) and BD women (Mdn = 3032mm3; IQR = 2816mm3) did not significantly differ as to the WML-load or the number and type of risk factors for WML. However, in men only, the number of manic/hypomanic episodes (r = 0.72; p < .001) as well as depressive episodes (r = 0.51; p < .001) correlated positively with WML-load. Conclusions WML-load strongly correlated with the number of manic episodes in male BD patients, suggesting that men might be more vulnerable to mania in the context of cerebral white matter changes. PMID:26252714

  7. Regional white matter hyperintensity volume, not hippocampal atrophy, predicts incident Alzheimer disease in the community.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Adam M; Provenzano, Frank A; Muraskin, Jordan; Manly, Jennifer J; Blum, Sonja; Apa, Zoltan; Stern, Yaakov; Brown, Truman R; Luchsinger, José A; Mayeux, Richard

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND New-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) is often attributed to degenerative changes in the hippocampus. However, the contribution of regionally distributed small vessel cerebrovascular disease, visualized as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging, remains unclear. OBJECTIVE To determine whether regional WMHs and hippocampal volume predict incident AD in an epidemiological study. DESIGN A longitudinal community-based epidemiological study of older adults from northern Manhattan, New York. SETTING The Washington Heights/Inwood Columbia Aging Project. PARTICIPANTS Between 2005 and 2007, 717 participants without dementia received magnetic resonance imaging scans. A mean (SD) of 40.28 (9.77) months later, 503 returned for follow-up clinical examination and 46 met criteria for incident dementia (45 with AD). Regional WMHs and relative hippocampal volumes were derived. Three Cox proportional hazards models were run to predict incident dementia, controlling for relevant variables. The first included all WMH measurements; the second included relative hippocampal volume; and the third combined the 2 measurements. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Incident AD. RESULTS White matter hyperintensity volume in the parietal lobe predicted time to incident dementia (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.194; P = .03). Relative hippocampal volume did not predict incident dementia when considered alone (HR = 0.419; P = .77) or with the WMH measures included in the model (HR = 0.302; P = .70). Including hippocampal volume in the model did not notably alter the predictive utility of parietal lobe WMHs (HR = 1.197; P = .049). CONCLUSIONS The findings highlight the regional specificity of the association of WMHs with AD. It is not clear whether parietal WMHs solely represent a marker for cerebrovascular burden or point to distinct injury compared with other regions. Future work should elucidate pathogenic mechanisms linking WMHs and AD pathology. PMID:22945686

  8. Lifelong Bilingualism Contributes to Cognitive Reserve against White Matter Integrity Declines in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Brian T.; Johnson, Nathan F.; Powell, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may contribute to cognitive reserve (CR) in normal aging. However, there is currently no neuroimaging evidence to suggest that lifelong bilinguals can retain normal cognitive functioning in the face of age-related neurodegeneration. Here we explored this issue by comparing white matter (WM) integrity and gray matter (GM) volumetric patterns of older adult lifelong bilinguals (N = 20) and monolinguals (N = 20). The groups were matched on a range of relevant cognitive test scores and on the established CR variables of education, socioeconomic status and intelligence. Participants underwent high-resolution structural imaging for assessment of GM volume and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of WM integrity. Results indicated significantly lower microstructural integrity in the bilingual group in several WM tracts. In particular, compared to their monolingual peers, the bilingual group showed lower fractional anisotropy and/or higher radial diffusivity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus bilaterally, the fornix, and multiple portions of the corpus callosum. There were no group differences in GM volume. Our results suggest that lifelong bilingualism contributes to CR against WM integrity declines in aging. PMID:24103400

  9. Components of Myelin Damage and Repair in the Progression of White Matter Pathology After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mierzwa, Amanda J.; Marion, Christina M.; Sullivan, Genevieve M.; McDaniel, Dennis P.; Armstrong, Regina C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract White matter tracts are highly vulnerable to damage from impact-acceleration forces of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mild TBI is characterized by a low density of traumatic axonal injury, whereas associated myelin pathology is relatively unexplored. We examined the progression of white matter pathology in mice after mild TBI with traumatic axonal injury localized in the corpus callosum. Adult mice received a closed-skull impact and were analyzed from 3 days to 6 weeks post-TBI/sham surgery. At all times post-TBI, electron microscopy revealed degenerating axons distributed among intact fibers in the corpus callosum. Intact axons exhibited significant demyelination at 3 days followed by evidence of remyelination at 1 week. Accordingly, bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase labeling demonstrated the generation of new oligodendrocytes, identified by myelin proteolipid protein messenger RNA expression, at 3 days post-TBI. Overall oligodendrocyte populations, identified by immunohistochemical staining for CC1 and/or glutathione S-transferase pi, were similar between TBI and sham mice by 2 weeks. Excessively long myelin figures, similar to redundant myelin sheaths, were a significant feature at all post-TBI time points. At 6 weeks post-TBI, microglial activation and astrogliosis were localized to areas of axon and myelin pathology. These studies show that demyelination, remyelination, and excessive myelin are components of white matter degeneration and recovery in mild TBI with traumatic axonal injury. PMID:25668562

  10. Fusion of white and gray matter geometry: a framework for investigating brain development

    PubMed Central

    Savadjiev, Peter; Rathi, Yogesh; Bouix, Sylvain; Smith, Alex R.; Schultz, Robert T.; Verma, Ragini; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Current neuroimaging investigation of the white matter typically focuses on measurements derived from diffusion tensor imaging, such as fractional anisotropy (FA). In contrast, imaging studies of the gray matter oftentimes focus on morphological features such as cortical thickness, folding and surface curvature. As a result, it is not clear how to combine findings from these two types of approaches in order to obtain a consistent picture of morphological changes in both gray and white matter. In this paper, we propose a joint investigation of gray and white matter morphology by combining geometrical information from white and the gray matter. To achieve this, we first introduce a novel method for computing multi-scale white matter tract geometry. Its formulation is based on the differential geometry of curve sets and is easily incorporated into a continuous scale-space framework. We then incorporate this method into a novel framework for “fusing” white and gray matter geometrical information. Given a set of fiber tracts originating in a particular cortical region, the key idea is to compute two scalar fields that represent geometrical characteristics of the white matter and of the surface of the cortical region. A quantitative marker is created by combining the distributions of these scalar values using Mutual Information. This marker can be then used in the study of normal and pathological brain structure and development. We apply this framework to a study on autism spectrum disorder in children. Our preliminary results support the view that autism may be characterized by early brain overgrowth, followed by reduced or arrested growth [7]. PMID:25066750

  11. Interpersonal competence in young adulthood and right laterality in white matter.

    PubMed

    De Pisapia, Nicola; Serra, Mauro; Rigo, Paola; Jager, Justin; Papinutto, Nico; Esposito, Gianluca; Venuti, Paola; Bornstein, Marc H

    2014-06-01

    The right hemisphere of the human brain is known to be involved in processes underlying emotion and social cognition. Clinical neuropsychology investigations and brain lesion studies have linked a number of personality and social disorders to abnormal white matter (WM) integrity in the right hemisphere. Here, we tested the hypothesis that interpersonal competencies are associated with integrity of WM tracts in the right hemisphere of healthy young adults. Thirty-one participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging scanning. Fractional anisotropy was used to quantify water diffusion. After the scanning session, participants completed the Adolescent Interpersonal Competence Questionnaire. Fractional anisotropy was subsequently correlated with Adolescent Interpersonal Competence Questionnaire scores using tract-based spatial statistics. Higher interpersonal competencies are related to higher WM integrity in several major tracts of the right hemisphere, in specific the uncinate fasciculus, the cingulum, the forceps minor, the infero-fronto occipital fasciculus, the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and the superior longitudinal fasciculus. These results provide the first direct analysis of the neuroanatomical basis of interpersonal competencies and young adult self-reported skills in social contexts. PMID:24345175

  12. Diminished performance on neuropsychological testing in late life depression is correlated with microstructural white matter abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Mettenburg, Joseph M; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Shimony, Joshua S; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Sheline, Yvette I

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional T2 weighted MR imaging results are non-specific for the extent of underlying white matter structural abnormalities present in late life depression (LLD). Diffusion tensor imaging provides a unique opportunity to investigate the extent and nature of structural injury, but has been limited by examining only a subset of regions of interest (ROI) and by confounds common to the study of an elderly population, including comorbid vascular pathology. Furthermore, comprehensive correlation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements, including axial and radial diffusivity measurements, has not been demonstrated in the late life depression population. Methods 51 depressed and 16 non-depressed, age- and cerebrovascular risk factor- matched elderly subjects underwent traditional anatomic T1 and T2 weight imaging, as well as DTI. The DTI data were skeletonized using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS), and both regional and global analyses were performed. Results Widespread structural abnormalities within white matter were detected in the LLD group, accounting for age, gender and education and matched for cerebrovascular risk factors and global T2 white matter hyperintensities (T2WMH). Regional differences were most prominent in uncinate and cingulate white matter and were generally characterized by an increase in radial diffusivity. Age-related changes particularly in the cingulate bundle were more advanced in individuals with LLD relative to controls. Regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations of regional fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity with five different neuropsychological factor scores. TBSS analysis demonstrated a greater extent of white matter abnormalities in LLD not responsive to treatment, as compared to controls. Conclusions White matter integrity is compromised in late life depression, largely manifested by increased radial diffusivity in specific regions, suggesting underlying myelin injury. A possible

  13. Information processing speed mediates the relationship between white matter and general intelligence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Alloza, Clara; Cox, Simon R; Duff, Barbara; Semple, Scott I; Bastin, Mark E; Whalley, Heather C; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2016-08-30

    Several authors have proposed that schizophrenia is the result of impaired connectivity between specific brain regions rather than differences in local brain activity. White matter abnormalities have been suggested as the anatomical substrate for this dysconnectivity hypothesis. Information processing speed may act as a key cognitive resource facilitating higher order cognition by allowing multiple cognitive processes to be simultaneously available. However, there is a lack of established associations between these variables in schizophrenia. We hypothesised that the relationship between white matter and general intelligence would be mediated by processing speed. White matter water diffusion parameters were studied using Tract-based Spatial Statistics and computed within 46 regions-of-interest (ROI). Principal component analysis was conducted on these white matter ROI for fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity, and on neurocognitive subtests to extract general factors of white mater structure (gFA, gMD), general intelligence (g) and processing speed (gspeed). There was a positive correlation between g and gFA (r= 0.67, p =0.001) that was partially and significantly mediated by gspeed (56.22% CI: 0.10-0.62). These findings suggest a plausible model of structure-function relations in schizophrenia, whereby white matter structure may provide a neuroanatomical substrate for general intelligence, which is partly supported by speed of information processing. PMID:27308721

  14. A Voxel-Based Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study of White Matter in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Katie; Wu, Jinghui; Malhotra, Anil K.; Burdick, Katherine E.; DeRosse, Pamela; Ardekani, Babak A.; Szeszko, Philip R.

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence from post-mortem and magnetic resonance imaging studies that hyperintensities, oligodendrioglial abnormalities and gross white matter volumetric alterations play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. There is also functional imaging evidence for a defect in frontal cortico-subcortical pathways in bipolar disorder, but the white matter comprising these pathways has not been well-investigated. Few studies have investigated white matter integrity in patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy volunteers and the majority of studies have used manual region-of-interest approaches. In this study, we compared fractional anisotropy (FA) values between 30 patients with bipolar disorder and 38 healthy volunteers in the brain white matter using a voxelwise analysis following inter-subject registration to Talairach space. Compared to healthy volunteers, patients demonstrated significantly (p < .001; cluster size ≥ 50) higher FA within the right and left frontal white matter and lower FA within the left cerebellar white matter. Examination of individual eigenvalues indicated that group differences in both axial and radial diffusivity contributed to abnormal FA within these regions. Tractography was performed in template space on averaged diffusion tensor imaging data from all individuals. Extraction of bundles passing through the clusters that differed significantly between groups suggested that white matter abnormalities along the pontine crossing tract, corticospinal/corticopontine tracts and thalamic radiation fibers may play a role in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder. Our findings are consistent with models of bipolar disorder that implicate dysregulation of cortico-subcortical and cerebellar regions in the disorder and may have relevance for phenomenology. PMID:19145224

  15. Atypical Frontal-Striatal-Thalamic Circuit White Matter Development in Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Kate D.; Liu, Yanni; Reamer, Elyse N.; Taylor, Stephan F.; Welsh, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Atypical development of frontal-striatal-thalamic circuitry (FSTC) has been hypothesized to underlie the early course of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); however, the development of FSTC white matter tracts remains to be studied in young patients. Method To address this gap, we scanned 36 patients with pediatric OCD compared to 27 healthy controls, aged 8 to 19 years, with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of white matter coherence. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used to test differential effects of age on FA, across the whole brain, in those with OCD compared to healthy youth, followed by analyses in a priori regions of interest (anterior corpus callosum, anterior cingulum bundle and anterior limb of the internal capsule [ALIC]) to further characterize developmental differences between groups. Results Patients with OCD showed more pronounced age-related increases in FA than controls in regions of interest, as well as several other white matter tracts. In patients, greater FA in anterior cingulum bundle correlated with more severe symptoms after controlling for age. Conclusions Our findings support theories of atypical FSTC maturation in pediatric OCD by providing the first evidence for altered trajectories of white matter development in anterior corpus callosum, anterior cingulum bundle, and ALIC in young patients. Steeper age-related increases of FA in these and other select white matter tracts in OCD, compared to healthy controls, may derive from an early delay in white matter development and/or prolonged white matter growth, but confirmation of these possibilities awaits longitudinal work. PMID:25440312

  16. Extensive White Matter Alterations and Its Correlations with Ataxia Severity in SCA 2 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Galvez, Victor; Mercadillo, Roberto; Diaz, Rosalinda; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies of SCA2 have revealed significant degeneration of white matter tracts in cerebellar and cerebral regions. The motor deficit in these patients may be attributable to the degradation of projection fibers associated with the underlying neurodegenerative process. However, this relationship remains unclear. Statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging enables an unbiased whole-brain quantitative comparison of the diffusion proprieties of white matter tracts in vivo. Methods Fourteen genetically confirmed SCA2 patients and aged-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics were performed to analyze structural white matter damage using two different measurements: fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Significant diffusion differences were correlated with the patient's ataxia impairment. Results Our analysis revealed decreased FA mainly in the inferior/middle/superior cerebellar peduncles, the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule and the bilateral superior corona radiata. Increases in MD were found mainly in cerebellar white matter, medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, among other regions. Clinical impairment measured with the SARA score correlated with FA in superior parietal white matter and bilateral anterior corona radiata. Correlations with MD were found in cerebellar white matter and the middle cerebellar peduncle. Conclusion Our findings show significant correlations between diffusion measurements in key areas affected in SCA2 and measures of motor impairment, suggesting a disruption of information flow between motor and sensory-integration areas. These findings result in a more comprehensive view of the clinical impact of the white matter degeneration in SCA2. PMID:26263162

  17. Immediate remote ischemic postconditioning after hypoxia ischemia in piglets protects cerebral white matter but not grey matter

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Mojgan; Bainbridge, Alan; Broad, Kevin D; Kawano, Go; Oliver-Taylor, Aaron; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Fierens, Igor; Rostami, Jamshid; Jane Hassell, K; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Gressens, Pierre; Hristova, Mariya; Bennett, Kate; Lebon, Sophie; Fleiss, Bobbi; Yellon, Derek; Hausenloy, Derek J; Golay, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) is a promising therapeutic intervention whereby brief episodes of ischemia/reperfusion of one organ (limb) mitigate damage in another organ (brain) that has experienced severe hypoxia-ischemia. Our aim was to assess whether RIPostC is protective following cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in a piglet model of neonatal encephalopathy (NE) using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) biomarkers and immunohistochemistry. After hypoxia-ischemia (HI), 16 Large White female newborn piglets were randomized to: (i) no intervention (n = 8); (ii) RIPostC – with four, 10-min cycles of bilateral lower limb ischemia/reperfusion immediately after HI (n = 8). RIPostC reduced the hypoxic-ischemic-induced increase in white matter proton MRS lactate/N acetyl aspartate (p = 0.005) and increased whole brain phosphorus-31 MRS ATP (p = 0.039) over the 48 h after HI. Cell death was reduced with RIPostC in the periventricular white matter (p = 0.03), internal capsule (p = 0.002) and corpus callosum (p = 0.021); there was reduced microglial activation in corpus callosum (p = 0.001) and more surviving oligodendrocytes in corpus callosum (p = 0.029) and periventricular white matter (p = 0.001). Changes in gene expression were detected in the white matter at 48 h, including KATP channel and endothelin A receptor. Immediate RIPostC is a potentially safe and promising brain protective therapy for babies with NE with protection in white but not grey matter. PMID:26661194

  18. Gray, White Matter Concentration Changes and Their Correlation with Heterotopic Neurons in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tae, Woo Suk; Joo, Eun Yun; Kim, Sung Tae

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify changes in gray and white matter concentrations (GMC, WMC), and their relation to heterotopic neuron numbers in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). Materials and Methods The gray matter or white matter concentrations of 16 left and 15 right mTLE patients who achieved an excellent surgical outcome were compared with those of 24 healthy volunteers for the left group and with 23 healthy volunteers for the right group, by optimized voxel-based morphometry using unmodulated and modulated images. A histologic count of heterotopic neurons was obtained in the white matter of the anterior temporal lobe originating from the patients' surgical specimens. In addition, the number of heterotopic neurons were tested to determine if there was a correlation with the GMC or WMC. Results The GMCs of the left and right mTLE groups were reduced in the ipsilateral hippocampi, bilateral thalami, precentral gyri, and in the cerebellum. The WMCs were reduced in the ipsilateral white matter of the anterior temporal lobe, bilateral parahippocampal gyri, and internal capsules, but increased in the pons and bilateral precentral gyri. The heterotopic neuron counts in the left mTLE group showed a positive correlation (r = 0.819, p < 0.0001) with GMCs and a negative correlation (r = -0.839, p < 0.0001) with WMCs in the white matter of the anterior temporal lobe. Conclusion The present study shows the abnormalities of the cortico-thalamo-hippocampal network including a gray matter volume reduction in the anterior frontal lobes and an abnormality of brain tissue concentration in the pontine area. Furthermore, heterotopic neuron numbers were significantly correlated with GMC or WMC in the left white matter of anterior temporal lobe. PMID:20046492

  19. Gray and white matter changes associated with tool-use learning in macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Quallo, M. M.; Price, C. J.; Ueno, K.; Asamizuya, T.; Cheng, K.; Lemon, R. N.; Iriki, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used noninvasive MRI and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to detect changes in brain structure in three adult Japanese macaques trained to use a rake to retrieve food rewards. Monkeys, who were naive to any previous tool use, were scanned repeatedly in a 4-T scanner over 6 weeks, comprising 2 weeks of habituation followed by 2 weeks of intensive daily training and a 2-week posttraining period. VBM analysis revealed significant increases in gray matter with rake performance across the three monkeys. The effects were most significant (P < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons across the whole brain) in the right superior temporal sulcus, right second somatosensory area, and right intraparietal sulcus, with less significant effects (P < 0.001 uncorrected) in these same regions of the left hemisphere. Bilateral increases were also observed in the white matter of the cerebellar hemisphere in lobule 5. In two of the monkeys who exhibited rapid learning of the rake task, gray matter volume in peak voxels increased by up to 17% during the intensive training period; the earliest changes were seen after 1 week of intensive training, and they generally peaked when performance on the task plateaued. In the third monkey, who was slower to learn the task, peak voxels showed no systematic changes. Thus, VBM can detect significant brain changes in individual trained monkeys exposed to tool-use training for the first time. This approach could open up a means of investigating the underlying neurobiology of motor learning and other higher brain functions in individual animals. PMID:19820167

  20. Altered Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in College Students with Mobile Phone Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongming; Zou, Zhiling; Song, Hongwen; Xu, Xiaodan; Wang, Huijun; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Huang, Xiting

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone dependence (MPD) is a behavioral addiction that has become an increasing public mental health issue. While previous research has explored some of the factors that may predict MPD, the underlying neural mechanisms of MPD have not been investigated yet. The current study aimed to explore the microstructural variations associated with MPD as measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter (WM) integrity [four indices: fractional anisotropy (FA); mean diffusivity (MD); axial diffusivity (AD); and radial diffusivity (RD)] were calculated via voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis, respectively. Sixty-eight college students (42 female) were enrolled and separated into two groups [MPD group, N = 34; control group (CG), N = 34] based on Mobile Phone Addiction Index (MPAI) scale score. Trait impulsivity was also measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). In light of underlying trait impulsivity, results revealed decreased GMV in the MPD group relative to controls in regions such as the right superior frontal gyrus (sFG), right inferior frontal gyrus (iFG), and bilateral thalamus (Thal). In the MPD group, GMV in the above mentioned regions was negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. Results also showed significantly less FA and AD measures of WM integrity in the MPD group relative to controls in bilateral hippocampal cingulum bundle fibers (CgH). Additionally, in the MPD group, FA of the CgH was also negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. These findings provide the first morphological evidence of altered brain structure with mobile phone overuse, and may help to better understand the neural mechanisms of MPD in relation to other behavioral and substance addiction disorders. PMID:27199831

  1. White-matter microstructure and gray-matter volumes in adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Paillère Martinot, M-L; Lemaitre, H; Artiges, E; Miranda, R; Goodman, R; Penttilä, J; Struve, M; Fadai, T; Kappel, V; Poustka, L; Conrod, P; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Büchel, C; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Ittermann, B; Lawrence, C; Loth, E; Mann, K; Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Schumann, G; Martinot, J-L; L, Reed; S, Williams; A, Lourdusamy; S, Costafreda; A, Cattrell; C, Nymberg; L, Topper; L, Smith; S, Havatzias; K, Stueber; C, Mallik; TK, Clarke; D, Stacey; Wong C, Peng; H, Werts; S, Williams; C, Andrew; S, Desrivieres; S, Zewdie; I, Häke; N, Ivanov; A, Klär; J, Reuter; C, Palafox; C, Hohmann; C, Schilling; K, Lüdemann; A, Romanowski; A, Ströhle; E, Wolff; M, Rapp; R, Brühl; A, Ihlenfeld; B, Walaszek; F, Schubert; C, Connolly; J, Jones; E, Lalor; E, McCabe; A, Ní Shiothcháin; R, Whelan; R, Spanagel; F, Leonardi-Essmann; W, Sommer; S, Vollstaedt-Klein; F, Nees; S, Steiner; M, Buehler; E, Stolzenburg; C, Schmal; F, Schirmbeck; P, Gowland; N, Heym; C, Newman; T, Huebner; S, Ripke; E, Mennigen; K, Muller; V, Ziesch; C, Büchel; U, Bromberg; L, Lueken; J, Yacubian; J, Finsterbusch; N, Bordas; S, de Bournonville; Z, Bricaud; Briand F, Gollier; J, Massicotte; JB, Poline; H, Vulser; Y, Schwartz; C, Lalanne; V, Frouin; B, Thyreau; J, Dalley; A, Mar; N, Subramaniam; D, Theobald; N, Richmond; M, de Rover; A, Molander; E, Jordan; E, Robinson; L, Hipolata; M, Moreno; M, Arroyo; D, Stephens; T, Ripley; H, Crombag; Y, Pena; M, Lathrop; D, Zelenika; S, Heath; D, Lanzerath; B, Heinrichs; T, Spranger; B, Fuchs; C, Speiser; F, Resch; J, Haffner; P, Parzer; R, Brunner; A, Klaassen; I, Klaassen; P, Constant; X, Mignon; T, Thomsen; S, Zysset; A, Vestboe; J, Ireland; J, Rogers

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in white-matter (WM) microstructure, as lower fractional anisotropy (FA), have been reported in adolescent-onset bipolar disorder and in youth at familial risk for bipolarity. We sought to determine whether healthy adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms (SBP) would have early WM microstructural alterations and whether those alterations would be associated with differences in gray-matter (GM) volumes. Forty-two adolescents with three core manic symptoms and no psychiatric diagnosis, and 126 adolescents matched by age and sex, with no psychiatric diagnosis or symptoms, were identified after screening the IMAGEN database of 2223 young adolescents recruited from the general population. After image quality control, voxel-wise statistics were performed on the diffusion parameters using tract-based spatial statistics in 25 SBP adolescents and 77 controls, and on GM and WM images using voxel-based morphometry in 30 SBP adolescents and 106 controls. As compared with healthy controls, adolescents with SBP displayed lower FA values in a number of WM tracts, particularly in the corpus callosum, cingulum, bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, uncinate fasciculi and corticospinal tracts. Radial diffusivity was mainly higher in posterior parts of bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi and right cingulum. As compared with controls, SBP adolescents had lower GM volume in the left anterior cingulate region. This is the first study to investigate WM microstructure and GM morphometric variations in adolescents with SBP. The widespread FA alterations in association and projection tracts, associated with GM changes in regions involved in mood disorders, suggest altered structural connectivity in those adolescents. PMID:23628983

  2. Fractional Anisotropy of Cerebral White Matter and Thickness of Cortical Gray Matter across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    P., Kochunov; DC, Glahn; J., Lancaster; P.M., Thompson; V., Kochunov; B., Rogers; P., Fox; J., Blangero; D.E., Williamson

    2011-01-01

    We examined age trajectories of fractional anisotropy (FA) of cerebral white matter (WM) and thickness of cortical gray matter (GM) in 1,031 healthy human subjects (aged 11-90 years). Whole-brain FA and GM thickness values followed quadratic trajectories with age but the relationship between them was linear, indicating that a putative biological mechanism may explain the non-linearity of their age trajectories. Inclusion of the FA values into the quadratic model of the whole-brain and regional GM thickness changes with age made the effect of the age2 term no longer significant for the whole-brain GM thickness and greatly reduced its significance for regional GM thickness measurements. The phylogenetic order of cerebral myelination helped to further explain the intersubject variability in GM thickness. FA values for the early maturing WM were significantly better (p=10−6) at explaining variability in GM thickness in maturing (aged 11-20) subjects than FA values for the late maturing WM. The opposite trend was observed for aging subjects (aged 40-90) where FA values for the late maturing WM were better (p=10−16) at explaining the variability in GM thickness. We concluded that the non-linearity of the age trajectory for GM thickness, measured from T1-weighted MRI, was partially explained by the heterogeneity and the heterochronicity of the age-related changes in the microintegrity of cerebral WM. We consider these findings as the evidence that the measurements of age-related changes in GM thickness and FA are driven, in part, by a common biological mechanism, presumed to be related to changes in cerebral myelination. PMID:21640837

  3. White-matter microstructure and gray-matter volumes in adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms.

    PubMed

    Paillère Martinot, M-L; Lemaitre, H; Artiges, E; Miranda, R; Goodman, R; Penttilä, J; Struve, M; Fadai, T; Kappel, V; Poustka, L; Conrod, P; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G J; Büchel, C; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Ittermann, B; Lawrence, C; Loth, E; Mann, K; Paus, T; Pausova, Z; Rietschel, M; Robbins, T W; Smolka, M N; Schumann, G; Martinot, J-L

    2014-04-01

    Abnormalities in white-matter (WM) microstructure, as lower fractional anisotropy (FA), have been reported in adolescent-onset bipolar disorder and in youth at familial risk for bipolarity. We sought to determine whether healthy adolescents with subthreshold bipolar symptoms (SBP) would have early WM microstructural alterations and whether those alterations would be associated with differences in gray-matter (GM) volumes. Forty-two adolescents with three core manic symptoms and no psychiatric diagnosis, and 126 adolescents matched by age and sex, with no psychiatric diagnosis or symptoms, were identified after screening the IMAGEN database of 2223 young adolescents recruited from the general population. After image quality control, voxel-wise statistics were performed on the diffusion parameters using tract-based spatial statistics in 25 SBP adolescents and 77 controls, and on GM and WM images using voxel-based morphometry in 30 SBP adolescents and 106 controls. As compared with healthy controls, adolescents with SBP displayed lower FA values in a number of WM tracts, particularly in the corpus callosum, cingulum, bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, uncinate fasciculi and corticospinal tracts. Radial diffusivity was mainly higher in posterior parts of bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi and right cingulum. As compared with controls, SBP adolescents had lower GM volume in the left anterior cingulate region. This is the first study to investigate WM microstructure and GM morphometric variations in adolescents with SBP. The widespread FA alterations in association and projection tracts, associated with GM changes in regions involved in mood disorders, suggest altered structural connectivity in those adolescents. PMID:23628983

  4. Improved prediction of Alzheimer's disease with longitudinal white matter/gray matter contrast changes.

    PubMed

    Grydeland, Håkon; Westlye, Lars T; Walhovd, Kristine B; Fjell, Anders M

    2013-11-01

    Brain morphometry measures derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The objective of the present study was to test whether we could improve morphometry-based detection and prediction of disease state by use of white matter/gray matter (WM/GM) signal intensity contrast obtained from conventional MRI scans. We hypothesized that including WM/GM contrast change along with measures of atrophy in the entorhinal cortex and the hippocampi would yield better classification of AD patients, and more accurate prediction of early disease progression. T1 -weighted MRI scans from two sessions approximately 2 years apart from 78 participants with AD (Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) = 0.5-2) and 71 age-matched controls were used to calculate annual change rates. Results showed that WM/GM contrast decay was larger in AD compared with controls in the medial temporal lobes. For the discrimination between AD and controls, entorhinal WM/GM contrast decay contributed significantly when included together with decrease in entorhinal cortical thickness and hippocampal volume, and increased the area under the curve to 0.79 compared with 0.75 when using the two morphometric variables only. Independent effects of WM/GM contrast decay and improved classification were also observed for the CDR-based subgroups, including participants converting from either a non-AD status to very mild AD, or from very mild to mild AD. Thus, WM/GM contrast decay increased diagnostic accuracy beyond what was obtained by well-validated morphometric measures alone. The findings suggest that signal intensity properties constitute a sensitive biomarker for cerebral degeneration in AD. PMID:22674625

  5. Increased Number of White Matter Lesions in Patients with Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Michael J.; Morrison, Leslie A.; Kim, Helen; Hart, Blaine L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGKROUND AND PURPOSE Familial cerebral cavernous malformations, an autosomal dominant disorder, result in excess morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The disorder is most prevalent in the Southwest United States, where the affected families are most often carriers of the CCM1-KRIT1 Common Hispanic Mutation. The brain and spinal cord parenchyma in these individuals is usually affected by multiple cavernous malformations. Previous studies have shown abnormalities of endothelial cell junctions and the blood-brain barrier in cerebral cavernous malformations. Endothelial cell abnormalities have also been described in pathologic studies of white matter hyperintensities. We compared the prevalence of white matter hyperintensities in a population with known familial cerebral cavernous malformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS We examined 191 subjects with familial cerebral cavernous malformations who were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved study. All carry the same Common Hispanic Mutation in the CCM1 gene. Each subject underwent 3TMR imaging, including gradient recalled-echo, SWI, and FLAIR sequences. The number of cavernous malformations and the number of nonhemorrhagic white matter hyperintensities were counted. Subjects older than 60 yearsof age were excluded due to the high prevalence of white matter lesions in this population, and children younger than 6 were excluded due to potential sedation requirements. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the prevalence of abnormal white matter hyperintensities in those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations compared with healthy controls or those with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformation within the familial cerebral cavernous malformations group; it was also performed to evaluate the associations between abnormal white matter hyperintensities and age, sex, headaches, thyroid disease, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, seizure history, or modified Rankin Scale score

  6. Multimodal neuroimaging based classification of autism spectrum disorder using anatomical, neurochemical, and white matter correlates

    PubMed Central

    Libero, Lauren E.; DeRamus, Thomas P.; Lahti, Adrienne C.; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Kana, Rajesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques, such as fMRI, structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) have uncovered evidence for widespread functional and anatomical brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggesting it to be a system-wide neural systems disorder. Nevertheless, most previous studies have focused on examining one index of neuropathology through a single neuroimaging modality, and seldom using multiple modalities to examine the same cohort of individuals. The current study aims to bring together multiple brain imaging modalities (structural MRI, DTI, and 1H-MRS) to investigate the neural architecture in the same set of individuals (19 high-functioning adults with ASD and 18 typically developing (TD) peers). Morphometry analysis revealed increased cortical thickness in ASD participants, relative to typical controls, across the left cingulate, left pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal cortex, and right precuneus, and reduced cortical thickness in right cuneus and right precentral gyrus. ASD adults also had reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) for two clusters on the forceps minor of the corpus callosum, revealed by DTI analyses. 1H-MRS results showed a reduction in the N-acetylaspartate/Creatine ratio in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in ASD participants. A decision tree classification analysis across the three modalities resulted in classification accuracy of 91.9% with FA, RD, and cortical thickness as key predictors. Examining the same cohort of adults with ASD and their TD peers, this study found alterations in cortical thickness, white matter (WM) connectivity, and neurochemical concentration in ASD. These findings underscore the potential for multimodal imaging to better inform on the neural characteristics most relevant to the disorder. PMID:25797658

  7. APOL1 renal-risk variants associate with reduced cerebral white matter lesion volume and increased gray matter volume.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Gadegbeku, Crystal A; Bryan, R Nick; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Ma, Lijun; Rocco, Michael V; Smith, S Carrie; Xu, Jianzhao; Whitlow, Christopher T; Wagner, Benjamin C; Langefeld, Carl D; Hawfield, Amret T; Bates, Jeffrey T; Lerner, Alan J; Raj, Dominic S; Sadaghiani, Mohammad S; Toto, Robert D; Wright, Jackson T; Bowden, Donald W; Williamson, Jeff D; Sink, Kaycee M; Maldjian, Joseph A; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-08-01

    To assess apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) renal-risk-variant effects on the brain, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based cerebral volumes and cognitive function were assessed in 517 African American-Diabetes Heart Study (AA-DHS) Memory IN Diabetes (MIND) and 2568 hypertensive African American Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) participants without diabetes. Within these cohorts, 483 and 197 had cerebral MRI, respectively. AA-DHS participants were characterized as follows: 60.9% female, mean age of 58.6 years, diabetes duration 13.1 years, estimated glomerular filtration rate of 88.2 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and a median spot urine albumin to creatinine ratio of 10.0 mg/g. In additive genetic models adjusting for age, sex, ancestry, scanner, intracranial volume, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, statins, nephropathy, smoking, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease, APOL1 renal-risk-variants were positively associated with gray matter volume (β = 3.4 × 10(-3)) and negatively associated with white matter lesion volume (β = -0.303) (an indicator of cerebral small vessel disease) and cerebrospinal fluid volume (β= -30707) (all significant), but not with white matter volume or cognitive function. Significant associations corresponding to adjusted effect sizes (β/SE) were observed with gray matter volume (0.16) and white matter lesion volume (-0.208), but not with cerebrospinal fluid volume (-0.251). Meta-analysis results with SPRINT Memory and Cognition in Decreased Hypertension (MIND) participants who had cerebral MRI were confirmatory. Thus, APOL1 renal-risk-variants are associated with larger gray matter volume and lower white matter lesion volume suggesting lower intracranial small vessel disease. PMID:27342958

  8. Unraveling the secrets of white matter – Bridging the gap between cellular, animal and human imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Walhovd, K.B.; Johansen-Berg, H.; Káradóttir, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    The CNS white matter makes up about half of the human brain, and with advances in human imaging it is increasingly becoming clear that changes in the white matter play a major role in shaping human behavior and learning. However, the mechanisms underlying these white matter changes remain poorly understood. Within this special issue of Neuroscience on white matter, recent advances in our knowledge of the function of white matter, from the molecular level to human imaging, are reviewed. Collaboration between fields is essential to understand the function of the white matter, but due to differences in methods and field-specific ‘language’, communication is often hindered. In this review, we try to address this hindrance by introducing the methods and providing a basic background to myelin biology and human imaging as a prelude to the other reviews within this special issue. PMID:25003711

  9. Portal-systemic shunt encephalopathy presenting with diffuse cerebral white matter lesion: an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Noriyuki; Kumamoto, Toshihide; Hanaoka, Takuya; Nakamura, Kenichiro; Hazama, Yusuke; Arakawa, Ryuki

    2008-12-01

    We report herein an autopsy case of portal-systemic encephalopathy (PSE) presenting with diffuse tissue rarefaction in the cerebral deep white matter. Clinically, the patient showed recurrent episodes of unconsciousness, abnormal behavior and urinary incontinence, as well as flapping tremor. Cognitive impairment and peripheral neuropathy developed following recurrent episodes. Although conventional arterial portography revealed a small portal-systemic collateral vessel of a left gastro-renal venous shunt, abdominal CT and liver biopsy showed no evidence of liver cirrhosis and serum ammonia level showed a mild increase. T2-weighted MRI demonstrated symmetrical signal hyperintensities in the deep white matter. Neuropathological findings showed Alzheimer type II astrocytes in the deep layers of the cerebral cortices and severe tissue rarefaction with no or slight reactive astrocytosis in the subcortical and deep white matter. These white matter changes have been reported infrequently in patients with PSE. The present case suggests that chronic PSE without liver cirrhosis may develop diffuse white matter lesions. PMID:18384515

  10. Coupled changes in brain white matter microstructure and fluid intelligence in later life.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Stuart J; Bastin, Mark E; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Engelhardt, Laura E; Cox, Simon R; Royle, Natalie A; Gow, Alan J; Corley, Janie; Pattie, Alison; Taylor, Adele M; Valdés Hernández, Maria Del C; Starr, John M; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J

    2015-06-01

    Understanding aging-related cognitive decline is of growing importance in aging societies, but relatively little is known about its neural substrates. Measures of white matter microstructure are known to correlate cross-sectionally with cognitive ability measures, but only a few small studies have tested for longitudinal relations among these variables. We tested whether there were coupled changes in brain white matter microstructure indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA) and three broad cognitive domains (fluid intelligence, processing speed, and memory) in a large cohort of human participants with longitudinal diffusion tensor MRI and detailed cognitive data taken at ages 73 years (n = 731) and 76 years (n = 488). Longitudinal changes in white matter microstructure were coupled with changes in fluid intelligence, but not with processing speed or memory. Individuals with higher baseline white matter FA showed less subsequent decline in processing speed. Our results provide evidence for a longitudinal link between changes in white matter microstructure and aging-related cognitive decline during the eighth decade of life. They are consistent with theoretical perspectives positing that a corticocortical "disconnection" partly explains cognitive aging. PMID:26041932

  11. Dementia associated with periventricular and deep white matter alterations: a subtype of subcortical dementia.

    PubMed

    Libon, D J; Bogdanoff, B; Bonavita, J; Skalina, S; Cloud, B S; Resh, R; Cass, P; Ball, S K

    1997-01-01

    This research examined the neuropsychological functioning of demented patients with periventricular and deep white matter alterations. Thirty-three outpatients with NINCDS-ADRDA probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 27 outpatients with probable/ possible ischaemic vascular dementia (IVD, Chui et al., 1992) associated with periventricular and deep white matter alterations matched for age, education, level of dementia, and functional disability were studied. White matter alterations were measured using a 40-point scale previously described by Junque et al. (1990). Subjects with cortical CVAs were excluded. On executive control tests, IVD subjects made more preservations on tests of mental control and response set, and produced fewer responses on phonemic controlled oral word association tests (letters: F,A,S). IVD subjects also made more preservations and graphomotor errors on clock drawings. On the California Verbal Learning Test the IVD group performed better than AD subjects on the short delay free recall test condition, the recognition discriminability index, and made fewer intrusion errors on both free and cued recall conditions. We conclude that neuropsychological assessment can differentiate AD from IVD associated with white matter alterations, and that the neuropsychological profile of demented subjects with significant periventricular and deep white matter alterations is similar to other subcortical dementing illnesses. PMID:14588416

  12. Characterizing white matter health and organization in atherosclerotic vascular disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Bijanki, Kelly Rowe; Arndt, Stephan; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Nopoulos, Peg; Paradiso, Sergio; Matsui, Joy T.; Johnson, Hans J.; Moser, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD) is endemic to the developed world, with known negative outcomes for cognition and brain health. The effects of AVD on the white matter fibers of the brain have not yet been studied using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). This study examined differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) between AVD and healthy comparison (HC) participants, and described the regional patterns of FA in each group. AVD participants were hypothesized to have lower FA than HC participants, indicating abnormalities in white matter health or organization. 1.5 tesla diffusion tensor imaging was performed in 35 AVD and 22 HC participants. Mean FA measures were calculated for the white matter of the whole brain, as well for individual lobes. Globally and in every brain region measured except the temporal lobes, there were significant effects of group where AVD participants had lower FA values than their HC counterparts. Group differences in FA remained significant when controlled for white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, suggesting that FA detects white matter abnormality above and beyond what is measurable using the older WMH technique. These findings suggest a likely neural substrate underlying the changes in cognition and mood reported in atherosclerotic vascular disease patients. PMID:24144509

  13. COMT genotype affects prefrontal white matter pathways in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Moriah E.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Colich, Natalie L.; Perry, Lee M.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena I.; Louro, Hugo M.; Hallmayer, Joachim F.; Waugh, Christian E.; Bammer, Roland; Glover, Gary H.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is widely used to evaluate the development of white matter. Information about how alterations in major neurotransmitter systems, such as the dopamine (DA) system, influence this development in healthy children, however, is lacking. Catechol-O-metyltransferase (COMT) is the major enzyme responsible for DA degradation in prefrontal brain structures, for which there is a corresponding genetic polymorphism (val158met) that confers either a more or less efficient version of this enzyme. The result of this common genetic variation is that children may have more or less available synaptic DA in prefrontal brain regions. In the present study we examined the relation between diffusion properties of frontal white matter structures and the COMT val158met polymorphism in 40 children ages 9–15. We found that the val allele was associated with significantly elevated fractional anisotropy values and reduced axial and radial diffusivities. These results indicate that the development of white matter in healthy children is related to COMT genotype and that alterations in white matter may be related to the differential availability of prefrontal DA. This investigation paves the way for further studies of how common functional variants in the genome might influence the development of brain white matter. PMID:20083203

  14. Independent component analysis of DTI data reveals white matter covariances in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guo, Ting; Sun, Qiaoyue; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with the clinical symptom of the continuous deterioration of cognitive and memory functions. Multiple diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) can successfully explain the white matter damages in AD patients. However, most studies focused on the univariate measures (voxel-based analysis) to examine the differences between AD patients and normal controls (NCs). In this investigation, we applied a multivariate independent component analysis (ICA) to investigate the white matter covariances based on FA measurement from DTI data in 35 AD patients and 45 NCs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We found that six independent components (ICs) showed significant FA reductions in white matter covariances in AD compared with NC, including the genu and splenium of corpus callosum (IC-1 and IC-2), middle temporal gyral of temporal lobe (IC-3), sub-gyral of frontal lobe (IC-4 and IC-5) and sub-gyral of parietal lobe (IC-6). Our findings revealed covariant white matter loss in AD patients and suggest that the unsupervised data-driven ICA method is effective to explore the changes of FA in AD. This study assists us in understanding the mechanism of white matter covariant reductions in the development of AD.

  15. Brain white matter structure and information processing speed in healthy older age.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Ksenia A; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Ritchie, Stuart J; Cox, Simon R; Storkey, Amos J; Starr, John M; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J; Bastin, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive decline, especially the slowing of information processing speed, is associated with normal ageing. This decline may be due to brain cortico-cortical disconnection caused by age-related white matter deterioration. We present results from a large, narrow age range cohort of generally healthy, community-dwelling subjects in their seventies who also had their cognitive ability tested in youth (age 11 years). We investigate associations between older age brain white matter structure, several measures of information processing speed and childhood cognitive ability in 581 subjects. Analysis of diffusion tensor MRI data using Tract-based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) showed that all measures of information processing speed, as well as a general speed factor composed from these tests (g speed), were significantly associated with fractional anisotropy (FA) across the white matter skeleton rather than in specific tracts. Cognitive ability measured at age 11 years was not associated with older age white matter FA, except for the g speed-independent components of several individual processing speed tests. These results indicate that quicker and more efficient information processing requires global connectivity in older age, and that associations between white matter FA and information processing speed (both individual test scores and g speed), unlike some other aspects of later life brain structure, are generally not accounted for by cognitive ability measured in youth. PMID:26254904

  16. Quantitative Tractography Metrics of White Matter Integrity in Diffusion-Tensor MRI

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Stephen; Lee, Stephanie Y.; Voorn, Thom; Tate, David F.; Paul, Robert H.; Zhang, Song; Salloway, Stephen P.; Malloy, Paul F.; Laidlaw, David H.

    2009-01-01

    We present new quantitative diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) tractography-based metrics for assessing cerebral white matter integrity. These metrics extend prior work in this area. Tractography models of cerebral white matter were produced from each subject's DTI data. The models are a set of curves (e.g., “streamtubes”) derived from DTI data that represent the underlying topography of the cerebral white matter. Nine metrics were calculated in whole brain tractography models and in three “tracts-of-interest” (TOI): transcallosal fibers, and the left and right cingulum bundles. The metrics included the number of streamtubes and several metrics based on the summed length of streamtubes in including some that were weighted by scalar anisotropy metrics and normalized for estimated intracranial volume. We then tested whether patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (i.e., vascular cognitive impairment or VCI) vs. healthy controls (HC) differed on the metrics. The metrics were significantly lower in the VCI group in whole brain and in transcallosal TOI but not in the left or right cingulum bundles. The metrics correlated significantly with cognitive functions known to be impacted by white matter abnormalities (e.g., processing speed) but not with those more impacted by cortical disease (e.g., naming). These new metrics help bridge the gap between DTI tractography and scalar analytical methods and provide a potential means for examining group differences in white matter integrity in specific tracts-of-interest. PMID:18617421

  17. Coupled Changes in Brain White Matter Microstructure and Fluid Intelligence in Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, Mark E.; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Engelhardt, Laura E.; Cox, Simon R.; Royle, Natalie A.; Gow, Alan J.; Corley, Janie; Pattie, Alison; Taylor, Adele M.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Starr, John M; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding aging-related cognitive decline is of growing importance in aging societies, but relatively little is known about its neural substrates. Measures of white matter microstructure are known to correlate cross-sectionally with cognitive ability measures, but only a few small studies have tested for longitudinal relations among these variables. We tested whether there were coupled changes in brain white matter microstructure indexed by fractional anisotropy (FA) and three broad cognitive domains (fluid intelligence, processing speed, and memory) in a large cohort of human participants with longitudinal diffusion tensor MRI and detailed cognitive data taken at ages 73 years (n = 731) and 76 years (n = 488). Longitudinal changes in white matter microstructure were coupled with changes in fluid intelligence, but not with processing speed or memory. Individuals with higher baseline white matter FA showed less subsequent decline in processing speed. Our results provide evidence for a longitudinal link between changes in white matter microstructure and aging-related cognitive decline during the eighth decade of life. They are consistent with theoretical perspectives positing that a corticocortical “disconnection” partly explains cognitive aging. PMID:26041932

  18. Schizophrenia Patients Demonstrate Both Inter-Voxel Level and Intra-Voxel Level White Matter Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Chuanjun; Ma, Xiaolei; Qu, Hongru; Wang, Lina; Jia, Feng; Wang, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) are the most frequently used metrics to investigate white matter impairments in mental disorders. However, these two metrics are derived from intra-voxel analyses and only reflect the diffusion properties solely within the voxel unit. Local diffusion homogeneity (LDH) is a newly developed inter-voxel metric which quantifies the local coherence of water molecule diffusion in a model-free manner. In this study, 94 schizophrenia patients and 91 sex- and age-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) examinations. White matter integrity was assessed by FA, MD and LDH. Group differences in these metrics were compared using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Compared with healthy controls, schizophrenia patients exhibited reduced FA and increased MD in the corpus callosum, cingulum, internal capsule, fornix and widespread superficial white matter in the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobes. We also found decreased LDH in the corpus callosum, cingulum, internal capsule and fornix in schizophrenia. Our findings suggest that both intra-voxel and inter-voxel diffusion metrics are able to detect impairments in the anisotropic white matter regions, and intra-voxel diffusion metrics could detect additional impairments in the widespread isotropic white matter regions in schizophrenia. PMID:27618693

  19. Characterization of neurons in the cortical white matter in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Richter, Zsófia; Janszky, József; Sétáló, György; Horváth, Réka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Seress, László; Ábrahám, Hajnalka

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter, and to investigate their distribution in mesial temporal sclerosis. Immunohistochemistry and quantification of neurons were performed on surgically resected tissue sections of patients with therapy-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal lobe tissues of patients with tumor but without epilepsy and that from autopsy were used as controls. Neurons were identified with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against NeuN, calcium-binding proteins, transcription factor Tbr1 and neurofilaments. We found significantly higher density of neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy than in that of controls. Based on their morphology and neurochemical content, both excitatory and inhibitory cells were present among these neurons. A subset of neurons in the white matter was Tbr-1-immunoreactive and these neurons coexpressed NeuN and neurofilament marker SMI311R. No colocalization of Tbr1 was observed with the inhibitory neuronal markers, calcium-binding proteins. We suggest that a large population of white matter neurons comprises remnants of the subplate. Furthermore, we propose that a subset of white matter neurons was arrested during migration, highlighting the role of cortical maldevelopment in epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis. PMID:27423628

  20. Microstructure and Cerebral Blood Flow within White Matter of the Human Brain: A TBSS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Giezendanner, Stéphanie; Fisler, Melanie Sarah; Soravia, Leila Maria; Andreotti, Jennifer; Walther, Sebastian; Wiest, Roland; Dierks, Thomas; Federspiel, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background White matter (WM) fibers connect different brain regions and are critical for proper brain function. However, little is known about the cerebral blood flow in WM and its relation to WM microstructure. Recent improvements in measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) by means of arterial spin labeling (ASL) suggest that the signal in white matter may be detected. Its implications for physiology needs to be extensively explored. For this purpose, CBF and its relation to anisotropic diffusion was analyzed across subjects on a voxel-wise basis with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and also across white matter tracts within subjects. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging and ASL were acquired in 43 healthy subjects (mean age = 26.3 years). Results CBF in WM was observed to correlate positively with fractional anisotropy across subjects in parts of the splenium of corpus callosum, the right posterior thalamic radiation (including the optic radiation), the forceps major, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. Furthermore, radial diffusivity correlated negatively with CBF across subjects in similar regions. Moreover, CBF and FA correlated positively across white matter tracts within subjects. Conclusion The currently observed findings on a macroscopic level might reflect the metabolic demand of white matter on a microscopic level involving myelination processes or axonal function. However, the exact underlying physiological mechanism of this relationship needs further evaluation. PMID:26942763

  1. White matter microstructure pathology in classic galactosemia revealed by neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; Zhang, Hui; Bastiani, Matteo; Jansma, Bernadette M; Roebroeck, Alard; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-03-01

    White matter abnormalities have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data collected in the past were generally qualitative in nature. Our objective was to investigate white matter microstructure pathology and examine correlations with outcome and behaviour in this disease, by using multi-shell diffusion weighted imaging. In addition to standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) was used to estimate density and orientation dispersion of neurites in a group of eight patients (aged 16-21 years) and eight healthy controls (aged 15-20 years). Extensive white matter abnormalities were found: neurite density index (NDI) was lower in the patient group in bilateral anterior areas, and orientation dispersion index (ODI) was increased mainly in the left hemisphere. These specific regional profiles are in agreement with the cognitive profile observed in galactosemia, showing higher order cognitive impairments, and language and motor impairments, respectively. Less favourable white matter properties correlated positively with age and age at onset of diet, and negatively with behavioural outcome (e.g. visual working memory). To conclude, this study provides evidence of white matter pathology regarding density and dispersion of neurites in these patients. The results are discussed in light of suggested pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25344151

  2. Neuroblast Distribution after Cortical Impact Is Influenced by White Matter Injury in the Immature Gyrencephalic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sabrina R.; Smith, Colin M.; Keeley, Kristen L.; McGuone, Declan; Dodge, Carter P.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Costine, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical contusions are a common type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. Current knowledge of neuroblast response to cortical injury arises primarily from studies utilizing aspiration or cryoinjury in rodents. In infants and children, cortical impact affects both gray and white matter and any neurogenic response may be complicated by the large expanse of white matter between the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the cortex, and the large number of neuroblasts in transit along the major white matter tracts to populate brain regions. Previously, we described an age-dependent increase of neuroblasts in the SVZ in response to cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain. Here, we investigate if neuroblasts target the injury, if white matter injury influences repair efforts, and if postnatal population of brain regions are disrupted. Piglets received a cortical impact to the rostral gyrus cortex or sham surgery at postnatal day (PND) 7, BrdU 2 days prior to (PND 5 and 6) or after injury (PND 7 and 8), and brains were collected at PND 14. Injury did not alter the number of neuroblasts in the white matter between the SVZ and the rostral gyrus. In the gray matter of the injury site, neuroblast density was increased in cavitated lesions, and the number of BrdU+ neuroblasts was increased, but comprised less than 1% of all neuroblasts. In the white matter of the injury site, neuroblasts with differentiating morphology were densely arranged along the cavity edge. In a ventral migratory stream, neuroblast density was greater in subjects with a cavitated lesion, indicating that TBI may alter postnatal development of regions supplied by that stream. Cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain produced complicated and variable lesions, increased neuroblast density in cavitated gray matter, resulted in potentially differentiating neuroblasts in the white matter, and may alter the postnatal population of brain regions utilizing a population of neuroblasts that

  3. Neuroblast Distribution after Cortical Impact Is Influenced by White Matter Injury in the Immature Gyrencephalic Brain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sabrina R; Smith, Colin M; Keeley, Kristen L; McGuone, Declan; Dodge, Carter P; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Costine, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Cortical contusions are a common type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. Current knowledge of neuroblast response to cortical injury arises primarily from studies utilizing aspiration or cryoinjury in rodents. In infants and children, cortical impact affects both gray and white matter and any neurogenic response may be complicated by the large expanse of white matter between the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the cortex, and the large number of neuroblasts in transit along the major white matter tracts to populate brain regions. Previously, we described an age-dependent increase of neuroblasts in the SVZ in response to cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain. Here, we investigate if neuroblasts target the injury, if white matter injury influences repair efforts, and if postnatal population of brain regions are disrupted. Piglets received a cortical impact to the rostral gyrus cortex or sham surgery at postnatal day (PND) 7, BrdU 2 days prior to (PND 5 and 6) or after injury (PND 7 and 8), and brains were collected at PND 14. Injury did not alter the number of neuroblasts in the white matter between the SVZ and the rostral gyrus. In the gray matter of the injury site, neuroblast density was increased in cavitated lesions, and the number of BrdU(+) neuroblasts was increased, but comprised less than 1% of all neuroblasts. In the white matter of the injury site, neuroblasts with differentiating morphology were densely arranged along the cavity edge. In a ventral migratory stream, neuroblast density was greater in subjects with a cavitated lesion, indicating that TBI may alter postnatal development of regions supplied by that stream. Cortical impact in the immature gyrencephalic brain produced complicated and variable lesions, increased neuroblast density in cavitated gray matter, resulted in potentially differentiating neuroblasts in the white matter, and may alter the postnatal population of brain regions utilizing a population of neuroblasts that

  4. Microstructural changes in white matter associated with freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Sarah; Leunissen, Inge; Vervoort, Griet; Vandenberghe, Wim; Swinnen, Stephan; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2015-04-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), freezing of gait (FOG) is associated with widespread functional and structural gray matter changes throughout the brain. Previous study of freezing-related white matter changes was restricted to brainstem and cerebellar locomotor tracts. This study was undertaken to determine the spatial distribution of white matter damage associated with FOG by combining whole brain and striatofrontal seed-based diffusion tensor imaging. Diffusion-weighted images were collected in 26 PD patients and 16 age-matched controls. Parkinson's disease groups with (n = 11) and without freezing of gait (n = 15) were matched for age and disease severity. We applied tract-based spatial statistics to compare fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of white matter structure across the whole brain between groups. Probabilistic tractography was used to evaluate fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of key subcortico-cortical tracts. Tract-based spatial statistics revealed decreased fractional anisotropy in PD with FOG in bilateral cerebellar and superior longitudinal fascicle clusters. Increased mean diffusivity values were apparent in the right internal capsule, superior frontal cortex, anterior corona radiata, the left anterior thalamic radiation, and cerebellum. Tractography showed consistent white matter alterations in striatofrontal tracts through the putamen, caudate, pallidum, subthalamic nucleus, and in connections of the cerebellar peduncle with subthalamic nucleus and pedunculopontine nucleus bilaterally. We conclude that FOG is associated with diffuse white matter damage involving major cortico-cortical, corticofugal motor, and several striatofrontal tracts in addition to previously described cerebello-pontine connectivity changes. These distributed white matter abnormalities may contribute to the motor and non-motor correlates of FOG. PMID:25640958

  5. White and Black Teachers' Job Satisfaction: Does Relational Demography Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild, Susan; Tobias, Robert; Corcoran, Sean; Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine; Noguera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Data on the impact of student, teacher, and principal racial and gender composition in urban schools on teacher work outcomes are limited. This study, a secondary data analysis of White and Black urban public school teachers using data taken from the restricted use 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), examines the effects of relational…

  6. A study of brain white matter plasticity in early blinds using tract-based spatial statistics and tract statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lao, Yi; Kang, Yue; Collignon, Olivier; Brun, Caroline; Kheibai, Shadi B; Alary, Flamine; Gee, James; Nelson, Marvin D; Lepore, Franco; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-12-16

    Early blind individuals are known to exhibit structural brain reorganization. Particularly, early-onset blindness may trigger profound brain alterations that affect not only the visual system but also the remaining sensory systems. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows in-vivo visualization of brain white matter connectivity, and has been extensively used to study brain white matter structure. Among statistical approaches based on DTI, tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) is widely used because of its ability to automatically perform whole brain white matter studies. Tract specific analysis (TSA) is a more recent method that localizes changes in specific white matter bundles. In the present study, we compare TBSS and TSA results of DTI scans from 12 early blind individuals and 13 age-matched sighted controls, with two aims: (a) to investigate white matter alterations associated with early visual deprivation; (b) to examine the relative sensitivity of TSA when compared with TBSS, for both deficit and hypertrophy of white matter microstructures. Both methods give consistent results for broad white matter regions of deficits. However, TBSS does not detect hypertrophy of white matter, whereas TSA shows a higher sensitivity in detecting subtle differences in white matter colocalized to the posterior parietal lobe. PMID:26559727

  7. in vivo quantification of white matter microstructure for use in aging: A focus on two emerging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, Melissa; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Charlton, Rebecca A.; Dean, Douglas; Little, Deborah; Deoni, Sean C

    2013-01-01

    Human brain imaging has seen many advances in the quantification of white matter in vivo. For example, these advances have revealed the association between white matter damage and vascular disease as well as their impact on risk for and development of dementia and depression in an aging population. Current neuroimaging methods to quantify white