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Sample records for adult wild-type mice

  1. Sod1 gene ablation in adult mice leads to physiological changes at the neuromuscular junction similar to changes that occur in old wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Ivannikov, Maxim V; Van Remmen, Holly

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be important mediators of muscle atrophy and weakness in aging and many degenerative conditions. However, the mechanisms and physiological processes specifically affected by elevated ROS in neuromuscular units that contribute to muscle weakness during aging are not well defined. Here we investigate the effects of chronic oxidative stress on neurotransmission and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling mechanisms in the levator auris longus (LAL) muscle from young (4-8 months) and old (22-28 months) wild-type mice and young adult Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase 1 knockout (Sod1(-/-)) mice. The frequency of spontaneous neurotransmitter release and the amplitude of evoked neurotransmitter release in young Sod1(-/-) and old wild-type LAL neuromuscular junctions were significantly reduced from the young wild-type values, and those declines were mirrored by decreases in synaptic vesicle pool size. Presynaptic cytosolic calcium concentration and mitochondrial calcium uptake amplitudes showed substantial increases in stimulated young Sod1(-/-) and old axon terminals. Surprisingly, LAL muscle fibers from old mice showed a greater excitability than fibers from either young wild-type or young Sod1(-/-) LAL. Both evoked excitatory junction potential (EJP) and spontaneous mini EJP amplitudes were considerably higher in LAL muscles from old mice than in fibers from young Sod1(-/-) LAL muscle. Despite a greater excitability, sarcoplasmic calcium influx in both old wild-type and young Sod1(-/-) LAL muscle fibers was significantly less. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium levels were also reduced in both old wild-type and young Sod1(-/-) mice, but the difference was not statistically significant in muscle fibers from old wild-type mice. The protein ratio of triad calcium channels RyR1/DHPR was not different in all groups. However, fibers from both young Sod1(-/-) and old mice had substantially elevated levels of protein carbonylation and S

  2. Early Life Inorganic Lead Exposure Induces Testicular Teratoma and Renal and Urinary Bladder Preneoplasia in Adult Metallothionein-Knockout Mice but Not in Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic lead compounds are carcinogenic in animals and have carcinogenic potential in humans. In mice, lead (Pb) is a transplacental carcinogen in the kidney. Metallothionein (MT) is a metal-binding protein that can reduce the toxicity of various metals, including Pb, either by direct sequestration or as an antioxidant for metals that generate reactive oxygen species. Although MT appears to reduce Pb carcinogenicity in adult mice it is unknown how MT deficiency may affect Pb carcinogenicity from early life exposure. Thus, groups (n = 10) of pregnant MT-I/II double knockout (MT-null) or 129/SVJ MT wild type (WT) mice were exposed to Pb acetate in the drinking water (0, 2000, 4000 ppm Pb) from gestation day 8 through birth and during lactation. Maternal drinking water Pb exposure continued to weaning at 4 weeks of age and the male offspring were then directly exposed to Pb until 8 weeks of age and observed until 2 years old. High dose (4000 ppm) but not low dose (2000 ppm) Pb reduced survival in the latter part of the study in both MT-null and WT mice. In MT-null mice, but not WT, early life Pb exposure caused a dose-related increase in testicular teratomas, to a maximum incidence of 28% compared to control (4%). Pb-induced renal cystic hyperplasia, considered preneoplastic, were a prominent occurrence in MT-null mice but nearly absent in WT mice. Pb dose-related increases in renal cystic hyperplasia occurred in adult MT-null with early life exposure with maximal incidence of 52%. Pb-treated MT-null mice also showed dose-related increases in urinary bladder hyperplasia with occasional papilloma that were absent in WT mice. Thus, MT deficiency made mice more sensitive to early life Pb exposure with regard to testes tumors, and renal and urinary bladder preneoplastic lesions. PMID:20600549

  3. Beta Cell Formation in vivo Through Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) in Wild Type Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Bruno; Hu, Wenchao; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is essential in type 1 diabetic individuals and is required in ~40- 50% of type 2 diabetics during their lifetime. Prior attempts at beta cell regeneration have relied upon pancreatic injury to induce beta cell proliferation, dedifferentiation and activation of the embryonic pathway, or stem cell replacement. We report an alternative method to transform adult non-stem (somatic) cells into pancreatic beta cells. The Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) approach targets cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic function in the organ's adult state and utilizes a synergistic mechanism that integrates three important levels of cellular regulation to induce beta cell formation: (i) glucose metabolism, (ii) membrane receptor function, and (iii) gene transcription. The aim of the present study was to induce pancreatic beta cell formation in vivo in adult animals without stem cells and without dedifferentiating cells to recapitulate the embryonic pathway as previously published (1-3). Our results employing CNIP demonstrate that: (i) insulin secreting cells can be generated in adult pancreatic tissue in vivo and circumvent the problem of generating endocrine (glucagon and somatostatin) cells that exert deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis, and (ii) longterm normalization of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion can be achieved in a wild type diabetic mouse model. The CNIP cocktail has the potential to be used as a preventative or therapeutic treatment or cure for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26696016

  4. Forebrain microglia from wild-type but not adult 5xFAD mice prevent amyloid-β plaque formation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Masuch, Annette; Nestel, Sigrun; Katzmarski, Natalie; Meyer-Luehmann, Melanie; Biber, Knut

    2015-01-01

    The role of microglia in amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition is controversial. In the present study, an organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC) system with an in vivo-like microglial-neuronal environment was used to investigate the potential contribution of microglia to Aβ plaque formation. We found that microglia ingested Aβ, thereby preventing plaque formation in OHSCs. Conversely, Aβ deposits formed rapidly in microglia-free wild-type slices. The capacity to prevent Aβ plaque formation was absent in forebrain microglia from young adult but not juvenile 5xFamilial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) mice. Since no loss of Aβ clearance capacity was observed in both wild-type and cerebellar microglia from 5xFAD animals, the high Aβ1-42 burden in the forebrain of 5xFAD animals likely underlies the exhaustion of microglial Aβ clearance capacity. These data may therefore explain why Aβ plaque formation has never been described in wild-type mice, and point to a beneficial role of microglia in AD pathology. We also describe a new method to study Aβ plaque formation in a cell culture setting.

  5. Restoration of cocaine stimulation and reward by reintroducing wild type dopamine transporter in adult knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyin; O'Neill, Brian; Han, Dawn D; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Wang, Yanlin; Gu, Howard H

    2014-11-01

    In previous studies, we generated knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) and found cocaine does not stimulate locomotion or produce reward in these mice, indicating DAT inhibition is necessary for cocaine stimulation and reward. However, DAT uptake is reduced in DAT-CI mice and thus the lack of cocaine responses could be due to adaptive changes. To test this, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild type DAT (AAV-DATwt) back into adult DAT-CI mice, which restores cocaine inhibition of DAT in affected brain regions but does not reverse the adaptive changes. In an earlier study we showed that AAV-DATwt injections in regions covering the lateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) and lateral caudate-putamen (CPu) restored cocaine stimulation but not cocaine reward. In the current study, we expanded the AAV-DATwt infected areas to cover the olfactory tubercle (Tu) and the ventral midbrain (vMB) containing the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) in addition to CPu and NAc with multiple injections. These mice displayed the restoration of both locomotor stimulation and cocaine reward. We further found that AAV-DATwt injection in the vMB alone was sufficient to restore both cocaine stimulation and reward in DAT-CI mice. AAV injected in the VTA and SN resulted in DATwt expression and distribution to the DA terminal regions. In summary, cocaine induced locomotion and reward can be restored in fully developed DAT-CI mice, and cocaine inhibition of DAT expressed in dopaminergic neurons originated from the ventral midbrain mediates cocaine reward and stimulation.

  6. Restoration of Cocaine Stimulation and Reward by Reintroducing Wild Type Dopamine Transporter in Adult Knock-in Mice with a Cocaine-Insensitive Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiyin; O’Neill, Brian; Han, Dawn D.; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Wang, Yanlin; Gu, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we generated knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) and found cocaine does not stimulate locomotion or produce reward in these mice, indicating DAT inhibition is necessary for cocaine stimulation and reward. However, DAT uptake is reduced in DAT-CI mice and thus the lack of cocaine responses could be due to adaptive changes. To test this, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild type DAT (AAV-DATwt) back into adult DAT-CI mice, which restores cocaine inhibition of DAT in affected brain regions but does not reverse the adaptive changes. In an earlier study we showed that AAV-DATwt injections in regions covering the lateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) and lateral caudate-putamen (CPu) restored cocaine stimulation but not cocaine reward. In the current study, we expanded the AAV-DATwt infected areas to cover the olfactory tubercle (Tu) and the ventral midbrain (vMB) containing the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) in addition to CPu and NAc with multiple injections. These mice displayed the restoration of both locomotor stimulation and cocaine reward. We further found that AAV-DATwt injection in the vMB alone was sufficient to restore both cocaine stimulation and reward in DAT-CI mice. AAV injected in the VTA and SN resulted in DATwt expression and distribution to the DA terminal regions. In summary, cocaine induced locomotion and reward can be restored in fully developed DAT-CI mice, and cocaine inhibition of DAT expressed in dopaminergic neurons originated from the ventral midbrain mediates cocaine reward and stimulation. PMID:24835281

  7. Action Potentials are required for nitric oxide dependent LTP in CA1 neurons of adult GluR1 knockout and Wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Keith G.; Hardingham, Neil R.; Fox, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Neocortical LTP consists of both pre- and postsynaptic components that rely on nitric oxide (NO) and GluR1 respectively. In this study, we found that hippocampal LTP, induced by theta-burst stimulation in mature (> 8 week old) GluR1 knockout mice was almost entirely NO-dependent and involved both the α splice variant of NO synthase-1 (αNOS-1) and the NO synthase-3 (NOS-3) isoforms of NO synthase. Theta-burst induced LTP was also partly NO-dependent in wild-type mice, and made up approximately 50% of the potentiation 2 hours post-tetanus. Theta-burst stimulation reliably produced postsynaptic spikes including a high probability of complex spikes. Inhibition of postsynaptic somatic spikes with intracellular QX314 or local TTX application prevented LTP in the GluR1 knockout mice and also blocked the NO-component of LTP in wild-types. We conclude that theta-burst stimulation is particularly well suited to producing the somatic postsynaptic spikes required for NO-dependent LTP. PMID:19109486

  8. Developmental Divergence of Sleep-Wake Patterns in Orexin Knockout and Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Cassandra M.; Johnson, Eric D.; Shaw, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by fragmented bouts of sleep and wakefulness during the day and night as well as cataplexy, has been linked in humans and non-human animals to the functional integrity of the orexinergic system. Adult orexin knockout mice and dogs with a mutation of the orexin receptor exhibit symptoms that mirror those seen in narcoleptic humans. As with narcolepsy, infant sleep-wake cycles in humans and rats are highly fragmented, with consolidated bouts of sleep and wakefulness developing gradually. Based on these common features of narcoleptics and infants, we hypothesized that the development of sleep-wake fragmentation in orexin knockout mice would be expressed as a developmental divergence between knockouts and wild-types, with the knockouts lagging behind the wild-types. We tested this hypothesis by recording the sleep-wake patterns of infant orexin knockout and wild-type mice across the first three postnatal weeks. Both knockouts and wild-types exhibited age-dependent, and therefore orexin-independent, quantitative and qualitative changes in sleep-wake patterning. At 3 weeks of age, however, by which time the sleep and wake bouts of the wild-types had consolidated further, the knockouts lagged behind the wild-types and exhibited significantly more bout fragmentation. These findings suggest the possibility that the fragmentation of behavioral states that characterizes narcolepsy in adults reflects reversion back toward the more fragmented sleep-wake patterns that characterize infancy. PMID:17284193

  9. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Cordes, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-specific antibodies produced against synthetic peptides are of high value in probing protein structure and function, especially when working with challenging proteins, including not readily available, non-immunogenic, toxic, and/or pathogenic proteins. Here, we present a straightforward method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well as a thorough characterization of their reactivity with a range of normal and pathogenic (misfolded) prion proteins. It is demonstrated that immunization of wild-type mice with ovalbumin-conjugated peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvant induces a good immune response, including high levels of specific anti-peptide antibodies, even against peptides very homologous to murine protein sequences. In general, using the strategies described here for selecting, synthesizing, and conjugating peptides and immunizing 4-5 mice with 2-3 different peptides, high-titered antibodies reacting with the target protein are routinely obtained with at least one of the peptides after three to four immunizations with incomplete Freund's adjuvant.

  10. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Cordes, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-specific antibodies produced against synthetic peptides are of high value in probing protein structure and function, especially when working with challenging proteins, including not readily available, non-immunogenic, toxic, and/or pathogenic proteins. Here, we present a straightforward method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well as a thorough characterization of their reactivity with a range of normal and pathogenic (misfolded) prion proteins. It is demonstrated that immunization of wild-type mice with ovalbumin-conjugated peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvant induces a good immune response, including high levels of specific anti-peptide antibodies, even against peptides very homologous to murine protein sequences. In general, using the strategies described here for selecting, synthesizing, and conjugating peptides and immunizing 4-5 mice with 2-3 different peptides, high-titered antibodies reacting with the target protein are routinely obtained with at least one of the peptides after three to four immunizations with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. PMID:26424281

  11. High Pathogenicity of Wild-Type Measles Virus Infection in CD150 (SLAM) Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sellin, Caroline I.; Davoust, Nathalie; Guillaume, Vanessa; Baas, Dominique; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2006-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease, associated in certain cases with infection of the central nervous system and development of a severe neurological disease. We have generated transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the human protein SLAM (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule), or CD150, recently identified as an MV receptor. In contrast to all other MV receptor transgenic models described so far, in these mice infection with wild-type MV strains is highly pathogenic. Intranasal infection of SLAM transgenic suckling mice leads to MV spread to different organs and the development of an acute neurological syndrome, characterized by lethargy, seizures, ataxia, weight loss, and death within 3 weeks. In addition, in this model, vaccine and wild-type MV strains can be distinguished by virulence. Furthermore, intracranial MV infection of adult transgenic mice generates a subclinical infection associated with a high titer of MV-specific antibodies in the serum. Finally, to analyze new antimeasles therapeutic approaches, we created a recombinant soluble form of SLAM and demonstrated its important antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results show the high susceptibility of SLAM transgenic mice to MV-induced neurological disease and open new perspectives for the analysis of the implication of SLAM in the neuropathogenicity of other morbilliviruses, which also use this molecule as a receptor. Moreover, this transgenic model, in allowing a simple readout of the efficacy of an antiviral treatment, provides unique experimental means to test novel anti-MV preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:16775330

  12. Tendon fascicle gliding in wild type, heterozygous, and lubricin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kohrs, Ross T; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sun, Yu-Long; Jay, Gregory D; Zhang, Ling; Warman, Matthew L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin in the lubrication of tendon fascicles. Lubricin, a glycoprotein, lubricates cartilage and tendon surfaces, but the function of lubricin within the tendon fascicle is unclear. We developed a novel method to assess the gliding resistance of a single fascicle in a mouse tail model and used it to test the hypothesis that gliding resistance would be increased in lubricin knockout mice. Thirty-six mouse tails were used from 12 wild type, 12 heterozygous, and 12 lubricin knockout mice. A 15 mm long fascicle segment was pulled proximally after being divided distally. The peak resistance during fascicle pullout and the fascicle perimeter were measured. Lubricin expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The peak gliding resistance in the lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than in the wild type (p < 0.05). Fascicles from heterozygous mice were intermediate in value, but not significantly different from either wild type or lubricin knockout fascicles in peak gliding resistance. No significant difference was found in fascicle perimeter among the three groups. No correlation was observed between fascicle perimeter and gliding resistance. While lubricin was detected by immunostaining on the fascicle surface in wild type and heterozygous mice, lubricin was not detectable in the tendons of knockout mice. We conclude that the absence of lubricin is associated with increased interfascicular friction and that lubricin may play an important role in interfascicular lubrication.

  13. Craniofacial statistical deformation models of wild-type mice and Crouzon mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron A.; Ersbøll, Bjarne K.; Hermann, Nuno V.; Oubel, Estanislao; Larsen, Rasmus; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Larsen, Per; Perlyn, Chad A.; Morriss-Kay, Gillian M.; Kreiborg, Sven

    2007-03-01

    Crouzon syndrome is characterised by premature fusion of cranial sutures and synchondroses leading to craniofacial growth disturbances. The gene causing the syndrome was discovered approximately a decade ago and recently the first mouse model of the syndrome was generated. In this study, a set of Micro CT scans of the heads of wild-type (normal) mice and Crouzon mice were investigated. Statistical deformation models were built to assess the anatomical differences between the groups, as well as the within-group anatomical variation. Following the approach by Rueckert et al. we built an atlas using B-spline-based nonrigid registration and subsequently, the atlas was nonrigidly registered to the cases being modelled. The parameters of these registrations were then used as input to a PCA. Using different sets of registration parameters, different models were constructed to describe (i) the difference between the two groups in anatomical variation and (ii) the within-group variation. These models confirmed many known traits in the wild-type and Crouzon mouse craniofacial anatomy. However, they also showed some new traits.

  14. Effect of Fluorosis on Liver Cells of VC Deficient and Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Jiao, Yan; Ma, Yonghui; Stuart, John M.; Li, Xiudian; Zhao, Fusheng; Wang, Lishi; Sun, DianJun

    2014-01-01

    For decades, mouse and other rodents have been used for the study of oxidative or related studies such as the effect of fluoride. It is known that rodents normally synthesize their own vitamin C (VC) due to the presence of a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, l-gulono-lactone-γ-oxidase (Gulo), while humans do not have the capacity of VC synthesis due to the deletion of most parts of the GULO gene. The spontaneous fracture (sfx) mouse recently emerged as a model for study of VC deficiency. We investigated the effect of fluoride on liver cells from wild type Balb/c and sfx mice. We found that activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were reduced in both wild type and sfx mice; however, the amount of reduction in the sfx cells is more than that in Balb/c cells. In addition, while both cells increased MDA, the increase in the sfx cells is greater than that in Balb/c cells. Gene networks of Sod, Gpx, and Cat in the liver of humans and mice are also different. Our study suggests that reaction to fluoride in vitamin C deficient mice might be different from that of wild type mice. PMID:24693236

  15. Effects of chronic variable stress on cognition and Bace1 expression among wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Z A; Tamashiro, K L K

    2016-01-01

    Stressful life events, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and glucocorticoids are now thought to have a role in the development of several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) through mechanisms that may include exacerbation of cognitive impairment, neuronal loss, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau neuropathology. In the current study, we use a wild-type mouse model to demonstrate that chronic variable stress impairs cognitive function and that aged mice are particularly susceptible. We also find that stress exposure is associated with a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in the expression of Bace1 in the hippocampus of young adult mice and the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala of aged mice. Further, the increased expression of Bace1 was associated with decreased methylation of several CpGs in the Bace1 promoter region. In a second series of experiments, exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) prevented the stress-related changes in cognition, gene expression and DNA methylation. Together, these findings re-affirm the adverse effects of stress on cognition and further suggest that aged individuals are especially susceptible. In addition, demonstrating that chronic stress results in decreased DNA methylation and increased expression of Bace1 in the brain may provide a novel link between stress, Aβ pathology and AD. Finally, understanding the mechanisms by which EE prevented the effects of stress on cognition and Bace1 expression will be an important area of future study that may provide insights into novel approaches to the treatment of AD. PMID:27404286

  16. Adaptive thermogenesis and thermal conductance in wild-type and UCP1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Willershäuser, Monja; Jastroch, Martin; Rourke, Bryan C.; Fromme, Tobias; Oelkrug, Rebecca; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Klingenspor, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We compared maximal cold-induced heat production (HPmax) and cold limits between warm (WA; 27°C), moderate cold (MCA; 18°C), or cold acclimated (CA; 5°C) wild-type and uncoupling-protein 1 knockout (UCP1-KO) mice. In wild-type mice, HPmax was successively increased after MCA and CA, and the cold limit was lowered to −8.3°C and −18.0°C, respectively. UCP1-KO mice also increased HPmax in response to MCA and CA, although to a lesser extent. Direct comparison revealed a maximal cold-induced recruitment of heat production by +473 mW and +227 mW in wild-type and UCP1-KO mice, respectively. The increase in cold tolerance of UCP1-KO mice from −0.9°C in MCA to −10.1°C in CA could not be directly related to changes in HPmax, indicating that UCP1-KO mice used the dissipated heat more efficiently than wild-type mice. As judged from respiratory quotients, acutely cold-challenged UCP1-KO mice showed a delayed transition toward lipid oxidation, and 5-h cold exposure revealed diminished physical activity and less variability in the control of metabolic rate. We conclude that BAT is required for maximal adaptive thermogenesis but also allows metabolic flexibility and a rapid switch toward sustained lipid-fuelled thermogenesis as an acute response to cold. In both CA groups, expression of contractile proteins (myosin heavy-chain isoforms) showed minor training effects in skeletal muscles, while cardiac muscle of UCP1-KO mice had novel expression of beta cardiac isoform. Neither respiration nor basal proton conductance of skeletal muscle mitochondria were different between genotypes. In subcutaneous white adipose tissue of UCP1-KO mice, cold exposure increased cytochrome-c oxidase activity and expression of the cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector A by 3.6-fold and 15-fold, respectively, indicating the recruitment of mitochondria-rich brown adipocyte-like cells. Absence of functional BAT leads to remodeling of white adipose tissue, which may significantly contribute

  17. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  18. Structural and Morphometric Comparison of Lower Incisors in PACAP-Deficient and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Sandor, B; Fintor, K; Reglodi, D; Fulop, D B; Helyes, Z; Szanto, I; Nagy, P; Hashimoto, H; Tamas, A

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with widespread distribution. PACAP plays an important role in the development of the nervous system, it has a trophic and protective effect, and it is also implicated in the regulation of various physiological functions. Teeth are originated from the mesenchyme of the neural crest and the ectoderm of the first branchial arch, suggesting similarities with the development of the nervous system. Earlier PACAP-immunoreactive fibers have been found in the odontoblastic and subodontoblastic layers of the dental pulp. Our previous examinations have shown that PACAP deficiency causes alterations in the morphology and structure of the developing molars of 7-day-old mice. In our present study, morphometric and structural comparison was performed on the incisors of 1-year-old wild-type and PACAP-deficient mice. Hard tissue density measurements and morphometric comparison were carried out on the mandibles and the lower incisors with micro-CT. For structural examination, Raman microscopy was applied on frontal thin sections of the mandible. With micro-CT morphometrical measurements, the size of the incisors and the relative volume of the pulp to dentin were significantly smaller in the PACAP-deficient group compared to the wild-type animals. The density of calcium hydroxyapatite in the dentin was reduced in the PACAP-deficient mice. No structural differences could be observed in the enamel with Raman microscopy. Significant differences were found in the dentin of PACAP-deficient mice with Raman microscopy, where increased carbonate/phosphate ratio indicates higher intracrystalline disordering. The evaluation of amide III bands in the dentin revealed higher structural diversity in wild-type mice. Based upon our present and previous results, it is obvious that PACAP plays an important role in tooth development with the regulation of morphogenesis, dentin, and enamel mineralization. Further studies are

  19. The mechanical properties of tail tendon fascicles from lubricin knockout, wild type and heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Reuvers, John; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhang, Ling; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Warman, Matthew L; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of lubricin on tendon stiffness and viscoelasticity. A total of 36 mice were tested with 12 mice in each of the following groups: lubricin knock-out ⁻/⁻, heterozygous ⁺/⁻ and wild-type ⁺/⁺. A ramp test was used to determine the elastic modulus by pulling the fascicles to 2.5% strain amplitude at a rate of 0.05 mm/s. Then, followed by a relaxation test that pulled the fascicles to 5% strain amplitude at a rate of 2 mm/s. The fascicles were allowed to relax for 2 min at the maximum strain and a single-cycle relaxation ratio was used to characterize viscoelastic properties. There was no significant difference in the Young's modulus between the three groups (p > 0.05), but the knockout mice had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower relaxation ratio than the wild type mice. Based on these data, we concluded that lubricin expression has an effect on the viscoelastic properties of tendon fascicles. The clinical significance of this finding, if any, remains to be demonstrated.

  20. The mechanical properties of tail tendon fascicles from lubricin knockout, wild type and heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Reuvers, John; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhang, Ling; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Warman, Matthew L.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of lubricin on tendon stiffness and viscoelasticity. A total of 36 mice were tested with 12 mice in each of the following groups: lubricin knock-out (−/−), heterozygous (+/−) and wild-type (+/+). A ramp test was used to determine the elastic modulus by pulling the fascicles to 2.5% strain amplitude at a rate of 0.05 mm/s. Then, followed by a relaxation test that pulled the fascicles to 5% strain amplitude at a rate of 2 mm/s. The fascicles were allowed to relax for 2 min at the maximum strain and a single-cycle relaxation ratio was used to characterize viscoelastic properties. There was no significant difference in the Young’s modulus between the three groups (p > 0.05), but the knockout mice had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower relaxation ratio than the wild type mice. Based on these data, we concluded that lubricin expression has an effect on the viscoelastic properties of tendon fascicles. The clinical significance of this finding, if any, remains to be demonstrated. PMID:21821131

  1. Insights into wild-type and mutant p53 functions provided by genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Donehower, Lawrence A

    2014-06-01

    Recent whole-exome sequencing studies of numerous human cancers have now conclusively shown that the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Despite extensive studies of the TP53 gene and its encoded protein (p53), our understanding of how TP53 mutations contribute to cancer initiation and progression remain incomplete. Genetically engineered mice with germline or inducible Trp53 somatic mutations have provided important insights into the mechanisms by which different types of p53 mutation influence cancer development. Trp53 germline mutations that alter specific p53 structural domains or posttranslation modification sites have benefitted our understanding of wild-type p53 functions in a whole organism context. Moreover, genetic approaches to reestablish functional wild-type p53 to p53-deficient tissues and tumors have increased our understanding of the therapeutic potential of restoring functional p53 signaling to cancers. This review outlines many of the key insights provided by the various categories of Trp53 mutant mice that have been generated by multiple genetic engineering approaches.

  2. Acquired transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-07-13

    L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE that is transmissible to cattle and several lines of prion protein (PrP) transgenic mice, but not to wild-type mice. In this study, we examined the transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-BSE prions to wild-type mice. Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in the brain and/or lymphoid tissues during the lifespan of mice that were asymptomatic subclinical carriers, indicating that wild-type mice were susceptible to sheep-passaged L-BSE. The morphological characteristics of the PrP(Sc) of sheep-passaged L-BSE included florid plaques that were distributed mainly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of subsequent passaged mice. The PrP(Sc) glycoform profiles of wild-type mice infected with sheep-passaged L-BSE were similar to those of the original isolate. The data indicate that sheep-passaged L-BSE has an altered host range and acquired transmissibility to wild-type mice.

  3. Acquired transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE that is transmissible to cattle and several lines of prion protein (PrP) transgenic mice, but not to wild-type mice. In this study, we examined the transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-BSE prions to wild-type mice. Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in the brain and/or lymphoid tissues during the lifespan of mice that were asymptomatic subclinical carriers, indicating that wild-type mice were susceptible to sheep-passaged L-BSE. The morphological characteristics of the PrP(Sc) of sheep-passaged L-BSE included florid plaques that were distributed mainly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of subsequent passaged mice. The PrP(Sc) glycoform profiles of wild-type mice infected with sheep-passaged L-BSE were similar to those of the original isolate. The data indicate that sheep-passaged L-BSE has an altered host range and acquired transmissibility to wild-type mice. PMID:26169916

  4. WILD-TYPE GROSS LEUKEMIA VIRUS AND THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE GLOMERULONEPHRITIS OF NEW ZEALAND MICE

    PubMed Central

    Mellors, Robert C.; Shirai, Toshikazu; Aoki, Tadao; Huebner, Robert J.; Krawczynski, Krzysztof

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the spontaneous glomerulonephritis of NZB and (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice is related at least in part to the formation of natural antibody against antigens of the G (Gross) system, and apparently to the deposition in the glomeruli of immune complexes of G natural antibody with G soluble antigen (GSA), type-specific antigen specified by wild-type Gross leukemia virus. G natural antibody and GSA are detectable in the acid-buffer eluate of the kidneys of NZB mice during the course of the glomerulonephritis. (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice develop glomerulonephritis and produce GSA and free G natural antibody earlier in life than do NZB mice. The proteinuria manifestation of the gomerulonephritis of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice becomes increasingly prevalent as GSA undergoes immune elimination from the circulation. Gross leukemia virus-specified antigens together with bound immunoglobulins are located in the glomerular lesions of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice, both in the mesangium as observed in NZB mice and also in the wall of the peripheral capillary loops of the glomeruli. PMID:4924198

  5. Ontogeny of SERT Expression and Antidepressant-like Response to Escitalopram in Wild-Type and SERT Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nathan C; Gould, Georgianna G; Koek, Wouter; Daws, Lynette C

    2016-08-01

    Depression is a disabling affective disorder for which the majority of patients are not effectively treated. This problem is exacerbated in children and adolescents for whom only two antidepressants are approved, both of which are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs). Unfortunately SSRIs are often less effective in juveniles than in adults; however, the mechanism(s) underlying age-dependent responses to SSRIs is unknown. To this end, we compared the antidepressant-like response to the SSRI escitalopram using the tail suspension test and saturation binding of [(3)H]citalopram to the serotonin transporter (SERT), the primary target of SSRIs, in juvenile [postnatal day (P)21], adolescent (P28), and adult (P90) wild-type (SERT+/+) mice. In addition, to model individuals carrying low-expressing SERT variants, we studied mice with reduced SERT expression (SERT+/-) or lacking SERT (SERT-/-). Maximal antidepressant-like effects were less in P21 mice relative to P90 mice. This was especially apparent in SERT+/- mice. However, the potency for escitalopram to produce antidepressant-like effects in SERT+/+ and SERT+/- mice was greater in P21 and P28 mice than in adults. SERT expression increased with age in terminal regions and decreased with age in cell body regions. Binding affinity values did not change as a function of age or genotype. As expected, in SERT-/- mice escitalopram produced no behavioral effects, and there was no specific [(3)H]citalopram binding. These data reveal age- and genotype-dependent shifts in the dose-response for escitalopram to produce antidepressant-like effects, which vary with SERT expression, and may contribute to the limited therapeutic response to SSRIs in juveniles and adolescents. PMID:27288483

  6. PHEX Mimetic (SPR4-Peptide) Corrects and Improves HYP and Wild Type Mice Energy-Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V.; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context PHEX or DMP1 mutations cause hypophosphatemic-rickets and altered energy metabolism. PHEX binds to DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a complex with α5β3 integrin that suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptides increase FGF23 by disrupting the PHEX-DMP1-Integrin complex. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide/motif to study the DMP1-PHEX interaction and to assess SPR4 for the treatment of energy metabolism defects in HYP and potentially other bone-mineral disorders. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle (VE) into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice (PHEX mutation) for 4 weeks. Results SPR4 partially corrected HYP mice hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1.25(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23 remained high and PTH was unaffected. WT-SPR4 mice developed hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia with increased PTH, FGF23 and 1.25(OH)2D3. SPR4 increased GAPDH HYP-bone expression 60× and corrected HYP-mice hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. HYP-VE serum uric-acid (UA) levels were reduced and SPR4 infusion suppressed UA levels in WT-mice but not HYP-mice. SPR4 altered leptin, adiponectin, and sympathetic-tone and increased the fat mass/weight ratio for HYP and WT mice. Expression of perlipin-2 a gene involved in obesity was reduced in HYP-VE and WT-SPR4 mice but increased in HYP-SPR4 mice. Also, increased expression of two genes that inhibit insulin-signaling, ENPP1 and ESP, occurred with HYP-VE mice. In contrast, SPR4 reduced expression of both ENPP1 and ESP in WT mice and suppressed ENPP1 in HYP mice. Increased expression of FAM20C and sclerostin occurred with HYP-VE mice. SPR4 suppressed expression of FAM20C and sclerostin in HYP and WT mice. Conclusions ASARM peptides and motifs are physiological substrates for PHEX and modulate osteocyte PHEX-DMP1-α5β3-integrin interactions and thereby FGF23 expression. These interactions also provide a nexus that regulates bone and energy metabolism. SPR4 suppression of

  7. Dietary supplementation with ipriflavone decreases hepatic iron stores in wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Patchen, Bonnie; Koppe, Tiago; Cheng, Aaron; Seo, Young Ah; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Fraenkel, Paula G

    2016-09-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide produced in the liver, decreases intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release by causing degradation of the iron exporter, ferroportin. Because its levels are inappropriately low in patients with iron overload syndromes, hepcidin is a potential drug target. We previously conducted a chemical screen that revealed ipriflavone, an orally available small molecule, as a potent inducer of hepcidin expression. To evaluate ipriflavone's effect on iron homeostasis, we placed groups of 5-week old wild type or thalassemia intermedia (Hbb(Th3+/-)) mice on a soy-free, iron-sufficient diet, AIN-93G containing 220mg iron and 0-750mgipriflavone/kg of food for 50days. Ipriflavone 500mg/kg significantly reduced liver iron stores and intestinal ferroportin expression in WT mice, while increasing the ratio of hepcidin transcript levels to liver iron stores. Ipriflavone supplementation in Hbb(Th3+/-) mice failed to alleviate iron overload and was associated with a milder reduction in intestinal ferroportin and a failure to alter the ratio of hepcidin transcript levels to liver iron stores or splenic expression of the hepcidin-regulatory hormone, erythroferrone. These data suggest that dietary supplementation with ipriflavone alone would not be sufficient to treat iron overload in thalassemia intermedia. PMID:27519943

  8. Adolescent social defeat disturbs adult aggression-related impulsivity in wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Caroline M; Coolen, Alex; de Boer, Sietse F; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2014-10-01

    Adolescence is generally considered as a developmental period during which adverse social experiences may have lasting consequences in terms of an increased vulnerability to affective disorders. This study aimed at determining the individual susceptibility to adolescent social stress using a rat model. We used rats of the Wild-type Groningen strain, which are characterized by a broad variation in adult levels of aggression and impulsivity. We hypothesized that experience of social defeat in adolescence results in heightened aggression and impulsivity levels in adulthood. In contrast to our expectation, adolescent social defeat did not lead to a difference in the average adult level of aggression and impulsivity, but the significant correlation between offensive aggression and impulsivity found in control animals was not present in animals defeated during adolescence.

  9. Only minor differences in renal osteodystrophy features between wild-type and sclerostin knockout mice with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Daniel; Parada-Rodriguez, Diego; Pichler, Stefanie; Marculescu, Rodrig; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Gross, Thomas; Reisinger, Andreas; Pahr, Dieter; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Haas, Martin; Malluche, Hartmut H

    2016-10-01

    Renal osteodystrophy affects the majority of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is characterized by progressive bone loss. This study evaluated the effects of sclerostin knockout on bone in a murine model of severe, surgically induced CKD in both sclerostin knockout and wild-type mice. Mice of both genotypes with normal kidney function served as controls. Tibiae were analyzed using micro-computed tomography, and lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by histomorphometry. Results were tested for statistical significance by 2-way ANOVA to investigate whether bone of the knockout mice reacted differently to CKD compared with bone of wild-type mice. In the tibiae, there was no difference after creation of CKD between wild-type and knockout animals for cortical thickness or cross-sectional moment of inertia. Increases in cortical porosity induced by CKD differed significantly between genotypes in the tibial metaphysis but not in the diaphysis. In the trabecular compartment, no difference in reaction to CKD between genotypes was found for bone volume, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and trabecular separation. In the lumbar vertebrae, significant differences in response to CKD between wild-type and knockout mice were seen for both bone volume and trabecular thickness. Osteoblast parameters did not differ significantly, whereas osteoclast numbers significantly increased in the wild-type but significantly decreased in knockout mice with CKD. No differences in response to CKD between genotypes were found for bone formation rate or mineral apposition rate. Thus, complete absence of sclerostin has only minor effects on CKD-induced bone loss in mice. PMID:27528549

  10. Gender differences between hypocretin/orexin knockout and wild type mice: age, body weight, body composition, metabolic markers, leptin and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M

    2014-12-01

    Female hypocretin knockout (Hcrt KO) mice have increased body weight despite decreased food intake compared to wild type (WT) mice. In order to understand the nature of the increased body weight, we carried out a detailed study of Hcrt KO and WT, male, and female mice. Female KO mice showed consistently higher body weight than WT mice, from 4 to 20 months (20-60%). Fat, muscle, and free fluid levels were all significantly higher in adult (7-9 months) as well as old (18-20 months) female KO mice compared to age-matched WT mice. Old male KO mice showed significantly higher fat content (150%) compared to age-matched WT mice, but no significant change in body weight. Respiratory quotient (-19%) and metabolic rates (-14%) were significantly lower in KO mice compared to WT mice, regardless of gender or age. Female KO mice had significantly higher serum leptin levels (191%) than WT mice at 18-20 months, but no difference between male mice were observed. Conversely, insulin resistance was significantly higher in both male (73%) and female (93%) KO mice compared to age- and sex-matched WT mice. We conclude that absence of the Hcrt peptide has gender-specific effects. In contrast, Hcrt-ataxin mice and human narcoleptics, with loss of the whole Hcrt cell, show weight gain in both sexes.

  11. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  12. Intraperitoneal Infection of Wild-Type Mice with Synthetically Generated Mammalian Prion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhe; McGovern, Gillian; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Fei; Zha, Liang; Jeffrey, Martin; Ma, Jiyan

    2015-07-01

    The prion hypothesis postulates that the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is an unorthodox protein conformation based agent. Recent successes in generating mammalian prions in vitro with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein provide strong support for the hypothesis. However, whether the pathogenic properties of synthetically generated prion (rec-Prion) recapitulate those of naturally occurring prions remains unresolved. Using end-point titration assay, we showed that the in vitro prepared rec-Prions have infectious titers of around 104 LD50/μg. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation of wild-type mice with rec-Prion caused prion disease with an average survival time of 210-220 days post inoculation. Detailed pathological analyses revealed that the nature of rec-Prion induced lesions, including spongiform change, disease specific prion protein accumulation (PrP-d) and the PrP-d dissemination amongst lymphoid and peripheral nervous system tissues, the route and mechanisms of neuroinvasion were all typical of classical rodent prions. Our results revealed that, similar to naturally occurring prions, the rec-Prion has a titratable infectivity and is capable of causing prion disease via routes other than direct intra-cerebral challenge. More importantly, our results established that the rec-Prion caused disease is pathogenically and pathologically identical to naturally occurring contagious TSEs, supporting the concept that a conformationally altered protein agent is responsible for the infectivity in TSEs.

  13. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection.

  14. Zika virus infection during the period of maximal brain growth causes microcephaly and corticospinal neuron apoptosis in wild type mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Chin; Abraham, Rachy; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choe, Hyeryun; Page, Damon T.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women has been established as a cause of microcephaly in newborns. Here we test the hypothesis that neurodevelopmental stages when the brain is undergoing rapid growth are particularly vulnerable to the effects of ZIKV infection. We injected ZIKV intracranially into wild type C57BL/6 mice at two different time points: early postnatal development, when the brain is growing at its maximal rate, and at weaning, when the brain has largely reached adult size. Both time points showed widespread immunoreactivity for ZIKV and cleaved caspase 3 (CC3, a marker of apoptosis) throughout the brain. However, in early postnatal ZIKV injected mice, some brain areas and cell types display particularly large increases in apoptosis that we did not observe in older animals. Corticospinal pyramidal neurons, a cell type implicated in human microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection, are an example of one such cell type. Proliferating cells in the ventricular zone stem cell compartment are also depleted. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that periods of rapid brain growth are especially susceptible to neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection, and establish a valuable model to investigate mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection and explore candidate therapeutics. PMID:27713505

  15. After a cold conditioning swim, UCP2-deficient mice are more able to defend against the cold than wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-08-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is widely distributed throughout the body including the brain, adipose tissue and skeletal muscles. In contrast to UCP1, UCP2 does not influence resting body temperature and UCP2-deficient (-/-) mice have normal thermoregulatory responses to a single exposure to cold ambient temperatures. Instead, UCP2-deficient mice are more anxious, exhibit anhedonia and have higher circulating corticosterone than wild type mice. To test the possible role of UCP2 in depressive behavior we exposed UCP2-deficient and wild type mice to a cold (26°C) forced swim and simultaneously measured rectal temperatures during and after the swim. The time that UCP2-deficient mice spent immobile did not differ from wild type mice and all mice floated more on day 2. However, UCP2-deficient mice were more able to defend against the decrease in body temperature during a second daily swim at 26°C than wild type mice (area under the curve for wild type mice: 247.0±6.4; for UCP2-deficient mice: 284.4±3.8, P<0.0001, Student's t test). The improved thermoregulation of wild type mice during a second swim at 26°C correlated with their greater immobility whereas defense against the warmth during a swim at 41°C correlated better with greater immobility of UCP2-deficient mice. Together these data indicate that while the lack of UCP2 has no acute effect on body temperature, UCP2 may inhibit rapid improvements in defense against cold, in contrast to UCP1, whose main function is to promote thermogenesis. PMID:24952267

  16. After a cold conditioning swim, UCP2-deficient mice are more able to defend against the cold than wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-08-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is widely distributed throughout the body including the brain, adipose tissue and skeletal muscles. In contrast to UCP1, UCP2 does not influence resting body temperature and UCP2-deficient (-/-) mice have normal thermoregulatory responses to a single exposure to cold ambient temperatures. Instead, UCP2-deficient mice are more anxious, exhibit anhedonia and have higher circulating corticosterone than wild type mice. To test the possible role of UCP2 in depressive behavior we exposed UCP2-deficient and wild type mice to a cold (26°C) forced swim and simultaneously measured rectal temperatures during and after the swim. The time that UCP2-deficient mice spent immobile did not differ from wild type mice and all mice floated more on day 2. However, UCP2-deficient mice were more able to defend against the decrease in body temperature during a second daily swim at 26°C than wild type mice (area under the curve for wild type mice: 247.0±6.4; for UCP2-deficient mice: 284.4±3.8, P<0.0001, Student's t test). The improved thermoregulation of wild type mice during a second swim at 26°C correlated with their greater immobility whereas defense against the warmth during a swim at 41°C correlated better with greater immobility of UCP2-deficient mice. Together these data indicate that while the lack of UCP2 has no acute effect on body temperature, UCP2 may inhibit rapid improvements in defense against cold, in contrast to UCP1, whose main function is to promote thermogenesis.

  17. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-05-21

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learning paradigms. However, a growing body of evidence challenges this theory, in that additional sites of plasticity appear to contribute to motor adaptation. Here, we consider phase-reversal training of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a simple form of motor learning for which a large body of experimental data is available in wild-type and mutant mice, in which the excitability of granule cells or inhibition of Purkinje cells was affected in a cell-specific fashion. We present novel electrophysiological recordings of Purkinje cell activity measured in naive wild-type mice subjected to this VOR adaptation task. We then introduce a minimal model that consists of learning at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells with the help of the climbing fibers. Although the minimal model reproduces the behavior of the wild-type animals and is analytically tractable, it fails at reproducing the behavior of mutant mice and the electrophysiology data. Therefore, we build a detailed model involving plasticity at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells' synapse guided by climbing fibers, feedforward inhibition of Purkinje cells, and plasticity at the mossy fiber to vestibular nuclei neuron synapse. The detailed model reproduces both the behavioral and electrophysiological data of both the wild-type and mutant mice and allows for experimentally testable predictions.

  18. Suppressed Accumulation of Cerebral Amyloid β Peptides in Aged Transgenic Alzheimer’s Disease Mice by Transplantation with Wild-Type or Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 2-Null Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Keene, C. Dirk; Chang, Rubens C.; Lopez-Yglesias, Americo H.; Shalloway, Bryan R.; Sokal, Izabella; Li, Xianwu; Reed, Patrick J.; Keene, Lisa M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Breyer, Richard M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A complex therapeutic challenge for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is minimizing deleterious aspects of microglial activation while maximizing beneficial actions, including phagocytosis/clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. One potential target is selective suppression of microglial prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) function, which influences microglial phagocytosis and elaboration of neurotoxic cytokines. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted bone marrow cells derived from wild-type mice or mice homozygous deficient for EP2 (EP2−/−) into lethally irradiated 5-month-old wild-type or APPswe-PS1ΔE9 double transgenic AD mouse model recipients. We found that cerebral engraftment by bone marrow transplant (BMT)-derived wild-type or EP2−/− microglia was more efficient in APPswe-PS1ΔE9 than in wild-type mice, and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received EP2−/− BMT had increased cortical microglia compared with APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received wild-type BMT. We found that myeloablative irradiation followed by bone marrow transplant-derived microglia engraftment, rather than cranial irradiation or BMT alone, was responsible for the approximate one-third reduction in both Aβ plaques and potentially more neurotoxic soluble Aβ species. An additional 25% reduction in cerebral cortical Aβ burden was achieved in mice that received EP2−/− BMT compared with mice that received wild-type BMT. Our results provide a foundation for an adult stem cell-based therapy to suppress soluble Aβ peptide and plaque accumulation in the cerebrum of patients with AD. PMID:20522650

  19. Induction of lytic pathways in T cell clones derived from wild-type or protein tyrosine kinase Fyn mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lancki, D W; Fields, P; Qian, D; Fitch, F W

    1995-08-01

    The OVA-reactive CD4+ Th1 clones and alloreactive CD8+ clones derived from wild-type or fyn-/- mice serve as model systems which have allowed us to investigate several aspects of the molecular events associated with T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, including 1) the differential utilization of two distinct cytolytic pathways by CD4+ Th1 clones and CD8+ CTL, 2) a comparison of the pathways of lysis induced by stimulation of the TCR or by alternative stimuli, 3) the requirement of Fyn for derivation of antigen-specific T-cell clones having properties of CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ CTL cells 4) the differential requirement of Fyn in the induction of responses by TCR and the alternative stimuli. Stimulation through the TCR, either by APC bearing relevant antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 mAb, resulted in comparable levels of target cell lysis by clones from both wild-type and fyn-/- mice. These clones also utilize the Fas pathway to lyse target cells. Thus, Fyn does not appear to be required for expression of the Fas pathway when triggered through the TCR. In contrast, lysis of target cells by T-cell clones lacking Fyn was deficient when stimulated through Thy-1 or Ly-6C (using mAb) or with Con A or phorbol ester as compared to clones derived from wild-type mice. The basis for the defect in response to stimulation through the GPI-linked molecules appears to be a signaling defect which affects all of the functional responses we measured, while the defect in response to Con A stimulation appears to affect lysis but not lymphokine production. Thus, Fyn expression is selectively required for efficient activation of the Fas pathway of lysis through Thy-1, Ly-6C, and by Con A or phorbol ester in these T-cell clones. CD8+ clones derived from fyn-/- mutant mice, like clones derived from wild-type mice, display antigen-specific lysis, and appear to express perforin message and perforin protein. A Ca(++)-dependent (presumably perforin/exocytosis) component and Fas component of lysis was

  20. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  1. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  2. Prognosis and management of adult wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A pooled analysis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, N R; Collins, D; Crotty, P; Ridgway, P F

    2016-09-01

    A pooled review was performed to determine survival in adult WT GIST (Wild Type GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours) and compare the same with pediatric WT GISTs. Electronic databases were searched using the terms "Wild type" AND "GIST". Eighty-two adult patients from 14 studies were included in the pooled analysis. Cumulative survival was greater than 50% in both age groups, hence medial survival could not be computed. Mean survival in adults was 15.7 years ± 0.78 and in children was 18.8 years ± 1.3 (p = 0.241). Median disease free survival in adults was 10 years while 5-year overall survival was 88%. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival between the two groups (p = 0.241). Overall survival in adults with WT GISTs is favourable compared to other adult GIST subtypes likely reflects a common molecular pathway similar to pediatric GIST. PMID:27566016

  3. H1-antihistamines exacerbate high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis in wild-type but not in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Vineesh V; Kassel, Karen M; Smith, Donald D; Luyendyk, James P; Williams, Kurt J; Cherian, Rachel; Reed, Gregory A; Flynn, Colleen A; Csanaky, Iván L; Lickteig, Andrew L; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew J; Klaassen, Curtis D; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2014-07-15

    We examined the effects of two over-the-counter H1-antihistamines on the progression of fatty liver disease in male C57Bl/6 wild-type and apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-/- mice. Mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 mo, together with administration of either cetirizine (4 mg/kg body wt) or fexofenadine (40 mg/kg body wt) in drinking water. Antihistamine treatments increased body weight gain, gonadal fat deposition, liver weight, and hepatic steatosis in wild-type mice but not in ApoE-/- mice. Lobular inflammation, acute inflammation, and necrosis were not affected by H1-antihistamines in either genotype. Serum biomarkers of liver injury tended to increase in antihistamine-treated wild-type mice. Serum level of glucose was increased by fexofenadine, whereas lipase was increased by cetirizine. H1-antihistamines reduced the mRNA expression of ApoE and carbohydrate response element-binding protein in wild-type mice, without altering the mRNA expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, fatty acid synthase, or ApoB100, in either genotype. Fexofenadine increased both triglycerides and cholesterol ester, whereas cetirizine increased only cholesterol ester in liver, with a concomitant decrease in serum triglycerides by both antihistamines in wild-type mice. Antihistamines increased hepatic levels of conjugated bile acids in wild-type mice, with the effect being significant in fexofenadine-treated animals. The increase was associated with changes in the expression of organic anion transport polypeptide 1b2 and bile salt export pump. These results suggest that H1-antihistamines increase the progression of fatty liver disease in wild-type mice, and there seems to be an association between the severity of disease, presence of ApoE, and increase in hepatic bile acid levels.

  4. Prolonged ethanol administration depletes mitochondrial DNA in MnSOD-overexpressing transgenic mice, but not in their wild type littermates

    SciTech Connect

    Larosche, Isabelle; Choumar, Amal; Fromenty, Bernard; Letteron, Philippe; Abbey-Toby, Adje; Van Remmen, Holly; Epstein, Charles J.; Richardson, Arlan; Feldmann, Gerard; Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah

    2009-02-01

    Alcohol consumption increases reactive oxygen species formation and lipid peroxidation, whose products can damage mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and alter mitochondrial function. A possible role of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) on these effects has not been investigated. To test whether MnSOD overexpression modulates alcohol-induced mitochondrial alterations, we added ethanol to the drinking water of transgenic MnSOD-overexpressing (TgMnSOD) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates for 7 weeks. In TgMnSOD mice, alcohol administration further increased the activity of MnSOD, but decreased cytosolic glutathione as well as cytosolic glutathione peroxidase activity and peroxisomal catalase activity. Whereas ethanol increased cytochrome P-450 2E1 and mitochondrial ROS generation in both WT and TgMnSOD mice, hepatic iron, lipid peroxidation products and respiratory complex I protein carbonyls were only increased in ethanol-treated TgMnSOD mice but not in WT mice. In ethanol-fed TgMnSOD mice, but not ethanol-fed WT mice, mtDNA was depleted, and mtDNA lesions blocked the progress of polymerases. The iron chelator, DFO prevented hepatic iron accumulation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation and mtDNA depletion in alcohol-treated TgMnSOD mice. Alcohol markedly decreased the activities of complexes I, IV and V of the respiratory chain in TgMnSOD, with absent or lesser effects in WT mice. There was no inflammation, apoptosis or necrosis, and steatosis was similar in ethanol-treated WT and TgMnSOD mice. In conclusion, prolonged alcohol administration selectively triggers iron accumulation, lipid peroxidation, respiratory complex I protein carbonylation, mtDNA lesions blocking the progress of polymerases, mtDNA depletion and respiratory complex dysfunction in TgMnSOD mice but not in WT mice.

  5. Spontaneous generation of rapidly transmissible prions in transgenic mice expressing wild-type bank vole prion protein.

    PubMed

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Stöhr, Jan; Oehler, Abby; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Grillo, Sunny K; Patel, Smita; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-02-28

    Currently, there are no animal models of the most common human prion disorder, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), in which prions are formed spontaneously from wild-type (WT) prion protein (PrP). Interestingly, bank voles (BV) exhibit an unprecedented promiscuity for diverse prion isolates, arguing that bank vole PrP (BVPrP) may be inherently prone to adopting misfolded conformations. Therefore, we constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing WT BVPrP. Tg(BVPrP) mice developed spontaneous CNS dysfunction between 108 and 340 d of age and recapitulated the hallmarks of prion disease, including spongiform degeneration, pronounced astrogliosis, and deposition of alternatively folded PrP in the brain. Brain homogenates of ill Tg(BVPrP) mice transmitted disease to Tg(BVPrP) mice in ∼35 d, to Tg mice overexpressing mouse PrP in under 100 d, and to WT mice in ∼185 d. Our studies demonstrate experimentally that WT PrP can spontaneously form infectious prions in vivo. Thus, Tg(BVPrP) mice may be useful for studying the spontaneous formation of prions, and thus may provide insight into the etiology of sporadic CJD.

  6. Spontaneous generation of rapidly transmissible prions in transgenic mice expressing wild-type bank vole prion protein.

    PubMed

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Stöhr, Jan; Oehler, Abby; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Grillo, Sunny K; Patel, Smita; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-02-28

    Currently, there are no animal models of the most common human prion disorder, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), in which prions are formed spontaneously from wild-type (WT) prion protein (PrP). Interestingly, bank voles (BV) exhibit an unprecedented promiscuity for diverse prion isolates, arguing that bank vole PrP (BVPrP) may be inherently prone to adopting misfolded conformations. Therefore, we constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing WT BVPrP. Tg(BVPrP) mice developed spontaneous CNS dysfunction between 108 and 340 d of age and recapitulated the hallmarks of prion disease, including spongiform degeneration, pronounced astrogliosis, and deposition of alternatively folded PrP in the brain. Brain homogenates of ill Tg(BVPrP) mice transmitted disease to Tg(BVPrP) mice in ∼35 d, to Tg mice overexpressing mouse PrP in under 100 d, and to WT mice in ∼185 d. Our studies demonstrate experimentally that WT PrP can spontaneously form infectious prions in vivo. Thus, Tg(BVPrP) mice may be useful for studying the spontaneous formation of prions, and thus may provide insight into the etiology of sporadic CJD. PMID:22331873

  7. The effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors nitro-L-arginine and 7-nitroindazole on spatial learning and motor functions in Lurcher mutant and wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Markvartová, V; Vozeh, F

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger that, among other things, plays an important role in the nervous system as a gaseous neurotransmitter, modulating long-term potentiation (LTP) induction of synaptic transmission. LTP has been suggested to be the basis of memory formation. On the other hand NO also participates in excitotoxic processes which play an important role in many neuropathological states. The aim of this work was to observe the effect of two NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors (N omega-Nitro-L-arginine, NA; 7-nitroindazole, NI) on spontaneous behaviour, spatial learning and motor functions in Lurcher (+/Lc) and wild type (+/+) mice, derived from the B6CBA strain. Heterozygous Lurcher mutant mice represent a natural model of the olivocerebellar degeneration. They suffer from postnatal, practically total, extinction of cerebellar Purkinje cells (due to the excitotoxic apoptosis) and a partial decrease of granule cells and inferior olive neurons (ION) because of the lost target of their axons. +/+ animals are healthy littermates of +/Lc. NA is a nonselective NOS inhibitor which influences, except neuronal (n), also endothelial (e) NOS with an impact on blood pressure, NI is a selective nNOS inhibitor without any circulatory effect. The adult animals of both types (+/Lc; +/+) were influenced by acute administration of both inhibitors (25 mg/kg i.p. 30 min. before experiments) and newborns only by both acute and long-term administration of NI (1 month, starting from postnatal day 2, P2). Control solutions - saline or solvents of both NA and NI inhibitors--diluted 1M HCl and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respectively, were given at a relevant volume in the same way. The effect of both inhibitors and control solutions on motor functions was tested using four standard procedures (horizontal wire, slanting ladder, rotating cylinder, foot-bridge); in newborns at the age of 14 days. Spatial learning ability was examined in five-day long procedure in the Morris

  8. Effects of female pheromones on gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression and luteinizing hormone release in male wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C; Wersinger, S R; Rissman, E F

    2000-12-01

    Pheromones are an important class of environmental cues that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in a variety of vertebrate species, including humans. When male mice contact female-soiled bedding, or urine, they display a reflexive luteinizing hormone (LH) surge within 30 min. Aside from the requirement that males have gonads to show this response, the physiological mechanisms that underlie this pituitary response are unknown. In this experiment, we asked if female pheromones acted at the level of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression to affect this hormone response. In addition, we also examined the contribution of one of the oestrogen receptors (ERalpha) by studying this neuroendocrine reflex in wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) males. Both ERalphaKO and wild-type males showed the expected LH surge, 45 and 90 min after contact with female pheromones. Males housed in clean bedding or bedding soiled by another adult male did not display the LH elevation. Interestingly, this dramatic change in LH concentrations was not accompanied by any alterations in GnRH mRNA expression or levels of primary transcript in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus. The one exception to this was a significant increase in GnRH mRNA expression in tissue collected from wild-type males exposed to bedding from another male. This is particularly intriguing since LH was not elevated in these males. These data replicate and extend our previous finding that ERalphaKO males do exhibit an LH surge in response to female pheromones. Thus, this neuroendocrine response is regulated by a steroid receptor other than ERalpha and does not require alterations in GnRH mRNA expression.

  9. Bone turnover in wild type and pleiotrophin-transgenic mice housed for three months in the International Space Station (ISS).

    PubMed

    Tavella, Sara; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Giuliani, Alessandra; Brun, Francesco; Canciani, Barbara; Manescu, Adrian; Marozzi, Katia; Cilli, Michele; Costa, Delfina; Liu, Yi; Piccardi, Federica; Tasso, Roberta; Tromba, Giuliana; Rustichelli, Franco; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2012-01-01

    Bone is a complex dynamic tissue undergoing a continuous remodeling process. Gravity is a physical force playing a role in the remodeling and contributing to the maintenance of bone integrity. This article reports an investigation on the alterations of the bone microarchitecture that occurred in wild type (Wt) and pleiotrophin-transgenic (PTN-Tg) mice exposed to a near-zero gravity on the International Space Station (ISS) during the Mice Drawer System (MDS) mission, to date, the longest mice permanence (91 days) in space. The transgenic mouse strain over-expressing pleiotrophin (PTN) in bone was selected because of the PTN positive effects on bone turnover. Wt and PTN-Tg control animals were maintained on Earth either in a MDS payload or in a standard vivarium cage. This study revealed a bone loss during spaceflight in the weight-bearing bones of both strains. For both Tg and Wt a decrease of the trabecular number as well as an increase of the mean trabecular separation was observed after flight, whereas trabecular thickness did not show any significant change. Non weight-bearing bones were not affected. The PTN-Tg mice exposed to normal gravity presented a poorer trabecular organization than Wt mice, but interestingly, the expression of the PTN transgene during the flight resulted in some protection against microgravity's negative effects. Moreover, osteocytes of the Wt mice, but not of Tg mice, acquired a round shape, thus showing for the first time osteocyte space-related morphological alterations in vivo. The analysis of specific bone formation and resorption marker expression suggested that the microgravity-induced bone loss was due to both an increased bone resorption and a decreased bone deposition. Apparently, the PTN transgene protection was the result of a higher osteoblast activity in the flight mice.

  10. Vitamin D2-enriched button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves memory in both wild type and APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Kersaitis, Cindy; Macaulay, Stuart Lance; Münch, Gerald; Niedermayer, Garry; Nigro, Julie; Payne, Matthew; Sheean, Paul; Vallotton, Pascal; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Bird, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, affecting over 30% of adult Australians, and increasing up to 80% for at-risk groups including the elderly (age>65). The role for Vitamin D in development of the central nervous system is supported by the association between Vitamin D deficiency and incidence of neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A reported positive relationship between Vitamin D status and cognitive performance suggests that restoring Vitamin D status might provide a cognitive benefit to those with Vitamin D deficiency. Mushrooms are a rich source of ergosterol, which can be converted to Vitamin D2 by treatment with UV light, presenting a new and convenient dietary source of Vitamin D2. We hypothesised that Vitamin D2-enriched mushrooms (VDM) could prevent the cognitive and pathological abnormalities associated with dementia. Two month old wild type (B6C3) and AD transgenic (APPSwe/PS1dE9) mice were fed a diet either deficient in Vitamin D2 or a diet which was supplemented with VDM, containing 1±0.2 µg/kg (∼54 IU/kg) vitamin D2, for 7 months. Effects of the dietary intervention on memory were assessed pre- and post-feeding. Brain sections were evaluated for amyloid β (Aβ) plaque loads and inflammation biomarkers using immuno-histochemical methods. Plasma vitamin D metabolites, Aβ40, Aβ42, calcium, protein and cholesterol were measured using biochemical assays. Compared with mice on the control diet, VDM-fed wild type and AD transgenic mice displayed improved learning and memory, had significantly reduced amyloid plaque load and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and elevated interleukin-10 in the brain. The results suggest that VDM might provide a dietary source of Vitamin D2 and other bioactives for preventing memory-impairment in dementia. This study supports the need for a randomised clinical trial to determine whether or not VDM consumption can benefit cognitive performance in the wider population. PMID:24204618

  11. Mice deficient for wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 display elevated anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ruan, C S; Zhou, F H; He, Z Y; Wang, S F; Yang, C R; Shen, Y J; Guo, Y; Zhao, H B; Chen, L; Liu, D; Liu, J; Baune, B T; Xiao, Z C; Zhou, X F

    2015-05-01

    Mood disorders are a severe health burden but molecular mechanisms underlying mood dysfunction remain poorly understood. Here, we show that wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) negatively responds to the stress-induced negative mood-related behaviors. Specifically, we show that Wip1 protein but not its mRNA level was downregulated in the hippocampus but not in the neocortex after 4 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in mice. Moreover, the CUMS-responsive WIP1 downregulation in the hippocampus was restored by chronic treatment of fluoxetine (i.p. 20 mg/kg) along with the CUMS procedure. In addition, Wip1 knockout mice displayed decreased exploratory behaviors as well as increased anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in mice without impaired motor activities under the non-CUMS condition. Furthermore, the Wip1 deficiency-responsive anxiety-like but not depression-like behaviors were further elevated in mice under CUMS. Although limitations like male-alone sampling and multiply behavioral testing exist, the present study suggests a potential protective function of Wip1 in mood stabilization. PMID:25732137

  12. Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their wild-type counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worgul, Basil V.; Smilenov, Lubomir; Brenner, David J.; Junk, Anna; Zhou, Wei; Hall, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    It is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. In vitro studies have shown that cells from individuals homozygous for ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) are much more radiosensitive than cells from unaffected individuals. Although cells heterozygous for the ATM gene (ATM(+/-)) may be slightly more radiosensitive in vitro, it remained to be determined whether the greater susceptibility of ATM(+/-) cells translates into an increased sensitivity for late effects in vivo, though there is a suggestion that radiotherapy patients that are heterozygous for the ATM gene may be more at risk of developing late normal tissue damage. We chose cataractogenesis in the lens as a means to assay for the effects of ATM deficiency in a late-responding tissue. One eye of wild-type, Atm heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice was exposed to 0.5-, 1.0-, 2.0-, or 4.0-Gy x rays. The animals were followed weekly for cataract development by conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Cataract development in the animals of all three groups was strongly dependent on dose. The lenses of homozygous mice were the first to opacify at any given dose. Most important in the present context is that cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals. The data suggest that ATM heterozygotes in the human population may also be radiosensitive. This may influence the choice of individuals destined to be exposed to higher than normal doses of radiation, such as astronauts, and may also suggest that radiotherapy patients who are ATM heterozygotes could be predisposed to increased late normal tissue damage.

  13. Intravenous ascorbate improves spatial memory in middle-aged APP/PSEN1 and wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of Vitamin C (ascorbate, ASC) on spatial memory in APP/PSEN1 mice, an Alzheimer's disease model. First, we confirmed the uptake time course in ASC-depleted gulo (-/-) mice, which cannot synthesize ASC. Differential tissue uptake was seen based on ASC transporter distribution. Liver (SVCT1 and SVCT2) ASC was elevated at 30, 60 and 120 min post-treatment (125 mg/kg, i.v.), whereas spleen (SVCT2) ASC increased at 60 and 120 min. There was no detectable change in cortical (SVCT2 at choroid plexus, and neurons) ASC within the 2-h interval, although the cortex preferentially retained ASC. APP/PSEN1 and wild type (WT) mice at three ages (3, 9, or 20 months) were treated with ASC (125 mg/kg, i.v.) or saline 45 min before testing on the Modified Y-maze, a two-trial task of spatial memory. Memory declined with age and ASC treatment improved performance in 9-month-old APP/PSEN1 and WT mice. APP/PSEN1 mice displayed no behavioral impairment relative to WT controls. Although dopamine and metabolite DOPAC decreased in the nucleus accumbens with age, and improved spatial memory was correlated with increased dopamine in saline treated mice, acute ASC treatment did not alter monoamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. These data show that the Modified Y-maze is sensitive to age-related deficits, but not additional memory deficits due to amyloid pathology in APP/PSEN1 mice. They also suggest improvements in short-term spatial memory were not due to changes in the neuropathological features of AD or monoamine signaling.

  14. Intravenous ascorbate improves spatial memory in middle-aged APP/PSEN1 and wild type mice

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, John A.; Harrison, Fiona E.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of Vitamin C (ascorbate, ASC) on spatial memory in APP/PSEN1 mice, an Alzheimer's disease model. First, we confirmed the uptake time course in ASC-depleted gulo (−/−) mice, which cannot synthesize ASC. Differential tissue uptake was seen based on ASC transporter distribution. Liver (SVCT1 & SVCT2) ASC was elevated at 30, 60 and 120 min post-treatment (125 mg/kg, i.v.), whereas spleen (SVCT2) ASC increased at 60 and 120 min. There was no detectable change in cortical (SVCT2 at choroid plexus, and neurons) ASC within the 2-hour interval, although the cortex preferentially retained ASC. APP/PSEN1 and wild type (WT) mice at three ages (3, 9, or 20 months) were treated with ASC (125 mg/kg, i.v.) or saline 45 min before testing on the Modified Y-maze, a two-trial task of spatial memory. Memory declined with age and ASC treatment improved performance in 9 month-old APP/PSEN1 and WT mice. APP/PSEN1 mice displayed no behavioral impairment relative to WT controls. Although dopamine and metabolite DOPAC decreased in the nucleus accumbens with age, and improved spatial memory was correlated with increased dopamine in saline treated mice, acute ASC treatment did not alter monoamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. These data show that the Modified Y-maze is sensitive to age-related deficits, but not additional memory deficits due to amyloid pathology in APP/PSEN1 mice. They also suggest improvements in short-term spatial memory were not due to changes in the neuropathological features of AD or monoamine signaling. PMID:24508240

  15. MDM2 overexpression generates a skin phenotype in both wild type and p53 null mice.

    PubMed

    Alkhalaf, M; Ganguli, G; Messaddeq, N; Le Meur, M; Wasylyk, B

    1999-02-18

    The MDM2 proto-oncogene is overexpressed in human tumours and regulates the activities of the tumour suppressors p53 and pRB. We created mice that overexpress MDM2 under the control of the CMV promoter. These mice did not display an increased tumour incidence, but rather a specific skin phenotype, characterized by desquamation and hyperkeratosis. Transgenic MDM2 was found to be overexpressed in the epidermis, a tissue that normally expresses high levels of MDM2. The phenotype appeared during the first week after birth and then lessened with age, closely following the level of expression of the transgene. MDM2 overexpression was associated with an increase in proliferation in the basal layer, thickening of the epidermis, altered expression of the differentiation markers cytokeratin CK14, CK10 and CK1, and a decrease in the size and the number of granules that contain products of differentiation. Transgenic mice on a p53 null background displayed similar although not identical changes, showing that the effects of MDM2 are to a certain degree p53 independent. The skin is a major site of MDM2 expression in mice, raising the possibility that MDM2 overexpression perturbs the normal pattern of MDM2 expression and inhibits differentiation of the epidermis. PMID:10050879

  16. GENE PROFILING IN WILD TYPE AND PPARÁ NULL MICE EXPOSED TO PFOA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perflurooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid used in a variety of commercial applications. Concerns have been raised because PFOA is ubiquitous in the environment and can be detected in human tissues. PFOA is a rodent carcinogen and a developmental toxicant in mice. W...

  17. Brown adipose tissue dynamics in wild-type and UCP1-knockout mice: in vivo insights with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Grimpo, Kirsten; Völker, Maximilian N; Heppe, Eva N; Braun, Steve; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Heldmaier, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    We used noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) of wild-type (WT) and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-knockout mice lacking UCP1-mediated nonshivering thermogenesis (NST). Mice were sequentially acclimated to an ambient temperature of 30°C, 18°C, and 5°C. We detected a remodeling of iBAT and a decrease in its lipid content in all mice during cold exposure. Ratios of energy-rich phosphates (ATP/ADP, phosphocreatine/ATP) in iBAT were maintained stable during noradrenergic stimulation of thermogenesis in cold- and warm-adapted mice and no difference between the genotypes was observed. As free fatty acids (FFAs) serve as fuel for thermogenesis and activate UCP1 for uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, brown adipose tissue is considered to be a main acceptor and consumer of FFAs. We measured a major loss of FFAs from iBAT during noradrenergic stimulation of thermogenesis. This mobilization of FFAs was observed in iBAT of WT mice as well as in mice lacking UCP1. The high turnover and the release of FFAs from iBAT suggests an enhancement of lipid metabolism, which in itself contributes to the sympathetically activated NST and which is independent from uncoupled respiration mediated by UCP1. Our study demonstrates that MRI, besides its potential for visualizing and quantification of fat tissue, is a valuable tool for monitoring functional in vivo processes like lipid and phosphate metabolism during NST. PMID:24343897

  18. Isolation and characterization of liver epithelial cell lines from wild-type and mutant TgN737Rpw mice.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, W. G.; Yoder, B. K.; Isfort, R. J.; Detilleux, P. G.; Foster, C.; Neilsen, N.; Woychik, R. P.; Wilkinson, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The Tg737 gene encodes a tetratricopeptide repeat containing protein that, when disrupted in TgN737Rpw mutant mice, results in pleiotropic phenotypes that include the proliferation of epithelial cells. In the kidney and liver, this causes a phenotype that resembles autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. In the liver, the affected epithelial cells morphologically and immunologically resemble oval cells. Here we describe the isolation, culture, and characterization of epithelial cell lines derived from the livers of wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous TgN737Rpw mice. Essentially homogeneous cell cultures were established and the expression of liver markers was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and by immunohistochemistry. All of the cell lines reacted to the A6 antibody that was raised against mouse oval cells and expressed markers seen in oval cells. Cells transplanted into the interscapular fat pads of isogenic mice formed well defined ductular structures. Furthermore, in transfection experiments, we have demonstrated the involvement of Tg737 in cellular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9094975

  19. Long-term continuous allopregnanolone elevation causes memory decline and hippocampus shrinkage, in female wild-type B6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Sara K S; Johansson, Maja; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2016-02-01

    Chronic stress in various forms increases the risk for cognitive dysfunction, dementia and Alzheimer's disease. While the pathogenesis behind these findings is unknown, growing evidence suggests that chronic increase in neurosteroid levels, such as allopregnanolone, is part of the mechanism. We treated wild-type C57BL/6J mice with allopregnanolone for 5months, using osmotic pumps. This treatment led to moderately increased levels of allopregnanolone, equivalent to that of mild chronic stress. After an interval of no treatment for 1month, female mice showed impaired learning and memory function in the Morris water maze (MWM) in combination with diminished hippocampus weight and increased cerebellum weight, both correlating to MWM performance. Male mice showed a minor reduction in memory function and no differences in brain structure. We conclude that chronic allopregnanolone elevation can lead to cognitive dysfunction and negative brain alterations. We suggest that allopregnanolone could play a key role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced cognitive disturbances and perhaps dementia. PMID:26497250

  20. Protective responses in mice to vaccination with multiply administered cold-adapted influenza vaccine reassortants and wild-type viruses.

    PubMed

    Romanova, J R; Tannock, G A; Alexandrova, G I

    1997-01-01

    Protective responses to influenza vaccine reassortants derived from the cold-adapted (ca) donor strains A/Leningrad/134/17/57 and B/USSR/60/69 and wild-type epidemic viruses were studied in two strains of mice. Preliminary experiments revealed that, when mixtures of three viruses were inoculated intranasally to mice with 50 microliters containing 10(6) EID50 per 200 microliters (10(5.4) EID50 per mouse), interference between strains did not occur. However, interference with the growth of the influenza reassortant B/60/32/R took place if its concentration in the mixture was reduced to 10(5) (10(4.4) per mouse) or if it was inoculated at 10(6) EID50 (10(5.4) per mouse) in the presence of the influenza reassortant R/34 and two other influenza A epidemic strains; interference was unrelated to serological responses to infection with B/60/32/R. Despite evidence of interference, mice inoculated with the same mixtures in two identical doses, three weeks apart, were able to clear a challenge from each of seven homotypic and heterotypic influenza A and B strains. Heterotypic clearance of influenza A challenge viruses was greater following mixed infection, indicating that common determinants within the surface antigen glycoproteins contributed to immune responses which were broader than could be expected to be induced by parenteral vaccination.

  1. Sound transmission along the ossicular chain in common wild-type laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Varavva, Polina; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2013-07-01

    The use of genetically modified mice can accelerate progress in auditory research. However, the fundamental profile of mouse hearing has not been thoroughly documented. In the current study, we explored mouse middle ear transmission by measuring sound-evoked vibrations at several key points along the ossicular chain using a laser-Doppler vibrometer. Observations were made through an opening in pars flaccida. Simultaneously, the pressure at the tympanic membrane close to the umbo was monitored using a micro-pressure-sensor. Measurements were performed in C57BL mice, which are widely used in hearing research. Our results show that the ossicular local transfer function, defined as the ratio of velocity to the pressure at the tympanic membrane, was like a high-pass filter, almost flat at frequencies above ∼15 kHz, decreasing rapidly at lower frequencies. There was little phase accumulation along the ossicles. Our results suggested that the mouse ossicles moved almost as a rigid body. Based on these 1-dimensional measurements, the malleus-incus-complex primarily rotated around the anatomical axis passing through the gonial termination of the anterior malleus and the short process of the incus, but secondary motions were also present. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012".

  2. Two weeks of metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of AMPK kinase dead but not wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Jonas M; Larsen, Steen; Helge, Jørn W; Dela, Flemming; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is used as an anti-diabetic drug. Metformin ameliorates insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity in liver and skeletal muscle. Reduced mitochondrial content has been reported in type 2 diabetic muscles and it may contribute to decreased insulin sensitivity characteristic for diabetic muscles. The molecular mechanism behind the effect of metformin is not fully clarified but inhibition of complex I in the mitochondria and also activation of the 5'AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported in muscle. Furthermore, both AMPK activation and metformin treatment have been associated with stimulation of mitochondrial function and biogenesis. However, a causal relationship in skeletal muscle has not been investigated. We hypothesized that potential effects of in vivo metformin treatment on mitochondrial function and protein expressions in skeletal muscle are dependent upon AMPK signaling. We investigated this by two weeks of oral metformin treatment of muscle specific kinase dead α(2) (KD) AMPK mice and wild type (WT) littermates. We measured mitochondrial respiration and protein activity and expressions of key enzymes involved in mitochondrial carbohydrate and fat metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial respiration, HAD and CS activity, PDH and complex I-V and cytochrome c protein expression were all reduced in AMPK KD compared to WT tibialis anterior muscles. Surprisingly, metformin treatment only enhanced respiration in AMPK KD mice and thereby rescued the respiration defect compared to the WT mice. Metformin did not influence protein activities or expressions in either WT or AMPK KD mice.We conclude that two weeks of in vivo metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in the mitochondrial deficient AMPK KD but not WT mice. The improvement seems to be unrelated to AMPK, and does not involve changes in key mitochondrial proteins.

  3. Effect of the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban on arterial thrombosis in wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nana-Maria; Dressel, Tobias; Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2012-11-01

    Rivaroxaban is a potent and specific direct inhibitor of coagulation factor Xa. Recent studies have highlighted its effectiveness in the prevention of venous thrombosis and embolic stroke due to atrial fibrillation. To evaluate the antithrombotic effects of rivaroxaban in an in vivo model of arterial thrombosis, photochemical vascular injury was induced in wild-type mice by intravenous rose bengal (50 mg/kg body weight [BW]) followed by illumination of the left common carotid artery using a 543 nm helium-neon laser beam. Rivaroxaban, injected concomitantly with rose bengal at doses of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mg/kg BW, dose-dependently prolonged the times to first thrombotic occlusion and stable thrombosis. Quantitative analysis of carotid flow curves revealed higher blood volumes passing through the injured artery with increasing rivaroxaban doses (P<0.01 and P<0.001 vs. vehicle for 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg , respectively), suggesting a dose-dependent effect on vascular patency. Consistently, a significantly higher proportion of mice that received 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban exhibited patent carotid arteries at the end of the flow monitoring period compared to vehicle alone (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). Histological analysis showed complete thrombotic arterial occlusion in vehicle-treated mice compared to less thrombotic material in mice injected with 3.0 mg/kg rivaroxaban (P<0.05). Rivaroxaban also prolonged the time to cessation of tail bleeding in a dose-dependent manner, starting at 1.5 mg/kg. Similar findings were obtained in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. Rivaroxaban may exert beneficial effects by preventing arterial thrombosis and vascular occlusion after endothelial injury. PMID:22281071

  4. Mouse model of the OPRM1 (A118G) polymorphism: differential heroin self-administration behavior compared with wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Picetti, Roberto; Butelman, Eduardo R; Ho, Ann; Blendy, Julie A; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-03-13

    Mu-opioid receptors (MOPRs) are the target of heroin and other prescription opioids, which are currently responsible for massive addiction morbidity in the US. The gene coding for the human MOPR (OPRM1) has an important functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), A118G. The OPRM1 A118G genotype results in substantially increased risk of heroin addiction in humans; however, the neurobiological mechanism for this increased risk is not fully understood. This study examined heroin self-administration (SA) behavior in A112G (G/G) mice, harboring a functionally equivalent SNP in Oprm1 with a similar amino acid substitution, in extended (4 h) SA sessions. Adult male and female G/G mice and 'wild-type' litter mates (A/A) were allowed to self-administer heroin (0.25 mg/kg/unit dose, FR1 with a nose poke response) for 4 h/day, for 10 consecutive days. Half of the mice then continued in a heroin dose-response study, while extinction from heroin SA was studied in the other half. In vivo microdialysis was used to measure acute heroin-induced increases of striatal dopamine in the GG vs AA genotypes. Male and female G/G mice responded for heroin significantly more (and thus had greater intake) than A/A mice, in the initial 10 days of heroin SA, and in the subsequent dose-response study. There were no significant differences in extinction of SA between the A/A and G/G mice. Heroin-induced increases in striatal dopamine levels are higher in the GG mice than in the AA mice. Both male and female G/G mice self-administered more heroin than did A/A mice over a 10-day period, possibly because of the greater increases of heroin-induced striatal dopamine in the GG mice. Furthermore, G/G male mice escalated the amount of heroin self-administration across 10 extended-access sessions more than A/A male mice did. These are the first studies to examine the acquisition of heroin SA in this mouse model. These studies may lead to a better understanding of the neurobiological and behavioral

  5. Sex and Immunogen-Specific Benefits of Immunotherapy Targeting Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Transgenic and Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Pavan K.; Rajamohamedsait, Hameetha B.; Gonzalez, Veronica; Rajamohamedsait, Wajitha J.; Ahmed, Nawal; Krishnaswamy, Senthilkumar; Sigurdsson, Einar M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the deposition of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) as amyloid in islets, a process thought to be toxic to β-cells. To determine the feasibility of targeting these aggregates therapeutically, we vaccinated transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress human IAPP and were fed a high-fat diet to promote their diabetic phenotype. Our findings indicate that prophylactic vaccination with IAPP and its derivative IAPP7-19-TT, protects wild-type female mice, but not males, from obesity-induced early mortality, and the derivative showed a strong trend for prolonging the lifespan of Tg females but not males. Furthermore, IAPP7-19-TT-immunized Tg females cleared a glucose bolus more efficiently than controls, while IAPP-immunized Tg females showed an impaired ability to clear a glucose bolus compared to their adjuvant injected Tg controls. Interestingly, IAPP or IAPP7-19-TT treatments had no effect on glucose clearance in Tg males. Overall, these beneficial effects of IAPP targeted immunization depend on Tg status, sex, and immunogen. Hence, future studies in this field should carefully consider these variables that clearly affect the therapeutic outcome. In conclusion, IAPP targeting immunotherapy may have benefits in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27379014

  6. Cyclodextrin Alters GABAergic Input to CA1 Pyramidal Cells in Wild-Type But Not in NPC1-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Frech, Moritz J; Rabenstein, Michael; Bovensiepen, Katja; Rost, Sebastian; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene. Actual, no causative treatment for NPC1 is available, although some drugs have been proven to be beneficial to patients, for example, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CDX). In this study, we used the BALB/c_Nctr-Npc1m1N/-J mouse strain to study the effect of CDX, which is described to prolong the life span and to alleviate the pathogenic phenotype. By means of patch clamp recordings, we measured inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) of CA1 pyramidal cells of CDX-treated and -untreated animals to elucidate the influence of CDX on the synaptic transmission. Surprisingly, CDX induced a significantly higher GABAergic IPSC frequency in wild-type mice than in NPC1(-/-) mice. Although the IPSCs were mainly GABAergic, we observed a significant reduction of the IPSC frequency in the presence of the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. The effect of strychnine did not differ in untreated and treated animals, indicating that the effect of CDX was most likely not based on an interaction with glycinergic transmission machinery. However, the unexpected effect of CDX on the GABAergic synaptic transmission is of special interest as a disturbance plays, for example, a crucial role in epilepsy and, moreover, as CDX is currently under investigation as a treatment for NPC1 in humans. PMID:26392920

  7. Sex and Immunogen-Specific Benefits of Immunotherapy Targeting Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Transgenic and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Pavan K; Rajamohamedsait, Hameetha B; Gonzalez, Veronica; Rajamohamedsait, Wajitha J; Ahmed, Nawal; Krishnaswamy, Senthilkumar; Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the deposition of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) as amyloid in islets, a process thought to be toxic to β-cells. To determine the feasibility of targeting these aggregates therapeutically, we vaccinated transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress human IAPP and were fed a high-fat diet to promote their diabetic phenotype. Our findings indicate that prophylactic vaccination with IAPP and its derivative IAPP7-19-TT, protects wild-type female mice, but not males, from obesity-induced early mortality, and the derivative showed a strong trend for prolonging the lifespan of Tg females but not males. Furthermore, IAPP7-19-TT-immunized Tg females cleared a glucose bolus more efficiently than controls, while IAPP-immunized Tg females showed an impaired ability to clear a glucose bolus compared to their adjuvant injected Tg controls. Interestingly, IAPP or IAPP7-19-TT treatments had no effect on glucose clearance in Tg males. Overall, these beneficial effects of IAPP targeted immunization depend on Tg status, sex, and immunogen. Hence, future studies in this field should carefully consider these variables that clearly affect the therapeutic outcome. In conclusion, IAPP targeting immunotherapy may have benefits in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27379014

  8. Evaluation of Electrical Impedance as a Biomarker of Myostatin Inhibition in Wild Type and Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Li, Jia; Yim, Sung; Pacheck, Adam; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Rutkove, Seward B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Non-invasive and effort independent biomarkers are needed to better assess the effects of drug therapy on healthy muscle and that affected by muscular dystrophy (mdx). Here we evaluated the use of multi-frequency electrical impedance for this purpose with comparison to force and histological parameters. Methods Eight wild-type (wt) and 10 mdx mice were treated weekly with RAP-031 activin type IIB receptor at a dose of 10 mg kg−1 twice weekly for 16 weeks; the investigators were blinded to treatment and disease status. At the completion of treatment, impedance measurements, in situ force measurements, and histology analyses were performed. Results As compared to untreated animals, RAP-031 wt and mdx treated mice had greater body mass (18% and 17%, p < 0.001 respectively) and muscle mass (25% p < 0.05 and 22% p < 0.001, respectively). The Cole impedance parameters in treated wt mice, showed a 24% lower central frequency (p < 0.05) and 19% higher resistance ratio (p < 0.05); no significant differences were observed in the mdx mice. These differences were consistent with those seen in maximum isometric force, which was greater in the wt animals (p < 0.05 at > 70 Hz), but not in the mdx animals. In contrast, maximum force normalized by muscle mass was unchanged in the wt animals and lower in the mdx animals by 21% (p < 0.01). Similarly, myofiber size was only non-significantly higher in treated versus untreated animals (8% p = 0.44 and 12% p = 0.31 for wt and mdx animals, respectively). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate electrical impedance of muscle reproduce the functional and histological changes associated with myostatin pathway inhibition and do not reflect differences in muscle size or volume. This technique deserves further study in both animal and human therapeutic trials. PMID:26485280

  9. Chronic allergic inflammation causes vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 hypomorph and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Hershey, Gurjit Khurana; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) gene have been identified in patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however, disease penetrance is low, suggesting additional factors play a role. Inflammation is associated with PAH and vascular remodeling, but whether allergic inflammation triggers vascular remodeling in individuals with BMPR2 mutations is unknown. Our goal was to determine if chronic allergic inflammation would induce more severe vascular remodeling and PAH in mice with reduced BMPR-II signaling. Groups of Bmpr2 hypomorph and wild-type (WT) Balb/c/Byj mice were exposed to house dust mite (HDM) allergen, intranasally for 7 or 20 weeks to generate a model of chronic inflammation. HDM exposure induced similar inflammatory cell counts in all groups compared to controls. Muscularization of pulmonary arterioles and arterial wall thickness were increased after 7 weeks HDM, more severe at 20 weeks, but similar in both groups. Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) was measured by direct cardiac catheterization to assess PAH. RVSP was similarly increased in both HDM exposed groups after 20 weeks compared to controls, but not after 7 weeks. Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine was also assessed and interestingly, at 20 weeks, was more severe in HDM exposed Bmpr2 hypomorph mice versus WT. We conclude that chronic allergic inflammation caused PAH and while the severity was mild and similar between WT and Bmpr2 hypomorph mice, AHR was enhanced with reduced BMPR-II signaling. These data suggest that vascular remodeling and PAH resulting from chronic allergic inflammation occurs independently of BMPR-II pathway alterations.

  10. Lung-targeted expression of the c-Raf-1 kinase in transgenic mice exposes a novel oncogenic character of the wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Kerkhoff, E; Fedorov, L M; Siefken, R; Walter, A O; Papadopoulos, T; Rapp, U R

    2000-04-01

    The c-Raf-1 kinase is a downstream effector of Ras signaling. Both proteins are highly oncogenic when they are mutationally activated, but only the Ras GTPase is frequently mutated in naturally occurring tumors. Although the c-Raf-1 protein was found to be amplified in different lung cancer cell lines, overexpression of the wild-type c-Raf-1 protein was shown to be insufficient to transform cultured cells. Here we have addressed the question of whether overexpression of the wild-type c-Raf-1 kinase can induce lung cancer in mice. We show that lung-targeted expression of oncogenically activated or wild-type c-Raf-1 proteins induces morphologically indistinguishable lung adenomas in transgenic mice. Compared with mice transgenic for the activated c-Raf-1-BxB, tumor development is delayed and occurs at a lower incidence in wild-type c-Raf-1 transgenic mice. Our studies show that the c-Raf-1 expression level is a critical parameter in tumor development and should be analyzed in more detail to evaluate its potential in the induction of cancer.

  11. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults. PMID:26240606

  12. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-01-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host–microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults. PMID:26240606

  13. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults.

  14. Differential Transcriptome Networks between IDO1-Knockout and Wild-Type Mice in Brain Microglia and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Pena, Dianelys; Nixon, Scott E.; Southey, Bruce R.; Lawson, Marcus A.; McCusker, Robert H.; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia in the brain and macrophages in peripheral organs are cell types responsible for immune response to challenges. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is an immunomodulatory enzyme of the tryptophan pathway that is expressed in the brain. The higher activity of IDO1 in response to immune challenge has been implicated in behavioral disorders. The impact of IDO1 depletion on the microglia transcriptome has not been studied. An investigation of the transcript networks in the brain microglia from IDO1-knockout (IDO1-KO) mice was undertaken, relative to peripheral macrophages and to wild-type (WT) mice under unchallenged conditions. Over 105 transcript isoforms were differentially expressed between WT and IDO1-KO within cell type. Within microglia, Saa3 and Irg1 were over-expressed in IDO1-KO relative to WT. Within macrophages, Csf3 and Sele were over-expressed in IDO1-KO relative to WT. Among the genes differentially expressed between strains, enriched biological processes included ion homeostasis and ensheathment of neurons within microglia, and cytokine and chemokine expression within macrophages. Over 11,110 transcript isoforms were differentially expressed between microglia and macrophages and of these, over 10,800 transcripts overlapped between strains. Enriched biological processes among the genes over- and under-expressed in microglia relative to macrophages included cell adhesion and apoptosis, respectively. Detected only in microglia or macrophages were 421 and 43 transcript isoforms, respectively. Alternative splicing between cell types based on differential transcript isoform abundance was detected in 210 genes including Phf11d, H2afy, and Abr. Across strains, networks depicted a predominance of genes under-expressed in microglia relative to macrophages that may be a precursor for the different response of both cell types to challenges. The detected transcriptome differences enhance the understanding of the role of IDO1 in the microglia transcriptome

  15. Vitamin D2-Enriched Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Improves Memory in Both Wild Type and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Louise; Kersaitis, Cindy; Macaulay, Stuart Lance; Münch, Gerald; Niedermayer, Garry; Nigro, Julie; Payne, Matthew; Sheean, Paul; Vallotton, Pascal; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Bird, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, affecting over 30% of adult Australians, and increasing up to 80% for at-risk groups including the elderly (age>65). The role for Vitamin D in development of the central nervous system is supported by the association between Vitamin D deficiency and incidence of neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A reported positive relationship between Vitamin D status and cognitive performance suggests that restoring Vitamin D status might provide a cognitive benefit to those with Vitamin D deficiency. Mushrooms are a rich source of ergosterol, which can be converted to Vitamin D2 by treatment with UV light, presenting a new and convenient dietary source of Vitamin D2. We hypothesised that Vitamin D2-enriched mushrooms (VDM) could prevent the cognitive and pathological abnormalities associated with dementia. Two month old wild type (B6C3) and AD transgenic (APPSwe/PS1dE9) mice were fed a diet either deficient in Vitamin D2 or a diet which was supplemented with VDM, containing 1±0.2 µg/kg (∼54 IU/kg) vitamin D2, for 7 months. Effects of the dietary intervention on memory were assessed pre- and post-feeding. Brain sections were evaluated for amyloid β (Aβ) plaque loads and inflammation biomarkers using immuno-histochemical methods. Plasma vitamin D metabolites, Aβ40, Aβ42, calcium, protein and cholesterol were measured using biochemical assays. Compared with mice on the control diet, VDM-fed wild type and AD transgenic mice displayed improved learning and memory, had significantly reduced amyloid plaque load and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and elevated interleukin-10 in the brain. The results suggest that VDM might provide a dietary source of Vitamin D2 and other bioactives for preventing memory-impairment in dementia. This study supports the need for a randomised clinical trial to determine whether or not VDM consumption can benefit cognitive performance in the wider population. PMID

  16. The effect of dietary prebiotics and probiotics on body weight, large intestine indices, and fecal bile acid profile in wild type and IL10-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Merhige, Patricia M; Hagey, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested roles of probiotics and prebiotics on body weight management and intestinal function. Here, the effects of a dietary prebiotic, inulin (50 mg/g diet), and probiotic, Bfidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bb12) (final dose verified at 10(5) colony forming unit (cfu)/g diet, comparable to human consumption), were determined separately and in combination in mice using cellulose-based AIN-93G diets under conditions allowed for the growth of commensal bacteria. Continuous consumption of Bb12 and/or inulin did not affect food intake or body, liver, and spleen weights of young and adult mice. Fecal bile acid profiles were determined by nanoESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry. In the presence of inulin, more bacterial deconjugation of taurine from primary bile acids was observed along with an increased cecal weight. Consumption of inulin in the absence or presence of Bb12 also increased the villus cell height in the proximal colon along with a trend of higher bile acid sulfation by intestinal cells. Feeding Bb12 alone at the physiological dose did not affect bile acid deconjugation and had little effect on other intestinal indices. Although interleukin (IL)10-null mice are susceptible to enterocolitis, they maintained the same body weight as the wild type mice under our specific pathogen-free housing condition and showed no signs of inflammation. Nevertheless, they had smaller cecum suggesting a mildly compromised intestinal development even before the disease manifestation. Our results are consistent with the notion that dietary factors such as prebiotics play important roles in the growth of intestinal microbiota and may impact on the intestinal health. In addition, fecal bile acid profiling could potentially be a non-invasive tool in monitoring the intestinal environment. PMID:23555939

  17. Electrical Impedance Myography to Detect the Effects of Electrical Muscle Stimulation in Wild Type and Mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Yim, Sung; Pacheck, Adam; Sanchez, Benjamin; Rutkove, Seward B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tools to better evaluate the impact of therapy on nerve and muscle disease are needed. Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is sensitive to neuromuscular disease progression as well as to therapeutic interventions including myostatin inhibition and antisense oligonucleotide-based treatments. Whether the technique identifies the impact of electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) is unknown. Methods Ten wild-type (wt) C57B6 mice and 10 dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice underwent 2 weeks of 20 min/day EMS on left gastrocnemius and sham stimulation on the right gastrocnemius. Multifrequency EIM data and limb girth were obtained before and at the conclusion of the protocol. Muscle weight, in situ force measurements, and muscle fiber histology were also assessed at the conclusion of the study. Results At the time of sacrifice, muscle weight was greater on the EMS-treated side than on the sham-stimulated side (p = 0.018 for wt and p = 0.007 for mdx). Similarly, in wt animals, EIM parameters changed significantly compared to baseline (resistance (p = 0.009), reactance (p = 0.0003) and phase (p = 0.002); these changes were due in part to reductions in the EIM values on the EMS-treated side and elevations on the sham-simulated side. Mdx animals showed analogous but non-significant changes (p = 0.083, p = 0.064, and p = 0.57 for resistance, reactance and phase, respectively). Maximal isometric force trended higher on the stimulated side in wt animals only (p = 0.06). Myofiber sizes in wt animals were also larger on the stimulated side than on the sham-stimulated side (p = 0.034); no significant difference was found in the mdx mice (p = 0.79). Conclusion EIM is sensitive to stimulation-induced muscle alterations in wt animals; similar trends are also present in mdx mice. The mechanisms by which these EIM changes develop, however, remains uncertain. Possible explanations include longer-term trophic effects and shorter-term osmotic effects. PMID:26986564

  18. Structural and morphometric comparison of the molar teeth in pre-eruptive developmental stage of PACAP-deficient and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Sandor, B; Fintor, K; Felszeghy, Sz; Juhasz, T; Reglodi, D; Mark, L; Kiss, P; Jungling, A; Fulop, B D; Nagy, A D; Hashimoto, H; Zakany, R; Nagy, A; Tamas, A

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide with widespread distribution. It plays pivotal role in neuronal development. PACAP-immunoreactive fibers have been found in the tooth pulp, and recently, it has been shown that PACAP may also play a role in the regeneration of the periodontium after luxation injuries. However, there is no data about the effect of endogenous PACAP on tooth development. Ectodermal organogenesis including tooth development is regulated by different members of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), hedgehog (HH), and Wnt families. There is also a growing evidence to support the hypothesis that PACAP interacts with sonic hedgehog (SHH) receptor (PTCH1) and its downstream target (Gli1) suggesting its role in tooth development. Therefore, our aim was to study molar tooth development in mice lacking endogenous PACAP. In this study morphometric, immunohistochemical and structural comparison of molar teeth in pre-eruptive developmental stage was performed on histological sections of 7-day-old wild-type and PACAP-deficient mice. Further structural analysis was carried out with Raman microscope. The morphometric comparison of the 7-day-old samples revealed that the dentin was significantly thinner in the molars of PACAP-deficient mice compared to wild-type animals. Raman spectra of the enamel in wild-type mice demonstrated higher diversity in secondary structure of enamel proteins. In the dentin of PACAP-deficient mice higher intracrystalline disordering in the hydroxyapatite molecular structure was found. We also obtained altered SHH, PTCH1 and Gli1 expression level in secretory ameloblasts of PACAP-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates suggesting that PACAP might play an important role in molar tooth development and matrix mineralization involving influence on SHH signaling cascade. PMID:25112419

  19. Peptide Transporter 1 is Responsible for Intestinal Uptake of the Dipeptide Glycylsarcosine: Studies in Everted Jejunal Rings from Wild-type and Pept1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Katherine; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of PEPT1 in the uptake of peptides/mimetics from mouse small intestine using glycylsarcosine (GlySar). After isolating jejunal tissue from wild-type and Pept1 null mice, 2-cm intestinal segments were everted and mounted on glass rods for tissue uptake studies. [14C]GlySar (4 μM) was studied as a function of time, temperature, sodium and pH, concentration, and potential inhibitors. Compared to wild-type animals, Pept1 null mice exhibited a 78% reduction of GlySar uptake at pH 6.0, 37°C. GlySar uptake showed pH dependence with peak values between pH 6.0-6.5 in wild-type animals, while no such tendency was observed in Pept1 null mice. GlySar exhibited Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics and a minor nonsaturable component in wild-type animals. In contrast, GlySar uptake occurred by only a nonsaturable process in Pept1 null mice. GlySar uptake was significantly inhibited by dipeptides, aminocephalosporins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the antiviral prodrug valacyclovir; these inhibitors had little, if any, effect on the uptake of GlySar in Pept1 null mice. The findings demonstrate that PEPT1 plays a critical role in the uptake of GlySar in jejunum, and suggest that PEPT1 is the major transporter responsible for the intestinal absorption of small peptides. PMID:20862774

  20. Metallothionein-I/II null mice are more sensitive than wild-type mice to the hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of chronic oral or injected inorganic arsenicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, Y; Goyer, R A; Achanzar, W; Waalkes, M P

    2000-06-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a low-molecular-weight, sulfhydryl-rich, metal-binding protein that can protect against the toxicity of cadmium, mercury, and copper. However, the role of MT in arsenic (As)-induced toxicity is less certain. To better define the ability of MT to modify As toxicity, MT-I/II knockout (MT-null) mice and the corresponding wild-type mice (WT) were exposed to arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)] either through the drinking water for 48 weeks, or through repeated sc injections (5 days/week) for 15 weeks. Chronic As exposure increased tissue MT concentrations (2-5-fold) in the WT but not in MT-null mice. Arsenic by both routes produced damage to the liver (fatty infiltration, inflammation, and focal necrosis) and kidney (tubular cell vacuolization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial fibrosis) in both MT-null and WT mice. However, in MT-null mice, the pathological lesions were more frequent and severe when compared to WT mice. This was confirmed biochemically, in that, at the higher oral doses of As, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were increased more in MT-null mice (60%) than in WT mice (30%). Chronic As exposures produced 2-10 fold elevation of serum interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels, with greater increases seen by repeated injections than by oral exposure, and again, MT-null mice had higher serum cytokines than WT mice after As exposure. Repeated As injections also decreased hepatic glutathione (GSH) by 35%, but GSH-peroxidase and GSH-reductase were minimally affected. MT-null mice were more sensitive than WT mice to the effect of GSH depletion by As(V). Hepatic caspase-3 activity was increased (2-3-fold) in both WT and MT-null mice, indicative of apoptotic cell death. In summary, chronic inorganic As exposure produced injuries to multiple organs, and MT-null mice are generally more susceptible than WT mice to As-induced toxicity regardless of route of exposure, suggesting that MT could be a

  1. The relative biological effectiveness of densely ionizing heavy-ion radiation for inducing ocular cataracts in wild type versus mice heterozygous for the ATM gene.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric J; Worgul, Basil V; Smilenov, Lubomir; Elliston, Carl D; Brenner, David J

    2006-07-01

    The accelerated appearance of ocular cataracts at younger ages has been recorded in both astronauts and airline pilots, and is usually attributed to high-energy heavy ions in galactic cosmic ray radiation. We have previously shown that high-LET 1-GeV/nucleon (56)Fe ions are significantly more effective than X-rays in producing cataracts in mice. We have also shown that mice haploinsufficient for ATM develop cataracts earlier than wild-type animals, when exposed to either low-LET X-rays or high-LET (56)Fe ions. In this paper we derive quantitative estimates for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high energy (56)Fe ions compared with X-rays, both for wild type and for mice haploinsufficient for ATM. There is a clear trend toward higher RBE's in haploinsufficient animals, both for low- and high-grade cataracts. Haploinsufficiency for ATM results in an enhanced sensitivity to X-rays compared with the wild type, and this enhancement appears even larger after exposure to high-LET heavy ions. PMID:16799786

  2. Experimental Support for the Ecoimmunity Theory: Distinct Phenotypes of Nonlymphocytic Cells in SCID and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Ochayon, David E; Baranovski, Boris M; Malkin, Peter; Schuster, Ronen; Kalay, Noa; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Sloma, Ido; Levinson, Justin; Brazg, Jared; Efroni, Sol; Lewis, Eli C; Nevo, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance toward "self" is critical in multiple immune disorders. While there are several mechanisms to describe the involvement of immune cells in the process, the role of peripheral tissue cells in that context is not yet clear. The theory of ecoimmunity postulates that interactions between immune and tissue cells represent a predator-prey relationship. A lifelong interaction, shaped mainly during early ontogeny, leads to selection of nonimmune cell phenotypes. Normally, therefore, nonimmune cells that evolve alongside an intact immune system would be phenotypically capable of evading immune responses, and cells whose phenotype falls short of satisfying this steady state would expire under hostile immune responses. This view was supported until recently by experimental evidence showing an inferior endurance of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-derived pancreatic islets when engrafted into syngeneic immune-intact wild-type (WT) mice, relative to islets from WT. Here we extend the experimental exploration of ecoimmunity by searching for the presence of the phenotypic changes suggested by the theory. Immune-related phenotypes of islets, spleen, and bone marrow immune cells were determined, as well as SCID and WT nonlymphocytic cells. Islet submass grafting was performed to depict syngeneic graft functionality. Islet cultures were examined under both resting and inflamed conditions for expression of CD40 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II and release of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-10, and insulin. Results depict multiple pathways that appear to be related to the sculpting of nonimmune cells by immune cells; 59 SCID islet genes displayed relative expression changes compared with WT islets. SCID cells expressed lower tolerability to inflammation and higher levels of immune-related molecules, including MHC class I. Accordingly, islets exhibited a marked increase in insulin release upon

  3. Impact of sex and ozone exposure on the course of pneumonia in wild type and SP-A (−/−) mice

    PubMed Central

    Mikerov, Anatoly N.; Hu, Sanmei; Durrani, Faryal; Gan, Xiaozhuang; Wang, Guirong; Umstead, Todd M.; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Female mice exhibited higher survival rate than males after pneumonia, with a reversal of this pattern following ozone exposure. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in innate immunity and SP-A (−/−) mice were more susceptible to pneumonia than wild type mice. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms of the differential susceptibility of mice to pneumonia. Wild type and SP-A (−/−) C57BL/6J male and female mice were exposed to ozone or filtered air (FA) and then infected intratracheally with Klebsiella pneumoniae. Blood, spleen, and lung were analyzed for bacterial counts, lung and spleen weights, and sex hormone and cortisol levels were measured in plasma within two days post-infection. We found: 1) in the absence of ozone-induced oxidative stress, males had higher level of bacterial dissemination compared to females; ozone exposure decreased pulmonary clearance in both sexes and ozone-exposed females were more affected than males; 2) ozone exposure increased lung weight, but decreased spleen weight in both sexes, and in both cases ozone-exposed females were affected the most; 3) plasma cortisol levels in infected mice changed: ozone-exposed > FA-exposed, females > males, and infected > non-infected; 4) no major sex hormone differences were observed in the studied conditions; 5) differences between wild type and SP-A (−/−) mice were observed in some of the studied conditions. We concluded that reduced pulmonary clearance, compromised spleen response to infection, and increased cortisol levels in ozone-exposed females, and the higher level of lung bacterial dissemination in FA-exposed males, contribute to the previously observed survival outcomes. PMID:22285567

  4. Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor improves long-term memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease as well as in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Susanna; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Lahtinen, Hanna-Maija; Koivisto, Henna; Hämäläinen, Elina; Saarma, Mart; Tanila, Heikki

    2015-09-15

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects and repairs dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease, which motivated us to investigate its therapeutic effect in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We employed an established APP/PS1 mouse model of AD and gave intrahippocampal injections of CDNF protein or CDNF transgene in an AAV2 viral vector to 1-year-old animals. We performed a behavioral test battery 2 weeks after the injections and collected tissue samples after the 3-week test period. Intrahippocampal CDNF-therapy improved long-term memory in both APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, but did not affect spontaneous exploration, object neophobia or early stages of spatial learning. The memory improvement was not associated with decreased brain amyloid load or enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. Intracranial CDNF treatment has beneficial effects on long-term memory and is well tolerated. The CDNF molecular mechanisms of action on memory await further studies.

  5. Activation of nicotinic α(7) acetylcholine receptor enhances long term potentation in wild type mice but not in APP(swe)/PS1ΔE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Söderman, Andreas; Mikkelsen, Jens D; West, Mark J; Christensen, Ditte Z; Jensen, Morten S

    2011-01-10

    Amyloid β (Aβ) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and binds to the nicotinic α(7) receptor (α(7) nAChR). Little is known about the degree to which the binding of Aβ to the α(7) nAChR influences the role of this receptor in long-term potentiation (LTP), however. We have studied the effect of the partial α(7) nAChR agonist SSR180711 on hippocampal slice preparations from normal wild type (Wt) and APP(swe)/PS1ΔE9 transgenic (Tg) mice. In the hippocampal slices from the 6 months old Wt mice, the application of both nicotine (5μM) and SSR180711 (300nM) resulted in a significant enhancement of LTP expressed in area CA1. However, in the Tg mice the application of SSR180711 did not result in an increase in LTP beyond control levels. The amount of binding of the α(7) nAChR ligand 125-I-α-bungarotoxin was not different between in Tg and Wt mice. These findings indicate that the α(7) nAChR is functionally blocked in the hippocampal neurons, downstream of the α(7) nAChR, and that this is likely due to an interaction between the receptor and Aβ, which leads to changes in LTP.

  6. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1(-/-)) and wild-type mice (DJ-1(+/+)) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1(-/-) and DJ-1(+/+) mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1(+/+) mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice. PMID:27313379

  7. Differences in strength-duration curves of electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists between DJ-1 homozygous knockout and wild-type mice: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Won-Deok; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Strength-duration (SD) curves are used in electrical diagnosis by physiotherapists to confirm muscle degeneration. However, the usefulness of SD curves in comparing muscle degeneration in DJ-1 homozygous knockout (DJ-1−/−) and wild-type mice (DJ-1+/+) is not yet fully understood. The electrical properties of the gastrocnemius muscles of DJ-1−/− and DJ-1+/+ mice were compared in the current study. [Subjects and Methods] The electrode of an electrical stimulator was applied to the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the rheobase until the response of contractive muscle to electrical stimulation became visible in mice. [Results] The rheobase of DJ-1−/− mice showed a significant increase in a time-dependent manner, compared to that of DJ-1+/+ mice. [Conclusion] These results demonstrate that the DJ-1 protein may be implicated in the regulation of neuromuscular activity of gastrocnemius muscles of mice. PMID:27313379

  8. Urokinase receptor-deficient mice mount an innate immune response to and clarify respiratory viruses as efficiently as wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Manuel; Lao, Yolanda; Eguiluz, César; Del Val, Margarita; Martínez, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    The plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is required for lung infiltration by innate immune cells in respiratory bacterial infections. In order to verify if this held true for respiratory viruses, wild type (WT) and uPAR knockout (uPAR(-/-)) mice were inoculated intranasally with the human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and the influenza A virus. At several days post-infection (dpi), viral titers in the lungs were determined while cell infiltrates in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the case of influenza A, body weight loss and mortality were also monitored. Only minor differences were observed between infected WT and uPAR(-/-) mice, primarily in influenza virus replication and pathology. These results indicate that uPAR does not play a major role in limiting virus replication or in orchestrating the innate immune response against HRSV or influenza infections in mice. This suggests that there are fundamental differences in the immune control of the viral infections studied here and those caused by bacteria. PMID:26115163

  9. Urokinase receptor-deficient mice mount an innate immune response to and clarify respiratory viruses as efficiently as wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Manuel; Lao, Yolanda; Eguiluz, César; Del Val, Margarita; Martínez, Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    The plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is required for lung infiltration by innate immune cells in respiratory bacterial infections. In order to verify if this held true for respiratory viruses, wild type (WT) and uPAR knockout (uPAR−/−) mice were inoculated intranasally with the human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and the influenza A virus. At several days post-infection (dpi), viral titers in the lungs were determined while cell infiltrates in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the case of influenza A, body weight loss and mortality were also monitored. Only minor differences were observed between infected WT and uPAR−/− mice, primarily in influenza virus replication and pathology. These results indicate that uPAR does not play a major role in limiting virus replication or in orchestrating the innate immune response against HRSV or influenza infections in mice. This suggests that there are fundamental differences in the immune control of the viral infections studied here and those caused by bacteria. PMID:26115163

  10. The mechanisms underlying the generation of the colonic migrating motor complex in both wild-type and nNOS knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Heredia, Dante J; McCann, Conor J; Hennig, Grant W; Smith, Terence K

    2010-02-01

    Colonic migrating motor complexes (CMMCs) propel fecal contents and are altered in diseased states, including slow-transit constipation. However, the mechanisms underlying the CMMCs are controversial because it has been proposed that disinhibition (turning off of inhibitory neurotransmission) or excitatory nerve activity generate the CMMC. Therefore, our aims were to reexamine the mechanisms underlying the CMMC in the colon of wild-type and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)(-/-) mice. CMMCs were recorded from the isolated murine large bowel using intracellular recordings of electrical activity from circular muscle (CM) combined with tension recording. Spontaneous CMMCs occurred in both wild-type (frequency: 0.3 cycles/min) and nNOS(-/-) mice (frequency: 0.4 cycles/min). CMMCs consisted of a hyperpolarization, followed by fast oscillations (slow waves) with action potentials superimposed on a slow depolarization (wild-type: 14.0 +/- 0.6 mV; nNOS(-/-): 11.2 +/- 1.5 mV). Both atropine (1 microM) and MEN 10,376 [neurokinin 2 (NK2) antagonist; 0.5 microM] added successively reduced the slow depolarization and the number of action potentials but did not abolish the fast oscillations. The further addition of RP 67580 (NK1 antagonist; 0.5 microM) blocked the fast oscillations and the CMMC. Importantly, none of the antagonists affected the resting membrane potential, suggesting that ongoing tonic inhibition of the CM was maintained. Fecal pellet propulsion, which was blocked by the NK2 or the NK1 antagonist, was slower down the longer, more constricted nNOS(-/-) mouse colon (wild-type: 47.9 +/- 2.4 mm; nNOS(-/-): 57.8 +/- 1.4 mm). These observations suggest that excitatory neurotransmission enhances pacemaker activity during the CMMC. Therefore, the CMMC is likely generated by a synergistic interaction between neural and interstitial cells of Cajal networks.

  11. Wild-type and IL10-null mice have differential colonic epithelial gene expression responses to dietary supplementation with synbiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis and inulin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Chan, Wan-Chun; Hu, Zihua

    2014-03-01

    Prebiotic plus probiotic (synbiotic) supplementations promote fermentation and have shown anti-inflammatory activity in colonic epithelium. However, in many instances, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have demonstrated adverse effects after prebiotic supplementation at a dose well tolerated by normal individuals. To test the hypothesis that the host inflammation affects the colonic epithelial response to increased fermentation, the gene expression of colonic epithelium was analyzed. In a 1-way experimental design to test the effect of supplements in wild-type mice using the standard diet formulated by the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN-93G) as the control diet, fermentable fiber inulin (5%) in the absence or presence of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) (10(8) CFU/kg diet) showed limited effects on gene expression as determined by whole-genome microarray. Bb12 supplementation alone was known not to increase fermentation and here instead significantly upregulated genes in nucleic acid metabolic processes. The effects of the synbiotic diet were then determined in mice exposed to LPS-induced inflammation in a 2-way experimental design testing the effect of diet and LPS. The microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses on the wild-type mice revealed that LPS-induced changes in the colonic epithelium were 4- to 10-fold less in the synbiotic diet group compared with the control diet group. Unlike the wild-type mice, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL10)-null mice (susceptible to IBD) given the synbiotic diet, compared with those given the control diet, had 3- to 40-fold increased expression of inflammation-related genes such as Cxcl1 (chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1) and S100a9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9) in the absence and presence of LPS exposure. These contrasting intestinal epithelial responses to increased fermentation in wild-type and IL10-null mice are similar

  12. Effects of Mechanical Overloading on the Properties of Soleus Muscle Fibers, with or without Damage in MDX and Wild Type Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Takashi; Oke, Yoshihiko; Nakai, Naoya; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Effects of mechanical overloading on the characteristics of regenerating or not-regenerating soleus muscle fibers were studied. The muscle fibers of mdx mice were characterized by the localization of myonuclei. Muscle damage was also induced in wild type (WT) mice by injection of cardiotoxin (CTX) into soleus muscle. Overloading was applied for 14 days to the left soleus muscle in mdx and intact and CTX-injected WT mice by removing the distal tendons of plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. The contralateral muscle served as the normal control. These animals were then allowed ambulation recovery in the cage. Central myonuclei were noted in many fibers of mdx and CTX-injected mice with or without overloading. In general, the fibers with central nuclei were considered as regenerating fibers. The fibers with more central nuclei were increased in mdx mice, but the fibers with more peripheral nuclei were increased in CTX-injected WT mice by overloading. The muscle satellite cells, neuromuscular junctions (NMJ), and myonuclei were stained. Most of the properties, such as number of myonuclei and satellite cells, size of NMJ, and fiber length, were not influenced by mechanical overloading in all mice. Approximately 0.6% branched fibers were seen in the intact soleus of mdx mice, although these fibers were not detected in WT mice. However, the percentage of these fibers was increased by overloading especially in mdx mice (~50% vs. ~2.5% in WT). In CTX-injected WT mice, these fibers were ~15% with or without overloading. The fiber cross sectional area in normal WT, but not in mdx and CTX-injected WT mice, was increased by overloading (p<0.05). These results suggested that the functional overload induced muscle damage in mdx mice, but promoted the regeneration in CTX-injected WT mice.

  13. Impact of mTORC1 inhibition on keratinocyte proliferation during skin tumor promotion in wild-type and BK5.AktWT mice.

    PubMed

    Rho, Okkyung; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Jiang, Guiyu; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mTORC1 signaling during 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion in both wild-type (FVB/N) and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA activated mTORC1 signaling in a time-dependent manner in cultured primary mouse keratinocytes and a mouse keratinocyte cell line. Early activation (15-30 min) of mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA was mediated in part by PKC activation, whereas later activation (2-4 h) was mediated by activation of EGFR and Akt. BK5.Akt(WT) transgenic mice, where Akt1 is overexpressed in basal epidermis, are highly sensitive to TPA-induced epidermal proliferation and two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Targeting mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferation as well as tumor promotion in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. A significant expansion (∼threefold) of the label retaining cell (LRC) population per hair follicle was observed in BK5.Akt(WT) mice compared to FVB/N mice. There was also a significant increase in K15 expressing cells in the hair follicle of transgenic mice that coincided with expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-S6K, and phospho-PRAS40, suggesting an important role of mTORC1 signaling in bulge-region keratinocyte stem cell (KSC) homeostasis. After 2 weeks of TPA treatment, LRCs had moved upward into the interfollicular epidermis from the bulge region of both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA-mediated LRC proliferation and migration was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. Collectively, the current data indicate that signaling through mTORC1 contributes significantly to the process of skin tumor promotion through effects on proliferation of the target cells for tumor development. PMID:24114993

  14. Impact of mTORC1 inhibition on keratinocyte proliferation during skin tumor promotion in wild-type and BK5.AktWT mice.

    PubMed

    Rho, Okkyung; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Jiang, Guiyu; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mTORC1 signaling during 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion in both wild-type (FVB/N) and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA activated mTORC1 signaling in a time-dependent manner in cultured primary mouse keratinocytes and a mouse keratinocyte cell line. Early activation (15-30 min) of mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA was mediated in part by PKC activation, whereas later activation (2-4 h) was mediated by activation of EGFR and Akt. BK5.Akt(WT) transgenic mice, where Akt1 is overexpressed in basal epidermis, are highly sensitive to TPA-induced epidermal proliferation and two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Targeting mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferation as well as tumor promotion in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. A significant expansion (∼threefold) of the label retaining cell (LRC) population per hair follicle was observed in BK5.Akt(WT) mice compared to FVB/N mice. There was also a significant increase in K15 expressing cells in the hair follicle of transgenic mice that coincided with expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-S6K, and phospho-PRAS40, suggesting an important role of mTORC1 signaling in bulge-region keratinocyte stem cell (KSC) homeostasis. After 2 weeks of TPA treatment, LRCs had moved upward into the interfollicular epidermis from the bulge region of both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA-mediated LRC proliferation and migration was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. Collectively, the current data indicate that signaling through mTORC1 contributes significantly to the process of skin tumor promotion through effects on proliferation of the target cells for tumor development.

  15. A Comparative Study of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Wild Type and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel; Cediel, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Lourdes, Rodriguez-de la Rosa; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Hernandez-Sanchez, Catalina; Zubeldia, Jose M.; Cerdan, Sebastian; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR) recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to prevent or

  16. A comparison of learning and memory characteristics of young and middle-aged wild-type mice in the IntelliCage.

    PubMed

    Mechan, Annis O; Wyss, Adrian; Rieger, Henry; Mohajeri, M Hasan

    2009-05-30

    We have tested the cognitive abilities of young (2.5 months) and middle-aged (14 months) wild-type C57Bl/6J mice in the IntelliCage, which enables automated monitoring of spontaneous and learning behaviour in a homecage-like environment. No differences were observed either in circadian activity or in performance in the novelty-induced exploration test, but middle-aged mice exhibited decreased exploratory activity overall. In the place learning test module, when mice were free to explore all corners without any negative reinforcement, young mice tended not to learn the task and performed less effectively than the middle-aged group. However, when an air-puff was administered as negative reinforcement following visits to an incorrect corner, young mice learned the task significantly better than middle-aged mice throughout the test period. Our data show that, in freely moving mice, the motivational cues for learning and retrieval of memory are age-dependent and dramatically influence learning and memory performance. Furthermore, the data reported here represent a step towards optimised cognitive test protocols when comparing young and middle-aged mice.

  17. Alterations in Oral [1-14C] 18:1n-9 Distribution in Lean Wild-Type and Genetically Obese (ob/ob) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinxia; Feng, Jie; Yu, Caihua; Shen, Qingwu W.; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-01-01

    Obesity may result from altered fatty acid (FA) disposal. Altered FA distribution in obese individuals is poorly understood. Lean wild-type C57BL/6J and obese C57BL/6Job/ob mice received an oral dose of [1-14C]18:1n-9 (oleic acid), and the radioactivity in tissues was evaluated at various time points. The 14C concentration decreased rapidly in gastrointestinal tract but gradually increased and peaked at 96 h in adipose tissue, muscle and skin in lean mice. The 14C concentration was constant in adipose tissue and muscle of obese mice from 4h to 168h. 14C-label content in adipose tissue was significantly affected by genotype, whereas muscle 14C-label content was affected by genotype, time and the interaction between genotype and time. There was higher total 14C retention (47.7%) in obese mice than in lean mice (9.0%) at 168 h (P<0.05). The 14C concentrations in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle were higher in obese mice than in lean mice (P<0.05). Perirenal adipose tissue contained the highest 14C content in lean mice, whereas subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) had the highest 14C content and accounted for the largest proportion of total radioactivity among fat depots in obese mice. More lipid radioactivity was recovered as TAG in SAT from obese mice than from lean mice (P<0.05). Gene expression suggested acyl CoA binding protein and fatty acid binding protein are important for FA distribution in adipose tissue and muscle. The FA distribution in major tissues was altered in ob/ob mice, perhaps contributing to obesity. Understanding the disparity in FA disposal between lean and obese mice may reveal novel targets for the treatment and prevention of obesity. PMID:25826747

  18. Alterations in oral [1-(14)C] 18:1n-9 distribution in lean wild-type and genetically obese (ob/ob) mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxia; Feng, Jie; Yu, Caihua; Shen, Qingwu W; Wang, Yizhen

    2015-01-01

    Obesity may result from altered fatty acid (FA) disposal. Altered FA distribution in obese individuals is poorly understood. Lean wild-type C57BL/6J and obese C57BL/6Job/ob mice received an oral dose of [1-(14)C]18:1n-9 (oleic acid), and the radioactivity in tissues was evaluated at various time points. The (14)C concentration decreased rapidly in gastrointestinal tract but gradually increased and peaked at 96 h in adipose tissue, muscle and skin in lean mice. The (14)C concentration was constant in adipose tissue and muscle of obese mice from 4 h to 168 h. (14)C-label content in adipose tissue was significantly affected by genotype, whereas muscle (14)C-label content was affected by genotype, time and the interaction between genotype and time. There was higher total (14)C retention (47.7%) in obese mice than in lean mice (9.0%) at 168 h (P<0.05). The (14)C concentrations in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle were higher in obese mice than in lean mice (P<0.05). Perirenal adipose tissue contained the highest (14)C content in lean mice, whereas subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) had the highest (14)C content and accounted for the largest proportion of total radioactivity among fat depots in obese mice. More lipid radioactivity was recovered as TAG in SAT from obese mice than from lean mice (P<0.05). Gene expression suggested acyl CoA binding protein and fatty acid binding protein are important for FA distribution in adipose tissue and muscle. The FA distribution in major tissues was altered in ob/ob mice, perhaps contributing to obesity. Understanding the disparity in FA disposal between lean and obese mice may reveal novel targets for the treatment and prevention of obesity.

  19. Transcriptomic Insights into the Response of Placenta and Decidua Basalis to the CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide Stimulation in Non-Obese Diabetic Mice and Wild-Type Controls

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Rui; Guo, Yu-Na; Qin, Chuan-Mei; Qin, Xiao-Li; Tao, Fei; Su, Fei; Tian, Fu-Ju; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection is one of the most frequent causes of miscarriage. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN) can mimic intrauterine infection. CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption was observed consistently in the NK-cell deficient non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice but not in the wild-type (WT) mice. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of differential pregnancy outcomes, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the placenta and decidua basalis was revealed by RNA-Seq with CpG ODN or control ODN treatment. Common DEGs in the WT and NOD mice were enriched in antimicrobial/antibacterial humoral responses that may be activated as a primary response to bacterial infection. The susceptibility to CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption in the NOD mice might mainly be attributed to M1 macrophage polarization and the immunodeficient status, such as the down-regulation in antigen processing and presentation, allograft rejection, and natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, the WT mice with normal immune systems could activate multiple immune responses and be resistant to CpG ODN-induced embryo-resorption, such as M2 macrophage differentiation and activation regulated by complement component C1q and peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathways. Collectively, this study suggests that the immunodeficient status of NOD mice and the macrophage polarization regulated by C1q and PPAR signaling might be the basis for differential pregnancy outcomes between the NOD and WT mice. PMID:27527166

  20. Inhibition of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Induces Salt-Sensitive Hypertension in Nitric Oxide Synthase 1α Knockout and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ximing; Chandrashekar, Kiran; Wang, Lei; Lai, En Yin; Wei, Jin; Zhang, Gensheng; Wang, Shaohui; Zhang, Jie; Juncos, Luis A; Liu, Ruisheng

    2016-04-01

    We recently showed that α, β, and γ splice variants of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) expressed in the macula densa and NOS1β accounts for most of the NO generation. We have also demonstrated that the mice with deletion of NOS1 specifically from the macula densa developed salt-sensitive hypertension. However, the global NOS1 knockout (NOS1KO) strain is neither hypertensive nor salt sensitive. This global NOS1KO strain is actually an NOS1αKO model. Consequently, we hypothesized that inhibition of NOS1β in NOS1αKO mice induces salt-sensitive hypertension. NOS1αKO and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice were implanted with telemetry transmitters and divided into 7-nitroindazole (10 mg/kg/d)-treated and nontreated groups. All of the mice were fed a normal salt (0.4% NaCl) diet for 5 days, followed by a high-salt diet (4% NaCl). NO generation by the macula densa was inhibited by >90% in WT and NOS1αKO mice treated with 7-nitroindazole. Glomerular filtration rate in conscious mice was increased by ≈ 40% after a high-salt diet in both NOS1αKO and WT mice. In response to acute volume expansion, glomerular filtration rate, diuretic and natriuretic response were significantly blunted in the WT and knockout mice treated with 7-nitroindazole. Mean arterial pressure had no significant changes in mice fed a high-salt diet, but increased ≈ 15 mm Hg similarly in NOS1αKO and WT mice treated with 7-nitroindazole. We conclude that NOS1β, but not NOS1α, plays an important role in control of sodium excretion and hemodynamics in response to either an acute or a chronic salt loading.

  1. The effect of mild traumatic brain injury on peripheral nervous system pathology in wild-type mice and the G93A mutant mouse model of motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, T M; Jaramillo, C A; Sataranatarajan, K; Watts, L; Sabia, M; Qi, W; Van Remmen, H

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with a risk of neurodegenerative disease. Some suggest a link between TBI and motor neuron disease (MND), including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To investigate the potential mechanisms linking TBI to MND, we measured motor function and neuropathology following mild-TBI in wild-type and a transgenic model of ALS, G93A mutant mice. Mild-TBI did not alter the lifespan of G93A mice or age of onset; however, rotarod performance was impaired in G93A verses wild-type mice. Grip strength was reduced only in G93A mice after mild-TBI. Increased electromyography (EMG) abnormalities and markers of denervation (AchR, Runx1) indicate that mild-TBI may result in peripheral effects that are exaggerated in G93A mice. Markers of inflammation (cell edema, astrogliosis and microgliosis) were detected at 24 and 72h in the brain and spinal cord in wild-type and G93A mice. Levels of F2-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress, were increased in the spinal cord 24h post mild-TBI in wild-type mice but were not affected by TBI in G93A mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that mild-TBI induces inflammation and oxidative stress and negatively impacts muscle denervation and motor performance, suggesting mild-TBI can potentiate motor neuron pathology and influence the development of MND in mice.

  2. Expression pattern of immediate early genes in the cerebellum of D1R KO, D2R KO, and wild type mice under vestibular-controlled activity.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Sato, Asako; Kitsukawa, Takashi; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the different motor abilities of D1R knockout (KO), D2R KO and wild-type (WT) mice. To understand the interaction between the cerebellum and the striatal direct and indirect pathways, we examined the expression patterns of immediate early genes (IEG) in the cerebellum of these three genotypes of mice. In the WT naive mice, there was little IEG expression. However, we observed a robust expression of c-fos mRNA in the vermis and hemisphere after running rota-rod tasks. In the vermis, c-fos was expressed throughout the lobules except lobule 7, and also in crus 1 of the ansiform lobule (Crus1), copula of the pyramis (Cop) and most significantly in the flocculus in the hemisphere. jun-B was much less expressed but more preferentially expressed in Purkinje cells. In addition, we observed significant levels of c-fos and jun-B expressions after handling mice, and after the stationary rota-rod task in naive mice. Surprisingly, we observed significant expression of c-fos and jun-B even 30 min after single weighing. Nonetheless, certain additional c-fos and jun-B expressions were observed in three genotypes of the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks 24 h after stationary rota-rod task and on days 1 and 5 after rota-rod tasks, but no significant differences in expressions after the running rota-rod tasks were observed among the three genotypes. In addition, there may be some differences 24 h after the stationary rota-rod task between the naive mice and the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks.

  3. Expression pattern of immediate early genes in the cerebellum of D1R KO, D2R KO, and wild type mice under vestibular-controlled activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Toru; Sato, Asako; Kitsukawa, Takashi; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the different motor abilities of D1R knockout (KO), D2R KO and wild-type (WT) mice. To understand the interaction between the cerebellum and the striatal direct and indirect pathways, we examined the expression patterns of immediate early genes (IEG) in the cerebellum of these three genotypes of mice. In the WT naive mice, there was little IEG expression. However, we observed a robust expression of c-fos mRNA in the vermis and hemisphere after running rota-rod tasks. In the vermis, c-fos was expressed throughout the lobules except lobule 7, and also in crus 1 of the ansiform lobule (Crus1), copula of the pyramis (Cop) and most significantly in the flocculus in the hemisphere. jun-B was much less expressed but more preferentially expressed in Purkinje cells. In addition, we observed significant levels of c-fos and jun-B expressions after handling mice, and after the stationary rota-rod task in naive mice. Surprisingly, we observed significant expression of c-fos and jun-B even 30 min after single weighing. Nonetheless, certain additional c-fos and jun-B expressions were observed in three genotypes of the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks 24 h after stationary rota-rod task and on days 1 and 5 after rota-rod tasks, but no significant differences in expressions after the running rota-rod tasks were observed among the three genotypes. In addition, there may be some differences 24 h after the stationary rota-rod task between the naive mice and the mice that experienced several sessions of motor tasks. PMID:26137459

  4. Bone Turnover in Wild Type and Pleiotrophin-Transgenic Mice Housed for Three Months in the International Space Station (ISS)

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Francesco; Canciani, Barbara; Manescu, Adrian; Marozzi, Katia; Cilli, Michele; Costa, Delfina; Liu, Yi; Piccardi, Federica; Tasso, Roberta; Tromba, Giuliana; Rustichelli, Franco; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2012-01-01

    Bone is a complex dynamic tissue undergoing a continuous remodeling process. Gravity is a physical force playing a role in the remodeling and contributing to the maintenance of bone integrity. This article reports an investigation on the alterations of the bone microarchitecture that occurred in wild type (Wt) and pleiotrophin-transgenic (PTN-Tg) mice exposed to a near-zero gravity on the International Space Station (ISS) during the Mice Drawer System (MDS) mission, to date, the longest mice permanence (91 days) in space. The transgenic mouse strain over-expressing pleiotrophin (PTN) in bone was selected because of the PTN positive effects on bone turnover. Wt and PTN-Tg control animals were maintained on Earth either in a MDS payload or in a standard vivarium cage. This study revealed a bone loss during spaceflight in the weight-bearing bones of both strains. For both Tg and Wt a decrease of the trabecular number as well as an increase of the mean trabecular separation was observed after flight, whereas trabecular thickness did not show any significant change. Non weight-bearing bones were not affected. The PTN-Tg mice exposed to normal gravity presented a poorer trabecular organization than Wt mice, but interestingly, the expression of the PTN transgene during the flight resulted in some protection against microgravity’s negative effects. Moreover, osteocytes of the Wt mice, but not of Tg mice, acquired a round shape, thus showing for the first time osteocyte space-related morphological alterations in vivo. The analysis of specific bone formation and resorption marker expression suggested that the microgravity-induced bone loss was due to both an increased bone resorption and a decreased bone deposition. Apparently, the PTN transgene protection was the result of a higher osteoblast activity in the flight mice. PMID:22438896

  5. A Novel 1,4-Dihydropyridine Derivative Improves Spatial Learning and Memory and Modifies Brain Protein Expression in Wild Type and Transgenic APPSweDI Mice.

    PubMed

    Jansone, Baiba; Kadish, Inga; van Groen, Thomas; Beitnere, Ulrika; Moore, Doyle Ray; Plotniece, Aiva; Pajuste, Karlis; Klusa, Vija

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ blockers, particularly those capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), have been suggested as a possible treatment or disease modifying agents for neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The present study investigated the effects of a novel 4-(N-dodecyl) pyridinium group-containing 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative (AP-12) on cognition and synaptic protein expression in the brain. Treatment of AP-12 was investigated in wild type C57BL/6J mice and transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (Tg APPSweDI) using behavioral tests and immunohistochemistry, as well as mass spectrometry to assess the blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. The data demonstrated the ability of AP-12 to cross the BBB, improve spatial learning and memory in both mice strains, induce anxiolytic action in transgenic mice, and increase expression of hippocampal and cortical proteins (GAD67, Homer-1) related to synaptic plasticity. The compound AP-12 can be seen as a prototype molecule for use in the design of novel drugs useful to halt progression of clinical symptoms (more specifically, anxiety and decline in memory) of neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Investigation of nasal CO₂ receptor transduction mechanisms in wild-type and GC-D knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kenemuth, Jessica K; Hennessy, Shane P; Hanson, Ryan J; Hensler, Allison J; Coates, E Lee

    2013-11-01

    The main olfactory system of mice contains a small subset of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are stimulated by CO₂. The objective of this study was to record olfactory receptor responses to a range of CO₂ concentrations to further elucidate steps in the proposed CO₂ transduction pathway in mice. Electro-olfactograms (EOGs) were recorded before and after inhibiting specific steps in the CO₂ transduction pathway with topically applied inhibitors. Inhibition of extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) did not significantly affect EOG responses to CO₂ but did decrease EOG responses to several control odorants. Inhibition of intracellular CA or cyclic nucleotide-gated channels attenuated EOG responses to CO₂, confirming the role of these components in CO₂ sensing in mice. We also show that, like canonical OSNs, CO₂-sensitive OSNs depend on Ca²⁺-activated Cl⁻ channels for depolarization of receptor neurons. Lastly, we found that guanylyl cyclase-D knockout mice were still able to respond to CO₂, indicating that other pathways may exist for the detection of low concentrations of nasal CO₂. We discuss these findings as they relate to previous studies on CO₂-sensitive OSNs in mice and other animals.

  7. Reactive oxygen species- and nitric oxide-mediated lung inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type and iNOS-deficient mice exposed to diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongwen; Ma, Joseph K; Barger, Mark W; Mercer, Robert R; Millecchia, Lyndell; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Castranova, Vince; Ma, Jane Y

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary responses to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) exposure are mediated through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) by alveolar macrophages (AM). The current study examined the differential roles of ROS and NO in DEP-induced lung injury using C57B/6J wild-type (WT) and inducible NO synthase knockout (iNOS KO) mice. Mice exposed by pharyngeal aspiration to DEP or carbon black particles (CB) (35 mg/kg) showed an inflammatory profile that included neutrophil infiltration, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and elevated albumin content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at 1, 3, and 7 d postexposure. The organic extract of DEP (DEPE) did not induce an inflammatory response. Comparing WT to iNOS KO mice, the results show that NO enhanced DEP-induced neutrophils infiltration and plasma albumin content in BALF and upregulated the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) by AM. DEP-exposed AM from iNOS KO mice displayed diminished production of IL-12 and, in response to ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, decreased production of IL-12 but increased production of IL-10 when compared to cells from WT mice. DEP, CB, but not DEPE, induced DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in AM, however, that is independent of cellular production of NO. These results demonstrate that DEP-induced immune/inflammatory responses in mice are regulated by both ROS- and NO-mediated pathways. NO did not affect ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage but upregulated IL-12 and provided a counterbalance to the ROS-mediated adaptive stress response that downregulates IL-12 and upregulates IL-10. PMID:19267316

  8. Effects of long-term treatment with pioglitazone on cognition and glucose metabolism of PS1-KI, 3xTg-AD, and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Masciopinto, F; Di Pietro, N; Corona, C; Bomba, M; Pipino, C; Curcio, M; Di Castelnuovo, A; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L M T; Sekler, I; Pandolfi, A; Sensi, S L

    2012-12-20

    In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term (9-month) treatment with pioglitazone (PIO; 20 mg/kg/d) in two animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related neural dysfunction and pathology: the PS1-KI(M146V) (human presenilin-1 (M146V) knock-in mouse) and 3xTg-AD (triple transgenic mouse carrying AD-linked mutations) mice. We also investigated the effects on wild-type (WT) mice. Mice were monitored for body mass changes, fasting glycemia, glucose tolerance, and studied for changes in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity (complexes I and IV) as well as energy metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)). Cognitive effects were investigated with the Morris water maze (MWM) test and the object recognition task (ORT). Behavioral analysis revealed that PIO treatment promoted positive cognitive effects in PS1-KI female mice. These effects were associated with normalization of peripheral gluco-regulatory abnormalities that were found in untreated PS1-KI females. PIO-treated PS1-KI females also showed no statistically significant alterations in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity but significantly increased reverse LDH activity.PIO treatment produced no effects on cognition, glucose metabolism, or mitochondrial functioning in 3xTg-AD mice. Finally, PIO treatment promoted enhanced short-term memory performance in WT male mice, a group that did not show deregulation of glucose metabolism but that showed decreased activity of complex I in hippocampal and cortical mitochondria. Overall, these results indicate metabolically driven cognitive-enhancing effects of PIO that are differentially gender-related among specific genotypes.

  9. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a rangemore » of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation, below spontaneous levels observed in control mice. Lastly, the 18F-FDG RBE was <1.0, indicating that the mixed radiation quality

  10. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Wendt, Dan; Hague, Chuck; Christianson, Terri; Koppaka, Vish; Crippen, Danielle; Kakkis, Emil; Vellard, Michel

    2010-08-16

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS). Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rh)GALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg) and pure (>or=97%) rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake) = 2.5 nM), thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA.

  11. The impact of agrin on the formation of orthogonal arrays of particles in cultured astrocytes from wild-type and agrin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Sperveslage, Jan; Wolburg, Hartwig; Noell, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet membranes are studded with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) containing orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) which can be visualized exclusively by the freeze-fracturing method. They are predominantly expressed where the astroglial membrane is in contact with the superficial and perivascular basal lamina. This polarity seems to be essential for the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The basal lamina containing many extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin and heparansulfate proteoglycans like agrin is thought to influence this OAP-related polarity of astrocytes. Recently, we have shown that agrin, in particular the neuronal isoform A4B8, is capable of influencing the formation of OAPs in astrocytes when cultured in the presence of agrin-conditioned media. In this paper we wanted to investigate whether coating with exogenous agrin compared to coating with other ECM components would induce OAP formation in astrocytes of the agrin-null mouse. For this purpose, we cultured astrocytes from agrin-null and wild-type mice on agrin- or ECM-coated surfaces. Immunofluorescent cytochemical staining of AQP4 indicated a higher AQP4 expression level in cultures with agrin- or ECM-coated than in cultures with uncoated surfaces, whereas western blot analyses and PCR showed no differences. α-Dystroglycan is thought to be a potential receptor of agrin and was immunostained in wild-type as well as in agrin-null astrocytes. In freeze-fracture replicas, we observed an increase in OAP density in astrocytes when growing on agrin- and ECM-coatings. These results concurred with other experiments in which changes in volume were measured following hypotonic stress, which supported the positive influence of exogenous agrin on AQP4 insertion into the membrane, on OAP formation and on water transport. PMID:20920487

  12. Dietary cladode powder from wild type and domesticated Opuntia species reduces atherogenesis in apoE knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Garoby-Salom, Sandra; Guéraud, Françoise; Camaré, Caroline; de la Rosa, Ana-Paulina Barba; Rossignol, Michel; Santos Díaz, María del Socorro; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intake of Opuntia species may prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to characterize the biological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Opuntia species and to investigate whether Opuntia cladodes prevent the development of atherosclerosis in vivo, in apoE(-)KO mice. The effects of the two Opuntia species, the wild Opuntia streptacantha and the domesticated Opuntia ficus-indica, were tested on the generation of intra- and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and kinetics of the LDL oxidation by murine CRL2181 endothelial cells and on the subsequent inflammatory signaling leading to the adhesion of monocytes on the activated endothelium and the formation of foam cells. Opuntia species blocked the extracellular ROS (superoxide anion) generation and LDL oxidation by CRL2181, as well as the intracellular ROS rise and signaling evoked by the oxidized LDL, including the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFκB, the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules, and the adhesion of monocytes to CRL2181. In vivo, Opuntia significantly reduced the formation of atherosclerotic lesions and the accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in the vascular wall of apoE-KO mice, indicating that Opuntia cladodes prevent lipid oxidation in the vascular wall. In conclusion, wild and domesticated Opuntia species exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties which emphasize their nutritional benefit for preventing cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Muscle glycogen remodeling and glycogen phosphate metabolism following exhaustive exercise of wild type and laforin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Jose M; Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Meyer, Catalina M; Segvich, Dyann M; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2015-09-11

    Glycogen, the repository of glucose in many cell types, contains small amounts of covalent phosphate, of uncertain function and poorly understood metabolism. Loss-of-function mutations in the laforin gene cause the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Lafora disease, characterized by increased glycogen phosphorylation and the formation of abnormal deposits of glycogen-like material called Lafora bodies. It is generally accepted that the phosphate is removed by the laforin phosphatase. To study the dynamics of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylation in vivo under physiological conditions, mice were subjected to glycogen-depleting exercise and then monitored while they resynthesized glycogen. Depletion of glycogen by exercise was associated with a substantial reduction in total glycogen phosphate and the newly resynthesized glycogen was less branched and less phosphorylated. Branching returned to normal on a time frame of days, whereas phosphorylation remained suppressed over a longer period of time. We observed no change in markers of autophagy. Exercise of 3-month-old laforin knock-out mice caused a similar depletion of glycogen but no loss of glycogen phosphate. Furthermore, remodeling of glycogen to restore the basal branching pattern was delayed in the knock-out animals. From these results, we infer that 1) laforin is responsible for glycogen dephosphorylation during exercise and acts during the cytosolic degradation of glycogen, 2) excess glycogen phosphorylation in the absence of laforin delays the normal remodeling of the branching structure, and 3) the accumulation of glycogen phosphate is a relatively slow process involving multiple cycles of glycogen synthesis-degradation, consistent with the slow onset of the symptoms of Lafora disease.

  14. Formation of DNA adducts in wild-type and transgenic mice expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1 and 1A2 after oral exposure to furfuryl alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Høie, Anja Hortemo; Monien, Bernhard Hans; Sakhi, Amrit Kaur; Glatt, Hansruedi; Hjertholm, Hege; Husøy, Trine

    2015-01-01

    Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is present in many heat-treated foods as a result of its formation via dehydration of pentoses. It is also used legally as a flavouring agent. In an inhalation study conducted in the National Toxicology Program, FFA showed some evidence of carcinogenic activity in rats and mice. FFA was generally negative in conventional genotoxicity assays, which suggests that it may be a non-genotoxic carcinogen. However, it was recently found that FFA is mutagenic in Salmonella strains expressing appropriate sulfotransferases (SULTs), such as human or mouse SULT1A1. The same DNA adducts that were formed by FFA in these strains, mainly N 2-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-2′-deoxyguanosine (N 2-MF-dG), were also detected in tissues of FFA-exposed mice and even in human lung specimens. In the present study, a single oral dose of FFA (250mg/kg body weight) or saline was administered to FVB/N mice and transgenic mice expressing human SULT1A1/1A2 on the FVB/N background. The transgenic mice were used, since human and mouse SULT1A1 substantially differ in substrate specificity and tissue distribution. DNA adducts were studied in liver, kidney, proximal and distal small intestine as well as colon, using isotope-dilution ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC–MS/MS). Surprisingly, low levels of adducts that may represent N 2-MF-dG were detected even in tissues of untreated mice. FFA exposure enhanced the adduct levels in colon and liver, but not in the remaining investigated tissues of wild-type (wt) mice. The situation was similar in transgenic mice, except that N 2-MF-dG levels were also strongly enhanced in the proximal small intestine. These different results between wt and transgenic mice may be attributed to the fact that human SULT1A1, but not the orthologous mouse enzyme, is strongly expressed in the small intestine. PMID:25904584

  15. Interferon-alpha/beta deficiency greatly exacerbates arthritogenic disease in mice infected with wild-type chikungunya virus but not with the cell culture-adapted live-attenuated 181/25 vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Christina L.; Burke, Crystal W.; Higgs, Stephen T.; Klimstra, William B.; Ryman, Kate D.

    2012-01-01

    In humans, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection causes fever, rash, and acute and persisting polyarthalgia/arthritis associated with joint swelling. We report a new CHIKV disease model in adult mice that distinguishes the wild-type CHIKV-LR strain from the live-attenuated vaccine strain (CHIKV-181/25). Although eight-week old normal mice inoculated in the hind footpad developed no hind limb swelling with either virus, CHIKV-LR replicated in musculoskeletal tissues and caused detectable inflammation. In mice deficient in STAT1-dependent interferon (IFN) responses, CHIKV-LR caused significant swelling of the inoculated and contralateral limbs and dramatic inflammatory lesions, while CHIKV-181/25 vaccine and another arthritogenic alphavirus, Sindbis, failed to induce swelling. IFN responses suppressed CHIKV-LR and CHIKV-181/25 replication equally in dendritic cells in vitro whereas macrophages were refractory to infection independently of STAT1-mediated IFN responses. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding may be a CHIKV vaccine attenuation mechanism as CHIKV-LR infectivity was not dependent upon GAG, while CHIKV-181/25 was highly dependent. PMID:22305131

  16. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues. PMID:26631592

  17. Ex vivo multiscale quantitation of skin biomechanics in wild-type and genetically-modified mice using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Lynch, Barbara; Bonod-Bidaud, Christelle; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Dokládal, Petr; Allain, Jean-Marc; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Ruggiero, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Soft connective tissues such as skin, tendon or cornea are made of about 90% of extracellular matrix proteins, fibrillar collagens being the major components. Decreased or aberrant collagen synthesis generally results in defective tissue mechanical properties as the classic form of Elhers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS). This connective tissue disorder is caused by mutations in collagen V genes and is mainly characterized by skin hyperextensibility. To investigate the relationship between the microstructure of normal and diseased skins and their macroscopic mechanical properties, we imaged and quantified the microstructure of dermis of ex vivo murine skin biopsies during uniaxial mechanical assay using multiphoton microscopy. We used two genetically-modified mouse lines for collagen V: a mouse model for cEDS harboring a Col5a2 deletion (a.k.a. pN allele) and the transgenic K14-COL5A1 mice which overexpress the human COL5A1 gene in skin. We showed that in normal skin, the collagen fibers continuously align with stretch, generating the observed increase in mechanical stress. Moreover, dermis from both transgenic lines exhibited altered collagen reorganization upon traction, which could be linked to microstructural modifications. These findings show that our multiscale approach provides new crucial information on the biomechanics of dermis that can be extended to all collagen-rich soft tissues.

  18. Adaptive regulation of intestinal thiamin uptake: molecular mechanism using wild-type and transgenic mice carrying hTHTR-1 and -2 promoters.

    PubMed

    Reidling, Jack C; Said, Hamid M

    2005-06-01

    Thiamin participates in metabolic pathways contributing to normal cellular functions, growth, and development. The molecular mechanism of the human intestinal thiamin absorption process involves the thiamin transporters-1 (hTHTR-1) and -2 (hTHTR-2), products of the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes. Little is known about adaptive regulation of the intestinal thiamin uptake process or the molecular mechanism(s) involved during thiamin deficiency. In these studies, we addressed these issues using wild-type mice and transgenic animals carrying the promoters of the hTHTR-1 and -2. We show that, in thiamin deficiency, a significant and specific upregulation in intestinal carrier-mediated thiamin uptake occurs and that this increase is associated with an induction in protein and mRNA levels of mTHTR-2 but not mTHTR-1; in addition, an increase in the activity of the SLC19A3, but not the SLC19A2, promoter was observed in the intestine of transgenic mice. Similar findings were detected in the kidney; however, expression of both thiamin transporters and activity of both human promoters were upregulated in this organ in thiamin deficiency. We also examined the effect of thiamin deficiency on the level of expression of mTHTR-1 and mTHTR-2 messages and activity of the human promoters in the heart and brain of transgenic mice and found an increase in mTHTR-1 mRNA and a rise in activity of the SLC19A2 promoter in thiamin-deficient mice. These results show that the intestinal and renal thiamin uptake processes are adaptively upregulated during dietary thiamin deficiency, that expression of mTHTR-1 and mTHTR-2 is regulated in a tissue-specific manner, and that this upregulation is mediated via transcriptional regulatory mechanism(s).

  19. The dietary effect of milk sphingomyelin on the lipid metabolism of obese/diabetic KK-A(y) mice and wild-type C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Ippei; Uemura, Mariko; Hosokawa, Masashi; Iwashima-Suzuki, Ai; Shiota, Makoto; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2016-09-14

    Purified milk sphingomyelin (SM) was obtained from lipid concentrated butter serum (LC-BS) by successive separations involving solvent fractionation, selective saponification, and silicic acid column chromatography. The SM obtained was given to obese/diabetic KK-A(y) mice and wild-type C57BL/6J mice. SM supplementation significantly increased fecal lipids paralleled with a decrease in non-HDL cholesterol levels in the serum and neutral lipids and in cholesterol levels in the livers of KK-A(y) mice. The reduction of liver lipid levels also resulted in a decrease in the total fatty acid content of the KK-A(y) mice livers, while n-3 fatty acids derived from the conversion of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) increased due to SM supplementation. In contrast to the KK-A(y) mice, little change in the serum and liver lipids was observed in wild-type C57BL/6J mice. The present study suggests that SM may be effective only in subjects with metabolic disorders. PMID:27501823

  20. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies.

    PubMed

    Chi, Michael W; Griffith, Leslie C; Vecsey, Christopher G

    2014-08-11

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis.

  1. Dried bonito dashi: taste qualities evaluated using conditioned taste aversion methods in wild-type and T1R1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Delay, Eugene R; Kondoh, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The primary taste of dried bonito dashi is thought to be umami, elicited by inosine 5'-monphosphate (IMP) and L-amino acids. The present study compared the taste qualities of 25% dashi with 5 basic tastes and amino acids using conditioned taste aversion methods. Although wild-type C57BL/6J mice with compromised olfactory systems generalized an aversion of dashi to all 5 basic tastes, generalization was greater to sucrose (sweet), citric acid (sour), and quinine (bitter) than to NaCl (salty) or monosodium L-glutamate (umami) with amiloride. At neutral pH (6.5-6.9), the aversion generalized to l-histidine, L-alanine, L-proline, glycine, L-aspartic acid, L-serine, and monosodium L-glutamate, all mixed with IMP. Lowering pH of the test solutions to 5.7-5.8 (matching dashi) with HCl decreased generalization to some amino acids. However, adding lactic acid to test solutions with the same pH increased generalization to 5'-inosine monophosphate, L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-arginine, and taurine but eliminated generalization to L-histidine. T1R1 knockout mice readily learned the aversion to dashi and generalized the aversion to sucrose, citric acid, and quinine but not to NaCl, glutamate, or any amino acid. These results suggest that dashi elicits a complex taste in mice that is more than umami, and deleting T1R1 receptor altered but did not eliminate their ability to taste dashi. In addition, lactic acid may alter or modulate taste transduction or cell-to-cell signaling.

  2. Integrated proteomic analysis of major isoaspartyl-containing proteins in the urine of wild type and protein L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shujia; Ni, Wenqin; Patananan, Alexander N; Clarke, Steven G; Karger, Barry L; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2013-02-19

    The formation of isoaspartyl residues (isoAsp or isoD) via either aspartyl isomerization or asparaginyl deamidation alters protein structure and potentially biological function. This is a spontaneous and nonenzymatic process, ubiquitous both in vivo and in nonbiological systems, such as in protein pharmaceuticals. In almost all organisms, protein L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT, EC2.1.1.77) recognizes and initiates the conversion of isoAsp back to aspartic acid. Additionally, alternative proteolytic and excretion pathways to metabolize isoaspartyl-containing proteins have been proposed but not fully explored, largely due to the analytical challenges for detecting isoAsp. We report here the relative quantitation and site profiling of isoAsp in urinary proteins from wild type and PIMT-deficient mice, representing products from excretion pathways. First, using a biochemical approach, we found that the total isoaspartyl level of proteins in urine of PIMT-deficient male mice was elevated. Subsequently, the major isoaspartyl protein species in urine from these mice were identified as major urinary proteins (MUPs) by shotgun proteomics. To enhance the sensitivity of isoAsp detection, a targeted proteomic approach using electron transfer dissociation-selected reaction monitoring (ETD-SRM) was developed to investigate isoAsp sites in MUPs. A total of 38 putative isoAsp modification sites in MUPs were investigated, with five derived from the deamidation of asparagine that were confirmed to contribute to the elevated isoAsp levels. Our findings lend experimental evidence for the hypothesized excretion pathway for isoAsp proteins. Additionally, the developed method opens up the possibility to explore processing mechanisms of isoaspartyl proteins at the molecular level, such as the fate of protein pharmaceuticals in circulation.

  3. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C.; Moya, Esteban A.; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6–72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:24574965

  4. Gastroenteritis in NF-κB-Deficient Mice Is Produced with Wild-Type Camplyobacter jejuni but Not with C. jejuni Lacking Cytolethal Distending Toxin despite Persistent Colonization with Both Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Taylor, Nancy S.; Xu, Sandy; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Erdman, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni continues to be a leading cause of bacterial enteritis in humans. However, because there are no readily available animal models to study the pathogenesis of C. jejuni-related diseases, the significance of potential virulence factors, such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), in vivo are poorly understood. Mice deficient in NF-κB subunits (p50−/− p65+/−) in a C57BL/129 background are particularly susceptible to colitis induced by another enterohepatic microaerobe, Helicobacter hepaticus, which, like C. jejuni, produces CDT. Wild-type C. jejuni 81-176 and an isogenic mutant lacking CDT activity (cdtB mutant) were inoculated into NF-κB-deficient (3X) and C57BL/129 mice. Wild-type C. jejuni colonized 29 and 50% of the C57BL/129 mice at 2 and 4 months postinfection (p.i.), respectively, whereas the C. jejuni cdtB mutant colonized 50% of the C57BL/129 mice at 2 p.i. but none of the mice at 4 months p.i. Although the C57BL/129 mice developed mild gastritis and typhlocolitis, they had robust immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Th1-promoted IgG2a humoral responses to both the wild-type strain and the C. jejuni cdtB mutant. In contrast, 75 to 100% of the 3X mice were colonized with both the wild type and the C. jejuni cdtB mutant at similar levels at all times examined. Wild-type C. jejuni caused moderately severe gastritis and proximal duodenitis in 3X mice that were more severe than the gastrointestinal lesions caused by the C. jejuni cdtB mutant. Persistent colonization of NF-κB-deficient mice with the wild type and the C. jejuni cdtB mutant was associated with significantly impaired IgG and IgG2a humoral responses (P < 0.001), which is consistent with an innate or adaptive immune system defect(s). These results suggest that the mechanism of clearance of C. jejuni is NF-κB dependent and that CDT may have proinflammatory activity in vivo, as well as a potential role in the ability of C. jejuni to escape immune surveillance. NF-κB-deficient mice

  5. High Affinity Dopamine D3 Receptor (D3R)-Selective Antagonists Attenuate Heroin Self-Administration in Wild-Type but not D3R Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) is a promising target for the development of pharmacotherapeutics to treat substance use disorders. Several D3R-selective antagonists are effective in animal models of drug abuse, especially in models of relapse. Nevertheless, poor bioavailability, metabolic instability, and/or predicted toxicity have impeded success in translating these drug candidates to clinical use. Herein, we report a series of D3R-selective 4-phenylpiperazines with improved metabolic stability. A subset of these compounds was evaluated for D3R functional efficacy and off-target binding at selected 5-HT receptor subtypes, where significant overlap in SAR with D3R has been observed. Several high affinity D3R antagonists, including compounds 16 (Ki = 0.12 nM) and 32 (Ki = 0.35 nM), showed improved metabolic stability compared to the parent compound, PG648 (6). Notably, 16 and the classic D3R antagonist SB277011A (2) were effective in reducing self-administration of heroin in wild-type but not D3R knockout mice. PMID:26203768

  6. Expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinase and TIMP genes in fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice compared to wild-type mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Jens Claus; Fuchs, Tanja; El Mustapha, Haddouti; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Bories, Jean Christophe; Wernert, Nicolas

    2006-07-01

    Matrix-degrading proteases play a key role in normal development, wound healing, many diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and, in particular, tumour invasion. In invasive tumours, these enzymes are expressed by fibroblasts of the tumour stroma. Their expression and activity are tightly regulated at several levels, an important one being transcription. Previous in vitro and in vivo findings pointed to a major role of the Ets-1 transcription factor for this level of regulation. In the present study, we tried to prove this role in fibroblasts. We stimulated wild-type mouse fibroblasts with physiological doses of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, known to induce different proteases and expressed by tumour cells) and compared the results to those obtained in Ets-1 -/- fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice. We found that basal Ets-1 levels are necessary not only for a fast induction of MMPs 2, 3 and 13 by bFGF but also for maintenance of the bFGF-induced expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) 1, 2 and 3, which are known not only to inhibit but also participate as activators of certain pro-MMPs.

  7. Scanning Ultrasound (SUS) Causes No Changes to Neuronal Excitability and Prevents Age-Related Reductions in Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Structure in Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Robert John; Leinenga, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Scanning ultrasound (SUS) is a noninvasive approach that has recently been shown to ameliorate histopathological changes and restore memory functions in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Although no overt neuronal damage was reported, the short- and long-term effects of SUS on neuronal excitability and dendritic tree morphology had not been investigated. To address this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice 2 and 24 hours after a single SUS treatment, and one week and 3 months after six weekly SUS treatments, including sham treatments as controls. In both treatment regimes, no changes in CA1 neuronal excitability were observed in SUS-treated neurons when compared to sham-treated neurons at any time-point. For the multiple treatment groups, we also determined the dendritic morphology and spine densities of the neurons from which we had recorded. The apical trees of sham-treated neurons were reduced at the 3 month time-point when compared to one week; however, surprisingly, no longitudinal change was detected in the apical dendritic trees of SUS-treated neurons. In contrast, the length and complexity of the basal dendritic trees were not affected by SUS treatment at either time-point. The apical dendritic spine densities were reduced, independent of the treatment group, at 3 months compared to one week. Collectively, these data suggest that ultrasound can be employed to prevent an age-associated loss of dendritic structure without impairing neuronal excitability. PMID:27727310

  8. DNA prime–protein boost increased the titer, avidity and persistence of anti-Aβ antibodies in wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, H; Mkrtichyan, M; Movsesyan, N; Petrushina, I; Mamikonyan, G; Cribbs, DH; Agadjanyan, MG; Ghochikyan, A

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we reported that a DNA vaccine, composed of three copies of a self B cell epitope of amyloid-β (Aβ42) and the foreign T-cell epitope, Pan DR epitope (PADRE), generated strong anti-Aβ immune responses in wild-type and amyloid precursor protein transgenic animals. Although DNA vaccines have several advantages over peptide–protein vaccines, they induce lower immune responses in large animals and humans compared with those in mice. The focus of this study was to further enhance anti-Aβ11 immune responses by developing an improved DNA vaccination protocol of the prime–boost regimen, in which the priming step would use DNA and the boosting step would use recombinant protein. Accordingly, we generated DNA and recombinant protein-based epitope vaccines and showed that priming with DNA followed by boosting with a homologous recombinant protein vaccine significantly increases the anti-Aβ antibody responses and do not change the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) profile of humoral immune responses. Furthermore, the antibodies generated by this prime–boost regimen were long-lasting and possessed a higher avidity for binding with an Aβ42 peptide. Thus, we showed that a heterologous prime–boost regimen could be an effective protocol for developing a potent Alzheimer’s disease (AD) vaccine. PMID:19865176

  9. Perseveration by NK1R-/- (‘knockout’) mice is blunted by doses of methylphenidate that affect neither other aspects of their cognitive performance nor the behaviour of wild-type mice in the 5-Choice Continuous Performance Test

    PubMed Central

    Pillidge, Katharine; Porter, Ashley J; Young, Jared W; Stanford, S Clare

    2016-01-01

    The underlying cause(s) of abnormalities expressed by patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have yet to be delineated. One factor that has been associated with increased vulnerability to ADHD is polymorphism(s) of TACR1, which is the human equivalent of the rodent NK1 (substance P-preferring) receptor gene (Nk1r). We have reported previously that genetically altered mice, lacking functional NK1R (NK1R–/–), express locomotor hyperactivity, which was blunted by the first-line treatment for ADHD, methylphenidate. Here, we compared the effects of this psychostimulant (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on the behaviour of NK1R-/- mice and their wild types in the 5-Choice Continuous Performance Test, which emulates procedures used to study attention and response control in ADHD patients. Methylphenidate increased total trials (a measure of ‘productivity’) completed by wild types, but not by NK1R-/- mice. Conversely, this drug reduced perseveration by NK1R-/- mice, but not by wild types. Other drug-induced changes in key behaviours were not genotype dependent, especially at the highest dose: for example, % omissions (an index of inattentiveness) was increased, whereas % false alarms and % premature responses (measures of impulsivity) declined in both genotypes, indicating reduced overall response. These findings are discussed in the context of the efficacy of methylphenidate in the treatment of ADHD. Moreover, they lead to several testable proposals. First, methylphenidate does not improve attention in a subgroup of ADHD patients with a functional deficit of TACR1. Second, these patients do not express excessive false alarms when compared with other groups of subjects, but they do express excessive perseveration, which would be ameliorated by methylphenidate. PMID:27097734

  10. Developmental expression of wild-type and mutant presenilin-1 in hippocampal neurons from transgenic mice: evidence for novel species-specific properties of human presenilin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, L.; Annaert, W.; Craessaerts, K.; Mathews, P. M.; Seeger, M.; Nixon, R. A.; Van Leuven, F.; Gandy, S.; Westaway, D.; St George-Hyslop, P.; De Strooper, B.; Fraser, P. E.

    1999-01-01

    Presenilins 1 (PS1) and 2 (PS2) are multispanning transmembrane proteins associated with familial Alzheimer disease (FAD). They are developmentally regulated, being expressed at highest levels during neuronal differentiation and are sustained at a lower level throughout life. We investigated the distribution and metabolism of endogenous murine PS1 as well as human wild-type (wtPS1) and the familial AD Met146Leu (M146L) mutant presenilins in dissociated cultures of hippocampal neurons derived from control and transgenic mice. We found that the PS1 endoproteolytic fragments and, to a lesser extent, the full-length protein, were expressed as early as day 3 post-plating. Both species increased until the cells were fully differentiated at day 12. Confocal microscopy revealed that presenilin is present in the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum and, as in punctate, vesicle-like structures within developing neurites and growth cones. Using a human-specific PS1 antibody, we were able to independently examine the distribution of the transgenic protein which, although similar to the endogenous, showed some unique qualities. These included (i) some heterogeneity in the proteolytic fragments of human PS1; (ii) significantly reduced levels of full-length human PS1, possibly as a result of preferential processing; and (iii) a more discrete intracellular distribution of human PS1. Colocalization with organelle-specific proteins revealed that PS1 was located in a diffuse staining pattern in the MAP2-positive dendrites and in a punctate manner in GAP43-positive axons. PS1 showed considerable overlap with GAP43, particularly at the growth cones. Similar patterns of PS1 distribution were detected in cultures derived from transgenic animals expressing human wild-type or mutant presenilins. The studies demonstrate that mutant presenilins are not grossly different in their processing or distribution within cultured neurons, which may represent more physiological models as compared to

  11. A local insult of okadaic acid in wild-type mice induces tau phosphorylation and protein aggregation in anatomically distinct brain regions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Siân; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-03-31

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the distribution and density of neurofibrillary tangles, a histological hallmark comprised predominately of phosphorylated tau protein, follows a distinct pattern through anatomically connected brain regions. Studies in transgenic mice engineered to regionally confine tau expression have suggested spreading of tau within neural networks. Furthermore, injection of protein lysates isolated from brains of transgenic mice or patients with tauopathies, including AD, were shown to behave like seeds, accelerating tau pathology and tangle formation in predisposed mice. However, it remains unclear how the initiation of primary aggregation events occurs and what triggers further dissemination throughout the neural system. To consolidate these findings, we pursued an alternative approach to assess the spreading of endogenous phosphorylated tau. To generate endogenous seeds, 130 nl of 100 μM protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor okadaic acid (OA) was injected unilaterally into the amygdala of 8-month-old C57Bl/6 wild-type mice. OA was detected in brain tissue by ELISA, and found to be restricted to the injected hemispheric quadrant, where it remained detectable a week post-injection. OA injection induced tau phosphorylation that was observed not only at the injection site but also in anatomically distinct areas across both hemispheres, including the cortex and hippocampus 24 h post-injection. An increase in insoluble tau was also observed in both hemispheres of injected brains by 7 days. Furthermore, thioflavin-S detected protein aggregation at the injection site and in the cortex of both injected and contralateral hemispheres. OA injection induced no thioflavin-positivity in tau knock-out mice. The data demonstrates that a local OA insult can rapidly initiate changes in protein phosphorylation, solubility and aggregation at anatomically distant sites. This model suggests that tau phosphorylation can be both a primary response to an insult, and a

  12. Gene expression patterns in the hippocampus during the development and aging of Glud1 (Glutamate Dehydrogenase 1) transgenic and wild type mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraneuronal levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in brain rise during aging. This is thought to lead to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal injury or death. To study the effects of glutamate hyperactivity in brain, we created transgenic (Tg) mice in which the gene for glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1) is over-expressed in neurons and in which such overexpression leads to excess synaptic release of glutamate. In this study, we analyzed whole genome expression in the hippocampus, a region important for learning and memory, of 10 day to 20 month old Glud1 and wild type (wt) mice. Results During development, maturation and aging, both Tg and wt exhibited decreases in the expression of genes related to neurogenesis, neuronal migration, growth, and process elongation, and increases in genes related to neuro-inflammation, voltage-gated channel activity, and regulation of synaptic transmission. Categories of genes that were differentially expressed in Tg vs. wt during development were: synaptic function, cytoskeleton, protein ubiquitination, and mitochondria; and, those differentially expressed during aging were: synaptic function, vesicle transport, calcium signaling, protein kinase activity, cytoskeleton, neuron projection, mitochondria, and protein ubiquitination. Overall, the effects of Glud1 overexpression on the hippocampus transcriptome were greater in the mature and aged than the young. Conclusions Glutamate hyperactivity caused gene expression changes in the hippocampus at all ages. Some of these changes may result in premature brain aging. The identification of these genomic expression differences is important in understanding the effects of glutamate dysregulation on neuronal function during aging or in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24593767

  13. Comparing Gene Expression during Cadmium Uptake and Distribution: Untreated versus Oral Cd-Treated Wild-Type and ZIP14 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Nebert, Lucia F.; Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; Landero Figueroa, Julio; Somarathna, Maheshika; Hojyo, Shintaro; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    The nonessential metal cadmium (Cd) is toxic only after entering the cell. Proteins possibly relevant to intracellular Cd accumulation include the divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) and all 14 zinc-like iron-like protein (ZIP) importers, 10 zinc transporter (ZnT) exporters, and metallothionein chaperones MT1 and MT2. Comparing oral Cd-treated ZIP14 knockout (KO) with wild-type (WT) mice, we predicted Cd uptake and distribution would be diminished in the KO—because ZIP14 is very highly expressed in GI tract and liver; this was indeed observed for Cd content in liver. However, the reverse was found in kidney and lung from 6 or 12 h through 10 days of Cd exposure; at these times, Cd accumulation was unexpectedly greater in KO than WT mice; mRNA levels of the 27 above-mentioned genes were thus examined in proximal small intestine (PSI) versus kidney to see if these paradoxical effects could be explained by substantial alterations in any of the other 26 genes. PSI genes highly expressed in untreated WT animals included seven ZIP and five ZnT transporters, DMT1, MT1, and MT2; kidney genes included 11 ZIP and 7 ZnT transporters, DMT1, MT1, and MT2. Over 10 days of oral Cd, a bimodal response was seen for Cd content in PSI and for various mRNAs; initially, acute effects caused by the toxic metal; subsequently, the up- or down-regulation of important genes presumably to combat the sustained adversity. These data underscore the complex interplay between the gastrointestinal tract and renal proteins that might be relevant to Cd uptake and distribution in animals exposed to oral Cd. PMID:25294218

  14. Safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant protein influenza A vaccine in adult human volunteers and protective efficacy against wild-type H1N1 virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Fries, L F; Dillon, S B; Hildreth, J E; Karron, R A; Funkhouser, A W; Friedman, C J; Jones, C S; Culleton, V G; Clements, M L

    1993-03-01

    A recombinant influenza A vaccine (D protein), comprising a carboxy-terminal sequence from the hemagglutinin HA2 subunit of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus (H1N1, A/PR/34) fused to 81 amino-terminal residues of the NS1 nonstructural protein, has previously protected mice against influenza A challenge by inducing H1N1/H2N2 cross-reactive cytotoxic T cells (CTL) without hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) or neutralizing antibody. In our dose-escalating study, the vaccine was safe in humans and induced both IgG and T cell proliferative responses to D protein but little antibody to A/PR/34 or A/Kawasaki/8/86 (H1N1, A/KW/86) viruses. Among an additional group of A/KW/86-seronegative volunteers immunized with 500 micrograms of D protein, none had a rise in serum HI or neutralizing antibody to A/KW/86, 20% had minimal IgG responses to A/KW/86 by EIA, and a minority had any increase in A/KW/86-specific CTL activity. However, viral shedding and clinical illness score were reduced in vaccines relative to A/KW/86-seronegative unimmunized controls after intranasal challenge with wild-type A/KW/86. D protein immunization conferred significant protective immunity not currently explained by any of the immune parameters measured.

  15. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-05-15

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how 'human-like' can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1{sub C}YP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+){sub s}evere-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs.

  16. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W

    2009-05-15

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how "human-like" can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1_CYP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+)_severe-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs. PMID:19285097

  17. Decline of microtubule-associated protein tau after experimental stroke in differently aged wild-type and 3xTg mice with Alzheimer-like alterations.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Dominik; Preißler, Hartmut; Hofmann, Sarah; Kacza, Johannes; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2016-08-25

    Stroke therapies are still limited to a minority of patients. Considering time-dependent aspects of stroke, the penumbra concept describes the transition from functional to permanent tissue damage. Thereby, the role of cytoskeletal elements, as for instance microtubules with associated tau remains poorly understood and is therefore not yet considered for therapeutic approaches. This study explored the expression of microtubule-associated protein tau related to neuronal damage in stroke-affected brain regions. Wild-type and triple-transgenic mice of 3, 7 and 12months of age and with an Alzheimer-like background underwent experimental stroke. After 24h, brain sections were used for immunofluorescence labeling of tau and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN). Potential functional consequences of cellular alterations were explored by statistical relationships to the general health condition, i.e. neurobehavioral deficits and loss of body weight. Immunoreactivity for whole tau decreased significantly in ischemic areas, while the decline at the border zone was more drastic for tau-immunoreactivity compared with the diminished NeuN labeling. Quantitative analyses confirmed pronounced sensitivity for tau-immunoreactivity in the ischemic border zone. Decline of tau- as well as NeuN-immunoreactivity correlated with body weight loss during the 24-h observation period. In conclusion, microtubule-associated protein tau was robustly identified as a highly sensitive cytoskeletal constitute under ischemic conditions, suggesting a pivotal role during the transition process toward long-lasting tissue damage. Consequently, cytoskeletal elements appear as promising targets for novel therapeutic approaches with the objective to impede ischemia-induced irreversible cellular degradation.

  18. Ethanol and 4-methylpyrazole increase DNA adduct formation of furfuryl alcohol in FVB/N wild-type mice and in mice expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1/1A2.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Benjamin; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Monien, Bernhard H

    2016-03-01

    Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is a carcinogenic food contaminant, which is formed by acid- and heat-catalyzed degradation of fructose and glucose. The activation by sulfotransferases (SULTs) yields a DNA reactive and mutagenic sulfate ester. The most prominent DNA adduct, N(2)-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-MF-dG), was detected in FFA-treated mice and also in human tissue samples. The dominant pathway of FFA detoxification is the oxidation via alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs). The activity of these enzymes may be greatly altered in the presence of inhibitors or competitive substrates. Here, we investigated the impact of ethanol and the ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4MP) on the DNA adduct formation by FFA in wild-type and in humanized mice that were transgenic for human SULT1A1/1A2 and deficient in the mouse (m) Sult1a1 and Sult1d1 genes (h1A1/1A2/1a1(-)/1d1(-)). The administration of FFA alone led to hepatic adduct levels of 4.5 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides and 33.6 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides in male and female wild-type mice, respectively, and of 19.6 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides and 95.4 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides in male and female h1A1/1A2/1a1(-)/1d1(-) mice. The coadministration of 1.6g ethanol/kg body weight increased N(2)-MF-dG levels by 2.3-fold in male and by 1.7-fold in female wild-type mice and by 2.5-fold in male and by 1.5-fold in female h1A1/1A2/1a1(-)/1d1(-) mice. The coadministration of 100mg 4MP/kg body weight had a similar effect on the adduct levels. These findings indicate that modulators of the oxidative metabolism, e.g. the drug 4MP or consumption of alcoholic beverages, may increase the genotoxic effects of FFA also in humans.

  19. Ethanol and 4-methylpyrazole increase DNA adduct formation of furfuryl alcohol in FVB/N wild-type mice and in mice expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1/1A2.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Benjamin; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Monien, Bernhard H

    2016-03-01

    Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is a carcinogenic food contaminant, which is formed by acid- and heat-catalyzed degradation of fructose and glucose. The activation by sulfotransferases (SULTs) yields a DNA reactive and mutagenic sulfate ester. The most prominent DNA adduct, N(2)-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-MF-dG), was detected in FFA-treated mice and also in human tissue samples. The dominant pathway of FFA detoxification is the oxidation via alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs). The activity of these enzymes may be greatly altered in the presence of inhibitors or competitive substrates. Here, we investigated the impact of ethanol and the ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4MP) on the DNA adduct formation by FFA in wild-type and in humanized mice that were transgenic for human SULT1A1/1A2 and deficient in the mouse (m) Sult1a1 and Sult1d1 genes (h1A1/1A2/1a1(-)/1d1(-)). The administration of FFA alone led to hepatic adduct levels of 4.5 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides and 33.6 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides in male and female wild-type mice, respectively, and of 19.6 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides and 95.4 N(2)-MF-dG/10(8) nucleosides in male and female h1A1/1A2/1a1(-)/1d1(-) mice. The coadministration of 1.6g ethanol/kg body weight increased N(2)-MF-dG levels by 2.3-fold in male and by 1.7-fold in female wild-type mice and by 2.5-fold in male and by 1.5-fold in female h1A1/1A2/1a1(-)/1d1(-) mice. The coadministration of 100mg 4MP/kg body weight had a similar effect on the adduct levels. These findings indicate that modulators of the oxidative metabolism, e.g. the drug 4MP or consumption of alcoholic beverages, may increase the genotoxic effects of FFA also in humans. PMID:26775039

  20. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baybutt, Herbert; Diack, Abigail B.; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5). Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production. PMID:27447728

  1. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Isobel J; Brown, Deborah; Baybutt, Herbert; Diack, Abigail B; Kellett, Katherine A B; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C; Hooper, Nigel M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5). Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production. PMID:27447728

  2. Effects of Lewis lung carcinoma on trabecular microstructural changes in wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone is a major target organ of metastasis. The present study investigated the effects of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) on trabecular microstructural changes, using tomographic analysis, in distal femur and lumbar 4 vertebra from LLC-bearing wild-type and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) defi...

  3. Effects of ascorbic acid on carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel subsulfide, and on tumor transplants growth in gulonolactone oxidase knock-out mice and wild-type C57BL mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kasprzak, Kazimierz S.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Kaczmarek, Monika Z.; Logsdon, Daniel L.; Fivash, Mathew J.; Salnikow, Konstantin

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to test a hypothesis that ascorbate depletion could enhance carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Homozygous L-gulono- < gamma > -lactone oxidase gene knock-out mice (Gulo-/- mice) unable to produce ascorbate and wild-type C57BL mice (WT mice) were injected intramuscularly with carcinogenic nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}), and observed for the development of injection site tumors for 57 weeks. Small pieces of one of the induced tumors were transplanted subcutaneously into separate groups of Gulo-/- and WT mice and the growth of these tumors was measured for up to 3 months. The two strains of mice differed significantly with regard to (1) Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis: Gulo-/- mice were 40% more susceptible than WT mice; and (2) transplanted tumors development: Gulo-/- mice were more receptive to tumor growth than WT mice, but only in terms of a much shorter tumor latency; later in the exponential phase of growth, the growth rates were the same. And, with adequate ascorbate supplementation, the two strains were equally susceptible to acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Statistically significant effects of dietary ascorbate dosing levels were the following: (1) reduction in ascorbate supplementation increased acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} in Gulo-/- mice; (2) ascorbate supplementation extended the latency of transplanted tumors in WT mice. In conclusion, the lack of endogenous ascorbate synthesis makes Gulo-/- mice more susceptible to Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis. Dietary ascorbate tends to attenuate acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} and to extend the latency of transplanted tumors. The latter effects may be of practical importance to humans and thus deserve further studies. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascorbate depletion enhances carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gulo-/- mice unable to synthesize ascorbate were used in this study. Black

  4. Toxicity studies with 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its metabolite 5-sulphooxymethylfurfural in wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing human sulphotransferases 1A1 and 1A2.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Marinovic, Morana; Taugner, Felicitas; Florian, Simone; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2012-05-01

    5-Sulphooxymethylfurfural (SMF), an electrophilic metabolite of the abundant Maillard product 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), was intraperitoneally administered to FVB/N mice. At a dosage of 250 mg/kg, most animals died after 5-11 days due to massive damage to proximal tubules. At lower dosages, administered repeatedly, tubules also were the major target of toxicity, with regeneration and atypical hyperplasia occurring at later periods. Additionally, hepatotoxic effects and serositis of peritoneal tissues were observed. SMF is a minor metabolite of HMF in conventional mice, but HMF is an excellent substrate for a major sulphotransferase (hSULT1A1) in humans. Parental FVB/N mice and FVB/N-hSULT1A1/2 mice, carrying multiple copies of the hSULT1A1/2 gene cluster, were exposed to HMF in drinking water (0, 134 and 536 mg/kg body mass/day) for 12 weeks. Nephrotoxic effects and enhanced proliferation of hepatocytes were only detected at the high dosage. They were mild and, surprisingly, unaffected by hSULT1A1/2 expression. Thus, SMF was a potent nephrotoxicant when administered as a bolus, but did not reach levels sufficient to produce serious toxicity when generated from HMF administered continuously via drinking water. This was even the case in transgenic mice expressing clearly higher HMF sulphation activity in liver and kidney than humans.

  5. The ESA Mice in Space (MIS) habitat: effects of cage confinement on neuromusculoskeletal structure and function and stress/behavior using wild-type C57Bl/6JRj mice in a modular science reference model (MSRM) test on ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blottner, Dieter; Vico, Laurence; Jamon, D. Berckmansp L. Vicop Y. Liup R. Canceddap M.

    Background: Environmental conditions likely affect physiology and behaviour of mice used for Life Sciences Research on Earth and in Space. Thus, mice habitats with sufficient statistical numbers should be developed for adequate life support and care and that should meet all nesces-sary ethical and scientific requirements needed to successfully perform animal experimentation in Space. Aim of study: We here analysed the effects of cage confinement on the weightbear-ing musculoskeletal system, behaviour and stress of wild-type mice (C57BL/6JRj, 30 g b.wt., total n = 24) housed for 25 days in a prototypical ground-based MSRM (modular science ref-erence module) in the frame of breadboard activities for a fully automated life support habitat called "Mice in Space" (MIS) at the Leuven University, Belgium. Results: Compared with control housing (individually ventilated cages, IVC-mice) the MIS mice revealed no significant changes in soleus muscle size and myofiber distribution (type I vs. II) and quality of bone (3-D microarchitecture and mineralisation of calvaria, spine and femur) determined by confocal and micro-computed tomography. Corticosterone metabolism measured non-invasively (faeces) monitored elevated adrenocortical activity at only start of the MIS cage confinement (day 1). Behavioural tests (i.e., grip strength, rotarod, L/D box, elevated plus-maze, open field, ag-gressiveness) performed subsequently revealed only minor changes in motor performance (MIS vs. controls). Conclusions: The MIS habitat will not, on its own, produce major effects that could confound interpretation of data induced by microgravity exposure on orbit as planned for future biosatellite programmes. Sponsors: ESA-ESTEC, Noordwijk, NL

  6. Analysis of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-deoxyadenosine adducts in wild-type and cytochrome P450 1b1 knockout mice using stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tod A; Morré, Jeff; Lauer, Fredine T; McQuistan, Tammie J; Hummel, Jessica M; Burchiel, Scott W; Williams, David E

    2015-04-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC; also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a potent carcinogen in animal models and a class 2A human carcinogen. Recent investigations into DBC-mediated toxicity identified DBC as a potent immunosuppressive agent similar to the well-studied immunotoxicant 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). DBC, like DMBA, is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 and forms the reactive metabolite DBC-11,12-diol-13,14-epoxide (DBCDE). DBCDE is largely responsible for the genotoxicity associated with DBC exposure. The immunosuppressive properties of several PAHs are also linked to genotoxic mechanisms. Therefore, this study was designed to identify DBCDE-DNA adduct formation in the spleen and thymus of wild-type and cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1) knockout (KO) mice using a highly sensitive stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS method. Stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS identified the major DBC adducts (±)-anti-cis-DBCDE-dA and (±)-anti-trans-DBCDE-dA in the lung, liver, and spleen of both WT and Cyp1b1 KO mice. However, adduct formation in the thymus was below the level of quantitation for our method. Additionally, adduct formation in Cyp1b1 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to wild-type (WT) mice receiving DBC via oral gavage. In conclusion, the current study identifies for the first time DBCDE-dA adducts in the spleen of mice supporting the link between genotoxicity and immunosuppression, in addition to supporting previous studies identifying Cyp1b1 as the primary CYP involved in DBC bioactivation to DBCDE. The high levels of DBC-DNA adducts identified in the spleen, along with the known high levels of Cyp1b1 expression in this organ, supports further investigation into DBC-mediated immunotoxicity.

  7. Analysis of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-deoxyadenosine adducts in wild-type and cytochrome P450 1b1 knockout mice using stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tod A; Morré, Jeff; Lauer, Fredine T; McQuistan, Tammie J; Hummel, Jessica M; Burchiel, Scott W; Williams, David E

    2015-04-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC; also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a potent carcinogen in animal models and a class 2A human carcinogen. Recent investigations into DBC-mediated toxicity identified DBC as a potent immunosuppressive agent similar to the well-studied immunotoxicant 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). DBC, like DMBA, is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 and forms the reactive metabolite DBC-11,12-diol-13,14-epoxide (DBCDE). DBCDE is largely responsible for the genotoxicity associated with DBC exposure. The immunosuppressive properties of several PAHs are also linked to genotoxic mechanisms. Therefore, this study was designed to identify DBCDE-DNA adduct formation in the spleen and thymus of wild-type and cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1) knockout (KO) mice using a highly sensitive stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS method. Stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS identified the major DBC adducts (±)-anti-cis-DBCDE-dA and (±)-anti-trans-DBCDE-dA in the lung, liver, and spleen of both WT and Cyp1b1 KO mice. However, adduct formation in the thymus was below the level of quantitation for our method. Additionally, adduct formation in Cyp1b1 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to wild-type (WT) mice receiving DBC via oral gavage. In conclusion, the current study identifies for the first time DBCDE-dA adducts in the spleen of mice supporting the link between genotoxicity and immunosuppression, in addition to supporting previous studies identifying Cyp1b1 as the primary CYP involved in DBC bioactivation to DBCDE. The high levels of DBC-DNA adducts identified in the spleen, along with the known high levels of Cyp1b1 expression in this organ, supports further investigation into DBC-mediated immunotoxicity. PMID:25868132

  8. Analysis of Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-Deoxyadenosine Adducts in Wild-Type and Cytochrome P450 1b1 Knockout Mice using Stable-Isotope Dilution UHPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Tod A.; Morré, Jeff; Lauer, Fredine T.; McQuistan, Tammie J.; Hummel, Jessica M.; Burchiel, Scott W.; Williams, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC; also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a potent carcinogen in animal models and a class 2A human carcinogen. Recent investigations into DBC-mediated toxicity identified DBC as a potent immunosuppressive agent similar to the well-studied immunotoxicant 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). DBC, like DMBA, is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 and forms the reactive metabolite DBC-11,12-diol-13,14-epoxide (DBCDE). DBCDE is largely responsible for the genotoxicity associated with DBC exposure. The immunosuppressive properties of several PAHs are also linked to genotoxic mechanisms. Therefore, this study was designed to identify DBCDE-DNA adduct formation in the spleen and thymus of wild-type and cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1) knockout (KO) mice using a highly sensitive stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS method. Stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS identified the major DBC adducts (±)-anti-cis-DBCDE-dA and (±)-anti-trans-DBCDE-dA in the lung, liver, and spleen of both WT and Cyp1b1 KO mice. However, adduct formation in the thymus was below the level of quantitation for our method. Additionally, adduct formation in Cyp1b1 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to wild-type (WT) mice receiving DBC via oral gavage. In conclusion, the current study identifies for the first time DBCDE-dA adducts in the spleen of mice supporting the link between genotoxicity and immunosuppression, in addition to supporting previous studies identifying Cyp1b1 as the primary CYP involved in DBC bioactivation to DBCDE. The high levels of DBC-DNA adducts identified in the spleen, along with the known high levels of Cyp1b1 expression in this organ, supports further investigation into DBC-mediated immunotoxicity. PMID:25868132

  9. Hyalinosis and Ym1/Ym2 Gene Expression in the Stomach and Respiratory Tract of 129S4/SvJae and Wild-Type and CYP1A2-Null B6,129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jerrold M.; Yoon, Michung; Anver, Miriam R.; Haines, Diana C.; Kudo, Gen; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Kimura, Shioko

    2001-01-01

    The C57BL/6, 129, and B6,129 mouse strains or stocks have been commonly used to generate targeted mutant mice. The pathology of these mice is not well characterized. In studies of these aging mice, we found high incidences of hyalinosis (eosinophilic cytoplasmic change) in the glandular stomach, respiratory tract, bile duct, and gall bladder of B6,129 CYP1A2-null and wild-type mice as well as in both sexes of the background 129S4/SvJae strain. The gastric lesions of the glandular stomach were found in 95.7% of female CYP1A2-null mice as well as in 45.7% of female 129S4/SvJae animals. The eosinophilic protein isolated from characteristic hyaline gastric lesions was identified as Ym2, a member of the chitinase family. Immunohistochemistry, using rabbit polyclonal antibodies to oligopeptides derived from the Ym1 sequence, detected focal to diffuse reactivity within both normal and abnormal nasal olfactory and respiratory epithelium, pulmonary alveolar macrophages, bone marrow myeloid cells, and the squamous epithelium of the forestomach and epithelium of the glandular stomach. Alveolar macrophages in acidophilic pneumonia, a major cause of death of aging 129 mice, and in mice with the me mutation also were highly immunoreactive. The possible cause of this protein excess in gastric and other lesions and its possible functions are discussed. PMID:11141507

  10. Immune response to lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus: isolation of infectious virus-immunoglobulin G complexes and quantitation of specific antiviral immunoglobulin G response in wild-type and nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cafruny, W A; Plagemann, P G

    1982-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV) causes a normally benign persistent infection of mice, resulting in a life-long viremia characterized by the presence of circulating infectious immune complexes, impaired clearance of certain enzymes from the blood, and modification of the host immune response to various heterologous antigens. In this study, we isolated infectious immunoglobulin G (IgG)-LDV complexes in the plasma of persistently infected mice by adsorption to and elution from protein A-Sepharose CL-4B. We found that practically all infectious LDV in the plasma of persistently infected mice is complexed to IgG. LDV infectivity in these complexes was partially neutralized, but could be reactivated by treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol. We also quantitated total plasma IgG and anti-LDV IgG in wild-type and nude Swiss and BALB/c mice as a function of the time after infection with LDV by radial immunodiffusion and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Total plasma IgG levels nearly doubled in BALB/c mice during 150 days of infection. IgG levels in uninfected nude mice were only 20% of those in uninfected BALB/c mice, but during infection with LDV increased to approximately those found in uninfected BALB/c mice. Anti-LDV IgG levels were almost as high in nude mice as in normal BALB/c mice. Isoelectric focusing of purified IgG from BALB/c mice showed that LDV infection resulted in the enhanced synthesis of all 16 normal IgG fractions that we could separate by this method, which suggests that LDV infection results in polyclonal activation of IgG-producing lymphocytes. PMID:7129626

  11. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity but Is Dispensable for Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Adult mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klein, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myogflox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myogflox/flox mice (mdx), Myogflox/flox mice (wild-type), and mdx:MyogfloxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted). mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function. PMID:21264243

  12. Detailed O-glycomics of the Muc2 mucin from colon of wild-type, core 1- and core 3-transferase-deficient mice highlights differences compared with human MUC2

    PubMed Central

    Thomsson, Kristina A; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica M; Ångström, Jonas; Johansson, Malin EV; Xia, Lijun; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2012-01-01

    The heavily O-glycosylated mucin MUC2 constitutes the major protein in the mucosal layer that acts as a physical barrier protecting the epithelial layer in the colon. In this study, Muc2 was purified from mucosal scrapings from the colon of wild-type (WT) mice, core 3 transferase knockout (C3Gnt−/−) mice and intestinal epithelial cell-specific core 1 knockout (IEC C1Galt1−/−) mice. The Muc2 O-glycans were released by reductive β-elimination and analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in the negative-ion mode. Muc2 from the distal colon of WT and C3Gnt−/− knockout mice carried a mixture of core 1- or core 2-type glycans, whereas Muc2 from IEC C1Galt1−/− mice carried highly sialylated core 3- and core 4-type glycans. A large portion of NeuAc in all mouse models was positioned on disialylated N-acetyllactosamine units, an epitope not reported on human colonic MUC2. Mass spectra and proton NMR spectroscopy revealed an abundant NeuAc linked to internally positioned N-acetylglucosamine on colonic murine Muc2, which also differs markedly from human MUC2. Our results highlight that murine colonic Muc2 O-glycosylation is substantially different from human MUC2, which could be one explanation for the different commensal microbiota of these two species. PMID:22581805

  13. Presynaptic control of striatal dopamine neurotransmission in adult vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti; Mooslehner, Katrin A; Chan, Pok Man; Emson, Piers C; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2003-05-01

    The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) plays a pivotal role in regulating the size of vesicular and cytosolic dopamine (DA) storage pools within the CNS, and can thus influence extracellular DA neurotransmission. Transgenic mice have been generated with a dramatically reduced (by approximately 95%) expression of the VMAT2 gene which, unlike complete knockout lines, survive into adulthood. We compared the pre-synaptic regulation of both impulse-dependent (exocytotic) and carrier-mediated (via reversal of the DA transporter, DAT) DA release in the dorsolateral caudate putamen (CPu) of striatal slices derived from adult homozygous VMAT2 mutant and wild-type mice using fast cyclic voltammetry. Impulse-dependent DA release, evoked by a single electrical pulse, was lower in homozygous (116 nm) than wild-type mice (351 nm) indicating smaller vesicular DA stores, an observation supported by the evanescent effect of amfonelic acid (300 nm) in homozygous mice. Amphetamine (2 microm) increased extracellular DA via DAT reversal in both wild-type (by 459 nm) and VMAT2 mutant (by 168 nm, p < 0.01 vs. wild-type) mice. In both cases, the effect was blocked by the DAT inhibitor GBR12935 (1 microm). Simultaneously, amphetamine decreased impulse-dependent DA release, albeit less in homozygous (by 55%) than in wild-type (by 78%) mice. In wild-types, this decrement was largely reversed by GBR12935 but not by the D2/D3 autoreceptor antagonist (-)sulpiride (1 microm). Conversely, in homozygous VMAT2 mutant mice, it was attenuated by (-)sulpiride but not GBR12935. The D2/D3 receptor agonist quinpirole inhibited impulse-dependent DA release with a lower EC50 value in homozygous mice (12 nm) compared with wild-types (34 nm), indicating the compensatory presence of functionally supersensitive release-regulating autoreceptors. However, analysis of DA reuptake kinetics obtained in the absence and presence of DAT blockade (by cocaine and amfonelic acid) revealed only minor differences in

  14. Positron emission tomographic imaging of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor system with [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528): improvements in image quantification using wild-type and knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Herance, Raúl; Rojas, Santiago; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Millán, Olga; Martín-García, Elena; Burokas, Aurelijus; Serra, Miquel Àngel; Maldonado, Rafael; Pareto, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assessed the feasibility of using positron emission tomography (PET) and the tracer [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528), an analogue of rimonabant, to study the brain cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor system. Wild-type (WT) and CB1 knockout (KO) animals were imaged at baseline and after pretreatment with blocking doses of rimonabant. Brain uptake in WT animals was higher (50%) than in KO animals in baseline conditions. After pretreatment with rimonabant, WT uptake lowered to the level of KO animals. The results of this study support the feasibility of using PET with the radiotracer [¹¹C]JHU75528 to image the brain CB1 receptor system in mice. In addition, this methodology can be used to assess the effect of new drugs in preclinical studies using genetically manipulated animals.

  15. Effects of a high-fat diet on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient and wild-type mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1-/-) and wildtype mice (C57BL/6J background) fed the AIN93G diet or that diet modified with 45% calories from fat. The high-fat diet i...

  16. Comparative hepatic effects of perfluorooctanoic acid and WY 14,643 in PPARa-knocked out and wild-type mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an environmentally persistent chemical commonly found in humans and wildlife. Induction of liver tumors by PFOA in rodents is thought to be mediated by PPARα activation, although hepatic hypertrophy persists in PPARα-null mice. This study evalua...

  17. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rona; Plinston, Chris; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Suardi, Silvia; Ruggerone, Margherita; Moda, Fabio; Graziano, Silvia; Sbriccoli, Marco; Cardone, Franco; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Ingrosso, Loredana; Baron, Thierry; Richt, Juergen; Andreoletti, Olivier; Simmons, Marion; Lockey, Richard; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2012-07-01

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans.

  18. Immunization of BALB/c mice with Brucella abortus 2308ΔwbkA confers protection against wild-type infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-qiang; Gui, Dan; Sun, Zhi-hua; Zhang, Jun-bo; Zhang, Wen-zhi; Guo, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that causes animal and human diseases. Vaccination is a major measure for prevention of brucellosis, but it is currently not possible to distinguish vaccinated animals from those that have been naturally infected. Therefore, in this study, we constructed the Brucella (B.) abortus 2380 wbkA mutant (2308ΔwbkA) and evaluated its virulence. The survival of 2308ΔwbkA was attenuated in murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) and BALB/c mice, and it induced high protective immunity in mice. The wbkA mutant elicited an anti-Brucella-specific immunoglobulin G response and induced the secretion of gamma interferon. Antibodies to 2308ΔwbkA could be detected in sera from mice, implying the potential for use of this protein as a diagnostic antigen. The WbkA antigen would allow serological differentiation between infected and vaccinated animals. These results suggest that 2308ΔwbkA is a potential attenuated vaccine against 16M. This vaccine will be further evaluated in sheep. PMID:26040616

  19. Nanoparticle Delivered Human Biliverdin Reductase-Based Peptide Increases Glucose Uptake by Activating IRK/Akt/GSK3 Axis: The Peptide Is Effective in the Cell and Wild-Type and Diabetic Ob/Ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Maines, Mahin D.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin's stimulation of glucose uptake by binding to the IRK extracellular domain is compromised in diabetes. We have recently described an unprecedented approach to stimulating glucose uptake. KYCCSRK (P2) peptide, corresponding to the C-terminal segment of hBVR, was effective in binding to and inducing conformational change in the IRK intracellular kinase domain. Although myristoylated P2, made of L-amino acids, was effective in cell culture, its use for animal studies was unsuitable. We developed a peptidase-resistant formulation of the peptide that was efficient in both mice and cell culture systems. The peptide was constructed of D-amino acids, in reverse order, and blocked at both termini. Delivery of the encapsulated peptide to HepG2 and HSKM cells was confirmed by its prolonged effect on stimulation of glucose uptake (>6 h). The peptide improved glucose clearance in both wild-type and Ob/Ob mice; it lowered blood glucose levels and suppressed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. IRK activity was stimulated in the liver of treated mice and in cultured cells. The peptide potentiated function of IRK's downstream effector, Akt-GSK3-(α, β) axis. Thus, P2-based approach can be used for improving glucose uptake by cells. Also, it allows for screening peptides in vitro and in animal models for treatment of diabetes. PMID:27294151

  20. Chronic GluN2B antagonism disrupts behavior in wild-type mice without protecting against synapse loss or memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Meilandt, William J; Gogineni, Alvin; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Weimer, Robby M; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-06-11

    Extensive evidence implicates GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B-NMDARs) in excitotoxic-insult-induced neurodegeneration and amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic dysfunction. Therefore, inhibiting GluN2B-NMDARs would appear to be a potential therapeutic strategy to provide neuroprotection and improve cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are no reports of long-term in vivo treatment of AD mouse models with GluN2B antagonists. We used piperidine18 (Pip18), a potent and selective GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, for long-term dosing in AD mouse models. Reduced freezing behavior in Tg2576 mice during fear conditioning was partially reversed after subchronic (17 d) Pip18 treatment. However, analysis of freezing behavior in different contexts indicated that this increased freezing likely involves elevated anxiety or excessive memory generalization in both nontransgenic (NTG) and Tg2576 mice. In PS2APP mice chronically fed with medicated food containing Pip18 for 4 months, spatial learning and memory deficits were not rescued, plaque-associated spine loss was not affected, and synaptic function was not altered. At the same time, altered open field activity consistent with increased anxiety and degraded performance in an active avoidance task were observed in NTG after chronic treatment. These results indicate that long-term treatment with a GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist does not provide a disease-modifying benefit and could cause cognitive liabilities rather than symptomatic benefit in AD mouse models. Therefore, these results challenge the expectation of the therapeutic potential for GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists in AD.

  1. Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) DNA adduct formation in DNA repair–deficient p53 haploinsufficient [Xpa(−/−)p53(+/−)] and wild-type mice fed BP and BP plus chlorophyllin for 28 days

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Miriam C.

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated DNA damage (DNA adduct formation) after feeding benzo[a]pyrene (BP) to wild-type (WT) and cancer-susceptible Xpa(−/−)p53(+/−) mice deficient in nucleotide excision repair and haploinsufficient for the tumor suppressor p53. DNA damage was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ES-MS/MS), which measures r7,t8,t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N 2-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPdG), and a chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA), using anti-r7,t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE)–DNA antiserum, which measures both BPdG and the other stable BP-DNA adducts. When mice were fed 100 ppm BP for 28 days, BP-induced DNA damage measured in esophagus, liver and lung was typically higher in Xpa(−/−)p53(+/−) mice, compared with WT mice. This result is consistent with the previously observed tumor susceptibility of Xpa(−/−)p53(+/−) mice. BPdG, the major DNA adduct associated with tumorigenicity, was the primary DNA adduct formed in esophagus (a target tissue in the mouse), whereas total BP-DNA adducts predominated in higher levels in the liver (a non-target tissue in the mouse). In an attempt to lower BP-induced DNA damage, we fed the WT and Xpa(−/−)p53(+/−) mice 0.3% chlorophyllin (CHL) in the BP-containing diet for 28 days. The addition of CHL resulted in an increase of BP–DNA adducts in esophagus, liver and lung of WT mice, a lowering of BPdG in esophagi of WT mice and livers of Xpa(−/−)p53(+/−) mice and an increase of BPdG in livers of WT mice. Therefore, the addition of CHL to a BP-containing diet showed a lack of consistent chemoprotective effect, indicating that oral CHL administration may not reduce PAH–DNA adduct levels consistently in human organs. PMID:22828138

  2. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Harwood, John L

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes.

  3. Radiation-induced DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness of 18F-FDG in wild-type mice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    Clinically, the most commonly used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer is the glucose analog 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), however little research has been conducted on the biological effects of 18F-FDG injections. The induction and repair of DNA damage and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of radiation from 18F-FDG relative to 662 keV γ-rays were investigated. The study also assessed whether low-dose radiation exposure from 18F-FDG was capable of inducing an adaptive response. DNA damage to the bone marrow erythroblast population was measured using micronucleus formation and lymphocyte γH2A.X levels. To test the RBE of 18F-FDG, mice were injected with a range of activities of 18F-FDG (0–14.80 MBq) or irradiated with Cs-137 γ-rays (0–100 mGy). The adaptive response was investigated 24 h after the 18F-FDG injection by 1 Gy in vivo challenge doses for micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) formation or 1, 2 and 4 Gy in vitro challenges doses for γH2A.X formation. A significant increase in MN-RET formation above controls occurred following injection activities of 3.70, 7.40 or 14.80 MBq (P < 0.001) which correspond to bone marrow doses of ~35, 75 and 150 mGy, respectively. Per unit dose, the Cs-137 radiation exposure induced significantly more damage than the 18F-FDG injections (RBE = 0.79 ± 0.04). A 20% reduction in γH2A.X fluorescence was observed in mice injected with a prior adapting low dose of 14.80 MBq 18F-FDG relative to controls (P < 0.019). A 0.74 MBq 18F-FDG injection, which gives mice a dose approximately equal to a typical human PET scan, did not cause a significant increase in DNA damage nor did it generate an adaptive response. Typical 18F-FDG injection activities used in small animal imaging (14.80 MBq) resulted in a decrease in DNA damage, as measured by γH2A.X formation

  4. Nutraceutical agents with anti-inflammatory properties prevent dietary saturated-fat induced disturbances in blood–brain barrier function in wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests that disturbances in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) may be pivotal to the pathogenesis and pathology of vascular-based neurodegenerative disorders. Studies suggest that heightened systemic and central inflammations are associated with BBB dysfunction. This study investigated the effect of the anti-inflammatory nutraceuticals garlic extract-aged (GEA), alpha lipoic acid (ALA), niacin, and nicotinamide (NA) in a murine dietary-induced model of BBB dysfunction. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet enriched in saturated fatty acids (SFA, 40% fat of total energy) for nine months to induce systemic inflammation and BBB disturbances. Nutraceutical treatment groups included the provision of either GEA, ALA, niacin or NA in the positive control SFA-group and in low-fat fed controls. Brain parenchymal extravasation of plasma derived immunoglobulin G (IgG) and large macromolecules (apolipoprotein (apo) B lipoproteins) measured by quantitative immunofluorescent microscopy, were used as markers of disturbed BBB integrity. Parenchymal glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were considered in the context of surrogate markers of neurovascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Total anti-oxidant status and glutathione reductase activity were determined in plasma. Results Brain parenchymal abundance of IgG and apoB lipoproteins was markedly exaggerated in mice maintained on the SFA diet concomitant with significantly increased GFAP and COX-2, and reduced systemic anti-oxidative status. The nutraceutical GEA, ALA, niacin, and NA completely prevented the SFA-induced disturbances of BBB and normalized the measures of neurovascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Conclusions The anti-inflammatory nutraceutical agents GEA, ALA, niacin, or NA are potent inhibitors of dietary fat-induced disturbances of BBB induced by systemic inflammations. PMID:23782872

  5. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  6. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates ischemia-reperfusion injury of the small intestine in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Kobata, Atsushi; Takeda, Shogo; Nadatani, Yuji; Otani, Koji; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) recognizes conserved molecular patterns associated with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, and detects some endogenous ligands. Previous studies demonstrated that in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the small intestine, the TLR2-dependent signaling exerted preventive effects on the damage in young mice, but did not have a significant effect in neonatal mice. We investigated the role of TLR2 in adult ischemia-reperfusion injury in the small intestine. Wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice at 16 weeks of age were subjected to intestinal I/R injury. Some wild-type mice received anti-Ly-6G antibodies to deplete circulating neutrophils. In wild-type mice, I/R induced severe small intestinal injury characterized by infiltration by inflammatory cells, disruption of the mucosal epithelium, and mucosal bleeding. Compared to wild-type mice, TLR2 knockout mice exhibited less severe mucosal injury induced by I/R, with a 35%, 33%, and 43% reduction in histological grading score and luminal concentration of hemoglobin, and the numbers of apoptotic epithelial cells, respectively. The I/R increased the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a marker of neutrophil infiltration, and the levels of mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the small intestine of the wild-type mice by 3.3-, 3.2-, and 13.0-fold, respectively. TLR2 deficiency significantly inhibited the I/R-induced increase in MPO activity and the expression of mRNAs for TNF-α and ICAM-1, but did not affect the expression of COX-2 mRNA. I/R also enhanced TLR2 mRNA expression by 2.9-fold. TLR2 proteins were found to be expressed in the epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and endothelial cells. Neutrophil depletion prevented intestinal I/R injury in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that TLR2 may mediate I/R injury of the small intestine in adult mice via induction of inflammatory mediators

  7. MTHFR deficiency or reduced intake of folate or choline in pregnant mice results in impaired short-term memory and increased apoptosis in the hippocampus of wild-type offspring.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, N M; Deng, L; Malysheva, O; Caudill, M A; Rozen, R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic or nutritional disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, with associated hyperhomocysteinemia, can result in complex disorders including pregnancy complications and neuropsychiatric diseases. In earlier work, we showed that mice with a complete deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a critical enzyme in folate and homocysteine metabolism, had cognitive impairment with disturbances in choline metabolism. Maternal demands for folate and choline are increased during pregnancy and deficiencies of these nutrients result in several negative outcomes including increased resorption and delayed development. The goal of this study was to investigate the behavioral and neurobiological impact of a maternal genetic deficiency in MTHFR or maternal nutritional deficiency of folate or choline during pregnancy on 3-week-old Mthfr(+/+) offspring. Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) females were placed on control diets (CD); and Mthfr(+/+) females were placed on folate-deficient diets (FD) or choline-deficient diets (ChDD) throughout pregnancy and lactation until their offspring were 3weeks of age. Short-term memory was assessed in offspring, and hippocampal tissue was evaluated for morphological changes, apoptosis, proliferation and choline metabolism. Maternal MTHFR deficiency resulted in short-term memory impairment in offspring. These dams had elevated levels of plasma homocysteine when compared with wild-type dams. There were no differences in plasma homocysteine in offspring. Increased apoptosis and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus of offspring from Mthfr(+/-) mothers. In the maternal FD and ChDD study, offspring also showed short-term memory impairment with increased apoptosis in the hippocampus; increased neurogenesis was observed in ChDD offspring. Choline acetyltransferase protein was increased in the offspring hippocampus of both dietary groups and betaine was decreased in the hippocampus of FD offspring. Our results reveal short-term memory

  8. MTHFR deficiency or reduced intake of folate or choline in pregnant mice results in impaired short-term memory and increased apoptosis in the hippocampus of wild-type offspring.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, N M; Deng, L; Malysheva, O; Caudill, M A; Rozen, R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic or nutritional disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, with associated hyperhomocysteinemia, can result in complex disorders including pregnancy complications and neuropsychiatric diseases. In earlier work, we showed that mice with a complete deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a critical enzyme in folate and homocysteine metabolism, had cognitive impairment with disturbances in choline metabolism. Maternal demands for folate and choline are increased during pregnancy and deficiencies of these nutrients result in several negative outcomes including increased resorption and delayed development. The goal of this study was to investigate the behavioral and neurobiological impact of a maternal genetic deficiency in MTHFR or maternal nutritional deficiency of folate or choline during pregnancy on 3-week-old Mthfr(+/+) offspring. Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) females were placed on control diets (CD); and Mthfr(+/+) females were placed on folate-deficient diets (FD) or choline-deficient diets (ChDD) throughout pregnancy and lactation until their offspring were 3weeks of age. Short-term memory was assessed in offspring, and hippocampal tissue was evaluated for morphological changes, apoptosis, proliferation and choline metabolism. Maternal MTHFR deficiency resulted in short-term memory impairment in offspring. These dams had elevated levels of plasma homocysteine when compared with wild-type dams. There were no differences in plasma homocysteine in offspring. Increased apoptosis and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus of offspring from Mthfr(+/-) mothers. In the maternal FD and ChDD study, offspring also showed short-term memory impairment with increased apoptosis in the hippocampus; increased neurogenesis was observed in ChDD offspring. Choline acetyltransferase protein was increased in the offspring hippocampus of both dietary groups and betaine was decreased in the hippocampus of FD offspring. Our results reveal short-term memory

  9. Neonatal infection with neurotropic influenza A virus affects working memory and expression of type III Nrg1 in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Asp, Linnéa; Beraki, Simret; Kristensson, Krister; Ogren, Sven Ove; Karlsson, Håkan

    2009-08-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that early life infections may contribute to the development of psychiatric disorders characterized by cognitive deficits. Here, we studied the effects of a neonatal influenza A/WSN/33 virus infection on locomotor activity, working memory and emotional behavior in adult mice. In addition to wild type mice, immunodeficient (Tap1(-/-)) mice lacking functional CD8(+) T cells, were included in the study to model the potential influence of a genetic deficit relating to virus clearance. Three to four months after the infection, infected Tap1(-/-) mice, but not wild type mice, exhibited deficits in working memory as well as increased rearing activity and anxiety. In the medial prefrontal cortices of these infected Tap1(-/-) mice reduced levels of type III Nrg1 transcripts were observed supporting a role for neuregulin 1 signaling in neuronal circuits involved in working memory. Virus replication, distribution or clearance did not differ between the two genotypes. The lack of CD8(+) T cells, however, appeared to contribute to a more pronounced glia response in Tap1(-/-) than in wild type mice. Thus, the present study suggest that the risk of developing deficits in cognitive and emotional behavior following a CNS infection during brain development is influenced by genetic variation in genes involved in the immune response.

  10. Overexpression of the wild-type SPT1 subunit lowers desoxysphingolipid levels and rescues the phenotype of HSAN1.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian S; Hornemann, Thorsten; McCampbell, Alex; Kuljis, Dika; Penno, Anke; Vardeh, Daniel; Tamrazian, Eric; Garofalo, Kevin; Lee, Ho-Joon; Kini, Lohit; Selig, Martin; Frosch, Matthew; Gable, Ken; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Woolf, Clifford J; Guan, Guiman; Harmon, Jeffrey M; Dunn, Teresa M; Brown, Robert H

    2009-11-18

    Mutations in the SPTLC1 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) cause an adult-onset, hereditary sensory, and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN1). We previously reported that mice bearing a transgene-expressing mutant SPTLC1 (tgSPTLC1(C133W)) show a reduction in SPT activity and hyperpathia at 10 months of age. Now analyzed at a later age, we find these mice develop sensory loss with a distal small fiber neuropathy and peripheral myelinopathy. This phenotype is largely reversed when these mice are crossed with transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type SPTLC1 showing that the mutant SPTLC1 protein is not inherently toxic. Simple loss of SPT activity also cannot account for the HSAN1 phenotype, since heterozygous SPTLC1 knock-out mice have reduced SPT activity but are otherwise normal. Rather, the presence of two newly identified, potentially deleterious deoxysphingoid bases in the tgSPTLC1(C133W), but not in the wild-type, double-transgenic tgSPTLC1(WT + C133W) or SPTLC1(+/-) mice, suggests that the HSAN1 mutations alter amino acid selectivity of the SPT enzyme such that palmitate is condensed with alanine and glycine, in addition to serine. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that HSAN1 is the result of a gain-of-function mutation in SPTLC1 that leads to accumulation of a toxic metabolite. PMID:19923297

  11. Evaluation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in adult +/+ and +/- BDNF mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, D E; Gao, X; Story, G M; Anderson, L I; Kucera, J; Walro, J M

    2001-07-01

    Deletion of a single copy of the BDNF gene has been shown to affect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of young adult BDNF mice. In the present report we evaluated various indices of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function between 9-month-old wild-type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/-) BDNF mutant mice. Performance in a sensorimotor beam walking task was significantly decreased in +/- mice as indicated by increased times required to traverse both a wide (21 mm) and narrow (6 mm) beam. No differences in spontaneous locomotor behavior were observed between the +/+ and +/- mice. Amphetamine-stimulated (5 mg/kg) locomotor behavior was increased to a greater degree in the +/- mice, with the number of movements performed by these mice being significantly greater than their +/+ controls. Corpus striatal dopamine concentrations were significantly greater in the +/- BDNF mice. The absence of any significant differences for dopamine concentrations within the hypothalamus and olfactory bulb of these mice, as well as an absence of any difference in striatal norepinephrine concentrations, suggested a relative specificity of these effects to the corpus striatum. Both the +/- and +/+ mice showed similar reductions in striatal dopamine concentrations in response to a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine (20 mg/kg). Collectively these data show increased levels of striatal dopamine concentrations associated with altered behavioral responses involving the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system within the heterozygous BDNF mutant mice. PMID:11421589

  12. Ultrasonic vocalizations of adult male Foxp2-mutant mice: behavioral contexts of arousal and emotion.

    PubMed

    Gaub, S; Fisher, S E; Ehret, G

    2016-02-01

    Adult mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) occur in multiple behavioral and stimulus contexts associated with various levels of arousal, emotion and social interaction. Here, in three experiments of increasing stimulus intensity (water; female urine; male interacting with adult female), we tested the hypothesis that USVs of adult males express the strength of arousal and emotion via different USV parameters (18 parameters analyzed). Furthermore, we analyzed two mouse lines with heterozygous Foxp2 mutations (R552H missense, S321X nonsense), known to produce severe speech and language disorders in humans. These experiments allowed us to test whether intact Foxp2 function is necessary for developing full adult USV repertoires, and whether mutations of this gene influence instinctive vocal expressions based on arousal and emotion. The results suggest that USV calling rate characterizes the arousal level, while sound pressure and spectrotemporal call complexity (overtones/harmonics, type of frequency jumps) may provide indices of levels of positive emotion. The presence of Foxp2 mutations did not qualitatively affect the USVs; all USV types that were found in wild-type animals also occurred in heterozygous mutants. However, mice with Foxp2 mutations displayed quantitative differences in USVs as compared to wild-types, and these changes were context dependent. Compared to wild-type animals, heterozygous mutants emitted mainly longer and louder USVs at higher minimum frequencies with a higher occurrence rate of overtones/harmonics and complex frequency jump types. We discuss possible hypotheses about Foxp2 influence on emotional vocal expressions, which can be investigated in future experiments using selective knockdown of Foxp2 in specific brain circuits.

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Scheving, Lawrence A; Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A; Wang, Rebecca F; Stevenson, Mary C; Threadgill, David W; Russell, William E

    2014-03-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Scheving, Lawrence A; Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A; Wang, Rebecca F; Stevenson, Mary C; Threadgill, David W; Russell, William E

    2014-03-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies. PMID:24407590

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A.; Wang, Rebecca F.; Stevenson, Mary C.; Threadgill, David W.; Russell, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies. PMID:24407590

  16. Altered neuronal architecture and plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Jeroen; Nys, Julie; Moons, Lieve; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are Zn(2+)-dependent endopeptidases considered to be essential for normal brain development and neuroplasticity by modulating extracellular matrix proteins, receptors, adhesion molecules, growth factors and cytoskeletal proteins. Specifically, MMP-3 has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity, hippocampus-dependent learning and neuronal development and migration in the cerebellum. However, the function(s) of this enzyme in the neocortex is understudied. Therefore, we explored the phenotypical characteristics of the neuronal architecture and the capacity for experience-dependent cortical plasticity in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3-deficient (MMP-3(-/-)) mice. Golgi-Cox stainings revealed a significant reduction in apical dendritic length and an increased number of apical obliques for layer V pyramidal neurons in the visual cortex of adult MMP-3(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) animals. In addition, a significant upregulation of both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (NF)-high, phosphorylated NF-medium, NF-low and α-internexin was detected in the visual cortex of MMP-3(-/-) mice. To assess the effect of MMP-3 deficiency on cortical plasticity, we monocularly enucleated adult MMP-3(-/-) mice and analyzed the reactivation of the contralateral visual cortex 7 weeks post-enucleation. In contrast to previous results in C57Bl/6J adult mice, activity remained confined to the binocular zone and did not expand into the monocular regions indicative for an aberrant open-eye potentiation. Permanent hypoactivity in the monocular cortex lateral and medial to V1 also indicated a lack of cross-modal plasticity. These observations demonstrate that genetic inactivation of MMP-3 has profound effects on the structural integrity and plasticity response of the visual cortex of adult mice.

  17. Pubertal and adult Leydig cell function in Mullerian inhibiting substance-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Arumugam, Ramamani; Baker, Stephen P; Lee, Mary M

    2005-02-01

    Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) causes Mullerian duct regression during sexual differentiation and regulates postnatal Leydig cell development. MIS knockout (MIS-KO) mice with targeted deletions of MIS develop Leydig cell hyperplasia, but their circulating androgen concentrations are reportedly unaltered. We compared reproductive hormone profiles, androgen biosynthesis, and the expression of key steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in MIS-KO and wild-type (WT) mice at puberty (36 d) and sexual maturity (60 d). In pubertal animals, basal testosterone and LH concentrations in plasma were lower in MIS-KO than WT mice, whereas human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone concentrations were similar. In adults, basal LH, and both basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated testosterone concentrations were similar. Purified Leydig cells from pubertal MIS-KO mice had lower testosterone but higher androstanediol and androstenedione production rates. In contrast, testosterone, androstanediol, and androstenedione production rates were all lower in adult MIS-KO Leydig cells. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression was lower in pubertal MIS-KO mice compared with WT, whereas 17beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase and 5alpha-reductase were greater, and P450c17 and P450scc were similar. The expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase was lower in adult MIS-KO mice, whereas that of 5alpha-reductase, P450c17, and P450scc was similar. Collectively, these results suggest that in the absence of MIS, Leydig cells remain less differentiated, causing an altered intratesticular androgen milieu that may contribute to the infertility of MIS-KO mice. In immature mice, this deficit in steroidogenic capacity appears to be mediated by a direct loss of MIS action in Leydig cells as well as by indirect effects via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  18. Environmental factors during early developmental period influence psychobehavioral abnormalities in adult PACAP-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Toshihiro; Ago, Yukio; Shintani, Norihito; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Baba, Akemichi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2010-06-19

    Mice lacking the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) (PACAP(-/-)) display behavioral abnormalities, and genetic variants of the genes encoding PACAP are associated with schizophrenia. Clinical studies show that environmental factors, besides genetic factors, play a key role in etiology of many psychiatric disorders. This study examined the effects of environmental factors such as short-term social isolation and an enriched environment on behavioral abnormalities of PACAP(-/-) mice. Rearing in isolation for 2-weeks from 4-weeks old induced hyperlocomotion and aggressive behaviors in the PACAP(-/-) mice without affecting the behavioral performance of the wild-type controls. Adult PACAP(-/-) mice showed not only hyperactivity, jumping behavior, and depression-like behavior, but also decreased social interaction. These abnormal behaviors were improved by rearing for 4-weeks in an early enriched environment (from 4-weeks old), although the deficits of prepulse inhibition (PPI) were not influenced by the enriched condition. In contrast, rearing for 4-weeks in late enriched environment (from 8-weeks old) did not affect the hyperactivity and jumping behaviors in the PACAP(-/-) mice. These results suggest that abnormal behaviors except PPI deficits in PACAP(-/-) mice depend on the environmental factors during the early stages of development.

  19. Flt3 Ligand Regulates the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Fetal and Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Baerenwaldt, Anne; von Burg, Nicole; Kreuzaler, Matthias; Sitte, Selina; Horvath, Edit; Peter, Annick; Voehringer, David; Rolink, Antonius G; Finke, Daniela

    2016-03-15

    Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) promotes survival of lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), but its role in regulating innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) during fetal and adult life is not understood. By using Flt3L knockout and transgenic mice, we demonstrate that Flt3L controls ILC numbers by regulating the pool of α4β7(-) and α4β7(+) lymphoid tissue inducer cell progenitors in the fetal liver and common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow. Deletion of flt3l severely reduced the number of fetal liver progenitors and lymphoid tissue inducer cells in the neonatal intestine, resulting in impaired development of Peyer's patches. In the adult intestine, NK cells and group 2 and 3 ILCs were severely reduced. This effect occurred independently of DCs as ILC numbers were normal in mice in which DCs were constitutively deleted. Finally, we could show that administration of Flt3L increased the number of NKp46(-) group 3 ILCs in wild-type and even in Il7(-/-) mice, which generally have reduced numbers of ILCs. Taken together, Flt3L significantly contributes to ILC and Peyer's patches development by targeting lymphoid progenitor cells during fetal and adult life.

  20. Effect of Dietary Treatment with Dimethylarsinous Acid (DMAIII) on the Urinary Bladder Epithelium of Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltransferase (As3mt) Knockout and C57BL/6 Wild Type Female Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is carcinogenic to the human urinary bladder. It produces urothelial cytotoxicity and proliferation in rats and mice. DMAv, a major methylated urinary metabolite of iAs, is a rat bladder carcinogen, but without effects on the...

  1. The heparan sulphate deficient Hspg2 exon 3 null mouse displays reduced deposition of TGF-β1 in skin compared to C57BL/6 wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Cindy; Smith, Susan M; Melrose, James

    2016-06-01

    This was an observational study where we examined the role of perlecan HS on the deposition of TGF-β1 in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mouse skin. Despite its obvious importance in skin repair and tissue homeostasis no definitive studies have immunolocalised TGF-β1 in skin in WT or Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mice. Vertical parasagittal murine dorsal skin from 3, 6 and 12 week old C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mice were fixed in neutral buffered formalin, paraffin embedded and 4 μm sections stained with Mayers haematoxylin and eosin (H & E). TGF-β1 was immunolocalised using a rabbit polyclonal antibody, heat retrieval and the Envision NovaRED detection system. Immunolocalisation of TGF-β1 differed markedly in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mouse skin, ablation of exon 3 of Hspg2 resulted in a very severe reduction in the deposition of TGF-β1 in skin 3-12 weeks postnatally. The reduced deposition of TGF-β1 observed in the present study would be expected to impact detrimentally on the remodelling and healing capacity of skin in mutant mice compounding on the poor wound-healing properties already reported for perlecan exon 3 null mice due to an inability to signal with FGF-2 and promote angiogenic repair processes. TGF-β1 also has cell mediated effects in tissue homeostasis and matrix stabilisation a reduction in TGF-β1 deposition would therefore be expected to detrimentally impact on skin homeostasis in the perlecan mutant mice.

  2. Retinal ganglion cell responses to voltage and current stimulation in wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Yong Sook; Ye, Jang Hee; Lee, Seokyoung; Nam, Yoonkey; Ryu, Sang Baek; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2011-06-01

    Retinal prostheses are being developed to restore vision for those with retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Since neural prostheses depend upon electrical stimulation to control neural activity, optimal stimulation parameters for successful encoding of visual information are one of the most important requirements to enable visual perception. In this paper, we focused on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses to different stimulation parameters and compared threshold charge densities in wild-type and rd1 mice. For this purpose, we used in vitro retinal preparations of wild-type and rd1 mice. When the neural network was stimulated with voltage- and current-controlled pulses, RGCs from both wild-type and rd1 mice responded; however the temporal pattern of RGC response is very different. In wild-type RGCs, a single peak within 100 ms appears, while multiple peaks (approximately four peaks) with ~10 Hz rhythm within 400 ms appear in RGCs in the degenerated retina of rd1 mice. We find that an anodic phase-first biphasic voltage-controlled pulse is more efficient for stimulation than a biphasic current-controlled pulse based on lower threshold charge density. The threshold charge densities for activation of RGCs both with voltage- and current-controlled pulses are overall more elevated for the rd1 mouse than the wild-type mouse. Here, we propose the stimulus range for wild-type and rd1 retinas when the optimal modulation of a RGC response is possible.

  3. Speed-Dependent Modulation of the Locomotor Behavior in Adult Mice Reveals Attractor and Transitional Gaits

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Maxime; Josset, Nicolas; Roussel, Marie; Couraud, Sébastien; Bretzner, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Locomotion results from an interplay between biomechanical constraints of the muscles attached to the skeleton and the neuronal circuits controlling and coordinating muscle activities. Quadrupeds exhibit a wide range of locomotor gaits. Given our advances in the genetic identification of spinal and supraspinal circuits important to locomotion in the mouse, it is now important to get a better understanding of the full repertoire of gaits in the freely walking mouse. To assess this range, young adult C57BL/6J mice were trained to walk and run on a treadmill at different locomotor speeds. Instead of using the classical paradigm defining gaits according to their footfall pattern, we combined the inter-limb coupling and the duty cycle of the stance phase, thus identifying several types of gaits: lateral walk, trot, out-of-phase walk, rotary gallop, transverse gallop, hop, half-bound, and full-bound. Out-of-phase walk, trot, and full-bound were robust and appeared to function as attractor gaits (i.e., a state to which the network flows and stabilizes) at low, intermediate, and high speeds respectively. In contrast, lateral walk, hop, transverse gallop, rotary gallop, and half-bound were more transient and therefore considered transitional gaits (i.e., a labile state of the network from which it flows to the attractor state). Surprisingly, lateral walk was less frequently observed. Using graph analysis, we demonstrated that transitions between gaits were predictable, not random. In summary, the wild-type mouse exhibits a wider repertoire of locomotor gaits than expected. Future locomotor studies should benefit from this paradigm in assessing transgenic mice or wild-type mice with neurotraumatic injury or neurodegenerative disease affecting gait. PMID:26941592

  4. Method for measurement of the blood-brain barrier permeability in the perfused mouse brain: application to amyloid-beta peptide in wild type and Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Barbra; Hogg, Elizabeth; Sagare, Abhay; Jovanovic, Suzana; Maness, Lawrence; Maurer, Calvin; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2004-09-30

    The role of transport exchanges of neuroactive solutes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized. To take full advantage of genetically altered mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders for BBB transport studies, we adapted a brain perfusion technique to the mouse. During a carotid brain perfusion with a medium containing sheep red blood cells and mock plasma, the physiological parameters in the arterial inflow, regional cerebral blood flow (14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography), ultrastructural integrity of the tissue, barrier to lanthanum, brain water content, energy metabolites and lactate levels remain unchanged. Amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) were iodinated by lactoperoxidase method. Non-oxidized mono-iodinated Abeta monomers were separated by HPLC (as confirmed by MALDI-TOF spectrometry) and used in transport measurements. Transport of intact 125I-Abeta40 across the BBB was time- and concentration-dependent in contrast to negligible 14C-inulin uptake. In 5-6 months old Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice, Abeta40 BBB transport was increased by >eight-fold compared to age-matched littermate controls, and was mediated via the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts. We conclude the present arterial brain perfusion method provides strictly controlled environment in cerebral microcirculation suitable for examining transport of rapidly and slowly penetrating molecules across the BBB in normal and transgenic mice.

  5. Gene expression: RNA interference in adult mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Anton P.; Meuse, Leonard; Pham, Thu-Thao T.; Conklin, Douglas S.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Kay, Mark A.

    2002-07-01

    RNA interference is an evolutionarily conserved surveillance mechanism that responds to double-stranded RNA by sequence-specific silencing of homologous genes. Here we show that transgene expression can be suppressed in adult mice by synthetic small interfering RNAs and by small-hairpin RNAs transcribed in vivo from DNA templates. We also show the therapeutic potential of this technique by demonstrating effective targeting of a sequence from hepatitis C virus by RNA interference in vivo.

  6. Impaired spatial learning and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis in histamine H1-receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ambrée, Oliver; Buschert, Jens; Zhang, Weiqi; Arolt, Volker; Dere, Ekrem; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2014-08-01

    The histamine H1-receptor (H1R) is expressed in wide parts of the brain including the hippocampus, which is involved in spatial learning and memory. Previous studies in H1R knockout (H1R-KO) mice revealed deficits in a variety of learning and memory tasks. It was also proposed that H1R activation is crucial for neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate negatively reinforced spatial learning in the water-maze and to assess survival and neuronal differentiation of newborn cells in the adult hippocampus of H1R-KO mice. H1R-KO and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to the following sequence of tests: (a) cued version, (b) place learning, (c) spatial probe, (d) long-term retention and (e) reversal learning. Furthermore hippocampal neurogenesis in terms of survival and differentiation was assessed in H1R-KO and WT mice. H1R-KO mice showed normal cued learning, but impaired place and reversal learning as well as impaired long-term retention performance. In addition, a marked reduction of newborn neurons in the hippocampus but no changes in differentiation of neural progenitors into neuronal and glial lineage was found in H1R-KO mice. Our data suggest that H1R deficiency in mice is associated with pronounced deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory. Furthermore, we herein provide first evidence that H1R deficiency in the mouse leads to a reduced neurogenesis. However, the exact mechanisms for the reduced number of cells in H1R-KO mice remain elusive and might be due to a reduced survival of newborn hippocampal neurons and/or a reduction in cell proliferation.

  7. Dynamics of Sun5 Localization during Spermatogenesis in Wild Type and Dpy19l2 Knock-Out Mice Indicates That Sun5 Is Not Involved in Acrosome Attachment to the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Sandra; Escoffier, Jessica; Nahed, Roland Abi; Pierre, Virginie; Karaouzene, Thomas; Ray, Pierre F.; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The acrosome is an organelle that is central to sperm physiology and a defective acrosome biogenesis leads to globozoospermia, a severe male infertility. The identification of the actors involved in acrosome biogenesis is therefore particularly important to decipher the molecular pathogeny of globozoospermia. We recently showed that a defect in the DPY19L2 gene is present in more than 70% of globozoospermic men and demonstrated that Dpy19l2, located in the inner nuclear membrane, is the first protein involved in the attachment of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope (NE). SUN proteins serve to link the nuclear envelope to the cytoskeleton and are therefore good candidates to participate in acrosome-nucleus attachment, potentially by interacting with DPY19L2. In order to characterize new actors of acrosomal attachment, we focused on Sun5 (also called Spag4l), which is highly expressed in male germ cells, and investigated its localization during spermatogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments in mice, we showed that Sun5 transits through different cellular compartments during meiosis. In pachytene spermatocytes, it is located in a membranous compartment different to the reticulum. In round spermatids, it progresses to the Golgi and the NE before to be located to the tail/head junction in epididymal sperm. Interestingly, we demonstrate that Sun5 is not, as initially reported, facing the acrosome but is in fact excluded from this zone. Moreover, we show that in Dpy19l2 KO spermatids, upon the detachment of the acrosome, Sun5 relocalizes to the totality of the NE suggesting that the acrosome attachment excludes Sun5 from the NE facing the acrosome. Finally, Western-blot experiments demonstrate that Sun5 is glycosylated. Overall, our work, associated with other publications, strongly suggests that the attachment of the acrosome to the nucleus does not likely depend on the formation of SUN complexes. PMID:25775128

  8. Tenascin-R restricts posttraumatic remodeling of motoneuron innervation and functional recovery after spinal cord injury in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Irintchev, Andrey; Schachner, Melitta

    2006-07-26

    Tenascin-R (TNR) is an extracellular glycoprotein in the CNS implicated in neural development and plasticity. Its repellent properties for growing axons in a choice situation with a conducive substrate in vitro have indicated that TNR may impede regeneration in the adult mammalian CNS. Here we tested whether constitutive lack of TNR has beneficial impacts on recovery from spinal cord injury in adult mice. Using the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale, we found that open-field locomotion in TNR-deficient (TNR-/-) mice recovered better that in wild-type (TNR+/+) littermates after compression of the thoracic spinal cord. We also designed, validated, and applied a motion analysis approach allowing numerical assessment of motor functions. We found, in agreement with the BBB score, that functions requiring low levels of supraspinal control such as plantar stepping improved more in TNR-/- mice. This was not the case for motor tasks demanding precision such as ladder climbing. Morphological analyses revealed no evidence that improved recovery of some functions in the mutant mice were attributable to enhanced tissue sparing or axonal regrowth. Estimates of perisomatic puncta revealed reduced innervation by cholinergic and GABAergic terminals around motoneurons in intact TNR-/- compared with TNR+/+ mice. Relative to nonlesioned animals, spinal cord repair was associated with increase in GABAergic and decrease of glutamatergic puncta in TNR-/- but not in TNR+/+ mice. Our results suggest that TNR restricts functional recovery by limiting posttraumatic remodeling of synapses around motoneuronal cell bodies where TNR is normally expressed in perineuronal nets.

  9. Methylphenidate restores novel object recognition in DARPP-32 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Heyser, Charles J; McNaughton, Caitlyn H; Vishnevetsky, Donna; Fienberg, Allen A

    2013-09-15

    Previously, we have shown that Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) knockout mice required significantly more trials to reach criterion than wild-type mice in an operant reversal-learning task. The present study was conducted to examine adult male and female DARPP-32 knockout mice and wild-type controls in a novel object recognition test. Wild-type and knockout mice exhibited comparable behavior during the initial exploration trials. As expected, wild-type mice exhibited preferential exploration of the novel object during the substitution test, demonstrating recognition memory. In contrast, knockout mice did not show preferential exploration of the novel object, instead exhibiting an increase in exploration of all objects during the test trial. Given that the removal of DARPP-32 is an intracellular manipulation, it seemed possible to pharmacologically restore some cellular activity and behavior by stimulating dopamine receptors. Therefore, a second experiment was conducted examining the effect of methylphenidate. The results show that methylphenidate increased horizontal activity in both wild-type and knockout mice, though this increase was blunted in knockout mice. Pretreatment with methylphenidate significantly impaired novel object recognition in wild-type mice. In contrast, pretreatment with methylphenidate restored the behavior of DARPP-32 knockout mice to that observed in wild-type mice given saline. These results provide additional evidence for a functional role of DARPP-32 in the mediation of processes underlying learning and memory. These results also indicate that the behavioral deficits in DARPP-32 knockout mice may be restored by the administration of methylphenidate.

  10. Norbin ablation results in defective adult hippocampal neurogenesis and depressive-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer; Varela, Santiago; Enikolopov, Grigori; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus subgranular zone is associated with the etiology and treatment efficiency of depression. Factors that affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been shown to contribute to the neuropathology of depression. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, plays a critical role in different aspects of neurogenesis. Of the eight metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), mGluR5 is the most highly expressed in neural stem cells. We previously identified Norbin as a positive regulator of mGluR5 and showed that its expression promotes neurite outgrowth. In this study, we investigated the role of Norbin in adult neurogenesis and depressive-like behaviors using Norbin-deficient mice. We found that Norbin deletion significantly reduced hippocampal neurogenesis; specifically, the loss of Norbin impaired the proliferation and maturation of newborn neurons without affecting cell-fate specification of neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). Norbin is highly expressed in the granular neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, but it is undetectable in NSCs/NPCs or immature neurons, suggesting that the effect of Norbin on neurogenesis is likely caused by a nonautonomous niche effect. In support of this hypothesis, we found that the expression of a cell-cell contact gene, Desmoplakin, is greatly reduced in Norbin-deletion mice. Moreover, Norbin-KO mice show an increased immobility in the forced-swim test and the tail-suspension test and reduced sucrose preference compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these results show that Norbin is a regulator of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and that its deletion causes depressive-like behaviors.

  11. Norbin ablation results in defective adult hippocampal neurogenesis and depressive-like behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Warner-Schmidt, Jennifer; Varela, Santiago; Enikolopov, Grigori; Greengard, Paul; Flajolet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus subgranular zone is associated with the etiology and treatment efficiency of depression. Factors that affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been shown to contribute to the neuropathology of depression. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, plays a critical role in different aspects of neurogenesis. Of the eight metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), mGluR5 is the most highly expressed in neural stem cells. We previously identified Norbin as a positive regulator of mGluR5 and showed that its expression promotes neurite outgrowth. In this study, we investigated the role of Norbin in adult neurogenesis and depressive-like behaviors using Norbin-deficient mice. We found that Norbin deletion significantly reduced hippocampal neurogenesis; specifically, the loss of Norbin impaired the proliferation and maturation of newborn neurons without affecting cell-fate specification of neural stem cells/neural progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). Norbin is highly expressed in the granular neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, but it is undetectable in NSCs/NPCs or immature neurons, suggesting that the effect of Norbin on neurogenesis is likely caused by a nonautonomous niche effect. In support of this hypothesis, we found that the expression of a cell–cell contact gene, Desmoplakin, is greatly reduced in Norbin-deletion mice. Moreover, Norbin-KO mice show an increased immobility in the forced-swim test and the tail-suspension test and reduced sucrose preference compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these results show that Norbin is a regulator of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and that its deletion causes depressive-like behaviors. PMID:26195764

  12. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  13. Drug-induced regeneration in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Strehin, Iossif; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise; Leferovich, John; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Whereas amphibians regenerate lost appendages spontaneously, mammals generally form scars over the injury site through the process of wound repair. The MRL mouse strain is an exception among mammals because it shows a spontaneous regenerative healing trait and so can be used to investigate proregenerative interventions in mammals. We report that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a central molecule in the process of regeneration in adult MRL mice. The degradation of HIF-1α protein, which occurs under normoxic conditions, is mediated by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). We used the drug 1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3-carboxylic acid (1,4-DPCA), a PHD inhibitor, to stabilize constitutive expression of HIF-1α protein. A locally injectable hydrogel containing 1,4-DPCA was designed to achieve controlled delivery of the drug over 4 to 10 days. Subcutaneous injection of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel into Swiss Webster mice that do not show a regenerative phenotype increased stable expression of HIF-1α protein over 5 days, providing a functional measure of drug release in vivo. Multiple peripheral subcutaneous injections of the 1,4-DPCA/hydrogel over a 10-day period led to regenerative wound healing in Swiss Webster mice after ear hole punch injury. Increased expression of the HIF-1α protein may provide a starting point for future studies on regeneration in mammals. PMID:26041709

  14. Maternal and pup genotype contribution to growth in wild-type and tau mutant Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Oklejewicz, M; Pen, I; Durieux, G C; Daan, S

    2001-07-01

    The single gene mutation tau in the Syrian hamster-apart from its effect on the circadian organization of locomotor activity--has a pronounced influence on body weight. In this study we investigate the impact of maternal and pup genotypes at the tau-locus on the growth rate of pups. Homozygous tau mutant hamsters (circadian period of 20 hours) had lower growth rates and adult body weights than wild-type hamsters, whereas heterozygous tau mutants (circadian period of 22 hours) were intermediate. In addition, heterozygous pups from heterozygous dams grew heavier than those from wild-type and homozygous dams. The effect of maternal genotype was further evaluated in a cross-foster design, where wild-type and homozygous mutant pups were fostered at birth to either wild-type or homozygous mutant dams. At all ages, the maternal tau genotype had a negative effect on body weight, whereas the pup tau genotype had a positive effect during the preweaning period and a negative effect afterward.

  15. Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects steady-state distribution and clearance of arsenic in arsenate-treated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Michael F.; Edwards, Brenda C.; Herbin-Davis, Karen M.; Saunders, Jesse; Styblo, Miroslav; Thomas, David J.

    2010-12-15

    Arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes formation of mono-, di-, and tri-methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenic. Distribution and retention of arsenic were compared in adult female As3mt knockout mice and wild-type C57BL/6 mice using a regimen in which mice received daily oral doses of 0.5 mg of arsenic as arsenate per kilogram of body weight. Regardless of genotype, arsenic body burdens attained steady state after 10 daily doses. At steady state, arsenic body burdens in As3mt knockout mice were 16 to 20 times greater than in wild-type mice. During the post dosing clearance period, arsenic body burdens declined in As3mt knockout mice to {approx} 35% and in wild-type mice to {approx} 10% of steady-state levels. Urinary concentration of arsenic was significantly lower in As3mt knockout mice than in wild-type mice. At steady state, As3mt knockout mice had significantly higher fractions of the body burden of arsenic in liver, kidney, and urinary bladder than did wild-type mice. These organs and lung had significantly higher arsenic concentrations than did corresponding organs from wild-type mice. Inorganic arsenic was the predominant species in tissues of As3mt knockout mice; tissues from wild-type mice contained mixtures of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites. Diminished capacity for arsenic methylation in As3mt knockout mice prolongs retention of inorganic arsenic in tissues and affects whole body clearance of arsenic. Altered retention and tissue tropism of arsenic in As3mt knockout mice could affect the toxic or carcinogenic effects associated with exposure to this metalloid or its methylated metabolites.

  16. Oestradiol Exposure Early in Life Programs Daily and Circadian Activity Rhythms in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Royston, S E; Bunick, D; Mahoney, M M

    2016-01-01

    Hormone signalling during critical periods organises the adult circadian timekeeping system by altering adult hormone sensitivity and shaping fundamental properties of circadian rhythmicity. However, the timing of when developmental oestrogens modify the timekeeping system is poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that alterations in postnatal oestrogenic signalling organise adult daily activity rhythms, we utilised aromatase knockout mice (ArKO), which lack the enzyme required for oestradiol synthesis. ArKO and wild-type (WT) males and females were administered either oestradiol (E) or oil (OIL) daily for the first 5 postnatal days (p1-5E and p1-5OIL , respectively) because this time encompasses the emergence of clock gene rhythmicity and light responsiveness in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a bilateral hypothalamic structure regarded as the 'master oscillator'. After sexual maturation, gonadectomy and exogenous oestradiol supplementation, locomotor parameters were assessed. We determined that altered oestrogenic signalling in early life exerts organisational control over the expression of daily and circadian activity rhythms in adult mice. Specifically, p1-5E reduced total wheel running activity in male and female ArKO and female WT mice but had no effect on WT male activity levels. In females, wheel running was consolidated by p1-5E to the early versus late evening, a phenomenon characteristic of male mice. The time of peak activity was advanced by p1-5E in WT and ArKO females but not males. P1-5E shortened the length of the active phase (alpha) in WT males but had no effect on ArKO males or females of either genotypes. Finally, p1-5E altered the magnitude of photic-induced shifts, suggesting that developmental oestrogenic signalling impacts adult circadian functions. In the present study, we further define both a critical period of development of the adult timekeeping system and the role that oestrogenic signalling plays in the expression of daily and

  17. Delivery of Human EV71 Receptors by Adeno-Associated Virus Increases EV71 Infection-Induced Local Inflammation in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hung-Bo; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Lin, Su-I; Lien, Shu-Pei; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus71 (EV71) is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia and one major causative agent of hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD). However potential animal models for vaccine development are limited to young mice. In this study, we used an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector to introduce the human EV71 receptors P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (hPSGL1) or a scavenger receptor class-B member-2 (hSCARB2) into adult ICR mice to change their susceptibility to EV71 infection. Mice were administered AAV-hSCARB2 or AAV-hPSGL1 through intravenous and oral routes. After three weeks, expression of human SCARB2 and PSGL1 was detected in various organs. After infection with EV71, we found that the EV71 viral load in AAV-hSCARB2- or AAV-hPSGL1-transduced mice was higher than that of the control mice in both the brain and intestines. The presence of EV71 viral particles in tissues was confirmed using immunohistochemistry analysis. Moreover, inflammatory cytokines were induced in the brain and intestines of AAV-hSCARB2- or AAV-hPSGL1-transduced mice after EV71 infection but not in wild-type mice. However, neurological disease was not observed in these animals. Taken together, we successfully infected adult mice with live EV71 and induced local inflammation using an AAV delivery system. PMID:25243194

  18. Delivery of human EV71 receptors by adeno-associated virus increases EV71 infection-induced local inflammation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung-Bo; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Lin, Su-I; Lien, Shu-Pei; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Chong, Pele; Chen, Chih-Yeh; Tao, Mi-Hua; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus71 (EV71) is now recognized as an emerging neurotropic virus in Asia and one major causative agent of hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD). However potential animal models for vaccine development are limited to young mice. In this study, we used an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector to introduce the human EV71 receptors P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (hPSGL1) or a scavenger receptor class-B member-2 (hSCARB2) into adult ICR mice to change their susceptibility to EV71 infection. Mice were administered AAV-hSCARB2 or AAV-hPSGL1 through intravenous and oral routes. After three weeks, expression of human SCARB2 and PSGL1 was detected in various organs. After infection with EV71, we found that the EV71 viral load in AAV-hSCARB2- or AAV-hPSGL1-transduced mice was higher than that of the control mice in both the brain and intestines. The presence of EV71 viral particles in tissues was confirmed using immunohistochemistry analysis. Moreover, inflammatory cytokines were induced in the brain and intestines of AAV-hSCARB2- or AAV-hPSGL1-transduced mice after EV71 infection but not in wild-type mice. However, neurological disease was not observed in these animals. Taken together, we successfully infected adult mice with live EV71 and induced local inflammation using an AAV delivery system.

  19. Cortical hypoplasia and ventriculomegaly of p73-deficient mice: Developmental and adult analysis.

    PubMed

    Medina-Bolívar, Carolina; González-Arnay, Emilio; Talos, Flaminia; González-Gómez, Miriam; Moll, Ute M; Meyer, Gundela

    2014-08-01

    Trp73, a member of the p53 gene family, plays a crucial role in neural development. We describe two main phenotypic variants of p73 deficiency in the brain, a severe one characterized by massive apoptosis in the cortex leading to early postnatal death and a milder, non-/low-apoptosis one in which 50% of pups may reach adulthood using an intensive-care breeding protocol. Both variants display the core triad of p73 deficiency: cortical hypoplasia, hippocampal malformations, and ventriculomegaly. We studied the development of the neocortex in p73 KO mice from early embryonic life into advanced age (25 months). Already at E14.5, the incipient cortical plate of the p73 KO brains showed a reduced width. Examination of adult neocortex revealed a generalized, nonprogressive reduction by 10-20%. Area-specific architectonic landmarks and lamination were preserved in all cortical areas. The surviving adult animals had moderate ventricular distension, whereas pups of the early lethal phenotypic variant showed severe ventriculomegaly. Ependymal cells of wild-type ventricles strongly express p73 and are particularly vulnerable to p73 deficiency. Ependymal denudation by apoptosis and reduction of ependymal cilia were already evident in young mice, with complete absence of cilia in older animals. Loss of p73 function in the ependyma may thus be one determining factor for chronic hydrocephalus, which leads to atrophy of subcortical structures (striatum, septum, amygdala). p73 Is thus involved in a variety of CNS activities ranging from embryonic regulation of brain size to the control of cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis in the adult brain via maintenance of the ependyma.

  20. Abnormal Motor Phenotype at Adult Stages in Mice Lacking Type 2 Deiodinase

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Andrés, David; Pulido-Valdeolivas, Irene; Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones have a key role in both the developing and adult central nervous system and skeletal muscle. The thyroid gland produces mainly thyroxine (T4) but the intracellular concentrations of 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3; the transcriptionally active hormone) in the central nervous system and skeletal muscle are modulated by the activity of type 2 deiodinase (D2). To date no neurological syndrome has been associated with mutations in the DIO2 gene and previous studies in young and juvenile D2-knockout mice (D2KO) did not find gross neurological alterations, possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. Aim This study aims to analyze the motor phenotype of 3-and-6-month-old D2KO mice to evaluate the role of D2 on the motor system at adult stages in which compensatory mechanisms could have failed. Results Motor abilities were explored by validated tests. In the footprint test, D2KO showed an altered global gait pattern (mice walked slower, with shorter strides and with a hindlimb wider base of support than wild-type mice). No differences were detected in the balance beam test. However, a reduced latency to fall was found in the rotarod, coat-hanger and four limb hanging wire tests indicating impairment on coordination and prehensile reflex and a reduction of muscle strength. In histological analyses of cerebellum and skeletal muscle, D2KO mice did not present gross structural abnormalities. Thyroid hormones levels and deiodinases activities were also determined. In D2KO mice, despite euthyroid T3 and high T4 plasma levels, T3 levels were significantly reduced in cerebral cortex (48% reduction) and skeletal muscle (33% reduction), but not in the cerebellum where other deiodinase (type 1) is expressed. Conclusions The motor alterations observed in D2KO mice indicate an important role for D2 in T3 availability to maintain motor function and muscle strength. Our results suggest a possible implication of D2 in motor disorders. PMID:25083788

  1. Impaired long-term memory retention: common denominator for acutely or genetically reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Nada M-B; Filipkowski, Robert K; Pruschy, Martin; Jaholkowski, Piotr; Winkler, Juergen; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2013-09-01

    In adult rodents, decreasing hippocampal neurogenesis experimentally using different approaches often impairs performance in hippocampus-dependent processes. Nonetheless, functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is far from being unraveled, and deficits so far described in animal models often lack reproducibility. One hypothesis is that such differences might be the consequence of the extent of the methodological specificity used to alter neurogenesis rather than the extent to which adult neurogenesis is altered. To address this, we focused on cranial irradiation, the most widely used technique to impair hippocampal neurogenesis and consequentially induce hippocampus-dependent behavioral deficits. To investigate the specificity of the technique, we thus exposed 4-5 months old female cyclin D2 knockout mice, a model lacking physiological levels of olfactory and hippocampal neurogenesis, to an X-ray dose of 10 Gy, reported to specifically affect transiently amplifying precursors. After a recovery period of 1.5 months, behavioral tests were performed and probed for locomotor activity, habituation, anxiety, and spatial learning and memory. Spatial learning in the Morris water maze was intact in all experimental groups. Although spatial memory retention assessed 24h following acquisition was also intact in all mice, irradiated wild type and cyclin D2 knockout mice displayed memory deficits one week after acquisition. In addition, we observed significant differences in tests addressing anxiety and locomotor activity dependent on the technique used to alter neurogenesis. Whereas irradiated mice were hyperactive regardless of their genotype, cyclin D2 knockout mice were hypoactive in most of the tests and displayed altered habituation. The present study emphasizes that different approaches aimed at decreasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis may result in distinct behavioral impairments related to locomotion and anxiety. In contrast, spatial long-term memory retention is

  2. Effects of neuron-specific estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ deletion on the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Rachel Y; Porteous, Robert; Chambon, Pierre; Abrahám, István; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-04-01

    The negative feedback mechanism through which 17β-estradiol (E2) acts to suppress the activity of the GnRH neurons remains unclear. Using inducible and cell-specific genetic mouse models, we examined the estrogen receptor (ER) isoforms expressed by neurons that mediate acute estrogen negative feedback. Adult female mutant mice in which ERα was deleted from all neurons in the neonatal period failed to exhibit estrous cycles or negative feedback. Adult mutant female mice with neonatal neuronal ERβ deletion exhibited normal estrous cycles, but a failure of E2 to suppress LH secretion was seen in ovariectomized mice. Mutant mice with a GnRH neuron-selective deletion of ERβ exhibited normal cycles and negative feedback, suggesting no critical role for ERβ in GnRH neurons in acute negative feedback. To examine the adult roles of neurons expressing ERα, an inducible tamoxifen-based Cre-LoxP approach was used to ablate ERα from neurons that express calmodulin kinase IIα in adults. This resulted in mice with no estrous cycles, a normal increase in LH after ovariectomy, but an inability of E2 to suppress LH secretion. Finally, acute administration of ERα- and ERβ-selective agonists to adult ovariectomized wild-type mice revealed that activation of ERα suppressed LH secretion, whereas ERβ agonists had no effect. This study highlights the differences in adult reproductive phenotypes that result from neonatal vs adult ablation of ERα in the brain. Together, these experiments expand previous global knockout studies by demonstrating that neurons expressing ERα are essential and probably sufficient for the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in female mice. PMID:24476134

  3. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  4. Selection for Evi1 activation in myelomonocytic leukemia induced by hyperactive signaling through wild-type NRas.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Rudolph, C; Morgan, M; Büsche, G; Salguero, G; Stripecke, R; Schlegelberger, B; Baum, C; Modlich, U

    2013-06-20

    Activation of NRas signaling is frequently found in human myeloid leukemia and can be induced by activating mutations as well as by mutations in receptors or signaling molecules upstream of NRas. To study NRas-induced leukemogenesis, we retrovirally overexpressed wild-type NRas in a murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model in C57BL/6J mice. Overexpression of wild-type NRas caused myelomonocytic leukemias ∼3 months after BMT in the majority of mice. A subset of mice (30%) developed malignant histiocytosis similar to mice that received mutationally activated NRas(G12D)-expressing bone marrow. Aberrant Ras signaling was demonstrated in cells expressing mutationally active or wild-type NRas, as increased activation of Erk and Akt was observed in both models. However, more NRas(G12D) were found to be in the activated, GTP-bound state in comparison with wild-type NRas. Consistent with observations reported for primary human myelomonocytic leukemia cells, Stat5 activation was also detected in murine leukemic cells. Furthermore, clonal evolution was detected in NRas wild-type-induced leukemias, including expansion of clones containing activating vector insertions in known oncogenes, such as Evi1 and Prdm16. In vitro cooperation of NRas and Evi1 improved long-term expansion of primary murine bone marrow cells. Evi1-positive cells upregulated Bcl-2 and may, therefore, provide anti-apoptotic signals that collaborate with the NRas-induced proliferative effects. As activation of Evi1 has been shown to coincide with NRAS mutations in human acute myeloid leukemia, our murine model recapitulates crucial events in human leukemogenesis. PMID:22847614

  5. Mutant and wild-type alpha-synuclein interact with mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Elkon, Hanock; Don, Jermy; Melamed, Eldad; Ziv, Ilan; Shirvan, Anat; Offen, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, was found to be the major component in the Lewy bodies (LB) in both inherited and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, rare mutations of alpha-synuclein cause autosomal-dominant PD. However, it is unknown how alpha-synuclein is involved in the pathogenesis of nigral degeneration in PD. In this study, we examine the protein-protein interactions of wild-type and mutant (A53T) a-synuclein with adult human brain cDNA expression library using the yeast two-hybrid technique. We found that both normal and mutant alpha-synuclein specifically interact with the mitochondrial complex IV enzyme, cytochrome C oxidase (COX). Wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein genes were further fused with c-Myc tag and translated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Using anti-c-Myc antibody, we demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein, coimmunoprecipitated with COX. We also showed that potassium cyanide, a selective COX inhibitor, synergistically enhanced the sensitivity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to dopamine-induced cell death. In conclusion, we found specific protein-protein interactions of alpha-synuclein, a major LB protein, to COX, a key enzyme of the mithochondrial respiratory system. This interaction suggests that alpha-synuclein aggregation may contribute to enhance the mitochondrial dysfunction, which might be a key factor in the pathogenesis of PD.

  6. CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice is associated with extrasynaptic utrophin in skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Durko, Margaret; Allen, Carol; Nalbantoglu, Josephine; Karpati, George

    2010-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic muscle disease characterized by the absence of sub-sarcolemmal dystrophin that results in muscle fibre necrosis, progressive muscle wasting and is fatal. Numerous experimental studies with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, an animal model for the disease, have demonstrated that extrasynaptic upregulation of utrophin, an analogue of dystrophin, can prevent muscle fibre deterioration and reduce or negate the dystrophic phenotype. A different approach for ectopic expression of utrophin relies on augmentation of CT-GalNAc transferase in muscle fibre. We investigated whether CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression in adult mice influence appearance of utrophin in the extrasynaptic sarcolemma. After electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying an expression cassette of CT-GalNAc transferase into tibialis anterior muscle of wild type and dystrophic mice, muscle sections were examined by immunofluorescence. CT-GalNAc transgene expression augmented sarcolemmal carbohydrate glycosylation and was accompanied by extrasynaptic utrophin. A 6-week time course study showed that the highest efficiency of utrophin overexpression in a plasmid harboured muscle fibres was 32.2% in CD-1 and 52% in mdx mice, 2 and 4 weeks after CT-GalNAc gene transfer, respectively. The study provides evidence that postnatal CT-GalNAc transferase overexpression stimulates utrophin upregulation that is inherently beneficial for muscle structure and strength restoration. Thus CT-GalNAc may provide an important therapeutic molecule for treatment of dystrophin deficiency in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  7. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Does Not Stimulate Subventricular Zone Neurogenesis in Adult Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Rui P.; Garcia-Verdugo, José Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    In rodents, the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) generates neuroblasts which migrate to the olfactory bulb (OB) and differentiate into interneurons. Recent work suggests that the neurotrophin Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) can enhance adult SVZ neurogenesis, but the mechanism by which it acts is unknown. Here, we analyzed the role of BDNF and its receptor TrkB in adult SVZ neurogenesis. We found that TrkB is the most prominent neurotrophin receptor in the mouse SVZ, but only the truncated, kinase-negative isoform (TrkB-TR) was detected. TrkB-TR is expressed in SVZ astrocytes and ependymal cells, but not in neuroblasts. TrkB mutants have reduced SVZ proliferation and survival and fewer new OB neurons. To test if this effect is cell-autonomous, we grafted SVZ cells from TrkB knockout mice (TrkB-KO) into the SVZ of wild-type mice (WT). Grafted progenitors generated neuroblasts that migrated to the OB in the absence of TrkB. The survival and differentiation of granular interneurons and Calbindin+ periglomerular interneurons seemed unaffected by the loss of TrkB, while dopaminergic periglomerular neurons were reduced. Intra-ventricular infusion of BDNF yielded different results depending on the animal species, having no effect on neuron production from mouse SVZ, while decreasing it in rats. Interestingly, mice and rats also differ in their expression of the neurotrophin receptor, p75. Our results indicate that TrkB is not essential for adult SVZ neurogenesis and do not support the current view that delivering BDNF to the SVZ can enhance adult neurogenesis. PMID:19074010

  8. Differential proteomic responses of selectively bred and wild-type Sydney rock oyster populations exposed to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E L; O'Connor, W; Parker, L; Ross, P; Raftos, D A

    2015-03-01

    Previous work suggests that larvae from Sydney rock oysters that have been selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are more resilient to the impacts of ocean acidification than nonselected, wild-type oysters. In this study, we used proteomics to investigate the molecular differences between oyster populations in adult Sydney rock oysters and to identify whether these form the basis for observations seen in larvae. Adult oysters from a selective breeding line (B2) and nonselected wild types (WT) were exposed for 4 weeks to elevated pCO2 (856 μatm) before their proteomes were compared to those of oysters held under ambient conditions (375 μatm pCO2 ). Exposure to elevated pCO2 resulted in substantial changes in the proteomes of oysters from both the selectively bred and wild-type populations. When biological functions were assigned, these differential proteins fell into five broad, potentially interrelated categories of subcellular functions, in both oyster populations. These functional categories were energy production, cellular stress responses, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and cell signalling. In the wild-type population, proteins were predominantly upregulated. However, unexpectedly, these cellular systems were downregulated in the selectively bred oyster population, indicating cellular dysfunction. We argue that this reflects a trade-off, whereby an adaptive capacity for enhanced mitochondrial energy production in the selectively bred population may help to protect larvae from the effects of elevated CO2 , whilst being deleterious to adult oysters.

  9. Not all water mazes are created equal: cyclin D2 knockout mice with constitutively suppressed adult hippocampal neurogenesis do show specific spatial learning deficits.

    PubMed

    Garthe, A; Huang, Z; Kaczmarek, L; Filipkowski, R K; Kempermann, G

    2014-04-01

    Studies using the Morris water maze to assess hippocampal function in animals, in which adult hippocampal neurogenesis had been suppressed, have yielded seemingly contradictory results. Cyclin D2 knockout (Ccnd2(-/-)) mice, for example, have constitutively suppressed adult hippocampal neurogenesis but had no overt phenotype in the water maze. In other paradigms, however, ablation of adult neurogenesis was associated with specific deficits in the water maze. Therefore, we hypothesized that the neurogenesis-related phenotype might also become detectable in Ccnd2(-/-) mice, if we used the exact setup and protocol that in our previous study had revealed deficits in mice with suppressed adult neurogenesis. Ccnd2(-/-) mice indeed learned the task and developed a normal preference for the goal quadrant, but were significantly less precise for the exact goal position and were slower in acquiring efficient and spatially more precise search strategies. Upon goal reversal (when the hidden platform was moved to a new position) Ccnd2(-/-) mice showed increased perseverance at the former platform location, implying that they were less flexible in updating the previously learned information. Both with respect to adult neurogenesis and behavioral performance, Ccnd2(+/-) mice ranged between wild types and knockouts. Importantly, hippocampus-dependent learning was not generally impaired by the mutation, but specifically functional aspects relying on precise and flexible encoding were affected. Whether ablation of adult neurogenesis causes a specific behavioral phenotype thus also depends on the actual task demands. The test parameters appear to be important variables influencing whether a task can pick up a contribution of adult neurogenesis to test performance.

  10. Dnmt3a in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Regulates Anxiety-Like Behavior in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Evan; Manashirov, Sharon; Zwang, Raaya; Gil, Shosh; Tsoory, Michael; Shemesh, Yair; Chen, Alon

    2016-01-20

    Recently, it has been suggested that alterations in DNA methylation mediate the molecular changes and psychopathologies that can occur following trauma. Despite the abundance of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) in the brain, which are responsible for catalyzing DNA methylation, their roles in behavioral regulation and in response to stressful challenges remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that adult mice which underwent chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) displayed elevated anxiety-like behavior that was accompanied by a reduction in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and a subsequent decrease in mPFC-global DNA methylation. To explore the role of mPFC-Dnmt3a in mediating the behavioral responses to stressful challenges we established lentiviral-based mouse models that express lower (knockdown) or higher (overexpression) levels of Dnmt3a specifically within the mPFC. Nonstressed mice injected with knockdown Dnmt3a lentiviruses specifically into the mPFC displayed the same anxiogenic phenotype as the CSDS mice, whereas overexpression of Dnmt3a induced an opposite, anxiolytic, effect in wild-type mice. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of CSDS mice attenuated stress-induced anxiety. Our results indicate a central role for mPFC-Dnmt3a as a mediator of stress-induced anxiety. Significance statement: DNA methylation is suggested to mediate the molecular mechanisms linking environmental challenges, such as chronic stress or trauma, to increased susceptibility to psychopathologies. Here, we show that chronic stress-induced increase in anxiety-like behavior is accompanied by a reduction in DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and global DNA methylation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Overexpression or knockdown of mPFC-Dnmt3a levels induces decrease or increase in anxiety-like behavior, respectively. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of chronic stressed mice attenuated

  11. Dnmt3a in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Regulates Anxiety-Like Behavior in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Evan; Manashirov, Sharon; Zwang, Raaya; Gil, Shosh; Tsoory, Michael; Shemesh, Yair; Chen, Alon

    2016-01-20

    Recently, it has been suggested that alterations in DNA methylation mediate the molecular changes and psychopathologies that can occur following trauma. Despite the abundance of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) in the brain, which are responsible for catalyzing DNA methylation, their roles in behavioral regulation and in response to stressful challenges remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that adult mice which underwent chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) displayed elevated anxiety-like behavior that was accompanied by a reduction in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and a subsequent decrease in mPFC-global DNA methylation. To explore the role of mPFC-Dnmt3a in mediating the behavioral responses to stressful challenges we established lentiviral-based mouse models that express lower (knockdown) or higher (overexpression) levels of Dnmt3a specifically within the mPFC. Nonstressed mice injected with knockdown Dnmt3a lentiviruses specifically into the mPFC displayed the same anxiogenic phenotype as the CSDS mice, whereas overexpression of Dnmt3a induced an opposite, anxiolytic, effect in wild-type mice. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of CSDS mice attenuated stress-induced anxiety. Our results indicate a central role for mPFC-Dnmt3a as a mediator of stress-induced anxiety. Significance statement: DNA methylation is suggested to mediate the molecular mechanisms linking environmental challenges, such as chronic stress or trauma, to increased susceptibility to psychopathologies. Here, we show that chronic stress-induced increase in anxiety-like behavior is accompanied by a reduction in DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and global DNA methylation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Overexpression or knockdown of mPFC-Dnmt3a levels induces decrease or increase in anxiety-like behavior, respectively. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of chronic stressed mice attenuated

  12. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects steady-state distribution and clearance of arsenic in arsenate-treated mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes formation of mono-, di-, and tri-methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenic. Distribution and retention of arsenic were compared in adult female As3mt knockout mice and wild-type C57BL/6 mice using a regimen in whi...

  13. Tropomodulin 1 directly controls thin filament length in both wild-type and tropomodulin 4-deficient skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Ochala, Julien; Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2015-01-01

    The sarcomeric tropomodulin (Tmod) isoforms Tmod1 and Tmod4 cap thin filament pointed ends and functionally interact with the leiomodin (Lmod) isoforms Lmod2 and Lmod3 to control myofibril organization, thin filament lengths, and actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that Tmod4 is more abundant than Tmod1 at both the transcript and protein level in a variety of muscle types, but the relative abundances of sarcomeric Tmods are muscle specific. We then generate Tmod4−/− mice, which exhibit normal thin filament lengths, myofibril organization, and skeletal muscle contractile function owing to compensatory upregulation of Tmod1, together with an Lmod isoform switch wherein Lmod3 is downregulated and Lmod2 is upregulated. However, RNAi depletion of Tmod1 from either wild-type or Tmod4−/− muscle fibers leads to thin filament elongation by ∼15%. Thus, Tmod1 per se, rather than total sarcomeric Tmod levels, controls thin filament lengths in mouse skeletal muscle, whereas Tmod4 appears to be dispensable for thin filament length regulation. These findings identify Tmod1 as the key direct regulator of thin filament length in skeletal muscle, in both adult muscle homeostasis and in developmentally compensated contexts. PMID:26586224

  14. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central station of the vomeronasal system. Recent evidence indicates adult neurogenesis in the AOB is involved in sex behaviour; however, the mechanisms underlying this function are unknown. By using Semaphorin 7A knockout (Sema7A ko) mice, which show a reduced number of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone neurons, small testicles and subfertility, and wild-type males castrated during adulthood, we demonstrate that the level of circulating testosterone regulates the sex-specific control of AOB neurogenesis and the vomeronasal system activation, which influences opposite-sex cue preference/attraction in mice. Overall, these data highlight adult neurogenesis as a hub for the integration of pheromonal and hormonal cues that control sex-specific responses in brain circuits. PMID:27782186

  15. Lingual deficits in neurotrophin double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nosrat, Irina V; Agerman, Karin; Marinescu, Andrea; Ernfors, Patrik; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2004-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) are members of the neurotrophin family and are expressed in the developing and adult tongue papillae. BDNF null-mutated mice exhibit specific impairments related to innervation and development of the gustatory system while NT-3 null mice have deficits in their lingual somatosensory innervation. To further evaluate the functional specificity of these neurotrophins in the peripheral gustatory system, we generated double BDNF/NT-3 knockout mice and compared the phenotype to BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. Taste papillae morphology was severely distorted in BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice compared to single BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. The deficits were found throughout the tongue and all gustatory papillae. There was a significant loss of fungiform papillae and the papillae were smaller in size compared to BDNF(-/-) and wild-type mice. Circumvallate papillae in the double knockouts were smaller and did not contain any intraepithelial nerve fibers. BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice exhibited additive losses in both somatosensory and gustatory innervation indicating that BDNF and NT-3 exert specific roles in the innervation of the tongue. However, the additional loss of fungiform papillae and taste buds in BDNF(-/-) xNT-3(-/-) mice compared to single BDNF knockout mice indicate a synergistic functional role for both BDNF-dependent gustatory and NT-3-dependent somatosensory innervations in taste bud and taste papillae innervation and development. PMID:16217617

  16. Combined effect of temperature and zinc on Caenorhabditis elegans wild type and daf-21 mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbiao; Ezemaduka, Anastasia N

    2014-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems is a far reaching environmental problem. The possible influences of heavy metal exposure and the potential harm to organisms when combined with other environmental stressors such as temperature have been largely unexplored. An aquatic toxicity test of Caenorhabditis elegans was performed to estimate the 24h median lethal concentration (LC50) of different zinc concentrations at different temperatures (15°C, 20°C, 25°C, and 30°C). We also examined the time course thermotolerance on wild type (N2) and daf-21 null (JT6130) adults exposed to 6.1mM zinc at 37°C. Hsp90 protein expression level in response to the combined effect of temperature and zinc toxicity was also investigated by both Western blots and ELISA. Our results show that C. elegans wild type nematodes exhibit severe lethal toxicity after a 24h exposure to zinc at higher temperatures. In addition, the expression level of Hsp90 was highly inhibited in adult worms subjected to zinc stress. This toxicity assay at different temperatures provides insight into organism response to combined effects of temperature and zinc toxicity. PMID:24679967

  17. Production of Cystatin C Wild Type and Stabilized Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Szymanska, Aneta; Lindstrom, Veronica; Grubb, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cystatin C is produced in all nucleated cells. It has various functions and biological activities. Researchers are focused on its role in kidney diseases as a marker of glomerular filtration but also as a very important link in development of amyloid diseases. This work describes expression and purification of both wild type (wt) and stabilized form (stab 1 and 2) of wt cystatin C and amyloid-forming L68Q mutant of cystatin C. The recombinant cystatin C can be used in projects requiring pure cystatin C to examine models of dimerization and fibrils formation as well as a standard in clinical tests.

  18. Porphyrin Interactions with Wild Type and Mutant Mouse Ferrochelatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Gloria C.; Franco, Ricardo; Lu, Yi; Ma, Jian-Guo; Shelnutt, John A.

    1999-05-19

    Ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1), the terminal enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes Fe2+ chelation into protoporphyrin IX. Resonance Raman and W-visible absorbance spectroscopes of wild type and engineered variants of murine ferrochelatase were used to examine the proposed structural mechanism for iron insertion into protoporphyrin by ferrochelatase. The recombinant variants (i.e., H207N and E287Q) are enzymes in which the conserved amino acids histidine-207 and glutamate-287 of murine ferrochelatase were substituted with asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Both of these residues are at the active site of the enzyme as deduced from the Bacillus subtilis ferrochelatase three-dimensional structure. Addition of free base or metalated porphyrins to wild type ferrochelatase and H207N variant yields a quasi 1:1 complex, possibly a monomeric protein-bound species. In contrast, the addition of porphyrin (either free base or metalated) to E287Q is sub-stoichiometric, as this variant retains bound porphyrin in the active site during isolation and purification. The specificity of porphyrin binding is confirmed by the narrowing of the structure-sensitive resonance Raman lines and the vinyl vibrational mode. Resonance Raman spectra of free base and metalated porphyrins bound to the wild type ferrochelatase indicate a nonplanar distortion of the porphyrin macrocycle, although the magnitude of the distortion cannot be determined without first defining the specific type of deformation. Significantly, the extent of the nonplanar distortion varies in the case of H207N- and E287Q-bound porphyrins. In fact, resonance Raman spectral decomposition indicates a homogeneous ruffled distortion for the nickel protoporphyrin bound to the wild type ferrochelatase, whereas both a planar and ruffled conformations are present for the H207N-bound porphyrin. Perhaps more revealing is the unusual resonance , 3 Raman spectrum of the endogenous E287Q-bound porphyrin, which has

  19. Brucella abortus ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity against wild type challenge in a mouse model of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Cheng, Jason X; Crosson, Sean

    2016-09-30

    The Brucella abortus general stress response (GSR) system regulates activity of the alternative sigma factor, σ(E1), which controls transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for persistence in a BALB/c mouse chronic infection model. We evaluated the host response to infection by a B. abortus strain lacking σ(E1) (ΔrpoE1), and identified pathological and immunological features that distinguish ΔrpoE1-infected mice from wild-type (WT), and that correspond with clearance of ΔrpoE1 from the host. ΔrpoE1 infection was indistinguishable from WT in terms of splenic bacterial burden, inflammation and histopathology up to 6weeks post-infection. However, Brucella-specific serum IgG levels in ΔrpoE1-infected mice were 5 times higher than WT by 4weeks post-infection, and remained significantly higher throughout the course of a 12-week infection. Total IgG and Brucella-specific IgG levels peaked strongly in ΔrpoE1-infected mice at 6weeks, which correlated with reduced splenomegaly and bacterial burden relative to WT-infected mice. Given the difference in immune response to infection with wild-type and ΔrpoE1, we tested whether ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity to wild-type challenge. Mice immunized with ΔrpoE1 completely resisted WT infection and had significantly higher serum titers of Brucella-specific IgG, IgG2a and IFN-γ after WT challenge relative to age-matched naïve mice. We conclude that immunization of BALB/c mice with the B. abortus GSR pathway mutant, ΔrpoE1, elicits an adaptive immune response that confers significant protective immunity against WT infection.

  20. "Wild type" GIST: Clinicopathological features and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wada, Ryuichi; Arai, Hiroki; Kure, Shoko; Peng, Wei-Xia; Naito, Zenya

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. Mutation of KIT and PDGFRA genes is implicated in the tumorigenesis. Approximately 10% of GISTs do not harbor mutation of these genes, and they are designated as "wild type" GIST. They are classified into succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient and non-SDH-deficient groups. SDH-deficient group includes Carney triad and Carney Stratakis syndrome. The patients are young women. Tumors occur in the antrum of the stomach, and tumor cells are epithelioid. Lymph node metastasis is frequent. The non-SDH-deficient group includes neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 and GISTs with mutations of BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA and with the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. GIST in NF occurs in the small intestine, and tumor cells are spindle shaped. GIST with BRAF mutation arises in the small intestine. Attention to the age, gender, family history and other neoplasms may raise the prediction of syndromic disease. Location of the tumor, morphology, and pleomorphism of the tumor cells are further informative. Lymphovascular invasion should be carefully evaluated. The determination of KIT expression is essential for the diagnosis. When wild type GIST is suspected, intensive genetic analysis is required. Further, a careful and long-time observation is recommended. PMID:27427238

  1. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. PMID:26319139

  2. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Davis, Carol; Sakellariou, George K.; Shi, Yun; Kayani, Anna C.; Pulliam, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne; Brooks, Susan V.; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that deletion of CuZnSOD in mice (Sod1−/− mice) leads to accelerated loss of muscle mass and contractile force during aging. To dissect the relative roles of skeletal muscle and motor neurons in this process, we used a Cre-Lox targeted approach to establish a skeletal muscle-specific Sod1-knockout (mKO) mouse to determine whether muscle-specific CuZnSOD deletion is sufficient to cause muscle atrophy. Surprisingly, mKO mice maintain muscle masses at or above those of wild-type control mice up to 18 mo of age. In contrast, maximum isometric specific force measured in gastrocnemius muscle is significantly reduced in the mKO mice. We found no detectable increases in global measures of oxidative stress or ROS production, no reduction in mitochondrial ATP production, and no induction of adaptive stress responses in muscle from mKO mice. However, Akt-mTOR signaling is elevated and the number of muscle fibers with centrally located nuclei is increased in skeletal muscle from mKO mice, which suggests elevated regenerative pathways. Our data demonstrate that lack of CuZnSOD restricted to skeletal muscle does not lead to muscle atrophy but does cause muscle weakness in adult mice and suggest loss of CuZnSOD may potentiate muscle regenerative pathways.—Zhang, Y., Davis, C., Sakellariou, G.K., Shi, Y., Kayani, A.C., Pulliam, D., Bhattacharya, A., Richardson, A., Jackson, M.J., McArdle, A., Brooks, S.V., Van Remmen, H. CuZnSOD gene deletion targeted to skeletal muscle leads to loss of contractile force but does not cause muscle atrophy in adult mice. PMID:23729587

  3. Heart regeneration in adult MRL mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leferovich, John M.; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Samulewicz, Stefan; Zhang, Xiang-Ming; Zwas, Donna; Lankford, Edward B.; Heber-Katz, Ellen

    2001-08-01

    The reaction of cardiac tissue to acute injury involves interacting cascades of cellular and molecular responses that encompass inflammation, hormonal signaling, extracellular matrix remodeling, and compensatory adaptation of myocytes. Myocardial regeneration is observed in amphibians, whereas scar formation characterizes cardiac ventricular wound healing in a variety of mammalian injury models. We have previously shown that the MRL mouse strain has an extraordinary capacity to heal surgical wounds, a complex trait that maps to at least seven genetic loci. Here, we extend these studies to cardiac wounds and demonstrate that a severe transmural, cryogenically induced infarction of the right ventricle heals extensively within 60 days, with the restoration of normal myocardium and function. Scarring is markedly reduced in MRL mice compared with C57BL/6 mice, consistent with both the reduced hydroxyproline levels seen after injury and an elevated cardiomyocyte mitotic index of 10-20% for the MRL compared with 1-3% for the C57BL/6. The myocardial response to injury observed in these mice resembles the regenerative process seen in amphibians.

  4. Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulation of p53 in Brown Fat at Adult But Not Embryonic Stages Regulates Thermogenesis and Body Weight in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Massadi, Omar; Porteiro, Begoña; Kuhlow, Doreen; Köhler, Markus; Gonzalez-Rellan, María J; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Quiñones, Mar; Senra, Ana; Alvarez, Clara V; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Schulz, Tim J; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor that plays multiple biological roles, including the capacity to modulate metabolism at different levels. However, its metabolic role in brown adipose tissue (BAT) remains largely unknown. Herein we sought to investigate the physiological role of endogenous p53 in BAT and its implication on BAT thermogenic activity and energy balance. To this end, we generated and characterized global p53-null mice and mice lacking p53 specifically in BAT. Additionally we performed gain-and-loss-of-function experiments in the BAT of adult mice using virogenetic and pharmacological approaches. BAT was collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, thermography, real-time PCR, and Western blot. p53-deficient mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure and BAT activity. However, the deletion of p53 in BAT using a Myf5-Cre driven p53 knockout did not show any changes in body weight or the expression of thermogenic markers. The acute inhibition of p53 in the BAT of adult mice slightly increased body weight and inhibited BAT thermogenesis, whereas its overexpression in the BAT of diet-induced obese mice reduced body weight and increased thermogenesis. On the other hand, pharmacological activation of p53 improves body weight gain due to increased BAT thermogenesis by sympathetic nervous system in obese adult wild-type mice but not in p53(-/-) animals. These results reveal that p53 regulates BAT metabolism by coordinating body weight and thermogenesis, but these metabolic actions are tissue specific and also dependent on the developmental stage.

  5. Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulation of p53 in Brown Fat at Adult But Not Embryonic Stages Regulates Thermogenesis and Body Weight in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Massadi, Omar; Porteiro, Begoña; Kuhlow, Doreen; Köhler, Markus; Gonzalez-Rellan, María J; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Quiñones, Mar; Senra, Ana; Alvarez, Clara V; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Schulz, Tim J; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor that plays multiple biological roles, including the capacity to modulate metabolism at different levels. However, its metabolic role in brown adipose tissue (BAT) remains largely unknown. Herein we sought to investigate the physiological role of endogenous p53 in BAT and its implication on BAT thermogenic activity and energy balance. To this end, we generated and characterized global p53-null mice and mice lacking p53 specifically in BAT. Additionally we performed gain-and-loss-of-function experiments in the BAT of adult mice using virogenetic and pharmacological approaches. BAT was collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, thermography, real-time PCR, and Western blot. p53-deficient mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure and BAT activity. However, the deletion of p53 in BAT using a Myf5-Cre driven p53 knockout did not show any changes in body weight or the expression of thermogenic markers. The acute inhibition of p53 in the BAT of adult mice slightly increased body weight and inhibited BAT thermogenesis, whereas its overexpression in the BAT of diet-induced obese mice reduced body weight and increased thermogenesis. On the other hand, pharmacological activation of p53 improves body weight gain due to increased BAT thermogenesis by sympathetic nervous system in obese adult wild-type mice but not in p53(-/-) animals. These results reveal that p53 regulates BAT metabolism by coordinating body weight and thermogenesis, but these metabolic actions are tissue specific and also dependent on the developmental stage. PMID:27183316

  6. Selective improvement of cognitive function in adult and aged APP/PS1 transgenic mice by continuous non-shock treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hsing-Chieh; Huang, Hei-Jen; Liang, Keng-Chen; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2011-07-27

    Exercise may contribute to prevention of the cognitive decline and delay the onset of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated the effects of continuous non-shock treadmill exercise in adult and aged male APP/PS1 double mutant transgenic mice. Adult (7-8 month-old) and aged (24 month-old) male APP/PS1 transgenic and wild-type mice were randomly assigned to either sedentary or exercise groups. The exercise program included a one-week treadmill acclimatization to adapt to the novel environment. After acclimation, mice ran on a treadmill 5 days/week until sacrificed for pathological analyses. During exercise training, no tail shock was used in the exercise paradigm; only gentle tail touching was used to induce the mice to run, to minimize the stress otherwise associated with treadmill exercise. We found that the exercise program selectively improved the spatial learning and memory associated with an increase in both cholinergic neurons in the medial septum (MS)/vertical diagonal band (VDB) and serotonergic neurons in the raphe nucleus of aged APP/PS1 transgenic mice. In adult APP/PS1 transgenic mice, the exercise paradigm increased exploratory activity and reduced anxiety with an associated increase in numbers of serotonergic neurons in the raphe nucleus. In addition, the exercise paradigm also reduced amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) levels and microglia activation, but not enough to reduce the plaque loading in the hippocampus of the APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Therefore, these findings suggest that there may exist an age-related difference in the effect of continuous non-shock treadmill exercise training on AD.

  7. Neurobiological Sequelae of Witnessing Stressful Events in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Brandon L.; Vialou, Vincent F.; Iñiguez, Sergio D.; Alcantara, Lyonna F.; Wright, Katherine N.; Feng, Jiang; Kennedy, Pamela J.; LaPlant, Quincey; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J.; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is well known that exposure to severe stress increases the risk for developing mood disorders. However, most chronic stress models in rodents involve at least some form of physically experiencing traumatic events. Methods This study assessed the effects of a novel social stress paradigm that is insulated from the effects of physical stress. Specifically, adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either emotional (ES) or physical stress (PS) for ten minutes per day for ten days. ES mice were exposed to the social defeat of a PS mouse by a larger more aggressive CD-1 mouse from the safety of an adjacent compartment. Results Like PS mice, ES mice exhibited a range of depression- and anxiety-like behaviors both 24 hr and 1 month after the stress. Increased levels of serum corticosterone, part of the stress response, accompanied these behavioral deficits. Based on prior work which implicated gene expression changes in the ventral tegmental area (a key brain reward region) in the PS phenotype, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression patterns in this brain region of ES and PS mice using RNA-seq. We found significant overlap between these conditions, which suggests several potential gene targets for mediating the behavioral abnormalities observed. Conclusions Together, these findings demonstrate that witnessing traumatic events is a potent stress in adult male mice capable of inducing long-lasting neurobiological perturbations. PMID:22795644

  8. Adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice reduces mortality in mice infected with human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangning; Li, Xiaoying; Fan, Xiaoxu; Ma, Chunmei; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years of age, and the neurological complications of this virus can lead to death. Until now, no vaccines or drugs have been available for the clinical control of this epidemic. Macrophages can engulf pathogens and mediate a series of host immune responses that play a role in the defence against infectious diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed the localizations of virus in muscle tissues of EV71-infected mice. The macrophages isolated from the adult mice could kill the virus gradually in vitro, as shown using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and virus titration. Co-localisation of lysosomes and virus within macrophages suggested that the lysosomes were possibly responsible for the phagocytosis of EV71. Activation of the macrophages in the peritoneal cavity of mice four days pre-infection reduced the mortality of mice upon lethal EV71 infection. The adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice inhibited virus replication in the muscle tissues of infected mice, and this was followed by a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of mortality, which suggested that the adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult humans represents a potential strategy to treat EV71-infected patients.

  9. The Intrauterine and Nursing Period Is a Window of Susceptibility for Development of Obesity and Intestinal Tumorigenesis by a High Fat Diet in Min/+ Mice as Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Ha Thi; Hetland, Ragna Bogen; Steffensen, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    We studied how obesogenic conditions during various life periods affected obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis in adult C57BL/6J-Min (multiple intestinal neoplasia)/+ mice. The mice were given a 10% fat diet throughout life (negative control) or a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, during both in utero and nursing, during adult life, or during their whole life-span, and terminated at 11 weeks for tumorigenesis (Min/+) or 23 weeks for obesogenic effect (wild-type). Body weight at 11 weeks was increased after a 45% fat diet during nursing, during both in utero and nursing, and throughout life, but had normalized at 23 weeks. In the glucose tolerance test, the early exposure to a 45% fat diet in utero, during nursing, or during both in utero and nursing, did not affect blood glucose, whereas a 45% fat diet given to adults or throughout life did. However, a 45% fat diet during nursing or during in utero and nursing increased the number of small intestinal tumors. So did exposures to a 45% fat diet in adult life or throughout life, but without increasing the tumor numbers further. The intrauterine and nursing period is a window of susceptibility for dietary fat-induced obesity and intestinal tumor development. PMID:25874125

  10. Similar L-dopa-stimulated motor activity in mice with adult-onset 6-hydroxydopamine-induced symmetric dopamine denervation and in transcription factor Pitx3 null mice with perinatal-onset symmetric dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Sagot, Ben; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2015-07-30

    The transcription factor Pitx3 null mutant (Pitx3Null) mice have a constitutive perinatal-onset and symmetric bilateral dopamine (DA) loss in the striatum. In these mice l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) induces apparently normal horizontal movements (walking) but also upward movements consisting of the vertical body trunk and waving paws that are absent in normal animals and in animals with the classic unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion-induced DA denervation. Thus, a concern is that the perinatal timing of the DA loss and potential developmental abnormalities in Pitx3Null mice may underlie these upward movements, thus reducing the usefulness as a DA denervation model. Here we show that in normal wild-type (Pitx3WT) mice with adult-onset symmetric, bilateral 6-OHDA-induced DA lesion in the dorsal striatum, l-dopa induces normal horizontal movements and upward movements that are qualitatively identical to those in Pitx3Null mice. Furthermore, after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the residual DA innervation in the striatum in Pitx3Null mice, l-dopa induces contraversive rotation that is similar to that in Pitx3WT mice with the classic unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. These results indicate that in Pitx3Null mice, the bilateral symmetric DA denervation in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for expressing the l-dopa-induced motor phenotype and the perinatal timing of their DA loss is not a determining factor, providing further evidence that Pitx3Null mice are a convenient and suitable mouse model to study the consequences of DA loss and dopaminergic replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is essential for physiological Beta cell function and islet vascularization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; Waldén, Tomas; Sandberg, Monica; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Phillipson, Mia

    2015-04-01

    The availability of paracrine factors in the islets of Langerhans, and the constitution of the beta cell basement membrane can both be affected by proteolytic enzymes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9) on islet function in mice. Islet function of Mmp9-deficient (Mmp9(-/-)) mice and their wild-type littermates was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. The pancreata of Mmp9(-/-) mice did not differ from wild type in islet mass or distribution. However, Mmp9(-/-) mice had an impaired response to a glucose load in vivo, with lower serum insulin levels. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced also in vitro in isolated Mmp9(-/-) islets. The vascular density of Mmp9(-/-) islets was lower, and the capillaries had fewer fenestrations, whereas the islet blood flow was threefold higher. These alterations could partly be explained by compensatory changes in the expression of matrix-related proteins. This in-depth investigation of the effects of the loss of MMP-9 function on pancreatic islets uncovers a deteriorated beta cell function that is primarily due to a shift in the beta cell phenotype, but also due to islet vascular aberrations. This likely reflects the importance of a normal islet matrix turnover exerted by MMP-9, and concomitant release of paracrine factors sequestered on the matrix.

  12. Neurokinin B is critical for normal timing of sexual maturation but dispensable for adult reproductive function in female mice.

    PubMed

    True, Cadence; Nasrin Alam, Sayeda; Cox, Kimberly; Chan, Yee-Ming; Seminara, Stephanie B

    2015-04-01

    Humans carrying mutations in neurokinin B (NKB) or the NKB receptor fail to undergo puberty due to decreased secretion of GnRH. Despite this pubertal delay, many of these patients go on to achieve activation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adulthood, a phenomenon termed reversal, indicating that NKB signaling may play a more critical role for the timing of pubertal development than adult reproductive function. NKB receptor-deficient mice are hypogonadotropic but have no defects in the timing of sexual maturation. The current study has performed the first phenotypic evaluation of mice bearing mutations in Tac2, the gene encoding the NKB ligand, to determine whether they have impaired sexual development similar to their human counterparts. Male Tac2-/- mice showed no difference in the timing of sexual maturation or fertility compared with wild-type littermates and were fertile. In contrast, Tac2-/- females had profound delays in sexual maturation, with time to vaginal opening and first estrus occurring significantly later than controls, and initial abnormalities in estrous cycles. However, cycling recovered in adulthood and Tac2-/- females were fertile, although they produced fewer pups per litter. Thus, female Tac2-/- mice parallel humans harboring NKB pathway mutations, with delayed sexual maturation and activation of the reproductive cascade later in life. Moreover, direct comparison of NKB ligand and receptor-deficient females confirmed that only NKB ligand-deficient animals have delayed sexual maturation, suggesting that in the absence of the NKB receptor, NKB may regulate the timing of sexual maturation through other tachykinin receptors.

  13. Bodyweight assessment of enamelin null mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert H-L; Lertlam, Rangsiyakorn; Simmer, James P; Wang, Chia-Ning; Hu, Jan C C

    2013-01-01

    The Enam null mice appear to be smaller than wild-type mice, which prompted the hypothesis that enamel defects negatively influence nutritional intake and bodyweight gain (BWG). We compared the BWG of Enam(-/-) and wild-type mice from birth (D0) to Day 42 (D42). Wild-type (WT) and Enam(-/-) (N) mice were given either hard chow (HC) or soft chow (SC). Four experimental groups were studied: WTHC, WTSC, NHC, and NSC. The mother's bodyweight (DBW) and the average litter bodyweight (ALBW) were obtained from D0 to D21. After D21, the pups were separated from the mother and provided the same type of food. Litter bodyweights were measured until D42. ALBW was compared at 7-day intervals using one-way ANOVA, while the influence of DBW on ALBW was analyzed by mixed-model analyses. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on hard chow (NHC) was significantly lower than the two WT groups at D21 and the differences persisted into young adulthood. The ALBW of Enam(-/-) mice maintained on soft chow (NSC) trended lower, but was not significantly different than that of the WT groups. We conclude that genotype, which affects enamel integrity, and food hardness influence bodyweight gain in postnatal and young adult mice. PMID:23509695

  14. Structure and age-dependent development of the turkey liver: a comparative study of a highly selected meat-type and a wild-type turkey line.

    PubMed

    Hünigen, Hana; Mainzer, Kathleen; Hirschberg, Ruth M; Custodis, Pia; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Al Masri, Salah; Richardson, Kenneth C; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Plendl, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    In this study the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the liver of a fast growing, meat-type turkey line (British United turkeys BUT Big 6, n=25) and a wild-type turkey line (Wild Canadian turkey, n=48) were compared at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 wk. Because the growth plates of long bones were still detectable in the 20-week-old wild-type turkeys, indicating immaturity, a group of 8 wild-type turkeys at the age of 24 wk was included in the original scope of the study. Over the term of the study, the body and liver weights of birds from the meat-type turkey line increased at a faster rate than those of the wild-type turkey line. However, the relative liver weight of the meat-type turkeys declined (from 2.7 to 0.9%) to a greater extent than that of the wild-type turkeys (from 2.8 to 1.9%), suggesting a mismatch in development between muscle weights and liver weights of the meat-type turkeys. Signs of high levels of fat storage in the liver were detected in both lines but were greater in the wild-type turkey line, suggesting a better feed conversion by the extreme-genotype birds i.e., meat-type birds. For the first time, this study presents morphologic data on the structure and arrangement of the lymphatic tissue within the healthy turkey liver, describing two different types of lymphatic aggregations within the liver parenchyma, i.e., aggregations with and without fibrous capsules. Despite differences during development, both adult meat-type and adult wild-type turkeys had similar numbers of lymphatic aggregations.

  15. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jaehong; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Wang, Lirong; Hafeez, Imran; Herz, Joachim; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Guénette, Suzanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    FE65 and FE65L1 are cytoplasmic adaptor proteins that bind a variety of proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein, and that mediate the assembly of multimolecular complexes. We previously reported that FE65/FE65L1 double knockout (DKO) mice display disorganized laminin in meningeal fibroblasts and a cobblestone lissencephaly-like phenotype in the developing cortex. Here, we examined whether loss of FE65 and FE65L1 causes ocular and muscular deficits, 2 phenotypes that frequently accompany cobblestone lissencephaly. Eyes of FE65/FE65L1 DKO mice develop normally, but lens degeneration becomes apparent in young adult mice. Abnormal lens epithelial cell migration, widespread small vacuole formation, and increased laminin expression underneath lens capsules suggest impaired interaction between epithelial cells and capsular extracellular matrix in DKO lenses. Cortical cataracts develop in FE65L1 knockout (KO) mice aged 16 months or more but are absent in wild-type or FE65 KO mice. FE65 family KO mice show attenuated grip strength, and the nuclei of DKO muscle cells frequently locate in the middle of muscle fibers. These findings reveal that FE65 and FE65L1 are essential for the maintenance of lens transparency, and their loss produce phenotypes in brain, eye, and muscle that are comparable to the clinical features of congenital muscular dystrophies in humans.—Suh, J., Moncaster, J. A., Wang, L., Hafeez, I., Herz, J., Tanzi, R. E., Goldstein, L. E., Guénette, S. Y. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness. PMID:25757569

  16. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment. PMID:26254692

  17. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment.

  18. Crystal structure of wild-type human procathepsin K.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, J.; Lalumière, M.; Ménard, R.; Cygler, M.

    1999-01-01

    Cathepsin K is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. It has been implicated as a major mediator of osteoclastic bone resorption. Wild-type human procathepsin K has been crystallized in a glycosylated and a deglycosylated form. The latter crystals diffract better, to 3.2 A resolution, and contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and refined to an R-factor of 0.194. The N-terminal fragment of the proregion forms a globular domain while the C-terminal segment is extended and shows substantial flexibility. The proregion interacts with the enzyme along the substrate binding groove and along the proregion binding loop (residues Ser138-Asn156). It binds to the active site in the opposite direction to that of natural substrates. The overall binding mode of the proregion to cathepsin K is similar to that observed in cathepsin L, caricain, and cathepsin B, but there are local differences that likely contribute to the specificity of these proregions for their cognate enzymes. The main observed difference is in the position of the short helix alpha3p (67p-75p), which occupies the S' subsites. As in the other proenzymes, the proregion utilizes the S2 subsite for anchoring by placing a leucine side chain there, according to the specificity of cathepsin K toward its substrate. PMID:10048321

  19. Litter Size Predicts Adult Stereotypic Behavior in Female Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bechard, Allison; Nicholson, Anthony; Mason, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Stereotypic behaviors are repetitive invariant behaviors that are common in many captive species and potentially indicate compromised welfare and suitability as research subjects. Adult laboratory mice commonly perform stereotypic bar-gnawing, route-tracing, and back-flipping, although great individual variation in frequency occurs. Early life factors (for example, level of maternal care received) have lasting effects on CNS functioning and abilities to cope with stress and therefore may also affect stereotypic behavior in offspring. Access to maternal resources and care are influenced by the number of pups in a litter; therefore, we examined both litter size and its potential correlate, weight at weaning, as early environmental predictors of adult stereotypic behavior in laboratory mice. Further, we assessed the effects on offspring stereotypic behavior of delaying the separation of mother and pups (weaning) beyond the standard 21 d of age. Analyzing stereotypic behavior in 3 different mouse colonies composed of 2 inbred strains (C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J) and an outbred stock (CD1[ICR]) revealed significant positive correlation between litter size and stereotypic behavior in female, but not male, mice. Weight and age at weaning did not significantly affect levels of stereotypy in either sex. Litter size therefore may be a useful indicator of individual predisposition to stereotypic behavior in female laboratory mice. PMID:23043805

  20. Tissue- and sex-specific effects of β-carotene 15,15′ oxygenase (BCO1) on retinoid and lipid metabolism in adult and developing mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Kyung; Zuccaro, Michael V.; Costabile, Brianna K.; Rodas, Rebeka; Quadro, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, β-carotene-15,15′-oxygenase (BCO1) is the main enzyme that cleaves β-carotene, the most abundant vitamin A precursor, to generate retinoids (vitamin A derivatives), both in adult and developing tissues. We previously reported that, in addition to this function, BCO1 can also influence the synthesis of retinyl esters, the storage form of retinoids, in the mouse embryo at mid-gestation. Indeed, lack of embryonic BCO1 impaired both lecithin-dependent and acyl CoA-dependent retinol esterification, mediated by lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and acyl CoA:retinol acyltransferase (ARAT), respectively. Furthermore, embryonic BCO1 also influenced the ester pools of cholesterol and diacylglycerol. In this report, we gained novel insights into this alternative function of BCO1 by investigating whether BCO1 influenced embryonic retinoid and lipid metabolism in a tissue-dependent manner. To this end, livers and brains from wild-type and BCO1−/− embryos at mid-gestation were analyzed for retinoid and lipid content, as well as gene expression levels. We also asked whether or not the role of BCO1 as a regulator of lecithin- and acyl CoA-dependent retinol esterification was exclusively restricted to the developing tissues. Thus, a survey of retinol and retinyl ester levels in adult tissues of wild-type, BCO1−/−, LRAT−/− and LRAT−/−BCO1−/− mice was performed. We showed that the absence of BCO1 affects embryonic retinoid and lipid homeostasis in a tissue-specific manner and that retinyl ester formation is also influenced by BCO1 in a few adult tissues (pancreas, lung, heart and adipose) in a sex- dependent manner. PMID:25602705

  1. Behavioral performance of tfm mice supports the beneficial role of androgen receptors in spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Angela; Robertson, Jennifer; Raber, Jacob

    2005-02-01

    In adulthood, androgens and androgen receptors might contribute to the sexually dimorphic performance in spatial learning and memory, but their roles seem complex. To study the potential role of androgen receptors in spatial learning and memory, we tested adult 6-8-month-old mutant mice with a naturally occurring defect in the androgen receptor gene (testicular feminization mutant or tfm) and C57Bl/6J wild-type mice. Because the trait is X-linked, only tfm males are completely androgen insensitive while female tfm mice are heterozygous, carrying one wild-type and one tfm copy of the androgen receptor. Here we show that female tfm carrier mice outperform tfm male mice in the water maze, while there are no gender differences in water maze performance in wild-type mice. In tfm mice, there were no gender differences in measures of anxiety in the open field or plus maze or sensorimotor function, indicating that potential differences in these measures did not contribute to the differences observed in the water maze. There were no differences in tfm and wild-type female and male mice in emotional learning and memory in the passive avoidance test. These findings support a beneficial role for androgen receptors in spatial learning and memory.

  2. Biosafety of recombinant and wild type nucleopolyhedroviruses as bioinsecticides.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Mohamed-Bassem; Ragheb, Didair A; El-Sheikh, El-Sayed A; Gomaa, El-Adarosy A; Kamita, Shizuo G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-06-01

    The entomopathogenic Autographa californica (Speyer) nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been genetically modified to increase its speed of kill. The potential adverse effects of a recombinant AcMNPV (AcAaIT) as well as wild type AcMNPV and wild type Spodoptera littoralis NPV (SlNPV) were studied. Cotton plants were treated with these viruses at concentrations that were adjusted to resemble the recommended field application rate (4 x 10(12) PIBs/feddan, feddan = 4,200 m2) and 3rd instar larvae of S. littoralis were allowed to feed on the contaminated plants. SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and DNA analyses were used to confirm that larvae that fed on these plants were virus-infected. Polyhedra that were purified from the infected larvae were subjected to structural protein analysis. A 32 KDa protein was found in polyhedra that were isolated from all of the viruses. Subtle differences were found in the size and abundance of ODV proteins. Antisera against polyhedral proteins isolated from AcAaIT polyhedra were raised in rabbits. The terminal bleeds from rabbits were screened against four coating antigens (i.e., polyhedral proteins from AcAaIT, AcAaIT from field-infected larvae (AcAaIT-field), AcMNPV, and SlNPV) using a two-dimensional titration method with the coated antigen format. Competitive inhibition experiments were conducted in parallel to optimize antibody and coating antigen concentrations for ELISA. The IC50 values for each combination ranged from 1.42 to 163 microg/ml. AcAaIT-derived polyhedrin gave the lowest IC50 value, followed by those of SlNPV, AcAaIT-field, and AcMNPV. The optimized ELISA system showed low cross reactivity for AcMNPV (0.87%), AcAaIT-field (1.2%), and SlNPV (4.0%). Genomic DNAs isolated from AcAaIT that were passaged in larvae of S. littoralis that were reared in the laboratory or field did not show any detectable differences. Albino rats (male and female) that were treated with AcAaIT, AcMNPV or SlNPV (either orally or by intraperitoneal injection at

  3. Aggression and aspects of impulsivity in wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Caroline M; de Boer, Sietse F; Buwalda, Bauke; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2014-01-01

    Aggression is closely related to impulsive behavior both in humans and in animals. To avoid potential negative consequences, aggressive behavior is kept in control by strong inhibitory mechanisms. Failure of these inhibitory mechanisms results in violent behavior. In the present experiments, we investigated whether aggressive behavior is related to impulsive behavior. Furthermore, we investigated if violent behavior can be distinguished from "normal" aggressive behavior in terms of impulsivity levels. We used rats of the wild-type Groningen strain, rats of this strain differ widely in their level of offensive aggression expressed toward an unfamiliar intruder male, ranging from no aggression at all to very high levels of intense and sometimes violent behavior. Violent behavior was displayed by some of the animals that were given repeated winning experience. We used behavioral performance in an unpredictable operant conditioning paradigm for food reinforcement (variable interval 15) and performance in a differential-reinforcement of low rate (DRL-60s) responding as determinants for impulsivity. We predicted that offensive aggression is correlated with behavioral flexibility measured by the VI-15 procedure and that aggressive behavior is characterized by low behavioral inhibition on the DRL task. In addition we expected that violent animals would be characterized by extremely low levels of behavioral inhibition on the DRL task. We showed that the level of offensive aggression indeed positively correlated with VI-15 performance. In addition, we showed that behavioral performance on the DRL procedure is similar in low and high aggressive rats. However, violent animals can be dissociated by a lower efficiency of lever pressing on a DRL-60s schedule of reinforcement.

  4. Impaired brain development and reduced cognitive function in phospholipase D-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Ute; Stegner, David; Hattingen, Elke; Beyer, Sandra; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Klein, Jochen

    2014-06-20

    The phospholipases D (PLD1 and 2) are signaling enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidic acid, a lipid second messenger involved in cell proliferation, and choline, a precursor of acetylcholine (ACh). In the present study, we investigated development and cognitive function in mice that were deficient for PLD1, or PLD2, or both. We found that PLD-deficient mice had reduced brain growth at 14-27 days post partum when compared to wild-type mice. In adult PLD-deficient mice, cognitive function was impaired in social and object recognition tasks. Using brain microdialysis, we found that wild-type mice responded with a 4-fold increase of hippocampal ACh release upon behavioral stimulation in the open field, while PLD-deficient mice released significantly less ACh. These results may be relevant for cognitive dysfunctions observed in fetal alcohol syndrome and in Alzheimer' disease. PMID:24813107

  5. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P N; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus.

  6. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P. N.; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus. PMID:27030589

  7. Genome editing with Cas9 in adult mice corrects a disease mutation and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hao; Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Bogorad, Roman L; Benedetti, Eric; Grompe, Markus; Koteliansky, Victor; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate CRISPR-Cas9–mediated correction of a Fah mutation in hepatocytes in a mouse model of the human disease hereditary tyrosinemia. Delivery of components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system by hydrodynamic injection resulted in initial expression of the wild-type Fah protein in ~1/250 liver cells. Expansion of Fah-positive hepatocytes rescued the body weight loss phenotype. Our study indicates that CRISPR-Cas9–mediated genome editing is possible in adult animals and has potential for correction of human genetic diseases. PMID:24681508

  8. Genome editing with Cas9 in adult mice corrects a disease mutation and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Bogorad, Roman L; Benedetti, Eric; Grompe, Markus; Koteliansky, Victor; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate CRISPR-Cas9-mediated correction of a Fah mutation in hepatocytes in a mouse model of the human disease hereditary tyrosinemia. Delivery of components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system by hydrodynamic injection resulted in initial expression of the wild-type Fah protein in ∼1/250 liver cells. Expansion of Fah-positive hepatocytes rescued the body weight loss phenotype. Our study indicates that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing is possible in adult animals and has potential for correction of human genetic diseases.

  9. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  10. Immature Neurons and Radial Glia, But Not Astrocytes or Microglia, Are Altered in Adult Cntnap2 and Shank3 Mice, Models of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Susana; Gould, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often associated with cognitive deficits and excessive anxiety. Neuroimaging studies have shown atypical structure and neural connectivity in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and striatum, regions associated with cognitive function and anxiety regulation. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is involved in many behaviors that are disrupted in ASD, including cognition, anxiety, and social behaviors. Additionally, glial cells, such as astrocytes and microglia, are important for modulating neural connectivity during development, and glial dysfunction has been hypothesized to be a key contributor to the development of ASD. Cells with astroglial characteristics are known to serve as progenitor cells in the developing and adult brain. Here, we examined adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, as well as astroglia and microglia in the hippocampus, mPFC, and striatum of two models that display autism-like phenotypes, Cntnap2−/− and Shank3+/ΔC transgenic mice. We found a substantial decrease in the number of immature neurons and radial glial progenitor cells in the ventral hippocampus of both transgenic models compared with wild-type controls. No consistent differences were detected in the number or size of astrocytes or microglia in any other brain region examined. Future work is needed to explore the functional contribution of adult neurogenesis to autism-related behaviors as well as to temporally characterize glial plasticity as it is associated with ASD. PMID:27785461

  11. Discovery of nigral dopaminergic neurogenesis in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brad E.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. As a result, intensive efforts have focused upon mechanisms that facilitate the death of mature dopaminergic neurons. Unfortunately, these efforts have been unsuccessful in providing an effective treatment to address neurodegeneration in this disease. Therefore, alternative theories of pathogenesis are being explored. Adult neurogenesis of dopaminergic neurons is an attractive concept that would provide a possible mechanism of neurodegeneration as well as offer an endogenous means to replenish affected neurons. To determine whether dopaminergic neurons experience neurogenesis in adult mice we developed a novel cell lineage tracing model that permitted detection of neurogenesis without many of the issues associated with popular techniques. Remarkably, we discovered that dopaminergic neurons are replenished in adult mice by Nestin+/Sox2- progenitor cells. What's more, the rate of neurogenesis is similar to the rate of dopaminergic neuron loss reported using a chronic, systemic inflammatory response mouse model. This observation may indicate that neuron loss in Parkinson's disease results from inhibition of neurogenesis. PMID:27482200

  12. AML1 deletion in adult mice causes splenomegaly and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Putz, G; Rosner, A; Nuesslein, I; Schmitz, N; Buchholz, F

    2006-02-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) encodes a DNA-binding subunit of the CBF transcription factor family and is required for the establishment of definitive hematopoiesis. AML1 is one of the most frequently mutated genes associated with human acute leukemia, suggesting that genetic alterations of the gene contribute to leukemogenesis. Here, we report the analysis of mice carrying conditional AML1 knockout alleles that were inactivated using the Cre/loxP system. AML1 was deleted in adult mice by inducing Cre activity to replicate AML1 deletions found in human MDS, familial platelet disorder and rare de novo human AML. At a latency of 2 months after induction, the thymus was reduced in size and frequently populated by immature double negative thymocytes, indicating defective T-lymphocyte maturation, resulting in lymphatic diseases with 50% penetrance, including atypical hyperplasia and thymic lymphoma. Metastatic lymphomas to the liver and the meninges were observed. Mice also developed splenomegaly with an expansion of the myeloid compartment. Increased Howell-Jolly body counts indicated splenic hypofunction. Thrombocytopenia occurred due to immaturity of mini-megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. Together with mild lymphocytopenia in the peripheral blood and increased fractions of immature cells in the bone marrow, AML1 deficient mice display features of a myelodysplastic syndrome, suggesting a preleukemic state.

  13. Growth Hormone Inhibits Hepatic De Novo Lipogenesis in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Majumdar, Neena; List, Edward O; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frank, Stuart J; Manzano, Anna; Bartrons, Ramon; Puchowicz, Michelle; Kopchick, John J; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2015-09-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are reported to have low growth hormone (GH) production and/or hepatic GH resistance. GH replacement can resolve the fatty liver condition in diet-induced obese rodents and in GH-deficient patients. However, it remains to be determined whether this inhibitory action of GH is due to direct regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Therefore, an adult-onset, hepatocyte-specific, GH receptor (GHR) knockdown (aLivGHRkd) mouse was developed to model hepatic GH resistance in humans that may occur after sexual maturation. Just 7 days after aLivGHRkd, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) was increased in male and female chow-fed mice, compared with GHR-intact littermate controls. However, hepatosteatosis developed only in male and ovariectomized female aLivGHRkd mice. The increase in DNL observed in aLivGHRkd mice was not associated with hyperactivation of the pathway by which insulin is classically considered to regulate DNL. However, glucokinase mRNA and protein levels as well as fructose-2,6-bisphosphate levels were increased in aLivGHRkd mice, suggesting that enhanced glycolysis drives DNL in the GH-resistant liver. These results demonstrate that hepatic GH actions normally serve to inhibit DNL, where loss of this inhibitory signal may explain, in part, the inappropriate increase in hepatic DNL observed in NAFLD patients. PMID:26015548

  14. Seipin knockout in mice impairs stem cell proliferation and progenitor cell differentiation in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus via reduced levels of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoxi; Zhou, Libin; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Conghui; Sha, Sha; Xian, Xunde; Ji, Yong; Liu, George; Chen, Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The seipin gene (BSCL2) was originally identified in humans as a loss-of-function gene associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 2 (CGL2). Neuronal seipin-knockout (seipin-nKO) mice display a depression-like phenotype with a reduced level of hippocampal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). The present study investigated the influence of seipin deficiency on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the underlying mechanisms of the effects. We show that the proliferative capability of stem cells in seipin-nKO mice was substantially reduced compared to in wild-type (WT) mice, and that this could be rescued by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (rosi). In seipin-nKO mice, neuronal differentiation of progenitor cells was inhibited, with the enhancement of astrogliogenesis; both of these effects were recovered by rosi treatment during early stages of progenitor cell differentiation. In addition, rosi treatment could correct the decline in hippocampal ERK2 phosphorylation and cyclin A mRNA level in seipin-nKO mice. The MEK inhibitor U0126 abolished the rosi-rescued cell proliferation and cyclin A expression in seipin-nKO mice. In seipin-nKO mice, the hippocampal Wnt3 protein level was less than that in WT mice, and there was a reduction of neurogenin 1 (Neurog1) and neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD1) mRNA, levels of which were corrected by rosi treatment. STAT3 phosphorylation (Tyr705) was enhanced in seipin-nKO mice, and was further elevated by rosi treatment. Finally, rosi treatment for 10 days could alleviate the depression-like phenotype in seipin-nKO mice, and this alleviation was blocked by the MEK inhibitor U0126. The results indicate that, by reducing PPARγ, seipin deficiency impairs proliferation and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells, respectively, in the adult DG, which might be responsible for the production of the depression-like phenotype in seipin-nKO mice. PMID

  15. Wild-Type Measles Virus with the Hemagglutinin Protein of the Edmonston Vaccine Strain Retains Wild-Type Tropism in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyo; Kato, Sei-ich; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Mori, Kazuyasu; Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Kimura, Hideki; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    A major difference between vaccine and wild-type strains of measles virus (MV) in vitro is the wider cell specificity of vaccine strains, resulting from the receptor usage of the hemagglutinin (H) protein. Wild-type H proteins recognize the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) (CD150), which is expressed on certain cells of the immune system, whereas vaccine H proteins recognize CD46, which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated human and monkey cells, in addition to SLAM. To examine the effect of the H protein on the tropism and attenuation of MV, we generated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing recombinant wild-type MV strains bearing the Edmonston vaccine H protein (MV-EdH) and compared them to EGFP-expressing wild-type MV strains. In vitro, MV-EdH replicated in SLAM+ as well as CD46+ cells, including primary cell cultures from cynomolgus monkey tissues, whereas the wild-type MV replicated only in SLAM+ cells. However, in macaques, both wild-type MV and MV-EdH strains infected lymphoid and respiratory organs, and widespread infection of MV-EdH was not observed. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that SLAM+ lymphocyte cells were infected preferentially with both strains. Interestingly, EGFP expression of MV-EdH in tissues and lymphocytes was significantly weaker than that of the wild-type MV. Taken together, these results indicate that the CD46-binding activity of the vaccine H protein is important for determining the cell specificity of MV in vitro but not the tropism in vivo. They also suggest that the vaccine H protein attenuates MV growth in vivo. PMID:22238320

  16. Genes Required for the Fitness of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium during Infection of Immunodeficient gp91-/- phox Mice.

    PubMed

    Grant, Andrew J; Oshota, Olusegun; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Mayho, Matthew; Peters, Sarah E; Clare, Simon; Maskell, Duncan J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Salmonella enterica causes systemic diseases (typhoid and paratyphoid fever), nontyphoidal septicemia (NTS), and gastroenteritis in humans and other animals worldwide. An important but underrecognized emerging infectious disease problem in sub-Saharan Africa is NTS in children and immunocompromised adults. A current goal is to identify Salmonella mutants that are not pathogenic in the absence of key components of the immune system such as might be found in immunocompromised hosts. Such attenuated strains have the potential to be used as live vaccines. We have used transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS) to screen mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for their ability to infect and grow in the tissues of wild-type and immunodeficient mice. This was to identify bacterial genes that might be deleted for the development of live attenuated vaccines that would be safer to use in situations and/or geographical areas where immunodeficiencies are prevalent. The relative fitness of each of 9,356 transposon mutants, representing mutations in 3,139 different genes, was determined in gp91(-/-) phox mice. Mutations in certain genes led to reduced fitness in both wild-type and mutant mice. To validate these results, these genes were mutated by allelic replacement, and resultant mutants were retested for fitness in the mice. A defined deletion mutant of cysE was attenuated in C57BL/6 wild-type mice and immunodeficient gp91(-/-) phox mice and was effective as a live vaccine in wild-type mice.

  17. Hepatic isometallothioneins in mice: induction in adults and postnatal ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, W C; Lehman-McKeeman, L D; Klaassen, C D

    1990-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate hepatic metallothionein-I (MT-I) and metallothionein-II (MT-II) in adult mice pretreated with various dosages of selected inorganic and organic compounds and in nonchemically treated neonatal mice. Male CF-1 mice received Zn (0.38-6.0 mmol/kg, sc), Cd (5-80 mumol/kg, sc), dexamethasone (10-1000 mumol/kg, sc), or ethanol (60-180 mmol/kg, po). Liver cytosol was prepared 24 hr after the administration of each compound. In another experiment, liver cytosols were prepared from male and female neonates 1 to 35 days after parturition. MT-I and MT-II in liver cytosols were isolated by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography and quantitated by atomic absorption spectrometry. Hepatic MT-I and MT-II concentrations in adult controls were 5.1 +/- 1.3 and 3.7 +/- 1.0 micrograms/g liver, respectively. All compounds increased hepatic MT levels in a dose-dependent manner over a narrow range of dosages. The lowest dosages of Zn, Cd, dexamethasone, and ethanol that produced a significant increase in total MT content (MT-I plus MT-II) were 0.38, 0.005, 0.3, and 90 mmol/kg, respectively. Maximal induction of total MT following the highest dosages of Zn, Cd, ethanol, and dexamethasone was 58, 34, 24, and 13 times the control value (8.8 +/- 2.4 micrograms total MT/g liver), respectively. The relationship between dose and hepatic MT content was linear following ethanol administration and log-linear following Zn, Cd, and dexamethasone administration. The ratio of MT-I/MT-II was approximately 2.4 following all dosages of metals. Following low and high dosages of organic compounds, the ratio of MT-I/MT-II was approximately 1.0 and 1.5, respectively. Total MT concentration in livers of 1- to 14-day-old mice was approximately 40 times that observed in adult liver (5.5 +/- 1.6 micrograms total MT/g liver) and returned toward adult levels 21 days after parturition. The ratio of MT-I/MT-II was approximately 1.8 during Postpartum Days 1 through 14

  18. Pentavalent outer membrane vesicles of Vibrio cholerae induce adaptive immune response and protective efficacy in both adult and passive suckling mice models.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Mitra, Soma; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chattopadhyay, Brajadulal

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated oral immunizations with single serotype outer membrane vesicles of Vibrio cholerae induced serogroup specific protective immunity in the RITARD model. In our present study, we advanced our research by formulating multi-serotype outer membrane vesicles, mixing the OMVs of five virulent V. cholerae strains. Four doses of oral immunization with cholera pentavalent outer membrane vesicles (CPMVs) induced V. cholerae specific B and T cell responses. CPMVs-immunized mice generated long lasting serum IgG, IgA, IgM as well as mucosal sIgA and also elicited a higher percentage of CD4+ T cell distribution in spleen. Our study revealed that in vitro CPMVs-activated dendritic cells were secreting T cell polarizing cytokines, IL-12p40, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-1β. Moreover, purified splenic CD4+ T cells of immunized mice also secreted IL-4, IL-13 and IL-17 cytokines, indicating the initiation of Th2 and Th17 cell mediated immune responses. CPMVs immunized adult female mice and their offspring were significantly protected from heterologous challenge with wild type V. cholerae. CPMVs could be exploited for the development of a novel non-living vaccine against circulating cholera in near future.

  19. Deficiency of complement receptors CR2/CR1 in Cr2⁻/⁻ mice reduces the extent of secondary brain damage after closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Neher, Miriam D; Rich, Megan C; Keene, Chesleigh N; Weckbach, Sebastian; Bolden, Ashley L; Losacco, Justin T; Patane, Jenée; Flierl, Michael A; Kulik, Liudmila; Holers, V Michael; Stahel, Philip F

    2014-05-24

    Complement activation at the C3 convertase level has been associated with acute neuroinflammation and secondary brain injury after severe head trauma. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that Cr2-/- mice, which lack the receptors CR2/CD21 and CR1/CD35 for complement C3-derived activation fragments, are protected from adverse sequelae of experimental closed head injury. Adult wild-type mice and Cr2-/- mice on a C57BL/6 genetic background were subjected to focal closed head injury using a standardized weight-drop device. Head-injured Cr2-/- mice showed significantly improved neurological outcomes for up to 72 hours after trauma and a significantly decreased post-injury mortality when compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the Cr2-/- genotype was associated with a decreased extent of neuronal cell death at seven days post-injury. Western blot analysis revealed that complement C3 levels were reduced in the injured brain hemispheres of Cr2-/- mice, whereas plasma C3 levels remained unchanged, compared to wild-type mice. Finally, head-injured Cr2-/- had an attenuated extent of post-injury C3 tissue deposition, decreased astrocytosis and microglial activation, and attenuated immunoglobulin M deposition in injured brains compared to wild-type mice. Targeting of these receptors for complement C3 fragments (CR2/CR1) may represent a promising future approach for therapeutic immunomodulation after traumatic brain injury.

  20. Deficiency of complement receptors CR2/CR1 in Cr2⁻/⁻ mice reduces the extent of secondary brain damage after closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Neher, Miriam D; Rich, Megan C; Keene, Chesleigh N; Weckbach, Sebastian; Bolden, Ashley L; Losacco, Justin T; Patane, Jenée; Flierl, Michael A; Kulik, Liudmila; Holers, V Michael; Stahel, Philip F

    2014-01-01

    Complement activation at the C3 convertase level has been associated with acute neuroinflammation and secondary brain injury after severe head trauma. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that Cr2-/- mice, which lack the receptors CR2/CD21 and CR1/CD35 for complement C3-derived activation fragments, are protected from adverse sequelae of experimental closed head injury. Adult wild-type mice and Cr2-/- mice on a C57BL/6 genetic background were subjected to focal closed head injury using a standardized weight-drop device. Head-injured Cr2-/- mice showed significantly improved neurological outcomes for up to 72 hours after trauma and a significantly decreased post-injury mortality when compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the Cr2-/- genotype was associated with a decreased extent of neuronal cell death at seven days post-injury. Western blot analysis revealed that complement C3 levels were reduced in the injured brain hemispheres of Cr2-/- mice, whereas plasma C3 levels remained unchanged, compared to wild-type mice. Finally, head-injured Cr2-/- had an attenuated extent of post-injury C3 tissue deposition, decreased astrocytosis and microglial activation, and attenuated immunoglobulin M deposition in injured brains compared to wild-type mice. Targeting of these receptors for complement C3 fragments (CR2/CR1) may represent a promising future approach for therapeutic immunomodulation after traumatic brain injury. PMID:24885042

  1. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanchun; Guan, Yingjun; Liu, Huancai; Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  2. Mitochondrially targeted wild-type p53 induces apoptosis in a solid human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Crawford, Howard C.; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic but also novel roles of p53 are becoming increasingly well characterized. We previously showed that ex vivo retroviral transfer of mitochondrially targeted wild type p53 (mitop53) in the Eμ-myc mouse lymphoma model efficiently induces tumor cell killing in vivo. In an effort to further explore the therapeutic potential of mitop53 for its pro-apoptotic effect in solid tumors, we generated replication-deficient recombinant human Adenovirus type 5 vectors. We show here that adenoviral delivery of mitop53 by intratumoral injection into HCT116 human colon carcinoma xenograft tumors in nude mice is surprisingly effective, resulting in tumor cell death of comparable potency to conventional p53. These apoptotic effects in vivo were confirmed by Ad5-mitop53 mediated cell death of HCT116 cells in culture. Together, these data provide encouragement to further explore the potential for novel mitop53 proteins in cancer therapy to execute the shortest known circuitry of p53 death signaling. PMID:18719383

  3. Wild-Type and Non-Wild-Type Mycobacterium tuberculosis MIC Distributions for the Novel Fluoroquinolone Antofloxacin Compared with Those for Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xia; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Wei, Guomei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Lingling; Schön, Thomas; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2016-01-01

    Antofloxacin (AFX) is a novel fluoroquinolone that has been approved in China for the treatment of infections caused by a variety of bacterial species. We investigated whether it could be repurposed for the treatment of tuberculosis by studying its in vitro activity. We determined the wild-type and non-wild-type MIC ranges for AFX as well as ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LFX), and moxifloxacin (MFX), using the microplate alamarBlue assay, of 126 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Beijing, China, of which 48 were OFX resistant on the basis of drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium. The MIC distributions were correlated with mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (Rv0006) and gyrB (Rv0005). Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data for AFX were retrieved from the literature. AFX showed lower MIC levels than OFX but higher MIC levels than LFX and MFX on the basis of the tentative epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) determined in this study. All strains with non-wild-type MICs for AFX harbored known resistance mutations that also resulted in non-wild-type MICs for LFX and MFX. Moreover, our data suggested that the current critical concentration of OFX for Löwenstein-Jensen medium that was recently revised by the World Health Organization might be too high, resulting in the misclassification of phenotypically non-wild-type strains with known resistance mutations as wild type. On the basis of our exploratory PK/PD calculations, the current dose of AFX is unlikely to be optimal for the treatment of tuberculosis, but higher doses could be effective. PMID:27324769

  4. Wild-Type and Non-Wild-Type Mycobacterium tuberculosis MIC Distributions for the Novel Fluoroquinolone Antofloxacin Compared with Those for Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Wei, Guomei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Lingling; Schön, Thomas; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J; Köser, Claudio U; Huang, Hairong

    2016-09-01

    Antofloxacin (AFX) is a novel fluoroquinolone that has been approved in China for the treatment of infections caused by a variety of bacterial species. We investigated whether it could be repurposed for the treatment of tuberculosis by studying its in vitro activity. We determined the wild-type and non-wild-type MIC ranges for AFX as well as ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LFX), and moxifloxacin (MFX), using the microplate alamarBlue assay, of 126 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Beijing, China, of which 48 were OFX resistant on the basis of drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium. The MIC distributions were correlated with mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (Rv0006) and gyrB (Rv0005). Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data for AFX were retrieved from the literature. AFX showed lower MIC levels than OFX but higher MIC levels than LFX and MFX on the basis of the tentative epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) determined in this study. All strains with non-wild-type MICs for AFX harbored known resistance mutations that also resulted in non-wild-type MICs for LFX and MFX. Moreover, our data suggested that the current critical concentration of OFX for Löwenstein-Jensen medium that was recently revised by the World Health Organization might be too high, resulting in the misclassification of phenotypically non-wild-type strains with known resistance mutations as wild type. On the basis of our exploratory PK/PD calculations, the current dose of AFX is unlikely to be optimal for the treatment of tuberculosis, but higher doses could be effective. PMID:27324769

  5. Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.8 in the regulation of the release and synthesis of substance P in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, He-Bin; Shiba, Eri; Li, Yu-Sang; Morioka, Norimitsu; Zheng, Tai-Xing; Ogata, Nobukuni; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2008-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Na(v)1.8 contributes to the release and/or synthesis of substance P (SP) in adult mice dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The SP released from cultured DRG neurons of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice exposed to either capsaicin or KCl was significantly lower than that from wild-type (C57BL/6) mice based on a radioimmunoassay. The SP level of L6 DRG in Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice was also lower than that in wild-type mice. After chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, the level of SP decreased in the L6 ipsilateral DRG of wild-type but not Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. The preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) mRNAs in L4 - 6 DRGs of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice also fell to half their normally abundant levels of expression. There were significant increases in Na(v)1.8 expression of the L6 contralateral DRG from wild-type mice and in the percentage of neurons expressing neurokinin-1 receptor in the cytosol of L6 DRGs from wild-type or Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. These findings suggest that Na(v)1.8 is involved in the regulation of the release and synthesis of SP in the DRG neurons of wild-type mice. PMID:18845912

  6. Ghrelin stimulates proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitors from the subventricular zone in the adult mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Endan; Kim, Yumi; Kim, Sehee; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Park, Seungjoon

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin has been shown to regulate neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of ghrelin on cell proliferation and neuroblast formation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory system (RMS) and generation of interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB). We found that ghrelin receptors were expressed in the SVZ-RMS-OB system. Ghrelin knockout (GKO) mice have fewer proliferating neural progenitor cells and neuroblasts in the SVZ, while ghrelin administration attenuated these changes. We also found that not only the number of BrdU-labeled cells but also the fraction of migratory neuroblasts in the RMS was decreased in the GKO mice compared with controls. Treatment of GKO mice with ghrelin restored these numbers to the wild-type control values. Far fewer BrdU/NeuN double-labeled cells were found in the OB of GKO mice than in wild-type mice 4 weeks after labeling, which were increased by ghrelin replacement. GKO mice showed less numbers of BrdU/calbindin, BrdU/calretinin and BrdU/tyrosine hydroxylase double-labeled cells in the periglomerular layer of the OB. However, these numbers were increased to wild-type values after ghrelin administration. Finally, in the GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats, ghrelin increased the number of progenitor cells and neuroblasts in the SVZ, without significant effect on the differentiation in the OB. These findings suggest that ghrelin is involved in the regulation of proliferation of progenitor cells in the SVZ, the number of migratory neuroblasts in the SVZ, and the differentiation of interneurons in the OB. PMID:24295570

  7. Estimation of the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration value distribution.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Stijn; Aerts, Marc; Verbeke, Geert; Beloeil, Pierre-Alexandre

    2014-01-30

    Antimicrobial resistance has become one of the main public health burdens of the last decades, and monitoring the development and spread of non-wild-type isolates has therefore gained increased interest. Monitoring is performed based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values, which are collected through the application of dilution experiments. In order to account for the unobserved population heterogeneity of wild-type and non-wild-type isolates, mixture models are extremely useful. Instead of estimating the entire mixture globally, it was our major aim to provide an estimate for the wild-type first component only. The characteristics of this first component are not expected to change over time, once the wild-type population has been confidently identified for a given antimicrobial. With this purpose, we developed a new method based on the multinomial distribution, and we carry out a simulation study to study the properties of the new estimator. Because the new approach fits within the likelihood framework, we can compare distinct distributional assumptions in order to determine the most suitable distribution for the wild-type population. We determine the optimal parameters based on the AIC criterion, and attention is also paid to the model-averaged approach using the Akaike weights. The latter is thought to be very suitable to derive specific characteristics of the wild-type distribution and to determine limits for the wild-type MIC range. In this way, the new method provides an elegant means to compare distinct distributional assumptions and to quantify the wild-type MIC distribution of specific antibiotic-bacterium combinations.

  8. Memory formation and retention are affected in adult miR-132/212 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Smith, Pascal Y; Filali, Mohammed; Goupil, Claudia; Planel, Emmanuel; Magill, Stephen T; Goodman, Richard H; Hébert, Sébastien S

    2015-01-01

    The miR-132/212 family is thought to play an important role in neural function and plasticity, while its misregulation has been observed in various neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we analyzed 6-month-old miR-132/212 knockout mice in a battery of cognitive and non-cognitive behavioral tests. No significant changes were observed in reflexes and basic sensorimotor functions as determined by the SHIRPA primary screen. Accordingly, miR-132/212 knockout mice did not differ from wild-type controls in general locomotor activity in an open-field test. Furthermore, no significant changes of anxiety were measured in an elevated plus maze task. However, the mutant mice showed retention phase defects in a novel object recognition test and in the T-water maze. Moreover, the learning and probe phases in the Barnes maze were clearly altered in knockout mice when compared to controls. Finally, changes in BDNF, CREB, and MeCP2 were identified in the miR-132/212-deficient mice, providing a potential mechanism for promoting memory loss. Taken together, these results further strengthen the role of miR-132/212 in memory formation and retention, and shed light on the potential consequences of its deregulation in neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Two different pathways for the maintenance of trabecular bone in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Marie K; Movérare, Sofia; Skrtic, Stanko; Alatalo, Sari; Halleen, Jussi; Mohan, Subburaman; Gustafsson, J A; Ohlsson, Claes

    2002-04-01

    Androgens may regulate the male skeleton either directly via activation of the androgen receptor (AR) or indirectly via aromatization of androgens into estrogen and, thereafter, via activation of estrogen receptors (ERs). There are two known estrogen receptors, ER-alpha and ER-beta. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative roles of ER-alpha, ER-beta, and AR in the maintenance of trabecular bone in male mice. Seven-month-old male mice, lacking ER-alpha (ERKO), ER-beta (BERKO), or both receptors (DERKO), were orchidectomized (orx) and treated for 3 weeks with 0.7 microg/mouse per day of 17beta-estradiol or vehicle. No reduction in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) was seen in ERKO, BERKO, or DERKO mice before orx, showing that neither ER-a nor ER-beta is required for the maintenance of a normal trabecular BMD in male mice. After orx, there was a pronounced decrease in trabecular BMD, similar for all groups, resulting in equal levels of trabecular BMD in all genotypes. This reduction was reversed completely in wild-type (WT) and BERKO mice treated with estrogen, and no significant effect of estrogen was found in ERKO or DERKO mice. In summary, the trabecular bone is preserved both by a testicular factor, presumably testosterone acting via AR and by an estrogen-induced activation of ER-alpha. These results indicate that AR and ER-alpha are redundant in the maintenance of the trabecular bone in male mice. In contrast, ER-beta is of no importance for the regulation of trabecular bone in male mice.

  10. Evaluation of Oogenesis Aspects in Neonatal and Adult Mice after Toloaldoxime Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fazeltabar Malekshah, Mohammad; Sedighi, Mahsa; Parivar, Kazem; Mohseni Kouchesfahani, Homa; Bigdeli, Mohamadali

    2015-01-01

    Objective Oximes are important materials in organic chemistry. Synparamethyl benzal- dehyde oxime (toloaldoxime) is structurally similar to other oximes, hence we have studied its effects on the neonatal and adult female Balb/c mice reproductive systems in order to provide a platform for future studies on the production of female contraceptive drugs. Materials and Methods In experimental study, we studied the effects of toloaldoxime on ovary growth and gonadal hormones of neonatal and adult Balb/c mice. A regression model for prediction was presented. Results The effects of toloaldoxime on neonatal mice were more than adult mice. The greatest effect was on the number of Graafian follicles (59.6% in adult mice and 31.83% in neonatal mice). The least effect was on ovary weight, and blood serum lev- els of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Conclusion According to the data obtained, toloaldoxime can be considered an anti- pregnancy substance. PMID:26464830

  11. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein.

  12. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein. PMID:27497324

  13. First Demonstration of Positive Allosteric-like Modulation at the Human Wild Type Translocator Protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Werry, Eryn L; Scarf, Alana M; Hanani, Raphy; Chua, Sook Wern; King, Victoria A; Barron, Melissa L; Martins, Ralph N; Ittner, Lars M; Rendina, Louis M; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-11-12

    We show that changing the number and position of nitrogen atoms in the heteroatomic core of a pyrazolopyrimidine acetamide is sufficient to induce complex binding to wild type human TSPO. Only compounds with this complex binding profile lacked intrinsic effect on glioblastoma proliferation but positively modulated the antiproliferative effects of a synthetic TSPO ligand. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of allosteric-like interaction at the wild type human TSPO.

  14. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Kim, Jane J; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Jeste, Dilip V; Achim, Cristian L; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions.

  15. Spatial Cognition in Adult and Aged Mice Exposed to High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Kim, Jane J; Scadeng, Miriam; Woods, Gina; Kado, Deborah M; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Jeste, Dilip V; Achim, Cristian L; Semenova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in multiple aspects of cognitive function, with spatial cognition being particularly sensitive to age-related decline. Environmental stressors, such as high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, that produce a diabetic phenotype and metabolic dysfunction may indirectly lead to exacerbated brain aging and promote the development of cognitive deficits. The present work investigated whether exposure to HFD exacerbates age-related cognitive deficits in adult versus aged mice. Adult (5 months old) and aged (15 months old) mice were exposed to control diet or HFD for three months prior to, and throughout, behavioral testing. Anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box test, discrimination learning and memory in the novel object/place recognition tests, and spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze test were assessed. HFD resulted in significant gains in body weight and fat mass content with adult mice gaining significantly more weight and adipose tissue due to HFD than aged mice. Weight gain was attributed to food calories sourced from fat, but not total calorie intake. HFD increased fasting insulin levels in all mice, but adult mice showed a greater increase relative to aged mice. Behaviorally, HFD increased anxiety-like behavior in adult but not aged mice without significantly affecting spatial cognition. In contrast, aged mice fed either control or HFD diet displayed deficits in novel place discrimination and spatial learning. Our results suggest that adult mice are more susceptible to the physiological and anxiety-like effects of HFD consumption than aged mice, while aged mice displayed deficits in spatial cognition regardless of dietary influence. We conclude that although HFD induces systemic metabolic dysfunction in both adult and aged mice, overall cognitive function was not adversely affected under the current experimental conditions. PMID:26448649

  16. Co-fibrillogenesis of Wild-type and D76N β2-Microglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Natalello, Antonino; Mangione, P. Patrizia; Giorgetti, Sofia; Porcari, Riccardo; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Relini, Annalisa; Ami, Diletta; Faravelli, Giulia; Valli, Maurizia; Stoppini, Monica; Doglia, Silvia M.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Raimondi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic variant of β2-microglobulin, D76N, can readily convert into genuine fibrils under physiological conditions and primes in vitro the fibrillogenesis of the wild-type β2-microglobulin. By Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that the amyloid transformation of wild-type β2-microglobulin can be induced by the variant only after its complete fibrillar conversion. Our current findings are consistent with preliminary data in which we have shown a seeding effect of fibrils formed from D76N or the natural truncated form of β2-microglobulin lacking the first six N-terminal residues. Interestingly, the hybrid wild-type/variant fibrillar material acquired a thermodynamic stability similar to that of homogenous D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils and significantly higher than the wild-type homogeneous fibrils prepared at neutral pH in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol. These results suggest that the surface of D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils can favor the transition of the wild-type protein into an amyloid conformation leading to a rapid integration into fibrils. The chaperone crystallin, which is a mild modulator of the lag phase of the variant fibrillogenesis, potently inhibits fibril elongation of the wild-type even once it is absorbed on D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils. PMID:26921323

  17. Susceptibility of Different Mouse Wild Type Strains to Develop Diet-Induced NAFLD/AFLD-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Vera H. I.; Macheiner, Tanja; Kessler, Sonja M.; Czepukojc, Beate; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Kiemer, Alexandra K.; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Lackner, Carolin; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease have been intensively studied, concerning pathophysiological mechanisms are still incompletely understood. This may be due to the use of different animal models and resulting model-associated variation. Therefore, this study aimed to compare three frequently used wild type mouse strains in their susceptibility to develop diet-induced features of non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease associated clinical, biochemical, and histological features in C57BL/6, CD-1, and 129Sv WT mice were induced by (i) high-fat diet feeding, (ii) ethanol feeding only, and (iii) the combination of high-fat diet and ethanol feeding. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid profiles were compared in CD-1 and 129Sv mice. Additionally hepatic fatty acid composition was determined in 129Sv mice. In C57BL/6 mice dietary regimens resulted in heterogeneous hepatic responses, ranging from pronounced steatosis and inflammation to a lack of any features of fatty liver disease. Liver-related serum biochemistry showed high deviations within the regimen groups. CD-1 mice did not exhibit significant changes in metabolic and liver markers and developed no significant steatosis or inflammation as a response to dietary regimens. Although 129Sv mice showed no weight gain, this strain achieved most consistent features of fatty liver disease, apparent from concentration alterations of liver-related serum biochemistry as well as moderate steatosis and inflammation as a result of all dietary regimens. Furthermore, the hepatic lipid profile as well as the fatty acid composition of 129Sv mice were considerably altered, upon feeding the different dietary regimens. Accordingly, diet-induced non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease is most consistently promoted in 129Sv mice compared to C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. As a conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of genetic background of used mouse strains for modeling diet

  18. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine overcomes the innate resistance to erlotinib of non-small cell lung cancer cells with wild-type EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yiyu; Ling, Yi-He; Sironi, Juan; Schwartz, Edward L.; Perez-Soler, Roman; Piperdi, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The EGFR inhibitor erlotinib is much less effective in NSCLC tumors with wild-type EGFR than in tumors with activating EGFR mutations. Autophagy is a tightly regulated lysosomal self-digestion process that may alternatively promote cell survival or type II cell death. This study assessed the role of autophagy in erlotinib-mediated cytotoxicity. Methods We used wild-type EGFR erlotinib-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cell lines to determine if inhibiting autophagy by a therapeutic agent potentiated the antitumor activity of erlotinib in vitro and in vivo. Results Erlotinib at a clinically relevant concentration (2 μM) induced autophagy in NSCLC cells with wild type EGFR, and the degree of induction was greater in resistant than in sensitive cells, suggesting that autophagy is cytoprotective. This was confirmed by knockdown of the autophagy-related gene Atg-5 and by using the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ), both of which increased the cytotoxicity of erlotinib. The synergistic activity of CQ was not due to the potentiation of erlotinib’s effects on autophagy, cell cycle arrest, inhibition of EGF receptor, or the inhibition of signaling downstream of the EGFR. Rather CQ markedly activated apoptosis in the cells. The ability of CQ to potentiate the antitumor activity of erlotinib was also seen in mice bearing NSCLC tumor xenografts. Conclusions The ability to adapt to anti-EGFR therapy by triggering autophagy may be a key determinant of resistance to erlotinib in wild-type EGFR NSCLC. Inhibition of autophagy by CQ represents a novel strategy to broaden the spectrum of erlotinib efficacy in wild-type EGFR NSCLC tumors. PMID:23575415

  19. Antidepressant-like effect of lead in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, M; Matteussi, A S; Rodrigues, A L

    1999-12-01

    It has been reported that lead can cause behavioral impairment by inhibiting the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, exhibits an antidepressant-like action in the forced swimming test. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether subacute lead exposure in adult male Swiss mice weighing 30-35 g causes an antidepressant-like action in a forced swimming test. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with 10 mg/kg lead acetate or saline daily for 7 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, the saline and lead-treated mice received an injection of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg, ip) or saline and were tested in forced swimming and in open-field tests. Immobility time was similarly reduced in the saline-MK-801, Pb-saline and Pb-MK-801 groups compared to the saline-saline group (mean +/- SEM; 197.3 +/- 18.5, 193.5 +/- 15.8, 191.3 +/- 12.3 and 264.0 +/- 14.4 s, respectively; N = 9). These data indicate that lead may exert its effect on the forced swimming test by directly or indirectly inhibiting the NMDA receptor complex. Lead treatment caused no deficit in memory of habituation and did not affect locomotor activity in an open-field (N = 14). However, mice that received MK-801 after lead exhibited a deficit in habituation (22% reduction in rearing responses between session 3 and 1; N = 14) as compared to control (41% reduction in rearing responses; N = 15), further suggesting that lead may have affected the NMDA receptor activity. Forced-swim immobility in a basin in two daily consecutive sessions was also significantly decreased by lead exposure (mean +/- SEM; day 1 = 10.6 +/- 3.2, day 2 = 19.6 +/- 3.6; N = 16) as compared to control (day 1 = 18.4 +/- 3.8, day 2 = 34.0 +/- 3.7; N = 17), whereas the number of crossings was not affected by lead treatment, further indicating a specific antidepressant-like action of lead.

  20. DR4 specific TRAIL variants are more efficacious than wild-type TRAIL in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Albarenque, Stella Maris; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J; Mohr, Andrea; Zwacka, Ralf M

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for pancreatic carcinoma afford only modest survival benefits. TRAIL, as a potent and specific inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells, would be a promising new treatment option. However, since not all pancreatic cancer cells respond to TRAIL, further improvements and optimizations are still needed. One strategy to improve the effectiveness of TRAIL-based therapies is to specifically target one of the 2 cell death inducing TRAIL-receptors, TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 to overcome resistance. To this end, we designed constructs expressing soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) variants that were rendered specific for either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 by amino acid changes in the TRAIL ectodomain. When we expressed these constructs, including wild-type sTRAIL (sTRAIL(wt)), TRAIL-R1 (sTRAIL(DR4)) and TRAIL-R2 (sTRAIL(DR5)) specific variants, in 293 producer cells we found all to be readily expressed and secreted into the supernatant. These supernatants were subsequently transferred onto target cancer cells and apoptosis measured. We found that the TRAIL-R1 specific variant had higher apoptosis-inducing activity in human pancreatic carcinoma Colo357 cells as well as PancTu1 cells that were additionally sensitized by targeting of XIAP. Finally, we tested TRAIL-R1 specific recombinant TRAIL protein (rTRAIL(DR4)) on Colo357 xenografts in nude mice and found them to be more efficacious than rTRAIL(wt). Our results demonstrate the benefits of synthetic biological approaches and show that TRAIL-R1 specific variants can potentially enhance the therapeutic efficacy of TRAIL-based therapies in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that they can possibly become part of individualized and tumor specific combination treatments in the future. PMID:25482930

  1. Resistance and gain-of-resistance phenotypes in cancers harboring wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rivera, Michelle; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the bedrock for the clinical management of cancer, and the tumor suppressor p53 has a central role in this therapeutic modality. This protein facilitates favorable antitumor drug response through a variety of key cellular functions, including cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. These functions essentially cease once p53 becomes mutated, as occurs in ~50% of cancers, and some p53 mutants even exhibit gain-of-function effects, which lead to greater drug resistance. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that resistance is also seen in cancers harboring wild-type p53. In this review, we discuss how wild-type p53 is inactivated to render cells resistant to antitumor drugs. This may occur through various mechanisms, including an increase in proteasomal degradation, defects in post-translational modification, and downstream defects in p53 target genes. We also consider evidence that the resistance seen in wild-type p53 cancers can be substantially greater than that seen in mutant p53 cancers, and this poses a far greater challenge for efforts to design strategies that increase drug response in resistant cancers already primed with wild-type p53. Because the mechanisms contributing to this wild-type p53 “gain-of-resistance” phenotype are largely unknown, a concerted research effort is needed to identify the underlying basis for the occurrence of this phenotype and, in parallel, to explore the possibility that the phenotype may be a product of wild-type p53 gain-of-function effects. Such studies are essential to lay the foundation for a rational therapeutic approach in the treatment of resistant wild-type p53 cancers. PMID:22227014

  2. IL-12p40 gene-deficient BALB/c mice exhibit lower weight loss, reduced lung pathology and decreased sensitization to allergen in response to infection with pneumonia virus of mice.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Pratima; Sarkar, Indranil; Atanley, Ethel; Gomis, Susantha; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) causes similar disease. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible, while C57BL/6 mice are more resistant to PVM. IL-12 was significantly more up-regulated in response to PVM infection in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice. IL-12p40-deficient neonatal and adult BALB/c mice showed significantly less weight loss than wild-type mice after PVM challenge. The percentage of regulatory T cells, as well as IFN-β and IL-18 expression, was higher in the lungs of both neonatal and adult IL-12p40-/- mice. Adult IL-12p40-/- mice also showed enhanced TGF-β and IL-10 expression and reduced inflammatory responses. Furthermore, IL-12p40-/- mice showed decreased sensitization to inhaled cockroach antigen after PVM infection when compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, these data suggest that a depressed regulatory capacity in BALB/c mice to PVM infection results in enhanced immunopathology and sensitization to allergen. PMID:27400340

  3. Variable stress-responsiveness in wild type and domesticated fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Peter; Iwamoto, Toshitaka; Murakami, Noboru

    2008-01-28

    We combined behavioral and physiological measures to compare coping style in wild-type Betta splendens and a domesticated strain selectively bred for sports fighting. We showed previously that the fighter strain is more aggressive than the wild type during experimental conditions that most closely resemble an actual fight. We predicted that compared to the wild type, the fighter strain would show a more proactive coping style, characterized by lesser cortisol and greater sympathetic responses to non-social challenges. We introduced males to an unfamiliar environment and spatial confinement as challenges that may resemble some of those that B. splendens may encounter in its natural habitat. We developed a non-invasive stress assay that enables repeated individual measures of water-borne cortisol. We estimated sympathetic activation through opercular beat rate and recorded the duration of behavioral immobility. We found that exposure to an unfamiliar environment raised cortisol levels in the wild type but not in the fighter strain and that confinement raised cortisol levels in both. In both strains opercular beat rates were significantly reduced during the latter stages of confinement compared to during the early stages. The fighter strain, but not the wild type, adopted a behavioral strategy of immobility from the very beginning of confinement.

  4. A positively gravitropic mutant mirrors the wild-type protonemal response in the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, T. A.; Cove, D. J.; Sack, F. D.

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. protonemata grow up in the dark by negative gravitropism. When upright wild-type protonemata are reoriented 90 degrees, they temporarily grow down soon after reorientation ("initial reversal") and also prior to cytokinesis ("mitotic reversal"). A positively gravitropic mutant designated wrong- way response (wwr-1) has been isolated by screening ultraviolet light-mutagenized Ceratodon protonemata. Protonemata of wwr-l reoriented from the vertical to the horizontal grow down with kinetics comparable to those of the wild-type. Protonemata of wwr-1 also show initial and mitotic reversals where they temporarily grow up. Thus, the direction of gravitropism, initial reversal, and mitotic reversal are coordinated though each are opposite in wwr-1 compared to the wild-type. Normal plastid zonation is still maintained in dark-grown wwr-1 apical cells, but the plastids are more numerous and plastid sedimentation is more pronounced. In addition, wwr-1 apical cells are wider and the tips greener than in the wild-type. These data suggest that a functional WWR gene product is not necessary for the establishment of some gravitropic polarity, for gravitropism, or for the coordination of the reversals. Thus, the WWR protein may normally transduce information about cell orientation.

  5. A positively gravitropic mutant mirrors the wild-type protonemal response in the moss Ceratodon purpureus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, T A; Cove, D J; Sack, F D

    1997-06-01

    Wild-type Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. protonemata grow up in the dark by negative gravitropism. When upright wild-type protonemata are reoriented 90 degrees, they temporarily grow down soon after reorientation ("initial reversal") and also prior to cytokinesis ("mitotic reversal"). A positively gravitropic mutant designated wrong- way response (wwr-1) has been isolated by screening ultraviolet light-mutagenized Ceratodon protonemata. Protonemata of wwr-l reoriented from the vertical to the horizontal grow down with kinetics comparable to those of the wild-type. Protonemata of wwr-1 also show initial and mitotic reversals where they temporarily grow up. Thus, the direction of gravitropism, initial reversal, and mitotic reversal are coordinated though each are opposite in wwr-1 compared to the wild-type. Normal plastid zonation is still maintained in dark-grown wwr-1 apical cells, but the plastids are more numerous and plastid sedimentation is more pronounced. In addition, wwr-1 apical cells are wider and the tips greener than in the wild-type. These data suggest that a functional WWR gene product is not necessary for the establishment of some gravitropic polarity, for gravitropism, or for the coordination of the reversals. Thus, the WWR protein may normally transduce information about cell orientation. PMID:11541791

  6. Variable stress-responsiveness in wild type and domesticated fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Peter; Iwamoto, Toshitaka; Murakami, Noboru

    2008-01-28

    We combined behavioral and physiological measures to compare coping style in wild-type Betta splendens and a domesticated strain selectively bred for sports fighting. We showed previously that the fighter strain is more aggressive than the wild type during experimental conditions that most closely resemble an actual fight. We predicted that compared to the wild type, the fighter strain would show a more proactive coping style, characterized by lesser cortisol and greater sympathetic responses to non-social challenges. We introduced males to an unfamiliar environment and spatial confinement as challenges that may resemble some of those that B. splendens may encounter in its natural habitat. We developed a non-invasive stress assay that enables repeated individual measures of water-borne cortisol. We estimated sympathetic activation through opercular beat rate and recorded the duration of behavioral immobility. We found that exposure to an unfamiliar environment raised cortisol levels in the wild type but not in the fighter strain and that confinement raised cortisol levels in both. In both strains opercular beat rates were significantly reduced during the latter stages of confinement compared to during the early stages. The fighter strain, but not the wild type, adopted a behavioral strategy of immobility from the very beginning of confinement. PMID:17884114

  7. Vitamin D receptor is required for dietary calcium-induced repression of calbindin-D9k expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Merry J G; Cao, Li-Ping; Kong, Juan; Sitrin, Michael D; Li, Yan Chun

    2005-05-01

    Calbindin (CaBP), the vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, is believed to play an important role in intracellular calcium transport. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high dietary calcium on the expression of CaBP-D9k and CaBP-D28k in the presence and absence of a functional vitamin D receptor (VDR). Treatment with the HCa-Lac diet containing 2% calcium, 1.5% phosphorus and 20% lactose reversed the hypocalcemia seen in adult VDR-null mice in 3 weeks but did not significantly change the blood ionized calcium in wild-type mice. This dietary treatment dramatically suppressed both the duodenal and the renal CaBP-D9k expression in wild-type mice at both mRNA and protein levels but had little effect on the expression of the same gene in VDR-null mice. Removal of this diet gradually restored the expression of CaBP-D9k to the untreated level in wild-type mice. Only moderate or little change in CaBP-D28k expression was seen in wild-type and VDR-null mice fed with the HCa-Lac diet. The VDR content in the duodenum or kidney of wild-type mice was not altered by the dietary treatment. These results suggest that calcium regulates CaBP-D9k expression by modulating the circulating 1,25-dihydrxyvitamin D(3) level and that VDR is thus required for the dietary calcium-induced suppression of CaBP-D9k expression. Calcium regulation of the CaBP-D9k level may represent an important mechanism by which animals maintain their calcium balance. PMID:15866228

  8. Histaminergic modulation of the intact respiratory network of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Dutschmann, M; Bischoff, A M; Büsselberg, D; Richter, D W

    2003-02-01

    Histaminergic modulation of neuronal activity in the respiratory network was investigated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the working heart-brainstem preparation of adult mice. Systemic application of histamine, as well as the H-1 and H-3 receptor agonists 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]- N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl) heptanecarboxamide (HTMT) and imetit, 0.5-10 micro M, significantly increased the frequency of respiratory burst discharges. Dimaprit, an H-2 receptor agonist, had no effect on respiratory activity. To test for ongoing histaminergic modulation we applied the histamine receptor antagonists pyrilamine (H-1); cimetidine (H-2) and thioperamide (H-3), each 0.5-10 micro M. Only the H-1 receptor antagonist had significant effects, viz. reduction of respiratory frequency and depression of burst amplitude. Underlying effects of histamine receptor activation were identified at the cellular level. Intracellular recordings showed that histamine mediated an increase in synaptic drive potentials in inspiratory neurones while augmentation of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic activity was observed in expiratory neurones. The augmented synaptic depolarisation of inspiratory neurones was blocked by the H-1 receptor antagonist. Histaminergic modulation is also involved in the hypoxic response of the respiratory network. Blockade of H-1 receptors significantly attenuated secondary depression of the biphasic hypoxic responses, while hypoxic augmentation was not affected. We conclude that histamine is a functional neuromodulator, which is tonically active in the respiratory network and is activated further during hypoxia. The data indicate that histaminergic neuromodulation acts predominantly via H-1 receptors.

  9. Impaired adult myelination in the prefrontal cortex of socially isolated mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Dietz, Karen; DeLoyht, Jacqueline M; Pedre, Xiomara; Kelkar, Dipti; Kaur, Jasbir; Vialou, Vincent; Lobo, Mary Kay; Dietz, David M; Nestler, Eric J; Dupree, Jeffrey; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Protracted social isolation of adult mice induced behavioral, transcriptional and ultrastructural changes in oligodendrocytes of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and impaired adult myelination. Social re-integration was sufficient to normalize behavioral and transcriptional changes. Short periods of isolation affected chromatin and myelin, but did not induce behavioral changes. Thus, myelinating oligodendrocytes in the adult PFC respond to social interaction with chromatin changes, suggesting that myelination acts as a form of adult plasticity. PMID:23143512

  10. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  11. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  12. Wild-type human p53 transactivates the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, C.V.; Brown, D.R.; Deb, S.; Deb, S.P.

    1995-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein negatively regulates cell growth and somatic mutations in the p53 gene lead to uncontrolled cell growth and oncogenesis. This report describes research which demonstrates, using a number of different cell lines, that at low levels, wild-type p53 transactivates the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter. When expressed at similar levels, tumor-derived p53 mutants did not transactivate the PCNA promoter. It also reports the identification of a wild-type human p53-binding site on the human PCNA promote. 84 refs., 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  13. Wild-Type p53 Binds to the TATA-Binding Protein and Represses Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Edward; Usheva, Anny; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Momand, Jamil; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Weinmann, Roberto; Levine, Arnold J.; Shenk, Thomas

    1992-12-01

    p53 activates transcription of genes with a p53 response element, and it can repress genes lacking the element. Here we demonstrate that wild-type but not mutant p53 inhibits transcription in a HeLa nuclear extract from minimal promoters. Wild-type but not mutant p53 binds to human TATA-binding protein (TBP). p53 does not bind to yeast TBP, and it cannot inhibit transcription in a HeLa extract where yeast TBP substitutes for human TBP. These results suggest a model in which p53 binds to TBP and interferes with transcriptional initiation.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy discriminates the response to microglial stimulation of wild type and Alzheimer’s disease models

    PubMed Central

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Yanez Lopez, Maria; Yuchun, Ding; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Prior, Malcolm; Brignell, Christopher; Parhizkar, Samira; Agostini, Alessandra; Bai, Li; Auer, Dorothee P.; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Microglia activation has emerged as a potential key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Metabolite levels assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are used as markers of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, but how they relate to microglial activation in health and chronic disease is incompletely understood. Using MRS, we monitored the brain metabolic response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced microglia activation in vivo in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (APP/PS1) and healthy controls (wild-type (WT) littermates) over 4 hours. We assessed reactive gliosis by immunohistochemistry and correlated metabolic and histological measures. In WT mice, LPS induced a microglial phenotype consistent with activation, associated with a sustained increase in macromolecule and lipid levels (ML9). This effect was not seen in APP/PS1 mice, where LPS did not lead to a microglial response measured by histology, but induced a late increase in the putative inflammation marker myoinositol (mI) and metabolic changes in total creatine and taurine previously reported to be associated with amyloid load. We argue that ML9 and mI distinguish the response of WT and APP/PS1 mice to immune mediators. Lipid and macromolecule levels may represent a biomarker of activation of healthy microglia, while mI may not be a glial marker. PMID:26813748

  15. In vitro re-expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) in cultured Ahr-deficient mouse antral follicles partially restores the phenotype to that of cultured wild-type mouse follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, A; Gao, L.; Karman, B.N.; Flaws, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic effects of various endocrine disrupting chemicals. In female mice, global deletion of the Ahr (AhrKO) results in slow growth of ovarian antral follicles. No studies, however, have examined whether injection of the Ahr restores the phenotypes of cultured AhrKO ovarian antral follicles to wild-type levels. Methods We developed a system to construct a recombinant adenovirus containing the Ahr to re-express the Ahr in AhrKO granulosa cells and whole antral follicles. We then compared follicle growth and levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway (Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Further, we compared the response to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Results AdAhr injection into AhrKO follicles partially restored their growth pattern to wild-type levels. Further, Ahr re-expressed follicles had significantly higher levels of Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1 compared to wild-type follicles. Upon TCDD treatment, only Cyp1a1 levels were significantly higher in Ahr re-expressed follicles compared to the levels in wild-type follicles. Conclusion Our system of re-expression of the Ahr partially restores follicle growth and transcript levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway to wild-type levels. PMID:25500125

  16. Selenium status alters the immune response and expulsion of adult Heligmosomodies bakeri in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heligmosomoides bakeri is a nematode with parasitic development exclusively in the small intestine of infected mice that induces a potent STAT6-dependent Th2 immune response. We previously demonstrated that host protective expulsion of adult H. bakeri was delayed in selenium (Se) deficient mice. ...

  17. Characterization of juvenile and young adult mice following induction of hydrocephalus with kaolin.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Luiza da Silva; Slobodian, Ili; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2009-09-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common neurological problem in humans, usually caused by an impairment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption. A reliable induced model of chronic hydrocephalus in mice would be useful to test hypotheses using genetic mutants. Our goal was to characterize behavioral and histological changes in juvenile and young adult mice with kaolin (aluminum silicate)-induced hydrocephalus. Seven-day old and 7-8 week old mice received injection of kaolin into the cisterna magna. Behavior was assessed repeatedly. Seven or 14 days following kaolin, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to assess ventricle size. In hydrocephalic mice, body weight was significantly lower than in age-matched saline-injected sham controls and the gait and posture score were impaired. Juvenile mice developed severe ventriculomegaly and had reduced corpus callosum thickness with gross white matter destruction by 14 days. Reactive astroglial change in white matter and cortex and reduced cellular proliferation in the subependymal zone were also apparent. Young adult mice developed only moderate ventricular enlargement without overt white matter destruction, although there was corpus callosum atrophy and mild astroglial reaction in white matter. Glial fibrillary acidic protein content was significantly higher in juvenile and young adult hydrocephalic mice at 7 and 14 days, but myelin basic protein content was not significantly altered. In conclusion, hydrocephalus induced by percutaneous injection of kaolin in juvenile and young adult mice is feasible. The associated periventricular alterations are essentially the same as those reported in rats of comparable ages.

  18. Vaccination of mice with liposome-entrapped adult antigens of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1988-01-01

    An immunization procedure was developed to induce protection of mice against the gastrointestinal helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Mice immunized by the oral route with antigens which were released by adult worms during their in vitro survival in a detergent-containing medium and which were entrapped in liposomes were protected against a challenge infection.

  19. The disorganized visual cortex in reelin-deficient mice is functional and allows for enhanced plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pielecka-Fortuna, Justyna; Wagener, Robin Jan; Martens, Ann-Kristin; Goetze, Bianka; Schmidt, Karl-Friedrich; Staiger, Jochen F; Löwel, Siegrid

    2015-11-01

    A hallmark of neocortical circuits is the segregation of processing streams into six distinct layers. The importance of this layered organization for cortical processing and plasticity is little understood. We investigated the structure, function and plasticity of primary visual cortex (V1) of adult mice deficient for the glycoprotein reelin and their wild-type littermates. In V1 of rl-/- mice, cells with different laminar fates are present at all cortical depths. Surprisingly, the (vertically) disorganized cortex maintains a precise retinotopic (horizontal) organization. Rl-/- mice have normal basic visual capabilities, but are compromised in more challenging perceptual tasks, such as orientation discrimination. Additionally, rl-/- animals learn and memorize a visual task as well as their wild-type littermates. Interestingly, reelin deficiency enhances visual cortical plasticity: juvenile-like ocular dominance plasticity is preserved into late adulthood. The present data offer an important insight into the capabilities of a disorganized cortical system to maintain basic functional properties.

  20. Activation of the central histaminergic system is involved in hypoxia-induced stroke tolerance in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yan-ying; Hu, Wei-wei; Dai, Hai-bin; Zhang, Jian-xiang; Zhang, Lu-yi; He, Ping; Shen, Yao; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Wei, Er-qing; Chen, Zhong

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that activation of the central histaminergic system is required for neuroprotection induced by hypoxic preconditioning. Wild-type (WT) and histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC-KO) mice were preconditioned by 3 hours of hypoxia (8% O2) and, 48 hours later, subjected to 30 minutes of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Hypoxic preconditioning improved neurologic function and decreased infarct volume in WT or HDC-KO mice treated with histamine, but not in HDC-KO or WT mice treated with α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH, an inhibitor of HDC). Laser-Doppler flowmetry analysis showed that hypoxic preconditioning ameliorated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the periphery of the MCA territory during ischemia in WT mice but not in HDC-KO mice. Histamine decreased in the cortex of WT mice after 2, 3, and 4 hours of hypoxia, and HDC activity increased after 3 hours of hypoxia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expressions showed a greater increase after hypoxia than those in HDC-KO or α-FMH-treated WT mice. In addition, the VEGF receptor-2 antagonist SU1498 prevented the protective effect of hypoxic preconditioning in infarct volume and reversed increased peripheral CBF in WT mice. Therefore, endogenous histamine is an essential mediator of hypoxic preconditioning. It may function by enhancing hypoxia-induced VEGF expression. PMID:20588322

  1. Activation of the central histaminergic system is involved in hypoxia-induced stroke tolerance in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan-ying; Hu, Wei-wei; Dai, Hai-bin; Zhang, Jian-xiang; Zhang, Lu-yi; He, Ping; Shen, Yao; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Wei, Er-qing; Chen, Zhong

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that activation of the central histaminergic system is required for neuroprotection induced by hypoxic preconditioning. Wild-type (WT) and histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC-KO) mice were preconditioned by 3 hours of hypoxia (8% O(2)) and, 48 hours later, subjected to 30 minutes of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Hypoxic preconditioning improved neurologic function and decreased infarct volume in WT or HDC-KO mice treated with histamine, but not in HDC-KO or WT mice treated with α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH, an inhibitor of HDC). Laser-Doppler flowmetry analysis showed that hypoxic preconditioning ameliorated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the periphery of the MCA territory during ischemia in WT mice but not in HDC-KO mice. Histamine decreased in the cortex of WT mice after 2, 3, and 4 hours of hypoxia, and HDC activity increased after 3 hours of hypoxia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expressions showed a greater increase after hypoxia than those in HDC-KO or α-FMH-treated WT mice. In addition, the VEGF receptor-2 antagonist SU1498 prevented the protective effect of hypoxic preconditioning in infarct volume and reversed increased peripheral CBF in WT mice. Therefore, endogenous histamine is an essential mediator of hypoxic preconditioning. It may function by enhancing hypoxia-induced VEGF expression.

  2. Litter Environment Affects Behavior and Brain Metabolic Activity of Adult Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Crews, David; Rushworth, David; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Ogawa, Sonoko

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, the formative environment for social and anxiety-related behaviors is the family unit; in the case of rodents, this is the litter and the mother-young bond. A deciding factor in this environment is the sex ratio of the litter and, in the case of mice lacking functional copies of gene(s), the ratio of the various genotypes in the litter. Both Sex and Genotype ratios of the litter affect the nature and quality of the individual's behavior later in adulthood, as well as metabolic activity in brain nuclei that underlie these behaviors. Mice were raised in litters reconstituted shortly after to birth to control for sex ratio and genotype ratio (wild type pups versus pups lacking a functional estrogen receptor α). In both males and females, the Sex and Genotype of siblings in the litter affected aggressive behaviors as well as patterns of metabolic activity in limbic nuclei in the social behavior network later in adulthood. Further, this pattern in males varied depending upon the Genotype of their brothers and sisters. Principal Components Analysis revealed two components comprised of several amygdalar and hypothalamic nuclei; the VMH showed strong correlations in both clusters, suggesting its pivotal nature in the organization of two neural networks. PMID:19707539

  3. Simvastatin and artesunate impact the structural organization of adult Schistosoma mansoni in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Alba Cristina Miranda de Barros; Santos, Thais da Silva; Neves, Renata Heisler; Lopes Torres, Eduardo José; Nogueira-Neto, José Firmino; Machado-Silva, José Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Experimental data have shown that simvastatin and artesunate possess activity against Schistosoma mansoni worms in mice fed standard chow. However, little is known regarding the roles of these drugs in mice fed high-fat chow. We have extended past studies by measuring the effects of these drugs on the structural organization of adult schistosomes in hypercholesterolemic mice. For this purpose, mice were gavaged with either simvastatin or artesunate at nine weeks post-infection and were euthanized by cervical dislocation at two weeks post-treatment. Adult worms were then collected and examined by conventional light microscopy, morphometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Plasma total cholesterol and worm reduction rates were significantly increased in mice fed high-fat chow compared with their respective control groups. Simvastatin and artesunate caused changes in the tegument, tubercles, and reproductive system (testicular lobes, vitelline glands and ovarian cells), particularly when administered to mice fed high-fat chow. In particular, the tegument and tubercles were significantly thinner in artesunate-treated worms in mice fed high-fat chow compared with mice fed standard chow. This study thus demonstrated that simvastatin and artesunate have several novel effects on the structural organization of adult worms. Together, these results show, for the first time, that simvastatin and artesunate display antischistosomal activity in hypercholesterolemic mice.

  4. B7-1/CD80-transduced tumor cells elicit better systemic immunity than wild-type tumor cells admixed with Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; McGowan, P; Ashe, S; Johnston, J V; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E

    1994-10-15

    Tumor cells genetically modified by transduction of B7 (B7-1/CD80), a natural ligand for the T-cell costimulatory molecules CD28 and CTLA-4, can elicit potent tumor immunity, and they can be effective for treatment of established cancers in animal models. In this study, three tumor lines, the EL4 lymphoma, the P815 mastocytoma, and the MCA102 sarcoma were transduced with recombinant retrovirus containing the murine B7 gene, and their potency to induce systemic immunity protective against challenge with wild-type tumor was compared to that of the same tumor cells admixed with the commonly used adjuvant Corynebacterium parvum. While admixture of tumor cells with C. parvum resulted in complete regression of tumors in syngeneic mice, it did not induce protective immunity against a subsequent challenge of wild-type cells from any of the 3 tumors tested. In contrast, B7-transduced EL4 and P815 tumors regressed locally and induced a potent systemic immunity to wild-type tumors and a higher level of cytotoxic T-cell activity than did tumor cells admixed with C. parvum. No systemic immunity was induced by B7-transduced nonimmunogenic MCA102 sarcoma cells. Our results demonstrate that immunogenic tumor cells transduced with the B7 gene are superior to tumor cells mixed with C. parvum for the induction of systemic tumor immunity. PMID:7522958

  5. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  6. Measuring cell wall elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Melissa; Venkataraman, Sankar; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P

    2006-07-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria.

  7. DNA binding properties of dioxin receptors in wild-type and mutant mouse hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cuthill, S.; Poellinger, L.

    1988-04-19

    The current model of action of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) entails stimulation of target gene transcription via the formation of dioxin-receptor complexes and subsequent accumulation of the complexes within the cell nucleus. Here, the authors have analyzed the DNA binding properties of the dioxin receptor in wild-type mouse hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells and a class of nonresponsive mutant cells which fail to accumulate dioxin-receptor complexes within the nucleus in vivo. In vitro, both the wild-type and mutant (/sup 3/H)dioxin-receptor complexes exhibited low affinity for DNA-cellulose (5-8% and around 4% retention, respectively) in the absence of prior biochemical manipulations. However, following chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, the wild-type but not the mutant dioxin receptor was transformed to a species with an increased affinity for DNA (40-50% retention on DNA-cellulose). The gross molecular structure of the mutant, non DNA binding dioxin receptor did not appear to be altered as compared to that of the wild-type receptor. These results imply that the primary deficiency in the mutant dioxin receptor form may reside at the DNA binding level and that, in analogy to steroid hormone receptors, DNA binding of the receptor may be an essential step in the regulation of target gene transcription by dioxin.

  8. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  9. Phosphate uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hansen wild type and phenotypes exposed to space flight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Berry, D; Volz, P A

    1979-10-01

    Rates of phosphate uptake were approximately twice as great for Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-cell phenotypic isolates exposed to space parameters as for the wild-type ground control. Quantitative determination of 32P was performed by liquid scintillation spectrometry utilizing Cerenkov radiation counting techniques. PMID:395899

  10. Comparative Effects of Wild-type, bmr-6, bmr-12 and Stacked Sorghum: Sorghum Stover Digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative Effects of Wild-type, bmr-6, bmr-12 and Stacked Sorghum: Sorghum Stover Digestibility H. M. Dann,1 A. M. DiCerbo,1 J. F. Pedersen,2 and R. J. Grant1 1 William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, Chazy, NY 2 USDA, ARS, NPA Wheat, Sorghum and Forage Research, University of Nebraska, ...

  11. COMPARISON OF IN VITRO-CULTURED AND WILD-TYPE PERKINSUS MARINUS I: PATHOGEN VIRULENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perkinsus marinus is a highly contagious pathogen of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. Until recently, transmission studies have employed wild-type parasites isolated directly from infected oysters. Newly developed methods to propagate P. marinus in vitro have led to usin...

  12. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice.

  13. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice. PMID:26231800

  14. Chloroplast parameters differ in wild type and transgenic poplars overexpressing gsh1 in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2009-07-01

    Poplar mutants overexpressing the bacterial genes gsh1 or gsh2 encoding the enzymes of glutathione biosynthesis are among the best-characterised transgenic plants. However, this characterisation originates exclusively from laboratory studies, and the performance of these mutants under field conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report a field experiment in which the wild-type poplar hybrid Populus tremula x P. alba and a transgenic line overexpressing the bacterial gene gsh1 encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol were grown for 3 years at a relatively clean (control) field site and a field site contaminated with heavy metals. Aboveground biomass accumulation was slightly smaller in transgenic compared to wild-type plants; soil contamination significantly decreased biomass accumulation in both wild-type and transgenic plants by more than 40%. Chloroplasts parameters, i.e., maximal diameter, projection area and perimeter, surface area and volume, surface/volume ratio and a two-dimensional form coefficient, were found to depend on plant type, leaf tissue and soil contamination. The greatest differences between wild and transgenic poplars were observed at the control site. Under these conditions, chloroplast sizes in palisade tissue of transgenic poplar significantly exceeded those of the wild type. In contrast to the wild type, palisade chloroplast volume exceeded that of spongy chloroplasts in transgenic poplars at both field sites. Chlorophyll content per chloroplast was the same in wild and transgenic poplars. Apparently, the increase in chloroplast volume was not connected to changes in the photosynthetic centres. Chloroplasts of transgenic poplar at the control site were more elongated in palisade cells and close to spherical in spongy mesophyll chloroplasts. At the contaminated site, palisade and spongy cell chloroplasts of leaves from transgenic trees and the wild type were the same shape. Transgenic poplars also had a smaller chloroplast

  15. Monocular Deprivation in Adult Mice Alters Visual Acuity and Single-Unit Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Scott; Lickey, Marvin E.; Pham, Tony A.; Fischer, Quentin S.; Graves, Aundrea

    2007-01-01

    It has been discovered recently that monocular deprivation in young adult mice induces ocular dominance plasticity (ODP). This contradicts the traditional belief that ODP is restricted to a juvenile critical period. However, questions remain. ODP of young adults has been observed only using methods that are indirectly related to vision, and the…

  16. GENE PROFILING IN WILD-TYPE AND PPARα-NULL MICE EXPOSED TO PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA), is a persistent environmental contaminant found in the tissues of humans and wildlife. Over the last decade, health concerns have been raised, in part, because of the long half-life of PFOS and other PFAAs in humans,...

  17. Toxicogenomic profiling of perfluorononanoic acid in wild-type and PPARa-null mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and a developmental toxicant in laboratory animals. Like other perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOA) and perfluoroalkyl acid (PFOS), PFNA is a known activator ofperoxisome prol...

  18. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans. PMID:27096360

  19. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans.

  20. A comparison of osteoclast-rich and osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis in adult mice sheds light on the role of the osteoclast in coupling bone resorption and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Thudium, Christian S; Moscatelli, Ilana; Flores, Carmen; Thomsen, Jesper S; Brüel, Annemarie; Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Karsdal, Morten A; Richter, Johan; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Osteopetrosis due to lack of acid secretion by osteoclasts is characterized by abolished bone resorption, increased osteoclast numbers, but normal or even increased bone formation. In contrast, osteoclast-poor osteopetrosis appears to have less osteoblasts and reduced bone formation, indicating that osteoclasts are important for regulating osteoblast activity. To illuminate the role of the osteoclast in controlling bone remodeling, we transplanted irradiated skeletally mature 3-month old wild-type mice with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to generate either an osteoclast-rich or osteoclast-poor adult osteopetrosis model. We used fetal liver HSCs from (1) oc/oc mice, (2) RANK KO mice, and (3) compared these to wt control cells. TRAP5b activity, a marker of osteoclast number and size, was increased in the oc/oc recipients, while a significant reduction was seen in the RANK KO recipients. In contrast, the bone resorption marker CTX-I was similarly decreased in both groups. Both oc/oc and Rank KO recipients developed a mild osteopetrotic phenotype. However, the osteoclast-rich oc/oc recipients showed higher trabecular bone volume (40 %), increased bone strength (66 %), and increased bone formation rate (54 %) in trabecular bone, while RANK KO recipients showed only minor trends compared to control recipients. We here show that maintaining non-resorbing osteoclasts, as opposed to reducing the osteoclasts, leads to increased bone formation, bone volume, and ultimately higher bone strength in vivo, which indicates that osteoclasts are sources of anabolic molecules for the osteoblasts.

  1. Increasing the effectiveness of intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice: a neurosurgical point of view.

    PubMed

    Mathon, Bertrand; Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Le Duigou, Caroline; Clemenceau, Stéphane; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-12-01

    Intracerebral injections of tracers or viral constructs in rodents are now commonly used in the neurosciences and must be executed perfectly. The purpose of this article is to update existing protocols for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice. Our procedure for stereotaxic injections in adult mice allows the investigator to improve the effectiveness and safety, and save time. Furthermore, for the first time, we describe a two-handed procedure for intracerebral injections in neonatal mice that can be performed by a single operator in a very short time. Our technique using the stereotaxic arm allows a higher precision than freehand techniques previously described. Stereotaxic injections in adult mice can be performed in 20 min and have >90% efficacy in targeting the injection site. Injections in neonatal mice can be performed in 5 min. Efficacy depends on the difficulty of precisely localizing the injection sites, due to the small size of the animal. We describe an innovative, effortless, and reproducible surgical protocol for intracerebral injections in adult and neonatal mice.

  2. CpG Improves Influenza Vaccine Efficacy in Young Adult but Not Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Alejandro; Co, Mary; Mathew, Anuja

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown a reduced efficacy of influenza vaccines in the elderly compared to young adults. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a commercially available inactivated influenza vaccine (Fluzone®) in young adult and aged mice. C57/BL6 mice were administered a single or double immunization of Fluzone® with or without CpG and challenged intranasally with H1N1 A/California/09 virus. A double immunization of Fluzone® adjuvanted with CpG elicited the highest level of protection in young adult mice which was associated with increases in influenza specific IgG, elevated HAI titres, reduced viral titres and lung inflammation. In contrast, the vaccine schedule which provided fully protective immunity in young adult mice conferred limited protection in aged mice. Antigen presenting cells from aged mice were found to be less responsive to in vitro stimulation by Fluzone and CpG which may partially explain this result. Our data are supportive of studies that have shown limited effectiveness of influenza vaccines in the elderly and provide important information relevant to the design of more immunogenic vaccines in this age group. PMID:26934728

  3. Long-lasting effects of minocycline on behavior in young but not adult Fragile X mice.

    PubMed

    Dansie, L E; Phommahaxay, K; Okusanya, A G; Uwadia, J; Huang, M; Rotschafer, S E; Razak, K A; Ethell, D W; Ethell, I M

    2013-08-29

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common single-gene inherited form of intellectual disability with behaviors characteristic of autism. People with FXS display childhood seizures, hyperactivity, anxiety, developmental delay, attention deficits, and visual-spatial memory impairment, as well as a propensity for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Several of these aberrant behaviors and FXS-associated synaptic irregularities also occur in "fragile X mental retardation gene" knock-out (Fmr1 KO) mice. We previously reported that minocycline promotes the maturation of dendritic spines - postsynaptic sites for excitatory synapses - in the developing hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice, which may underlie the beneficial effects of minocycline on anxiolytic behavior in young Fmr1 KO mice. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of minocycline treatment in young and adult Fmr1 KO mice, and determined the dependence of behavioral improvements on short-term versus long-term minocycline administration. We found that 4- and 8-week-long treatments significantly reduced locomotor activity in both young and adult Fmr1 KO mice. Some behavioral improvements persisted in young mice post-treatment, but in adults the beneficial effects were lost soon after minocycline treatment was stopped. We also show, for the first time, that minocycline treatment partially attenuates the number and severity of audiogenic seizures in Fmr1 KO mice. This report provides further evidence that minocycline treatment has immediate and long-lasting benefits on FXS-associated behaviors in the Fmr1 KO mouse model.

  4. Recognition memory and β-amyloid plaques in adult Tg2576 mice are not modified after oral exposure to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Diana; Torrente, Margarita; Vicens, Paloma; Colomina, Maria Teresa; Gómez, Mercedes; Domingo, José L

    2012-01-01

    The role of aluminum (Al) in Alzheimer disease is highly controversial. However, this element has been detected in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in patients with Alzheimer disease. Its presence in neuritic plaques in hippocampus is especially relevant, as this is an area closely related to spatial learning and memory. In this study, the diet of wild-type and Tg2576 mice (animals overexpressing the human amyloid precursor protein) was supplemented with Al lactate (1 mg/g). General neurotoxic Al effects were evaluated using a functional observational battery and a novel object recognition task. Four experimental groups were used: Control-wild, Al-wild, Control-Tg, and Al-Tg mice. The results show a decreased home-cage activity and an increase in piloerection in all Al-exposed animals, and an increased sensorimotor reactivity in Tg2576 mice given Al. Neither Al treatment nor genotype had any noticeable effect on corticosterone levels and Al concentrations in frontal cortex and cerebellum of the mice. Recognition memory was impaired in Tg2576 mice, whereas β-amyloid plaque depositions were observed in all these animals. However, Al did not alter the recognition memory and β-amyloid plaque loads of Tg2576 mice.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility in Escherichia coli of human and avian origin--a comparison of wild-type distributions.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, M; Bengtsson, S; Bonnedahl, J; Hernandez, J; Olsen, B; Kahlmeter, G

    2009-05-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 97 Escherichia coli isolates from birds, and 100 clinical isolates from blood cultures, were determined by disk diffusion. The wild-type distributions were defined by the normalized resistance interpretation method. It is shown that the avian and clinical inhibition zone diameter distributions of wild-type E. coli are indistinguishable.

  6. A mutant chaperone converts a wild-type protein into a tumor-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Andrea; Philip, Mary; Yoshida, Barbara A; Azadi, Parastoo; Liu, Hui; Meredith, Stephen C; Schreiber, Hans

    2006-10-13

    Monoclonal antibodies have become important therapeutic agents against certain cancers. Many tumor-specific antigens are mutant proteins that are predominantly intracellular and thus not readily accessible to monoclonal antibodies. We found that a wild-type transmembrane protein could be transformed into a tumor-specific antigen. A somatic mutation in the chaperone gene Cosmc abolished function of a glycosyltransferase, disrupting O-glycan Core 1 synthesis and creating a tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitope consisting of a monosaccharide and a specific wild-type protein sequence. This epitope induced a high-affinity, highly specific, syngeneic monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity. Such tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitopes represent potential targets for monoclonal antibody therapy.

  7. Mating success of wild type and sepia mutants Drosophila melanogaster in different choice.

    PubMed

    Stanić, Snezana; Pavković-Lucic, Sofija

    2005-01-01

    Mating behaviour of red-eyed (wt) and brown-eyed (sepia) Drosophila melanogaster was studied under light conditions. Mating success was directly observed in mating vials and techniques usually applied in the studies of sexual selection ("female choice" and "multiple choice"). The comparison of sexual activity of mutant and wild types clearly indicates that they are not equally successful in matings. Sepia eye colour mutation decreases sexual activity of Drosophila melanogaster males, influences the preference ability of females and decreases the number of progeny from homogamic mating of the se x se type, as well as from heterogamic copulations in which sepia females take part. Non-random mating of wild type males and sepia females (in "multiple-choice" situation), with genetically and phenotypically different individuals, could be another mechanism for conservation of genetic polymorphism in natural populations. PMID:16440285

  8. Wild-type minimal inhibitory concentration distributions in bacteria of animal origin in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Pantozzi, Florencia L; Ibar, Mariela P; Nievas, Victorio F; Vigo, Germán B; Moredo, Fabiana A; Giacoboni, Gabriela I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profiles of indicator bacteria isolated from domestic animal feces. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by agar dilution. Interpretative criteria on the basis of wild-type MIC distributions and epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFF or ECV) were used according to the 'European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing' (EUCAST) data. Results from 237 isolates of Escherichia coli showed reduced susceptibility for ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline, the antimicrobials commonly used in intensive breeding of pigs and hens. Regarding all the species of the genus Enterococcus spp., there are only ECOFF or ECV for vancomycin. Of the 173 Enterococcus spp. isolated, only one showed reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and was classified as 'non-wild-type' (NWT) population. This is the first report in Argentina showing data of epidemiological cutoff values in animal bacteria.

  9. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a vaccinated child.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Mam; Marin, Mona; Leung, Jessica; Bryce, Clare H; Schmid, D Scott; Zaki, Sherif R; Drew, Clifton; Liu, Lindy; Smelser, Chad

    2013-02-01

    Encephalitis associated with varicella-zoster virus, rare among children in the varicella vaccine era, has generally been associated with a rash. We report fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a child who had received 1 dose of varicella vaccine. Varicella-zoster virus encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for children presenting with acute neurologic symptoms, even vaccine recipients.

  11. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-07

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064.

    PubMed

    da Silva Vasconcelos, Eliton; de Lima, Vanderlei Aparecido; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Cruz-Hernández, Isara Lourdes; Hokka, Carlos Osamu

    2013-12-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064). The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant.

  13. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Vasconcelos, Eliton; de Lima, Vanderlei Aparecido; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Cruz-Hernández, Isara Lourdes; Hokka, Carlos Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064). The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant. PMID:24688492

  14. Physiology and metabolic fluxes of wild-type and riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, U; Hatzimanikatis, V; Hohmann, H P; Manneberg, M; van Loon, A P; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Continuous cultivation in a glucose-limited chemostat was used to determine the growth parameters of wild-type Bacillus subtilis and of a recombinant, riboflavin-producing strain. Maintenance coefficients of 0.45 and 0.66 mmol of glucose g-1 h-1 were determined for the wild-type and recombinant strains, respectively. However, the maximum molar growth yield of 82 to 85 g (cell dry weight)/mol of glucose was found to be almost identical in both strains. A nonlinear relationship between the specific riboflavin production rate and the dilution rate was observed, revealing a coupling of product formation and growth under strict substrate-limited conditions. Most prominently, riboflavin formation completely ceased at specific growth rates below 0.15 h-1. For molecular characterization of B. subtilis, the total amino acid composition of the wild type was experimentally determined and the complete building block requirements for biomass formation were derived. In particular, the murein sacculus was found to constitute approximately 9% of B. subtilis biomass, three- to fivefold more than in Escherichia coli. Estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes by a refined mass balance approach revealed a substantial, growth rate-dependent flux through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. Furthermore, this flux is indicated to be increased in the strain engineered for riboflavin formation. Glucose catabolism at low growth rates with reduced biomass yields was supported mainly by the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:8837424

  15. Interaction of root gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis wild-type and starchless mutants.

    PubMed

    Vitha, S; Zhao, L; Sack, F D

    2000-02-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis.

  16. Developmentally controlled telomere addition in wild-type and mutant paramecia.

    PubMed Central

    Forney, J D; Blackburn, E H

    1988-01-01

    We analyzed sites of macronuclear telomere addition at a single genetic locus in Paramecium tetraurelia. We showed that in homozygous wild-type cells, differential genomic processing during macronuclear development resulted in the A surface antigen gene being located 8, 13, or 26 kilobases upstream from a macronuclear telomere. We describe variable rearrangements that occurred at the telomere 8 kilobases from the A gene. A mutant (d48) that forms a telomere near the 5' end of the A gene was also analyzed. This mutant was shown to create simple terminal deletions; telomeric repeats were added directly to the truncated wild-type A gene sequence. In both the mutant and wild-type cells, the telomeric sequences (a mixture of C4A2 and C3A3 repeats) were added to various sequences within a specific 200- to 500-base-pair region rather than to a single site. No similarities were found in the primary sequences surrounding the telomere addition sites. The mutation in d48 changed the region of telomere addition at the A gene locus; this is the first example in ciliates of a mutation that affects the site of telomere addition. Images PMID:3336360

  17. Root graviresponsiveness and cellular differentiation in wild-type and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1989-01-01

    Primary roots of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana L. are strongly graviresponsive despite lacking amyloplasts in their columella cells. The ultrastructures of calyptrogen and peripheral cells in wild-type as compared to mutant seedlings are not significantly different. The largest difference in cellular differentiation in caps of mutant and wild-type roots is the relative volume of plastids in columella cells. Plastids occupy 12.3% of the volume of columella cells in wild-type seedlings, but only 3.69% of columella cells in mutant seedlings. These results indicate that: (1) amyloplasts and starch are not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; (2) the increase in relative volume of plastids that usually accompanies differentiation of columella cells is not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; and (3) the absence of starch and amyloplasts does not affect the structure of calyptrogen (i.e. meristematic) and secretory (i.e. peripheral) cells in root caps. These results are discussed relative to proposed models for root gravitropism.

  18. Transient Suppression of Dbx1 PreBötzinger Interneurons Disrupts Breathing in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vann, Nikolas C.; Pham, Francis D.; Hayes, John A.; Kottick, Andrew; Del Negro, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons derived from Dbx1-expressing precursors located in the brainstem preBötzinger complex (preBötC) putatively form the core oscillator for inspiratory breathing movements. We tested this Dbx1 core hypothesis by expressing archaerhodopsin in Dbx1-derived interneurons and then transiently hyperpolarizing these neurons while measuring respiratory rhythm in vitro or breathing in vagus-intact adult mice. Transient illumination of the preBötC interrupted inspiratory rhythm in both slice preparations and sedated mice. In awake mice, light application reduced breathing frequency and prolonged the inspiratory duration. Support for the Dbx1 core hypothesis previously came from embryonic and perinatal mouse experiments, but these data suggest that Dbx1-derived preBötC interneurons are rhythmogenic in adult mice too. The neural origins of breathing behavior can be attributed to a localized and genetically well-defined interneuron population. PMID:27611210

  19. Transient Suppression of Dbx1 PreBötzinger Interneurons Disrupts Breathing in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Vann, Nikolas C; Pham, Francis D; Hayes, John A; Kottick, Andrew; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Interneurons derived from Dbx1-expressing precursors located in the brainstem preBötzinger complex (preBötC) putatively form the core oscillator for inspiratory breathing movements. We tested this Dbx1 core hypothesis by expressing archaerhodopsin in Dbx1-derived interneurons and then transiently hyperpolarizing these neurons while measuring respiratory rhythm in vitro or breathing in vagus-intact adult mice. Transient illumination of the preBötC interrupted inspiratory rhythm in both slice preparations and sedated mice. In awake mice, light application reduced breathing frequency and prolonged the inspiratory duration. Support for the Dbx1 core hypothesis previously came from embryonic and perinatal mouse experiments, but these data suggest that Dbx1-derived preBötC interneurons are rhythmogenic in adult mice too. The neural origins of breathing behavior can be attributed to a localized and genetically well-defined interneuron population. PMID:27611210

  20. Effects of cage density on behavior in young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lauren P; Chedester, Alan L; Cole, Marlene N

    2007-08-01

    Optimal housing conditions for mice can be achieved by minimizing environmental variables, such as those that may contribute to anxiety-like behavior. This study evaluated the effects of cage size on juvenile mice through assessment of differences in weaning weight, locomotor skills, and anxiety-like behavior. Eighteen pairs of male and pregnant female Swiss-Webster (Cr:SW) mice were housed in 3 different caging scenarios, providing 429, 505, or 729 cm2 of space. Litters were standardized to 10 pups per litter in each cage. Mice reared in each caging scenario were assessed with the open-field, light-dark exploration, and elevated plus-maze tests. No differences in weaning weight were noted. Mice reared in the 505- and 729-cm2 cages explored a significantly larger area of the open-field arena than did those in the 429-cm2 cages. Those reared in the 505-cm2 cages spent more time in the center of the open field than did those in the 729-cm2 cages, suggesting that anxiety-like behavior may be increased in the animals housed in the larger cages. This study did not establish a consistent link between decreased floor space and increased anxiety-like behavior; neither does there appear to be a consistent effect of available floor area on the development of locomotor skills on mouse pups.

  1. Short-term calorie restriction enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis and remote fear memory in a Ghsr-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Amanda K.E.; Redhead, Yushi T.; Rees, Daniel J.; Ratcliff, Michael S.G.; Reichenbach, Alex; Wells, Timothy; Francis, Lewis; Amstalden, Katia; Andrews, Zane B.; Davies, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR) have been described at both organismal and cellular levels in multiple organs. However, our understanding of the causal mediators of such hormesis is poorly understood, particularly in the context of higher brain function. Here, we show that the receptor for the orexigenic hormone acyl-ghrelin, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghsr), is enriched in the neurogenic niche of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Acute elevation of acyl-ghrelin levels by injection or by overnight CR, increased DG levels of the neurogenic transcription factor, Egr-1. Two weeks of CR increased the subsequent number of mature newborn neurons in the DG of adult wild-type but not Ghsr−/− mice. CR wild-type mice also showed improved remote contextual fear memory. Our findings suggest that Ghsr mediates the beneficial effects of CR on enhancing adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory. PMID:26460782

  2. Functional Prestin Transduction of Immature Outer Hair Cells from Normal and Prestin-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Anping; Wooltorton, Julian R.A.; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Pereira, Fred A.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2008-01-01

    Prestin is a membrane protein in the outer hair cell (OHC) that has been shown to be essential for electromotility. OHCs from prestin-null mice do not express prestin, do not have a nonlinear capacitance (the electrical signature of electromotility), and are smaller in size than wild-type OHCs. We sought to determine whether prestin-null OHCs can be transduced to incorporate functional prestin protein in a normal fashion. A recombinant helper-dependent adenovirus expressing prestin and green fluorescent protein (HDAd–prestin–GFP) was created and tested in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells). Transduced HEK cells demonstrated membrane expression of prestin and nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP was then applied to cochlear sensory epithelium explants harvested from wild-type and prestin-null mice at postnatal days 2–3, the age at which native prestin is just beginning to become functional in wild-type mice. At postnatal days 4–5, we investigated transduced OHCs for (1) their prestin expression pattern as revealed by immunofluorescence; (2) their cell surface area as measured by linear capacitance; and (3) their prestin function as indicated by nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP efficiently transduced OHCs of both genotypes and prestin protein localized to the plasma membrane. Whole-cell voltage clamp studies revealed a nonlinear capacitance in transduced wild-type and prestin-null OHCs, but not in non-transduced cells of either genotype. Prestin transduction did not increase the linear capacitance (cell surface area) for either genotype. In peak nonlinear capacitance, voltage at peak nonlinear capacitance, charge density of the nonlinear capacitance, and shape of the voltage-capacitance curves, the transduced cells of the two genotypes resembled each other and previously reported data from adult wild-type mouse OHCs. Thus, prestin introduced into prestin-deficient OHCs segregates normally to the cell membrane and generates a normal

  3. Mice with ablated adult brain neurogenesis are not impaired in antidepressant response to chronic fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Jedynak, Paulina; Kos, Tomasz; Sandi, Carmen; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K

    2014-09-01

    The neurogenesis hypothesis of major depression has two main facets. One states that the illness results from decreased neurogenesis while the other claims that the very functioning of antidepressants depends on increased neurogenesis. In order to verify the latter, we have used cyclin D2 knockout mice (cD2 KO mice), known to have virtually no adult brain neurogenesis, and we demonstrate that these mice successfully respond to chronic fluoxetine. After unpredictable chronic mild stress, mutant mice showed depression-like behavior in forced swim test, which was eliminated with chronic fluoxetine treatment, despite its lack of impact on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cD2 KO mice. Our results suggest that new neurons are not indispensable for the action of antidepressants such as fluoxetine. Using forced swim test and tail suspension test, we also did not observe depression-like behavior in control cD2 KO mice, which argues against the link between decreased adult brain neurogenesis and major depression.

  4. A humanized version of Foxp2 does not affect ultrasonic vocalization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, K; Schreiweis, C; Minge, C; Pääbo, S; Fischer, J; Enard, W

    2015-11-01

    The transcription factor FOXP2 has been linked to severe speech and language impairments in humans. An analysis of the evolution of the FOXP2 gene has identified two amino acid substitutions that became fixed after the split of the human and chimpanzee lineages. Studying the functional consequences of these two substitutions in the endogenous Foxp2 gene of mice showed alterations in dopamine levels, striatal synaptic plasticity, neuronal morphology and cortico-striatal-dependent learning. In addition, ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) of pups had a significantly lower average pitch than control littermates. To which degree adult USVs would be affected in mice carrying the 'humanized' Foxp2 variant remained unclear. In this study, we analyzed USVs of 68 adult male mice uttered during repeated courtship encounters with different females. Mice carrying the Foxp2(hum/hum) allele did not differ significantly in the number of call elements, their element structure or in their element composition from control littermates. We conclude that neither the structure nor the usage of USVs in adult mice is affected by the two amino acid substitutions that occurred in FOXP2 during human evolution. The reported effect for pup vocalization thus appears to be transient. These results are in line with accumulating evidence that mouse USVs are hardly influenced by vocal learning. Hence, the function and evolution of genes that are necessary, but not sufficient for vocal learning in humans, must be either studied at a different phenotypic level in mice or in other organisms.

  5. Genetic relationships and epidemiological links between wild type 1 poliovirus isolates in Pakistan and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Efforts have been made to eliminate wild poliovirus transmission since 1988 when the World Health Organization began its global eradication campaign. Since then, the incidence of polio has decreased significantly. However, serotype 1 and serotype 3 still circulate endemically in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Both countries constitute a single epidemiologic block representing one of the three remaining major global reservoirs of poliovirus transmission. In this study we used genetic sequence data to investigate transmission links among viruses from diverse locations during 2005-2007. Methods In order to find the origins and routes of wild type 1 poliovirus circulation, polioviruses were isolated from faecal samples of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) patients. We used viral cultures, two intratypic differentiation methods PCR, ELISA to characterize as vaccine or wild type 1 and nucleic acid sequencing of entire VP1 region of poliovirus genome to determine the genetic relatedness. Results One hundred eleven wild type 1 poliovirus isolates were subjected to nucleotide sequencing for genetic variation study. Considering the 15% divergence of the sequences from Sabin 1, Phylogenetic analysis by MEGA software revealed that active inter and intra country transmission of many genetically distinct strains of wild poliovirus type 1 belonged to genotype SOAS which is indigenous in this region. By grouping wild type 1 polioviruses according to nucleotide sequence homology, three distinct clusters A, B and C were obtained with multiple chains of transmission together with some silent circulations represented by orphan lineages. Conclusion Our results emphasize that there was a persistent transmission of wild type1 polioviruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2005-2007. The epidemiologic information provided by the sequence data can contribute to the formulation of better strategies for poliomyelitis control to those critical areas, associated with high risk

  6. Biomass Productivities in Wild Type and Pigment Mutant of Cyclotella sp. (Diatom)

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Bartha, Richard; Aksoy, M.; Weissman, Joseph C.; Benemann, John

    2008-07-03

    Microalgae are expected to play a significant role in greenhouse gas mitigation because they can utilize CO2 from powerplant flue gases directly while producing a variety of renewable carbon-neutral biofuels. In order for such a microalgal climate change mitigation strategy to become economically feasible, it will be necessary to significantly improve biomass productivities. One approach to achieve this objective is to reduce, via mutagenesis, the number of light harvesting pigments, which, according to theory, should significantly improve the light utilization efficiency, primarily by increasing the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is). Employing chemical (ethylmethylsulfonate, EMS) and UV mutagenesis of a wild type strain of the diatom Cyclotella, approximately 10,000 pigment mutants were generated, and two of the most promising ones (CM1 and CM1-1) were subjected to further testing in both laboratory cultures and outdoor ponds. Measurements of photosynthetic oxygen production rates as a function of light intensity (i.e., P-I curves) of samples taken from laboratory batch cultures during the exponential and linear growth phase indicated that the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is) was two to three times greater in the pigment mutant CM1-1 than in the wild type, i.e., 355-443 versus 116-169 μmole/m2∙sec, respectively. While theory, i.e., the Bush equation, predicts that such a significant gain in Is should increase light utilization efficiencies and thus biomass productivities, particularly at high light intensities, no improvements in biomass productivities were observed in either semi-continuous laboratory cultures or outdoor ponds. In fact, the maximum biomass productivity in semi-continuous laboratory culture was always greater in the wild type than in the mutant, namely 883 versus 725 mg/L∙d, respectively at low light intensity (200 μmole/m2∙sec) and 1229 versus 1043 mg/L∙d, respectively at high light intensity

  7. Effect of chronic social defeat stress on behaviors and dopamine receptor in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guang-Biao; Zhao, Tong; Gao, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Xu, Yu-Ming; Li, Hao; Lv, Lu-Xian

    2016-04-01

    Victims of bullying often undergo depression, low self-esteem, high anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. The social defeat model has become widely accepted for studying experimental animal behavior changes associated with bullying; however, differences in the effects in susceptible and unsusceptible individuals have not been well studied. The present study investigated the effects of social defeat stress on behavior and the expression of dopamine receptors D1 and D2 in the brains of adult mice. Adult mice were divided into susceptible and unsusceptible groups after 10days of social defeat stress. Behavioral tests were conducted, and protein levels in the brains were assessed by Western blotting. The results indicate that all mice undergo decreased locomotion and increased anxiety behavior. However, decreased social interaction and impaired memory performance were only observed in susceptible mice. A significantly decreased expression of D1 was observed in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of susceptible mice only. No significant differences in D2 expression were shown between control and defeated mice in any area studied. These data indicate that depression-like behavior and cognition impairment caused by social defeat stress in susceptible mice may be related to changes in the dopamine receptor D1. PMID:26655446

  8. Development of infectious clones of a wild-type Korean rabies virus and evaluation of their pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Sun; Kim, Chi-Kyeong; Um, Ji-Hye; Ju, Young Ran; Lee, Yeong Seon; Choi, Young-Ki; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-09-01

    Most reverse genetic (RG) systems for rabies viruses (RVs) have been constructed on the genome background of laboratory-adapted strains. In this study, we developed an RG system using a Korean wild type (KGH) strain to investigate the pathogenic potential of different strains. We developed a RG system with the KGH strain for the first time. Following the complete genome sequencing of the KGH strain, pKGH infectious clones were constructed using the CMV/T7 promoter, and HamRz and HdvRz were introduced to allow self-cleavage of the synthesized RNA. We successfully recovered the rescued virus by constructing chimeric RVs in which we replaced a part of the construct with the partial gene from the fixed RC-HL strain. The rescued viruses formed clearer and countable plaques in an immunostaining plaque assay, with a distinct plaque morphology. Furthermore, compared with the chimeric RVs, the pKGH/RCinsΔ4 strain containing the KGH strain G protein exhibited a decreased efficiency of cell-to-cell spreading in BHK-21 cells and significantly reduced (100-1000 fold) replication kinetics. However, pKGH/RCinsΔ4 strain-infected mice revealed 100% morbidity at 11days post-infection, whereas other chimeric RV strains showed no mortality. Our RG system is a useful tool for studying differences in the cell-to-cell spreading efficiency and replication with respect to the different internalization patterns of street and fixed laboratory-adapted viruses. PMID:27397101

  9. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans. PMID:26079769

  10. Heterozygous L1-deficient mice express an autism-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Bruno; Wass, Christopher; Netrakanti, Meera; Saylor, Joshua; Schachner, Melitta; Matzel, Louis D

    2015-10-01

    The L1CAM (L1) gene encodes a cell adhesion molecule that contributes to several important processes in the developing and adult nervous system, including neuronal migration, survival, and plasticity. In humans and mice, mutations in the X chromosome-linked gene L1 cause severe neurological defects in males. L1 heterozygous female mice with one functional copy of the L1 gene show complex morphological features that are different from L1 fully-deficient and wild-type littermate mice. However, almost no information is available on the behavior of L1 heterozygous mice and humans. Here, we investigated the behavior of heterozygous female mice in which the L1 gene is constitutively inactivated. These mice were compared to wild-type littermate females. Animals were assessed in five categories of behavioral tests: five tests for anxiety/stress/exploration, four tests for motor abilities, two tests for spatial learning, three tests for social behavior, and three tests for repetitive behavior. We found that L1 heterozygous mice express an autism-like phenotype, comprised of reduced social behaviors and excessive self-grooming (a repetitive behavior also typical in animal models of autism). L1 heterozygous mice also exhibited an increase in sensitivity to light, assessed by a reluctance to enter the lighted areas of novel environments. However, levels of anxiety, stress, motor abilities, and spatial learning in L1 heterozygous mice were similar to those of wild-type mice. These observations raise the possibility that using molecules known to trigger L1 functions may become valuable in the treatment of autism in humans.

  11. Endogenous brain erythropoietin is a potent sex-specific respiratory stimulant in adult and newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Ballot, Orlane; Joseph, Vincent; Soliz, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that endogenous brain Epo is a respiratory stimulant. Adult (3 mo) and newborn (10 days) male and female mice received an intracisternal (cisterna magna) injection of soluble Epo receptor (sEpoR; competes with EpoR to bind Epo; 50 μg/ml) or vehicle (0.1% BSA in PBS). Twenty-four hours after injection, we used whole body plethysmography to record minute ventilation (V̇e) tidal volume (VT), respiratory frequency (fR), O2 consumption (V̇o2), and CO2 production (V̇co2) under normoxia and progressive exposure to hypoxia (12-10-6% O2; 10 min each). In adult male and female mice sEpoR decreased normoxic V̇e (-25%), due to a decrease of VT in males and fR in females. Moreover, sEpoR injection decreased the ventilatory response to 12% O2, assessed as V̇e/V̇o2 or V̇e/V̇co2, in male but not in female mice. In newborn male and female mice sEpoR decreased V̇e (-37% in males, -59% in females) and VT (-38% in males, -47% in females) in normoxia and fR in females. During hypoxia, sEpoR decreased V̇e/V̇o2 and V̇e/V̇co2 in mice of both sexes. Upon extreme hypoxia (6% O2), the newborn mice treated with sEpoR showed respiratory depression, signs of asphyxia (gasping) and a high mortality rate in males and females. We concluded that endogenous brain Epo is a potent respiratory stimulant under normoxia and hypoxia in adult and newborn mice. Because sex-specific effects are different in newborn male and female, sex steroids secreted at different ages mice appear to modulate the effects of Epo on respiratory regulation in normoxia and in response to hypoxia. PMID:25792712

  12. Perinatal DDT Exposure Induces Hypertension and Cardiac Hypertrophy in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele A.; Sethi, Sunjay; Benard, Ludovic; Moshier, Erin; Haraldsson, Borje; Buettner, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was used extensively to control malaria, typhus, body lice, and bubonic plague worldwide, until countries began restricting its use in the 1970s. However, the use of DDT to control vector-borne diseases continues in developing countries. Prenatal DDT exposure is associated with elevated blood pressure in humans. Objective: We hypothesized that perinatal DDT exposure causes hypertension in adult mice. Methods: DDT was administered to C57BL/6J dams from gestational day 11.5 to postnatal day 5. Blood pressure (BP) and myocardial wall thickness were measured in male and female adult offspring. Adult mice were treated with an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril, to evaluate sensitivity to amelioration of DDT-associated hypertension by ACE inhibition. We further assessed the influence of DDT exposure on the expression of mRNAs that regulate BP through renal ion transport. Results: Adult mice perinatally exposed to DDT exhibited chronically increased systolic BP, increased myocardial wall thickness, and elevated expression of mRNAs of several renal ion transporters. Captopril completely reversed hypertension in mice perinatally exposed to DDT. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that perinatal exposure to DDT causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in adult offspring. A key mechanism underpinning this hypertension is an overactivated renin angiotensin system because ACE inhibition reverses the hypertension induced by perinatal DDT exposure. Citation: La Merrill M, Sethi S, Benard L, Moshier E, Haraldsson B, Buettner C. 2016. Perinatal DDT exposure induces hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in adult mice. Environ Health Perspect 124:1722–1727; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP164 PMID:27325568

  13. Developmental and adult GAP-43 deficiency in mice dynamically alters hippocampal neurogenesis and mossy fiber volume.

    PubMed

    Latchney, Sarah E; Masiulis, Irene; Zaccaria, Kimberly J; Lagace, Diane C; Powell, Craig M; McCasland, James S; Eisch, Amelia J

    2014-01-01

    Growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) is a presynaptic protein that plays key roles in axonal growth and guidance and in modulating synapse formation. Previous work has demonstrated that mice lacking one allele of this gene (GAP-43+/- mice) exhibit hippocampal structural abnormalities, impaired spatial learning and stress-induced behavioral withdrawal and anxiety, behaviors that are dependent on proper hippocampal circuitry and function. Given the correlation between hippocampal function, synaptic connectivity and neurogenesis, we tested if behaviorally naïve GAP-43+/- mice had alterations in either neurogenesis or synaptic connectivity in the hippocampus during early postnatal development and young adulthood, and following behavior testing in older adults. To test our hypothesis, we examined hippocampal cell proliferation (Ki67), number of immature neuroblasts (doublecortin, DCX) and mossy fiber volume (synaptoporin) in behaviorally naïve postnatal day 9 (P9) and P26, and behaviorally experienced 5- to 7-month-old GAP-43+/- and +/+ littermate mice. P9 GAP-43+/- mice had fewer Ki67+ and DCX+ cells compared to +/+ mice, particularly in the posterior dentate gyrus, and smaller mossy fiber volume in the same region. In young adulthood, however, male GAP-43+/- mice had more Ki67+ and DCX+ cells and greater mossy fiber volume in the posterior dentate gyrus relative to male +/+ mice. These increases were not seen in females. In 5- to 7-month-old GAP-43+/- mice (whose behaviors were the focus of our prior publication), there was no global change in the number of proliferating or immature neurons relative to +/+ mice. However, more detailed analysis revealed fewer proliferative DCX+ cells in the anterior dentate gyrus of male GAP-43+/- mice compared to male +/+ mice. This reduction was not observed in females. These results suggest that young GAP-43+/- mice have decreased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic connectivity, but slightly older mice have greater hippocampal

  14. Acute Multiple Organ Failure in Adult Mice Deleted for the Developmental Regulator Wt1

    PubMed Central

    Chau, You-Ying; Brownstein, David; Mjoseng, Heidi; Lee, Wen-Chin; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Perry, Paul; Berry, Rachel; Thornburn, Anna; Sexton, David; Morton, Nik; Hohenstein, Peter; Freyer, Elisabeth; Samuel, Kay; van't Hof, Rob; Hastie, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    There is much interest in the mechanisms that regulate adult tissue homeostasis and their relationship to processes governing foetal development. Mice deleted for the Wilms' tumour gene, Wt1, lack kidneys, gonads, and spleen and die at mid-gestation due to defective coronary vasculature. Wt1 is vital for maintaining the mesenchymal–epithelial balance in these tissues and is required for the epithelial-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) that generates coronary vascular progenitors. Although Wt1 is only expressed in rare cell populations in adults including glomerular podocytes, 1% of bone marrow cells, and mesothelium, we hypothesised that this might be important for homeostasis of adult tissues; hence, we deleted the gene ubiquitously in young and adult mice. Within just a few days, the mice suffered glomerulosclerosis, atrophy of the exocrine pancreas and spleen, severe reduction in bone and fat, and failure of erythropoiesis. FACS and culture experiments showed that Wt1 has an intrinsic role in both haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell lineages and suggest that defects within these contribute to the phenotypes we observe. We propose that glomerulosclerosis arises in part through down regulation of nephrin, a known Wt1 target gene. Protein profiling in mutant serum showed that there was no systemic inflammatory or nutritional response in the mutant mice. However, there was a dramatic reduction in circulating IGF-1 levels, which is likely to contribute to the bone and fat phenotypes. The reduction of IGF-1 did not result from a decrease in circulating GH, and there is no apparent pathology of the pituitary and adrenal glands. These findings 1) suggest that Wt1 is a major regulator of the homeostasis of some adult tissues, through both local and systemic actions; 2) highlight the differences between foetal and adult tissue regulation; 3) point to the importance of adult mesenchyme in tissue turnover. PMID:22216009

  15. THE EFFECTS OF HYPERTHERMIA ON SPERMATOGENESIS, APOPTOSIS, GENE EXPRESSION AND FERTILITY IN ADULT MALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of hyperthermia on spermatogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression and fertility in adult male mice
    John C. Rockett1, Faye L. Mapp1, J. Brian Garges1, J. Christopher Luft1, Chisato Mori2 and David J. Dix1.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Envir...

  16. Nutritional intervention restores muscle but not kidney phenotypes in adult calcineurin Aα null mice.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kirsten; Reddy, Ramesh N; Price, S Russ; Williams, Clintoria R; Gooch, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Mice lacking the α isoform of the catalytic subunit of calcineurin (CnAα) were first reported in 1996 and have been an important model to understand the role of calcineurin in the brain, immune system, bones, muscle, and kidney. Research using the mice has been limited, however, by failure to thrive and early lethality of most null pups. Work in our laboratory led to the rescue of CnAα-/- mice by supplemental feeding to compensate for a defect in salivary enzyme secretion. The data revealed that, without intervention, knockout mice suffer from severe caloric restriction. Since nutritional deprivation is known to significantly alter development, it is imperative that previous conclusions based on CnAα-/- mice are revisited to determine which aspects of the phenotype were attributable to caloric restriction versus a direct role for CnAα. In this study, we find that defects in renal development and function persist in adult CnAα-/- mice including a significant decrease in glomerular filtration rate and an increase in blood urea nitrogen levels. These data indicate that impaired renal development we previously reported was not due to caloric restriction but rather a specific role for CnAα in renal development and function. In contrast, we find that rather than being hypoglycemic, rescued mice are mildly hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. Examination of muscle fiber types shows that previously reported reductions in type I muscle fibers are no longer evident in rescued null mice. Rather, loss of CnAα likely alters insulin response due to a reduction in insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS2) expression and signaling in muscle. This study illustrates the importance of re-examining the phenotypes of CnAα-/- mice and the advances that are now possible with the use of adult, rescued knockout animals. PMID:23638102

  17. Gonadectomy prior to puberty decreases normal parental behavior in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Kercmar, Jasmina; Snoj, Tomaz; Tobet, Stuart A.; Majdic, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones secreted by gonads influence development and expression of many behaviors including parental behaviors. The capacity to display many behaviors develops under the influence of sex steroid hormones; it begins with gonadal differentiation and lasts through puberty. The timing of gonadectomy may have important and long lasting effects on the organization and activation of neural circuits regulating the expression of different behaviors. The present study investigated the importance of exposure to endogenous gonadal steroid hormones during pubertal period/adolescence on parental behavior in adult mice. Male and female WT mice were gonadectomized either before puberty (25 days of age) or after puberty (60 days of age) and tested for parental behavior with and without estradiol benzoate (EB) replacement in adulthood. Additional groups of mice were gonadectomized at P25 and supplemented with estradiol (females) or testosterone (males) during puberty. Female mice gonadectomized after puberty or gonadectomized before puberty and supplemented with estradiol during puberty, displayed better pup directed parental behaviors in comparison to mice gonadectomized at 25 days of age regardless treatment with estradiol in adulthood. However, mice treated with EB in adulthood displayed better non-pup directed nest building behavior than when they were tested without EB treatment regardless of sex and time of gonadectomy. To examine whether the sensitivity to sex steroid hormones was altered due to differences in time without gonads prior to the testing, mice were also tested for female sex behavior and there were no differences between mice gonadectomized at P25 or P60, although this could not completely rule out the possibility that parental behavior is more sensitive to prolonged absence of steroid hormones than female sex behavior. These results suggest that the absence of gonads and thereby the absence of appropriate gonadal steroid hormones during puberty

  18. Voluntary Wheel Running Does not Affect Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior in Young Adult and Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Stephen A.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral stimulation of the innate immune system with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) causes prolonged depressive-like behavior in aged mice that is dependent on indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) activation. Regular moderate intensity exercise training has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects that might reduce depressive-like behavior in aged mice. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that voluntary wheel running would attenuate LPS-induced depressive-like behavior and brain IDO gene expression in 4-month-old and 22-month-old C57BL/6J mice. Mice were housed with a running wheel (Voluntary Wheel Running, VWR) or no wheel (Standard) for 30 days (young adult mice) or 70 days (aged mice), after which they were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (young adult mice: 0.83 mg/kg; aged mice: 0.33 mg/kg). Young adult VWR mice ran on average 6.9 km/day, while aged VWR mice ran on average 3.4 km/day. Both young adult and aged VWR mice increased their forced exercise tolerance compared to their respective Standard control groups. VWR had no effect on LPS-induced anorexia, weight-loss, increased immobility in the tail suspension test, and decreased sucrose preference in either young adult or aged mice. Four (young adult mice) and twenty-four (aged mice) hours after injection of LPS transcripts for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IDO were upregulated in the whole brain independently of VWR. These results indicate that prolonged physical exercise has no effect on the neuroinflammatory response to LPS and its behavioral consequences. PMID:24281669

  19. Effect of oral administration of Kudoa septempunctata genotype ST3 in adult BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Meejung; Woo, Hochoon; Kang, Bongjo; Jang, Yeounghwan; Shin, Taekyun

    2015-01-01

    Kudoa septempunctata (Myxozoa: Multivalvulida) infects the muscles of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus, Paralichthyidae) in the form of spores. To investigate the effect of K. septempunctata spores in mammals, adult BALB/c mice were fed with spores of K. septempunctata genotype ST3 (1.35 × 10(5) to 1.35 × 10(8) spores/mouse). After ingestion of spores, the mice remained clinically normal during the 24-h observation period. No spores were found in any tissue examined by histopathological screening. Quantitative PCR screening of the K. septempunctata 18S rDNA gene revealed that the K. septempunctata spores were detected only in the stool samples from the spore-fed groups. Collectively, these findings suggest that K. septempunctata spores are excreted in faeces and do not affect the gastrointestinal tract of adult mice. PMID:26630307

  20. [Effect of alcohol in combination with stress in the prenatal period on adult mice behaviour].

    PubMed

    Morozova, M V; Popova, N K

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the prenatal alcohol and stress on behaviour of adult CBA/LacJ male mice. Pregnant mice were given ethanol 11% from to 21 days of the gestation and were exposed to restraint stress for two hours daily from 15 to 21 days gestation. At 3 months of age, the offspring were tested for behaviour. Alcohol and stress-exposed animals buried more marbles in the marble-burying test, which models obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). In addition, the alcohol and stress-exposed males showed increased social activity. No significant effects of the prenatal alcohol and stress exposure on locomotor activity, anxiety, exploring activity of the adult male mice were revealed. Conclusion was made that exposure to the alcohol and stress combination in prenatal period produces predisposition to OCD.

  1. Telomerase gene therapy in adult and old mice delays aging and increases longevity without increasing cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes de Jesus, Bruno; Vera, Elsa; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Tejera, Agueda M; Ayuso, Eduard; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in aging research is to improve health during aging. In the case of mice, genetic manipulations that shorten or lengthen telomeres result, respectively, in decreased or increased longevity. Based on this, we have tested the effects of a telomerase gene therapy in adult (1 year of age) and old (2 years of age) mice. Treatment of 1- and 2-year old mice with an adeno associated virus (AAV) of wide tropism expressing mouse TERT had remarkable beneficial effects on health and fitness, including insulin sensitivity, osteoporosis, neuromuscular coordination and several molecular biomarkers of aging. Importantly, telomerase-treated mice did not develop more cancer than their control littermates, suggesting that the known tumorigenic activity of telomerase is severely decreased when expressed in adult or old organisms using AAV vectors. Finally, telomerase-treated mice, both at 1-year and at 2-year of age, had an increase in median lifespan of 24 and 13%, respectively. These beneficial effects were not observed with a catalytically inactive TERT, demonstrating that they require telomerase activity. Together, these results constitute a proof-of-principle of a role of TERT in delaying physiological aging and extending longevity in normal mice through a telomerase-based treatment, and demonstrate the feasibility of anti-aging gene therapy. PMID:22585399

  2. Cumulative neonatal oxygen exposure predicts response of adult mice infected with influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Maduekwe, Echezona T.; Buczynski, Bradley W.; Yee, Min; Rangasamy, Tiruamalai; Stevens, Timothy P.; Lawrence, B. Paige; O'Reilly, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary An acceptable level of oxygen exposure in preterm infants that maximizes efficacy and minimizes harm has yet to be determined. Quantifying oxygen exposure as an area-under-the curve (OAUC) has been predictive of later respiratory symptoms among former low birth weight infants. Here, we test the hypothesis that quantifying OAUC in newborn mice can predict their risk for altered lung development and respiratory viral infections as adults. Newborn mice were exposed to room air or a FiO2 of 100% oxygen for 4 days, 60% oxygen for 8 days, or 40% oxygen for 16 days (same cumulative dose of excess oxygen). At 8 weeks of age, mice were infected intranasally with a non-lethal dose of influenza A virus. Adult mice exposed to 100% oxygen for 4 days or 60% oxygen for 8 days exhibited alveolar simplification and altered elastin deposition compared to siblings birthed into room air, as well as increased inflammation and fibrotic lung disease following viral infection. These changes were not observed in mice exposed to 40% oxygen for 16 days. Our findings in mice support the concept that quantifying OAUC over a currently unspecified threshold can predict human risk for respiratory morbidity later in life. PMID:24850805

  3. Does the early social environment affect structure and consistency of personality in wild-type male's rat?

    PubMed

    Gracceva, Giulia; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2011-09-01

    Animal personality has been extensively studied from a functional and evolutionary point of view. Less attention has been paid to the development of personality, its phenotypic plasticity, and the influence of manipulation of early environmental factors. Here we describe the effects of manipulating the sex ratio of the litter, at postnatal day (pnd) 3, in wild-type rats, on personality traits in adulthood. We measured the treatment effects on aggression, defensive burying, and open field behavior at pnd 90 and 120, as well as on their contextual generality, and stability over time (differential and structural consistency). Main effects of litter composition were found on open field behavior at pnd 120 but not on the other behaviors. Since correlations between behaviors changed over time irrespective of the specific treatment, whereas in previous studies on unmanipulated litters this was not the case we suggest that early handling may disrupt adult personality traits. Overall the data indicate that personality is less stable over time that often assumed, having both proximate and ultimate implications.

  4. Pathological impact of SMN2 mis-splicing in adult SMA mice

    PubMed Central

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Ling, Karen K Y; Hua, Yimin; Wilkinson, John Erby; Nomakuchi, Tomoki; Rigo, Frank; Hung, Gene; Xu, David; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z; Ko, Chien-Ping; Bennett, C Frank; Krainer, Adrian R

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SMN1 cause spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. The related SMN2 gene expresses suboptimal levels of functional SMN protein, due to a splicing defect. Many SMA patients reach adulthood, and there is also adult-onset (type IV) SMA. There is currently no animal model for adult-onset SMA, and the tissue-specific pathogenesis of post-developmental SMN deficiency remains elusive. Here, we use an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to exacerbate SMN2 mis-splicing. Intracerebroventricular ASO injection in adult SMN2-transgenic mice phenocopies key aspects of adult-onset SMA, including delayed-onset motor dysfunction and relevant histopathological features. SMN2 mis-splicing increases during late-stage disease, likely accelerating disease progression. Systemic ASO injection in adult mice causes peripheral SMN2 mis-splicing and affects prognosis, eliciting marked liver and heart pathologies, with decreased IGF1 levels. ASO dose–response and time-course studies suggest that only moderate SMN levels are required in the adult central nervous system, and treatment with a splicing-correcting ASO shows a broad therapeutic time window. We describe distinctive pathological features of adult-onset and early-onset SMA. PMID:24014320

  5. Juvenile ethanol exposure increases rewarding properties of cocaine and morphine in adult DBA/2J mice.

    PubMed

    Molet, Jenny; Hervé, Denis; Thiébot, Marie-Hélène; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2013-12-01

    Convergent data showed that ethanol exposure during adolescence can alter durably ethanol-related behaviour at adulthood. However, the consequences of juvenile ethanol exposure on the reinforcing effects of other drugs of abuse remain unclear. In the present work, we evaluated in adult male DBA/2J mice the effects of early ethanol exposure on the sensitivity to the incentive effects of cocaine and morphine, and on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in response to cocaine. Juvenile male mice received intragastric administration of ethanol (2×2.5g/kg/day) or water for 5 days starting on postnatal day 28. When reaching adult age (10 week-old), animals were subjected to an unbiased procedure to assess conditioned place preference (CPP) to cocaine or morphine. In addition, activation of ERK in response to an acute injection of cocaine was investigated using immunoblotting in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens. Mice that have been subjected to early ethanol exposure developed CPP to doses of cocaine (5mg/kg) or morphine (10mg/kg) below the threshold doses to induce CPP in water pre-exposed mice. In addition, early ethanol administration significantly increased striatal ERK phosphorylation normally induced by acute cocaine (10 and 20mg/kg) in adult mice. These results show that, in DBA/2J mice, early exposure to ethanol enhanced the perception of the incentive effects of cocaine and morphine. Ethanol pre-exposure also induced a positive modulation of striatal ERK signalling, in line with the inference that juvenile ethanol intake may contribute to the development of addictive behaviour at adult age. PMID:23619165

  6. Prenatal allergen and diesel exhaust exposure and their effects on allergy in adult offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple studies have suggested that prenatal exposure to either allergens or air pollution may increase the risk for the development of allergic immune responses in young offspring. However, the effects of prenatal environmental exposures on adult offspring have not been well-studied. We hypothesized that combined prenatal exposure to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) allergen and diesel exhaust particles will be associated with altered IgE production, airway inflammation, airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and airway remodeling of adult offspring. Methods Following sensitization via the airway route to A. fumigatus and mating, pregnant BALB/c mice were exposed to additional A. fumigatus and/or diesel exhaust particles. At age 9-10 weeks, their offspring were sensitized and challenged with A. fumigatus. Results We found that adult offspring from mice that were exposed to A. fumigatus or diesel exhaust particles during pregnancy experienced decreases in IgE production. Adult offspring of mice that were exposed to both A. fumigatus and diesel exhaust particles during pregnancy experienced decreases in airway eosinophilia. Conclusion These results suggest that, in this model, allergen and/or diesel administration during pregnancy may be associated with protection from developing systemic and airway allergic immune responses in the adult offspring. PMID:20459836

  7. Fibrillin-1 microfibrils influence adult bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Silvia; Bigarella, Carolina L; Del Solar, Maria; Ghaffari, Saghi; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that fibrillin-1 assemblies regulate the fate of skeletal stem cells (aka, mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]) by modulating TGFβ activity within the microenvironment of adult bone marrow niches. Since MSCs can also influence hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activities, here we investigated adult hematopoiesis in mice with Cre-mediated inactivation of the fibrillin-1 (Fbn1) gene in the mesenchyme of the forming limbs (Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice). Analyses of 3-month-old Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice revealed a statistically significant increase of circulating red blood cells, which a differentiation assay correlated with augmented erythropoiesis. This finding, together with evidence of fibrillin-1 deposition in erythroblastic niches, supported the notion that this extracellular matrix protein normally restricts differentiation of erythroid progenitors. Whereas flow cytometry measurements identified a decreased HSC frequency in mutant relative to wild type mice, no appreciable differences were noted with regard to the relative abundance and differentiation potential of myeloid progenitor cells. Together these findings implied that fibrillin-1 normally promotes HSC expansion but does not influence cell lineage commitment. Since local TGFβ hyperactivity has been associated with abnormal osteogenesis in Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice, 1-month-old mutant and wild type animals were systemically treated for 8weeks with either a pan-TGF-β-neutralizing antibody or an antibody of the same IgG1 isotype. The distinct outcomes of these pharmacological interventions strongly suggest that fibrillin-1 differentially modulates TGFβ activity in HSC vs. erythroid niches.

  8. The course of LCMV infection in gnotobiotic and conventional adult mice pretreated with attenuated NDV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Szeri, I; Csatáry, L K; Anderlik, P; Bános, Z; Nász, I; Barna, Z

    1990-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal treatment with two different doses of live Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) containing attenuated NDV vaccine one day before intracerebral inoculation with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) had no influence on the ratio and time of deaths after infection with a 100 LD50 dose of LCMV either in gnotobiotic or in conventional mice. There was no difference either in the LD50 values determined on the basis of three parallel LCMV titration performed on mice pretreated with two different doses of vaccine or untreated. NDV vaccine pretreatment thus did not influence the cellular immune response to LCMV infection either in gnotobiotic or in conventional adult mice. As the NDV vaccine increased the cellular immune response to LCMV infection in suckling mice according to earlier results, the present results reinforce our earlier statement that the direction of immunomodulatory effects can be influenced by age.

  9. Rearing in Seawater Mesocosms Improves the Spawning Performance of Growth Hormone Transgenic and Wild-Type Coho Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Leggatt, Rosalind A.; Hollo, Tanya; Vandersteen, Wendy E.; McFarlane, Kassandra; Goh, Benjamin; Prevost, Joelle; Devlin, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenes can significantly accelerate growth rates in fish and cause associated alterations to their physiology and behaviour. Concern exists regarding potential environmental risks of GH transgenic fish, should they enter natural ecosystems. In particular, whether they can reproduce and generate viable offspring under natural conditions is poorly understood. In previous studies, GH transgenic salmon grown under contained culture conditions had lower spawning behaviour and reproductive success relative to wild-type fish reared in nature. However, wild-type salmon cultured in equal conditions also had limited reproductive success. As such, whether decreased reproductive success of GH transgenic salmon is due to the action of the transgene or to secondary effects of culture (or a combination) has not been fully ascertained. Hence, salmon were reared in large (350,000 L), semi-natural, seawater tanks (termed mesocosms) designed to minimize effects of standard laboratory culture conditions, and the reproductive success of wild-type and GH transgenic coho salmon from mesocosms were compared with that of wild-type fish from nature. Mesocosm rearing partially restored spawning behaviour and success of wild-type fish relative to culture rearing, but remained lower overall than those reared in nature. GH transgenic salmon reared in the mesocosm had similar spawning behaviour and success as wild-type fish reared in the mesocosm when in full competition and without competition, but had lower success in male-only competition experiments. There was evidence of genotype×environmental interactions on spawning success, so that spawning success of transgenic fish, should they escape to natural systems in early life, cannot be predicted with low uncertainty. Under the present conditions, we found no evidence to support enhanced mating capabilities of GH transgenic coho salmon compared to wild-type salmon. However, it is clear that GH transgenic salmon are

  10. Growth Restriction, Leptin, and the Programming of Adult Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Lauritz R; Zhu, Vivian; Miller, Alise; Roghair, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Prematurity and neonatal growth restriction (GR) are risk factors for autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Leptin production is suppressed during periods of undernutrition, and we have shown that isolated neonatal leptin deficiency leads to adult hyperactivity while neonatal leptin supplementation normalizes the brain morphology of GR mice. We hypothesized that neonatal leptin would prevent the development of GR-associated behavioral abnormalities. From postnatal day 4–14, C57BL/6 mice were randomized to daily injections of saline or leptin (80 ng/g), and GR was identified by a weanling weight below the tenth percentile. The behavioral phenotypes of GR and control mice were assessed beginning at 4 months. Within the tripartite chamber, GR mice had significantly impaired social interaction. Baseline escape times from the Barnes maze were faster for GR mice (65+/−6 sec vs 87+/−7 sec for controls, p<0.05), but GR mice exhibited regression in their escape times on days 2 and 3 (56% regressed vs 22% of control saline mice, p<0.05). Compared to controls, GR mice entered the open arms of the elevated plus maze more often and stayed there longer (72+/−10 sec vs 36+/−5 sec, p<0.01). Neonatal leptin supplementation normalized the behavior of GR mice across all behavioral assays. In conclusion, GR alters the social interactions, learning and activity of mice, and supplementation with the neurotrophic hormone leptin mitigates these effects. We speculate neonatal leptin deficiency may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with postnatal growth restriction, and postnatal leptin therapy may be protective. PMID:25196633

  11. Astrocyte leptin receptor (ObR) and leptin transport in adult-onset obese mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weihong; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Sakharkar, Amul; Cain, Courtney; Yu, Chuanhui; Kastin, Abba J

    2008-06-01

    The agouti viable yellow (A vy) spontaneous mutation generates an unusual mouse phenotype of agouti-colored coat and adult-onset obesity with metabolic syndrome. Persistent production of agouti signaling protein in A vy mice antagonizes melanocortin receptors in the hypothalamus. To determine how this disruption of neuroendocrine circuits affects leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we measured leptin influx in A vy and B6 control mice after the development of obesity, hyperleptinemia, and increased adiposity. After iv bolus injection, (125)I-leptin crossed the BBB significantly faster in young (2 month old) B6 mice than in young A vy mice or in older (8 month old) mice of either strain. This difference was not observed by in situ brain perfusion studies, indicating the cause being circulating factors, such as elevated leptin levels or soluble receptors. Thus, A vy mice showed peripheral leptin resistance. ObRa, the main transporting receptor for leptin at the BBB, showed no change in mRNA expression in the cerebral microvessels between the age-matched (2 month old) A vy and B6 mice. Higher ObRb mRNA was seen in the A vy microvasculature with unknown significance. Immunofluorescent staining unexpectedly revealed that many of the ObR(+) cells were astrocytes and that the A vy mice showed significantly more ObR(+) astrocytes in the hypothalamus than the B6 mice. Although leptin permeation from the circulation was slower in the A vy mice, the increased ObR expression in astrocytes and increased ObRb mRNA in microvessels suggest the possibility of heightened central nervous system sensitivity to circulating leptin.

  12. Growth restriction, leptin, and the programming of adult behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Lauritz R; Zhu, Vivian; Miller, Alise; Roghair, Robert D

    2014-12-15

    Prematurity and neonatal growth restriction (GR) are risk factors for autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Leptin production is suppressed during periods of undernutrition, and we have shown that isolated neonatal leptin deficiency leads to adult hyperactivity while neonatal leptin supplementation normalizes the brain morphology of GR mice. We hypothesized that neonatal leptin would prevent the development of GR-associated behavioral abnormalities. From postnatal day 4-14, C57BL/6 mice were randomized to daily injections of saline or leptin (80ng/g), and GR was identified by a weanling weight below the tenth percentile. The behavioral phenotypes of GR and control mice were assessed beginning at 4 months. Within the tripartite chamber, GR mice had significantly impaired social interaction. Baseline escape times from the Barnes maze were faster for GR mice (65+/-6s vs 87+/-7s for controls, p<0.05), but GR mice exhibited regression in their escape times on days 2 and 3 (56% regressed vs 22% of control saline mice, p<0.05). Compared to controls, GR mice entered the open arms of the elevated plus maze more often and stayed there longer (72+/-10s vs 36+/-5s, p<0.01). Neonatal leptin supplementation normalized the behavior of GR mice across all behavioral assays. In conclusion, GR alters the social interactions, learning and activity of mice, and supplementation with the neurotrophic hormone leptin mitigates these effects. We speculate neonatal leptin deficiency may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with postnatal growth restriction, and postnatal leptin therapy may be protective.

  13. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  14. Proteomic response to physiological fermentation stresses in a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Ferro, Elisa; Coratza, Grazietta; Bovalini, Lucia; Lusini, Paola; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-01-01

    We report a study on the adaptive response of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolated from natural spontaneous grape must, to mild and progressive physiological stresses due to fermentation. We observed by two-dimensional electrophoresis how the yeast proteome changes during glucose exhaustion, before the cell enters its complete stationary phase. On the basis of their identification, the proteins representing the S. cerevisiae proteomic response to fermentation stresses were divided into three classes: repressed proteins, induced proteins and autoproteolysed proteins. In an overall view, the proteome adaptation of S. cerevisiae at the time of glucose exhaustion seems to be directed mainly against the effects of ethanol, causing both hyperosmolarity and oxidative responses. Stress-induced autoproteolysis is directed mainly towards specific isoforms of glycolytic enzymes. Through the use of a wild-type S. cerevisiae strain and PMSF, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar proteinase B, we could also distinguish the specific contributions of the vacuole and the proteasome to the autoproteolytic process. PMID:12401115

  15. Prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of wild type BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-06-01

    Even though mutations in the tumor suppressor, BRCA1, markedly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, most breast and ovarian cancers express wild type BRCA1. An important question is therefore how the tumor-suppressive function of normal BRCA1 is overcome during development of most cancers. Because prolactin promotes these and other cancers, we investigated the hypothesis that prolactin interferes with the ability of BRCA1 to inhibit the cell cycle. Examining six different cancer cell lines with wild type BRCA1, and making use of both prolactin and the growth-inhibiting selective prolactin receptor modulator, S179D PRL, we demonstrate that prolactin activation of Stat5 results in the formation of a complex between phospho-Stat5 and BRCA1. Formation of this complex does not interfere with nuclear translocation or binding of BRCA1 to the p21 promoter, but does interfere with the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate the p21 promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Stat5 in prolactin-stimulated cells resulted in increased p21 expression. We conclude that prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of BRCA1 by interfering with BRCA1's upregulation of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21.

  16. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  17. Gravitropism of hypocotyls of wild-type and starch-deficient Arabidopsis seedlings in spaceflight studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Edelmann, R. E.; Wood, P. C.

    1999-01-01

    The major purpose of this spaceflight project was to investigate the starch-statolith hypothesis for gravity perception, and a secondary goal was to study plant growth and development under spaceflight conditions. This research was based on our ground studies of gravity perception in the wild type and three starch-deficient (one starchless and two reduced starch) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Dark-grown seedlings that developed in microgravity were given one of several (30 min, 60 min, or 90 min) 1-g stimuli by an on-board centrifuge, and additional controls for seedling development also were performed. These latter control experiments included a morphological study of plants that developed in space in microgravity (F microg), in space on a centrifuge (F 1g), on the ground (G 1g), and on a rotating clinostat on the ground. Since elevated levels of ethylene were reported in the spacecraft atmosphere, additional controls for morphology and gravitropism with added ethylene also were performed. While exogenous ethylene reduced the absolute magnitude of the response in all four strains of Arabidopsis, this gas did not appear to change the relative graviresponsiveness among the strains. The relative response of hypocotyls of microgravity-grown seedlings to the stimuli provided by the in-flight centrifuge was: wild type > starch-deficient mutants. Although the protoplast pressure model for gravity perception cannot be excluded, these results are consistent with a statolith-based model for perception in plants.

  18. Plastid sedimentation kinetics in roots of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCleery, S. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation and movement of plastids in columella cells of the root cap were measured in seedlings of wild-type, a reduced starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis. To assay for sedimentation, we used both linear measurements and the change of angle from the cell center as indices in vertical and reoriented plants with the aid of computer-assisted image analysis. Seedlings were fixed at short periods after reorientation, and plastid sedimentation correlated with starch content in the three strains of Arabidopsis. Amyloplasts of wild-type seedlings showed the greatest sedimentation, whereas plastids of the starchless mutant showed no significant sedimentation in the vertically grown and reoriented seedlings. Because previous research has shown that a full complement of starch is needed for full gravitropic sensitivity, this study correlates increased sensitivity with plastid sedimentation. However, although plastid sedimentation contributed to gravisensitivity, it was not required, because the gravitropic starchless mutant had plastids that did not sediment. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to measure plastid sedimentation in Arabidopsis roots after reorientation of seedlings. Taken together, the results of this study are consistent with the classic plastid-based and protoplast-based models of graviperception and suggest that multiple systems of perception exist in plant cells.

  19. Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in wild-type turkeys living in close contact with domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Jessup, D A; DaMassa, A J; Lewis, R; Jones, K R

    1983-12-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum was isolated from 2 wild-type turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and 1 domestic turkey living in close contact on a farm in Tehama County, California. Sinusitis was detected in 2 of 14 wild-type turkeys and in 1 of 12 feral broad-breasted bronze turkeys, but in none of several chickens on the premises. The entire mixed flock was captured, sinus aspirates were collected from affected birds, and blood samples were obtained from all birds for serologic testing. Blood samples also were obtained from 10 domestic turkeys on adjacent premises from which breeding stock had been borrowed. The M gallisepticum isolated from sinus aspirates was typed and inoculated into susceptible chickens, resulting in airsacculitis. California wild turkeys with and without histories of exposure to domestic fowl and wild turkeys shipped into California from Texas for release were tested for antibodies to M gallisepticum, using the plate agglutination test. Evidence of M gallisepticum infection was not found in wild turkeys at any location other than the original premises.

  20. Global carbon utilization profiles of wild-type, mutant, and transformant strains of Hypocrea jecorina.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Schmoll, Monika; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2006-03-01

    The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), an industrial producer of cellulases and hemicellulases, can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides. However, the catabolic pathways for the resulting monomers and their relationship to enzyme induction are not well known. Here we used the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays technique to evaluate the growth of H. jecorina on 95 carbon sources. For this purpose, we compared several wild-type isolates, mutants producing different amounts of cellulases, and strains transformed with a heterologous antibiotic resistance marker gene. The wild-type isolates and transformed strains had the highest variation in growth patterns on individual carbon sources. The cellulase mutants were relatively similar to their parental strains. Both in the mutant and in the transformed strains, the most significant changes occurred in utilization of xylitol, erythritol, D-sorbitol, D-ribose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, maltotriose, and beta-methyl-glucoside. Increased production of cellulases was negatively correlated with the ability to grow on gamma-aminobutyrate, adonitol, and 2-ketogluconate; and positively correlated with that on d-sorbitol and saccharic acid. The reproducibility, relative simplicity, and high resolution (+/-10% of increase in mycelial density) of the phenotypic microarrays make them a useful tool for the characterization of mutant and transformed strains and for a global analysis of gene function.

  1. Genetic recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses among wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Roth, Anette; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    Genetic recombination has been suggested to occur in mosquito-borne flaviviruses. In contrast, tick-borne flaviviruses have been thought to evolve in a clonal manner, although recent studies suggest that recombination occurs also for these viruses. We re-analyzed the data and found that previous conclusions on wild type recombination were probably falsely drawn due to misalignments of nucleotide sequences, ambiguities in GenBank sequences, or different laboratory culture histories suggestive of recombination events in laboratory. To evaluate if reliable predictions of wild type recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses can be made, we analyzed viral strains sequenced exclusively for this study, and other flavivirus sequences retrieved from GenBank. We detected genetic signals supporting recombination between viruses within the three clades of TBEV-Eu, TBEV-Sib and TBEV-Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that the tick-borne encephalitis viruses may undergo recombination under natural conditions, but that geographic barriers restrict most recombination events to involve only closely genetically related viruses.

  2. Glucocorticoid-regulated glycoprotein maturation in wild-type and mutant rat cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones can regulate the posttranslational maturation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) precursor polyproteins in M1.54, a stably infected rat hepatoma cell line. We have used complement- mediated cytolysis to recover variants of M1.54 that fail to express MTV cell surface glycoproteins in a hormone-regulated manner (Firestone, G.L., and K.R. Yamamoto, 1983, Mol. Cell. Biol., 3:149- 160). One such clonal isolate, CR4, is similar to wild-type with respect to synthesis of MTV mRNAs, production of the MTV glycoprotein precursor (gPr74env) and a glycosylated maturation product (gp51), and hormone-induced processing of two MTV phosphoproteins. In contrast, three viral cell surface glycoproteins (gp78, gp70, and gp32) and one extracellular species (gp70s), which derive from gPr74env in glucocorticoid-treated wild-type cells, fail to appear in CR4. CR4 showed no apparent alterations in proliferation rate, cell shape, or expression of total functional mRNA and bulk glycoproteins. We conclude that the genetic lesion in CR4 defines a highly selective hormone- regulated glycoprotein maturation pathway that alters the fate of a restricted subset of precursor species. PMID:3023398

  3. Structural insights into conformational stability of both wild-type and mutant EZH2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aier, Imlimaong; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Raj, Utkarsh

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have been observed to maintain the pattern of histone by methylation of the histone tail responsible for the gene expression in various cellular processes, of which enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) acts as tumor suppressor. Overexpression of EZH2 results in hyper activation found in a variety of cancer. Point mutation on two important residues were induced and the results were compared between the wild type and mutant EZH2. The mutation of Y641 and A677 present in the active region of the protein alters the interaction of the top ranked compound with the newly modeled binding groove of the SET domain, giving a GLIDE score of −12.26 kcal/mol, better than that of the wild type at −11.664 kcal/mol. In depth analysis were carried out for understanding the underlying molecular mechanism using techniques viz. molecular dynamics, principal component analysis, residue interaction network and free energy landscape analysis, which showed that the mutated residues changed the overall conformation of the system along with the residue-residue interaction network. The insight from this study could be of great relevance while designing new compounds for EZH2 enzyme inhibition and the effect of mutation on the overall binding mechanism of the system. PMID:27713574

  4. Co-fibrillogenesis of Wild-type and D76N β2-Microglobulin: THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF FIBRILLAR SEEDS.

    PubMed

    Natalello, Antonino; Mangione, P Patrizia; Giorgetti, Sofia; Porcari, Riccardo; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Relini, Annalisa; Ami, Diletta; Faravelli, Giulia; Valli, Maurizia; Stoppini, Monica; Doglia, Silvia M; Bellotti, Vittorio; Raimondi, Sara

    2016-04-29

    The amyloidogenic variant of β2-microglobulin, D76N, can readily convert into genuine fibrils under physiological conditions and primes in vitro the fibrillogenesis of the wild-type β2-microglobulin. By Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that the amyloid transformation of wild-type β2-microglobulin can be induced by the variant only after its complete fibrillar conversion. Our current findings are consistent with preliminary data in which we have shown a seeding effect of fibrils formed from D76N or the natural truncated form of β2-microglobulin lacking the first six N-terminal residues. Interestingly, the hybrid wild-type/variant fibrillar material acquired a thermodynamic stability similar to that of homogenous D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils and significantly higher than the wild-type homogeneous fibrils prepared at neutral pH in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol. These results suggest that the surface of D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils can favor the transition of the wild-type protein into an amyloid conformation leading to a rapid integration into fibrils. The chaperone crystallin, which is a mild modulator of the lag phase of the variant fibrillogenesis, potently inhibits fibril elongation of the wild-type even once it is absorbed on D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils. PMID:26921323

  5. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau

    PubMed Central

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M.; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  6. Antigen spreading-induced CD8+T cells confer protection against the lethal challenge of wild-type malignant mesothelioma by eliminating myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boon Kiat; Tang, Jiansong; Wu, Xilin; Cheung, Ka-Wai; Lok Lo, Nathan Tin; Man, Kwan; Liu, Li; Chen, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    A key focus in cancer immunotherapy is to investigate the mechanism of efficacious vaccine responses. Using HIV-1 GAG-p24 in a model PD1-based DNA vaccine, we recently reported that vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells conferred complete prevention and therapeutic cure of AB1-GAG malignant mesothelioma in immunocompetent BALB/c mice. Here, we further investigated the efficacy and correlation of protection on the model vaccine-mediated antigen spreading against wild-type AB1 (WT-AB1) mesothelioma. We found that this vaccine was able to protect mice completely from three consecutive lethal challenges of AB1-GAG mesothelioma. Through antigen spreading these animals also developed tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, but neither CD4+ T cells nor antibodies, rejecting WT-AB1 mesothelioma. A majority of these protected mice (90%) were also completely protected against the lethal WT-AB1 challenge. Adoptive cell transfer experiments further demonstrated that antigen spreading-induced CD8+ T cells conferred efficacious therapeutic effects against established WT-AB1 mesothelioma and prevented the increase of exhausted PD-1+ and Tim-3+ CD8+ T cells. A significant inverse correlation was found between the frequency of functional PD1−Tim3− CD8+ T cells and that of MDSCs or tumor mass in vivo. Mechanistically, we found that WT-AB1 mesothelioma induced predominantly polymorphonuclear (PMN) MDSCs in vivo. In co-cultures with efficacious CD8+ T cells, a significant number of PMN-MDSCs underwent apoptosis in a dose-dependent way. Our findings indicate that efficacious CD8+ T cells capable of eliminating both tumor cells and MDSCs are likely necessary for fighting wild-type malignant mesothelioma. PMID:26431275

  7. Apolipoprotein E4 reduces evoked hippocampal acetylcholine release in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Dolejší, Eva; Liraz, Ori; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) is the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. We utilized apoE4-targeted replacement mice (approved by the Tel Aviv University Animal Care Committee) to investigate whether cholinergic dysfunction, which increases during aging and is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, is accentuated by apoE4. This revealed that levels of the pre-synaptic cholinergic marker, vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the hippocampus and the corresponding electrically evoked release of acetylcholine, are similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) mice. Both parameters decrease with age. This decrease is, however, significantly more pronounced in the apoE4 mice. The levels of cholinacetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were similar in the hippocampus of young apoE4 and apoE3 mice and decreased during aging. For ChAT, this decrease was similar in the apoE4 and apoE3 mice, whereas it was more pronounced in the apoE4 mice, regarding their corresponding AChE and BuChE levels. The level of muscarinic receptors was higher in the apoE4 than in the apoE3 mice at 4 months and increased to similar levels with age. However, the relative representation of the M1 receptor subtype decreased during aging in apoE4 mice. These results demonstrate impairment of the evoked release of acetylcholine in hippocampus by apoE4 in 12-month-old mice but not in 4-month-old mice. The levels of ChAT and the extent of the M2 receptor-mediated autoregulation of ACh release were similar in the adult mice, suggesting that the apoE4-related inhibition of hippocampal ACh release in these mice is not driven by these parameters. Evoked ACh release from hippocampal and cortical slices is similar in 4-month-old apoE4 and apoE3 mice but is specifically and significantly reduced in hippocampus, but not cortex, of 12-month-old apoE4 mice. This effect is accompanied by decreased VAChT levels. These findings show that

  8. Premature aging of the hippocampal neurogenic niche in adult Bmal1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amira A H; Schwarz-Herzke, Beryl; Stahr, Anna; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; von Gall, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis undergoes dramatic age-related changes. Mice with targeted deletion of the clock geneBmal1 (Bmal1(-/-)) show disrupted regulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis, accelerated aging, neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits. As proliferation of neuronal progenitor/precursor cells (NPCs) is enhanced in young Bmal1(-/-) mice, we tested the hypothesis that this results in premature aging of hippocampal neurogenic niche in adult Bmal1(-/-) mice as compared to wildtype littermates. We found significantly reduced pool of hippocampal NPCs, scattered distribution, enhanced survival of NPCs and an increased differentiation of NPCs into the astroglial lineage at the expense of the neuronal lineage. Immunoreaction of the redox sensitive histone deacetylase Sirtuine 1, peroxisomal membrane protein at 70 kDa and expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Waf1/CIP1) were increased in adult Bmal1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, genetic disruption of the molecular clockwork leads to accelerated age-dependent decline in adult neurogenesis presumably as a consequence of oxidative stress.

  9. Integration of CD45-positive leukocytes into newly forming lymphatics of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Buttler, K; Lohrberg, M; Gross, G; Weich, H A; Wilting, J

    2016-06-01

    The embryonic origin of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) has been a matter of controversy since more than a century. However, recent studies in mice have supported the concept that embryonic lymphangiogenesis is a complex process consisting of growth of lymphatics from specific venous segments as well as the integration of lymphangioblasts into the lymphatic networks. Similarly, the mechanisms of adult lymphangiogenesis are poorly understood and have rarely been studied. We have recently shown that endothelial progenitor cells isolated from the lung of adult mice have the capacity to form both blood vessels and lymphatics when grafted with Matrigel plugs into the skin of syngeneic mice. Here, we followed up on these experiments and studied the behavior of host leukocytes during lymphangiogenesis in the Matrigel plugs. We observed a striking co-localization of CD45(+) leukocytes with the developing lymphatics. Numerous CD45(+) cells expressed the LEC marker podoplanin and were obviously integrated into the lining of lymphatic capillaries. This indicates that, similar to inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis in man, circulating CD45(+) cells of adult mice are capable of initiating lymphangiogenesis and of adopting a lymphvasculogenic cellular differentiation program. The data are discussed in the context of embryonic and inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26748643

  10. Targeted deletion of Vegfa in adult mice induces vision loss.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Toshihide; Westenskow, Peter D; Bravo, Stephen; Aguilar, Edith; Friedlander, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Current therapies directed at controlling vascular abnormalities in cancers and neovascular eye diseases target VEGF and can slow the progression of these diseases. While the critical role of VEGF in development has been well described, the function of locally synthesized VEGF in the adult eye is incompletely understood. Here, we show that conditionally knocking out Vegfa in adult mouse retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, which regulate retinal homeostasis, rapidly leads to vision loss and ablation of the choriocapillaris, the major blood supply for the outer retina and photoreceptor cells. This deletion also caused rapid dysfunction of cone photoreceptors, the cells responsible for fine visual acuity and color vision. Furthermore, Vegfa deletion showed significant downregulation of multiple angiogenic genes in both physiological and pathological states, whereas the deletion of the upstream regulatory transcriptional factors HIFs did not affect the physiological expressions of angiogenic genes. These results suggest that endogenous VEGF provides critical trophic support necessary for retinal function. Targeting factors upstream of VEGF, such as HIFs, may be therapeutically advantageous compared with more potent and selective VEGF antagonists, which may have more off-target inhibitory trophic effects. PMID:23093773

  11. Emotional disorders in adult mice heterozygous for the transcription factor Phox2b.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Bieke; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Naert, Arne; Matrot, Boris; Van den Bergh, Omer; D'Hooge, Rudi; Gallego, Jorge

    2015-03-15

    Phox2b is an essential transcription factor for the development of the autonomic nervous system. Mice carrying one invalidated Phox2b allele (Phox2b(+/-)) show mild autonomic disorders including sleep apneas, and impairments in chemosensitivity and thermoregulation that recover within 10days of postnatal age. Because Phox2b is not expressed above the pons nor in the cerebellum, this mutation is not expected to affect brain development and cognitive functioning directly. However, the transient physiological disorders in Phox2b(+/-) mice might impair neurodevelopment. To examine this possibility, we conducted a behavioral test battery of emotional, motor, and cognitive functioning in adult Phox2b(+/-) mice and their wildtype littermates (Phox2b(+/+)). Adult Phox2b(+/-) mice showed altered exploratory behavior in the open field and in the elevated plus maze, both indicative of anxiety. Phox2b(+/-) mice did not show cognitive or motor impairments. These results suggest that also mild autonomic control deficits may disturb long-term emotional development. PMID:25582512

  12. Emotional disorders in adult mice heterozygous for the transcription factor Phox2b.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Bieke; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Naert, Arne; Matrot, Boris; Van den Bergh, Omer; D'Hooge, Rudi; Gallego, Jorge

    2015-03-15

    Phox2b is an essential transcription factor for the development of the autonomic nervous system. Mice carrying one invalidated Phox2b allele (Phox2b(+/-)) show mild autonomic disorders including sleep apneas, and impairments in chemosensitivity and thermoregulation that recover within 10days of postnatal age. Because Phox2b is not expressed above the pons nor in the cerebellum, this mutation is not expected to affect brain development and cognitive functioning directly. However, the transient physiological disorders in Phox2b(+/-) mice might impair neurodevelopment. To examine this possibility, we conducted a behavioral test battery of emotional, motor, and cognitive functioning in adult Phox2b(+/-) mice and their wildtype littermates (Phox2b(+/+)). Adult Phox2b(+/-) mice showed altered exploratory behavior in the open field and in the elevated plus maze, both indicative of anxiety. Phox2b(+/-) mice did not show cognitive or motor impairments. These results suggest that also mild autonomic control deficits may disturb long-term emotional development.

  13. Ketogenic diet exposure during the juvenile period increases social behaviors and forebrain neural activation in adult Engrailed 2 null mice.

    PubMed

    Verpeut, Jessica L; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-07-01

    Prolonged consumption of ketogenic diets (KD) has reported neuroprotective benefits. Several studies suggest KD interventions could be useful in the management of neurological and developmental disorders. Alterations in the Engrailed (En) genes, specifically Engrailed 2 (En2), have neurodevelopmental consequences and produce autism-related behaviors. The following studies used En2 knockout (KO; En2(-/-)), and wild-type (WT; En2(+/+)), male mice fed either KD (80% fat, 0.1% carbohydrates) or control diet (CD; 10% fat, 70% carbohydrates). The objective was to determine whether a KD fed from weaning at postnatal day (PND) 21 to adulthood (PND 60) would alter brain monoamines concentrations, previously found dysregulated, and improve social outcomes. In WT animals, there was an increase in hypothalamic norepinephrine content in the KD-fed group. However, regional monoamines were not altered in KO mice in KD-fed compared with CD-fed group. In order to determine the effects of juvenile exposure to KD in mice with normal blood ketone levels, separate experiments were conducted in mice removed from the KD or CD and fed standard chow for 2days (PND 62). In a three-chamber social test with a novel mouse, KO mice previously exposed to the KD displayed similar social and self-grooming behaviors compared with the WT group. Groups previously exposed to a KD, regardless of genotype, had more c-Fos-positive cells in the cingulate cortex, lateral septal nuclei, and anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. In the novel object condition, KO mice previously exposed to KD had similar behavioral responses and pattern of c-Fos immunoreactivity compared with the WT group. Thus, juvenile exposure to KD resulted in short-term consequences of improving social interactions and appropriate exploratory behaviors in a mouse model that displays autism-related behaviors. Such findings further our understanding of metabolic-based therapies for neurological and developmental disorders. PMID

  14. SUPPRESSION OF IDIOTYPIC SPECIFICITIES IN ADULT MICE BY ADMINISTRATION OF ANTIIDIOTYPIC ANTIBODY

    PubMed Central

    Hart, David A.; Wang, Ai-Lan; Pawlak, Laura L.; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1972-01-01

    It has previously been shown that there are extensive idiotypic cross-reactions among antiphenylarsonate antibodies of A/J mice. The present work indicates that administration, into normal, adult A/J mice, of rabbit antiidiotypic antibody directed to A/J antiphenylarsonate antibody suppresses almost completely the subsequent production of antibody of the corresponding idiotype. No effect was noted on the formation of antibodies to the protein carrier or of antiphenylarsonate antibody of a different idiotype. The data are consistent with central suppression of production of the idiotypic antibody mediated through interaction with immunoglobulin receptors on lymphocytes. PMID:4623607

  15. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adult hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.

  16. Mgat5 modulates the effect of early life stress on adult behavior and physical health in mice.

    PubMed

    Feldcamp, Laura; Doucet, Jean-Sebastien; Pawling, Judy; Fadel, Marc P; Fletcher, Paul J; Maunder, Robert; Dennis, James W; Wong, Albert H C

    2016-10-01

    Psychosocial adversity in early life increases the likelihood of mental and physical illness, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Mgat5 is an N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase in the Golgi pathway that remodels the N-glycans of glycoproteins at the cell surface. Mice lacking Mgat5 display conditional phenotypes in behaviour, immunity, metabolism, aging and cancer susceptibility. Here we investigated potential gene-environment interactions between Mgat5 and early life adversity on behaviour and physiological measures of physical health. Mgat5(-/-) mutant and Mgat5(+/+) wild-type C57Bl/6 littermates were subject to maternal separation or foster rearing as an early life stressor, in comparison to control mice reared normally. We found an interaction between Mgat5 genotype and maternal rearing condition in which Mgat5(-/-) mice subjected to early life stress had lower glucose levels and higher bone density. Mgat5(-/-) genotype was also associated with less immobility in the forced swim test and greater sucrose consumption, consistent with a less depression-like phenotype. Cortical neuron dendrite spine density and branching was altered by Mgat5 deletion as well. In general, Mgat5 genotype affects both behaviour and physical outcomes in response to early life stress, suggesting some shared pathways for both in this model. These results provide a starting point for studying the mechanisms by which protein N-glycosylation mediates the effects of early life adversity. PMID:27329152

  17. Cellulose Supplementation Early in Life Ameliorates Colitis in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Hollister, Emily B.; Luna, Ruth Ann; Szigeti, Reka; Tatevian, Nina; Smith, C. Wayne; Versalovic, James; Kellermayer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Decreased consumption of dietary fibers, such as cellulose, has been proposed to promote the emergence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD: Crohn disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC]) where intestinal microbes are recognized to play an etiologic role. However, it is not known if transient fiber consumption during critical developmental periods may prevent consecutive intestinal inflammation. The incidence of IBD peaks in young adulthood indicating that pediatric environmental exposures may be important in the etiology of this disease group. We studied the effects of transient dietary cellulose supplementation on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis susceptibility during the pediatric period in mice. Cellulose supplementation stimulated substantial shifts in the colonic mucosal microbiome. Several bacterial taxa decreased in relative abundance (e.g., Coriobacteriaceae [p = 0.001]), and other taxa increased in abundance (e.g., Peptostreptococcaceae [p = 0.008] and Clostridiaceae [p = 0.048]). Some of these shifts persisted for 10 days following the cessation of cellulose supplementation. The changes in the gut microbiome were associated with transient trophic and anticolitic effects 10 days following the cessation of a cellulose-enriched diet, but these changes diminished by 40 days following reversal to a low cellulose diet. These findings emphasize the transient protective effect of dietary cellulose in the mammalian large bowel and highlight the potential role of dietary fibers in amelioration of intestinal inflammation. PMID:23437211

  18. Experimental investigation of magneto-aerotaxis on wild-type magnetotactic bacteria in sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Egli, R.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MB) synthesize chains of magnetic particles, called magnetosomes, which provide a magnetic dipole that passively aligns the cells along the geomagnetic field. Flagellar propulsion allows MB to swim straight along field lines in what is known as magnetotaxis. The flagellum rotation sense is controlled by the chemical environment, so that MB can efficiently move across chemically stratified environments to reach the so-called oxic-anoxic interface (OAI). This combination of oriented swimming controlled by chemical (oxygen) sensing is called magneto-aerotaxis (Frankel 1997). Experiments with MB cultures show that magnetic spirilla can change instantaneously the swimming direction, while the behaviour of cocci depends on a sort of 'internal state' dictated by their original location with respect to the OAI. Here, we present first results the magneto-aerotactic behaviour of wild-type MB living in microcosms created with sediment retrieved from lake Chiemsee (Bavaria, Germany). In these microcosms, a stable population of MB (mainly unidentified strains of cocci, and Magnetobacterium Bavaricum) occur in the upmost few cm below the sediment surface, with maximum concentrations just below the OAI. We tested the reaction of this MB population to changes in chemical conditions by putting the microcosm inside a glove box with controlled oxygen-free atmospheres (N2 and CO2). A new equilibrium was reached within few weeks, with the OAI first moving upward and then disappearing. The depth distribution and swimming direction of MB was tested during and after the formation of a new equilibrium. We were never able to observe swimming directions consistent with bacteria moving upward in the sediment, as it was the case with cultured cocci in Frankel [1997], even long time after the entire sediment column became completely anoxic. Nevertheless, the disappearance of the OAI was accompanied by a slight but significant decrease of the total MB population

  19. Social experience modulates ocular dominance plasticity differentially in adult male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Balog, Jenny; Matthies, Ulrike; Naumann, Lisa; Voget, Mareike; Winter, Christine; Lehmann, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    Environmental factors have long been known to regulate brain plasticity. We investigated the potential influence of social experience on ocular dominance plasticity. Fully adult female or male mice were monocularly deprived for four days and kept a) either alone or in pairs of the same sex and b) either in a small cage or a large, featureless arena. While mice kept alone did not show ocular dominance plasticity, no matter whether in a cage or in an arena, paired female mice in both environmental conditions displayed a shift of ocular dominance towards the open eye. Paired male mice, in contrast, showed no plasticity in the cage, but a very strong ocular dominance shift in the arena. This effect was not due to increased locomotion, since the covered distance was similar in single and paired male mice in the arena, and furnishing cages with a running wheel did not enable ocular dominance plasticity in cage-housed mice. Confirming recent results in rats, the plasticity-enhancing effect of the social environment was shown to be mediated by serotonin. Our results demonstrate that social experience has a strong effect on cortical plasticity that is sex-dependent. This has potential consequences both for animal research and for human education and rehabilitation.

  20. Round and Round and Round We Go: Behavior of Adult Female Mice on the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Decadal Survey (2011) emphasized the importance of long duration rodent experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). To accomplish this objective, flight hardware and science capabilities supporting mouse studies in space were developed at Ames Research Center. Here we present a video-based behavioral analysis of ten C57BL6 female adult mice exposed to a total of 37 days in space compared with identically housed Ground Controls. Flight and Control mice exhibited the same range of behaviors, including feeding, drinking, exploratory behavior, grooming, and social interactions. Mice propelled themselves freely and actively throughout the Habitat using their forelimbs to push off or by floating from one cage area to another. Overall activity was greater in Flt as compared to GC mice. Spontaneous, organized circling or race-tracking behavior emerged within the first few days of flight and encompassed the primary dark cycle activity for the remainder of the experiment. I will summarize qualitative observations and quantitative comparisons of mice in microgravity and 1g conditions. Behavioral phenotyping revealed important insights into the overall health and adaptation of mice to the space environment, and identified unique behaviors that can guide future habitat development and research on rodents in space.

  1. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-07-29

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes.

  2. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes. PMID:26923756

  3. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:25360084

  4. Genome Sequence of SG33 Strain and Recombination between Wild-Type and Vaccine Myxoma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination. PMID:21470452

  5. Purification of extrachloroplastic. beta. -amylase from leaves of starchless and wild type Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, C.; Monroe, J.; Preiss, J. )

    1989-04-01

    Amylase activity in crude leaf extracts from starchless mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is 5 to 10 fold higher than in the wild type (WT) when plants are grown under a 12 h photoperiod. Visualized on native PAGE, the increased activity is attributed primarily to a previously characterized extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. The {beta}-amylases from phosoglucomutase deficient (starchless) and WT leaves were purified to homogeneity in two steps utilizing polyethylene glycol fractionation, and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The enzyme from both mutant and WT leaves had negligible activity toward either {beta}-limit dextrin or pullulan. The specific activities of both purified enzymes were similar indicating that the protein is over-expressed in the mutant. Preliminary antibody neutralization experiments suggest that the two {beta}-amylases are not different.

  6. Quality assessment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis): comparison between commercial and wild types.

    PubMed

    De Witte, B; Devriese, L; Bekaert, K; Hoffman, S; Vandermeersch, G; Cooreman, K; Robbens, J

    2014-08-15

    This study compared species identity, microplastics, chemical and microbial contamination between consumption mussels and wild type mussels, collected at Belgian department stores and Belgian groynes and quaysides, respectively. Species identification based on genetic analysis showed a high number of Mytilus (M.) edulis compared to M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis/galloprovincialis hybrid mussels. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.6 to 5.1 fibres/10 g of mussel. A higher prevalence of orange fibres at quaysides is related to fisheries activities. Chemical contamination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorobiphenyls could be related to industrial activities and water turbidity, with maximum concentrations at the quayside of port Zeebrugge. The inverse was noted for Escherichia coli contamination, which was relatively low at Zeebrugge quayside with a total count of 3.9 × 10(2)CFU/100 g tissue, due to limited agricultural effluents. Results of this complementary analysis stress the importance of integrated monitoring and quality assessment.

  7. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stefanie L; Seggio, Joseph A; Nascimento, Nara F; Huh, Dana D; Hicks, Jasmin A; Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Wang, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species.

  8. Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Wild-Type and Oncolytic Adenovirus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cascalló, Manel; Chillón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contamination of adenovirus (Ad) stocks with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) is usually unnoticed, and it has been associated with lower Ad yields upon large-scale production. During Ad propagation, AAV contamination needs to be detected routinely by polymerase chain reaction without symptomatic suspicion. In this study, we describe that the coinfection of either Ad wild type 5 or oncolytic Ad with AAV results in a large-plaque phenotype associated with an accelerated release of Ad from coinfected cells. This accelerated release was accompanied with the expected decrease in Ad yields in two out of three cell lines tested. Despite this lower Ad yield, coinfection with AAV accelerated cell death and enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by Ad propagation. Intratumoral coinjection of Ad and AAV in two xenograft tumor models improved antitumor activity and mouse survival. Therefore, we conclude that accidental or intentional AAV coinfection has important implications for Ad-mediated virotherapy. PMID:24020980

  9. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors. PMID:22286706

  10. Comparation of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene transfected and wild-type porcine neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-E; Quan, Fu-Sheng; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Ying; He, Xiao-Ning

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to transfect and express the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene into porcine neural stem cells (NSCs) to determine whether EGFP can be used as a marker to monitor NSCs. NSCs were isolated from embryonic day 30 fetal pig brain and transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. Transfected and wild-type NSCs were induced to differentiate into cells of neuronal and myogenic lineages. Markers of passage three NSCs and their differentiated cells were tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that EGFP could be expressed in NSCs and the differentiated cells. NSCs expressed Nestin, NogoA, DCX, Hes1, Oct4, CD-90 and Sox2. NSCs could differentiated into astrocyte (GFAP(+)), oligodendrocyte (GalC(+)), neuron (NF(+), NSE(+) and MAP2(+)) and myocyte (myf-6(+) and myoD(+)). We concluded that EGFP can be used as a marker in monitoring NSCs. PMID:19580981

  11. Comparation of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene transfected and wild-type porcine neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-E; Quan, Fu-Sheng; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Ying; He, Xiao-Ning

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to transfect and express the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene into porcine neural stem cells (NSCs) to determine whether EGFP can be used as a marker to monitor NSCs. NSCs were isolated from embryonic day 30 fetal pig brain and transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. Transfected and wild-type NSCs were induced to differentiate into cells of neuronal and myogenic lineages. Markers of passage three NSCs and their differentiated cells were tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that EGFP could be expressed in NSCs and the differentiated cells. NSCs expressed Nestin, NogoA, DCX, Hes1, Oct4, CD-90 and Sox2. NSCs could differentiated into astrocyte (GFAP(+)), oligodendrocyte (GalC(+)), neuron (NF(+), NSE(+) and MAP2(+)) and myocyte (myf-6(+) and myoD(+)). We concluded that EGFP can be used as a marker in monitoring NSCs.

  12. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors.

  13. Analysis of purified Wild type and mutant adenovirus particles by SILAC based quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Ali; Heesom, Kate; Bramson, Jonathan L.; Curiel, David; Ugai, Hideyo

    2014-01-01

    We used SILAC (stable isotope labelling of amino acids in cell culture) and high-throughput quantitative MS mass spectrometry to analyse the protein composition of highly purified WT wild type adenoviruses, mutant adenoviruses lacking an internal protein component (protein V) and recombinant adenoviruses of the type commonly used in gene therapy, including one virus that had been used in a clinical trial. We found that the viral protein abundance and composition were consistent across all types of virus examined except for the virus lacking protein V, which also had reduced amounts of another viral core protein, protein VII. In all the samples analysed we found no evidence of consistent packaging or contamination with cellular proteins. We believe this technique is a powerful method to analyse the protein composition of this important gene therapy vector and genetically engineered or synthetic virus-like particles. The raw data have been deposited at proteomexchange, identifer PXD001120. PMID:25096814

  14. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  15. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stefanie L.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Hicks, Jasmin A.; Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  16. Organophosphonate Utilization by the Wild-Type Strain of Penicillium notatum

    PubMed Central

    Bujacz, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Krzysko-Lupicka, T.; Golab, Z.; Lejczak, B.; Kavfarski, P.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the biodegradation of compounds containing phosphorus-to-carbon bonds by using a wild-type strain of Penicillium notatum. The substrate specificity of this strain was studied, and we found that it is able to utilize structurally diverse organophosphonates as sole sources of phosphorus. This ability seems to be inducible, as indicated by the presence of a lag phase during growth. A popular herbicide, glyphosate, inhibited fungal growth, but it was also degraded by the fungus if it was applied in sublethal doses. This indicates that P. notatum may play an important role in biodegradation of organophosphonates. The strain which we used did not metabolize any of the phosphonates which we tested when they were used as sole carbon or nitrogen sources. PMID:16535094

  17. Adolescent Mice, Unlike Adults, Consume More Alcohol in the Presence of Peers than Alone

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Sheree; Chein, Jason; Gould, Thomas; Holliday, Erica; Steinberg, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    One hallmark of adolescent risk taking is that it typically occurs when adolescents are with peers. It has been hypothesized that the presence of peers primes a reward-sensitive motivational state that overwhelms adolescents’ immature capacity for inhibitory control. We examined this hypothesis using a rodent model. A sample of mice were raised in same-sex triads and were tested for alcohol consumption either as juveniles or as adults, with half in each age group tested alone and half tested with their cagemates. The presence of “peers” increased alcohol consumption among adolescent mice, but not adults. The peer effect on human adolescent reward-seeking may reflect a hard-wired, evolutionarily conserved process through which the presence of agemates increases individuals’ sensitivity to potential rewards in their immediate environment. PMID:24341974

  18. Constant replenishment from circulating monocytes maintains the macrophage pool in the intestine of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Bain, Calum C; Bravo-Blas, Alberto; Scott, Charlotte L; Gomez Perdiguero, Elisa; Geissmann, Frederic; Henri, Sandrine; Malissen, Bernard; Osborne, Lisa C; Artis, David; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-10-01

    The paradigm that macrophages that reside in steady-state tissues are derived from embryonic precursors has never been investigated in the intestine, which contains the largest pool of macrophages. Using fate-mapping models and monocytopenic mice, together with bone marrow chimera and parabiotic models, we found that embryonic precursor cells seeded the intestinal mucosa and demonstrated extensive in situ proliferation during the neonatal period. However, these cells did not persist in the intestine of adult mice. Instead, they were replaced around the time of weaning by the chemokine receptor CCR2-dependent influx of Ly6C(hi) monocytes that differentiated locally into mature, anti-inflammatory macrophages. This process was driven largely by the microbiota and had to be continued throughout adult life to maintain a normal intestinal macrophage pool.

  19. Environmental enrichment is associated with rapid volumetric brain changes in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Jan; Allemang-Grand, Rylan; Dazai, Jun; Lerch, Jason P

    2015-04-01

    Environmental enrichment is a model of increased structural brain plasticity. Previous histological observations have shown molecular and cellular changes in a few pre-determined areas of the rodent brain. However, little is known about the time course of enrichment-induced brain changes and how they distribute across the whole brain. Here we expose adult mice to three weeks of environmental enrichment using a novel re-configurable maze design. In-vivo MRI shows volumetric brain changes in brain areas related to spatial memory, navigation, and sensorimotor experience, such as the hippocampal formation and the sensorimotor cortex. Evidence from a second cohort of mice indicates that these plastic changes might occur as early as 24h after exposure. This suggests that novel experiences are powerful modulators of plasticity even in the adult brain. Understanding and harnessing the underlying molecular mechanisms could advance future treatments of neurological disease.

  20. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  1. Comparison of growth and pubertal progression in wild type female rats with different bedding types

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Ho; Kim, Shin-Hee; Jung, Kyung A; Kim, So Youn; Chung, Sung-Hoon; Park, Young Shil; Yoon, Kyung Lim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Endocrine-disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system and therefore affect growth and pubertal progression. The study aim was to compare the growth and pubertal progression in wild-type female rats with different bedding types. Methods Twenty 5-week-old female wild-type Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups with different bedding types: one group received wood shaving bedding, while a second group received corncob bedding. We determined crown-rump length and body weight as anthropometric measurements and assessed the serum growth hormone (GH) and estradiol levels. The gh1 mRNA expression levels were compared using quantitative real time transcription polymerase chain reaction. The estrous cycle was evaluated by vaginal smear. Results The anthropometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. The mean relative expression of the gh1 gene was lower in the corncob bedding group than that in the wood shaving group (P=0.768). Meanwhile serum GH and estradiol were increased in the wood shaving bedding group; however this difference was not statistically significant. The time to first estrus and the length of the estrous cycle were increased in the corncob bedding group; the proportion of normal estrous cycles was also decreased. These findings indicate irregularities in the estrous cycle. Conclusion Endocrine-disrupting chemicals in corncob bedding might be associated with time to first estrus and length of the estrous cycle. Therefore, the type of bedding should be considered as a factor affecting pubertal progression in rodents. PMID:25883928

  2. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Salazar, Francisco; Ramirez, Melanie; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods: Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR) spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results: ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions: ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria. PMID:26421136

  3. LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation prognosticates survival after radiochemotherapy in IDH1 wild-type glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mock, Andreas; Geisenberger, Christoph; Orlik, Christian; Warta, Rolf; Schwager, Christian; Jungk, Christine; Dutruel, Céline; Geiselhart, Lea; Weichenhan, Dieter; Zucknick, Manuela; Nied, Ann-Katrin; Friauf, Sara; Exner, Janina; Capper, David; Hartmann, Christian; Lahrmann, Bernd; Grabe, Niels; Debus, Jürgen; von Deimling, Andreas; Popanda, Odilia; Plass, Christoph; Unterberg, Andreas; Abdollahi, Amir; Schmezer, Peter; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2016-07-15

    MGMT promoter methylation status is currently the only established molecular prognosticator in IDH wild-type glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Therefore, we aimed to discover novel therapy-associated epigenetic biomarkers. After enrichment for hypermethylated fractions using methyl-CpG-immunoprecipitation (MCIp), we performed global DNA methylation profiling for 14 long-term (LTS; >36 months) and 15 short-term (STS; 6-10 months) surviving GBM patients. Even after exclusion of the G-CIMP phenotype, we observed marked differences between the LTS and STS methylome. A total of 1,247 probes in 706 genes were hypermethylated in LTS and 463 probes in 305 genes were found to be hypermethylated in STS patients (p values < 0.05, log2 fold change ± 0.5). We identified 13 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with a minimum of four differentially methylated probes per gene. Indeed, we were able to validate a subset of these DMRs through a second, independent method (MassARRAY) in our LTS/STS training set (ADCY1, GPC3, LOC283731/ISLR2). These DMRs were further assessed for their prognostic capability in an independent validation cohort (n = 62) of non-G-CIMP GBMs from the TCGA. Hypermethylation of multiple CpGs mapping to the promoter region of LOC283731 correlated with improved patient outcome (p = 0.03). The prognostic performance of LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation was confirmed in a third independent study cohort (n = 89), and was independent of gender, performance (KPS) and MGMT status (p = 0.0485, HR = 0.63). Intriguingly, the prediction was most pronounced in younger GBM patients (<60 years). In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence that promoter methylation status of this novel gene is a prognostic biomarker in IDH1 wild-type/non-G-CIMP GBMs. PMID:26934681

  4. Real-time quantification of wild-type contaminants in glyphosate tolerant soybean

    PubMed Central

    Battistini, Elena; Noli, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Background Trait purity is a key factor for the successful utilization of biotech varieties and is currently assessed by analysis of individual seeds or plants. Here we propose a novel PCR-based approach to test trait purity that can be applied to bulk samples. To this aim the insertion site of a transgene is characterized and the corresponding sequence of the wild-type (wt) allele is used as diagnostic target for amplification. As a demonstration, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR method to test purity of glyphosate tolerant (Roundup Ready®, RR) soybean. Results The soybean wt sequence at the RR locus was characterized and found to be highly conserved among conventional genotypes, thus allowing the detection of possibly any soybean non-trait contaminant. On the other hand, no amplification product was obtained from RR soybean varieties, indicating that the wt sequence is single copy and represents a suitable marker of conventional soybean presence. In addition, results obtained from the analysis of wt-spiked RR samples demonstrate that it is possible to use the real-time PCR assay to quantify the non-trait contamination with an acceptable degree of accuracy. Conclusion In principle this approach could be successfully applied to any transgenic event, provided that the wild-type sequence is conserved and single copy. The main advantages of the assay here described derive from its applicability to bulk samples, which would allow to increase the number of single seeds or plants forming the analytical sample, thus improving accuracy and throughput while containing costs. For these reasons this application of quantitative PCR could represent a useful tool in agricultural biotechnology. PMID:19267904

  5. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel AS

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome

  6. Neonatal Colon Insult Alters Growth Factor Expression and TRPA1 Responses in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Julie A.; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Malin, Sacha A.; Davis, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation or pain during neonatal development can result in long-term structural and functional alterations of nociceptive pathways, ultimately altering pain perception in adulthood. We have developed a mouse model of neonatal colon irritation (NCI) to investigate the plasticity of pain processing within the viscerosensory system. Mouse pups received an intracolonic administration of 2% mustard oil (MO) on postnatal days 8 and 10. Distal colons were processed at subsequent timepoints for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and growth factor expression. Adult mice were assessed for visceral hypersensitivity by measuring the visceromotor response during colorectal distension. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from adult mice were retrogradely labeled from the distal colon and calcium imaging was used to measure transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) responses to acute application of capsaicin and MO, respectively. Despite the absence of inflammation (as indicated by MPO activity), neonatal exposure to intracolonic MO transiently maintained a higher expression level of growth factor messenger RNA (mRNA). Adult NCI mice displayed significant visceral hypersensitivity, as well as increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw, compared to control mice. The percentage of TRPA1-expressing colon afferents was significantly increased in NCI mice, however they displayed no increase in the percentage of TRPV1-immunopositive or capsaicin-sensitive colon DRG neurons. These results suggest that early neonatal colon injury results in a long-lasting visceral hypersensitivity, possibly driven by an early increase in growth factor expression and maintained by permanent changes in TRPA1 function. PMID:20850221

  7. NGF induces appearance of adult-like response to spatial novelty in 18-day male mice.

    PubMed

    Calamandrei, Gemma; Valanzano, Angela; Ricceri, Laura

    2002-10-17

    We investigated the effects of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) administration on the maturation of reactivity to spatial and non-spatial novelty in developing mice. CD-1 mice of both sexes received intracerebral administration of NGF on postnatal day (pnd) 15, and their response to object displacement (spatial novelty) and object substitution (object novelty) were assessed in a spatial open-field with four objects on pnd 18 or 28. On pnd 18, NGF induced only in males precocious appearance of spatial novelty discrimination, while increasing choline acetyltransferase activity in neocortex and hippocampus of both sexes. The behavioral and neurochemical effects disappeared by pnd 28. NGF triggers adult-like responding to spatial novelty in developing mice and such effect is gender-specific.

  8. Effect of vitamin C deficiency during postnatal development on adult behavior: functional phenotype of Gulo-/- knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Curran, C P; Nebert, D W; Patel, K V; Williams, M T; Vorhees, C V

    2012-04-01

    Organisms using oxygen for aerobic respiration require antioxidants to balance the production of reactive oxygen species during metabolic processes. Various species--including humans and other primates--suffer mutations in the GULO gene encoding L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase; GULO is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of ascorbate, an important cellular antioxidant. Animals lacking the ability to synthesize vitamin C develop scurvy without dietary supplementation. The Gulo-/- knockout (KO) mouse requires oral supplemental vitamin C; without this supplementation the animal dies with a scorbutic condition within several weeks. Vitamin C is known to be most abundant in the brain, where it is believed to play important roles in neuroprotection, neurotransmission and neuromodulation. We therefore hypothesized that ascorbate deficiency in Gulo-/- KO mice might lead to an abnormal behavioral phenotype. We established the amount of ascorbate in the drinking water (220 ppm) necessary for generating a chronic low-ascorbate status in the brain, yet clinically the mice appeared healthy throughout 100 days postpartum at which time all behavioral-phenotyping tests were completed. Compared with Gulo+/+ wild-type littermates, ascorbate-deficient Gulo-/- mice were found to be less active in moving in their environment; when in water, these mice swam more slowly in some tests, consistent with a mild motor deficit. We found no evidence of cognitive, anxiety or sensorimotor-gating problems. Despite being less active, Gulo-/- mice exhibited exaggerated hyperactivity to the dopaminergic agonist methamphetamine. The subnormal movement, combined with hypersensitivity to a dopamine agonist, point to developmental ascorbate deficiency causing long-term striatal dysfunction. PMID:22296218

  9. Vitamin E Status and Metabolism in Adult and Aged Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Traber, Maret G.; Mustacich, Debbie J.; Sullivan, Laura C.; Leonard, Scott W.; Ahern-Rindell, Amelia; Kerkvliet, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is involved in regulation of mechanisms for detoxification of xenobiotics, as well as vitamin A metabolism. Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient whose metabolism is initialized via the cytochrome P450 system. Thus, AhR absence could alter hepatic regulation of α-tocopherol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we assessed vitamin E status in adult (2–5 m) and old (21–22 m), wildtype and AhR-null mice. Plasma α-tocopherol concentrations in AhR null mice (2.3 ± 1.2 μmol/L, n= 19) were lower than those of wildtype mice (3.2 ± 1.2, n=17, P=0.0131); those in old mice (3.2 ± 1.2, n= 20) were higher than those of adults (2.2 ± 1.0, n=16, p=0.0075). Hepatic α-tocopherol concentrations were not different between genotypes, but were nearly double in old (32 ± 8 nmol/g, n=20) as compared with adult mice (17 ± 2, n=16, p<0.0001). Hepatic Cyp3a concentrations in AhR-null mice were greater than those in wildtypes (p=0.0011). Genotype (p=0.0047), sex (p<0.0001) and age (p<0.0001) were significant modifiers of liver α-tocopherol metabolite (α-CEHC) concentrations. In general, Cyp3a concentrations correlated with hepatic α-tocopherol (r= 0.3957, p<0.05) and α-CEHC (r=0.4260, p<0.05) concentrations. Since there were no significant genotype differences in the hepatic α- or γ-tocopherol concentrations, AhR null mice did not have dramatically altered vitamin E metabolism. Since they did have higher hepatic α-CEHC concentrations, these data suggest metabolism was up-regulated in the AhR null mice in order to maintain the hepatic tocopherol concentrations similar to those of wildtypes. PMID:20153623

  10. Behavioral responses to and brain distribution of morphine in mature adult and aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, C.K.; Ho, I.K.; Hoskins, B.

    1986-03-01

    Mature adult (3-6 mo old) and aged (2 yr old) male ICR mice were injected with 10 to 100 mg/kg morphine, s.c. The ED50 values for running behavior (as measured using Stoelting activity monitors and having each mouse serve as its own control) representing 5 times control activity was approximately 7.5 mg/kg for aged mice and approximately 17.5 mg/kg for the mature adults. The ED50 values for analgesia 1 hr after morphine administration using the tail-flick method (max. response time = 8 sec) were approx. 70 mg/kg for the aged mice and 15 mg/kg for the mature adults. One hour after injecting /sup 3/H-morphine at doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg, 0.13 and 0.14% of the doses appeared in brains of aged and mature adult mice, respectively. Regional distribution of the morphine was the same for both age groups. Expressed as percent of total brain morphine, it was as follows: cortex, 30%; midbrain, 18%; cerebellum, 17%; medulla, 12%; pons, 9%; striatum, 8% and periaqueductal gray, 6%. Expressed as g morphine/g tissue for the 2 doses, the distribution was; periaqueductal gray, 30 and 80; striatum, 9 and 34; medulla, 6 and 20 pons; 5 and 19; cerebellum, 4 and 13; midbrain 2.5 and 8.5 and cortex, 2 and 8. These results suggest that the differences in response to morphine by the two age groups were due to age-related differences in opioid receptor populations and/or affinities.

  11. Generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice revealed MAGI-2 expression patterns in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kan-ichiro; Nishimura, Tomoki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Ookura, Tetsuya; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted 2 (MAGI-2) protein, which is known to localize at the tight junction of epithelial cells, contains multiple copies of the PDZ and WW domains in its structure. Although the expression pattern of Magi2 mRNA in representative organs has been previously published, its detailed cellular distribution at the histological level remains unknown. Such detailed information would be useful to clarify the biological function of MAGI-2. Here, we report the generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice for Magi2 in which exon 6 of the gene was substituted by the Venus-encoding sequence. We detected the expression of the Venus reporter protein in kidney podocytes from these knock-in mice. We also detected Venus reporter protein expression in spermatids within the testes and within neurons in various regions of the brain. Detection of the reporter protein from these diverse locations indicated the endogenous expression of MAGI-2 in these tissues. Our data suggested a potential function of MAGI-2 in the glomerular filtration process and sperm cell maturation. These data indicate that the Venus reporter knock-in mouse for Magi2 is a useful model for the further study of Magi2 gene function.

  12. Theory of hantavirus infection spread incorporating localized adult and itinerant juvenile mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkre, V. M.; Giuggioli, L.; Abramson, G.; Camelo-Neto, G.

    2007-02-01

    A generalized model of the spread of the Hantavirus in mice populations is presented on the basis of recent observational findings concerning the movement characteristics of the mice that carry the infection. The factual information behind the generalization is based on mark-recapture observations reported in Giuggioli et al. [Bull. Math. Biol. 67, 1135 (2005)] that have necessitated the introduction of home ranges in the simple model of Hantavirus spread presented by Abramson and Kenkre [Phys. Rev. E 66, 11912 (2002)]. The essential feature of the model presented here is the existence of adult mice that remain largely confined to locations near their home ranges, and itinerant juvenile mice that are not so confined, and, during their search for their own homes, move and infect both other juveniles and adults that they meet during their movement. The model is presented at three levels of description: mean field, kinetic and configuration. Results of calculations are shown explicitly from the mean field equations and the simulation rules, and are found to agree in some respects and to differ in others. The origin of the differences is shown to lie in spatial correlations. It is indicated how mark-recapture observations in the field may be employed to verify the applicability of the theory.

  13. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J; Beard, Philippa M; Mabbott, Neil A; Smith, Lee B; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development.

  14. Immunosuppression transfer by spleen cells from young to adult mice previous to Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Montes, M R; García-Camacho, M P; Casasola, J; Taylor, M L

    1988-02-01

    The passive transfer of spleen cells from 1 month old mice into