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Sample records for adult wild-type mouse

  1. Porphyrin Interactions with Wild Type and Mutant Mouse Ferrochelatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Gloria C.; Franco, Ricardo; Lu, Yi; Ma, Jian-Guo; Shelnutt, John A.

    1999-05-19

    Ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1), the terminal enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes Fe2+ chelation into protoporphyrin IX. Resonance Raman and W-visible absorbance spectroscopes of wild type and engineered variants of murine ferrochelatase were used to examine the proposed structural mechanism for iron insertion into protoporphyrin by ferrochelatase. The recombinant variants (i.e., H207N and E287Q) are enzymes in which the conserved amino acids histidine-207 and glutamate-287 of murine ferrochelatase were substituted with asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Both of these residues are at the active site of the enzyme as deduced from the Bacillus subtilis ferrochelatase three-dimensional structure. Addition of free base or metalated porphyrins to wild type ferrochelatase and H207N variant yields a quasi 1:1 complex, possibly a monomeric protein-bound species. In contrast, the addition of porphyrin (either free base or metalated) to E287Q is sub-stoichiometric, as this variant retains bound porphyrin in the active site during isolation and purification. The specificity of porphyrin binding is confirmed by the narrowing of the structure-sensitive resonance Raman lines and the vinyl vibrational mode. Resonance Raman spectra of free base and metalated porphyrins bound to the wild type ferrochelatase indicate a nonplanar distortion of the porphyrin macrocycle, although the magnitude of the distortion cannot be determined without first defining the specific type of deformation. Significantly, the extent of the nonplanar distortion varies in the case of H207N- and E287Q-bound porphyrins. In fact, resonance Raman spectral decomposition indicates a homogeneous ruffled distortion for the nickel protoporphyrin bound to the wild type ferrochelatase, whereas both a planar and ruffled conformations are present for the H207N-bound porphyrin. Perhaps more revealing is the unusual resonance , 3 Raman spectrum of the endogenous E287Q-bound porphyrin, which has

  2. DNA binding properties of dioxin receptors in wild-type and mutant mouse hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cuthill, S.; Poellinger, L.

    1988-04-19

    The current model of action of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) entails stimulation of target gene transcription via the formation of dioxin-receptor complexes and subsequent accumulation of the complexes within the cell nucleus. Here, the authors have analyzed the DNA binding properties of the dioxin receptor in wild-type mouse hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells and a class of nonresponsive mutant cells which fail to accumulate dioxin-receptor complexes within the nucleus in vivo. In vitro, both the wild-type and mutant (/sup 3/H)dioxin-receptor complexes exhibited low affinity for DNA-cellulose (5-8% and around 4% retention, respectively) in the absence of prior biochemical manipulations. However, following chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, the wild-type but not the mutant dioxin receptor was transformed to a species with an increased affinity for DNA (40-50% retention on DNA-cellulose). The gross molecular structure of the mutant, non DNA binding dioxin receptor did not appear to be altered as compared to that of the wild-type receptor. These results imply that the primary deficiency in the mutant dioxin receptor form may reside at the DNA binding level and that, in analogy to steroid hormone receptors, DNA binding of the receptor may be an essential step in the regulation of target gene transcription by dioxin.

  3. Retinal ganglion cell responses to voltage and current stimulation in wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Yong Sook; Ye, Jang Hee; Lee, Seokyoung; Nam, Yoonkey; Ryu, Sang Baek; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2011-06-01

    Retinal prostheses are being developed to restore vision for those with retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Since neural prostheses depend upon electrical stimulation to control neural activity, optimal stimulation parameters for successful encoding of visual information are one of the most important requirements to enable visual perception. In this paper, we focused on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses to different stimulation parameters and compared threshold charge densities in wild-type and rd1 mice. For this purpose, we used in vitro retinal preparations of wild-type and rd1 mice. When the neural network was stimulated with voltage- and current-controlled pulses, RGCs from both wild-type and rd1 mice responded; however the temporal pattern of RGC response is very different. In wild-type RGCs, a single peak within 100 ms appears, while multiple peaks (approximately four peaks) with ~10 Hz rhythm within 400 ms appear in RGCs in the degenerated retina of rd1 mice. We find that an anodic phase-first biphasic voltage-controlled pulse is more efficient for stimulation than a biphasic current-controlled pulse based on lower threshold charge density. The threshold charge densities for activation of RGCs both with voltage- and current-controlled pulses are overall more elevated for the rd1 mouse than the wild-type mouse. Here, we propose the stimulus range for wild-type and rd1 retinas when the optimal modulation of a RGC response is possible.

  4. Adolescent social defeat disturbs adult aggression-related impulsivity in wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Caroline M; Coolen, Alex; de Boer, Sietse F; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2014-10-01

    Adolescence is generally considered as a developmental period during which adverse social experiences may have lasting consequences in terms of an increased vulnerability to affective disorders. This study aimed at determining the individual susceptibility to adolescent social stress using a rat model. We used rats of the Wild-type Groningen strain, which are characterized by a broad variation in adult levels of aggression and impulsivity. We hypothesized that experience of social defeat in adolescence results in heightened aggression and impulsivity levels in adulthood. In contrast to our expectation, adolescent social defeat did not lead to a difference in the average adult level of aggression and impulsivity, but the significant correlation between offensive aggression and impulsivity found in control animals was not present in animals defeated during adolescence.

  5. Beta Cell Formation in vivo Through Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) in Wild Type Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Bruno; Hu, Wenchao; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is essential in type 1 diabetic individuals and is required in ~40- 50% of type 2 diabetics during their lifetime. Prior attempts at beta cell regeneration have relied upon pancreatic injury to induce beta cell proliferation, dedifferentiation and activation of the embryonic pathway, or stem cell replacement. We report an alternative method to transform adult non-stem (somatic) cells into pancreatic beta cells. The Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) approach targets cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic function in the organ's adult state and utilizes a synergistic mechanism that integrates three important levels of cellular regulation to induce beta cell formation: (i) glucose metabolism, (ii) membrane receptor function, and (iii) gene transcription. The aim of the present study was to induce pancreatic beta cell formation in vivo in adult animals without stem cells and without dedifferentiating cells to recapitulate the embryonic pathway as previously published (1-3). Our results employing CNIP demonstrate that: (i) insulin secreting cells can be generated in adult pancreatic tissue in vivo and circumvent the problem of generating endocrine (glucagon and somatostatin) cells that exert deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis, and (ii) longterm normalization of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion can be achieved in a wild type diabetic mouse model. The CNIP cocktail has the potential to be used as a preventative or therapeutic treatment or cure for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26696016

  6. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  7. Brucella abortus ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity against wild type challenge in a mouse model of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Cheng, Jason X; Crosson, Sean

    2016-09-30

    The Brucella abortus general stress response (GSR) system regulates activity of the alternative sigma factor, σ(E1), which controls transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for persistence in a BALB/c mouse chronic infection model. We evaluated the host response to infection by a B. abortus strain lacking σ(E1) (ΔrpoE1), and identified pathological and immunological features that distinguish ΔrpoE1-infected mice from wild-type (WT), and that correspond with clearance of ΔrpoE1 from the host. ΔrpoE1 infection was indistinguishable from WT in terms of splenic bacterial burden, inflammation and histopathology up to 6weeks post-infection. However, Brucella-specific serum IgG levels in ΔrpoE1-infected mice were 5 times higher than WT by 4weeks post-infection, and remained significantly higher throughout the course of a 12-week infection. Total IgG and Brucella-specific IgG levels peaked strongly in ΔrpoE1-infected mice at 6weeks, which correlated with reduced splenomegaly and bacterial burden relative to WT-infected mice. Given the difference in immune response to infection with wild-type and ΔrpoE1, we tested whether ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity to wild-type challenge. Mice immunized with ΔrpoE1 completely resisted WT infection and had significantly higher serum titers of Brucella-specific IgG, IgG2a and IFN-γ after WT challenge relative to age-matched naïve mice. We conclude that immunization of BALB/c mice with the B. abortus GSR pathway mutant, ΔrpoE1, elicits an adaptive immune response that confers significant protective immunity against WT infection.

  8. The kinetic mechanism of wild-type and mutant mouse dihydrofolate reductases.

    PubMed

    Thillet, J; Adams, J A; Benkovic, S J

    1990-05-29

    A kinetic mechanism is presented for mouse dihydrofolate reductase that predicts all the steady-state parameters and full time-course kinetics. This mechanism was derived from association and dissociation rate constants and pre-steady-state transients by using stopped-flow fluorescence and absorbance measurements. The major features of this kinetic mechanism are as follows: (1) the two native enzyme conformers, E1 and E2, bind ligands with varying affinities although only one conformer, E1, can support catalysis in the forward direction, (2) tetrahydrofolate dissociation is the rate-limiting step under steady-state turnover at low pH, and (3) the pH-independent rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate is fast (khyd = 9000 s-1) and favorable (Keq = 100). The overall mechanism is similar in form to the Escherichia coli kinetic scheme (Fierke et al., 1987), although several differences are observed: (1) substrates and products predominantly bind the same form of the E. coli enzyme, and (2) the hydride transfer rate from NADPH to either folate or dihydrofolate is considerably faster for the mouse enzyme. The role of Glu-30 (Asp-27 in E. coli) in mouse DHFR has also been examined by using site-directed mutagenesis as a potential source of these differences. While aspartic acid is strictly conserved in all bacterial DHFRs, glutamic acid is conserved in all known eucaryotes. The two major effects of substituting Asp for Glu-30 in the mouse enzyme are (1) a decreased rate of folate reduction and (2) an increased rate of hydride transfer from NADPH to dihydrofolate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Viscoelasticity in wild-type and vinculin-deficient (5.51) mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells examined by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W H; Ezzell, R M

    1996-07-10

    We have been studying mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells which contain no detectable vinculin protein (5.51 cells), and compared them with F9 wild-type cells. Employing atomic force microscopy, we probed the elastic properties of individual F9 wild-type and 5.51 cells by measuring the dynamic response of controlled loads of the cantilever tip. An elastic modulus (Young) of approximately 3.8 and approximately 2.5 kPa was calculated for wild-type and 5.51 cells, respectively. Using disc rheometry, we detected a marked change in shear of a 1000g pellet of approximately 55 x 10(6) cells between wild-type and 5.51 mutants. These differences are attributed to the loss of vinculin and altered cytoskeletal organization in these cells.

  10. Viscoelasticity in wild-type and vinculin-deficient (5.51) mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells examined by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W H; Ezzell, R M

    1996-07-10

    We have been studying mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells which contain no detectable vinculin protein (5.51 cells), and compared them with F9 wild-type cells. Employing atomic force microscopy, we probed the elastic properties of individual F9 wild-type and 5.51 cells by measuring the dynamic response of controlled loads of the cantilever tip. An elastic modulus (Young) of approximately 3.8 and approximately 2.5 kPa was calculated for wild-type and 5.51 cells, respectively. Using disc rheometry, we detected a marked change in shear of a 1000g pellet of approximately 55 x 10(6) cells between wild-type and 5.51 mutants. These differences are attributed to the loss of vinculin and altered cytoskeletal organization in these cells. PMID:8660960

  11. Prognosis and management of adult wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A pooled analysis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, N R; Collins, D; Crotty, P; Ridgway, P F

    2016-09-01

    A pooled review was performed to determine survival in adult WT GIST (Wild Type GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours) and compare the same with pediatric WT GISTs. Electronic databases were searched using the terms "Wild type" AND "GIST". Eighty-two adult patients from 14 studies were included in the pooled analysis. Cumulative survival was greater than 50% in both age groups, hence medial survival could not be computed. Mean survival in adults was 15.7 years ± 0.78 and in children was 18.8 years ± 1.3 (p = 0.241). Median disease free survival in adults was 10 years while 5-year overall survival was 88%. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival between the two groups (p = 0.241). Overall survival in adults with WT GISTs is favourable compared to other adult GIST subtypes likely reflects a common molecular pathway similar to pediatric GIST. PMID:27566016

  12. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs (Rb-/- MEFs). Findings Comparative analysis of the expression profiles of 3T3-L1 cells and wild-type MEFs revealed genes involved specifically in early regulation of the adipocyte differentiation as well as secreted factors and signaling molecules regulating the later phase of differentiation. In an attempt to identify transcription factors regulating adipogenesis, bioinformatics analysis of the promoters of coordinately and highly expressed genes was performed. We were able to identify a number of high-confidence target genes for follow-up experimental studies. Additionally, combination of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1. To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis of 64 deregulated genes showed that the Rb-/- MEF model exhibits a brown(-like) adipocyte phenotype. Additionally, the analysis results indicate a different or additional role for pRb family member involvement in the lineage commitment. Conclusion In this study a number of commonly modulated genes during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells and MEFs, potential transcriptional regulation mechanisms, and differentially regulated targets during adipocyte differentiation of Rb

  13. Endogenous p53 protein generated from wild-type alternatively spliced p53 RNA in mouse epidermal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kulesz-Martin, M F; Lisafeld, B; Huang, H; Kisiel, N D; Lee, L

    1994-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a wild-type alternatively spliced p53 (p53as) RNA exists in mouse cultured cells and normal mouse tissues at approximately 25 to 33% of the level of the major p53 RNA form. The alternative RNA transcript is 96 nucleotides longer than the major transcript as a result of alternative splicing of intron 10 sequences. The protein expected to be generated from the p53as transcript is 9 amino acids shorter than the major p53 protein and has 17 different amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. We report here that p53as protein exists in nontransformed and malignant epidermal cells and is localized to the nucleus. In addition, p53as protein is preferentially expressed during the G2 phase of the cell cycle and in cells with greater than G2 DNA content compared with the major p53 protein, which is preferentially expressed in G1. The p53as immunoreactivity is elevated and shifted to the G1 phase of the cell cycle following actinomycin D treatment of nontransformed cells but not malignant cells. In view of the dimerization and tetramerization of p53 protein which may be necessary for its DNA binding and transcriptional activation activities, the presence of p53as protein in cells has important implications for understanding the physiological function(s) of the p53 gene. Images PMID:8114705

  14. Characterization of Hemodynamics in Great Arteries of Wild-Type Mouse Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Based on Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhou, Yue; Ma, Youcai; Wang, Jingying; He, Yihua; Li, Zhian

    2016-03-01

    Hemodynamic factors in cardiovascular system are hypothesized to play a significant role in causing structural heart development. It is thus important to improve our understanding of velocity characteristics and parameters. We present such a study on wild-type mouse to characterize the vessel geometry, flow pattern, and wall shear stress in great arteries. Microultrasound imaging for small animals was used to measure blood boundary and velocity of the great arteries. Subsequently, specimens' flow boundary conditions were used for 3-dimensional reconstructions of the great artery and aortic arch dimensions, and blood flow velocity data were input into subject-specific computational fluid dynamics for modeling hemodynamics. Measurement by microultrasound imaging showed that blood velocities in the great artery and aortic arch had strong correlations with vascular sizes, whereas blood pressure had a weak trend in relation to vascular size. Wall shear stress magnitude increased when closer to arterial branches and reduced proximally in the aortic root and distally in the descending aorta, and the parameters were related to the fluid mechanics in branches in some degree. We developed a method to investigate fluid mechanics in mouse arteries, using a combination of microultrasound and computational fluid dynamics, and demonstrated its ability to reveal detailed geometric, kinematic, and fluid mechanics parameters.

  15. Susceptibility of Different Mouse Wild Type Strains to Develop Diet-Induced NAFLD/AFLD-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Vera H. I.; Macheiner, Tanja; Kessler, Sonja M.; Czepukojc, Beate; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Kiemer, Alexandra K.; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Lackner, Carolin; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease have been intensively studied, concerning pathophysiological mechanisms are still incompletely understood. This may be due to the use of different animal models and resulting model-associated variation. Therefore, this study aimed to compare three frequently used wild type mouse strains in their susceptibility to develop diet-induced features of non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease associated clinical, biochemical, and histological features in C57BL/6, CD-1, and 129Sv WT mice were induced by (i) high-fat diet feeding, (ii) ethanol feeding only, and (iii) the combination of high-fat diet and ethanol feeding. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid profiles were compared in CD-1 and 129Sv mice. Additionally hepatic fatty acid composition was determined in 129Sv mice. In C57BL/6 mice dietary regimens resulted in heterogeneous hepatic responses, ranging from pronounced steatosis and inflammation to a lack of any features of fatty liver disease. Liver-related serum biochemistry showed high deviations within the regimen groups. CD-1 mice did not exhibit significant changes in metabolic and liver markers and developed no significant steatosis or inflammation as a response to dietary regimens. Although 129Sv mice showed no weight gain, this strain achieved most consistent features of fatty liver disease, apparent from concentration alterations of liver-related serum biochemistry as well as moderate steatosis and inflammation as a result of all dietary regimens. Furthermore, the hepatic lipid profile as well as the fatty acid composition of 129Sv mice were considerably altered, upon feeding the different dietary regimens. Accordingly, diet-induced non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease is most consistently promoted in 129Sv mice compared to C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. As a conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of genetic background of used mouse strains for modeling diet

  16. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-05-15

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how 'human-like' can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1{sub C}YP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+){sub s}evere-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs.

  17. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: comparing 'humanized' mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W

    2009-05-15

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how "human-like" can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1_CYP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+)_severe-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs. PMID:19285097

  18. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults. PMID:26240606

  19. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-01-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host–microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults. PMID:26240606

  20. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults.

  1. Modified protocol for in vivo imaging of wild-type mouse retina with customized miniature spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) device

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This protocol outlines and evaluates a modified scanning procedure for a customized spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging apparatus within the wild-type C57Bl/6 mouse posterior segment. This modified protocol allows for the capture of a 50 degree field of view spanning 3 mm by 3 mm perimeter with the optic disc as the central point. By utilizing this scanning protocol a more reliable measurement of retinal thickness can be achieved outside the fluctuating region of the optic disc. This protocol, when applied to this high resolution device, enables non-invasive in vivo histological imaging and biometric assessment of the various layers of the rodent posterior segment within a 20 – 30 min procedural time-frame. This protocol could establish a standardized method for evaluating morphological changes, with this commercial SDOCT device, when assessing longitudinal disease pathophysiology and treatment response in mouse models for future vision science research. PMID:23057840

  2. Mouse model of the OPRM1 (A118G) polymorphism: differential heroin self-administration behavior compared with wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Picetti, Roberto; Butelman, Eduardo R; Ho, Ann; Blendy, Julie A; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-03-13

    Mu-opioid receptors (MOPRs) are the target of heroin and other prescription opioids, which are currently responsible for massive addiction morbidity in the US. The gene coding for the human MOPR (OPRM1) has an important functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), A118G. The OPRM1 A118G genotype results in substantially increased risk of heroin addiction in humans; however, the neurobiological mechanism for this increased risk is not fully understood. This study examined heroin self-administration (SA) behavior in A112G (G/G) mice, harboring a functionally equivalent SNP in Oprm1 with a similar amino acid substitution, in extended (4 h) SA sessions. Adult male and female G/G mice and 'wild-type' litter mates (A/A) were allowed to self-administer heroin (0.25 mg/kg/unit dose, FR1 with a nose poke response) for 4 h/day, for 10 consecutive days. Half of the mice then continued in a heroin dose-response study, while extinction from heroin SA was studied in the other half. In vivo microdialysis was used to measure acute heroin-induced increases of striatal dopamine in the GG vs AA genotypes. Male and female G/G mice responded for heroin significantly more (and thus had greater intake) than A/A mice, in the initial 10 days of heroin SA, and in the subsequent dose-response study. There were no significant differences in extinction of SA between the A/A and G/G mice. Heroin-induced increases in striatal dopamine levels are higher in the GG mice than in the AA mice. Both male and female G/G mice self-administered more heroin than did A/A mice over a 10-day period, possibly because of the greater increases of heroin-induced striatal dopamine in the GG mice. Furthermore, G/G male mice escalated the amount of heroin self-administration across 10 extended-access sessions more than A/A male mice did. These are the first studies to examine the acquisition of heroin SA in this mouse model. These studies may lead to a better understanding of the neurobiological and behavioral

  3. Sod1 gene ablation in adult mice leads to physiological changes at the neuromuscular junction similar to changes that occur in old wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Ivannikov, Maxim V; Van Remmen, Holly

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be important mediators of muscle atrophy and weakness in aging and many degenerative conditions. However, the mechanisms and physiological processes specifically affected by elevated ROS in neuromuscular units that contribute to muscle weakness during aging are not well defined. Here we investigate the effects of chronic oxidative stress on neurotransmission and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling mechanisms in the levator auris longus (LAL) muscle from young (4-8 months) and old (22-28 months) wild-type mice and young adult Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase 1 knockout (Sod1(-/-)) mice. The frequency of spontaneous neurotransmitter release and the amplitude of evoked neurotransmitter release in young Sod1(-/-) and old wild-type LAL neuromuscular junctions were significantly reduced from the young wild-type values, and those declines were mirrored by decreases in synaptic vesicle pool size. Presynaptic cytosolic calcium concentration and mitochondrial calcium uptake amplitudes showed substantial increases in stimulated young Sod1(-/-) and old axon terminals. Surprisingly, LAL muscle fibers from old mice showed a greater excitability than fibers from either young wild-type or young Sod1(-/-) LAL. Both evoked excitatory junction potential (EJP) and spontaneous mini EJP amplitudes were considerably higher in LAL muscles from old mice than in fibers from young Sod1(-/-) LAL muscle. Despite a greater excitability, sarcoplasmic calcium influx in both old wild-type and young Sod1(-/-) LAL muscle fibers was significantly less. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium levels were also reduced in both old wild-type and young Sod1(-/-) mice, but the difference was not statistically significant in muscle fibers from old wild-type mice. The protein ratio of triad calcium channels RyR1/DHPR was not different in all groups. However, fibers from both young Sod1(-/-) and old mice had substantially elevated levels of protein carbonylation and S

  4. Forebrain microglia from wild-type but not adult 5xFAD mice prevent amyloid-β plaque formation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Masuch, Annette; Nestel, Sigrun; Katzmarski, Natalie; Meyer-Luehmann, Melanie; Biber, Knut

    2015-01-01

    The role of microglia in amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition is controversial. In the present study, an organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC) system with an in vivo-like microglial-neuronal environment was used to investigate the potential contribution of microglia to Aβ plaque formation. We found that microglia ingested Aβ, thereby preventing plaque formation in OHSCs. Conversely, Aβ deposits formed rapidly in microglia-free wild-type slices. The capacity to prevent Aβ plaque formation was absent in forebrain microglia from young adult but not juvenile 5xFamilial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) mice. Since no loss of Aβ clearance capacity was observed in both wild-type and cerebellar microglia from 5xFAD animals, the high Aβ1-42 burden in the forebrain of 5xFAD animals likely underlies the exhaustion of microglial Aβ clearance capacity. These data may therefore explain why Aβ plaque formation has never been described in wild-type mice, and point to a beneficial role of microglia in AD pathology. We also describe a new method to study Aβ plaque formation in a cell culture setting.

  5. Interaction of wild-type and variant mouse 3T3 cells with lectins from Bandeiraea simplicifolia seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, W S; Peters, B P; Blake, D A; Yep, D; Chu, E H; Goldstein, I J

    1979-01-01

    An isolectin (BS I-B4) derived from Bandeiraea simplicifolia seeds and specific for terminal alpha-D-galactopyranosyl groups was found to be cytotoxic to Swiss 3T3 mouse cells. After mutagenesis and selection with BS I-B4, a variant clonal cell line resistant to both this isolectin and the alpha-D- and beta-D-galactose-binding lectin abrin was isolated. The parental cell line showed homogeneous and noninteracting binding sites for BS I-B4, whereas the variant cells exhibited a curved plot with a reduced number of binding regions. Another lectin, BS II, which is derived from the same seeds by specific for terminal N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyl groups, was cytotoxic to the variant but not the parental cells. These results suggest a possible lesion in the biosynthesis of cell surface structures resulting in the exposure of subterminal N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyl moieties in the variant line. Images PMID:284346

  6. Comparison of dendritic calcium transients in juvenile wild type and SOD1(G93A) mouse lumbar motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Katharina A; Lamano, Jonathan B; Samuels, Julienne; Heckman, C J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of spinal motoneurons in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown alterations long before disease onset, including increased dendritic branching, increased persistent Na(+) and Ca(2+) currents, and impaired axonal transport. In this study dendritic Ca(2+) entry was investigated using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp of juvenile (P4-11) motoneurons. Neurons were filled with both Ca(2+) Green-1 and Texas Red dextrans, and line scans performed throughout. Steps were taken to account for different sources of variability, including (1) dye filling and laser penetration, (2) dendritic anatomy, and (3) the time elapsed from the start of recording. First, Ca(2+) Green-1 fluorescence was normalized by Texas Red; next, neurons were reconstructed so anatomy could be evaluated; finally, time was recorded. Customized software detected the largest Ca(2+) transients (area under the curve) from each line scan and matched it with parameters above. Overall, larger dendritic diameter and shorter path distance from the soma were significant predictors of larger transients, while time was not significant up to 2 h (data thereafter was dropped). However, Ca(2+) transients showed additional variability. Controlling for previous factors, significant variation was found between Ca(2+) signals from different processes of the same neuron in 3/7 neurons. This could reflect differential expression of Ca(2+) channels, local neuromodulation or other variations. Finally, Ca(2+) transients in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons were significantly smaller than in non-transgenic motoneurons. In conclusion, motoneuron processes show highly variable Ca(2+) transients, but these transients are smaller overall in SOD1(G93A) motoneurons. PMID:25914627

  7. The mouse glucocorticoid receptor: mapping of functional domains by cloning, sequencing and expression of wild-type and mutant receptor proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, M; Northrop, J P; Ringold, G M

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated mouse glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNAs which, when expressed in transfected mammalian cells, produce a fully functional GR protein. Sequence analysis reveals an open reading frame of 2349 bp which could encode a protein of approximately 86,000 daltons. We have also isolated two receptor cDNAs from mouse S49 nuclear transfer-deficient (nt-) cells which encode mutant forms of the receptor protein. One cDNA encodes a protein that is unable to bind hormone and represents the endogenous hormone binding deficient receptor recently discovered in S49 cells. The lesion in this receptor is due to a single amino acid substitution (Glu-546 to Gly). The second cDNA from nt- cells produces a receptor protein that is able to bind hormone but has reduced nuclear binding. This cDNA, therefore, encodes for the S49 nt- receptor which has been shown to have reduced affinity for DNA. The lesion maps to a single amino acid substitution (Arg-484 to His) located in a highly Cys, Lys, Arg-rich region of the protein previously implicated in DNA binding. Our studies provide unambiguous identification of receptor domains and specific amino acids critical for the hormone and DNA binding properties of this transcriptional regulatory protein. Contained within the first 106 amino acids of the mouse GR is a stretch of nine glutamines with two prolines which are related to the family of transcribed repetitive elements, opa, found in Drosophila melanogaster. A truncated receptor lacking these 106 amino acids is functionally indistinguishable from the wild-type receptor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3780669

  8. Expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinase and TIMP genes in fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice compared to wild-type mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Jens Claus; Fuchs, Tanja; El Mustapha, Haddouti; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Bories, Jean Christophe; Wernert, Nicolas

    2006-07-01

    Matrix-degrading proteases play a key role in normal development, wound healing, many diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and, in particular, tumour invasion. In invasive tumours, these enzymes are expressed by fibroblasts of the tumour stroma. Their expression and activity are tightly regulated at several levels, an important one being transcription. Previous in vitro and in vivo findings pointed to a major role of the Ets-1 transcription factor for this level of regulation. In the present study, we tried to prove this role in fibroblasts. We stimulated wild-type mouse fibroblasts with physiological doses of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, known to induce different proteases and expressed by tumour cells) and compared the results to those obtained in Ets-1 -/- fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice. We found that basal Ets-1 levels are necessary not only for a fast induction of MMPs 2, 3 and 13 by bFGF but also for maintenance of the bFGF-induced expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) 1, 2 and 3, which are known not only to inhibit but also participate as activators of certain pro-MMPs.

  9. Mouse model of human RPE65 P25L hypomorph resembles wild type under normal light rearing but is fully resistant to acute light damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yu, Shirley; Duncan, Todd; Li, Yichao; Liu, Pinghu; Gene, Erelda; Cortes-Pena, Yoel; Qian, Haohua; Dong, Lijin; Redmond, T Michael

    2015-08-01

    Human RPE65 mutations cause a spectrum of blinding retinal dystrophies from severe early-onset disease to milder manifestations. The RPE65 P25L missense mutation, though having <10% of wild-type (WT) activity, causes relatively mild retinal degeneration. To better understand these mild forms of RPE65-related retinal degeneration, and their effect on cone photoreceptor survival, we generated an Rpe65/P25L knock-in (KI/KI) mouse model. We found that, when subject to the low-light regime (∼100 lux) of regular mouse housing, homozygous Rpe65/P25L KI/KI mice are morphologically and functionally very similar to WT siblings. While mutant protein expression is decreased by over 80%, KI/KI mice retinae retain comparable 11-cis-retinal levels with WT. Consistently, the scotopic and photopic electroretinographic (ERG) responses to single-flash stimuli also show no difference between KI/KI and WT mice. However, the recovery of a-wave response following moderate visual pigment bleach is delayed in KI/KI mice. Importantly, KI/KI mice show significantly increased resistance to high-intensity (20 000 lux for 30 min) light-induced retinal damage (LIRD) as compared with WT, indicating impaired rhodopsin regeneration in KI/KI. Taken together, the Rpe65/P25L mutant produces sufficient chromophore under normal conditions to keep opsins replete and thus manifests a minimal phenotype. Only when exposed to intensive light is this hypomorphic mutation manifested physiologically, as its reduced expression and catalytic activity protects against the successive cycles of opsin regeneration underlying LIRD. These data also help define minimal requirements of chromophore for photoreceptor survival in vivo and may be useful in assessing a beneficial therapeutic dose for RPE65 gene therapy in humans.

  10. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein.

  11. High-Molecular-Weight Paired Helical Filaments from Alzheimer Brain Induces Seeding of Wild-Type Mouse Tau into an Argyrophilic 4R Tau Pathology in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Audouard, Emilie; Houben, Sarah; Masaracchia, Caterina; Yilmaz, Zehra; Suain, Valérie; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Buée, Luc; Boom, Alain; Leroy, Karelle; Ando, Kunie; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the development of tau pathology follows neuroanatomically connected pathways, suggesting that abnormal tau species might recruit normal tau by passage from cell to cell. Herein, we analyzed the effect of stereotaxic brain injection of human Alzheimer high-molecular-weight paired helical filaments (PHFs) in the dentate gyrus of wild-type and mutant tau THY-Tau22 mice. After 3 months of incubation, wild-type and THY-Tau22 mice developed an atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a tau pathology characterized by Gallyas and tau-positive grain-like inclusions into granule cells that extended in the hippocampal hilus and eventually away into the alveus, and the fimbria. Gallyas-positive neuropil threads and oligodendroglial coiled bodies were also observed. These tau inclusions were composed only of mouse tau, and were immunoreactive with antibodies to 4R tau, phosphotau, misfolded tau, ubiquitin, and p62. Although local hyperphosphorylation of tau was increased in the dentate gyrus in THY-Tau22 mice, the development of neurofibrillary tangles made of mutant human tau was not accelerated in the hippocampus, indicating that wild-type human PHFs were inefficient in seeding tau aggregates made of G272V/P301S mutant human tau. Our results indicate thus that injection of human wild-type Alzheimer PHF seeded aggregation of wild-type murine tau into an argyrophilic 4R tau pathology, and constitutes an interesting model independent of expression of a mutant tau protein. PMID:27497324

  12. Larval Population Density Alters Adult Sleep in Wild-Type Drosophila melanogaster but Not in Amnesiac Mutant Flies.

    PubMed

    Chi, Michael W; Griffith, Leslie C; Vecsey, Christopher G

    2014-08-11

    Sleep has many important biological functions, but how sleep is regulated remains poorly understood. In humans, social isolation and other stressors early in life can disrupt adult sleep. In fruit flies housed at different population densities during early adulthood, social enrichment was shown to increase subsequent sleep, but it is unknown if population density during early development can also influence adult sleep. To answer this question, we maintained Drosophila larvae at a range of population densities throughout larval development, kept them isolated during early adulthood, and then tested their sleep patterns. Our findings reveal that flies that had been isolated as larvae had more fragmented sleep than those that had been raised at higher population densities. This effect was more prominent in females than in males. Larval population density did not affect sleep in female flies that were mutant for amnesiac, which has been shown to be required for normal memory consolidation, adult sleep regulation, and brain development. In contrast, larval population density effects on sleep persisted in female flies lacking the olfactory receptor or83b, suggesting that olfactory signals are not required for the effects of larval population density on adult sleep. These findings show that population density during early development can alter sleep behavior in adulthood, suggesting that genetic and/or structural changes are induced by this developmental manipulation that persist through metamorphosis.

  13. Early Life Inorganic Lead Exposure Induces Testicular Teratoma and Renal and Urinary Bladder Preneoplasia in Adult Metallothionein-Knockout Mice but Not in Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic lead compounds are carcinogenic in animals and have carcinogenic potential in humans. In mice, lead (Pb) is a transplacental carcinogen in the kidney. Metallothionein (MT) is a metal-binding protein that can reduce the toxicity of various metals, including Pb, either by direct sequestration or as an antioxidant for metals that generate reactive oxygen species. Although MT appears to reduce Pb carcinogenicity in adult mice it is unknown how MT deficiency may affect Pb carcinogenicity from early life exposure. Thus, groups (n = 10) of pregnant MT-I/II double knockout (MT-null) or 129/SVJ MT wild type (WT) mice were exposed to Pb acetate in the drinking water (0, 2000, 4000 ppm Pb) from gestation day 8 through birth and during lactation. Maternal drinking water Pb exposure continued to weaning at 4 weeks of age and the male offspring were then directly exposed to Pb until 8 weeks of age and observed until 2 years old. High dose (4000 ppm) but not low dose (2000 ppm) Pb reduced survival in the latter part of the study in both MT-null and WT mice. In MT-null mice, but not WT, early life Pb exposure caused a dose-related increase in testicular teratomas, to a maximum incidence of 28% compared to control (4%). Pb-induced renal cystic hyperplasia, considered preneoplastic, were a prominent occurrence in MT-null mice but nearly absent in WT mice. Pb dose-related increases in renal cystic hyperplasia occurred in adult MT-null with early life exposure with maximal incidence of 52%. Pb-treated MT-null mice also showed dose-related increases in urinary bladder hyperplasia with occasional papilloma that were absent in WT mice. Thus, MT deficiency made mice more sensitive to early life Pb exposure with regard to testes tumors, and renal and urinary bladder preneoplastic lesions. PMID:20600549

  14. Ex vivo, microelectrode analysis of conduction through the AV node of wild-type and Nkx2-5 mutant mouse hearts as guided by a Cx40-eGFP transgenic reporter.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Li, Alex; Choi, Jacob S; Miquerol, Lucile; Jay, Patrick Y

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mutations of the cardiac transcription factor NKX2-5 cause hypoplastic development of the AV node and conduction block. How the anatomy of the mutant AV node relates to its function is unknown. We thus studied conduction through the AV nodal region in ex vivo preparations of wild-type and Nkx2-5(+/-) mouse hearts in which the central conduction system was highlighted by a transgenic Cx40-eGFP reporter. Fluorescence imaging guided electrode placement and pacing of the inferior and superior approaches to the AV node. Nkx2-5(+/-) hearts had a prolonged atrio-His interval compared to the wild type, consistent with previous in vivo observations. The conduction time to the His bundle from the Cx40(-) AV nodal region that is superior to and immediately adjacent to the Cx40(+) lower node is slightly, but not significantly greater in Nkx2-5(+/-) than wild-type hearts. A novel phenotype was also observed. Pacing the Cx40(-) inferior approach to the AV node with increasing stimulus strength led to progressive shortening of the stimulus-to-His conduction interval in wild-type but not Nkx2-5(+/-) hearts. The strength of pacing at the Cx40(-) superior approach had no effect on the conduction interval in either group. The prolonged AV delay in the Nkx2-5(+/-) heart appears to arise before the Cx40(+) lower node. Whether the pacing phenotype explains the mutant's conduction defect is uncertain, but the observation adds to a number of unique properties of the inferior approach to the AV node.

  15. Restoration of cocaine stimulation and reward by reintroducing wild type dopamine transporter in adult knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyin; O'Neill, Brian; Han, Dawn D; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Wang, Yanlin; Gu, Howard H

    2014-11-01

    In previous studies, we generated knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) and found cocaine does not stimulate locomotion or produce reward in these mice, indicating DAT inhibition is necessary for cocaine stimulation and reward. However, DAT uptake is reduced in DAT-CI mice and thus the lack of cocaine responses could be due to adaptive changes. To test this, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild type DAT (AAV-DATwt) back into adult DAT-CI mice, which restores cocaine inhibition of DAT in affected brain regions but does not reverse the adaptive changes. In an earlier study we showed that AAV-DATwt injections in regions covering the lateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) and lateral caudate-putamen (CPu) restored cocaine stimulation but not cocaine reward. In the current study, we expanded the AAV-DATwt infected areas to cover the olfactory tubercle (Tu) and the ventral midbrain (vMB) containing the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) in addition to CPu and NAc with multiple injections. These mice displayed the restoration of both locomotor stimulation and cocaine reward. We further found that AAV-DATwt injection in the vMB alone was sufficient to restore both cocaine stimulation and reward in DAT-CI mice. AAV injected in the VTA and SN resulted in DATwt expression and distribution to the DA terminal regions. In summary, cocaine induced locomotion and reward can be restored in fully developed DAT-CI mice, and cocaine inhibition of DAT expressed in dopaminergic neurons originated from the ventral midbrain mediates cocaine reward and stimulation.

  16. Restoration of Cocaine Stimulation and Reward by Reintroducing Wild Type Dopamine Transporter in Adult Knock-in Mice with a Cocaine-Insensitive Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiyin; O’Neill, Brian; Han, Dawn D.; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Wang, Yanlin; Gu, Howard H.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we generated knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) and found cocaine does not stimulate locomotion or produce reward in these mice, indicating DAT inhibition is necessary for cocaine stimulation and reward. However, DAT uptake is reduced in DAT-CI mice and thus the lack of cocaine responses could be due to adaptive changes. To test this, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild type DAT (AAV-DATwt) back into adult DAT-CI mice, which restores cocaine inhibition of DAT in affected brain regions but does not reverse the adaptive changes. In an earlier study we showed that AAV-DATwt injections in regions covering the lateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) and lateral caudate-putamen (CPu) restored cocaine stimulation but not cocaine reward. In the current study, we expanded the AAV-DATwt infected areas to cover the olfactory tubercle (Tu) and the ventral midbrain (vMB) containing the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) in addition to CPu and NAc with multiple injections. These mice displayed the restoration of both locomotor stimulation and cocaine reward. We further found that AAV-DATwt injection in the vMB alone was sufficient to restore both cocaine stimulation and reward in DAT-CI mice. AAV injected in the VTA and SN resulted in DATwt expression and distribution to the DA terminal regions. In summary, cocaine induced locomotion and reward can be restored in fully developed DAT-CI mice, and cocaine inhibition of DAT expressed in dopaminergic neurons originated from the ventral midbrain mediates cocaine reward and stimulation. PMID:24835281

  17. Understanding the role of Leu22 variants in methotrexate resistance: comparison of wild-type and Leu22Arg variant mouse and human dihydrofolate reductase ternary crystal complexes with methotrexate and NADPH.

    PubMed

    Cody, Vivian; Luft, Joe R; Pangborn, Walt

    2005-02-01

    Structural data are reported to 2.5 A resolution for the first full analysis of the methotrexate-resistant Leu22Arg (L22R) variant of mouse dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR) crystallized as a ternary complex with methotrexate (MTX) and the cofactor NADPH. These results are compared with the MTX and NADPH ternary complexes of L22R human DHFR (hDHFR) and those of mouse and human wild-type DHFR enzymes. The conformation of mDHFR Arg22 is such that it makes hydrogen-bonding contacts with Asp21, Trp24 and a structural water molecule, observations which were not made in the L22R hDHFR ternary complex. These data show that there is little difference between the structures of the wild type and L22R variant for either mouse or human DHFR; however, there are significant differences between the species. Comparison of these structures reveals that the active site of mDHFR is larger than that in the hDHFR structure. In mDHFR, the position of MTX is shifted 0.6 A toward helix C (residues 59-65), which in turn is shifted 1.2 A away from the active site relative to that observed in the hDHFR ternary complexes. In the L22R variant mDHFR structure, MTX makes shorter contacts to the conserved residues Ile7, Val115 and Tyr121 than in the L22R variant human DHFR structure. These contacts are comparable in both wild-type enzymes. The unexpected results from this comparison of the mouse and human DHFR complexes bound with the same ligand and cofactor illustrate the importance of detailed study of several species of enzyme, even when there is a high sequence homology between them. These data suggest that the differences in binding interactions of the L22R variant are in agreement with the weaker binding affinity for MTX in the variant enzymes; the larger size of the binding site in mDHFR supports the observation that the binding affinity of MTX for L22R mDHFR is significantly weaker than that of the L22R hDHFR enzyme.

  18. Rapid binding of a cationic active site inhibitor to wild type and mutant mouse acetylcholinesterase: Brownian dynamics simulation including diffusion in the active site gorge.

    PubMed

    Tara, S; Elcock, A H; Kirchhoff, P D; Briggs, J M; Radic, Z; Taylor, P; McCammon, J A

    1998-12-01

    It is known that anionic surface residues play a role in the long-range electrostatic attraction between acetylcholinesterase and cationic ligands. In our current investigation, we show that anionic residues also play an important role in the behavior of the ligand within the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Negatively charged residues near the gorge opening not only attract positively charged ligands from solution to the enzyme, but can also restrict the motion of the ligand once it is inside of the gorge. We use Brownian dynamics techniques to calculate the rate constant kon, for wild type and mutant acetylcholinesterase with a positively charged ligand. These calculations are performed by allowing the ligand to diffuse within the active site gorge. This is an extension of previously reported work in which a ligand was allowed to diffuse only to the enzyme surface. By setting the reaction criteria for the ligand closer to the active site, better agreement with experimental data is obtained. Although a number of residues influence the movement of the ligand within the gorge, Asp74 is shown to play a particularly important role in this function. Asp74 traps the ligand within the gorge, and in this way helps to ensure a reaction.

  19. In vitro re-expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) in cultured Ahr-deficient mouse antral follicles partially restores the phenotype to that of cultured wild-type mouse follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, A; Gao, L.; Karman, B.N.; Flaws, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic effects of various endocrine disrupting chemicals. In female mice, global deletion of the Ahr (AhrKO) results in slow growth of ovarian antral follicles. No studies, however, have examined whether injection of the Ahr restores the phenotypes of cultured AhrKO ovarian antral follicles to wild-type levels. Methods We developed a system to construct a recombinant adenovirus containing the Ahr to re-express the Ahr in AhrKO granulosa cells and whole antral follicles. We then compared follicle growth and levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway (Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Further, we compared the response to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Results AdAhr injection into AhrKO follicles partially restored their growth pattern to wild-type levels. Further, Ahr re-expressed follicles had significantly higher levels of Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1 compared to wild-type follicles. Upon TCDD treatment, only Cyp1a1 levels were significantly higher in Ahr re-expressed follicles compared to the levels in wild-type follicles. Conclusion Our system of re-expression of the Ahr partially restores follicle growth and transcript levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway to wild-type levels. PMID:25500125

  20. A Quadruple Knockout of lasIR and rhlIR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 That Retains Wild-Type Twitching Motility Has Equivalent Infectivity and Persistence to PAO1 in a Mouse Model of Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lazenby, James J.; Griffin, Phoebe E.; Kyd, Jennelle; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Cooley, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been widely reported that quorum-sensing incapable strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are less virulent than wild type strains. However, quorum sensing mutants of P. aeruginosa have been shown to develop other spontaneous mutations under prolonged culture conditions, and one of the phenotypes of P. aeruginosa that is frequently affected by this phenomenon is type IV pili-dependent motility, referred to as twitching motility. As twitching motility has been reported to be important for adhesion and colonisation, we aimed to generate a quorum-sensing knockout for which the heritage was recorded and the virulence factor production in areas unrelated to quorum sensing was known to be intact. We created a lasIRrhlIR quadruple knockout in PAO1 using a published technique that allows for the deletion of antibiotic resistance cartridges following mutagenesis, to create an unmarked QS knockout of PAO1, thereby avoiding the need for use of antibiotics in culturing, which can have subtle effects on bacterial phenotype. We phenotyped this mutant demonstrating that it produced reduced levels of protease and elastase, barely detectable levels of pyoverdin and undetectable levels of the quorum sensing signal molecules N-3-oxododecanoly-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl homoserine lactone, but retained full twitching motility. We then used a mouse model of acute lung infection with P. aeruginosa to demonstrate that the lasIRrhlIR knockout strain showed equal persistence to wild type parental PAO1, induced equal or greater neutrophil infiltration to the lungs, and induced similar levels of expression of inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and similar antibody responses, both in terms of magnitude and isotype. Our results suggest, in contrast to previous reports, that lack of quorum sensing alone does not significantly affect the immunogenicity, infectiveness and persistence of P. aeruginosa in a mouse model of acute lung infection. PMID:23593362

  1. Action Potentials are required for nitric oxide dependent LTP in CA1 neurons of adult GluR1 knockout and Wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Keith G.; Hardingham, Neil R.; Fox, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Neocortical LTP consists of both pre- and postsynaptic components that rely on nitric oxide (NO) and GluR1 respectively. In this study, we found that hippocampal LTP, induced by theta-burst stimulation in mature (> 8 week old) GluR1 knockout mice was almost entirely NO-dependent and involved both the α splice variant of NO synthase-1 (αNOS-1) and the NO synthase-3 (NOS-3) isoforms of NO synthase. Theta-burst induced LTP was also partly NO-dependent in wild-type mice, and made up approximately 50% of the potentiation 2 hours post-tetanus. Theta-burst stimulation reliably produced postsynaptic spikes including a high probability of complex spikes. Inhibition of postsynaptic somatic spikes with intracellular QX314 or local TTX application prevented LTP in the GluR1 knockout mice and also blocked the NO-component of LTP in wild-types. We conclude that theta-burst stimulation is particularly well suited to producing the somatic postsynaptic spikes required for NO-dependent LTP. PMID:19109486

  2. An Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 missense mutant colonizes the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine better than the wild type but is not a better probiotic.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Krogfelt, Karen A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna; Kenney, Linda J; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Previously we reported that the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine selected for two different Escherichia coli MG1655 mutants with improved colonizing ability: nonmotile E. coli MG1655 flhDC deletion mutants that grew 15% faster in vitro in mouse cecal mucus and motile E. coli MG1655 envZ missense mutants that grew slower in vitro in mouse cecal mucus yet were able to cocolonize with the faster-growing flhDC mutants. The E. coli MG1655 envZ gene encodes a histidine kinase that is a member of the envZ-ompR two-component signal transduction system, which regulates outer membrane protein profiles. In the present investigation, the envZP41L gene was transferred from the intestinally selected E. coli MG1655 mutant to E. coli Nissle 1917, a human probiotic strain used to treat gastrointestinal infections. Both the E. coli MG1655 and E. coli Nissle 1917 strains containing envZP41L produced more phosphorylated OmpR than their parents. The E. coli Nissle 1917 strain containing envZP41L also became more resistant to bile salts and colicin V and grew 50% slower in vitro in mucus and 15% to 30% slower on several sugars present in mucus, yet it was a 10-fold better colonizer than E. coli Nissle 1917. However, E. coli Nissle 1917 envZP41L was not better at preventing colonization by enterohemorrhagic E. coli EDL933. The data can be explained according to our "restaurant" hypothesis for commensal E. coli strains, i.e., that they colonize the intestine as sessile members of mixed biofilms, obtaining the sugars they need for growth locally, but compete for sugars with invading E. coli pathogens planktonically. PMID:24478082

  3. An Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 missense mutant colonizes the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine better than the wild type but is not a better probiotic.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Jimmy; Leatham-Jensen, Mary P; Mokszycki, Matthew E; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Krogfelt, Karen A; Kazmierczak, Krystyna; Kenney, Linda J; Conway, Tyrrell; Cohen, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Previously we reported that the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine selected for two different Escherichia coli MG1655 mutants with improved colonizing ability: nonmotile E. coli MG1655 flhDC deletion mutants that grew 15% faster in vitro in mouse cecal mucus and motile E. coli MG1655 envZ missense mutants that grew slower in vitro in mouse cecal mucus yet were able to cocolonize with the faster-growing flhDC mutants. The E. coli MG1655 envZ gene encodes a histidine kinase that is a member of the envZ-ompR two-component signal transduction system, which regulates outer membrane protein profiles. In the present investigation, the envZP41L gene was transferred from the intestinally selected E. coli MG1655 mutant to E. coli Nissle 1917, a human probiotic strain used to treat gastrointestinal infections. Both the E. coli MG1655 and E. coli Nissle 1917 strains containing envZP41L produced more phosphorylated OmpR than their parents. The E. coli Nissle 1917 strain containing envZP41L also became more resistant to bile salts and colicin V and grew 50% slower in vitro in mucus and 15% to 30% slower on several sugars present in mucus, yet it was a 10-fold better colonizer than E. coli Nissle 1917. However, E. coli Nissle 1917 envZP41L was not better at preventing colonization by enterohemorrhagic E. coli EDL933. The data can be explained according to our "restaurant" hypothesis for commensal E. coli strains, i.e., that they colonize the intestine as sessile members of mixed biofilms, obtaining the sugars they need for growth locally, but compete for sugars with invading E. coli pathogens planktonically.

  4. Chronic GluN2B antagonism disrupts behavior in wild-type mice without protecting against synapse loss or memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Meilandt, William J; Gogineni, Alvin; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Weimer, Robby M; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2014-06-11

    Extensive evidence implicates GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B-NMDARs) in excitotoxic-insult-induced neurodegeneration and amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic dysfunction. Therefore, inhibiting GluN2B-NMDARs would appear to be a potential therapeutic strategy to provide neuroprotection and improve cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are no reports of long-term in vivo treatment of AD mouse models with GluN2B antagonists. We used piperidine18 (Pip18), a potent and selective GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, for long-term dosing in AD mouse models. Reduced freezing behavior in Tg2576 mice during fear conditioning was partially reversed after subchronic (17 d) Pip18 treatment. However, analysis of freezing behavior in different contexts indicated that this increased freezing likely involves elevated anxiety or excessive memory generalization in both nontransgenic (NTG) and Tg2576 mice. In PS2APP mice chronically fed with medicated food containing Pip18 for 4 months, spatial learning and memory deficits were not rescued, plaque-associated spine loss was not affected, and synaptic function was not altered. At the same time, altered open field activity consistent with increased anxiety and degraded performance in an active avoidance task were observed in NTG after chronic treatment. These results indicate that long-term treatment with a GluN2B-NMDAR antagonist does not provide a disease-modifying benefit and could cause cognitive liabilities rather than symptomatic benefit in AD mouse models. Therefore, these results challenge the expectation of the therapeutic potential for GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists in AD.

  5. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Harwood, John L

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes.

  6. Properties of wild-type and fluorescent protein-tagged mouse tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel (Na V 1.8) heterologously expressed in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Geoffrey G; Puhl, Henry L; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2008-04-01

    The tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na(+) current arising from Na(V)1.8-containing channels participates in nociceptive pathways but is difficult to functionally express in traditional heterologous systems. Here, we show that injection of cDNA encoding mouse Na(V)1.8 into the nuclei of rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons results in TTX-resistant Na(+) currents with amplitudes equal to or exceeding the currents arising from natively expressing channels of mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The activation and inactivation properties of the heterologously expressed Na(V)1.8 Na(+) channels were similar but not identical to native TTX-resistant channels. Most notably, the half-activation potential of the heterologously expressed Na(V)1.8 channels was shifted about 10 mV toward more depolarized potentials. Fusion of fluorescent proteins to the N- or C-termini of Na(V)1.8 did not substantially affect functional expression in SCG neurons. Unexpectedly, fluorescence was not concentrated at the plasma membrane but found throughout the interior of the neuron in a granular pattern. A similar expression pattern was observed in nodose ganglion neurons expressing the tagged channels. In contrast, expression of tagged Na(V)1.8 in HeLa cells revealed a fluorescence pattern consistent with sequestration in the endoplasmic reticulum, thus providing a basis for poor functional expression in clonal cell lines. Our results establish SCG neurons as a favorable surrogate for the expression and study of molecularly defined Na(V)1.8-containing channels. The data also indicate that unidentified factors may be required for the efficient functional expression of Na(V)1.8 with a biophysical phenotype identical to that found in sensory neurons. PMID:18272876

  7. Dietary DHA supplementation causes selective changes in phospholipids from different brain regions in both wild type mice and the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bascoul-Colombo, Cécile; Guschina, Irina A.; Maskrey, Benjamin H.; Good, Mark; O'Donnell, Valerie B.; Harwood, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is of major concern in ageing populations and we have used the Tg2576 mouse model to understand connections between brain lipids and amyloid pathology. Because dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been identified as beneficial, we compared mice fed with a DHA-supplemented diet to those on a nutritionally-sufficient diet. Major phospholipids from cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum were separated and analysed. Each phosphoglyceride had a characteristic fatty acid composition which was similar in cortex and hippocampus but different in the cerebellum. The biggest changes on DHA-supplementation were within ethanolamine phospholipids which, together with phosphatidylserine, had the highest proportions of DHA. Reciprocal alterations in DHA and arachidonate were found. The main diet-induced alterations were found in ethanolamine phospholipids, (and included their ether derivatives), as were the changes observed due to genotype. Tg mice appeared more sensitive to diet with generally lower DHA percentages when on the standard diet and higher relative proportions of DHA when the diet was supplemented. All four major phosphoglycerides analysed showed age-dependent decreases in polyunsaturated fatty acid contents. These data provide, for the first time, a detailed evaluation of phospholipids in different brain areas previously shown to be relevant to behaviour in the Tg2576 mouse model for AD. The lipid changes observed with genotype are consistent with the subtle alterations found in AD patients, especially for the ethanolamine phospholipid molecular species. They also emphasise the contrasting changes in fatty acid content induced by DHA supplementation within individual phospholipid classes. PMID:26968097

  8. Safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant protein influenza A vaccine in adult human volunteers and protective efficacy against wild-type H1N1 virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Fries, L F; Dillon, S B; Hildreth, J E; Karron, R A; Funkhouser, A W; Friedman, C J; Jones, C S; Culleton, V G; Clements, M L

    1993-03-01

    A recombinant influenza A vaccine (D protein), comprising a carboxy-terminal sequence from the hemagglutinin HA2 subunit of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus (H1N1, A/PR/34) fused to 81 amino-terminal residues of the NS1 nonstructural protein, has previously protected mice against influenza A challenge by inducing H1N1/H2N2 cross-reactive cytotoxic T cells (CTL) without hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) or neutralizing antibody. In our dose-escalating study, the vaccine was safe in humans and induced both IgG and T cell proliferative responses to D protein but little antibody to A/PR/34 or A/Kawasaki/8/86 (H1N1, A/KW/86) viruses. Among an additional group of A/KW/86-seronegative volunteers immunized with 500 micrograms of D protein, none had a rise in serum HI or neutralizing antibody to A/KW/86, 20% had minimal IgG responses to A/KW/86 by EIA, and a minority had any increase in A/KW/86-specific CTL activity. However, viral shedding and clinical illness score were reduced in vaccines relative to A/KW/86-seronegative unimmunized controls after intranasal challenge with wild-type A/KW/86. D protein immunization conferred significant protective immunity not currently explained by any of the immune parameters measured.

  9. The effect of mild traumatic brain injury on peripheral nervous system pathology in wild-type mice and the G93A mutant mouse model of motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, T M; Jaramillo, C A; Sataranatarajan, K; Watts, L; Sabia, M; Qi, W; Van Remmen, H

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with a risk of neurodegenerative disease. Some suggest a link between TBI and motor neuron disease (MND), including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To investigate the potential mechanisms linking TBI to MND, we measured motor function and neuropathology following mild-TBI in wild-type and a transgenic model of ALS, G93A mutant mice. Mild-TBI did not alter the lifespan of G93A mice or age of onset; however, rotarod performance was impaired in G93A verses wild-type mice. Grip strength was reduced only in G93A mice after mild-TBI. Increased electromyography (EMG) abnormalities and markers of denervation (AchR, Runx1) indicate that mild-TBI may result in peripheral effects that are exaggerated in G93A mice. Markers of inflammation (cell edema, astrogliosis and microgliosis) were detected at 24 and 72h in the brain and spinal cord in wild-type and G93A mice. Levels of F2-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress, were increased in the spinal cord 24h post mild-TBI in wild-type mice but were not affected by TBI in G93A mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that mild-TBI induces inflammation and oxidative stress and negatively impacts muscle denervation and motor performance, suggesting mild-TBI can potentiate motor neuron pathology and influence the development of MND in mice.

  10. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi; Peters, Christoph; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  11. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean H; West, John D

    2016-05-15

    The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera with functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1(-/-) null cells in adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras and determine if Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes in one female Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c) chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1(-/-)↔Gpi1(c/c), this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1(-/-) null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1(-/-) null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1(-/-) null cells could survive in many adult tissues.

  12. Characterization of cDNA encoding mouse DNA repair protein O sup 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and high-level expression of the wild-type and mutant proteins in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Susumu; Tano, Keizo ); von Wronski, M.A.; Brent, T.P. ); Bigner, D.D. ); Mitra, S. )

    1992-02-25

    A mouse cDNA clone encoding O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), responsible for repair of mutagenic O{sup 6}-alkylguanine in DNA, was cloned from a {lambda}gt11 library. On the basis of an open reading frame in cDNA, the mouse protein contains 211 amino acids with a molecular mass of 22 kDa. The size and the predicted N-terminal sequence of the mouse protein were confirmed experimentally. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse MGMT is 70% homologous to that of the human MGMT. Cysteine-149 was shown to be the only alkyl acceptor residue in the mouse protein, in confirmation of the prediction based on conserved sequences of different MGMTs. Mouse MGMT protein is recognized by some monoclonal antibodies specific for human MGMT. Site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to reclone the mouse cDNA in a T7 promoter-based vector for overexpression of the native repair protein in Escherichia coli. The mouse protein has a tetrapeptide sequence, Pro-Glu-Gly-Val at positions 56-59, absent in the human protein. Neither deletion of this tetrapeptide nor substitution of valine-169 with alanine affected the activity of the mutant proteins.

  13. Liver repopulation and correction of metabolic liver disease by transplanted adult mouse pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Al-Dhalimy, M; Lagasse, E; Finegold, M; Grompe, M

    2001-02-01

    The emergence of cells with hepatocellular properties in the adult pancreas has been described in several experimental models. To determine whether adult pancreas contains cells that can give rise to therapeutically useful and biochemically normal hepatocytes, we transplanted suspensions of wild-type mouse pancreatic cells into syngeneic recipients deficient in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase and manifesting tyrosinemia. Four of 34 (12%) mutant mice analyzed were fully rescued by donor-derived cells and had normal liver function. Ten additional mice (29%) showed histological evidence of donor-derived hepatocytes in the liver. Previous work has suggested that pancreatic liver precursors reside within or close to pancreatic ducts. We therefore performed additional transplantations using either primary cell suspensions enriched for ducts or cultured ducts. Forty-four mutant mice were transplanted with cells enriched for pancreatic duct cells, but only three of the 34 (9%) recipients analyzed displayed donor-derived hepatocytes. In addition, 28 of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase-deficient mice were transplanted with cultured pancreatic duct cells, but no donor-derived hepatocytes were observed. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult mouse pancreas contains hepatocyte progenitor cells capable of significant therapeutic liver reconstitution. However, contrary to previous reports, we were unable to detect these cells within the duct compartment. PMID:11159194

  14. Developmental Divergence of Sleep-Wake Patterns in Orexin Knockout and Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Cassandra M.; Johnson, Eric D.; Shaw, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by fragmented bouts of sleep and wakefulness during the day and night as well as cataplexy, has been linked in humans and non-human animals to the functional integrity of the orexinergic system. Adult orexin knockout mice and dogs with a mutation of the orexin receptor exhibit symptoms that mirror those seen in narcoleptic humans. As with narcolepsy, infant sleep-wake cycles in humans and rats are highly fragmented, with consolidated bouts of sleep and wakefulness developing gradually. Based on these common features of narcoleptics and infants, we hypothesized that the development of sleep-wake fragmentation in orexin knockout mice would be expressed as a developmental divergence between knockouts and wild-types, with the knockouts lagging behind the wild-types. We tested this hypothesis by recording the sleep-wake patterns of infant orexin knockout and wild-type mice across the first three postnatal weeks. Both knockouts and wild-types exhibited age-dependent, and therefore orexin-independent, quantitative and qualitative changes in sleep-wake patterning. At 3 weeks of age, however, by which time the sleep and wake bouts of the wild-types had consolidated further, the knockouts lagged behind the wild-types and exhibited significantly more bout fragmentation. These findings suggest the possibility that the fragmentation of behavioral states that characterizes narcolepsy in adults reflects reversion back toward the more fragmented sleep-wake patterns that characterize infancy. PMID:17284193

  15. Chronic coexistence of two troponin T isoforms in adult transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes decreased contractile kinetics and caused dilatative remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bin; Wei, Hongguang; Jin, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Our previous in vivo and ex vivo studies suggested that coexistence of two or more troponin T (TnT) isoforms in adult cardiac muscle decreased cardiac function and efficiency (Huang QQ, Feng HZ, Liu J, Du J, Stull LB, Moravec CS, Huang X, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 294: C213-C22, 2008; Feng HZ, Jin JP, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 299: H97-H105, 2010). Here we characterized Ca(2+)-regulated contractility of isolated adult cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice coexpressing a fast skeletal muscle TnT together with the endogenous cardiac TnT. Without the influence of extracellular matrix, coexistence of the two TnT isoforms resulted in lower shortening amplitude, slower shortening and relengthening velocities, and longer relengthening time. The level of resting cytosolic Ca(2+) was unchanged, but the peak Ca(2+) transient was lowered and the durations of Ca(2+) rising and decaying were longer in the transgenic mouse cardiomyocytes vs. the wild-type controls. Isoproterenol treatment diminished the differences in shortening amplitude and shortening and relengthening velocities, whereas the prolonged durations of relengthening and Ca(2+) transient in the transgenic cardiomyocytes remained. At rigor state, a result from depletion of Ca(2+), resting sarcomere length of the transgenic cardiomyocytes became shorter than that in wild-type cells. Inhibition of myosin motor diminished this effect of TnT function on cross bridges. The length but not width of transgenic cardiomyocytes was significantly increased compared with the wild-type controls, corresponding to longitudinal addition of sarcomeres and dilatative remodeling at the cellular level. These dominantly negative effects of normal fast TnT demonstrated that chronic coexistence of functionally distinct variants of TnT in adult cardiomyocytes reduces contractile performance with pathological consequences.

  16. Survival of glucose phosphate isomerase null somatic cells and germ cells in adult mouse chimaeras

    PubMed Central

    Keighren, Margaret A.; Flockhart, Jean H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mouse Gpi1 gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glucose phosphate isomerase. Homozygous Gpi1−/− null mouse embryos die but a previous study showed that some homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells survived when combined with wild-type cells in fetal chimaeras. One adult female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera with functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes was also identified in a preliminary study. The aims were to characterise the survival of Gpi1−/− null cells in adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras and determine if Gpi1−/− null germ cells are functional. Analysis of adult Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaeras with pigment and a reiterated transgenic lineage marker showed that low numbers of homozygous Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many tissues of adult chimaeras, including oocytes. Breeding experiments confirmed that Gpi1−/− null oocytes in one female Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera were functional and provided preliminary evidence that one male putative Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c chimaera produced functional spermatozoa from homozygous Gpi1−/− null germ cells. Although the male chimaera was almost certainly Gpi1−/−↔Gpi1c/c, this part of the study is considered preliminary because only blood was typed for GPI. Gpi1−/− null germ cells should survive in a chimaeric testis if they are supported by wild-type Sertoli cells. It is also feasible that spermatozoa could bypass a block at GPI, but not blocks at some later steps in glycolysis, by using fructose, rather than glucose, as the substrate for glycolysis. Although chimaera analysis proved inefficient for studying the fate of Gpi1−/− null germ cells, it successfully identified functional Gpi1−/− null oocytes and revealed that some Gpi1−/− null cells could survive in many adult tissues. PMID:27103217

  17. Method for measurement of the blood-brain barrier permeability in the perfused mouse brain: application to amyloid-beta peptide in wild type and Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Barbra; Hogg, Elizabeth; Sagare, Abhay; Jovanovic, Suzana; Maness, Lawrence; Maurer, Calvin; Deane, Rashid; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2004-09-30

    The role of transport exchanges of neuroactive solutes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is increasingly recognized. To take full advantage of genetically altered mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders for BBB transport studies, we adapted a brain perfusion technique to the mouse. During a carotid brain perfusion with a medium containing sheep red blood cells and mock plasma, the physiological parameters in the arterial inflow, regional cerebral blood flow (14C-iodoantipyrine autoradiography), ultrastructural integrity of the tissue, barrier to lanthanum, brain water content, energy metabolites and lactate levels remain unchanged. Amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta) were iodinated by lactoperoxidase method. Non-oxidized mono-iodinated Abeta monomers were separated by HPLC (as confirmed by MALDI-TOF spectrometry) and used in transport measurements. Transport of intact 125I-Abeta40 across the BBB was time- and concentration-dependent in contrast to negligible 14C-inulin uptake. In 5-6 months old Alzheimer's Tg2576 mice, Abeta40 BBB transport was increased by >eight-fold compared to age-matched littermate controls, and was mediated via the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts. We conclude the present arterial brain perfusion method provides strictly controlled environment in cerebral microcirculation suitable for examining transport of rapidly and slowly penetrating molecules across the BBB in normal and transgenic mice.

  18. The heparan sulphate deficient Hspg2 exon 3 null mouse displays reduced deposition of TGF-β1 in skin compared to C57BL/6 wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Cindy; Smith, Susan M; Melrose, James

    2016-06-01

    This was an observational study where we examined the role of perlecan HS on the deposition of TGF-β1 in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mouse skin. Despite its obvious importance in skin repair and tissue homeostasis no definitive studies have immunolocalised TGF-β1 in skin in WT or Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) perlecan exon 3 null mice. Vertical parasagittal murine dorsal skin from 3, 6 and 12 week old C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mice were fixed in neutral buffered formalin, paraffin embedded and 4 μm sections stained with Mayers haematoxylin and eosin (H & E). TGF-β1 was immunolocalised using a rabbit polyclonal antibody, heat retrieval and the Envision NovaRED detection system. Immunolocalisation of TGF-β1 differed markedly in C57BL/6 and Hspg2(∆3-/∆3-) mouse skin, ablation of exon 3 of Hspg2 resulted in a very severe reduction in the deposition of TGF-β1 in skin 3-12 weeks postnatally. The reduced deposition of TGF-β1 observed in the present study would be expected to impact detrimentally on the remodelling and healing capacity of skin in mutant mice compounding on the poor wound-healing properties already reported for perlecan exon 3 null mice due to an inability to signal with FGF-2 and promote angiogenic repair processes. TGF-β1 also has cell mediated effects in tissue homeostasis and matrix stabilisation a reduction in TGF-β1 deposition would therefore be expected to detrimentally impact on skin homeostasis in the perlecan mutant mice.

  19. Tendon fascicle gliding in wild type, heterozygous, and lubricin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kohrs, Ross T; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sun, Yu-Long; Jay, Gregory D; Zhang, Ling; Warman, Matthew L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin in the lubrication of tendon fascicles. Lubricin, a glycoprotein, lubricates cartilage and tendon surfaces, but the function of lubricin within the tendon fascicle is unclear. We developed a novel method to assess the gliding resistance of a single fascicle in a mouse tail model and used it to test the hypothesis that gliding resistance would be increased in lubricin knockout mice. Thirty-six mouse tails were used from 12 wild type, 12 heterozygous, and 12 lubricin knockout mice. A 15 mm long fascicle segment was pulled proximally after being divided distally. The peak resistance during fascicle pullout and the fascicle perimeter were measured. Lubricin expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The peak gliding resistance in the lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than in the wild type (p < 0.05). Fascicles from heterozygous mice were intermediate in value, but not significantly different from either wild type or lubricin knockout fascicles in peak gliding resistance. No significant difference was found in fascicle perimeter among the three groups. No correlation was observed between fascicle perimeter and gliding resistance. While lubricin was detected by immunostaining on the fascicle surface in wild type and heterozygous mice, lubricin was not detectable in the tendons of knockout mice. We conclude that the absence of lubricin is associated with increased interfascicular friction and that lubricin may play an important role in interfascicular lubrication.

  20. Suppressed Accumulation of Cerebral Amyloid β Peptides in Aged Transgenic Alzheimer’s Disease Mice by Transplantation with Wild-Type or Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 2-Null Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Keene, C. Dirk; Chang, Rubens C.; Lopez-Yglesias, Americo H.; Shalloway, Bryan R.; Sokal, Izabella; Li, Xianwu; Reed, Patrick J.; Keene, Lisa M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Breyer, Richard M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A complex therapeutic challenge for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is minimizing deleterious aspects of microglial activation while maximizing beneficial actions, including phagocytosis/clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. One potential target is selective suppression of microglial prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) function, which influences microglial phagocytosis and elaboration of neurotoxic cytokines. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted bone marrow cells derived from wild-type mice or mice homozygous deficient for EP2 (EP2−/−) into lethally irradiated 5-month-old wild-type or APPswe-PS1ΔE9 double transgenic AD mouse model recipients. We found that cerebral engraftment by bone marrow transplant (BMT)-derived wild-type or EP2−/− microglia was more efficient in APPswe-PS1ΔE9 than in wild-type mice, and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received EP2−/− BMT had increased cortical microglia compared with APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received wild-type BMT. We found that myeloablative irradiation followed by bone marrow transplant-derived microglia engraftment, rather than cranial irradiation or BMT alone, was responsible for the approximate one-third reduction in both Aβ plaques and potentially more neurotoxic soluble Aβ species. An additional 25% reduction in cerebral cortical Aβ burden was achieved in mice that received EP2−/− BMT compared with mice that received wild-type BMT. Our results provide a foundation for an adult stem cell-based therapy to suppress soluble Aβ peptide and plaque accumulation in the cerebrum of patients with AD. PMID:20522650

  1. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  2. Endoglin Deficiency in Bone Marrow Is Sufficient to Cause Cerebrovascular Dysplasia in the Adult Mouse after VEGF Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Walker, Espen J.; Degos, Vincent; Jun, Kristine; Kuo, Robert; Pile-Spellman, John; Su, Hua; Young, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) home to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced brain angiogenic foci, and VEGF induces cerebrovascular dysplasia in adult endoglin heterozygous (Eng+/−) mice. We hypothesized that Eng+/− BMDCs cause cerebrovascular dysplasia in the adult mouse after VEGF stimulation. Methods BM transplantation was performed using adult wild-type (WT) and Eng+/− mice as donors/recipients. An adeno-associated viral vector expressing VEGF (AAV-VEGF) was injected into the basal ganglia 4 weeks after transplantation. Vascular density, dysplasia index (vessels >15 μm/100 vessels), and BMDCs in the angiogenic foci were analyzed. Results The dysplasia index of WT/Eng+/− BM mice was higher than WT/WT BM mice (p<0.001) and was similar to Eng+/−/Eng+/− BM mice (p=0.2). Dysplasia in Eng+/− mice was partially rescued by WT BM (p<0.001). WT/WT BM and WT/Eng+/− BM mice had similar numbers of BMDCs in the angiogenic foci (p=0.4), most of which were CD68+. Eng+/− monocytes/macrophages expressed less matrix metalloproteinase-9 and Notch1. Conclusions ENG-deficient BMDCs are sufficient for VEGF to induce vascular dysplasia in the adult mouse brain. Our data support a previously unrecognized role of BM in the development of cerebrovascular malformations. PMID:23306322

  3. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Cordes, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-specific antibodies produced against synthetic peptides are of high value in probing protein structure and function, especially when working with challenging proteins, including not readily available, non-immunogenic, toxic, and/or pathogenic proteins. Here, we present a straightforward method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well as a thorough characterization of their reactivity with a range of normal and pathogenic (misfolded) prion proteins. It is demonstrated that immunization of wild-type mice with ovalbumin-conjugated peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvant induces a good immune response, including high levels of specific anti-peptide antibodies, even against peptides very homologous to murine protein sequences. In general, using the strategies described here for selecting, synthesizing, and conjugating peptides and immunizing 4-5 mice with 2-3 different peptides, high-titered antibodies reacting with the target protein are routinely obtained with at least one of the peptides after three to four immunizations with incomplete Freund's adjuvant.

  4. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Cordes, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-specific antibodies produced against synthetic peptides are of high value in probing protein structure and function, especially when working with challenging proteins, including not readily available, non-immunogenic, toxic, and/or pathogenic proteins. Here, we present a straightforward method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well as a thorough characterization of their reactivity with a range of normal and pathogenic (misfolded) prion proteins. It is demonstrated that immunization of wild-type mice with ovalbumin-conjugated peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvant induces a good immune response, including high levels of specific anti-peptide antibodies, even against peptides very homologous to murine protein sequences. In general, using the strategies described here for selecting, synthesizing, and conjugating peptides and immunizing 4-5 mice with 2-3 different peptides, high-titered antibodies reacting with the target protein are routinely obtained with at least one of the peptides after three to four immunizations with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. PMID:26424281

  5. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain.

  6. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bordiuk, Olivia L; Smith, Karen; Morin, Peter J; Semënov, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ), and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS) occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain. PMID:25375658

  7. Effect of Fluorosis on Liver Cells of VC Deficient and Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Jiao, Yan; Ma, Yonghui; Stuart, John M.; Li, Xiudian; Zhao, Fusheng; Wang, Lishi; Sun, DianJun

    2014-01-01

    For decades, mouse and other rodents have been used for the study of oxidative or related studies such as the effect of fluoride. It is known that rodents normally synthesize their own vitamin C (VC) due to the presence of a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, l-gulono-lactone-γ-oxidase (Gulo), while humans do not have the capacity of VC synthesis due to the deletion of most parts of the GULO gene. The spontaneous fracture (sfx) mouse recently emerged as a model for study of VC deficiency. We investigated the effect of fluoride on liver cells from wild type Balb/c and sfx mice. We found that activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were reduced in both wild type and sfx mice; however, the amount of reduction in the sfx cells is more than that in Balb/c cells. In addition, while both cells increased MDA, the increase in the sfx cells is greater than that in Balb/c cells. Gene networks of Sod, Gpx, and Cat in the liver of humans and mice are also different. Our study suggests that reaction to fluoride in vitamin C deficient mice might be different from that of wild type mice. PMID:24693236

  8. PCSK9 is not involved in the degradation of LDL receptors and BACE1 in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mali; Wu, Guoxin; Baysarowich, Jennifer; Kavana, Michael; Addona, George H.; Bierilo, Kathleen K.; Mudgett, John S.; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Sitlani, Ayesha; Renger, John J.; Hubbard, Brian K.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Zerbinatti, Celina V.

    2010-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a secreted protein that regulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) levels in humans. PCSK9 has also been shown to regulate the levels of additional membrane-bound proteins in vitro, including the very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and the β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), which are all highly expressed in the CNS and have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To better understand the role of PCSK9 in regulating these additional target proteins in vivo, their steady-state levels were measured in the brain of wild-type, PCSK9-deficient, and human PCSK9 overexpressing transgenic mice. We found that while PCSK9 directly bound to recombinant LDLR, VLDLR, and apoER2 protein in vitro, changes in PCSK9 expression did not alter the level of these receptors in the mouse brain. In addition, we found no evidence that PCSK9 regulates BACE1 levels or APP processing in the mouse brain. In conclusion, our results suggest that while PCSK9 plays an important role in regulating circulating LDL cholesterol levels by reducing the number of hepatic LDLRs, it does not appear to modulate the levels of LDLR and other membrane-bound proteins in the adult mouse brain. PMID:20453200

  9. Maternal and pup genotype contribution to growth in wild-type and tau mutant Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Oklejewicz, M; Pen, I; Durieux, G C; Daan, S

    2001-07-01

    The single gene mutation tau in the Syrian hamster-apart from its effect on the circadian organization of locomotor activity--has a pronounced influence on body weight. In this study we investigate the impact of maternal and pup genotypes at the tau-locus on the growth rate of pups. Homozygous tau mutant hamsters (circadian period of 20 hours) had lower growth rates and adult body weights than wild-type hamsters, whereas heterozygous tau mutants (circadian period of 22 hours) were intermediate. In addition, heterozygous pups from heterozygous dams grew heavier than those from wild-type and homozygous dams. The effect of maternal genotype was further evaluated in a cross-foster design, where wild-type and homozygous mutant pups were fostered at birth to either wild-type or homozygous mutant dams. At all ages, the maternal tau genotype had a negative effect on body weight, whereas the pup tau genotype had a positive effect during the preweaning period and a negative effect afterward.

  10. Rhythmic Ganglion Cell Activity in Bleached and Blind Adult Mouse Retinas

    PubMed Central

    Menzler, Jacob; Channappa, Lakshmi; Zeck, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    In retinitis pigmentosa – a degenerative disease which often leads to incurable blindness- the loss of photoreceptors deprives the retina from a continuous excitatory input, the so-called dark current. In rodent models of this disease this deprivation leads to oscillatory electrical activity in the remaining circuitry, which is reflected in the rhythmic spiking of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). It remained unclear, however, if the rhythmic RGC activity is attributed to circuit alterations occurring during photoreceptor degeneration or if rhythmic activity is an intrinsic property of healthy retinal circuitry which is masked by the photoreceptor’s dark current. Here we tested these hypotheses by inducing and analysing oscillatory activity in adult healthy (C57/Bl6) and blind mouse retinas (rd10 and rd1). Rhythmic RGC activity in healthy retinas was detected upon partial photoreceptor bleaching using an extracellular high-density multi-transistor-array. The mean fundamental spiking frequency in bleached retinas was 4.3 Hz; close to the RGC rhythm detected in blind rd10 mouse retinas (6.5 Hz). Crosscorrelation analysis of neighbouring wild-type and rd10 RGCs (separation distance <200 µm) reveals synchrony among homologous RGC types and a constant phase shift (∼70 msec) among heterologous cell types (ON versus OFF). The rhythmic RGC spiking in these retinas is driven by a network of presynaptic neurons. The inhibition of glutamatergic ganglion cell input or the inhibition of gap junctional coupling abolished the rhythmic pattern. In rd10 and rd1 retinas the presynaptic network leads to local field potentials, whereas in bleached retinas additional pharmacological disinhibition is required to achieve detectable field potentials. Our results demonstrate that photoreceptor bleaching unmasks oscillatory activity in healthy retinas which shares many features with the functional phenotype detected in rd10 retinas. The quantitative physiological differences advance the

  11. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  12. Effects of chronic variable stress on cognition and Bace1 expression among wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Z A; Tamashiro, K L K

    2016-01-01

    Stressful life events, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and glucocorticoids are now thought to have a role in the development of several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) through mechanisms that may include exacerbation of cognitive impairment, neuronal loss, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau neuropathology. In the current study, we use a wild-type mouse model to demonstrate that chronic variable stress impairs cognitive function and that aged mice are particularly susceptible. We also find that stress exposure is associated with a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in the expression of Bace1 in the hippocampus of young adult mice and the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala of aged mice. Further, the increased expression of Bace1 was associated with decreased methylation of several CpGs in the Bace1 promoter region. In a second series of experiments, exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) prevented the stress-related changes in cognition, gene expression and DNA methylation. Together, these findings re-affirm the adverse effects of stress on cognition and further suggest that aged individuals are especially susceptible. In addition, demonstrating that chronic stress results in decreased DNA methylation and increased expression of Bace1 in the brain may provide a novel link between stress, Aβ pathology and AD. Finally, understanding the mechanisms by which EE prevented the effects of stress on cognition and Bace1 expression will be an important area of future study that may provide insights into novel approaches to the treatment of AD. PMID:27404286

  13. ATM localization and gene expression in the adult mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Leemput, Julia; Masson, Christel; Bigot, Karine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Dansault, Anouk; Provost, Alexandra; Gadin, Stéphanie; Aoufouchi, Said; Menasche, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Purpose High levels of metabolism and oxygen consumption in most adult murine ocular compartments, combined with exposure to light and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, are major sources of oxidative stress, causing DNA damage in ocular cells. Of all mammalian body cells, photoreceptor cells consume the largest amount of oxygen and generate the highest levels of oxidative damage. The accumulation of such damage throughout life is a major factor of aging tissues. Several multiprotein complexes have recently been identified as the major sensors and mediators involved in the maintenance of DNA integrity. The activity of these complexes initially seemed to be restricted to dividing cells, given their ultimate role in major cell cycle checkpoints. However, it was later established that they are also active in post-mitotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate that the DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for the development, maintenance, and normal functioning of the adult central nervous system. One major molecular factor in the DDR is the protein, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). It is required for the rapid induction of cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks. These cytotoxic DNA lesions may be caused by oxidative damage. To understand how ATM prevents oxidative stress and participates in the maintenance of genomic integrity and cell viability of the adult retina, we determined the ATM expression patterns and studied its localization in the adult mouse eye. Methods Atm gene expression was analyzed by RT–PCR experiments and its localization by in situ hybridization on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. ATM protein expression was determined by western blot analysis of proteins homogenates extracted from several mouse tissues and its localization by immunohistochemistry experiments performed on adult mouse ocular and cerebellar tissue sections. In addition, subcellular localization was realized by confocal microscopy imaging of ocular tissue

  14. A Comprehensive Atlas of the Adult Mouse Penis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tiffany R; Wright, David K; Gradie, Paul E; Johnston, Leigh A; Pask, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Mice are routinely used to study the development of the external genitalia and, in particular, the process of male urethral closure. This is because misplacement of the male penile urethra, or hypospadias, is amongst the most common birth defects reported in humans. While mice present a tractable model to study penile development, several structures differ between mice and humans, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on their annotation and developmental origins. Defining the ontology of the mouse prepuce is especially important for the relevance and interpretation of mouse models of hypospadias to human conditions. We have developed a detailed annotation of the adult mouse penis that addresses these differences and enables an accurate comparison of murine and human hypospadias phenotypes. Through MRI data, gross morphology and section histology, we define the origin of the mouse external and internal prepuces, their relationship to the single human foreskin as well as provide a comprehensive view of the various structures of the mouse penis and their associated muscle attachments within the body. These data are combined to annotate structures in a novel 3D adult penis atlas that can be downloaded, viewed at any angle, and manipulated to examine the relationship of various structures.

  15. A Comprehensive Atlas of the Adult Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tiffany R.; Wright, David K.; Gradie, Paul E.; Johnston, Leigh A.; Pask, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Mice are routinely used to study the development of the external genitalia and, in particular, the process of male urethral closure. This is because misplacement of the male penile urethra, or hypospadias, is amongst the most common birth defects reported in humans. While mice present a tractable model to study penile development, several structures differ between mice and humans, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on their annotation and developmental origins. Defining the ontology of the mouse prepuce is especially important for the relevance and interpretation of mouse models of hypospadias to human conditions. We have developed a detailed annotation of the adult mouse penis that addresses these differences and enables an accurate comparison of murine and human hypospadias phenotypes. Through MRI data, gross morphology and section histology, we define the origin of the mouse external and internal prepuces, their relationship to the single human foreskin as well as provide a comprehensive view of the various structures of the mouse penis and their associated muscle attachments within the body. These data are combined to annotate structures in a novel 3D adult penis atlas that can be downloaded, viewed at any angle, and manipulated to examine the relationship of various structures. PMID:26112156

  16. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V; Yoon, Jin H; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-12-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages.

  17. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V.; Yoon, Jin H.; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages. PMID:25502280

  18. Mutant and wild-type alpha-synuclein interact with mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Elkon, Hanock; Don, Jermy; Melamed, Eldad; Ziv, Ilan; Shirvan, Anat; Offen, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, was found to be the major component in the Lewy bodies (LB) in both inherited and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, rare mutations of alpha-synuclein cause autosomal-dominant PD. However, it is unknown how alpha-synuclein is involved in the pathogenesis of nigral degeneration in PD. In this study, we examine the protein-protein interactions of wild-type and mutant (A53T) a-synuclein with adult human brain cDNA expression library using the yeast two-hybrid technique. We found that both normal and mutant alpha-synuclein specifically interact with the mitochondrial complex IV enzyme, cytochrome C oxidase (COX). Wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein genes were further fused with c-Myc tag and translated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Using anti-c-Myc antibody, we demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein, coimmunoprecipitated with COX. We also showed that potassium cyanide, a selective COX inhibitor, synergistically enhanced the sensitivity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to dopamine-induced cell death. In conclusion, we found specific protein-protein interactions of alpha-synuclein, a major LB protein, to COX, a key enzyme of the mithochondrial respiratory system. This interaction suggests that alpha-synuclein aggregation may contribute to enhance the mitochondrial dysfunction, which might be a key factor in the pathogenesis of PD.

  19. Tropomodulin 1 directly controls thin filament length in both wild-type and tropomodulin 4-deficient skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Ochala, Julien; Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2015-01-01

    The sarcomeric tropomodulin (Tmod) isoforms Tmod1 and Tmod4 cap thin filament pointed ends and functionally interact with the leiomodin (Lmod) isoforms Lmod2 and Lmod3 to control myofibril organization, thin filament lengths, and actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that Tmod4 is more abundant than Tmod1 at both the transcript and protein level in a variety of muscle types, but the relative abundances of sarcomeric Tmods are muscle specific. We then generate Tmod4−/− mice, which exhibit normal thin filament lengths, myofibril organization, and skeletal muscle contractile function owing to compensatory upregulation of Tmod1, together with an Lmod isoform switch wherein Lmod3 is downregulated and Lmod2 is upregulated. However, RNAi depletion of Tmod1 from either wild-type or Tmod4−/− muscle fibers leads to thin filament elongation by ∼15%. Thus, Tmod1 per se, rather than total sarcomeric Tmod levels, controls thin filament lengths in mouse skeletal muscle, whereas Tmod4 appears to be dispensable for thin filament length regulation. These findings identify Tmod1 as the key direct regulator of thin filament length in skeletal muscle, in both adult muscle homeostasis and in developmentally compensated contexts. PMID:26586224

  20. Craniofacial statistical deformation models of wild-type mice and Crouzon mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron A.; Ersbøll, Bjarne K.; Hermann, Nuno V.; Oubel, Estanislao; Larsen, Rasmus; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Larsen, Per; Perlyn, Chad A.; Morriss-Kay, Gillian M.; Kreiborg, Sven

    2007-03-01

    Crouzon syndrome is characterised by premature fusion of cranial sutures and synchondroses leading to craniofacial growth disturbances. The gene causing the syndrome was discovered approximately a decade ago and recently the first mouse model of the syndrome was generated. In this study, a set of Micro CT scans of the heads of wild-type (normal) mice and Crouzon mice were investigated. Statistical deformation models were built to assess the anatomical differences between the groups, as well as the within-group anatomical variation. Following the approach by Rueckert et al. we built an atlas using B-spline-based nonrigid registration and subsequently, the atlas was nonrigidly registered to the cases being modelled. The parameters of these registrations were then used as input to a PCA. Using different sets of registration parameters, different models were constructed to describe (i) the difference between the two groups in anatomical variation and (ii) the within-group variation. These models confirmed many known traits in the wild-type and Crouzon mouse craniofacial anatomy. However, they also showed some new traits.

  1. Differential proteomic responses of selectively bred and wild-type Sydney rock oyster populations exposed to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E L; O'Connor, W; Parker, L; Ross, P; Raftos, D A

    2015-03-01

    Previous work suggests that larvae from Sydney rock oysters that have been selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are more resilient to the impacts of ocean acidification than nonselected, wild-type oysters. In this study, we used proteomics to investigate the molecular differences between oyster populations in adult Sydney rock oysters and to identify whether these form the basis for observations seen in larvae. Adult oysters from a selective breeding line (B2) and nonselected wild types (WT) were exposed for 4 weeks to elevated pCO2 (856 μatm) before their proteomes were compared to those of oysters held under ambient conditions (375 μatm pCO2 ). Exposure to elevated pCO2 resulted in substantial changes in the proteomes of oysters from both the selectively bred and wild-type populations. When biological functions were assigned, these differential proteins fell into five broad, potentially interrelated categories of subcellular functions, in both oyster populations. These functional categories were energy production, cellular stress responses, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and cell signalling. In the wild-type population, proteins were predominantly upregulated. However, unexpectedly, these cellular systems were downregulated in the selectively bred oyster population, indicating cellular dysfunction. We argue that this reflects a trade-off, whereby an adaptive capacity for enhanced mitochondrial energy production in the selectively bred population may help to protect larvae from the effects of elevated CO2 , whilst being deleterious to adult oysters.

  2. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  3. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Matthew A; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J; Reilly, John F; Young, Warren G; Bloom, Floyd E; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-07-19

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional "imprint" consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior-posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org).

  4. Dissection of complex adult traits in a mouse synthetic population.

    PubMed

    Burke, David T; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Chen, Shu; West, Joshua L; Wilkowski, Jodi M; Goldstein, Steven A; Miller, Richard A; Galecki, Andrzej T

    2012-08-01

    Finding the causative genetic variations that underlie complex adult traits is a significant experimental challenge. The unbiased search strategy of genome-wide association (GWAS) has been used extensively in recent human population studies. These efforts, however, typically find only a minor fraction of the genetic loci that are predicted to affect variation. As an experimental model for the analysis of adult polygenic traits, we measured a mouse population for multiple phenotypes and conducted a genome-wide search for effector loci. Complex adult phenotypes, related to body size and bone structure, were measured as component phenotypes, and each subphenotype was associated with a genomic spectrum of candidate effector loci. The strategy successfully detected several loci for the phenotypes, at genome-wide significance, using a single, modest-sized population (N = 505). The effector loci each explain 2%-10% of the measured trait variation and, taken together, the loci can account for over 25% of a trait's total population variation. A replicate population (N = 378) was used to confirm initially observed loci for one trait (femur length), and, when the two groups were merged, the combined population demonstrated increased power to detect loci. In contrast to human population studies, our mouse genome-wide searches find loci that individually explain a larger fraction of the observed variation. Also, the additive effects of our detected mouse loci more closely match the predicted genetic component of variation. The genetic loci discovered are logical candidates for components of the genetic networks having evolutionary conservation with human biology. PMID:22588897

  5. Glucocorticoid-regulated glycoprotein maturation in wild-type and mutant rat cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones can regulate the posttranslational maturation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) precursor polyproteins in M1.54, a stably infected rat hepatoma cell line. We have used complement- mediated cytolysis to recover variants of M1.54 that fail to express MTV cell surface glycoproteins in a hormone-regulated manner (Firestone, G.L., and K.R. Yamamoto, 1983, Mol. Cell. Biol., 3:149- 160). One such clonal isolate, CR4, is similar to wild-type with respect to synthesis of MTV mRNAs, production of the MTV glycoprotein precursor (gPr74env) and a glycosylated maturation product (gp51), and hormone-induced processing of two MTV phosphoproteins. In contrast, three viral cell surface glycoproteins (gp78, gp70, and gp32) and one extracellular species (gp70s), which derive from gPr74env in glucocorticoid-treated wild-type cells, fail to appear in CR4. CR4 showed no apparent alterations in proliferation rate, cell shape, or expression of total functional mRNA and bulk glycoproteins. We conclude that the genetic lesion in CR4 defines a highly selective hormone- regulated glycoprotein maturation pathway that alters the fate of a restricted subset of precursor species. PMID:3023398

  6. Combined effect of temperature and zinc on Caenorhabditis elegans wild type and daf-21 mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbiao; Ezemaduka, Anastasia N

    2014-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems is a far reaching environmental problem. The possible influences of heavy metal exposure and the potential harm to organisms when combined with other environmental stressors such as temperature have been largely unexplored. An aquatic toxicity test of Caenorhabditis elegans was performed to estimate the 24h median lethal concentration (LC50) of different zinc concentrations at different temperatures (15°C, 20°C, 25°C, and 30°C). We also examined the time course thermotolerance on wild type (N2) and daf-21 null (JT6130) adults exposed to 6.1mM zinc at 37°C. Hsp90 protein expression level in response to the combined effect of temperature and zinc toxicity was also investigated by both Western blots and ELISA. Our results show that C. elegans wild type nematodes exhibit severe lethal toxicity after a 24h exposure to zinc at higher temperatures. In addition, the expression level of Hsp90 was highly inhibited in adult worms subjected to zinc stress. This toxicity assay at different temperatures provides insight into organism response to combined effects of temperature and zinc toxicity. PMID:24679967

  7. Production of Cystatin C Wild Type and Stabilized Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Szymanska, Aneta; Lindstrom, Veronica; Grubb, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cystatin C is produced in all nucleated cells. It has various functions and biological activities. Researchers are focused on its role in kidney diseases as a marker of glomerular filtration but also as a very important link in development of amyloid diseases. This work describes expression and purification of both wild type (wt) and stabilized form (stab 1 and 2) of wt cystatin C and amyloid-forming L68Q mutant of cystatin C. The recombinant cystatin C can be used in projects requiring pure cystatin C to examine models of dimerization and fibrils formation as well as a standard in clinical tests.

  8. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Carol F.; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. PMID:26111446

  9. "Wild type" GIST: Clinicopathological features and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wada, Ryuichi; Arai, Hiroki; Kure, Shoko; Peng, Wei-Xia; Naito, Zenya

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. Mutation of KIT and PDGFRA genes is implicated in the tumorigenesis. Approximately 10% of GISTs do not harbor mutation of these genes, and they are designated as "wild type" GIST. They are classified into succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient and non-SDH-deficient groups. SDH-deficient group includes Carney triad and Carney Stratakis syndrome. The patients are young women. Tumors occur in the antrum of the stomach, and tumor cells are epithelioid. Lymph node metastasis is frequent. The non-SDH-deficient group includes neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 and GISTs with mutations of BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA and with the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. GIST in NF occurs in the small intestine, and tumor cells are spindle shaped. GIST with BRAF mutation arises in the small intestine. Attention to the age, gender, family history and other neoplasms may raise the prediction of syndromic disease. Location of the tumor, morphology, and pleomorphism of the tumor cells are further informative. Lymphovascular invasion should be carefully evaluated. The determination of KIT expression is essential for the diagnosis. When wild type GIST is suspected, intensive genetic analysis is required. Further, a careful and long-time observation is recommended. PMID:27427238

  10. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Carol F.; Ratliff, Michelle L.; Powell, Rebecca; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-08-07

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. - Highlights: • An ARID3a-deficient mouse kidney cell line expresses multiple progenitor markers. • This cell line spontaneously forms multiple nephron-like structures in vitro. • This cell line formed mouse kidney structures in immunocompromised medaka fish kidneys. • Our data identify a novel model system for studying kidney development.

  11. Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Wild-Type and Oncolytic Adenovirus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cascalló, Manel; Chillón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contamination of adenovirus (Ad) stocks with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) is usually unnoticed, and it has been associated with lower Ad yields upon large-scale production. During Ad propagation, AAV contamination needs to be detected routinely by polymerase chain reaction without symptomatic suspicion. In this study, we describe that the coinfection of either Ad wild type 5 or oncolytic Ad with AAV results in a large-plaque phenotype associated with an accelerated release of Ad from coinfected cells. This accelerated release was accompanied with the expected decrease in Ad yields in two out of three cell lines tested. Despite this lower Ad yield, coinfection with AAV accelerated cell death and enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by Ad propagation. Intratumoral coinjection of Ad and AAV in two xenograft tumor models improved antitumor activity and mouse survival. Therefore, we conclude that accidental or intentional AAV coinfection has important implications for Ad-mediated virotherapy. PMID:24020980

  12. Tissue tropism of recombinant coxsackieviruses in an adult mouse model.

    PubMed

    Harvala, Heli; Kalimo, Hannu; Bergelson, Jeffrey; Stanway, Glyn; Hyypiä, Timo

    2005-07-01

    Recombinant viruses, constructed by exchanging the 5' non-coding region (5'NCR), structural and non-structural protein coding sequences were used to investigate determinants responsible for differences between coxsackievirus A9 (CAV9) and coxsackievirus B3 (CBV3) infections in adult mice and two cell lines. Plaque assay titration of recombinant and parental viruses from different tissues from adult BALB/c mice demonstrated that the structural region of CBV3 determined tropism to the liver tissue due to receptor recognition, and the 5'NCR of CBV3 enhanced viral multiplication in the mouse pancreas. Infection with a chimeric virus, containing the structural region from CBV3 and the rest of the genome from CAV9, and the parental CBV3 strain, caused high levels of viraemia in adult mice. The ability of these viruses to infect the central nervous system suggested that neurotropism is associated with high replication levels and the presence of the CBV3 capsid proteins, which also enhanced formation of neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, the appearance of neutralizing antibodies correlated directly with the clearance of the viruses from the tissues. These results demonstrate potential pathogenicity of intraspecies recombinant coxsackieviruses, and the complexity of the genetic determinants underlying tissue tropism.

  13. RUNX1B Expression Is Highly Heterogeneous and Distinguishes Megakaryocytic and Erythroid Lineage Fate in Adult Mouse Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Julia E.; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Tsoulaki, Olga; Leong, Hui Sun; Fadlullah, Muhammad Z. H.; Miller, Crispin; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    The Core Binding Factor (CBF) protein RUNX1 is a master regulator of definitive hematopoiesis, crucial for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) emergence during ontogeny. RUNX1 also plays vital roles in adult mice, in regulating the correct specification of numerous blood lineages. Akin to the other mammalian Runx genes, Runx1 has two promoters P1 (distal) and P2 (proximal) which generate distinct protein isoforms. The activities and specific relevance of these two promoters in adult hematopoiesis remain to be fully elucidated. Utilizing a dual reporter mouse model we demonstrate that the distal P1 promoter is broadly active in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) populations. By contrast the activity of the proximal P2 promoter is more restricted and its upregulation, in both the immature Lineage- Sca1high cKithigh (LSK) and bipotential Pre-Megakaryocytic/Erythroid Progenitor (PreMegE) populations, coincides with a loss of erythroid (Ery) specification. Accordingly the PreMegE population can be prospectively separated into “pro-erythroid” and “pro-megakaryocyte” populations based on Runx1 P2 activity. Comparative gene expression analyses between Runx1 P2+ and P2- populations indicated that levels of CD34 expression could substitute for P2 activity to distinguish these two cell populations in wild type (WT) bone marrow (BM). Prospective isolation of these two populations will enable the further investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in megakaryocytic/erythroid (Mk/Ery) cell fate decisions. Having characterized the extensive activity of P1, we utilized a P1-GFP homozygous mouse model to analyze the impact of the complete absence of Runx1 P1 expression in adult mice and observed strong defects in the T cell lineage. Finally, we investigated how the leukemic fusion protein AML1-ETO9a might influence Runx1 promoter usage. Short-term AML1-ETO9a induction in BM resulted in preferential P2 upregulation, suggesting its expression may be important to

  14. Functional properties of K+ currents in adult mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brouillette, Judith; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Fiset, Céline

    2004-01-01

    Although the K+ currents expressed in hearts of adult mice have been studied extensively, detailed information concerning their relative sizes and biophysical properties in ventricle and atrium is lacking. Here we describe and validate pharmacological and biophysical methods that can be used to isolate the three main time- and voltage-dependent outward K+ currents which modulate action potential repolarization. A Ca2+-independent transient outward K+ current, Ito, can be separated from total outward current using an ‘inactivating prepulse’. The rapidly activating, slowly inactivating delayed rectifier K+ current, IKur, can be isolated using submillimolar concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The remaining K+ current, Iss, can be obtained by combining these two procedures: (i) inactivating Ito and (ii) eliminating IKur by application of low concentration of 4-AP. Iss activates relatively slowly and shows very little inactivation, even during depolarizations lasting several seconds. Our findings also show that the rate of reactivation of Ito is more than 20-fold faster than that of IKur. These results demonstrate that the outward K+ currents in mouse ventricles can be separated based on their distinct time and voltage dependence, and different sensitivities to 4-AP. Data obtained at both 22 and 32°C demonstrate that although the duration of the inactivating prepulse has to be adapted for the recording temperature, this approach for separation of K+ current components is also valid at more physiological temperatures. To demonstrate that these methods also allow separation of these K+ currents in other cell types, we have applied this same approach to myocytes from mouse atria. Molecular approaches have been used to compare the expression levels of different K+ channels in mouse atrium and ventricle. These findings provide new insights into the functional roles of IKur, Ito and Iss during action potential repolarization. PMID:15272047

  15. An anatomic gene expression atlas of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lydia; Bernard, Amy; Lau, Chris; Overly, Caroline C; Dong, Hong-Wei; Kuan, Chihchau; Pathak, Sayan; Sunkin, Susan M; Dang, Chinh; Bohland, Jason W; Bokil, Hemant; Mitra, Partha P; Puelles, Luis; Hohmann, John; Anderson, David J; Lein, Ed S; Jones, Allan R; Hawrylycz, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Studying gene expression provides a powerful means of understanding structure-function relationships in the nervous system. The availability of genome-scale in situ hybridization datasets enables new possibilities for understanding brain organization based on gene expression patterns. The Anatomic Gene Expression Atlas (AGEA) is a new relational atlas revealing the genetic architecture of the adult C57Bl/6J mouse brain based on spatial correlations across expression data for thousands of genes in the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA). The AGEA includes three discovery tools for examining neuroanatomical relationships and boundaries: (1) three-dimensional expression-based correlation maps, (2) a hierarchical transcriptome-based parcellation of the brain and (3) a facility to retrieve from the ABA specific genes showing enriched expression in local correlated domains. The utility of this atlas is illustrated by analysis of genetic organization in the thalamus, striatum and cerebral cortex. The AGEA is a publicly accessible online computational tool integrated with the ABA (http://mouse.brain-map.org/agea). PMID:19219037

  16. High Pathogenicity of Wild-Type Measles Virus Infection in CD150 (SLAM) Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sellin, Caroline I.; Davoust, Nathalie; Guillaume, Vanessa; Baas, Dominique; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2006-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease, associated in certain cases with infection of the central nervous system and development of a severe neurological disease. We have generated transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the human protein SLAM (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule), or CD150, recently identified as an MV receptor. In contrast to all other MV receptor transgenic models described so far, in these mice infection with wild-type MV strains is highly pathogenic. Intranasal infection of SLAM transgenic suckling mice leads to MV spread to different organs and the development of an acute neurological syndrome, characterized by lethargy, seizures, ataxia, weight loss, and death within 3 weeks. In addition, in this model, vaccine and wild-type MV strains can be distinguished by virulence. Furthermore, intracranial MV infection of adult transgenic mice generates a subclinical infection associated with a high titer of MV-specific antibodies in the serum. Finally, to analyze new antimeasles therapeutic approaches, we created a recombinant soluble form of SLAM and demonstrated its important antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results show the high susceptibility of SLAM transgenic mice to MV-induced neurological disease and open new perspectives for the analysis of the implication of SLAM in the neuropathogenicity of other morbilliviruses, which also use this molecule as a receptor. Moreover, this transgenic model, in allowing a simple readout of the efficacy of an antiviral treatment, provides unique experimental means to test novel anti-MV preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:16775330

  17. Immunochemical detection of arylamine N-acetyltransferase during mouse embryonic development and in adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Stanley, L A; Copp, A J; Pope, J; Rolls, S; Smelt, V; Perry, V H; Sim, E

    1998-11-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are important in susceptibility to xenobiotic-induced disorders (e.g., drug-induced autoimmune disease, bladder cancer), but their role in endogenous metabolism is yet to be elucidated. The discovery that human NAT1 acts upon p-aminobenzoylgluatamate (p-ABG) to generate p-acetamidobenzoylglutamate (p-AABG), a major urinary metabolite of folic acid, suggests that human NAT1 may play a role in folic acid metabolism and hence in the normal development of the neural tube. In this study we examined the distribution of NAT in neuronal tissue from adult mice and embryos. Immunohistochemical staining of the adult mouse cerebellum revealed NAT2 (the mouse homologue of human NAT1) expression in the cell bodies and dendrites of Purkinje cells and in the neuroglia of the molecular layer. In embryos, NAT2 was detected in developing neuronal tissue on days 9.5, 11.5, and 13.5. It was expressed intensely in the nerual tube around the time of closure. The level of expression subsequently declined in the neuroepithelium but increased in glial cells. In addition, NAT2 was detected in the developing heart and gut. These findings demonstrate that the embryo itself expresses an enzyme which is involved in the metabolism of folic acid, so that the role played by both mother and embryo must be considered when examining the role of folic acid in embryonic development. These findings imply that polymorphisms in NAT genes could play a role in determining susceptibility to neural tube defects (NTD) and orofacial clefting, developmental disorders which can be prevented by dietary administration of folic acid. PMID:9839355

  18. Structure and age-dependent development of the turkey liver: a comparative study of a highly selected meat-type and a wild-type turkey line.

    PubMed

    Hünigen, Hana; Mainzer, Kathleen; Hirschberg, Ruth M; Custodis, Pia; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Al Masri, Salah; Richardson, Kenneth C; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Plendl, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    In this study the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the liver of a fast growing, meat-type turkey line (British United turkeys BUT Big 6, n=25) and a wild-type turkey line (Wild Canadian turkey, n=48) were compared at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 wk. Because the growth plates of long bones were still detectable in the 20-week-old wild-type turkeys, indicating immaturity, a group of 8 wild-type turkeys at the age of 24 wk was included in the original scope of the study. Over the term of the study, the body and liver weights of birds from the meat-type turkey line increased at a faster rate than those of the wild-type turkey line. However, the relative liver weight of the meat-type turkeys declined (from 2.7 to 0.9%) to a greater extent than that of the wild-type turkeys (from 2.8 to 1.9%), suggesting a mismatch in development between muscle weights and liver weights of the meat-type turkeys. Signs of high levels of fat storage in the liver were detected in both lines but were greater in the wild-type turkey line, suggesting a better feed conversion by the extreme-genotype birds i.e., meat-type birds. For the first time, this study presents morphologic data on the structure and arrangement of the lymphatic tissue within the healthy turkey liver, describing two different types of lymphatic aggregations within the liver parenchyma, i.e., aggregations with and without fibrous capsules. Despite differences during development, both adult meat-type and adult wild-type turkeys had similar numbers of lymphatic aggregations.

  19. Purinergic signaling promotes proliferation of adult mouse subventricular zone cells.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Satoshi; Sunabori, Takehiko; Kanki, Hiroaki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2012-07-01

    In adult mammalian brains, neural stem cells (NSCs) exist in the subventricular zone (SVZ), where persistent neurogenesis continues throughout life. Those NSCs produce neuroblasts that migrate into the olfactory bulb via formation of transit-amplifying cells, which are committed precursor cells of the neuronal lineage. In this SVZ niche, cell-cell communications conducted by diffusible factors as well as physical cell-cell contacts are important for the regulation of the proliferation and fate determination of NSCs. Previous studies have suggested that extracellular purinergic signaling, which is mediated by purine compounds such as ATP, plays important roles in cell-cell communication in the CNS. Purinergic signaling also promotes the proliferation of adult NSCs in vitro. However, the in vivo roles of purinergic signaling in the neurogenic niche still remain unknown. In this study, ATP infusion into the lateral ventricle of the mouse brain resulted in an increase in the numbers of rapidly dividing cells and Mash1-positive transit-amplifying cells (Type C cells) in the SVZ. Mash1-positive cells express the P2Y1 purinergic signaling receptor and infusion of the P2Y1 receptor-specific antagonist MRS2179 decreased the number of rapidly dividing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells and Type C cells. Moreover, a 17% reduction of rapidly dividing BrdU-positive cells and a 19% reduction of Mash1-positive cells were observed in P2Y1 knock-out mice. Together, these results suggest that purinergic signaling promotes the proliferation of rapidly dividing cells and transit-amplifying cells, in the SVZ niche through the P2Y1 receptor. PMID:22764232

  20. Crystal structure of wild-type human procathepsin K.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, J.; Lalumière, M.; Ménard, R.; Cygler, M.

    1999-01-01

    Cathepsin K is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. It has been implicated as a major mediator of osteoclastic bone resorption. Wild-type human procathepsin K has been crystallized in a glycosylated and a deglycosylated form. The latter crystals diffract better, to 3.2 A resolution, and contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and refined to an R-factor of 0.194. The N-terminal fragment of the proregion forms a globular domain while the C-terminal segment is extended and shows substantial flexibility. The proregion interacts with the enzyme along the substrate binding groove and along the proregion binding loop (residues Ser138-Asn156). It binds to the active site in the opposite direction to that of natural substrates. The overall binding mode of the proregion to cathepsin K is similar to that observed in cathepsin L, caricain, and cathepsin B, but there are local differences that likely contribute to the specificity of these proregions for their cognate enzymes. The main observed difference is in the position of the short helix alpha3p (67p-75p), which occupies the S' subsites. As in the other proenzymes, the proregion utilizes the S2 subsite for anchoring by placing a leucine side chain there, according to the specificity of cathepsin K toward its substrate. PMID:10048321

  1. Biosafety of recombinant and wild type nucleopolyhedroviruses as bioinsecticides.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Mohamed-Bassem; Ragheb, Didair A; El-Sheikh, El-Sayed A; Gomaa, El-Adarosy A; Kamita, Shizuo G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-06-01

    The entomopathogenic Autographa californica (Speyer) nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been genetically modified to increase its speed of kill. The potential adverse effects of a recombinant AcMNPV (AcAaIT) as well as wild type AcMNPV and wild type Spodoptera littoralis NPV (SlNPV) were studied. Cotton plants were treated with these viruses at concentrations that were adjusted to resemble the recommended field application rate (4 x 10(12) PIBs/feddan, feddan = 4,200 m2) and 3rd instar larvae of S. littoralis were allowed to feed on the contaminated plants. SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and DNA analyses were used to confirm that larvae that fed on these plants were virus-infected. Polyhedra that were purified from the infected larvae were subjected to structural protein analysis. A 32 KDa protein was found in polyhedra that were isolated from all of the viruses. Subtle differences were found in the size and abundance of ODV proteins. Antisera against polyhedral proteins isolated from AcAaIT polyhedra were raised in rabbits. The terminal bleeds from rabbits were screened against four coating antigens (i.e., polyhedral proteins from AcAaIT, AcAaIT from field-infected larvae (AcAaIT-field), AcMNPV, and SlNPV) using a two-dimensional titration method with the coated antigen format. Competitive inhibition experiments were conducted in parallel to optimize antibody and coating antigen concentrations for ELISA. The IC50 values for each combination ranged from 1.42 to 163 microg/ml. AcAaIT-derived polyhedrin gave the lowest IC50 value, followed by those of SlNPV, AcAaIT-field, and AcMNPV. The optimized ELISA system showed low cross reactivity for AcMNPV (0.87%), AcAaIT-field (1.2%), and SlNPV (4.0%). Genomic DNAs isolated from AcAaIT that were passaged in larvae of S. littoralis that were reared in the laboratory or field did not show any detectable differences. Albino rats (male and female) that were treated with AcAaIT, AcMNPV or SlNPV (either orally or by intraperitoneal injection at

  2. Aggression and aspects of impulsivity in wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Caroline M; de Boer, Sietse F; Buwalda, Bauke; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2014-01-01

    Aggression is closely related to impulsive behavior both in humans and in animals. To avoid potential negative consequences, aggressive behavior is kept in control by strong inhibitory mechanisms. Failure of these inhibitory mechanisms results in violent behavior. In the present experiments, we investigated whether aggressive behavior is related to impulsive behavior. Furthermore, we investigated if violent behavior can be distinguished from "normal" aggressive behavior in terms of impulsivity levels. We used rats of the wild-type Groningen strain, rats of this strain differ widely in their level of offensive aggression expressed toward an unfamiliar intruder male, ranging from no aggression at all to very high levels of intense and sometimes violent behavior. Violent behavior was displayed by some of the animals that were given repeated winning experience. We used behavioral performance in an unpredictable operant conditioning paradigm for food reinforcement (variable interval 15) and performance in a differential-reinforcement of low rate (DRL-60s) responding as determinants for impulsivity. We predicted that offensive aggression is correlated with behavioral flexibility measured by the VI-15 procedure and that aggressive behavior is characterized by low behavioral inhibition on the DRL task. In addition we expected that violent animals would be characterized by extremely low levels of behavioral inhibition on the DRL task. We showed that the level of offensive aggression indeed positively correlated with VI-15 performance. In addition, we showed that behavioral performance on the DRL procedure is similar in low and high aggressive rats. However, violent animals can be dissociated by a lower efficiency of lever pressing on a DRL-60s schedule of reinforcement.

  3. Wild-Type Measles Virus with the Hemagglutinin Protein of the Edmonston Vaccine Strain Retains Wild-Type Tropism in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyo; Kato, Sei-ich; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Mori, Kazuyasu; Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Kimura, Hideki; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    A major difference between vaccine and wild-type strains of measles virus (MV) in vitro is the wider cell specificity of vaccine strains, resulting from the receptor usage of the hemagglutinin (H) protein. Wild-type H proteins recognize the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) (CD150), which is expressed on certain cells of the immune system, whereas vaccine H proteins recognize CD46, which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated human and monkey cells, in addition to SLAM. To examine the effect of the H protein on the tropism and attenuation of MV, we generated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing recombinant wild-type MV strains bearing the Edmonston vaccine H protein (MV-EdH) and compared them to EGFP-expressing wild-type MV strains. In vitro, MV-EdH replicated in SLAM+ as well as CD46+ cells, including primary cell cultures from cynomolgus monkey tissues, whereas the wild-type MV replicated only in SLAM+ cells. However, in macaques, both wild-type MV and MV-EdH strains infected lymphoid and respiratory organs, and widespread infection of MV-EdH was not observed. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that SLAM+ lymphocyte cells were infected preferentially with both strains. Interestingly, EGFP expression of MV-EdH in tissues and lymphocytes was significantly weaker than that of the wild-type MV. Taken together, these results indicate that the CD46-binding activity of the vaccine H protein is important for determining the cell specificity of MV in vitro but not the tropism in vivo. They also suggest that the vaccine H protein attenuates MV growth in vivo. PMID:22238320

  4. Visualization of Melanosome Dynamics within Wild-Type and Dilute Melanocytes Suggests a Paradigm for Myosin V Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xufeng; Bowers, Blair; Rao, Kang; Wei, Qin; Hammer, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Unlike wild-type mouse melanocytes, where melanosomes are concentrated in dendrites and dendritic tips, melanosomes in dilute (myosin Va−) melanocytes are concentrated in the cell center. Here we sought to define the role that myosin Va plays in melanosome transport and distribution. Actin filaments that comprise a cortical shell running the length of the dendrite were found to exhibit a random orientation, suggesting that myosin Va could drive the outward spreading of melanosomes by catalyzing random walks. In contrast to this mechanism, time lapse video microscopy revealed that melanosomes undergo rapid (∼1.5 μm/s) microtubule-dependent movements to the periphery and back again. This bidirectional traffic occurs in both wild-type and dilute melanocytes, but it is more obvious in dilute melanocytes because the only melanosomes in their periphery are those undergoing this movement. While providing an efficient means to transport melanosomes to the periphery, this component does not by itself result in their net accumulation there. These observations, together with previous studies showing extensive colocalization of myosin Va and melanosomes in the actin-rich periphery, suggest a mechanism in which a myosin Va–dependent interaction of melanosomes with F-actin in the periphery prevents these organelles from returning on microtubules to the cell center, causing their distal accumulation. This “capture” model is supported by the demonstration that (a) expression of the myosin Va tail domain within wild-type cells creates a dilute-like phenotype via a process involving initial colocalization of tail domains with melanosomes in the periphery, followed by an ∼120-min, microtubule-based redistribution of melanosomes to the cell center; (b) microtubule-dependent melanosome movement appears to be damped by myosin Va; (c) intermittent, microtubule-independent, ∼0.14 μm/s melanosome movements are seen only in wild-type melanocytes; and (d) these movements do

  5. Mitochondrially targeted wild-type p53 induces apoptosis in a solid human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Crawford, Howard C.; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic but also novel roles of p53 are becoming increasingly well characterized. We previously showed that ex vivo retroviral transfer of mitochondrially targeted wild type p53 (mitop53) in the Eμ-myc mouse lymphoma model efficiently induces tumor cell killing in vivo. In an effort to further explore the therapeutic potential of mitop53 for its pro-apoptotic effect in solid tumors, we generated replication-deficient recombinant human Adenovirus type 5 vectors. We show here that adenoviral delivery of mitop53 by intratumoral injection into HCT116 human colon carcinoma xenograft tumors in nude mice is surprisingly effective, resulting in tumor cell death of comparable potency to conventional p53. These apoptotic effects in vivo were confirmed by Ad5-mitop53 mediated cell death of HCT116 cells in culture. Together, these data provide encouragement to further explore the potential for novel mitop53 proteins in cancer therapy to execute the shortest known circuitry of p53 death signaling. PMID:18719383

  6. Wild-Type and Non-Wild-Type Mycobacterium tuberculosis MIC Distributions for the Novel Fluoroquinolone Antofloxacin Compared with Those for Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xia; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Wei, Guomei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Lingling; Schön, Thomas; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2016-01-01

    Antofloxacin (AFX) is a novel fluoroquinolone that has been approved in China for the treatment of infections caused by a variety of bacterial species. We investigated whether it could be repurposed for the treatment of tuberculosis by studying its in vitro activity. We determined the wild-type and non-wild-type MIC ranges for AFX as well as ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LFX), and moxifloxacin (MFX), using the microplate alamarBlue assay, of 126 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Beijing, China, of which 48 were OFX resistant on the basis of drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium. The MIC distributions were correlated with mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (Rv0006) and gyrB (Rv0005). Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data for AFX were retrieved from the literature. AFX showed lower MIC levels than OFX but higher MIC levels than LFX and MFX on the basis of the tentative epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) determined in this study. All strains with non-wild-type MICs for AFX harbored known resistance mutations that also resulted in non-wild-type MICs for LFX and MFX. Moreover, our data suggested that the current critical concentration of OFX for Löwenstein-Jensen medium that was recently revised by the World Health Organization might be too high, resulting in the misclassification of phenotypically non-wild-type strains with known resistance mutations as wild type. On the basis of our exploratory PK/PD calculations, the current dose of AFX is unlikely to be optimal for the treatment of tuberculosis, but higher doses could be effective. PMID:27324769

  7. Wild-Type and Non-Wild-Type Mycobacterium tuberculosis MIC Distributions for the Novel Fluoroquinolone Antofloxacin Compared with Those for Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Wei, Guomei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Lingling; Schön, Thomas; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J; Köser, Claudio U; Huang, Hairong

    2016-09-01

    Antofloxacin (AFX) is a novel fluoroquinolone that has been approved in China for the treatment of infections caused by a variety of bacterial species. We investigated whether it could be repurposed for the treatment of tuberculosis by studying its in vitro activity. We determined the wild-type and non-wild-type MIC ranges for AFX as well as ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LFX), and moxifloxacin (MFX), using the microplate alamarBlue assay, of 126 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Beijing, China, of which 48 were OFX resistant on the basis of drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium. The MIC distributions were correlated with mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (Rv0006) and gyrB (Rv0005). Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data for AFX were retrieved from the literature. AFX showed lower MIC levels than OFX but higher MIC levels than LFX and MFX on the basis of the tentative epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) determined in this study. All strains with non-wild-type MICs for AFX harbored known resistance mutations that also resulted in non-wild-type MICs for LFX and MFX. Moreover, our data suggested that the current critical concentration of OFX for Löwenstein-Jensen medium that was recently revised by the World Health Organization might be too high, resulting in the misclassification of phenotypically non-wild-type strains with known resistance mutations as wild type. On the basis of our exploratory PK/PD calculations, the current dose of AFX is unlikely to be optimal for the treatment of tuberculosis, but higher doses could be effective. PMID:27324769

  8. Estimation of the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration value distribution.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Stijn; Aerts, Marc; Verbeke, Geert; Beloeil, Pierre-Alexandre

    2014-01-30

    Antimicrobial resistance has become one of the main public health burdens of the last decades, and monitoring the development and spread of non-wild-type isolates has therefore gained increased interest. Monitoring is performed based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values, which are collected through the application of dilution experiments. In order to account for the unobserved population heterogeneity of wild-type and non-wild-type isolates, mixture models are extremely useful. Instead of estimating the entire mixture globally, it was our major aim to provide an estimate for the wild-type first component only. The characteristics of this first component are not expected to change over time, once the wild-type population has been confidently identified for a given antimicrobial. With this purpose, we developed a new method based on the multinomial distribution, and we carry out a simulation study to study the properties of the new estimator. Because the new approach fits within the likelihood framework, we can compare distinct distributional assumptions in order to determine the most suitable distribution for the wild-type population. We determine the optimal parameters based on the AIC criterion, and attention is also paid to the model-averaged approach using the Akaike weights. The latter is thought to be very suitable to derive specific characteristics of the wild-type distribution and to determine limits for the wild-type MIC range. In this way, the new method provides an elegant means to compare distinct distributional assumptions and to quantify the wild-type MIC distribution of specific antibiotic-bacterium combinations.

  9. Sox2 and Jagged1 Expression in Normal and Drug-Damaged Adult Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sean; Taylor, Ruth R.; Forge, Andrew; Hume, Clifford R.

    2007-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells detect environmental signals associated with hearing, balance, and body orientation. In humans and other mammals, significant hair cell loss leads to irreversible hearing and balance deficits, whereas hair cell loss in nonmammalian vertebrates is repaired by the spontaneous generation of replacement hair cells. Research in mammalian hair cell regeneration is hampered by the lack of in vivo damage models for the adult mouse inner ear and the paucity of cell-type-specific markers for non-sensory cells within the sensory receptor epithelia. The present study delineates a protocol to drug damage the adult mouse auditory epithelium (organ of Corti) in situ and uses this protocol to investigate Sox2 and Jagged1 expression in damaged inner ear sensory epithelia. In other tissues, the transcription factor Sox2 and a ligand member of the Notch signaling pathway, Jagged1, are involved in regenerative processes. Both are involved in early inner ear development and are expressed in developing support cells, but little is known about their expressions in the adult. We describe a nonsurgical technique for inducing hair cell damage in adult mouse organ of Corti by a single high-dose injection of the aminoglycoside kanamycin followed by a single injection of the loop diuretic furosemide. This drug combination causes the rapid death of outer hair cells throughout the cochlea. Using immunocytochemical techniques, Sox2 is shown to be expressed specifically in support cells in normal adult mouse inner ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 is absent from auditory hair cells, but is expressed in a subset of vestibular hair cells. Double-labeling experiments with Sox2 and calbindin suggest Sox2-positive hair cells are Type II. Jagged1 is also expressed in support cells in the adult ear and is not affected by drug damage. Sox2 and Jagged1 may be involved in the maintenance of support cells in adult mouse inner ear. PMID:18157569

  10. Cerebellar stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin; Guan, Wuqiang; Yu, Yong-Chun; Fu, Yinghui

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • No new neurons and astrocytes are generated in adult mouse cerebellum. • Very few mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells exist, and most of them are quiescent. • Cell proliferation rate is diversified among cerebellar regions and decreases over time. - Abstract: Although previous studies implied that cerebellar stem cells exist in some adult mammals, little is known about whether these stem cells can produce new neurons and astrocytes. In this study by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, we found that there are abundant BrdU{sup +} cells in adult mouse cerebellum, and their quantity and density decreases significantly over time. We also found cell proliferation rate is diversified in different cerebellar regions. Among these BrdU{sup +} cells, very few are mash1{sup +} or nestin{sup +} stem cells, and the vast majority of cerebellar stem cells are quiescent. Data obtained by in vivo retrovirus injection indicate that stem cells do not produce neurons and astrocytes in adult mouse cerebellum. Instead, some cells labeled by retrovirus are Iba1{sup +} microglia. These results indicate that very few stem cells exist in adult mouse cerebellum, and none of these stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and astrogenesis under physiological condition.

  11. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice.

  12. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice. PMID:26231800

  13. First Demonstration of Positive Allosteric-like Modulation at the Human Wild Type Translocator Protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Werry, Eryn L; Scarf, Alana M; Hanani, Raphy; Chua, Sook Wern; King, Victoria A; Barron, Melissa L; Martins, Ralph N; Ittner, Lars M; Rendina, Louis M; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-11-12

    We show that changing the number and position of nitrogen atoms in the heteroatomic core of a pyrazolopyrimidine acetamide is sufficient to induce complex binding to wild type human TSPO. Only compounds with this complex binding profile lacked intrinsic effect on glioblastoma proliferation but positively modulated the antiproliferative effects of a synthetic TSPO ligand. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of allosteric-like interaction at the wild type human TSPO.

  14. Co-fibrillogenesis of Wild-type and D76N β2-Microglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Natalello, Antonino; Mangione, P. Patrizia; Giorgetti, Sofia; Porcari, Riccardo; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Relini, Annalisa; Ami, Diletta; Faravelli, Giulia; Valli, Maurizia; Stoppini, Monica; Doglia, Silvia M.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Raimondi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic variant of β2-microglobulin, D76N, can readily convert into genuine fibrils under physiological conditions and primes in vitro the fibrillogenesis of the wild-type β2-microglobulin. By Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that the amyloid transformation of wild-type β2-microglobulin can be induced by the variant only after its complete fibrillar conversion. Our current findings are consistent with preliminary data in which we have shown a seeding effect of fibrils formed from D76N or the natural truncated form of β2-microglobulin lacking the first six N-terminal residues. Interestingly, the hybrid wild-type/variant fibrillar material acquired a thermodynamic stability similar to that of homogenous D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils and significantly higher than the wild-type homogeneous fibrils prepared at neutral pH in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol. These results suggest that the surface of D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils can favor the transition of the wild-type protein into an amyloid conformation leading to a rapid integration into fibrils. The chaperone crystallin, which is a mild modulator of the lag phase of the variant fibrillogenesis, potently inhibits fibril elongation of the wild-type even once it is absorbed on D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils. PMID:26921323

  15. Localization of PPAR isotypes in the adult mouse and human brain

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Anna; Truitt, Jay; Merriman, Morgan; Ponomareva, Olga; Jameson, Kelly; Ferguson, Laura B.; Mayfield, R. Dayne; Harris, R. Adron

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. PPAR agonists have well-documented anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective roles in the central nervous system. Recent evidence suggests that PPAR agonists are attractive therapeutic agents for treating neurodegenerative diseases as well as addiction. However, the distribution of PPAR mRNA and protein in brain regions associated with these conditions (i.e. prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, ventral tegmental area) is not well defined. Moreover, the cell type specificity of PPARs in mouse and human brain tissue has yet to be investigated. We utilized quantitative PCR and double immunofluorescence microscopy to determine that both PPAR mRNA and protein are expressed ubiquitously throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PPARs have unique cell type specificities that are consistent between species. PPARα was the only isotype to colocalize with all cell types in both adult mouse and adult human brain tissue. Overall, we observed a strong neuronal signature, which raises the possibility that PPAR agonists may be targeting neurons rather than glia to produce neuroprotection. Our results fill critical gaps in PPAR distribution and define novel cell type specificity profiles in the adult mouse and human brain. PMID:27283430

  16. Overexpression of the wild-type SPT1 subunit lowers desoxysphingolipid levels and rescues the phenotype of HSAN1.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian S; Hornemann, Thorsten; McCampbell, Alex; Kuljis, Dika; Penno, Anke; Vardeh, Daniel; Tamrazian, Eric; Garofalo, Kevin; Lee, Ho-Joon; Kini, Lohit; Selig, Martin; Frosch, Matthew; Gable, Ken; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Woolf, Clifford J; Guan, Guiman; Harmon, Jeffrey M; Dunn, Teresa M; Brown, Robert H

    2009-11-18

    Mutations in the SPTLC1 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) cause an adult-onset, hereditary sensory, and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN1). We previously reported that mice bearing a transgene-expressing mutant SPTLC1 (tgSPTLC1(C133W)) show a reduction in SPT activity and hyperpathia at 10 months of age. Now analyzed at a later age, we find these mice develop sensory loss with a distal small fiber neuropathy and peripheral myelinopathy. This phenotype is largely reversed when these mice are crossed with transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type SPTLC1 showing that the mutant SPTLC1 protein is not inherently toxic. Simple loss of SPT activity also cannot account for the HSAN1 phenotype, since heterozygous SPTLC1 knock-out mice have reduced SPT activity but are otherwise normal. Rather, the presence of two newly identified, potentially deleterious deoxysphingoid bases in the tgSPTLC1(C133W), but not in the wild-type, double-transgenic tgSPTLC1(WT + C133W) or SPTLC1(+/-) mice, suggests that the HSAN1 mutations alter amino acid selectivity of the SPT enzyme such that palmitate is condensed with alanine and glycine, in addition to serine. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that HSAN1 is the result of a gain-of-function mutation in SPTLC1 that leads to accumulation of a toxic metabolite. PMID:19923297

  17. Resistance and gain-of-resistance phenotypes in cancers harboring wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rivera, Michelle; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the bedrock for the clinical management of cancer, and the tumor suppressor p53 has a central role in this therapeutic modality. This protein facilitates favorable antitumor drug response through a variety of key cellular functions, including cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. These functions essentially cease once p53 becomes mutated, as occurs in ~50% of cancers, and some p53 mutants even exhibit gain-of-function effects, which lead to greater drug resistance. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that resistance is also seen in cancers harboring wild-type p53. In this review, we discuss how wild-type p53 is inactivated to render cells resistant to antitumor drugs. This may occur through various mechanisms, including an increase in proteasomal degradation, defects in post-translational modification, and downstream defects in p53 target genes. We also consider evidence that the resistance seen in wild-type p53 cancers can be substantially greater than that seen in mutant p53 cancers, and this poses a far greater challenge for efforts to design strategies that increase drug response in resistant cancers already primed with wild-type p53. Because the mechanisms contributing to this wild-type p53 “gain-of-resistance” phenotype are largely unknown, a concerted research effort is needed to identify the underlying basis for the occurrence of this phenotype and, in parallel, to explore the possibility that the phenotype may be a product of wild-type p53 gain-of-function effects. Such studies are essential to lay the foundation for a rational therapeutic approach in the treatment of resistant wild-type p53 cancers. PMID:22227014

  18. Protective responses in mice to vaccination with multiply administered cold-adapted influenza vaccine reassortants and wild-type viruses.

    PubMed

    Romanova, J R; Tannock, G A; Alexandrova, G I

    1997-01-01

    Protective responses to influenza vaccine reassortants derived from the cold-adapted (ca) donor strains A/Leningrad/134/17/57 and B/USSR/60/69 and wild-type epidemic viruses were studied in two strains of mice. Preliminary experiments revealed that, when mixtures of three viruses were inoculated intranasally to mice with 50 microliters containing 10(6) EID50 per 200 microliters (10(5.4) EID50 per mouse), interference between strains did not occur. However, interference with the growth of the influenza reassortant B/60/32/R took place if its concentration in the mixture was reduced to 10(5) (10(4.4) per mouse) or if it was inoculated at 10(6) EID50 (10(5.4) per mouse) in the presence of the influenza reassortant R/34 and two other influenza A epidemic strains; interference was unrelated to serological responses to infection with B/60/32/R. Despite evidence of interference, mice inoculated with the same mixtures in two identical doses, three weeks apart, were able to clear a challenge from each of seven homotypic and heterotypic influenza A and B strains. Heterotypic clearance of influenza A challenge viruses was greater following mixed infection, indicating that common determinants within the surface antigen glycoproteins contributed to immune responses which were broader than could be expected to be induced by parenteral vaccination.

  19. Characterizing Newly Repopulated Microglia in the Adult Mouse: Impacts on Animal Behavior, Cell Morphology, and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Monica R. P.; Lee, Rafael J.; West, Brian L.; Green, Kim N.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R)/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS) resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function similarly to the

  20. Characterizing newly repopulated microglia in the adult mouse: impacts on animal behavior, cell morphology, and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Monica R P; Lee, Rafael J; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are the primary immune cell in the brain and are postulated to play important roles outside of immunity. Administration of the dual colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R)/c-Kit kinase inhibitor, PLX3397, to adult mice results in the elimination of ~99% of microglia, which remain eliminated for as long as treatment continues. Upon removal of the inhibitor, microglia rapidly repopulate the entire adult brain, stemming from a central nervous system (CNS) resident progenitor cell. Using this method of microglial elimination and repopulation, the role of microglia in both healthy and diseased states can be explored. Here, we examine the responsiveness of newly repopulated microglia to an inflammatory stimulus, as well as determine the impact of these cells on behavior, cognition, and neuroinflammation. Two month-old wild-type mice were placed on either control or PLX3397 diet for 21 d to eliminate microglia. PLX3397 diet was then removed in a subset of animals to allow microglia to repopulate and behavioral testing conducted beginning at 14 d repopulation. Finally, inflammatory profiling of the microglia-repopulated brain in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.25 mg/kg) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was determined 21 d after inhibitor removal using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as detailed analyses of microglial morphologies. We find mice with repopulated microglia to perform similarly to controls by measures of behavior, cognition, and motor function. Compared to control/resident microglia, repopulated microglia had larger cell bodies and less complex branching in their processes, which resolved over time after inhibitor removal. Inflammatory profiling revealed that the mRNA gene expression of repopulated microglia was similar to normal resident microglia and that these new cells appear functional and responsive to LPS. Overall, these data demonstrate that newly repopulated microglia function similarly to the

  1. Oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse brain; the effect of LPS-induced inflammatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kazunori; Furube, Eriko; Muneoka, Shiori; Ono, Katsuhiko; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-19

    Evidence have been accumulated that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain. The fornix, projection and commissure pathway of hippocampal neurons, carries signals from the hippocampus to other parts of the brain and has critical role in memory and learning. However, basic characterization of adult oligodendrogenesis in this brain region is not well understood. In the present study, therefore, we aimed to examine the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and the effect of acute inflammatory stimulation on oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse. We demonstrated the proliferation of OPCs and a new generation of mature oligodendrocytes by using bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Oligodendrogenesis of adult fornix was also demonstrated by using oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 transgenic mouse. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) attenuated proliferation of OPCs in the fornix together with reduced proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells. Time course analysis showed that a single administration of LPS attenuated the proliferation of OPCs during 24-48 h. On the other hand, consecutive administration of LPS did not suppress proliferation of OPCs. The treatment of LPS did not affect differentiation of OPCs into mature oligodendrocytes. Treatment of a microglia inhibitor minocycline significantly attenuated basal proliferation of OPCs under normal condition. In conclusion, the present study indicates that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs and a single administration of LPS transiently attenuates proliferation of OPCs without changing differentiation in the fornix of the adult mouse brains.

  2. Regeneration and characterization of adult mouse hippocampal neurons in a defined in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Kucku; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Neelima; Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; Kindy, Mark S; Hickman, James J

    2009-02-15

    Although the majority of human illnesses occur during adulthood, most of the available in vitro disease models are based upon cells obtained from embryonic/fetal tissues because of the difficulties involved with culturing adult cells. Development of adult mouse neuronal cultures has a special significance because of the abundance of transgenic disease models that use this species. In this study a novel cell culture method has been developed that supports the long-term survival and physiological regeneration of adult mouse hippocampal cells in a serum-free defined environment. In this well-defined, controlled system, adult mouse hippocampal cells survived for up to 21 days in culture. The cultured cells exhibited typical hippocampal neuronal morphology and electrophysiological properties after recovery from the trauma of dissociation, and stained positive for the expected neuronal markers. This system has great potential as an investigative tool for in vitro studies of adult diseases, the aging brain or transgenic models of age-associated disorders. PMID:18955083

  3. Ascl3 marks adult progenitor cells of the mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Rugel-Stahl, Anastasia; Elliott, Marilyn E; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2012-05-01

    The Ascl3 transcription factor marks a subset of salivary gland duct cells present in the three major salivary glands of the mouse. In vivo, these cells generate both duct and secretory acinar cell descendants. Here, we have analyzed whether Ascl3-expressing cells retain this multipotent lineage potential in adult glands. Cells isolated from mouse salivary glands were cultured in vitro as non-adherent spheres. Lineage tracing of the Ascl3-expressing cells within the spheres demonstrates that Ascl3+ cells isolated from adult glands remain multipotent, generating both duct and acinar cell types in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the progenitor cells characterized by Keratin 5 expression are an independent population from Ascl3+ progenitor cells. We conclude that the Ascl3+ cells are intermediate lineage-restricted progenitor cells of the adult salivary glands.

  4. A comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of infant and adult mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linlin; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaonuan; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2014-10-01

    Ovary development is a complex process involving numerous genes. A well-developed ovary is essential for females to keep fertility and reproduce offspring. In order to gain a better insight into the molecular mechanisms related to the process of mammalian ovary development, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis on ovaries isolated from infant and adult mice by using next-generation sequencing technology (SOLiD). We identified 15,454 and 16,646 transcriptionally active genes at the infant and adult stage, respectively. Among these genes, we also identified 7021 differentially expressed genes. Our analysis suggests that, in general, the adult ovary has a higher level of transcriptomic activity. However, it appears that genes related to primordial follicle development, such as those encoding Figla and Nobox, are more active in the infant ovary, whereas expression of genes vital for follicle development, such as Gdf9, Bmp4 and Bmp15, is upregulated in the adult. These data suggest a dynamic shift in gene expression during ovary development and it is apparent that these changes function to facilitate follicle maturation, when additional functional gene studies are considered. Furthermore, our investigation has also revealed several important functional pathways, such as apoptosis, MAPK and steroid biosynthesis, that appear to be much more active in the adult ovary compared to those of the infant. These findings will provide a solid foundation for future studies on ovary development in mice and other mammals and help to expand our understanding of the complex molecular and cellular events that occur during postnatal ovary development. PMID:25251848

  5. A comprehensive transcriptomic analysis of infant and adult mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Pan, Linlin; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaonuan; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2014-10-01

    Ovary development is a complex process involving numerous genes. A well-developed ovary is essential for females to keep fertility and reproduce offspring. In order to gain a better insight into the molecular mechanisms related to the process of mammalian ovary development, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis on ovaries isolated from infant and adult mice by using next-generation sequencing technology (SOLiD). We identified 15,454 and 16,646 transcriptionally active genes at the infant and adult stage, respectively. Among these genes, we also identified 7021 differentially expressed genes. Our analysis suggests that, in general, the adult ovary has a higher level of transcriptomic activity. However, it appears that genes related to primordial follicle development, such as those encoding Figla and Nobox, are more active in the infant ovary, whereas expression of genes vital for follicle development, such as Gdf9, Bmp4 and Bmp15, is upregulated in the adult. These data suggest a dynamic shift in gene expression during ovary development and it is apparent that these changes function to facilitate follicle maturation, when additional functional gene studies are considered. Furthermore, our investigation has also revealed several important functional pathways, such as apoptosis, MAPK and steroid biosynthesis, that appear to be much more active in the adult ovary compared to those of the infant. These findings will provide a solid foundation for future studies on ovary development in mice and other mammals and help to expand our understanding of the complex molecular and cellular events that occur during postnatal ovary development.

  6. Spatiotemporal features of early neuronogenesis differ in wild-type and albino mouse retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rachel, Rivka A.; Dolen, Gul; Hayes, Nancy L.; Lu, Alice; Erskine, Lynda; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Mason, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    In albino mammals, lack of pigment in the retinal pigment epithelium is associated with retinal defects, including poor visual acuity from a photoreceptor deficit in the central retina and poor depth perception from a decrease in ipsilaterally projecting retinal fibers. Possible contributors to these abnormalities are reported delays in neuronogenesis (Ilia and Jeffery, 1996) and retinal maturation (Webster and Rowe, 1991). To further determine possible perturbations in neuronogenesis and/or differentiation, we used cell-specific markers and refined birth dating methods to examine these events during retinal ganglion cell (RGC) genesis in albino and pigmented mice from embryonic day 11 (E11) to E18. Our data indicate that relative to pigmented mice, more ganglion cells are born in the early stages of neuronogenesis in the albino retina, although the initiation of RGC genesis in the albino is unchanged. The cellular organization of the albino retina is perturbed as early as E12. In addition, cell cycle kinetics and output along the nasotemporal axis differ in retinas of albino and pigmented mice, both absolutely, with the temporal aspect of the retina expanded in albino, and relative to the position of the optic nerve head. Finally, blocking melanin synthesis in pigmented eyecups in culture leads to an increase in RGC differentiation, consistent with a role for melanin formation in regulating RGC neuronogenesis. These results point to spatiotemporal defects in neuronal production in the albino retina, which could perturb expression of genes that specify cell fate, number, and/or projection phenotype.

  7. Variable stress-responsiveness in wild type and domesticated fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Peter; Iwamoto, Toshitaka; Murakami, Noboru

    2008-01-28

    We combined behavioral and physiological measures to compare coping style in wild-type Betta splendens and a domesticated strain selectively bred for sports fighting. We showed previously that the fighter strain is more aggressive than the wild type during experimental conditions that most closely resemble an actual fight. We predicted that compared to the wild type, the fighter strain would show a more proactive coping style, characterized by lesser cortisol and greater sympathetic responses to non-social challenges. We introduced males to an unfamiliar environment and spatial confinement as challenges that may resemble some of those that B. splendens may encounter in its natural habitat. We developed a non-invasive stress assay that enables repeated individual measures of water-borne cortisol. We estimated sympathetic activation through opercular beat rate and recorded the duration of behavioral immobility. We found that exposure to an unfamiliar environment raised cortisol levels in the wild type but not in the fighter strain and that confinement raised cortisol levels in both. In both strains opercular beat rates were significantly reduced during the latter stages of confinement compared to during the early stages. The fighter strain, but not the wild type, adopted a behavioral strategy of immobility from the very beginning of confinement.

  8. A positively gravitropic mutant mirrors the wild-type protonemal response in the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, T. A.; Cove, D. J.; Sack, F. D.

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. protonemata grow up in the dark by negative gravitropism. When upright wild-type protonemata are reoriented 90 degrees, they temporarily grow down soon after reorientation ("initial reversal") and also prior to cytokinesis ("mitotic reversal"). A positively gravitropic mutant designated wrong- way response (wwr-1) has been isolated by screening ultraviolet light-mutagenized Ceratodon protonemata. Protonemata of wwr-l reoriented from the vertical to the horizontal grow down with kinetics comparable to those of the wild-type. Protonemata of wwr-1 also show initial and mitotic reversals where they temporarily grow up. Thus, the direction of gravitropism, initial reversal, and mitotic reversal are coordinated though each are opposite in wwr-1 compared to the wild-type. Normal plastid zonation is still maintained in dark-grown wwr-1 apical cells, but the plastids are more numerous and plastid sedimentation is more pronounced. In addition, wwr-1 apical cells are wider and the tips greener than in the wild-type. These data suggest that a functional WWR gene product is not necessary for the establishment of some gravitropic polarity, for gravitropism, or for the coordination of the reversals. Thus, the WWR protein may normally transduce information about cell orientation.

  9. A positively gravitropic mutant mirrors the wild-type protonemal response in the moss Ceratodon purpureus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, T A; Cove, D J; Sack, F D

    1997-06-01

    Wild-type Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. protonemata grow up in the dark by negative gravitropism. When upright wild-type protonemata are reoriented 90 degrees, they temporarily grow down soon after reorientation ("initial reversal") and also prior to cytokinesis ("mitotic reversal"). A positively gravitropic mutant designated wrong- way response (wwr-1) has been isolated by screening ultraviolet light-mutagenized Ceratodon protonemata. Protonemata of wwr-l reoriented from the vertical to the horizontal grow down with kinetics comparable to those of the wild-type. Protonemata of wwr-1 also show initial and mitotic reversals where they temporarily grow up. Thus, the direction of gravitropism, initial reversal, and mitotic reversal are coordinated though each are opposite in wwr-1 compared to the wild-type. Normal plastid zonation is still maintained in dark-grown wwr-1 apical cells, but the plastids are more numerous and plastid sedimentation is more pronounced. In addition, wwr-1 apical cells are wider and the tips greener than in the wild-type. These data suggest that a functional WWR gene product is not necessary for the establishment of some gravitropic polarity, for gravitropism, or for the coordination of the reversals. Thus, the WWR protein may normally transduce information about cell orientation. PMID:11541791

  10. Variable stress-responsiveness in wild type and domesticated fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Peter; Iwamoto, Toshitaka; Murakami, Noboru

    2008-01-28

    We combined behavioral and physiological measures to compare coping style in wild-type Betta splendens and a domesticated strain selectively bred for sports fighting. We showed previously that the fighter strain is more aggressive than the wild type during experimental conditions that most closely resemble an actual fight. We predicted that compared to the wild type, the fighter strain would show a more proactive coping style, characterized by lesser cortisol and greater sympathetic responses to non-social challenges. We introduced males to an unfamiliar environment and spatial confinement as challenges that may resemble some of those that B. splendens may encounter in its natural habitat. We developed a non-invasive stress assay that enables repeated individual measures of water-borne cortisol. We estimated sympathetic activation through opercular beat rate and recorded the duration of behavioral immobility. We found that exposure to an unfamiliar environment raised cortisol levels in the wild type but not in the fighter strain and that confinement raised cortisol levels in both. In both strains opercular beat rates were significantly reduced during the latter stages of confinement compared to during the early stages. The fighter strain, but not the wild type, adopted a behavioral strategy of immobility from the very beginning of confinement. PMID:17884114

  11. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org).

  12. High-resolution gene expression atlases for adult and developing mouse brain and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Henry, Alex M; Hohmann, John G

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the structure, genetics, circuits, and physiological properties of the mammalian brain in both normal and pathological states is ever increasing as research labs worldwide probe the various aspects of brain function. Until recently, however, comprehensive cataloging of gene expression across the central nervous system has been lacking. The Allen Institute for Brain Science, as part of its mission to propel neuroscience research, has completed several large gene-mapping projects in mouse, nonhuman primate, and human brain, producing informative online public resources and tools. Here we present the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, covering ~20,000 genes throughout the adult mouse brain; the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas, detailing expression of approximately 2,000 important developmental genes across seven embryonic and postnatal stages of brain growth; and the Allen Spinal Cord Atlas, revealing expression for ~20,000 genes in the adult and neonatal mouse spinal cords. Integrated data-mining tools, including reference atlases, informatics analyses, and 3-D viewers, are described. For these massive-scale projects, high-throughput industrial techniques were developed to standardize and reliably repeat experimental goals. To verify consistency and accuracy, a detailed analysis of the 1,000 most viewed genes for the adult mouse brain (according to website page views) was performed by comparing our data with peer-reviewed literature and other databases. We show that our data are highly consistent with independent sources and provide a comprehensive compendium of information and tools used by thousands of researchers each month. All data and tools are freely available via the Allen Brain Atlas portal (www.brain-map.org). PMID:22832508

  13. Primary monolayer culture of adult mouse hepatocytes -- a model for the study of hepatotropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Arnheiter, H

    1980-01-01

    Primary monolayer cultures of adult mouse hepatocytes isolated by collagenase perfusion of the liver in situ were exposed to 2 hepatotropic viruses, an avian influenza A virus adapted to grow in mouse liver in vivo and a herpes simplex type I virus. Influenza virus infection led to lysis ofindividual hepatocytes and total monolayer destruction within 18 to 120 hours after infection according to the virus dose used. Virus replication was evidenced by assaying hepatocyte supernates for hemagglutinin and infectivity, by immunofluorescent staining and by electron microscopy. Herpes virus infection resulted in polykaryocyte formation followed by nuclear pycnosis and cell lysis. Virus replication was assayed by titration of supernate infectivity.

  14. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  15. Fluoxetine increases plasticity and modulates the proteomic profile in the adult mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Perera, L.; Muniz, M.; Vierci, G.; Bornia, N.; Baroncelli, L.; Sale, A.; Rossi, F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The scarce functional recovery of the adult CNS following injuries or diseases is largely due to its reduced potential for plasticity, the ability to reorganize neural connections as a function of experience. Recently, some new strategies restoring high levels of plasticity in the adult brain have been identified, especially in the paradigmatic model of the visual system. A chronic treatment with the anti-depressant fluoxetine reinstates plasticity in the adult rat primary visual cortex, inducing recovery of vision in amblyopic animals. The molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain largely unknown. Here, we explored fluoxetine effects on mouse visual cortical plasticity, and exploited a proteomic approach to identify possible candidates mediating the outcome of the antidepressant treatment on adult cortical plasticity. We showed that fluoxetine restores ocular dominance plasticity in the adult mouse visual cortex, and identified 31 differentially expressed protein spots in fluoxetine-treated animals vs. controls. MALDITOF/TOF mass spectrometry identification followed by bioinformatics analysis revealed that these proteins are involved in the control of cytoskeleton organization, endocytosis, molecular transport, intracellular signaling, redox cellular state, metabolism and protein degradation. Altogether, these results indicate a complex effect of fluoxetine on neuronal signaling mechanisms potentially involved in restoring plasticity in the adult brain. PMID:26205348

  16. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  17. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  18. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  19. Wild-type human p53 transactivates the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, C.V.; Brown, D.R.; Deb, S.; Deb, S.P.

    1995-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein negatively regulates cell growth and somatic mutations in the p53 gene lead to uncontrolled cell growth and oncogenesis. This report describes research which demonstrates, using a number of different cell lines, that at low levels, wild-type p53 transactivates the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter. When expressed at similar levels, tumor-derived p53 mutants did not transactivate the PCNA promoter. It also reports the identification of a wild-type human p53-binding site on the human PCNA promote. 84 refs., 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  20. Wild-Type p53 Binds to the TATA-Binding Protein and Represses Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Edward; Usheva, Anny; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Momand, Jamil; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Weinmann, Roberto; Levine, Arnold J.; Shenk, Thomas

    1992-12-01

    p53 activates transcription of genes with a p53 response element, and it can repress genes lacking the element. Here we demonstrate that wild-type but not mutant p53 inhibits transcription in a HeLa nuclear extract from minimal promoters. Wild-type but not mutant p53 binds to human TATA-binding protein (TBP). p53 does not bind to yeast TBP, and it cannot inhibit transcription in a HeLa extract where yeast TBP substitutes for human TBP. These results suggest a model in which p53 binds to TBP and interferes with transcriptional initiation.

  1. Wild-type and mutated presenilins 2 trigger p53-dependent apoptosis and down-regulate presenilin 1 expression in HEK293 human cells and in murine neurons.

    PubMed

    Alves da Costa, Cristine; Paitel, Erwan; Mattson, Mark P; Amson, Robert; Telerman, Adam; Ancolio, Karine; Checler, Frédéric; Mattson, Marc P

    2002-03-19

    Presenilins 1 and 2 are two homologous proteins that, when mutated, account for most early onset Alzheimer's disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that, among various functions, presenilins could modulate cell apoptotic responses. Here we establish that the overexpression of presenilin 2 (PS2) and its mutated form Asn-141-Ile-PS2 alters the viability of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells as established by combined trypan blue exclusion, sodium 3'-[1-(phenylamino-carbonyl)-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzene sulfonic acid hydrate assay, and propidium iodide incorporation FACS analyses. The two parent proteins increase the acetyl-DEVD-al-sensitive caspase-3-like activity in both HEK293 cells and Telencephalon specific murine neurons, modulate Bax and bcl-2 expressions, and enhance cytochrome C translocation into the cytosol. We show that overexpression of both wild-type and mutated PS2 increases p53-like immunoreactivity and transcriptional activity. We also establish that wild-type- and mutated PS2-induced caspase activation is reduced by p53 antisense approach and by pifithrin-alpha, a chemical inhibitor of p53. Furthermore, mouse fibroblasts in which the PS2 gene has been knocked out exhibited strongly reduced p53-transcriptional activity. Finally, we establish that the overexpression of both wild-type and mutated PS2 is accompanied by a drastic reduction of endogenous presenilin 1 (PS1) expression. Interestingly, pifithrin-alpha diminished endogenous PS2 immunoreactivity, whereas the inhibitor increases PS1 expression. Altogether, our data demonstrate that wild-type and familial Alzheimer's disease-linked PS2 trigger apoptosis and down-regulate PS1 expression through p53-dependent mechanisms. PMID:11904448

  2. The mechanisms underlying the generation of the colonic migrating motor complex in both wild-type and nNOS knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Heredia, Dante J; McCann, Conor J; Hennig, Grant W; Smith, Terence K

    2010-02-01

    Colonic migrating motor complexes (CMMCs) propel fecal contents and are altered in diseased states, including slow-transit constipation. However, the mechanisms underlying the CMMCs are controversial because it has been proposed that disinhibition (turning off of inhibitory neurotransmission) or excitatory nerve activity generate the CMMC. Therefore, our aims were to reexamine the mechanisms underlying the CMMC in the colon of wild-type and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)(-/-) mice. CMMCs were recorded from the isolated murine large bowel using intracellular recordings of electrical activity from circular muscle (CM) combined with tension recording. Spontaneous CMMCs occurred in both wild-type (frequency: 0.3 cycles/min) and nNOS(-/-) mice (frequency: 0.4 cycles/min). CMMCs consisted of a hyperpolarization, followed by fast oscillations (slow waves) with action potentials superimposed on a slow depolarization (wild-type: 14.0 +/- 0.6 mV; nNOS(-/-): 11.2 +/- 1.5 mV). Both atropine (1 microM) and MEN 10,376 [neurokinin 2 (NK2) antagonist; 0.5 microM] added successively reduced the slow depolarization and the number of action potentials but did not abolish the fast oscillations. The further addition of RP 67580 (NK1 antagonist; 0.5 microM) blocked the fast oscillations and the CMMC. Importantly, none of the antagonists affected the resting membrane potential, suggesting that ongoing tonic inhibition of the CM was maintained. Fecal pellet propulsion, which was blocked by the NK2 or the NK1 antagonist, was slower down the longer, more constricted nNOS(-/-) mouse colon (wild-type: 47.9 +/- 2.4 mm; nNOS(-/-): 57.8 +/- 1.4 mm). These observations suggest that excitatory neurotransmission enhances pacemaker activity during the CMMC. Therefore, the CMMC is likely generated by a synergistic interaction between neural and interstitial cells of Cajal networks.

  3. Peptide Transporter 1 is Responsible for Intestinal Uptake of the Dipeptide Glycylsarcosine: Studies in Everted Jejunal Rings from Wild-type and Pept1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Katherine; Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of PEPT1 in the uptake of peptides/mimetics from mouse small intestine using glycylsarcosine (GlySar). After isolating jejunal tissue from wild-type and Pept1 null mice, 2-cm intestinal segments were everted and mounted on glass rods for tissue uptake studies. [14C]GlySar (4 μM) was studied as a function of time, temperature, sodium and pH, concentration, and potential inhibitors. Compared to wild-type animals, Pept1 null mice exhibited a 78% reduction of GlySar uptake at pH 6.0, 37°C. GlySar uptake showed pH dependence with peak values between pH 6.0-6.5 in wild-type animals, while no such tendency was observed in Pept1 null mice. GlySar exhibited Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics and a minor nonsaturable component in wild-type animals. In contrast, GlySar uptake occurred by only a nonsaturable process in Pept1 null mice. GlySar uptake was significantly inhibited by dipeptides, aminocephalosporins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and the antiviral prodrug valacyclovir; these inhibitors had little, if any, effect on the uptake of GlySar in Pept1 null mice. The findings demonstrate that PEPT1 plays a critical role in the uptake of GlySar in jejunum, and suggest that PEPT1 is the major transporter responsible for the intestinal absorption of small peptides. PMID:20862774

  4. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  5. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties.

  6. Amino acid uptake profiling of wild type and recombinant Streptomyces lividans TK24 batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Lule, Ivan; Van Hove, Sven; Vercammen, Dominique; Wouters, Christine; Bernaerts, Kristel; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2011-04-10

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an interesting host for the secretory production of heterologous proteins. To obtain a good secretion yield of heterologous proteins, the availability of suitable nitrogen sources in the medium is required. Often, undefined mixtures of amino acids are used to improve protein yields. However, the understanding of amino acid utilization as well as their contribution to the heterologous protein synthesis is poor. In this paper, amino acid utilization by wild type and recombinant S. lividans TK24 growing on a minimal medium supplemented with casamino acids is profiled by intensive analysis of the exometabolome (metabolic footprint) as a function of time. Dynamics of biomass, substrates, by-products and heterologous protein are characterized, analyzed and compared. As an exemplary protein mouse Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (mTNF-α) is considered. Results unveil preferential glutamate and aspartate assimilation, together with glucose and ammonium, but the associated high biomass growth rate is unfavorable for protein production. Excretion of organic acids as well as alanine is observed. Pyruvate and alanine overflow point at an imbalance between carbon and nitrogen catabolism and biosynthetic fluxes. Lactate secretion is probably related to clump formation. Heterologous protein production induces a slowdown in growth, denser clump formation and a shift in metabolism, as reflected in the altered substrate requirements and overflow pattern. Besides glutamate and aspartate, most amino acids are catabolized, however, their exact contribution in heterologous protein production could not be seized from macroscopic quantities. The metabolic footprints presented in this paper provide a first insight into the impact and relevance of amino acids on biomass growth and protein production. Type and availability of substrates together with biomass growth rate and morphology affect the protein secretion efficiency and should be optimally controlled

  7. Molecular properties of adult mouse gastric and intestinal epithelial progenitors in their niches.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Marios; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Mills, Jason C; Leip, Douglas G; Lovett, Michael; Clifton, Sandra W; Ippolito, Joseph E; Glasscock, Jarret I; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Brent, Michael R; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2006-04-21

    We have sequenced 36,641 expressed sequence tags from laser capture microdissected adult mouse gastric and small intestinal epithelial progenitors, obtaining 4031 and 3324 unique transcripts, respectively. Using Gene Ontology (GO) terms, each data set was compared with cDNA libraries from intact adult stomach and small intestine. Genes in GO categories enriched in progenitors were filtered against genes in GO categories represented in hematopoietic, neural, and embryonic stem cell transcriptomes and mapped onto transcription factor networks, plus canonical signal transduction and metabolic pathways. Wnt/beta-catenin, phosphoinositide-3/Akt kinase, insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, integrin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor signaling cascades, plus glycerolipid, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolic pathways are among those prominently represented in adult gut progenitors. The results reveal shared as well as distinctive features of adult gut stem cells when compared with other stem cell populations.

  8. Subretinal delivery and electroporation in pigmented and nonpigmented adult mouse eyes

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, John M.; Goodman, Penny; Chrenek, Micah A.; Johnson, Christiana J.; Berglin, Lennart; Redmond, T. Michael.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Subretinal injection offers one of the best ways to deliver many classes of drugs, reagents, cells and treatments to the photoreceptor, Müller, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Agents delivered to this space are placed within microns of the intended target cell, accumulating to high concentrations because there is no dilution due to transport processes or diffusion. Dilution in the interphotoreceptor space (IPS) is minimal because the IPS volume is only 10-20 microliters in the human eye and less than 1 microliter in the mouse eye. For gene delivery purposes, we wished to transfect the cells adjacent to the IPS in adult mouse eyes. Others transfect these cells in neonatal rats to study the development of the retina. In both neonates and adults, electroporation is found to be effective Here we describe the optimization of electroporation conditions for RPE cells in the adult mouse eye with naked plasmids. However, both techniques, subretinal injection and electroporation, present some technical challenges that require skill on the part of the surgeon to prevent untoward damage to the eye. Here we describe methods that we have used for the past ten years (1). PMID:22688698

  9. Measuring cell wall elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Melissa; Venkataraman, Sankar; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P

    2006-07-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria.

  10. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  11. Phosphate uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hansen wild type and phenotypes exposed to space flight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Berry, D; Volz, P A

    1979-10-01

    Rates of phosphate uptake were approximately twice as great for Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-cell phenotypic isolates exposed to space parameters as for the wild-type ground control. Quantitative determination of 32P was performed by liquid scintillation spectrometry utilizing Cerenkov radiation counting techniques. PMID:395899

  12. Comparative Effects of Wild-type, bmr-6, bmr-12 and Stacked Sorghum: Sorghum Stover Digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative Effects of Wild-type, bmr-6, bmr-12 and Stacked Sorghum: Sorghum Stover Digestibility H. M. Dann,1 A. M. DiCerbo,1 J. F. Pedersen,2 and R. J. Grant1 1 William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, Chazy, NY 2 USDA, ARS, NPA Wheat, Sorghum and Forage Research, University of Nebraska, ...

  13. COMPARISON OF IN VITRO-CULTURED AND WILD-TYPE PERKINSUS MARINUS I: PATHOGEN VIRULENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perkinsus marinus is a highly contagious pathogen of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. Until recently, transmission studies have employed wild-type parasites isolated directly from infected oysters. Newly developed methods to propagate P. marinus in vitro have led to usin...

  14. Chloroplast parameters differ in wild type and transgenic poplars overexpressing gsh1 in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2009-07-01

    Poplar mutants overexpressing the bacterial genes gsh1 or gsh2 encoding the enzymes of glutathione biosynthesis are among the best-characterised transgenic plants. However, this characterisation originates exclusively from laboratory studies, and the performance of these mutants under field conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report a field experiment in which the wild-type poplar hybrid Populus tremula x P. alba and a transgenic line overexpressing the bacterial gene gsh1 encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol were grown for 3 years at a relatively clean (control) field site and a field site contaminated with heavy metals. Aboveground biomass accumulation was slightly smaller in transgenic compared to wild-type plants; soil contamination significantly decreased biomass accumulation in both wild-type and transgenic plants by more than 40%. Chloroplasts parameters, i.e., maximal diameter, projection area and perimeter, surface area and volume, surface/volume ratio and a two-dimensional form coefficient, were found to depend on plant type, leaf tissue and soil contamination. The greatest differences between wild and transgenic poplars were observed at the control site. Under these conditions, chloroplast sizes in palisade tissue of transgenic poplar significantly exceeded those of the wild type. In contrast to the wild type, palisade chloroplast volume exceeded that of spongy chloroplasts in transgenic poplars at both field sites. Chlorophyll content per chloroplast was the same in wild and transgenic poplars. Apparently, the increase in chloroplast volume was not connected to changes in the photosynthetic centres. Chloroplasts of transgenic poplar at the control site were more elongated in palisade cells and close to spherical in spongy mesophyll chloroplasts. At the contaminated site, palisade and spongy cell chloroplasts of leaves from transgenic trees and the wild type were the same shape. Transgenic poplars also had a smaller chloroplast

  15. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C.; Moya, Esteban A.; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6–72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:24574965

  16. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  17. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sueli; Zeisel, Amit; Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-06-10

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogeneous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from 10 regions of the mouse juvenile and adult CNS. Thirteen distinct populations were identified, 12 of which represent a continuum from Pdgfra(+) oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly formed oligodendrocytes were detected in the adult CNS and were responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra(+) population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS. PMID:27284195

  18. Rapid and efficient gene delivery into the adult mouse brain via focal electroporation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yusuke; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    In vivo gene delivery is required for studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms of various biological events. Virus-mediated gene transfer or generation of transgenic animals is widely used; however, these methods are time-consuming and expensive. Here we show an improved electroporation technique for acute gene delivery into the adult mouse brain. Using a syringe-based microelectrode, local DNA injection and the application of electric current can be performed simultaneously; this allows rapid and efficient gene transduction of adult non-neuronal cells. Combining this technique with various expression vectors that carry specific promoters resulted in targeted gene expression in astrocytic cells. Our results constitute a powerful strategy for the genetic manipulation of adult brains in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. PMID:27430903

  19. Oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the mouse juvenile and adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sueli; Zeisel, Amit; Codeluppi, Simone; van Bruggen, David; Mendanha Falcão, Ana; Xiao, Lin; Li, Huiliang; Häring, Martin; Hochgerner, Hannah; Romanov, Roman A; Gyllborg, Daniel; Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B; La Manno, Gioele; Lönnerberg, Peter; Floriddia, Elisa M; Rezayee, Fatemah; Ernfors, Patrik; Arenas, Ernest; Hjerling-Leffler, Jens; Harkany, Tibor; Richardson, William D; Linnarsson, Sten; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo

    2016-06-10

    Oligodendrocytes have been considered as a functionally homogeneous population in the central nervous system (CNS). We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on 5072 cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage from 10 regions of the mouse juvenile and adult CNS. Thirteen distinct populations were identified, 12 of which represent a continuum from Pdgfra(+) oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to distinct mature oligodendrocytes. Initial stages of differentiation were similar across the juvenile CNS, whereas subsets of mature oligodendrocytes were enriched in specific regions in the adult brain. Newly formed oligodendrocytes were detected in the adult CNS and were responsive to complex motor learning. A second Pdgfra(+) population, distinct from OPCs, was found along vessels. Our study reveals the dynamics of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation, uncoupling them at a transcriptional level and highlighting oligodendrocyte heterogeneity in the CNS.

  20. Running increases cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    van Praag, H; Kempermann, G; Gage, F H

    1999-03-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. Environmental enrichment, however, typically consists of many components, such as expanded learning opportunities, increased social interaction, more physical activity and larger housing. We attempted to separate components by assigning adult mice to various conditions: water-maze learning (learner), swim-time-yoked control (swimmer), voluntary wheel running (runner), and enriched (enriched) and standard housing (control) groups. Neither maze training nor yoked swimming had any effect on bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell number. However, running doubled the number of surviving newborn cells, in amounts similar to enrichment conditions. Our findings demonstrate that voluntary exercise is sufficient for enhanced neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

  1. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  2. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  3. Cranial irradiation induces bone marrow-derived microglia in adult mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Suto, Nana; Suzue, Kazutomo; Kaminuma, Takuya; Nakano, Takashi; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-07-01

    Postnatal hematopoietic progenitor cells do not contribute to microglial homeostasis in adult mice under normal conditions. However, previous studies using whole-body irradiation and bone marrow (BM) transplantation models have shown that adult BM cells migrate into the brain tissue and differentiate into microglia (BM-derived microglia; BMDM). Here, we investigated whether cranial irradiation alone was sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse brain. Transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of a murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter (MSCV-GFP mice) were used. MSCV-GFP mice express GFP in BM cells but not in the resident microglia in the brain. Therefore, these mice allowed us to detect BM-derived cells in the brain without BM reconstitution. MSCV-GFP mice, aged 8-12 weeks, received 13.0 Gy irradiation only to the cranium, and BM-derived cells in the brain were quantified at 3 and 8 weeks after irradiation. No BM-derived cells were detected in control non-irradiated MSCV-GFP mouse brains, but numerous GFP-labeled BM-derived cells were present in the brain stem, basal ganglia and cerebral cortex of the irradiated MSCV-GFP mice. These BM-derived cells were positive for Iba1, a marker for microglia, indicating that GFP-positive BM-derived cells were microglial in nature. The population of BMDM was significantly greater at 8 weeks post-irradiation than at 3 weeks post-irradiation in all brain regions examined. Our results clearly show that cranial irradiation alone is sufficient to induce the generation of BMDM in the adult mouse.

  4. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Saif I; Dondzillo, Anna; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Felsen, Gidon; Lei, Tim C; Klug, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  5. Light Scattering Properties Vary across Different Regions of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stubblefield, Elizabeth A.; Felsen, Gidon

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue. PMID:23874433

  6. Light scattering properties vary across different regions of the adult mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Juboori, Saif I.

    Recently developed optogenetic tools provide powerful approaches to optically excite or inhibit neural activity. In a typical in-vivo experiment, light is delivered to deep nuclei via an implanted optical fiber. Light intensity attenuates with increasing distance from the fiber tip, determining the volume of tissue in which optogenetic proteins can successfully be activated. However, whether and how this volume of effective light intensity varies as a function of brain region or wavelength has not been systematically studied. The goal of this study was to measure and compare how light scatters in different areas of the mouse brain. We delivered different wavelengths of light via optical fibers to acute slices of mouse brainstem, midbrain and forebrain tissue. We measured light intensity as a function of distance from the fiber tip, and used the data to model the spread of light in specific regions of the mouse brain. We found substantial differences in effective attenuation coefficients among different brain areas, which lead to substantial differences in light intensity demands for optogenetic experiments. The use of light of different wavelengths additionally changes how light illuminates a given brain area. We created a brain atlas of effective attenuation coefficients of the adult mouse brain, and integrated our data into an application that can be used to estimate light scattering as well as required light intensity for optogenetic manipulation within a given volume of tissue.

  7. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation.

    PubMed

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl C H; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. PMID:26259873

  8. Ultrastructural analysis of adult mouse neocortex comparing aldehyde perfusion with cryo fixation

    PubMed Central

    Korogod, Natalya; Petersen, Carl CH; Knott, Graham W

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of brain ultrastructure using electron microscopy typically relies on chemical fixation. However, this is known to cause significant tissue distortion including a reduction in the extracellular space. Cryo fixation is thought to give a truer representation of biological structures, and here we use rapid, high-pressure freezing on adult mouse neocortex to quantify the extent to which these two fixation methods differ in terms of their preservation of the different cellular compartments, and the arrangement of membranes at the synapse and around blood vessels. As well as preserving a physiological extracellular space, cryo fixation reveals larger numbers of docked synaptic vesicles, a smaller glial volume, and a less intimate glial coverage of synapses and blood vessels compared to chemical fixation. The ultrastructure of mouse neocortex therefore differs significantly comparing cryo and chemical fixation conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05793.001 PMID:26259873

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility in Escherichia coli of human and avian origin--a comparison of wild-type distributions.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, M; Bengtsson, S; Bonnedahl, J; Hernandez, J; Olsen, B; Kahlmeter, G

    2009-05-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 97 Escherichia coli isolates from birds, and 100 clinical isolates from blood cultures, were determined by disk diffusion. The wild-type distributions were defined by the normalized resistance interpretation method. It is shown that the avian and clinical inhibition zone diameter distributions of wild-type E. coli are indistinguishable.

  10. De novo cerebrovascular malformation in the adult mouse after endothelial Alk1 deletion and angiogenic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Sun, Zhengda; Han, Zhenying; Jun, Kristine; Camus, Marine; Wankhede, Mamta; Mao, Lei; Arnold, Tom; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In humans, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (Alk1) deficiency causes arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in multiple organs, including the brain. Focal Alk1 pan-cellular deletion plus vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulation induces brain AVMs (bAVMs) in the adult mouse. We hypothesized that deletion of Alk1 in endothelial cell (EC) alone plus focal VEGF stimulation is sufficient to induce bAVM in the adult mouse. Methods Focal angiogenesis was induced in the brain of eight-week-old Pdgfb-iCreER;Alk12f/2f mice by injection of adeno-associated viral vectors expressing VEGF (AAV-VEGF). Two weeks later, EC-Alk1 deletion was induced by tamoxifen (TM) treatment. Vascular morphology was analyzed, and EC proliferation and Dysplasia Index (number of vessels with diameter >15μm per 200 vessels) were quantified10 days after TM administration. Results Tangles of enlarged vessels resembling AVMs were present in the brain angiogenic region of TM-treated Pdgfb-iCreER;Alk12f/2f mice. Induced bAVMs were marked by increased Dysplasia Index (P<0.001), and EC proliferation clustered within the dysplastic vessels. AVMs were also detected around the ear tag-wound and in other organs. Conclusions Deletion of Alk1 in EC in adult mice leads to an increased local EC proliferation during brain angiogenesis and de novo bAVM. PMID:24457293

  11. A mutant chaperone converts a wild-type protein into a tumor-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Andrea; Philip, Mary; Yoshida, Barbara A; Azadi, Parastoo; Liu, Hui; Meredith, Stephen C; Schreiber, Hans

    2006-10-13

    Monoclonal antibodies have become important therapeutic agents against certain cancers. Many tumor-specific antigens are mutant proteins that are predominantly intracellular and thus not readily accessible to monoclonal antibodies. We found that a wild-type transmembrane protein could be transformed into a tumor-specific antigen. A somatic mutation in the chaperone gene Cosmc abolished function of a glycosyltransferase, disrupting O-glycan Core 1 synthesis and creating a tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitope consisting of a monosaccharide and a specific wild-type protein sequence. This epitope induced a high-affinity, highly specific, syngeneic monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity. Such tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitopes represent potential targets for monoclonal antibody therapy.

  12. Mating success of wild type and sepia mutants Drosophila melanogaster in different choice.

    PubMed

    Stanić, Snezana; Pavković-Lucic, Sofija

    2005-01-01

    Mating behaviour of red-eyed (wt) and brown-eyed (sepia) Drosophila melanogaster was studied under light conditions. Mating success was directly observed in mating vials and techniques usually applied in the studies of sexual selection ("female choice" and "multiple choice"). The comparison of sexual activity of mutant and wild types clearly indicates that they are not equally successful in matings. Sepia eye colour mutation decreases sexual activity of Drosophila melanogaster males, influences the preference ability of females and decreases the number of progeny from homogamic mating of the se x se type, as well as from heterogamic copulations in which sepia females take part. Non-random mating of wild type males and sepia females (in "multiple-choice" situation), with genetically and phenotypically different individuals, could be another mechanism for conservation of genetic polymorphism in natural populations. PMID:16440285

  13. Wild-type minimal inhibitory concentration distributions in bacteria of animal origin in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Pantozzi, Florencia L; Ibar, Mariela P; Nievas, Victorio F; Vigo, Germán B; Moredo, Fabiana A; Giacoboni, Gabriela I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profiles of indicator bacteria isolated from domestic animal feces. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by agar dilution. Interpretative criteria on the basis of wild-type MIC distributions and epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFF or ECV) were used according to the 'European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing' (EUCAST) data. Results from 237 isolates of Escherichia coli showed reduced susceptibility for ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline, the antimicrobials commonly used in intensive breeding of pigs and hens. Regarding all the species of the genus Enterococcus spp., there are only ECOFF or ECV for vancomycin. Of the 173 Enterococcus spp. isolated, only one showed reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and was classified as 'non-wild-type' (NWT) population. This is the first report in Argentina showing data of epidemiological cutoff values in animal bacteria.

  14. Human tau expression reduces adult neurogenesis in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Yutaro; Xu, Guixiang; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lamb, Bruce T

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is a central feature of a class of neurodegenerative diseases termed tauopathies. Notably, there is increasing evidence that tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease, are also characterized by a reduction in neurogenesis, the birth of adult neurons. However, the exact relationship between hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of MAPT and neurogenic deficits remains unclear, including whether this is an early- or late-stage disease marker. In the present study, we used the genomic-based hTau mouse model of tauopathy to examine the temporal and spatial regulation of adult neurogenesis during the course of the disease. Surprisingly, hTau mice exhibited reductions in adult neurogenesis in 2 different brain regions by as early as 2 months of age, before the development of robust MAPT pathology in this model. This reduction was found to be due to reduced proliferation and not because of enhanced apoptosis in the hippocampus. At these same time points, hTau mice also exhibited altered MAPT phosphorylation with neurogenic precursors. To examine whether the effects of MAPT on neurogenesis were cell autonomous, neurospheres prepared from hTau animals were examined in vitro, revealing a growth deficit when compared with non-transgenic neurosphere cultures. Taken together, these studies provide evidence that altered adult neurogenesis is a robust and early marker of altered, cell-autonomous function of MAPT in the hTau mouse mode of tauopathy and that altered adult neurogenesis should be examined as a potential marker and therapeutic target for human tauopathies.

  15. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a vaccinated child.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Mam; Marin, Mona; Leung, Jessica; Bryce, Clare H; Schmid, D Scott; Zaki, Sherif R; Drew, Clifton; Liu, Lindy; Smelser, Chad

    2013-02-01

    Encephalitis associated with varicella-zoster virus, rare among children in the varicella vaccine era, has generally been associated with a rash. We report fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a child who had received 1 dose of varicella vaccine. Varicella-zoster virus encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for children presenting with acute neurologic symptoms, even vaccine recipients.

  17. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-07

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Isolation and characterization of liver epithelial cell lines from wild-type and mutant TgN737Rpw mice.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, W. G.; Yoder, B. K.; Isfort, R. J.; Detilleux, P. G.; Foster, C.; Neilsen, N.; Woychik, R. P.; Wilkinson, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The Tg737 gene encodes a tetratricopeptide repeat containing protein that, when disrupted in TgN737Rpw mutant mice, results in pleiotropic phenotypes that include the proliferation of epithelial cells. In the kidney and liver, this causes a phenotype that resembles autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. In the liver, the affected epithelial cells morphologically and immunologically resemble oval cells. Here we describe the isolation, culture, and characterization of epithelial cell lines derived from the livers of wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous TgN737Rpw mice. Essentially homogeneous cell cultures were established and the expression of liver markers was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and by immunohistochemistry. All of the cell lines reacted to the A6 antibody that was raised against mouse oval cells and expressed markers seen in oval cells. Cells transplanted into the interscapular fat pads of isogenic mice formed well defined ductular structures. Furthermore, in transfection experiments, we have demonstrated the involvement of Tg737 in cellular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9094975

  19. Cyclodextrin Alters GABAergic Input to CA1 Pyramidal Cells in Wild-Type But Not in NPC1-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Frech, Moritz J; Rabenstein, Michael; Bovensiepen, Katja; Rost, Sebastian; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene. Actual, no causative treatment for NPC1 is available, although some drugs have been proven to be beneficial to patients, for example, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CDX). In this study, we used the BALB/c_Nctr-Npc1m1N/-J mouse strain to study the effect of CDX, which is described to prolong the life span and to alleviate the pathogenic phenotype. By means of patch clamp recordings, we measured inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) of CA1 pyramidal cells of CDX-treated and -untreated animals to elucidate the influence of CDX on the synaptic transmission. Surprisingly, CDX induced a significantly higher GABAergic IPSC frequency in wild-type mice than in NPC1(-/-) mice. Although the IPSCs were mainly GABAergic, we observed a significant reduction of the IPSC frequency in the presence of the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. The effect of strychnine did not differ in untreated and treated animals, indicating that the effect of CDX was most likely not based on an interaction with glycinergic transmission machinery. However, the unexpected effect of CDX on the GABAergic synaptic transmission is of special interest as a disturbance plays, for example, a crucial role in epilepsy and, moreover, as CDX is currently under investigation as a treatment for NPC1 in humans. PMID:26392920

  20. Negative growth regulation in a glioblastoma tumor cell line that conditionally expresses human wild-type p53

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, W.E.; Shields, M.T.; Amin, M.; Sauve, G.J. ); Appella, E.; Romano, J.W.; Ullrich, S.J. )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the effect that human wild-type p53 (wt-p53) expression has on cell proliferation the authors constructed a recombinant plasmid, pM47, in which wt-p53 cDNA is under transcriptional control of the hormone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter linked to the dominant biochemical selection marker gene Eco gpt. The pM47 plasmid was introduced into T98G cells derived from a human glioblastomas multiforme tumor, and a stable clonal cell line, GM47.23, was derived that conditionally expressed wt-p53 following exposure to dexamethasone. The authors show that induction of wt-p53 expression in exponentially growing cells inhibits cell cycle progression and that the inhibitory effect is reversible upon removal of the inducer or infection with simian virus 40. Moreover, when growth-arrested cells are stimulated to proliferate, induction of wt-p53 expression inhibits G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} progression into S phase and the cells accumulate with a DNA content equivalent to cells arrested in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Taken together, these studies suggest that wt-p53 may play a negative role in growth regulation.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy discriminates the response to microglial stimulation of wild type and Alzheimer’s disease models

    PubMed Central

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Yanez Lopez, Maria; Yuchun, Ding; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Prior, Malcolm; Brignell, Christopher; Parhizkar, Samira; Agostini, Alessandra; Bai, Li; Auer, Dorothee P.; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Microglia activation has emerged as a potential key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Metabolite levels assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are used as markers of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, but how they relate to microglial activation in health and chronic disease is incompletely understood. Using MRS, we monitored the brain metabolic response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced microglia activation in vivo in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (APP/PS1) and healthy controls (wild-type (WT) littermates) over 4 hours. We assessed reactive gliosis by immunohistochemistry and correlated metabolic and histological measures. In WT mice, LPS induced a microglial phenotype consistent with activation, associated with a sustained increase in macromolecule and lipid levels (ML9). This effect was not seen in APP/PS1 mice, where LPS did not lead to a microglial response measured by histology, but induced a late increase in the putative inflammation marker myoinositol (mI) and metabolic changes in total creatine and taurine previously reported to be associated with amyloid load. We argue that ML9 and mI distinguish the response of WT and APP/PS1 mice to immune mediators. Lipid and macromolecule levels may represent a biomarker of activation of healthy microglia, while mI may not be a glial marker. PMID:26813748

  2. Spontaneous generation of rapidly transmissible prions in transgenic mice expressing wild-type bank vole prion protein.

    PubMed

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Stöhr, Jan; Oehler, Abby; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Grillo, Sunny K; Patel, Smita; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-02-28

    Currently, there are no animal models of the most common human prion disorder, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), in which prions are formed spontaneously from wild-type (WT) prion protein (PrP). Interestingly, bank voles (BV) exhibit an unprecedented promiscuity for diverse prion isolates, arguing that bank vole PrP (BVPrP) may be inherently prone to adopting misfolded conformations. Therefore, we constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing WT BVPrP. Tg(BVPrP) mice developed spontaneous CNS dysfunction between 108 and 340 d of age and recapitulated the hallmarks of prion disease, including spongiform degeneration, pronounced astrogliosis, and deposition of alternatively folded PrP in the brain. Brain homogenates of ill Tg(BVPrP) mice transmitted disease to Tg(BVPrP) mice in ∼35 d, to Tg mice overexpressing mouse PrP in under 100 d, and to WT mice in ∼185 d. Our studies demonstrate experimentally that WT PrP can spontaneously form infectious prions in vivo. Thus, Tg(BVPrP) mice may be useful for studying the spontaneous formation of prions, and thus may provide insight into the etiology of sporadic CJD.

  3. Experimental research on wild-type p53 plasmid transfected into retinoblastoma cells and tissues using an ultrasound microbubble intensifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhou, X; Diao, L; Wang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The transfection efficiency of wild-type p53 (wtp53) was investigated in retinoblastoma (RB) Y79 cells using an ultrasound microbubble technique. A human RB nude mouse xenograft tumour model was also used to investigate whether this technique could deliver wtp53 into solid tumours. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that wtp53 was successfully transfected into Y79 cells in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group and in the plasmid with liposomes group, but not in the plasmid with ultrasound group or in the untreated control group. Flow cytometry showed that apoptosis was highest in the microbubbles and ultrasound group (25.58%) compared with the plasmid with liposomes group (19.50%), and the other two groups (< 10%). RT-PCR also showed that the wtp53 gene was successfully transfected into solid tumours in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group. This study provides preliminary evidence in support of a potential new approach to RB gene therapy. PMID:20819437

  4. Experimental research on wild-type p53 plasmid transfected into retinoblastoma cells and tissues using an ultrasound microbubble intensifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhou, X; Diao, L; Wang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The transfection efficiency of wild-type p53 (wtp53) was investigated in retinoblastoma (RB) Y79 cells using an ultrasound microbubble technique. A human RB nude mouse xenograft tumour model was also used to investigate whether this technique could deliver wtp53 into solid tumours. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that wtp53 was successfully transfected into Y79 cells in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group and in the plasmid with liposomes group, but not in the plasmid with ultrasound group or in the untreated control group. Flow cytometry showed that apoptosis was highest in the microbubbles and ultrasound group (25.58%) compared with the plasmid with liposomes group (19.50%), and the other two groups (< 10%). RT-PCR also showed that the wtp53 gene was successfully transfected into solid tumours in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group. This study provides preliminary evidence in support of a potential new approach to RB gene therapy.

  5. Spontaneous generation of rapidly transmissible prions in transgenic mice expressing wild-type bank vole prion protein.

    PubMed

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Stöhr, Jan; Oehler, Abby; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Grillo, Sunny K; Patel, Smita; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-02-28

    Currently, there are no animal models of the most common human prion disorder, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), in which prions are formed spontaneously from wild-type (WT) prion protein (PrP). Interestingly, bank voles (BV) exhibit an unprecedented promiscuity for diverse prion isolates, arguing that bank vole PrP (BVPrP) may be inherently prone to adopting misfolded conformations. Therefore, we constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing WT BVPrP. Tg(BVPrP) mice developed spontaneous CNS dysfunction between 108 and 340 d of age and recapitulated the hallmarks of prion disease, including spongiform degeneration, pronounced astrogliosis, and deposition of alternatively folded PrP in the brain. Brain homogenates of ill Tg(BVPrP) mice transmitted disease to Tg(BVPrP) mice in ∼35 d, to Tg mice overexpressing mouse PrP in under 100 d, and to WT mice in ∼185 d. Our studies demonstrate experimentally that WT PrP can spontaneously form infectious prions in vivo. Thus, Tg(BVPrP) mice may be useful for studying the spontaneous formation of prions, and thus may provide insight into the etiology of sporadic CJD. PMID:22331873

  6. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064.

    PubMed

    da Silva Vasconcelos, Eliton; de Lima, Vanderlei Aparecido; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Cruz-Hernández, Isara Lourdes; Hokka, Carlos Osamu

    2013-12-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064). The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant.

  7. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Vasconcelos, Eliton; de Lima, Vanderlei Aparecido; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Cruz-Hernández, Isara Lourdes; Hokka, Carlos Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064). The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant. PMID:24688492

  8. Physiology and metabolic fluxes of wild-type and riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, U; Hatzimanikatis, V; Hohmann, H P; Manneberg, M; van Loon, A P; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Continuous cultivation in a glucose-limited chemostat was used to determine the growth parameters of wild-type Bacillus subtilis and of a recombinant, riboflavin-producing strain. Maintenance coefficients of 0.45 and 0.66 mmol of glucose g-1 h-1 were determined for the wild-type and recombinant strains, respectively. However, the maximum molar growth yield of 82 to 85 g (cell dry weight)/mol of glucose was found to be almost identical in both strains. A nonlinear relationship between the specific riboflavin production rate and the dilution rate was observed, revealing a coupling of product formation and growth under strict substrate-limited conditions. Most prominently, riboflavin formation completely ceased at specific growth rates below 0.15 h-1. For molecular characterization of B. subtilis, the total amino acid composition of the wild type was experimentally determined and the complete building block requirements for biomass formation were derived. In particular, the murein sacculus was found to constitute approximately 9% of B. subtilis biomass, three- to fivefold more than in Escherichia coli. Estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes by a refined mass balance approach revealed a substantial, growth rate-dependent flux through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. Furthermore, this flux is indicated to be increased in the strain engineered for riboflavin formation. Glucose catabolism at low growth rates with reduced biomass yields was supported mainly by the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:8837424

  9. Interaction of root gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis wild-type and starchless mutants.

    PubMed

    Vitha, S; Zhao, L; Sack, F D

    2000-02-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis.

  10. Developmentally controlled telomere addition in wild-type and mutant paramecia.

    PubMed Central

    Forney, J D; Blackburn, E H

    1988-01-01

    We analyzed sites of macronuclear telomere addition at a single genetic locus in Paramecium tetraurelia. We showed that in homozygous wild-type cells, differential genomic processing during macronuclear development resulted in the A surface antigen gene being located 8, 13, or 26 kilobases upstream from a macronuclear telomere. We describe variable rearrangements that occurred at the telomere 8 kilobases from the A gene. A mutant (d48) that forms a telomere near the 5' end of the A gene was also analyzed. This mutant was shown to create simple terminal deletions; telomeric repeats were added directly to the truncated wild-type A gene sequence. In both the mutant and wild-type cells, the telomeric sequences (a mixture of C4A2 and C3A3 repeats) were added to various sequences within a specific 200- to 500-base-pair region rather than to a single site. No similarities were found in the primary sequences surrounding the telomere addition sites. The mutation in d48 changed the region of telomere addition at the A gene locus; this is the first example in ciliates of a mutation that affects the site of telomere addition. Images PMID:3336360

  11. Root graviresponsiveness and cellular differentiation in wild-type and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1989-01-01

    Primary roots of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana L. are strongly graviresponsive despite lacking amyloplasts in their columella cells. The ultrastructures of calyptrogen and peripheral cells in wild-type as compared to mutant seedlings are not significantly different. The largest difference in cellular differentiation in caps of mutant and wild-type roots is the relative volume of plastids in columella cells. Plastids occupy 12.3% of the volume of columella cells in wild-type seedlings, but only 3.69% of columella cells in mutant seedlings. These results indicate that: (1) amyloplasts and starch are not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; (2) the increase in relative volume of plastids that usually accompanies differentiation of columella cells is not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; and (3) the absence of starch and amyloplasts does not affect the structure of calyptrogen (i.e. meristematic) and secretory (i.e. peripheral) cells in root caps. These results are discussed relative to proposed models for root gravitropism.

  12. Genetic relationships and epidemiological links between wild type 1 poliovirus isolates in Pakistan and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Efforts have been made to eliminate wild poliovirus transmission since 1988 when the World Health Organization began its global eradication campaign. Since then, the incidence of polio has decreased significantly. However, serotype 1 and serotype 3 still circulate endemically in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Both countries constitute a single epidemiologic block representing one of the three remaining major global reservoirs of poliovirus transmission. In this study we used genetic sequence data to investigate transmission links among viruses from diverse locations during 2005-2007. Methods In order to find the origins and routes of wild type 1 poliovirus circulation, polioviruses were isolated from faecal samples of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) patients. We used viral cultures, two intratypic differentiation methods PCR, ELISA to characterize as vaccine or wild type 1 and nucleic acid sequencing of entire VP1 region of poliovirus genome to determine the genetic relatedness. Results One hundred eleven wild type 1 poliovirus isolates were subjected to nucleotide sequencing for genetic variation study. Considering the 15% divergence of the sequences from Sabin 1, Phylogenetic analysis by MEGA software revealed that active inter and intra country transmission of many genetically distinct strains of wild poliovirus type 1 belonged to genotype SOAS which is indigenous in this region. By grouping wild type 1 polioviruses according to nucleotide sequence homology, three distinct clusters A, B and C were obtained with multiple chains of transmission together with some silent circulations represented by orphan lineages. Conclusion Our results emphasize that there was a persistent transmission of wild type1 polioviruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2005-2007. The epidemiologic information provided by the sequence data can contribute to the formulation of better strategies for poliomyelitis control to those critical areas, associated with high risk

  13. Biomass Productivities in Wild Type and Pigment Mutant of Cyclotella sp. (Diatom)

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Bartha, Richard; Aksoy, M.; Weissman, Joseph C.; Benemann, John

    2008-07-03

    Microalgae are expected to play a significant role in greenhouse gas mitigation because they can utilize CO2 from powerplant flue gases directly while producing a variety of renewable carbon-neutral biofuels. In order for such a microalgal climate change mitigation strategy to become economically feasible, it will be necessary to significantly improve biomass productivities. One approach to achieve this objective is to reduce, via mutagenesis, the number of light harvesting pigments, which, according to theory, should significantly improve the light utilization efficiency, primarily by increasing the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is). Employing chemical (ethylmethylsulfonate, EMS) and UV mutagenesis of a wild type strain of the diatom Cyclotella, approximately 10,000 pigment mutants were generated, and two of the most promising ones (CM1 and CM1-1) were subjected to further testing in both laboratory cultures and outdoor ponds. Measurements of photosynthetic oxygen production rates as a function of light intensity (i.e., P-I curves) of samples taken from laboratory batch cultures during the exponential and linear growth phase indicated that the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is) was two to three times greater in the pigment mutant CM1-1 than in the wild type, i.e., 355-443 versus 116-169 μmole/m2∙sec, respectively. While theory, i.e., the Bush equation, predicts that such a significant gain in Is should increase light utilization efficiencies and thus biomass productivities, particularly at high light intensities, no improvements in biomass productivities were observed in either semi-continuous laboratory cultures or outdoor ponds. In fact, the maximum biomass productivity in semi-continuous laboratory culture was always greater in the wild type than in the mutant, namely 883 versus 725 mg/L∙d, respectively at low light intensity (200 μmole/m2∙sec) and 1229 versus 1043 mg/L∙d, respectively at high light intensity

  14. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  15. A novel type of self-beating cardiomyocytes in adult mouse ventricles

    SciTech Connect

    Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2009-04-10

    This study was designed to investigate the presence of resident heart cells that are distinct from terminally-differentiated cardiomyocytes. Adult mouse heart was coronary perfused with collagenase, and ventricles were excised and further digested. After spinning cardiomyocyte-containing fractions down, the supernatant fraction was collected and cultured without adding any chemicals. Two to five days after plating, some of rounded cells adhered to the culture dish, gradually changed their shape and then started self-beating. These self-beating cells did not appreciably proliferate but underwent a further morphological maturation process to form highly branched shapes with many projections. These cells were mostly multinucleated, well sarcomeric-organized and expressed cardiac marker proteins, defined as atypically-shaped cardiomyocytes (ACMs). Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ACMs exhibited spontaneous action potentials arising from the preceding slow diastolic depolarization. We thus found a novel type of resident heart cells in adult cardiac ventricles that spontaneously develop into self-beating cardiomyocytes.

  16. Expression of Quaking RNA-Binding Protein in the Adult and Developing Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Aono, Kentaro; Kawashima, Togo; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Ku, Li; Feng, Yue; Koike, Chieko

    2016-01-01

    Quaking (QKI), which belongs to the STAR family of KH domain-containing RNA-binding proteins, functions in pre-mRNA splicing, microRNA regulation, and formation of circular RNA. QKI plays critical roles in myelinogenesis in the central and peripheral nervous systems and has been implicated neuron-glia fate decision in the brain; however, neither the expression nor function of QKI in the neural retina is known. Here we report the expression of QKI RNA-binding protein in the developing and mature mouse retina. QKI was strongly expressed by Müller glial cells in both the developing and adult retina. Intriguingly, during development, QKI was expressed in early differentiating neurons, such as the horizontal and amacrine cells, and subsequently in later differentiating bipolar cells, but not in photoreceptors. Neuronal expression was uniformly weak in the adult. Among QKI isoforms (5, 6, and 7), QKI-5 was the predominantly expressed isoform in the adult retina. To study the function of QKI in the mouse retina, we examined quakingviable(qkv) mice, which have a dysmyelination phenotype that results from deficiency of QKI expression and reduced numbers of mature oligodendrocytes. In homozygous qkv mutant mice (qkv/qkv), the optic nerve expression levels of QKI-6 and 7, but not QKI-5 were reduced. In the retina of the mutant homozygote, QKI-5 levels were unchanged, and QKI-6 and 7 levels, already low, were also unaffected. We conclude that QKI is expressed in developing and adult Müller glia. QKI is additionally expressed in progenitors and in differentiating neurons during retinal development, but expression weakened or diminished during maturation. Among QKI isoforms, we found that QKI-5 predominated in the adult mouse retina. Since Müller glial cells are thought to share properties with retinal progenitor cells, our data suggest that QKI may contribute to maintaining retinal progenitors prior to differentiation into neurons. On the other hand, the expression of QKI in

  17. Establishment of Leptin-Responsive Cell Lines from Adult Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Hiroshi; Dote, Katsuko; Bando, Mika; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hosoda, Kiminori; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2016-01-01

    Leptin resistance is considered to be the primary cause of obesity. However, the cause of leptin resistance remains incompletely understood, and there is currently no cure for the leptin-resistant state. In order to identify novel drug-target molecules that could overcome leptin resistance, it would be useful to develop in vitro assay systems for evaluating leptin resistance. In this study, we established immortalized adult mouse hypothalamus—derived cell lines, termed adult mouse hypothalamus (AMH) cells, by developing transgenic mice in which SV40 Tag was overexpressed in chromogranin A—positive cells in a tamoxifen-dependent manner. In order to obtain leptin-responsive clones, we selected clones based on the phosphorylation levels of STAT3 induced by leptin. The selected clones were fairly responsive to leptin in terms of STAT3, ERK, and Akt phosphorylation and induction of c-Fos mRNA induction. Pretreatment with leptin, insulin, and palmitate attenuated the c-Fos mRNA response to leptin, suggesting that certain aspects of leptin resistance might be reconstituted in this cellular model. These cell lines are useful tools for understanding the molecular nature of the signal disturbance in the leptin-resistant state and for identifying potential target molecules for drugs that relieve leptin resistance, although they have drawbacks including de-differentiated nature and lack of long-time stability. PMID:26849804

  18. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  19. Wt1 dictates the fate of fetal and adult Leydig cells during development in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Zheng, Qiao-Song; Li, Xi-Xia; Hu, Zhao-Yuan; Gao, Fei; Cheng, C Yan; Liu, Yi-Xun

    2014-12-15

    Wilms' tumor 1 (Wt1) is a tumor suppressor gene encoding ∼24 zinc finger transcription factors. In the mammalian testis, Wt1 is expressed mostly by Sertoli cells (SCs) involved in testis development, spermatogenesis, and adult Leydig cell (ALC) steroidogenesis. Global knockout (KO) of Wt1 is lethal in mice due to defects in embryogenesis. Herein, we showed that Wt1 is involved in regulating fetal Leydig cell (FLC) degeneration and ALC differentiation during testicular development. Using Wt1(-/flox);Amh-Cre mice that specifically deleted Wt1 in the SC vs. age-matched wild-type (WT) controls, FLC-like-clusters were found in Wt1-deficient testes that remained mitotically active from postnatal day 1 (P1) to P56, and no ALC was detected at these ages. Leydig cells in mutant adult testes displayed morphological features of FLC. Also, FLC-like cells in adult mutant testes had reduced expression in ALC-associated genes Ptgds, Sult1e1, Vcam1, Hsd11b1, Hsd3b6, and Hsd17b3 but high expression of FLC-associated genes Thbs2 and Hsd3b1. Whereas serum LH and testosterone level in mutant mice were not different from controls, intratesticular testosterone level was significantly reduced. Deletion of Wt1 gene also perturbed the expression of steroidogenic enzymes Star, P450c17, Hsd3b6, Hsd3b1, Hsd17b1, and Hsd17b3. FLCs in adult mutant testes failed to convert androstenedione to testosterone due to a lack of Hsd17b3, and this defect was rescued by coculturing with fetal SCs. In summary, FLC-like cells in mutant testes are putative FLCs that remain mitotically active in adult mice, illustrating that Wt1 dictates the fate of FLC and ALC during postnatal testis development.

  20. Ontogeny of SERT Expression and Antidepressant-like Response to Escitalopram in Wild-Type and SERT Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nathan C; Gould, Georgianna G; Koek, Wouter; Daws, Lynette C

    2016-08-01

    Depression is a disabling affective disorder for which the majority of patients are not effectively treated. This problem is exacerbated in children and adolescents for whom only two antidepressants are approved, both of which are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs). Unfortunately SSRIs are often less effective in juveniles than in adults; however, the mechanism(s) underlying age-dependent responses to SSRIs is unknown. To this end, we compared the antidepressant-like response to the SSRI escitalopram using the tail suspension test and saturation binding of [(3)H]citalopram to the serotonin transporter (SERT), the primary target of SSRIs, in juvenile [postnatal day (P)21], adolescent (P28), and adult (P90) wild-type (SERT+/+) mice. In addition, to model individuals carrying low-expressing SERT variants, we studied mice with reduced SERT expression (SERT+/-) or lacking SERT (SERT-/-). Maximal antidepressant-like effects were less in P21 mice relative to P90 mice. This was especially apparent in SERT+/- mice. However, the potency for escitalopram to produce antidepressant-like effects in SERT+/+ and SERT+/- mice was greater in P21 and P28 mice than in adults. SERT expression increased with age in terminal regions and decreased with age in cell body regions. Binding affinity values did not change as a function of age or genotype. As expected, in SERT-/- mice escitalopram produced no behavioral effects, and there was no specific [(3)H]citalopram binding. These data reveal age- and genotype-dependent shifts in the dose-response for escitalopram to produce antidepressant-like effects, which vary with SERT expression, and may contribute to the limited therapeutic response to SSRIs in juveniles and adolescents. PMID:27288483

  1. Structural and Morphometric Comparison of Lower Incisors in PACAP-Deficient and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Sandor, B; Fintor, K; Reglodi, D; Fulop, D B; Helyes, Z; Szanto, I; Nagy, P; Hashimoto, H; Tamas, A

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with widespread distribution. PACAP plays an important role in the development of the nervous system, it has a trophic and protective effect, and it is also implicated in the regulation of various physiological functions. Teeth are originated from the mesenchyme of the neural crest and the ectoderm of the first branchial arch, suggesting similarities with the development of the nervous system. Earlier PACAP-immunoreactive fibers have been found in the odontoblastic and subodontoblastic layers of the dental pulp. Our previous examinations have shown that PACAP deficiency causes alterations in the morphology and structure of the developing molars of 7-day-old mice. In our present study, morphometric and structural comparison was performed on the incisors of 1-year-old wild-type and PACAP-deficient mice. Hard tissue density measurements and morphometric comparison were carried out on the mandibles and the lower incisors with micro-CT. For structural examination, Raman microscopy was applied on frontal thin sections of the mandible. With micro-CT morphometrical measurements, the size of the incisors and the relative volume of the pulp to dentin were significantly smaller in the PACAP-deficient group compared to the wild-type animals. The density of calcium hydroxyapatite in the dentin was reduced in the PACAP-deficient mice. No structural differences could be observed in the enamel with Raman microscopy. Significant differences were found in the dentin of PACAP-deficient mice with Raman microscopy, where increased carbonate/phosphate ratio indicates higher intracrystalline disordering. The evaluation of amide III bands in the dentin revealed higher structural diversity in wild-type mice. Based upon our present and previous results, it is obvious that PACAP plays an important role in tooth development with the regulation of morphogenesis, dentin, and enamel mineralization. Further studies are

  2. Adaptive thermogenesis and thermal conductance in wild-type and UCP1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Willershäuser, Monja; Jastroch, Martin; Rourke, Bryan C.; Fromme, Tobias; Oelkrug, Rebecca; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Klingenspor, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We compared maximal cold-induced heat production (HPmax) and cold limits between warm (WA; 27°C), moderate cold (MCA; 18°C), or cold acclimated (CA; 5°C) wild-type and uncoupling-protein 1 knockout (UCP1-KO) mice. In wild-type mice, HPmax was successively increased after MCA and CA, and the cold limit was lowered to −8.3°C and −18.0°C, respectively. UCP1-KO mice also increased HPmax in response to MCA and CA, although to a lesser extent. Direct comparison revealed a maximal cold-induced recruitment of heat production by +473 mW and +227 mW in wild-type and UCP1-KO mice, respectively. The increase in cold tolerance of UCP1-KO mice from −0.9°C in MCA to −10.1°C in CA could not be directly related to changes in HPmax, indicating that UCP1-KO mice used the dissipated heat more efficiently than wild-type mice. As judged from respiratory quotients, acutely cold-challenged UCP1-KO mice showed a delayed transition toward lipid oxidation, and 5-h cold exposure revealed diminished physical activity and less variability in the control of metabolic rate. We conclude that BAT is required for maximal adaptive thermogenesis but also allows metabolic flexibility and a rapid switch toward sustained lipid-fuelled thermogenesis as an acute response to cold. In both CA groups, expression of contractile proteins (myosin heavy-chain isoforms) showed minor training effects in skeletal muscles, while cardiac muscle of UCP1-KO mice had novel expression of beta cardiac isoform. Neither respiration nor basal proton conductance of skeletal muscle mitochondria were different between genotypes. In subcutaneous white adipose tissue of UCP1-KO mice, cold exposure increased cytochrome-c oxidase activity and expression of the cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector A by 3.6-fold and 15-fold, respectively, indicating the recruitment of mitochondria-rich brown adipocyte-like cells. Absence of functional BAT leads to remodeling of white adipose tissue, which may significantly contribute

  3. Zika virus infection during the period of maximal brain growth causes microcephaly and corticospinal neuron apoptosis in wild type mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Chin; Abraham, Rachy; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choe, Hyeryun; Page, Damon T.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women has been established as a cause of microcephaly in newborns. Here we test the hypothesis that neurodevelopmental stages when the brain is undergoing rapid growth are particularly vulnerable to the effects of ZIKV infection. We injected ZIKV intracranially into wild type C57BL/6 mice at two different time points: early postnatal development, when the brain is growing at its maximal rate, and at weaning, when the brain has largely reached adult size. Both time points showed widespread immunoreactivity for ZIKV and cleaved caspase 3 (CC3, a marker of apoptosis) throughout the brain. However, in early postnatal ZIKV injected mice, some brain areas and cell types display particularly large increases in apoptosis that we did not observe in older animals. Corticospinal pyramidal neurons, a cell type implicated in human microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection, are an example of one such cell type. Proliferating cells in the ventricular zone stem cell compartment are also depleted. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that periods of rapid brain growth are especially susceptible to neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection, and establish a valuable model to investigate mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection and explore candidate therapeutics. PMID:27713505

  4. Does the early social environment affect structure and consistency of personality in wild-type male's rat?

    PubMed

    Gracceva, Giulia; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Groothuis, Ton G G

    2011-09-01

    Animal personality has been extensively studied from a functional and evolutionary point of view. Less attention has been paid to the development of personality, its phenotypic plasticity, and the influence of manipulation of early environmental factors. Here we describe the effects of manipulating the sex ratio of the litter, at postnatal day (pnd) 3, in wild-type rats, on personality traits in adulthood. We measured the treatment effects on aggression, defensive burying, and open field behavior at pnd 90 and 120, as well as on their contextual generality, and stability over time (differential and structural consistency). Main effects of litter composition were found on open field behavior at pnd 120 but not on the other behaviors. Since correlations between behaviors changed over time irrespective of the specific treatment, whereas in previous studies on unmanipulated litters this was not the case we suggest that early handling may disrupt adult personality traits. Overall the data indicate that personality is less stable over time that often assumed, having both proximate and ultimate implications.

  5. Gonadotropin treatment augments postnatal oogenesis and primordial follicle assembly in adult mouse ovaries?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    positive immuno staining on germ cell nest-like clusters and at places primordial follicles appeared connected through oocytes. Conclusions The results of the present study show that gonadotropin (PMSG) treatment to adult mouse leads to increased pluripotent stem cell activity in the ovaries, associated with increased meiosis, appearance of several cohorts of PF and their assembly in close proximity of OSE. This was found associated with the presence of germ cell nests and cytoplasmic continuity of oocytes in PF. We have earlier reported that pluripotent ovarian stem cells in the adult mammalian ovary are the VSELs which give rise to slightly differentiated OGSCs. Thus we propose that gonadotropin through its action on pluripotent VSELs augments neo-oogenesis and PF assembly in adult mouse ovaries. PMID:23134576

  6. Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.8 in the regulation of the release and synthesis of substance P in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, He-Bin; Shiba, Eri; Li, Yu-Sang; Morioka, Norimitsu; Zheng, Tai-Xing; Ogata, Nobukuni; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2008-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Na(v)1.8 contributes to the release and/or synthesis of substance P (SP) in adult mice dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The SP released from cultured DRG neurons of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice exposed to either capsaicin or KCl was significantly lower than that from wild-type (C57BL/6) mice based on a radioimmunoassay. The SP level of L6 DRG in Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice was also lower than that in wild-type mice. After chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, the level of SP decreased in the L6 ipsilateral DRG of wild-type but not Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. The preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) mRNAs in L4 - 6 DRGs of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice also fell to half their normally abundant levels of expression. There were significant increases in Na(v)1.8 expression of the L6 contralateral DRG from wild-type mice and in the percentage of neurons expressing neurokinin-1 receptor in the cytosol of L6 DRGs from wild-type or Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. These findings suggest that Na(v)1.8 is involved in the regulation of the release and synthesis of SP in the DRG neurons of wild-type mice. PMID:18845912

  7. Fingolimod induces neurogenesis in adult mouse hippocampus and improves contextual fear memory.

    PubMed

    Efstathopoulos, P; Kourgiantaki, A; Karali, K; Sidiropoulou, K; Margioris, A N; Gravanis, A; Charalampopoulos, I

    2015-11-24

    Fingolimod (FTY720) was the first per os administered disease-modifying agent approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. It is thought that fingolimod modulates the immune response by activating sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P1) on lymphocytes following its in vivo phosphorylation. In addition to its immune-related effects, there is evidence that fingolimod exerts several other effects in the central nervous system, including regulation of the proliferation, survival and differentiation of various cell types and their precursors. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of fingolimod on the production of new neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus and the association of this effect with the ability for pattern separation, an established adult neurogenesis-dependent memory function. Immunofluorescence analysis after chronic administration of a physiologic dose of fingolimod (0.3 mg kg(-1)) revealed a significant increase in both the proliferation and the survival of neural progenitors in the area of dentate gyrus of hippocampus, compared with control animals. These effects were replicated in vitro, in cultures of murine hippocampal neural stem/precursor cells that express S1P1 receptor, suggesting cell-autonomous actions. The effects of fingolimod on neurogenesis were correlated to enhanced ability for context discrimination after fear conditioning. Since impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory is a common feature of many neuropsychiatric conditions, fingolimod treatment may be beneficial in therapeutic armamentarium of these disorders.

  8. Localization and regulation of PML bodies in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Małgorzata H; Magalska, Adriana; Malinowska, Monika; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Czaban, Iwona; Patel, Satyam; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Zołocińska, Ewa; Broszkiewicz, Hanna; Parobczak, Kamil; Nair, Rajeevkumar R; Rylski, Marcin; Pawlak, Robert; Bramham, Clive R; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2016-06-01

    PML is a tumor suppressor protein involved in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic leukemia. In non-neuronal cells, PML is a principal component of characteristic nuclear bodies. In the brain, PML has been implicated in the control of embryonic neurogenesis, and in certain physiological and pathological phenomena in the adult brain. Yet, the cellular and subcellular localization of the PML protein in the brain, including its presence in the nuclear bodies, has not been investigated comprehensively. Because the formation of PML bodies appears to be a key aspect in the function of the PML protein, we investigated the presence of these structures and their anatomical distribution, throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PML is broadly expressed across the gray matter, with the highest levels in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In the cerebral cortex PML is present exclusively in neurons, in which it forms well-defined nuclear inclusions containing SUMO-1, SUMO 2/3, but not Daxx. At the ultrastructural level, the appearance of neuronal PML bodies differs from the classic one, i.e., the solitary structure with more or less distinctive capsule. Rather, neuronal PML bodies have the form of small PML protein aggregates located in the close vicinity of chromatin threads. The number, size, and signal intensity of neuronal PML bodies are dynamically influenced by immobilization stress and seizures. Our study indicates that PML bodies are broadly involved in activity-dependent nuclear phenomena in adult neurons.

  9. Rearing in Seawater Mesocosms Improves the Spawning Performance of Growth Hormone Transgenic and Wild-Type Coho Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Leggatt, Rosalind A.; Hollo, Tanya; Vandersteen, Wendy E.; McFarlane, Kassandra; Goh, Benjamin; Prevost, Joelle; Devlin, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenes can significantly accelerate growth rates in fish and cause associated alterations to their physiology and behaviour. Concern exists regarding potential environmental risks of GH transgenic fish, should they enter natural ecosystems. In particular, whether they can reproduce and generate viable offspring under natural conditions is poorly understood. In previous studies, GH transgenic salmon grown under contained culture conditions had lower spawning behaviour and reproductive success relative to wild-type fish reared in nature. However, wild-type salmon cultured in equal conditions also had limited reproductive success. As such, whether decreased reproductive success of GH transgenic salmon is due to the action of the transgene or to secondary effects of culture (or a combination) has not been fully ascertained. Hence, salmon were reared in large (350,000 L), semi-natural, seawater tanks (termed mesocosms) designed to minimize effects of standard laboratory culture conditions, and the reproductive success of wild-type and GH transgenic coho salmon from mesocosms were compared with that of wild-type fish from nature. Mesocosm rearing partially restored spawning behaviour and success of wild-type fish relative to culture rearing, but remained lower overall than those reared in nature. GH transgenic salmon reared in the mesocosm had similar spawning behaviour and success as wild-type fish reared in the mesocosm when in full competition and without competition, but had lower success in male-only competition experiments. There was evidence of genotype×environmental interactions on spawning success, so that spawning success of transgenic fish, should they escape to natural systems in early life, cannot be predicted with low uncertainty. Under the present conditions, we found no evidence to support enhanced mating capabilities of GH transgenic coho salmon compared to wild-type salmon. However, it is clear that GH transgenic salmon are

  10. Effects of organisational oestradiol on adult immunoreactive oestrogen receptors (alpha and beta) in the male mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kudwa, A E; Harada, N; Honda, S-I; Rissman, E F

    2007-10-01

    Steroid hormones act on developing neural circuits that regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are involved in hormone-sensitive behaviours. To test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to oestradiol (E(2)) organises the quantity of adult oestrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta), we used male mice with a targeted mutation of the aromatase enzyme gene (ArKO) and their wild-type (WT) littermates. These mice are unable to aromatise testosterone to E(2), but still express both ERalpha and beta. To evaluate adult responsiveness to E(2), gonadectomised males were implanted with Silastic capsules containing E(2), or an empty implant, 5 days prior to sacrifice. Immunoreactivity for ERalpha and ERbeta was quantified in the caudal ventromedial nucleus (VMN) and the medial preoptic area (POA). Regardless of genotype, adult treatment with E(2) reduced ERalpha-immunoreactive (ir) and ERbeta-ir cell numbers in the POA, as well as ERbeta-ir, but not ERalpha-ir, cell numbers in the VMN. Genotype, and thus endogenous exposure to E(2), produced opposite effects on ER expression in the two brain areas. In the VMN, ArKO males had more ERalpha-ir and ERbeta-ir cells than did WT males. In the POA, ArKO males had fewer ERalpha-ir and ERbeta-ir cells than did WT males. Thus, numbers of immunoreactive neurones containing both ERs in the adult ArKO male were enhanced in the POA, but decreased in the VMN, and most likely these patterns were established during the developmental critical period. Furthermore, although both ERalpha and beta-ir cell numbers are altered by the disruption of the aromatase gene, ERbeta is altered in a more robust and region-specific manner.

  11. Effects of female pheromones on gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression and luteinizing hormone release in male wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C; Wersinger, S R; Rissman, E F

    2000-12-01

    Pheromones are an important class of environmental cues that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in a variety of vertebrate species, including humans. When male mice contact female-soiled bedding, or urine, they display a reflexive luteinizing hormone (LH) surge within 30 min. Aside from the requirement that males have gonads to show this response, the physiological mechanisms that underlie this pituitary response are unknown. In this experiment, we asked if female pheromones acted at the level of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression to affect this hormone response. In addition, we also examined the contribution of one of the oestrogen receptors (ERalpha) by studying this neuroendocrine reflex in wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) males. Both ERalphaKO and wild-type males showed the expected LH surge, 45 and 90 min after contact with female pheromones. Males housed in clean bedding or bedding soiled by another adult male did not display the LH elevation. Interestingly, this dramatic change in LH concentrations was not accompanied by any alterations in GnRH mRNA expression or levels of primary transcript in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus. The one exception to this was a significant increase in GnRH mRNA expression in tissue collected from wild-type males exposed to bedding from another male. This is particularly intriguing since LH was not elevated in these males. These data replicate and extend our previous finding that ERalphaKO males do exhibit an LH surge in response to female pheromones. Thus, this neuroendocrine response is regulated by a steroid receptor other than ERalpha and does not require alterations in GnRH mRNA expression.

  12. Insights into wild-type and mutant p53 functions provided by genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Donehower, Lawrence A

    2014-06-01

    Recent whole-exome sequencing studies of numerous human cancers have now conclusively shown that the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Despite extensive studies of the TP53 gene and its encoded protein (p53), our understanding of how TP53 mutations contribute to cancer initiation and progression remain incomplete. Genetically engineered mice with germline or inducible Trp53 somatic mutations have provided important insights into the mechanisms by which different types of p53 mutation influence cancer development. Trp53 germline mutations that alter specific p53 structural domains or posttranslation modification sites have benefitted our understanding of wild-type p53 functions in a whole organism context. Moreover, genetic approaches to reestablish functional wild-type p53 to p53-deficient tissues and tumors have increased our understanding of the therapeutic potential of restoring functional p53 signaling to cancers. This review outlines many of the key insights provided by the various categories of Trp53 mutant mice that have been generated by multiple genetic engineering approaches.

  13. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  14. Proteomic response to physiological fermentation stresses in a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Ferro, Elisa; Coratza, Grazietta; Bovalini, Lucia; Lusini, Paola; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-01-01

    We report a study on the adaptive response of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolated from natural spontaneous grape must, to mild and progressive physiological stresses due to fermentation. We observed by two-dimensional electrophoresis how the yeast proteome changes during glucose exhaustion, before the cell enters its complete stationary phase. On the basis of their identification, the proteins representing the S. cerevisiae proteomic response to fermentation stresses were divided into three classes: repressed proteins, induced proteins and autoproteolysed proteins. In an overall view, the proteome adaptation of S. cerevisiae at the time of glucose exhaustion seems to be directed mainly against the effects of ethanol, causing both hyperosmolarity and oxidative responses. Stress-induced autoproteolysis is directed mainly towards specific isoforms of glycolytic enzymes. Through the use of a wild-type S. cerevisiae strain and PMSF, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar proteinase B, we could also distinguish the specific contributions of the vacuole and the proteasome to the autoproteolytic process. PMID:12401115

  15. Prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of wild type BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-06-01

    Even though mutations in the tumor suppressor, BRCA1, markedly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, most breast and ovarian cancers express wild type BRCA1. An important question is therefore how the tumor-suppressive function of normal BRCA1 is overcome during development of most cancers. Because prolactin promotes these and other cancers, we investigated the hypothesis that prolactin interferes with the ability of BRCA1 to inhibit the cell cycle. Examining six different cancer cell lines with wild type BRCA1, and making use of both prolactin and the growth-inhibiting selective prolactin receptor modulator, S179D PRL, we demonstrate that prolactin activation of Stat5 results in the formation of a complex between phospho-Stat5 and BRCA1. Formation of this complex does not interfere with nuclear translocation or binding of BRCA1 to the p21 promoter, but does interfere with the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate the p21 promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Stat5 in prolactin-stimulated cells resulted in increased p21 expression. We conclude that prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of BRCA1 by interfering with BRCA1's upregulation of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21.

  16. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  17. Gravitropism of hypocotyls of wild-type and starch-deficient Arabidopsis seedlings in spaceflight studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Edelmann, R. E.; Wood, P. C.

    1999-01-01

    The major purpose of this spaceflight project was to investigate the starch-statolith hypothesis for gravity perception, and a secondary goal was to study plant growth and development under spaceflight conditions. This research was based on our ground studies of gravity perception in the wild type and three starch-deficient (one starchless and two reduced starch) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Dark-grown seedlings that developed in microgravity were given one of several (30 min, 60 min, or 90 min) 1-g stimuli by an on-board centrifuge, and additional controls for seedling development also were performed. These latter control experiments included a morphological study of plants that developed in space in microgravity (F microg), in space on a centrifuge (F 1g), on the ground (G 1g), and on a rotating clinostat on the ground. Since elevated levels of ethylene were reported in the spacecraft atmosphere, additional controls for morphology and gravitropism with added ethylene also were performed. While exogenous ethylene reduced the absolute magnitude of the response in all four strains of Arabidopsis, this gas did not appear to change the relative graviresponsiveness among the strains. The relative response of hypocotyls of microgravity-grown seedlings to the stimuli provided by the in-flight centrifuge was: wild type > starch-deficient mutants. Although the protoplast pressure model for gravity perception cannot be excluded, these results are consistent with a statolith-based model for perception in plants.

  18. Plastid sedimentation kinetics in roots of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCleery, S. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation and movement of plastids in columella cells of the root cap were measured in seedlings of wild-type, a reduced starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis. To assay for sedimentation, we used both linear measurements and the change of angle from the cell center as indices in vertical and reoriented plants with the aid of computer-assisted image analysis. Seedlings were fixed at short periods after reorientation, and plastid sedimentation correlated with starch content in the three strains of Arabidopsis. Amyloplasts of wild-type seedlings showed the greatest sedimentation, whereas plastids of the starchless mutant showed no significant sedimentation in the vertically grown and reoriented seedlings. Because previous research has shown that a full complement of starch is needed for full gravitropic sensitivity, this study correlates increased sensitivity with plastid sedimentation. However, although plastid sedimentation contributed to gravisensitivity, it was not required, because the gravitropic starchless mutant had plastids that did not sediment. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to measure plastid sedimentation in Arabidopsis roots after reorientation of seedlings. Taken together, the results of this study are consistent with the classic plastid-based and protoplast-based models of graviperception and suggest that multiple systems of perception exist in plant cells.

  19. The mechanical properties of tail tendon fascicles from lubricin knockout, wild type and heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Reuvers, John; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhang, Ling; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Warman, Matthew L; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of lubricin on tendon stiffness and viscoelasticity. A total of 36 mice were tested with 12 mice in each of the following groups: lubricin knock-out ⁻/⁻, heterozygous ⁺/⁻ and wild-type ⁺/⁺. A ramp test was used to determine the elastic modulus by pulling the fascicles to 2.5% strain amplitude at a rate of 0.05 mm/s. Then, followed by a relaxation test that pulled the fascicles to 5% strain amplitude at a rate of 2 mm/s. The fascicles were allowed to relax for 2 min at the maximum strain and a single-cycle relaxation ratio was used to characterize viscoelastic properties. There was no significant difference in the Young's modulus between the three groups (p > 0.05), but the knockout mice had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower relaxation ratio than the wild type mice. Based on these data, we concluded that lubricin expression has an effect on the viscoelastic properties of tendon fascicles. The clinical significance of this finding, if any, remains to be demonstrated.

  20. The mechanical properties of tail tendon fascicles from lubricin knockout, wild type and heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Reuvers, John; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhang, Ling; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Warman, Matthew L.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of lubricin on tendon stiffness and viscoelasticity. A total of 36 mice were tested with 12 mice in each of the following groups: lubricin knock-out (−/−), heterozygous (+/−) and wild-type (+/+). A ramp test was used to determine the elastic modulus by pulling the fascicles to 2.5% strain amplitude at a rate of 0.05 mm/s. Then, followed by a relaxation test that pulled the fascicles to 5% strain amplitude at a rate of 2 mm/s. The fascicles were allowed to relax for 2 min at the maximum strain and a single-cycle relaxation ratio was used to characterize viscoelastic properties. There was no significant difference in the Young’s modulus between the three groups (p > 0.05), but the knockout mice had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower relaxation ratio than the wild type mice. Based on these data, we concluded that lubricin expression has an effect on the viscoelastic properties of tendon fascicles. The clinical significance of this finding, if any, remains to be demonstrated. PMID:21821131

  1. Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in wild-type turkeys living in close contact with domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Jessup, D A; DaMassa, A J; Lewis, R; Jones, K R

    1983-12-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum was isolated from 2 wild-type turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and 1 domestic turkey living in close contact on a farm in Tehama County, California. Sinusitis was detected in 2 of 14 wild-type turkeys and in 1 of 12 feral broad-breasted bronze turkeys, but in none of several chickens on the premises. The entire mixed flock was captured, sinus aspirates were collected from affected birds, and blood samples were obtained from all birds for serologic testing. Blood samples also were obtained from 10 domestic turkeys on adjacent premises from which breeding stock had been borrowed. The M gallisepticum isolated from sinus aspirates was typed and inoculated into susceptible chickens, resulting in airsacculitis. California wild turkeys with and without histories of exposure to domestic fowl and wild turkeys shipped into California from Texas for release were tested for antibodies to M gallisepticum, using the plate agglutination test. Evidence of M gallisepticum infection was not found in wild turkeys at any location other than the original premises.

  2. Global carbon utilization profiles of wild-type, mutant, and transformant strains of Hypocrea jecorina.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Schmoll, Monika; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2006-03-01

    The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), an industrial producer of cellulases and hemicellulases, can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides. However, the catabolic pathways for the resulting monomers and their relationship to enzyme induction are not well known. Here we used the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays technique to evaluate the growth of H. jecorina on 95 carbon sources. For this purpose, we compared several wild-type isolates, mutants producing different amounts of cellulases, and strains transformed with a heterologous antibiotic resistance marker gene. The wild-type isolates and transformed strains had the highest variation in growth patterns on individual carbon sources. The cellulase mutants were relatively similar to their parental strains. Both in the mutant and in the transformed strains, the most significant changes occurred in utilization of xylitol, erythritol, D-sorbitol, D-ribose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, maltotriose, and beta-methyl-glucoside. Increased production of cellulases was negatively correlated with the ability to grow on gamma-aminobutyrate, adonitol, and 2-ketogluconate; and positively correlated with that on d-sorbitol and saccharic acid. The reproducibility, relative simplicity, and high resolution (+/-10% of increase in mycelial density) of the phenotypic microarrays make them a useful tool for the characterization of mutant and transformed strains and for a global analysis of gene function.

  3. Genetic recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses among wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Roth, Anette; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    Genetic recombination has been suggested to occur in mosquito-borne flaviviruses. In contrast, tick-borne flaviviruses have been thought to evolve in a clonal manner, although recent studies suggest that recombination occurs also for these viruses. We re-analyzed the data and found that previous conclusions on wild type recombination were probably falsely drawn due to misalignments of nucleotide sequences, ambiguities in GenBank sequences, or different laboratory culture histories suggestive of recombination events in laboratory. To evaluate if reliable predictions of wild type recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses can be made, we analyzed viral strains sequenced exclusively for this study, and other flavivirus sequences retrieved from GenBank. We detected genetic signals supporting recombination between viruses within the three clades of TBEV-Eu, TBEV-Sib and TBEV-Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that the tick-borne encephalitis viruses may undergo recombination under natural conditions, but that geographic barriers restrict most recombination events to involve only closely genetically related viruses.

  4. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. PMID:26319139

  5. Structural insights into conformational stability of both wild-type and mutant EZH2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aier, Imlimaong; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Raj, Utkarsh

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have been observed to maintain the pattern of histone by methylation of the histone tail responsible for the gene expression in various cellular processes, of which enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) acts as tumor suppressor. Overexpression of EZH2 results in hyper activation found in a variety of cancer. Point mutation on two important residues were induced and the results were compared between the wild type and mutant EZH2. The mutation of Y641 and A677 present in the active region of the protein alters the interaction of the top ranked compound with the newly modeled binding groove of the SET domain, giving a GLIDE score of −12.26 kcal/mol, better than that of the wild type at −11.664 kcal/mol. In depth analysis were carried out for understanding the underlying molecular mechanism using techniques viz. molecular dynamics, principal component analysis, residue interaction network and free energy landscape analysis, which showed that the mutated residues changed the overall conformation of the system along with the residue-residue interaction network. The insight from this study could be of great relevance while designing new compounds for EZH2 enzyme inhibition and the effect of mutation on the overall binding mechanism of the system. PMID:27713574

  6. Co-fibrillogenesis of Wild-type and D76N β2-Microglobulin: THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF FIBRILLAR SEEDS.

    PubMed

    Natalello, Antonino; Mangione, P Patrizia; Giorgetti, Sofia; Porcari, Riccardo; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Relini, Annalisa; Ami, Diletta; Faravelli, Giulia; Valli, Maurizia; Stoppini, Monica; Doglia, Silvia M; Bellotti, Vittorio; Raimondi, Sara

    2016-04-29

    The amyloidogenic variant of β2-microglobulin, D76N, can readily convert into genuine fibrils under physiological conditions and primes in vitro the fibrillogenesis of the wild-type β2-microglobulin. By Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that the amyloid transformation of wild-type β2-microglobulin can be induced by the variant only after its complete fibrillar conversion. Our current findings are consistent with preliminary data in which we have shown a seeding effect of fibrils formed from D76N or the natural truncated form of β2-microglobulin lacking the first six N-terminal residues. Interestingly, the hybrid wild-type/variant fibrillar material acquired a thermodynamic stability similar to that of homogenous D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils and significantly higher than the wild-type homogeneous fibrils prepared at neutral pH in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol. These results suggest that the surface of D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils can favor the transition of the wild-type protein into an amyloid conformation leading to a rapid integration into fibrils. The chaperone crystallin, which is a mild modulator of the lag phase of the variant fibrillogenesis, potently inhibits fibril elongation of the wild-type even once it is absorbed on D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils. PMID:26921323

  7. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  8. Wild-Type p53 Enhances Efficiency of Simian Virus 40 Large-T-Antigen-Induced Cellular Transformation▿

    PubMed Central

    Hermannstädter, Andrea; Ziegler, Christine; Kühl, Marion; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2009-01-01

    Abortive infection of BALB/c mouse embryo fibroblasts differing in p53 gene status (p53+/+ versus p53−/−) with simian virus 40 (SV40) revealed a quantitatively and qualitatively decreased transformation efficiency in p53−/− cells compared to p53+/+ cells, suggesting a supportive effect of wild-type (wt) p53 in the SV40 transformation process. SV40 transformation efficiency also was low in immortalized p53−/− BALB/c 10-1 cells but could be restored to approximately the level in immortalized p53+/+ BALB/c 3T3 cells by reconstituting wt p53, but not mutant p53 (mutp53), expression. Stable expression of large T antigen (LT) in p53+/+ 3T3 cells resulted in full transformation, while LT expression in p53−/− 10-1 cells could not promote growth in suspension or in soft agar to a significant extent. The helper effect of wt p53 is mediated by its cooperation with LT and resides in the p53 N terminus, as an N-terminally truncated p53 (ΔNp53) could not rescue the p53-null phenotype. The p53 N terminus serves as a scaffold for recruiting transcriptional regulators like p300/CBP and Mdm2 into the LT-p53 complex. Consequently, LT affected global and specific gene expression in p53+/+ cells significantly more than in p53−/− cells. Our data suggest that recruitment of transcriptional regulators into the LT-p53 complex may help to modify cellular gene expression in response to the needs of cellular transformation. PMID:19625393

  9. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGES

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  10. An EGFR wild type-EGFRvIII-HB-EGF feed forward loop regulates the activation of EGFRvIII

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Yang, Chin-Rang; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Cipher, Daisha J.; Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar Thidil; Rehman, Alizeh; Jiwani, Ameena J.; Mickey, Bruce; Madden, Christopher; Raisanen, Jack; Burma, Sandeep; Saha, Debabrata; Wang, Zhixiang; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Kesari, Santosh; Boothman, David A.; Habib, Amyn A.

    2014-01-01

    EGFRvIII is a key oncogene in glioblastoma (GBM). EGFRvIII results from an in frame deletion in the extracellular domain of EGFR, does not bind ligand, and is thought to be constitutively active. While EGFRvIII dimerization is known to activate EGFRvIII, the factors that drive EGFRvIII dimerization and activation are not well understood. Here we present a new model of EGFRvIII activation and propose that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in glioma cells is driven by co-expressed activated EGFR wild type (EGFRwt). Increasing EGFRwt leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation and activation while silencing EGFRwt inhibits EGFRvIII activation. Both the dimerization arm and the kinase activity of EGFRwt are required for EGFRvIII activation. EGFRwt activates EGFRvIII by facilitating EGFRvIII dimerization. We have previously identified HB-EGF, a ligand for EGFRwt, as a gene induced specifically by EGFRvIII. In this study we show that HB-EGF, is induced by EGFRvIII only when EGFRwt is present. Remarkably, altering HB-EGF recapitulates the effect of EGFRwt on EGFRvIII activation. Thus, increasing HB-EGF leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation while silencing HB-EGF attenuates EGFRvIII phosphorylation, suggesting that an EGFRvIII-HB-EGF-EGFRwt feed forward loop regulates EGFRvIII activation. Silencing EGFRwt or HB-EGF leads to a striking inhibition of EGFRvIII induced tumorigenicity, while increasing EGFRwt or HB-EGF levels resulted in accelerated EGFRvIII mediated oncogenicity in an orthotopic mouse model. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of this loop in human GBM. Thus, our data demonstrate that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in GBM is likely maintained by a continuous EGFRwt-EGFRvIII-HBEGF loop, potentially an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24077285

  11. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Meertens, Laurent; Chazal, Maxime; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Zamborlini, Alessia; Despres, Philippe; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D stands as a “gold standard” for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E) protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation. PMID:26861019

  12. Bone turnover in wild type and pleiotrophin-transgenic mice housed for three months in the International Space Station (ISS).

    PubMed

    Tavella, Sara; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Giuliani, Alessandra; Brun, Francesco; Canciani, Barbara; Manescu, Adrian; Marozzi, Katia; Cilli, Michele; Costa, Delfina; Liu, Yi; Piccardi, Federica; Tasso, Roberta; Tromba, Giuliana; Rustichelli, Franco; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2012-01-01

    Bone is a complex dynamic tissue undergoing a continuous remodeling process. Gravity is a physical force playing a role in the remodeling and contributing to the maintenance of bone integrity. This article reports an investigation on the alterations of the bone microarchitecture that occurred in wild type (Wt) and pleiotrophin-transgenic (PTN-Tg) mice exposed to a near-zero gravity on the International Space Station (ISS) during the Mice Drawer System (MDS) mission, to date, the longest mice permanence (91 days) in space. The transgenic mouse strain over-expressing pleiotrophin (PTN) in bone was selected because of the PTN positive effects on bone turnover. Wt and PTN-Tg control animals were maintained on Earth either in a MDS payload or in a standard vivarium cage. This study revealed a bone loss during spaceflight in the weight-bearing bones of both strains. For both Tg and Wt a decrease of the trabecular number as well as an increase of the mean trabecular separation was observed after flight, whereas trabecular thickness did not show any significant change. Non weight-bearing bones were not affected. The PTN-Tg mice exposed to normal gravity presented a poorer trabecular organization than Wt mice, but interestingly, the expression of the PTN transgene during the flight resulted in some protection against microgravity's negative effects. Moreover, osteocytes of the Wt mice, but not of Tg mice, acquired a round shape, thus showing for the first time osteocyte space-related morphological alterations in vivo. The analysis of specific bone formation and resorption marker expression suggested that the microgravity-induced bone loss was due to both an increased bone resorption and a decreased bone deposition. Apparently, the PTN transgene protection was the result of a higher osteoblast activity in the flight mice.

  13. Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor improves long-term memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease as well as in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Susanna; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Lahtinen, Hanna-Maija; Koivisto, Henna; Hämäläinen, Elina; Saarma, Mart; Tanila, Heikki

    2015-09-15

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects and repairs dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease, which motivated us to investigate its therapeutic effect in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We employed an established APP/PS1 mouse model of AD and gave intrahippocampal injections of CDNF protein or CDNF transgene in an AAV2 viral vector to 1-year-old animals. We performed a behavioral test battery 2 weeks after the injections and collected tissue samples after the 3-week test period. Intrahippocampal CDNF-therapy improved long-term memory in both APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, but did not affect spontaneous exploration, object neophobia or early stages of spatial learning. The memory improvement was not associated with decreased brain amyloid load or enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. Intracranial CDNF treatment has beneficial effects on long-term memory and is well tolerated. The CDNF molecular mechanisms of action on memory await further studies.

  14. A mouse model of adult-onset anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shun; Souma, Tomokazu; Hirano, Ikuo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Minegishi, Naoko; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin regulates erythropoiesis in a hypoxia-inducible manner. Here we generate inherited super-anaemic mice (ISAM) as a mouse model of adult-onset anaemia caused by erythropoietin deficiency. ISAM express erythropoietin in the liver but lack erythropoietin production in the kidney. Around weaning age, when the major erythropoietin-producing organ switches from the liver to the kidney, ISAM develop anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency, which is curable by administration of recombinant erythropoietin. In ISAM severe chronic anaemia enhances transgenic green fluorescent protein and Cre expression driven by the complete erythropoietin-gene regulatory regions, which facilitates efficient labelling of renal erythropoietin-producing cells. We show that the majority of cortical and outer medullary fibroblasts have the innate potential to produce erythropoietin, and also reveal a new set of erythropoietin target genes. ISAM are a useful tool for the evaluation of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and to trace the dynamics of erythropoietin-producing cells. PMID:23727690

  15. Expression profiling of long noncoding RNAs in neonatal and adult mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Wu, Ji

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, advancements in genome-wide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is pervasively transcribed in the genome and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated lncRNAs as a new class of regulatory molecules are involved in mammalian development (Carninci et al. (2005); Fatica and Bozzoni (2014)), but very few studies have been conducted on the potential roles of lncRNAs in mammalian testis development. To get insights into the expression patterns of lncRNA during mouse testis development, we investigated the lncRNAs expression profiles of neonatal and adult mouse testes using microarray platform and related results have been published (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013) e75750.). Here, we describe in detail the experimental system, methods and validation for the generation of the microarray data associated with our recent publication (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013) e75750.). Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database repository with the dataset identifier GSE43442. PMID:26217809

  16. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERT)Nat)/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  17. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle Erin; Rosten, Patty; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lai, Courteney; Humphries, R. Keith

    2016-01-01

    Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1’s importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1’s functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA)26Sortm1(Cre/ERT)Nat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre)1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1’s role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation. PMID:26986211

  18. Chronic morphine induces premature mitosis of proliferating cells in the adult mouse subgranular zone.

    PubMed

    Mandyam, Chitra D; Norris, Rebekah D; Eisch, Amelia J

    2004-06-15

    The birth of cells with neurogenic potential in the adult brain is assessed commonly by detection of exogenous S phase markers, such as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Analysis of other phases of the cell cycle, however, can provide insight into how external factors, such as opiates, influence the cycling of newly born cells. To this end, we examined the expression of two endogenous cell cycle markers in relation to BrdU: proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phosphorylated histone H3 (pHisH3). Two hours after one intraperitoneal BrdU injection, BrdU-, PCNA-, and pHisH3-immunoreactive (IR) cells exhibited similar distribution in the adult mouse subgranular zone (SGZ). Quantitative analysis within the SGZ revealed a relative abundance of cells labeled for PCNA > BrdU > pHisH3. Similar to our reports in rat SGZ, chronic morphine treatment decreased BrdU- and PCNA-IR cells in mouse SGZ by 28 and 38%, respectively. We also show that pHisH3-IR cells are influenced by chronic morphine to a greater extent (58% decrease) than are BrdU- or PCNA-IR cells. Cell cycle phase analysis of SGZ BrdU-IR cells using triple labeling for BrdU, PCNA, and pHisH3 revealed premature mitosis in chronic morphine-treated mice. These results suggest that morphine-treated mice have a shorter Gap2/mitosis (G(2)/M) phase when compared to sham-treated mice. These findings demonstrate the power of using a combination of exogenous and endogenous cell cycle markers and nuclear morphology to track proliferating cells through different phases of the cell cycle and to reveal the regulation of cell cycle phase by chronic morphine. PMID:15160390

  19. Retinal lesions induce fast intrinsic cortical plasticity in adult mouse visual system.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Katrien; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Cuyvers, Annemie; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Van Brussel, Leen; Eysel, Ulf T; Nys, Julie; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal activity plays an important role in the development and structural-functional maintenance of the brain as well as in its life-long plastic response to changes in sensory stimulation. We characterized the impact of unilateral 15° laser lesions in the temporal lower visual field of the retina, on visually driven neuronal activity in the afferent visual pathway of adult mice using in situ hybridization for the activity reporter gene zif268. In the first days post-lesion, we detected a discrete zone of reduced zif268 expression in the contralateral hemisphere, spanning the border between the monocular segment of the primary visual cortex (V1) with extrastriate visual area V2M. We could not detect a clear lesion projection zone (LPZ) in areas lateral to V1 whereas medial to V2M, agranular and granular retrosplenial cortex showed decreased zif268 levels over their full extent. All affected areas displayed a return to normal zif268 levels, and this was faster in higher order visual areas than in V1. The lesion did, however, induce a permanent LPZ in the retinorecipient layers of the superior colliculus. We identified a retinotopy-based intrinsic capacity of adult mouse visual cortex to recover from restricted vision loss, with recovery speed reflecting the areal cortical magnification factor. Our observations predict incomplete visual field representations for areas lateral to V1 vs. lack of retinotopic organization for areas medial to V2M. The validation of this mouse model paves the way for future interrogations of cortical region- and cell-type-specific contributions to functional recovery, up to microcircuit level. PMID:26663520

  20. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  1. Impact of mTORC1 inhibition on keratinocyte proliferation during skin tumor promotion in wild-type and BK5.AktWT mice.

    PubMed

    Rho, Okkyung; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Jiang, Guiyu; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mTORC1 signaling during 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion in both wild-type (FVB/N) and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA activated mTORC1 signaling in a time-dependent manner in cultured primary mouse keratinocytes and a mouse keratinocyte cell line. Early activation (15-30 min) of mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA was mediated in part by PKC activation, whereas later activation (2-4 h) was mediated by activation of EGFR and Akt. BK5.Akt(WT) transgenic mice, where Akt1 is overexpressed in basal epidermis, are highly sensitive to TPA-induced epidermal proliferation and two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Targeting mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferation as well as tumor promotion in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. A significant expansion (∼threefold) of the label retaining cell (LRC) population per hair follicle was observed in BK5.Akt(WT) mice compared to FVB/N mice. There was also a significant increase in K15 expressing cells in the hair follicle of transgenic mice that coincided with expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-S6K, and phospho-PRAS40, suggesting an important role of mTORC1 signaling in bulge-region keratinocyte stem cell (KSC) homeostasis. After 2 weeks of TPA treatment, LRCs had moved upward into the interfollicular epidermis from the bulge region of both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA-mediated LRC proliferation and migration was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. Collectively, the current data indicate that signaling through mTORC1 contributes significantly to the process of skin tumor promotion through effects on proliferation of the target cells for tumor development. PMID:24114993

  2. Impact of mTORC1 inhibition on keratinocyte proliferation during skin tumor promotion in wild-type and BK5.AktWT mice.

    PubMed

    Rho, Okkyung; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Jiang, Guiyu; DiGiovanni, John

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mTORC1 signaling during 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion in both wild-type (FVB/N) and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA activated mTORC1 signaling in a time-dependent manner in cultured primary mouse keratinocytes and a mouse keratinocyte cell line. Early activation (15-30 min) of mTORC1 signaling induced by TPA was mediated in part by PKC activation, whereas later activation (2-4 h) was mediated by activation of EGFR and Akt. BK5.Akt(WT) transgenic mice, where Akt1 is overexpressed in basal epidermis, are highly sensitive to TPA-induced epidermal proliferation and two-stage skin carcinogenesis. Targeting mTORC1 with rapamycin effectively inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and hyperproliferation as well as tumor promotion in a dose-dependent manner in both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. A significant expansion (∼threefold) of the label retaining cell (LRC) population per hair follicle was observed in BK5.Akt(WT) mice compared to FVB/N mice. There was also a significant increase in K15 expressing cells in the hair follicle of transgenic mice that coincided with expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-S6K, and phospho-PRAS40, suggesting an important role of mTORC1 signaling in bulge-region keratinocyte stem cell (KSC) homeostasis. After 2 weeks of TPA treatment, LRCs had moved upward into the interfollicular epidermis from the bulge region of both wild-type and BK5.Akt(WT) mice. TPA-mediated LRC proliferation and migration was significantly inhibited by rapamycin. Collectively, the current data indicate that signaling through mTORC1 contributes significantly to the process of skin tumor promotion through effects on proliferation of the target cells for tumor development.

  3. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F.

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  4. Experimental investigation of magneto-aerotaxis on wild-type magnetotactic bacteria in sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Egli, R.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MB) synthesize chains of magnetic particles, called magnetosomes, which provide a magnetic dipole that passively aligns the cells along the geomagnetic field. Flagellar propulsion allows MB to swim straight along field lines in what is known as magnetotaxis. The flagellum rotation sense is controlled by the chemical environment, so that MB can efficiently move across chemically stratified environments to reach the so-called oxic-anoxic interface (OAI). This combination of oriented swimming controlled by chemical (oxygen) sensing is called magneto-aerotaxis (Frankel 1997). Experiments with MB cultures show that magnetic spirilla can change instantaneously the swimming direction, while the behaviour of cocci depends on a sort of 'internal state' dictated by their original location with respect to the OAI. Here, we present first results the magneto-aerotactic behaviour of wild-type MB living in microcosms created with sediment retrieved from lake Chiemsee (Bavaria, Germany). In these microcosms, a stable population of MB (mainly unidentified strains of cocci, and Magnetobacterium Bavaricum) occur in the upmost few cm below the sediment surface, with maximum concentrations just below the OAI. We tested the reaction of this MB population to changes in chemical conditions by putting the microcosm inside a glove box with controlled oxygen-free atmospheres (N2 and CO2). A new equilibrium was reached within few weeks, with the OAI first moving upward and then disappearing. The depth distribution and swimming direction of MB was tested during and after the formation of a new equilibrium. We were never able to observe swimming directions consistent with bacteria moving upward in the sediment, as it was the case with cultured cocci in Frankel [1997], even long time after the entire sediment column became completely anoxic. Nevertheless, the disappearance of the OAI was accompanied by a slight but significant decrease of the total MB population

  5. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog regulates p53 in vivo in the adult mouse eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose p53 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in preventing cancer development. p53 participates in relevant aspects of cell biology, including apoptosis and cell cycle control and must be strictly regulated to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (Mdm2) is an important negative regulator of p53. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mdm2 regulates p53 in vivo in the adult lens. Methods We analyzed mice expressing human p53 transgene (Tgp53) selectively in the lens in the presence or absence of Mdm2. Mice with the required genotypes were obtained by crossing transgenic, mdm2+/−, and p53−/− mice. Eye phenotype and lens histology and ultrastructure were analyzed in adult mice. Results In a wild-type genetic background (mdm2+/+), lens damage and microphthalmia were observed only in mice homozygous for Tgp53 (t/t). However, in an mdm2 null background, just one allele of Tgp53 (mdm2−/−/Tgp53t/0 mice) was sufficient to cause lens damage and microphthalmia. Furthermore, Mdm2 in only one allele was sufficient to rescue these deleterious effects, since the mdm2+/−/Tgp53t/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to the control mice. Conclusions Mdm2 regulates p53 in the adult lens in vivo. This information may have relevance for analyzing normal and pathological conditions of the lens, and designing cancer therapies targeting Mdm2–p53 interaction. PMID:24339722

  6. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-07-29

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes.

  7. Establishment of a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for widespread and temporal genetic modification in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ichise, Hirotake; Hori, Akiko; Shiozawa, Seiji; Kondo, Saki; Kanegae, Yumi; Saito, Izumu; Ichise, Taeko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    Temporal genetic modification of mice using the ligand-inducible Cre/loxP system is an important technique that allows the bypass of embryonic lethal phenotypes and access to adult phenotypes. In this study, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-driver mouse strain for the purpose of widespread and temporal Cre recombination. The new line, named CM32, expresses the GFPneo-fusion gene in a wide variety of tissues before FLP recombination and tamoxifen-inducible Cre after FLP recombination. Using FLP-recombined CM32 mice (CM32Δ mice) and Cre reporter mouse lines, we evaluated the efficiency of Cre recombination with and without tamoxifen administration to adult mice, and found tamoxifen-dependent induction of Cre recombination in a variety of adult tissues. In addition, we demonstrated that conditional activation of an oncogene could be achieved in adults using CM32Δ mice. CM32Δ;T26 mice, which harbored a Cre recombination-driven, SV40 large T antigen-expressing transgene, were viable and fertile. No overt phenotype was found in the mice up to 3 months after birth. Although they displayed pineoblastomas (pinealoblastomas) and/or thymic enlargement due to background Cre recombination by 6 months after birth, they developed epidermal hyperplasia when administered tamoxifen. Collectively, our results suggest that the CM32Δ transgenic mouse line can be applied to the assessment of adult phenotypes in mice with loxP-flanked transgenes. PMID:26923756

  8. Patterns and dynamics of subventricular zone neuroblast migration in the ischemic striatum of the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui L; Chopp, Michael; Gregg, Sara R; Toh, Yier; Roberts, Cindi; LeTourneau, Yvonne; Buller, Benjamin; Jia, Longfei; Davarani, Siamak P Nejad; Zhang, Zheng G

    2009-01-01

    The migratory behavior of neuroblasts after a stroke is poorly understood. Using time-lapse microscopy, we imaged migration of neuroblasts and cerebral vessels in living brain slices of adult doublecortin (DCX, a marker of neuroblasts) enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice that were subjected to 7 days of stroke. Our results show that neuroblasts originating in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mouse brain laterally migrated in chains or individually to reach the ischemic striatum. The chains were initially formed at the border between the SVZ and the striatum by neuroblasts in the SVZ and then extended to the striatum. The average speed of DCX-eGFP-expressing cells within chains was 28.67±1.04 μm/h, which was significantly faster (P < 0.01) than the speed of the cells in the SVZ (17.98±0.57 μm/h). Within the ischemic striatum, individual neuroblasts actively extended or retracted their processes, suggestive of probing the immediate microenvironment. The neuroblasts close to cerebral blood vessels exhibited multiple processes. Our data suggest that neuroblasts actively interact with the microenvironment to reach the ischemic striatum by multiple migratory routes. PMID:19436318

  9. Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function in the adult mouse main olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Steve; Sickles, Heather M.; DeLeonardis, Chris; Alcaraz, Ana; Gridley, Thomas; Lin, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Notch receptors are expressed in neurons and glia in the adult nervous system, but why this expression persists is not well-understood. Here we examine the role of the Notch pathway in the postnatal mouse main olfactory system, and show evidence consistent with a model where Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function. In the absence of Notch2, the laminar nature of these glial-like cells is disrupted. Hes1, Hey1, and Six1, which are downstream effectors of the Notch pathway, are down-regulated, and cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression by sustentacular cells is reduced. Functional levels of GST activity are also reduced. These disruptions are associated with increased olfactory sensory neuron degeneration. Surprisingly, expression of Notch3 is also down-regulated. This suggests the existence of a feedback loop where expression of Notch3 is initially independent of Notch2, but requires Notch2 for maintained expression. While the Notch pathway has previously been shown to be important for promoting gliogenesis during development, this is the first demonstration that the persistent expression of Notch receptors is required for maintaining glial function in adult. PMID:18155189

  10. Y1 receptors are critical for the proliferation of adult mouse precursor cells in the olfactory neuroepithelium.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Kharen L; Karl, Tim; Hort, Yvonne; Duffy, Liesl; Shine, John; Herzog, Herbert

    2008-05-01

    While the regenerative capacity of the olfactory neuroepithelium has been well studied less is known about the molecular events controlling precursor cell activity. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory system, and NPY has been shown to play a role in neuroregeneration of the brain. In this study, we show that the numbers of olfactory neurospheres derived from NPY, NPY/peptide YY, and Y1 receptor knockout mice are decreased compared with wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis of isolated horizontal basal cells, globose basal cells, and glandular cells showed that only glandular cells derived from WT mice, but not from NPY and Y1 receptor knockout mice, formed secondary neurospheres suggesting a critical role for NPY signaling in this process. Interestingly, olfactory function tests revealed that olfaction in Y1 knockout mice is impaired compared with those of WT mice, probably because of the reduced number of olfactory neurons formed. Together these results indicate that NPY and the Y1 receptor are required for the normal proliferation of adult olfactory precursors and olfactory function.

  11. Genome Sequence of SG33 Strain and Recombination between Wild-Type and Vaccine Myxoma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination. PMID:21470452

  12. Purification of extrachloroplastic. beta. -amylase from leaves of starchless and wild type Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, C.; Monroe, J.; Preiss, J. )

    1989-04-01

    Amylase activity in crude leaf extracts from starchless mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is 5 to 10 fold higher than in the wild type (WT) when plants are grown under a 12 h photoperiod. Visualized on native PAGE, the increased activity is attributed primarily to a previously characterized extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. The {beta}-amylases from phosoglucomutase deficient (starchless) and WT leaves were purified to homogeneity in two steps utilizing polyethylene glycol fractionation, and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The enzyme from both mutant and WT leaves had negligible activity toward either {beta}-limit dextrin or pullulan. The specific activities of both purified enzymes were similar indicating that the protein is over-expressed in the mutant. Preliminary antibody neutralization experiments suggest that the two {beta}-amylases are not different.

  13. Quality assessment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis): comparison between commercial and wild types.

    PubMed

    De Witte, B; Devriese, L; Bekaert, K; Hoffman, S; Vandermeersch, G; Cooreman, K; Robbens, J

    2014-08-15

    This study compared species identity, microplastics, chemical and microbial contamination between consumption mussels and wild type mussels, collected at Belgian department stores and Belgian groynes and quaysides, respectively. Species identification based on genetic analysis showed a high number of Mytilus (M.) edulis compared to M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis/galloprovincialis hybrid mussels. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.6 to 5.1 fibres/10 g of mussel. A higher prevalence of orange fibres at quaysides is related to fisheries activities. Chemical contamination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorobiphenyls could be related to industrial activities and water turbidity, with maximum concentrations at the quayside of port Zeebrugge. The inverse was noted for Escherichia coli contamination, which was relatively low at Zeebrugge quayside with a total count of 3.9 × 10(2)CFU/100 g tissue, due to limited agricultural effluents. Results of this complementary analysis stress the importance of integrated monitoring and quality assessment.

  14. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stefanie L; Seggio, Joseph A; Nascimento, Nara F; Huh, Dana D; Hicks, Jasmin A; Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Wang, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species.

  15. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors. PMID:22286706

  16. Comparation of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene transfected and wild-type porcine neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-E; Quan, Fu-Sheng; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Ying; He, Xiao-Ning

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to transfect and express the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene into porcine neural stem cells (NSCs) to determine whether EGFP can be used as a marker to monitor NSCs. NSCs were isolated from embryonic day 30 fetal pig brain and transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. Transfected and wild-type NSCs were induced to differentiate into cells of neuronal and myogenic lineages. Markers of passage three NSCs and their differentiated cells were tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that EGFP could be expressed in NSCs and the differentiated cells. NSCs expressed Nestin, NogoA, DCX, Hes1, Oct4, CD-90 and Sox2. NSCs could differentiated into astrocyte (GFAP(+)), oligodendrocyte (GalC(+)), neuron (NF(+), NSE(+) and MAP2(+)) and myocyte (myf-6(+) and myoD(+)). We concluded that EGFP can be used as a marker in monitoring NSCs. PMID:19580981

  17. Comparation of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene transfected and wild-type porcine neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-E; Quan, Fu-Sheng; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Ying; He, Xiao-Ning

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to transfect and express the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene into porcine neural stem cells (NSCs) to determine whether EGFP can be used as a marker to monitor NSCs. NSCs were isolated from embryonic day 30 fetal pig brain and transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. Transfected and wild-type NSCs were induced to differentiate into cells of neuronal and myogenic lineages. Markers of passage three NSCs and their differentiated cells were tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that EGFP could be expressed in NSCs and the differentiated cells. NSCs expressed Nestin, NogoA, DCX, Hes1, Oct4, CD-90 and Sox2. NSCs could differentiated into astrocyte (GFAP(+)), oligodendrocyte (GalC(+)), neuron (NF(+), NSE(+) and MAP2(+)) and myocyte (myf-6(+) and myoD(+)). We concluded that EGFP can be used as a marker in monitoring NSCs.

  18. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors.

  19. Analysis of purified Wild type and mutant adenovirus particles by SILAC based quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Ali; Heesom, Kate; Bramson, Jonathan L.; Curiel, David; Ugai, Hideyo

    2014-01-01

    We used SILAC (stable isotope labelling of amino acids in cell culture) and high-throughput quantitative MS mass spectrometry to analyse the protein composition of highly purified WT wild type adenoviruses, mutant adenoviruses lacking an internal protein component (protein V) and recombinant adenoviruses of the type commonly used in gene therapy, including one virus that had been used in a clinical trial. We found that the viral protein abundance and composition were consistent across all types of virus examined except for the virus lacking protein V, which also had reduced amounts of another viral core protein, protein VII. In all the samples analysed we found no evidence of consistent packaging or contamination with cellular proteins. We believe this technique is a powerful method to analyse the protein composition of this important gene therapy vector and genetically engineered or synthetic virus-like particles. The raw data have been deposited at proteomexchange, identifer PXD001120. PMID:25096814

  20. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stefanie L.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Hicks, Jasmin A.; Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  1. Organophosphonate Utilization by the Wild-Type Strain of Penicillium notatum

    PubMed Central

    Bujacz, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Krzysko-Lupicka, T.; Golab, Z.; Lejczak, B.; Kavfarski, P.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the biodegradation of compounds containing phosphorus-to-carbon bonds by using a wild-type strain of Penicillium notatum. The substrate specificity of this strain was studied, and we found that it is able to utilize structurally diverse organophosphonates as sole sources of phosphorus. This ability seems to be inducible, as indicated by the presence of a lag phase during growth. A popular herbicide, glyphosate, inhibited fungal growth, but it was also degraded by the fungus if it was applied in sublethal doses. This indicates that P. notatum may play an important role in biodegradation of organophosphonates. The strain which we used did not metabolize any of the phosphonates which we tested when they were used as sole carbon or nitrogen sources. PMID:16535094

  2. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  3. Comparison of growth and pubertal progression in wild type female rats with different bedding types

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Ho; Kim, Shin-Hee; Jung, Kyung A; Kim, So Youn; Chung, Sung-Hoon; Park, Young Shil; Yoon, Kyung Lim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Endocrine-disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system and therefore affect growth and pubertal progression. The study aim was to compare the growth and pubertal progression in wild-type female rats with different bedding types. Methods Twenty 5-week-old female wild-type Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups with different bedding types: one group received wood shaving bedding, while a second group received corncob bedding. We determined crown-rump length and body weight as anthropometric measurements and assessed the serum growth hormone (GH) and estradiol levels. The gh1 mRNA expression levels were compared using quantitative real time transcription polymerase chain reaction. The estrous cycle was evaluated by vaginal smear. Results The anthropometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. The mean relative expression of the gh1 gene was lower in the corncob bedding group than that in the wood shaving group (P=0.768). Meanwhile serum GH and estradiol were increased in the wood shaving bedding group; however this difference was not statistically significant. The time to first estrus and the length of the estrous cycle were increased in the corncob bedding group; the proportion of normal estrous cycles was also decreased. These findings indicate irregularities in the estrous cycle. Conclusion Endocrine-disrupting chemicals in corncob bedding might be associated with time to first estrus and length of the estrous cycle. Therefore, the type of bedding should be considered as a factor affecting pubertal progression in rodents. PMID:25883928

  4. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Salazar, Francisco; Ramirez, Melanie; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods: Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR) spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results: ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions: ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria. PMID:26421136

  5. LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation prognosticates survival after radiochemotherapy in IDH1 wild-type glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mock, Andreas; Geisenberger, Christoph; Orlik, Christian; Warta, Rolf; Schwager, Christian; Jungk, Christine; Dutruel, Céline; Geiselhart, Lea; Weichenhan, Dieter; Zucknick, Manuela; Nied, Ann-Katrin; Friauf, Sara; Exner, Janina; Capper, David; Hartmann, Christian; Lahrmann, Bernd; Grabe, Niels; Debus, Jürgen; von Deimling, Andreas; Popanda, Odilia; Plass, Christoph; Unterberg, Andreas; Abdollahi, Amir; Schmezer, Peter; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2016-07-15

    MGMT promoter methylation status is currently the only established molecular prognosticator in IDH wild-type glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Therefore, we aimed to discover novel therapy-associated epigenetic biomarkers. After enrichment for hypermethylated fractions using methyl-CpG-immunoprecipitation (MCIp), we performed global DNA methylation profiling for 14 long-term (LTS; >36 months) and 15 short-term (STS; 6-10 months) surviving GBM patients. Even after exclusion of the G-CIMP phenotype, we observed marked differences between the LTS and STS methylome. A total of 1,247 probes in 706 genes were hypermethylated in LTS and 463 probes in 305 genes were found to be hypermethylated in STS patients (p values < 0.05, log2 fold change ± 0.5). We identified 13 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with a minimum of four differentially methylated probes per gene. Indeed, we were able to validate a subset of these DMRs through a second, independent method (MassARRAY) in our LTS/STS training set (ADCY1, GPC3, LOC283731/ISLR2). These DMRs were further assessed for their prognostic capability in an independent validation cohort (n = 62) of non-G-CIMP GBMs from the TCGA. Hypermethylation of multiple CpGs mapping to the promoter region of LOC283731 correlated with improved patient outcome (p = 0.03). The prognostic performance of LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation was confirmed in a third independent study cohort (n = 89), and was independent of gender, performance (KPS) and MGMT status (p = 0.0485, HR = 0.63). Intriguingly, the prediction was most pronounced in younger GBM patients (<60 years). In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence that promoter methylation status of this novel gene is a prognostic biomarker in IDH1 wild-type/non-G-CIMP GBMs. PMID:26934681

  6. Real-time quantification of wild-type contaminants in glyphosate tolerant soybean

    PubMed Central

    Battistini, Elena; Noli, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Background Trait purity is a key factor for the successful utilization of biotech varieties and is currently assessed by analysis of individual seeds or plants. Here we propose a novel PCR-based approach to test trait purity that can be applied to bulk samples. To this aim the insertion site of a transgene is characterized and the corresponding sequence of the wild-type (wt) allele is used as diagnostic target for amplification. As a demonstration, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR method to test purity of glyphosate tolerant (Roundup Ready®, RR) soybean. Results The soybean wt sequence at the RR locus was characterized and found to be highly conserved among conventional genotypes, thus allowing the detection of possibly any soybean non-trait contaminant. On the other hand, no amplification product was obtained from RR soybean varieties, indicating that the wt sequence is single copy and represents a suitable marker of conventional soybean presence. In addition, results obtained from the analysis of wt-spiked RR samples demonstrate that it is possible to use the real-time PCR assay to quantify the non-trait contamination with an acceptable degree of accuracy. Conclusion In principle this approach could be successfully applied to any transgenic event, provided that the wild-type sequence is conserved and single copy. The main advantages of the assay here described derive from its applicability to bulk samples, which would allow to increase the number of single seeds or plants forming the analytical sample, thus improving accuracy and throughput while containing costs. For these reasons this application of quantitative PCR could represent a useful tool in agricultural biotechnology. PMID:19267904

  7. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel AS

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome

  8. Temporal profiles of synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult mouse hippocampus with methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Joong-Sun; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2012-07-25

    Methotrexate, which is used to treat many malignancies and autoimmune diseases, affects brain functions including hippocampal-dependent memory function. However, the precise mechanisms underlying methotrexate-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. To evaluate temporal changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals, the expression and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cAMP responsive element-binding protein, glutamate receptor 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were examined in the hippocampi of adult C57BL/6 mice after methotrexate (40 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Western blot analysis showed biphasic changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult hippocampi following methotrexate treatment. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and glutamate receptor 1 were acutely activated during the early phase (1 day post-injection), while extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and cAMP responsive element-binding protein activation showed biphasic increases during the early (1 day post-injection) and late phases (7-14 days post-injection). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased significantly during the late phase (7-14 days post-injection). Therefore, methotrexate treatment affects synaptic plasticity-related signals in the adult mouse hippocampus, suggesting that changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals may be associated with neuronal survival and plasticity-related cellular remodeling.

  9. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  10. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  11. High yield extraction of pure spinal motor neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single embryo and adult mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Marie-Josée; Yang, Qiurui; Cadau, Sébastien; Blais, Mathieu; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Gros-Louis, François; Berthod, François

    2015-01-01

    Extraction of mouse spinal motor neurons from transgenic mouse embryos recapitulating some aspects of neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has met with limited success. Furthermore, extraction and long-term culture of adult mouse spinal motor neurons and glia remain also challenging. We present here a protocol designed to extract and purify high yields of motor neurons and glia from individual spinal cords collected on embryos and adult (5-month-old) normal or transgenic mice. This method is based on mild digestion of tissue followed by gradient density separation allowing to obtain two millions motor neurons over 92% pure from one E14.5 single embryo and more than 30,000 from an adult mouse. These cells can be cultured more than 14 days in vitro at a density of 100,000 cells/cm2 to maintain optimal viability. Functional astrocytes and microglia and small gamma motor neurons can be purified at the same time. This protocol will be a powerful and reliable method to obtain motor neurons and glia to better understand mechanisms underlying spinal cord diseases. PMID:26577180

  12. Doublecortin (DCX) is not Essential for Survival and Differentiation of Newborn Neurons in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Jagroop; Xi, Yanwei; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Germain, Johanne; Francis, Fiona; Lagace, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    In the adult brain, expression of the microtubule-associated protein Doublecortin (DCX) is associated with neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that give rise to new neurons in the dentate gyrus. Many studies quantify the number of DCX-expressing cells as a proxy for the level of adult neurogenesis, yet no study has determined the effect of removing DCX from adult hippocampal NPCs. Here, we use a retroviral and inducible mouse transgenic approach to either knockdown or knockout DCX from adult NPCs in the dentate gyrus and examine how this affects cell survival and neuronal maturation. Our results demonstrate that shRNA-mediated knockdown of DCX or Cre-mediated recombination in floxed DCX mice does not alter hippocampal neurogenesis and does not change the neuronal fate of the NPCs. Together these findings show that the survival and maturation of adult-generated hippocampal neurons does not require DCX. PMID:26793044

  13. Viral adaptation to an antiviral protein enhances the fitness level to above that of the uninhibited wild type.

    PubMed

    Cherwa, James E; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Wichman, Holly A; Fane, Bentley A

    2009-11-01

    Viruses often evolve resistance to antiviral agents. While resistant strains are able to replicate in the presence of the agent, they generally exhibit lower fitness than the wild-type strain in the absence of the inhibitor. In some cases, resistant strains become dependent on the antiviral agent. However, the agent rarely, if ever, elevates dependent strain fitness above the uninhibited wild-type level. This would require an adaptive mechanism to convert the antiviral agent into a beneficial growth factor. Using an inhibitory scaffolding protein that specifically blocks phiX174 capsid assembly, we demonstrate that such mechanisms are possible. To obtain the quintuple-mutant resistant strain, the wild-type virus was propagated for approximately 150 viral life cycles in the presence of increasing concentrations of the inhibitory protein. The expression of the inhibitory protein elevated the strain's fitness significantly above the uninhibited wild-type level. Thus, selecting for resistance coselected for dependency, which was characterized and found to operate on the level of capsid nucleation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a virus evolving a mechanism to productively utilize an antiviral agent to stimulate its fitness above the uninhibited wild-type level. The results of this study may be predictive of the types of resistant phenotypes that could be selected by antiviral agents that specifically target capsid assembly. PMID:19726521

  14. Mitochondrial Function in Cell Wall Glycoprotein Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 (Wild Type) and [rho0] Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iung, Annie Rakotoarivony; Coulon, Joël; Kiss, Ferenc; Ekome, Jacques Ngondi; Vallner, Judit; Bonaly, Roger

    1999-01-01

    We studied phosphopeptidomannans (PPMs) of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 strains (S. diastaticus): a wild type strain grown aerobically, anaerobically, and in the presence of antimycin and a [rho0] mutant grown aerobically and anaerobically. The aerobic wild-type cultures were highly flocculent, but all others were weakly flocculent. Ligands implicated in flocculation of mutants or antimycin-treated cells were not aggregated as much by concanavalin A as were those of the wild type. The [rho0] mutants and antimycin-treated cells differ from the wild type in PPM composition and invertase, acid phosphatase, and glucoamylase activities. PPMs extracted from different cells differ in the protein but not in the glycosidic moiety. The PPMs were less stable in mitochondrion-deficient cells than in wild-type cells grown aerobically, and this difference may be attributable to defective mitochondrial function during cell wall synthesis. The reduced flocculation of cells grown in the presence of antimycin, under anaerobiosis, or carrying a [rho0] mutation may be the consequence of alterations of PPM structures which are the ligands of lectins, both involved in this cell-cell recognition phenomenon. These respiratory chain alterations also affect peripheral, biologically active glycoproteins such as extracellular enzymes and peripheral PPMs. PMID:10583995

  15. Acquired transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-07-13

    L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE that is transmissible to cattle and several lines of prion protein (PrP) transgenic mice, but not to wild-type mice. In this study, we examined the transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-BSE prions to wild-type mice. Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in the brain and/or lymphoid tissues during the lifespan of mice that were asymptomatic subclinical carriers, indicating that wild-type mice were susceptible to sheep-passaged L-BSE. The morphological characteristics of the PrP(Sc) of sheep-passaged L-BSE included florid plaques that were distributed mainly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of subsequent passaged mice. The PrP(Sc) glycoform profiles of wild-type mice infected with sheep-passaged L-BSE were similar to those of the original isolate. The data indicate that sheep-passaged L-BSE has an altered host range and acquired transmissibility to wild-type mice.

  16. Acquired transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE that is transmissible to cattle and several lines of prion protein (PrP) transgenic mice, but not to wild-type mice. In this study, we examined the transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-BSE prions to wild-type mice. Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in the brain and/or lymphoid tissues during the lifespan of mice that were asymptomatic subclinical carriers, indicating that wild-type mice were susceptible to sheep-passaged L-BSE. The morphological characteristics of the PrP(Sc) of sheep-passaged L-BSE included florid plaques that were distributed mainly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of subsequent passaged mice. The PrP(Sc) glycoform profiles of wild-type mice infected with sheep-passaged L-BSE were similar to those of the original isolate. The data indicate that sheep-passaged L-BSE has an altered host range and acquired transmissibility to wild-type mice. PMID:26169916

  17. Gap Junctional Blockade Stochastically Induces Different Species-Specific Head Anatomies in Genetically Wild-Type Girardia dorotocephala Flatworms.

    PubMed

    Emmons-Bell, Maya; Durant, Fallon; Hammelman, Jennifer; Bessonov, Nicholas; Volpert, Vitaly; Morokuma, Junji; Pinet, Kaylinnette; Adams, Dany S; Pietak, Alexis; Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-11-24

    The shape of an animal body plan is constructed from protein components encoded by the genome. However, bioelectric networks composed of many cell types have their own intrinsic dynamics, and can drive distinct morphological outcomes during embryogenesis and regeneration. Planarian flatworms are a popular system for exploring body plan patterning due to their regenerative capacity, but despite considerable molecular information regarding stem cell differentiation and basic axial patterning, very little is known about how distinct head shapes are produced. Here, we show that after decapitation in G. dorotocephala, a transient perturbation of physiological connectivity among cells (using the gap junction blocker octanol) can result in regenerated heads with quite different shapes, stochastically matching other known species of planaria (S. mediterranea, D. japonica, and P. felina). We use morphometric analysis to quantify the ability of physiological network perturbations to induce different species-specific head shapes from the same genome. Moreover, we present a computational agent-based model of cell and physical dynamics during regeneration that quantitatively reproduces the observed shape changes. Morphological alterations induced in a genomically wild-type G. dorotocephala during regeneration include not only the shape of the head but also the morphology of the brain, the characteristic distribution of adult stem cells (neoblasts), and the bioelectric gradients of resting potential within the anterior tissues. Interestingly, the shape change is not permanent; after regeneration is complete, intact animals remodel back to G. dorotocephala-appropriate head shape within several weeks in a secondary phase of remodeling following initial complete regeneration. We present a conceptual model to guide future work to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which bioelectric networks stochastically select among a small set of discrete head morphologies. Taken together

  18. Gap Junctional Blockade Stochastically Induces Different Species-Specific Head Anatomies in Genetically Wild-Type Girardia dorotocephala Flatworms

    PubMed Central

    Emmons-Bell, Maya; Durant, Fallon; Hammelman, Jennifer; Bessonov, Nicholas; Volpert, Vitaly; Morokuma, Junji; Pinet, Kaylinnette; Adams, Dany S.; Pietak, Alexis; Lobo, Daniel; Levin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The shape of an animal body plan is constructed from protein components encoded by the genome. However, bioelectric networks composed of many cell types have their own intrinsic dynamics, and can drive distinct morphological outcomes during embryogenesis and regeneration. Planarian flatworms are a popular system for exploring body plan patterning due to their regenerative capacity, but despite considerable molecular information regarding stem cell differentiation and basic axial patterning, very little is known about how distinct head shapes are produced. Here, we show that after decapitation in G. dorotocephala, a transient perturbation of physiological connectivity among cells (using the gap junction blocker octanol) can result in regenerated heads with quite different shapes, stochastically matching other known species of planaria (S. mediterranea, D. japonica, and P. felina). We use morphometric analysis to quantify the ability of physiological network perturbations to induce different species-specific head shapes from the same genome. Moreover, we present a computational agent-based model of cell and physical dynamics during regeneration that quantitatively reproduces the observed shape changes. Morphological alterations induced in a genomically wild-type G. dorotocephala during regeneration include not only the shape of the head but also the morphology of the brain, the characteristic distribution of adult stem cells (neoblasts), and the bioelectric gradients of resting potential within the anterior tissues. Interestingly, the shape change is not permanent; after regeneration is complete, intact animals remodel back to G. dorotocephala-appropriate head shape within several weeks in a secondary phase of remodeling following initial complete regeneration. We present a conceptual model to guide future work to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which bioelectric networks stochastically select among a small set of discrete head morphologies. Taken together

  19. Difluoromethyl ketones: Potent inhibitors of wild type and carbamate-insensitive G119S mutant Anopheles gambiae acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Camerino, Eugene; Wong, Dawn M; Tong, Fan; Körber, Florian; Gross, Aaron D; Islam, Rafique; Viayna, Elisabet; Mutunga, James M; Li, Jianyong; Totrov, Maxim M; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Carlier, Paul R

    2015-10-15

    Malaria is a devastating disease in sub-Saharan Africa, and current vector control measures are threatened by emerging resistance mechanisms. With the goal of developing new, selective, resistance-breaking insecticides we explored α-fluorinated methyl ketones as reversible covalent inhibitors of Anopheles gambiae acetylcholinesterase (AgAChE). Trifluoromethyl ketones 5 demonstrated remarkable volatility in microtiter plate assays, but 5c,e-h exhibited potent (1-100 nM) inhibition of wild type (WT) AgAChE and weak inhibition of resistant mutant G119S mutant AgAChE. Fluoromethyl ketones 10c-i exhibited submicromolar to micromolar inhibition of WT AgAChE, but again only weakly inhibited G119S AgAChE. Interestingly, difluoromethyl ketone inhibitors 9c and 9g had single digit nanomolar inhibition of WT AgAChE, and 9g had excellent potency against G119S AgAChE. Approach to steady-state inhibition was quite slow, but after 23 h incubation an IC50 value of 25.1 ± 1.2 nM was measured. We attribute the slow, tight-binding G119S AgAChE inhibition of 9g to a balance of steric size and electrophilicity. However, toxicities of 5g, 9g, and 10g to adult A. gambiae in tarsal contact, fumigation, and injection assays were lower than expected based on WT AgAChE inhibition potency and volatility. Potential toxicity-limiting factors are discussed. PMID:26386602

  20. Adult plasticity in the subcortical auditory pathway of the maternal mouse.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jason A; Shepard, Kathryn N; McClintock, Shannon K; Liu, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Subcortical auditory nuclei were traditionally viewed as non-plastic in adulthood so that acoustic information could be stably conveyed to higher auditory areas. Studies in a variety of species, including humans, now suggest that prolonged acoustic training can drive long-lasting brainstem plasticity. The neurobiological mechanisms for such changes are not well understood in natural behavioral contexts due to a relative dearth of in vivo animal models in which to study this. Here, we demonstrate in a mouse model that a natural life experience with increased demands on the auditory system - motherhood - is associated with improved temporal processing in the subcortical auditory pathway. We measured the auditory brainstem response to test whether mothers and pup-naïve virgin mice differed in temporal responses to both broadband and tone stimuli, including ultrasonic frequencies found in mouse pup vocalizations. Mothers had shorter latencies for early ABR peaks, indicating plasticity in the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus. Shorter interpeak latency between waves IV and V also suggest plasticity in the inferior colliculus. Hormone manipulations revealed that these cannot be explained solely by estrogen levels experienced during pregnancy and parturition in mothers. In contrast, we found that pup-care experience, independent of pregnancy and parturition, contributes to shortening auditory brainstem response latencies. These results suggest that acoustic experience in the maternal context imparts plasticity on early auditory processing that lasts beyond pup weaning. In addition to establishing an animal model for exploring adult auditory brainstem plasticity in a neuroethological context, our results have broader implications for models of perceptual, behavioral and neural changes that arise during maternity, where subcortical sensorineural plasticity has not previously been considered. PMID:24992362

  1. Anoctamins support calcium-dependent chloride secretion by facilitating calcium signaling in adult mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Rainer; Faria, Diana; Skryabin, Boris V; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Rock, Jason R; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal epithelial electrolyte secretion is activated by increase in intracellular cAMP or Ca(2+) and opening of apical Cl(-) channels. In infants and young animals, but not in adults, Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels may cause secretory diarrhea during rotavirus infection. While detailed knowledge exists concerning the contribution of cAMP-activated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels, analysis of the role of Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels became possible through identification of the anoctamin (TMEM16) family of proteins. We demonstrate expression of several anoctamin paralogues in mouse small and large intestines. Using intestinal-specific mouse knockout models for anoctamin 1 (Ano1) and anoctamin 10 (Ano10) and a conventional knockout model for anoctamin 6 (Ano6), we demonstrate the role of anoctamins for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion induced by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCH). Ano1 is preferentially expressed in the ileum and large intestine, where it supports Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) secretion. In contrast, Ano10 is essential for Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in jejunum, where expression of Ano1 was not detected. Although broadly expressed, Ano6 has no role in intestinal cholinergic Cl(-) secretion. Ano1 is located in a basolateral compartment/membrane rather than in the apical membrane, where it supports CCH-induced Ca(2+) increase, while the essential and possibly only apical Cl(-) channel is CFTR. These results define a new role of Ano1 for intestinal Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion and demonstrate for the first time a contribution of Ano10 to intestinal transport.

  2. Adult plasticity in the subcortical auditory pathway of the maternal mouse.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Jason A; Shepard, Kathryn N; McClintock, Shannon K; Liu, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Subcortical auditory nuclei were traditionally viewed as non-plastic in adulthood so that acoustic information could be stably conveyed to higher auditory areas. Studies in a variety of species, including humans, now suggest that prolonged acoustic training can drive long-lasting brainstem plasticity. The neurobiological mechanisms for such changes are not well understood in natural behavioral contexts due to a relative dearth of in vivo animal models in which to study this. Here, we demonstrate in a mouse model that a natural life experience with increased demands on the auditory system - motherhood - is associated with improved temporal processing in the subcortical auditory pathway. We measured the auditory brainstem response to test whether mothers and pup-naïve virgin mice differed in temporal responses to both broadband and tone stimuli, including ultrasonic frequencies found in mouse pup vocalizations. Mothers had shorter latencies for early ABR peaks, indicating plasticity in the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus. Shorter interpeak latency between waves IV and V also suggest plasticity in the inferior colliculus. Hormone manipulations revealed that these cannot be explained solely by estrogen levels experienced during pregnancy and parturition in mothers. In contrast, we found that pup-care experience, independent of pregnancy and parturition, contributes to shortening auditory brainstem response latencies. These results suggest that acoustic experience in the maternal context imparts plasticity on early auditory processing that lasts beyond pup weaning. In addition to establishing an animal model for exploring adult auditory brainstem plasticity in a neuroethological context, our results have broader implications for models of perceptual, behavioral and neural changes that arise during maternity, where subcortical sensorineural plasticity has not previously been considered.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonist treatment during mouse embryogenesis impairs social behavior and cognitive function of adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joanna M; Cuasay, Katrina; Abebe, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a regulator of rodent embryogenesis during the period of neural tube closure. VIP enhanced growth in whole cultured mouse embryos; treatment with a VIP antagonist during embryogenesis inhibited growth and development. VIP antagonist treatment during embryogenesis also had permanent effects on adult brain chemistry and impaired social recognition behavior in adult male mice. The neurological deficits of autism appear to be initiated during neural tube closure and social behavior deficits are among the key characteristics of this disorder that is more common in males and is frequently accompanied by mental retardation. The current study examined the blockage of VIP during embryogenesis as a model for the behavioral deficits of autism. Treatment of pregnant mice with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10 had no apparent effect on the general health or sensory or motor capabilities of adult offspring. However, male offspring exhibited reduced sociability in the social approach task and deficits in cognitive function, as assessed through cued and contextual fear conditioning. Female offspring did not show these deficiencies. These results suggest that this paradigm has usefulness as a mouse model for aspects of autism as it selectively impairs male offspring who exhibit the reduced social behavior and cognitive dysfunction seen in autism. Furthermore, the study indicates that the foundations of some aspects of social behavior are laid down early in mouse embryogenesis, are regulated in a sex specific manner and that interference with embryonic regulators such as VIP can have permanent effects on adult social behavior.

  4. Effects of temperature and growth hormone on individual growth trajectories of wild-type and transgenic coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, M; Björklund, M; Sundström, L F; Devlin, R H

    2010-02-01

    In this study, individual growth patterns of wild-type and growth-enhanced coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch at 8, 12 and 16 degrees C water temperature were followed. Despite large differences among individuals in growth rates, there was generally little variation in the shape of the growth curves among O. kisutch individuals of both genotypes and at all temperatures. Typically, individuals that were relatively large initially were also relatively large at the end of the growth period. The limitation in variation was more pronounced in the growth-enhanced O. kisutch than in the wild type, where the relative size of some individuals reared at 12 and 8 degrees C changed by the end of the trial. As a warmer temperature seems to decrease the plasticity of growth trajectories in wild-type fish, it is possible that global warming will influence the ability of wild fish to adapt their growth to changing conditions.

  5. Data for proteomic profiling of Anthers from a photosensitive male sterile mutant and wild-type cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Song, Meizhen; Meng, Yanyan; Ma, Jianhui; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2015-09-01

    Cotton is an important economic crop, used mainly for the production of textile fiber. Using a space mutation breeding technique, a novel photosensitive genetic male sterile mutant CCRI9106 was isolated from the wild-type upland cotton cultivar CCRI040029. To study the male sterile mechanisms of CCRI9106, histological and iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic analyses of anthers were performed. This data article contains data related to the research article titled iTRAQ-Facilitated Proteomic Profiling of Anthers From a Photosensitive Male Sterile Mutant and Wild-type Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)[1]. This research article describes the iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic analysis of the wild-type and a photosensitive male sterile mutant in cotton. The report indicated that exine formation defect is the key reason for male sterility in mutant plant. The information presented here represents the tables and figures that detail the processing of the raw data obtained from iTRAQ analysis. PMID:26958592

  6. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and a vaccine strain of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi using pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Livengood, Julia L; Lanka, Saraswathi; Maddox, Carol; Tewari, Deepanker

    2016-07-25

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi), the causative agent of strangles, is an important equine pathogen. Strangles is a highly contagious disease and a commercial modified live vaccine (MLV) is used for protection, which although effective, may also result in clinical signs of the disease. A rapid means to differentiate between the MLV and wild-type infection is crucial for quarantine release and limiting the disease spread. This study describes the use of a pyrosequencing assay targeting a single nucleotide deletion upstream of the SzPSe gene to distinguish between the wild-type and vaccine strains. A set of 96 characterized clinical specimens and isolates were tested using the assay. The assay was successful in differentiating between wild-type S. equi and the vaccine strains and in discriminating S. equi from other Streptococci. The vaccine strain was identified in 61.7% (29/47) of the strangles cases in horses with a history of MLV vaccination.

  7. Enigmatic in vivo iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) mutant transcript correction to wild-type in Hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lualdi, Susanna; Tappino, Barbara; Di Duca, Marco; Dardis, Andrea; Anderson, Christopher J; Biassoni, Roberto; Thompson, Peter W; Corsolini, Fabio; Di Rocco, Maja; Bembi, Bruno; Regis, Stefano; Cooper, David N; Filocamo, Mirella

    2010-04-01

    Sequence analysis of the X-linked iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) gene in two Hunter syndrome patients revealed a lack of concordance between IDS genomic DNA and cDNA. These individuals were found to be hemizygous respectively for a nonsense mutation [c.22C>T;p.R8X] and a frameshift micro-insertion [c.10insT;p.P4Sfs] in their genomic DNA. However, both wild-type and mutant IDS sequences were evident upon cDNA analysis. Similar discrepant results were also obtained in a third unrelated patient carrying the same p.R8X mutation. Since both p.R8X mutations were inherited from carrier mothers, somatic mosaicism could be excluded. Although the presence of wild-type IDSmRNA-transcripts was confirmed in all three patients by restriction enzyme digestion, clone sequencing, pyrosequencing and single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE), no wild-type IDS genomic sequence was detectable. The relative abundance of wild-type and mutation-bearing IDS-transcripts in different tissues was quantified by SNuPE. Although IDS transcript levels, as measured by real-time PCR, were reduced (51-71% normal) in these patients, some wild-type IDS protein was detectable by western blotting. Various possible explanations for these unprecedented findings (e.g. accidental contamination, artefactual in vitro nucleotide misincorporation, malsegregation of an extra maternal X-chromosome) were explored and experimentally excluded. PCR-based discriminant assay and segregation analysis of a linked IDS polymorphism (rs1141608) also served to exclude the presence of IDS cDNA derived from the maternal wild-type chromosome. Although it remains to be formally demonstrated by direct experimentation, the intriguing possibility arises that we have observed the in vivo correction of heritable gene lesions at the RNA level operating via a correction mechanism akin to RNA-editing. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, Steven J.; Bateman, Ted A.; Smith, Erin E.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls.

  9. The effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors nitro-L-arginine and 7-nitroindazole on spatial learning and motor functions in Lurcher mutant and wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Markvartová, V; Vozeh, F

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger that, among other things, plays an important role in the nervous system as a gaseous neurotransmitter, modulating long-term potentiation (LTP) induction of synaptic transmission. LTP has been suggested to be the basis of memory formation. On the other hand NO also participates in excitotoxic processes which play an important role in many neuropathological states. The aim of this work was to observe the effect of two NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors (N omega-Nitro-L-arginine, NA; 7-nitroindazole, NI) on spontaneous behaviour, spatial learning and motor functions in Lurcher (+/Lc) and wild type (+/+) mice, derived from the B6CBA strain. Heterozygous Lurcher mutant mice represent a natural model of the olivocerebellar degeneration. They suffer from postnatal, practically total, extinction of cerebellar Purkinje cells (due to the excitotoxic apoptosis) and a partial decrease of granule cells and inferior olive neurons (ION) because of the lost target of their axons. +/+ animals are healthy littermates of +/Lc. NA is a nonselective NOS inhibitor which influences, except neuronal (n), also endothelial (e) NOS with an impact on blood pressure, NI is a selective nNOS inhibitor without any circulatory effect. The adult animals of both types (+/Lc; +/+) were influenced by acute administration of both inhibitors (25 mg/kg i.p. 30 min. before experiments) and newborns only by both acute and long-term administration of NI (1 month, starting from postnatal day 2, P2). Control solutions - saline or solvents of both NA and NI inhibitors--diluted 1M HCl and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respectively, were given at a relevant volume in the same way. The effect of both inhibitors and control solutions on motor functions was tested using four standard procedures (horizontal wire, slanting ladder, rotating cylinder, foot-bridge); in newborns at the age of 14 days. Spatial learning ability was examined in five-day long procedure in the Morris

  10. Quantitative Expression Profile of Distinct Functional Regions in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Mamoru; Uno, Kenichiro D.; Tsujino, Kaori; Hanashima, Carina; Shigeyoshi, Yasufumi; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain is composed of distinct regions with specialized roles including regulation of circadian clocks, feeding, sleep/awake, and seasonal rhythms. To find quantitative differences of expression among such various brain regions, we conducted the BrainStars (B*) project, in which we profiled the genome-wide expression of ∼50 small brain regions, including sensory centers, and centers for motion, time, memory, fear, and feeding. To avoid confounds from temporal differences in gene expression, we sampled each region every 4 hours for 24 hours, and pooled the samples for DNA-microarray assays. Therefore, we focused on spatial differences in gene expression. We used informatics to identify candidate genes with expression changes showing high or low expression in specific regions. We also identified candidate genes with stable expression across brain regions that can be used as new internal control genes, and ligand-receptor interactions of neurohormones and neurotransmitters. Through these analyses, we found 8,159 multi-state genes, 2,212 regional marker gene candidates for 44 small brain regions, 915 internal control gene candidates, and 23,864 inferred ligand-receptor interactions. We also found that these sets include well-known genes as well as novel candidate genes that might be related to specific functions in brain regions. We used our findings to develop an integrated database (http://brainstars.org/) for exploring genome-wide expression in the adult mouse brain, and have made this database openly accessible. These new resources will help accelerate the functional analysis of the mammalian brain and the elucidation of its regulatory network systems. PMID:21858037

  11. Adult mouse model of early hepatocellular carcinoma promoted by alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mouse model of alcohol-driven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that develops in livers with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: Adult C57BL/6 male mice received multiple doses of chemical carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 7 wk of 4% Lieber-DeCarli diet. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and liver Cyp2e1 were assessed. Expression of F4/80, CD68 for macrophages and Ly6G, MPO, E-selectin for neutrophils was measured. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-1β/iNOS (M1) and Arg-1/IL-10/CD163/CD206 (M2) expression. Liver steatosis and fibrosis were measured by oil-red-O and Sirius red staining respectively. HCC development was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by histology. Cellular proliferation was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). RESULTS: Alcohol-DEN mice showed higher ALTs than pair fed-DEN mice throughout the alcohol feeding without weight gain. Alcohol feeding resulted in increased ALT, liver steatosis and inflammation compared to pair-fed controls. Alcohol-DEN mice had reduced steatosis and increased fibrosis indicating advanced liver disease. Molecular characterization showed highest levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers in alcohol-DEN livers. Importantly, M2 macrophages were predominantly higher in alcohol-DEN livers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased numbers of intrahepatic cysts and liver histology confirmed the presence of early HCC in alcohol-DEN mice compared to all other groups. This correlated with increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, a marker of HCC, in alcohol-DEN mice. PCNA immunostaining revealed significantly increased hepatocyte proliferation in livers from alcohol-DEN compared to pair fed-DEN or alcohol-fed mice. CONCLUSION: We describe a new 12-wk HCC model in adult mice that develops in livers with alcoholic hepatitis and defines ALD as co-factor in HCC. PMID:27122661

  12. Establishment of three cell lines from Chinese giant salamander and their sensitivities to the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiang-Di; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Huang, Xing; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2015-06-12

    Known as lethal pathogens, Ranaviruses have been identified in diseased fish, amphibians (including Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus, the world's largest amphibian) and reptiles, causing organ necrosis and systemic hemorrhage. Here, three Chinese giant salamander cell lines, thymus cell line (GSTC), spleen cell line (GSSC) and kidney cell line (GSKC) were initially established. Their sensitivities to ranaviruses, wild-type Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV) and recombinant Rana grylio virus carrying EGFP gene (rRGV-EGFP) were tested. Temporal transcription pattern of ranavirus major capsid protein (MCP), fluorescence and electron microscopy observations showed that both the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus could replicate in the cell lines.

  13. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  14. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Wendt, Dan; Hague, Chuck; Christianson, Terri; Koppaka, Vish; Crippen, Danielle; Kakkis, Emil; Vellard, Michel

    2010-08-16

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS). Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rh)GALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg) and pure (>or=97%) rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake) = 2.5 nM), thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA.

  15. Targeted entry via somatostatin receptors using a novel modified retrovirus glycoprotein that delivers genes at levels comparable to those of wild-type viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Ryu, Byoung Y; Krueger, Robin L; Heldt, Scott A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a novel viral glycoprotein created by replacing a natural receptor-binding sequence of the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein with the peptide ligand somatostatin. This new chimeric glycoprotein, which has been named the Sst receptor binding site (Sst-RBS), gives targeted transduction based on three criteria: (i) a gain of the use of a new entry receptor not used by any known virus; (ii) targeted entry at levels comparable to gene delivery by wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoproteins; and (iii) a loss of the use of the natural ecotropic virus receptor. Retroviral vectors coated with Sst-RBS gained the ability to bind and transduce human 293 cells expressing somatostatin receptors. Their infection was specific to target somatostatin receptors, since a synthetic somatostatin peptide inhibited infection in a dose-dependent manner and the ability to transduce mouse cells bearing the natural ecotropic receptor was effectively lost. Importantly, vectors coated with the Sst-RBS glycoprotein gave targeted entry of up to 1 × 10(6) transducing U/ml, a level comparable to that seen with infection of vectors coated with the parental wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein through the ecotropic receptor and approaching that of infection of VSV G-coated vectors through the VSV receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a glycoprotein that gives targeted entry of retroviral vectors at levels comparable to the natural capacity of viral envelope glycoproteins.

  16. Isogenic pairs of wild type and mutant induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from Rett syndrome patients as in vitro disease model.

    PubMed

    Ananiev, Gene; Williams, Emily Cunningham; Li, Hongda; Chang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum developmental disorder caused by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Excellent RTT mouse models have been created to study the disease mechanisms, leading to many important findings with potential therapeutic implications. These include the identification of many MeCP2 target genes, better understanding of the neurobiological consequences of the loss- or mis-function of MeCP2, and drug testing in RTT mice and clinical trials in human RTT patients. However, because of potential differences in the underlying biology between humans and common research animals, there is a need to establish cell culture-based human models for studying disease mechanisms to validate and expand the knowledge acquired in animal models. Taking advantage of the nonrandom pattern of X chromosome inactivation in female induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), we have generated isogenic pairs of wild type and mutant iPSC lines from several female RTT patients with common and rare RTT mutations. R294X (arginine 294 to stop codon) is a common mutation carried by 5-6% of RTT patients. iPSCs carrying the R294X mutation has not been studied. We differentiated three R294X iPSC lines and their isogenic wild type control iPSC into neurons with high efficiency and consistency, and observed characteristic RTT pathology in R294X neurons. These isogenic iPSC lines provide unique resources to the RTT research community for studying disease pathology, screening for novel drugs, and testing toxicology. PMID:21966470

  17. The impact of agrin on the formation of orthogonal arrays of particles in cultured astrocytes from wild-type and agrin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Sperveslage, Jan; Wolburg, Hartwig; Noell, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet membranes are studded with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) containing orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) which can be visualized exclusively by the freeze-fracturing method. They are predominantly expressed where the astroglial membrane is in contact with the superficial and perivascular basal lamina. This polarity seems to be essential for the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The basal lamina containing many extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin and heparansulfate proteoglycans like agrin is thought to influence this OAP-related polarity of astrocytes. Recently, we have shown that agrin, in particular the neuronal isoform A4B8, is capable of influencing the formation of OAPs in astrocytes when cultured in the presence of agrin-conditioned media. In this paper we wanted to investigate whether coating with exogenous agrin compared to coating with other ECM components would induce OAP formation in astrocytes of the agrin-null mouse. For this purpose, we cultured astrocytes from agrin-null and wild-type mice on agrin- or ECM-coated surfaces. Immunofluorescent cytochemical staining of AQP4 indicated a higher AQP4 expression level in cultures with agrin- or ECM-coated than in cultures with uncoated surfaces, whereas western blot analyses and PCR showed no differences. α-Dystroglycan is thought to be a potential receptor of agrin and was immunostained in wild-type as well as in agrin-null astrocytes. In freeze-fracture replicas, we observed an increase in OAP density in astrocytes when growing on agrin- and ECM-coatings. These results concurred with other experiments in which changes in volume were measured following hypotonic stress, which supported the positive influence of exogenous agrin on AQP4 insertion into the membrane, on OAP formation and on water transport. PMID:20920487

  18. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25256750

  19. LRRK2 is expressed in areas affected by Parkinson's disease in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco; Pérez-Tur, Jordi

    2006-02-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was recently found to have multiple mutations that are causative for autosomal dominant inherited Parkinson's disease (PD). Previously, we used Northern blot analysis to show that this gene was expressed in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, medulla, spinal cord, occipital pole, frontal lobe, temporal lobe and caudate putamen. However, a more comprehensive map of LRRK2 mRNA localization in the central nervous system is still lacking. In this study we have mapped the distribution of the mRNA encoding for LRRK2 using nonradioactive in situ hybridization. We detected a moderate expression of this PD-related gene throughout the adult B2B6 mouse brain. A stronger hybridization signal was observed in deep cerebral cortex layers, superficial cingulate cortex layers, the piriform cortex, hippocampal formation, caudate putamen, substantia nigra, the basolateral and basomedial anterior amygdala nuclei, reticular thalamic nucleus and also in the cerebellar granular cell layer. Given that LRRK2 mRNA is highly enriched in motor systems and also is expressed in other systems, we may conclude that mutations in LRRK2 may affect several motor and nonmotor structures that may play an important role in the development of PD.

  20. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner.

  1. Adult pallium transcriptomes surprise in not reflecting predicted homologies across diverse chicken and mouse pallial sectors

    PubMed Central

    Belgard, T. Grant; Montiel, Juan F.; Wang, Wei Zhi; García-Moreno, Fernando; Ponting, Chris P.; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    The thorniest problem in comparative neurobiology is the identification of the particular brain region of birds and reptiles that corresponds to the mammalian neocortex [Butler AB, Reiner A, Karten HJ (2011) Ann N Y Acad Sci 1225:14–27; Wang Y, Brzozowska-Prechtl A, Karten HJ (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(28):12676–12681]. We explored which genes are actively transcribed in the regions of controversial ancestry in a representative bird (chicken) and mammal (mouse) at adult stages. We conducted four analyses comparing the expression patterns of their 5,130 most highly expressed one-to-one orthologous genes that considered global patterns of expression specificity, strong gene markers, and coexpression networks. Our study demonstrates transcriptomic divergence, plausible convergence, and, in two exceptional cases, conservation between specialized avian and mammalian telencephalic regions. This large-scale study potentially resolves the complex relationship between developmental homology and functional characteristics on the molecular level and settles long-standing evolutionary debates. PMID:23878249

  2. Visualizing form and function in organotypic slices of the adult mouse parotid gland

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jennifer D.; Peters, Christian G.; Saunders, Rudel; Won, Jong Hak; Betzenhauser, Matthew J.; Gunning, William T.; Yule, David I.; Giovannucci, David R.

    2008-01-01

    An organotypic slice preparation of the adult mouse parotid salivary gland amenable to a variety of optical assessments of fluid and protein secretion dynamics is described. The semi-intact preparation rendered without the use of enzymatic treatment permitted live-cell imaging and multiphoton analysis of cellular and supracellular signals. Toward this end we demonstrated that the parotid slice is a significant addition to the repertoire of tools available to investigators to probe exocrine structure and function since there is currently no cell culture system that fully recapitulates parotid acinar cell biology. Importantly, we show that a subpopulation of the acinar cells of parotid slices can be maintained in short-term culture and retain their morphology and function for up to 2 days. This in vitro model system is a significant step forward compared with enzymatically dispersed acini that rapidly lose their morphological and functional characteristics over several hours, and it was shown to be long enough for the expression and trafficking of exogenous protein following adenoviral infection. This system is compatible with a variety of genetic and physiological approaches used to study secretory function. PMID:18669626

  3. Expression of dominant negative cadherin in the adult mouse brain modifies rearing behavior.

    PubMed

    Edsbagge, Josefina; Zhu, Shunwei; Xiao, Min-Yi; Wigström, Holger; Mohammed, Abdul H; Semb, Henrik

    2004-03-01

    The cadherin superfamily of cell-cell adhesion molecules (CAM) are crucial regulators of morphogenesis and axonal guidance during development of the nervous system and have been suggested to play important roles in neural plasticity of the brain. To study the latter, we created a mouse model that expressed a dominant negative classical cadherin in the brain of adult mice. The mice were tested for spontaneous motor activity and exploratory behavior in the open field, anxiety in the plus-maze, and spatial learning and memory in the water-T maze. Mice expressing the dominant negative cadherin displayed reduced rearing behavior, but no change in motor activity, in the open field, indicating deficits in exploratory behavior. In the water maze, animals expressing the mutant cadherin showed normal escape latencies and were indistinguishable from control littermates. Similarly, LTP in hippocampal slices of cadherin mutant and control mice were indistinguishable. These findings demonstrate intact spatial learning in mice expressing a dominant negative cadherin but altered rearing behavior, suggesting the involvement of classical cadherins in mechanisms mediating rearing behavior.

  4. Adult pallium transcriptomes surprise in not reflecting predicted homologies across diverse chicken and mouse pallial sectors.

    PubMed

    Belgard, T Grant; Montiel, Juan F; Wang, Wei Zhi; García-Moreno, Fernando; Margulies, Elliott H; Ponting, Chris P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2013-08-01

    The thorniest problem in comparative neurobiology is the identification of the particular brain region of birds and reptiles that corresponds to the mammalian neocortex [Butler AB, Reiner A, Karten HJ (2011) Ann N Y Acad Sci 1225:14-27; Wang Y, Brzozowska-Prechtl A, Karten HJ (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(28):12676-12681]. We explored which genes are actively transcribed in the regions of controversial ancestry in a representative bird (chicken) and mammal (mouse) at adult stages. We conducted four analyses comparing the expression patterns of their 5,130 most highly expressed one-to-one orthologous genes that considered global patterns of expression specificity, strong gene markers, and coexpression networks. Our study demonstrates transcriptomic divergence, plausible convergence, and, in two exceptional cases, conservation between specialized avian and mammalian telencephalic regions. This large-scale study potentially resolves the complex relationship between developmental homology and functional characteristics on the molecular level and settles long-standing evolutionary debates.

  5. Next-generation sequencing facilitates quantitative analysis of wild-type and Nrl−/− retinal transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Matthew J.; Rajasimha, Harsha K.; Roger, Jerome E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized systems-based analysis of cellular pathways. The goals of this study are to compare NGS-derived retinal transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) to microarray and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR) methods and to evaluate protocols for optimal high-throughput data analysis. Methods Retinal mRNA profiles of 21-day-old wild-type (WT) and neural retina leucine zipper knockout (Nrl−/−) mice were generated by deep sequencing, in triplicate, using Illumina GAIIx. The sequence reads that passed quality filters were analyzed at the transcript isoform level with two methods: Burrows–Wheeler Aligner (BWA) followed by ANOVA (ANOVA) and TopHat followed by Cufflinks. qRT–PCR validation was performed using TaqMan and SYBR Green assays. Results Using an optimized data analysis workflow, we mapped about 30 million sequence reads per sample to the mouse genome (build mm9) and identified 16,014 transcripts in the retinas of WT and Nrl−/− mice with BWA workflow and 34,115 transcripts with TopHat workflow. RNA-seq data confirmed stable expression of 25 known housekeeping genes, and 12 of these were validated with qRT–PCR. RNA-seq data had a linear relationship with qRT–PCR for more than four orders of magnitude and a goodness of fit (R2) of 0.8798. Approximately 10% of the transcripts showed differential expression between the WT and Nrl−/− retina, with a fold change ≥1.5 and p value <0.05. Altered expression of 25 genes was confirmed with qRT–PCR, demonstrating the high degree of sensitivity of the RNA-seq method. Hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes uncovered several as yet uncharacterized genes that may contribute to retinal function. Data analysis with BWA and TopHat workflows revealed a significant overlap yet provided complementary insights in transcriptome profiling. Conclusions Our study represents the first detailed analysis of retinal

  6. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-Yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  7. PAX6 MiniPromoters drive restricted expression from rAAV in the adult mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hickmott, Jack W; Chen, Chih-yu; Arenillas, David J; Korecki, Andrea J; Lam, Siu Ling; Molday, Laurie L; Bonaguro, Russell J; Zhou, Michelle; Chou, Alice Y; Mathelier, Anthony; Boye, Sanford L; Hauswirth, William W; Molday, Robert S; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Current gene therapies predominantly use small, strong, and readily available ubiquitous promoters. However, as the field matures, the availability of small, cell-specific promoters would be greatly beneficial. Here we design seven small promoters from the human paired box 6 (PAX6) gene and test them in the adult mouse retina using recombinant adeno-associated virus. We chose the retina due to previous successes in gene therapy for blindness, and the PAX6 gene since it is: well studied; known to be driven by discrete regulatory regions; expressed in therapeutically interesting retinal cell types; and mutated in the vision-loss disorder aniridia, which is in need of improved therapy. At the PAX6 locus, 31 regulatory regions were bioinformatically predicted, and nine regulatory regions were constructed into seven MiniPromoters. Driving Emerald GFP, these MiniPromoters were packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus, and injected intravitreally into postnatal day 14 mice. Four MiniPromoters drove consistent retinal expression in the adult mouse, driving expression in combinations of cell-types that endogenously express Pax6: ganglion, amacrine, horizontal, and Müller glia. Two PAX6-MiniPromoters drive expression in three of the four cell types that express PAX6 in the adult mouse retina. Combined, they capture all four cell types, making them potential tools for research, and PAX6-gene therapy for aniridia. PMID:27556059

  8. Trifluoperazine rescues human dopaminergic cells from wild-type α-synuclein-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Höllerhage, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim N; de Andrade, Anderson; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Dolga, Amalia; Culmsee, Carsten; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hengerer, Bastian; Höglinger, Günter U

    2014-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Presently, there is no causal therapy available to slow down or halt disease progression. The presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein aggregates to form intraneuronal Lewy bodies in PD. It is generally believed that intermediates on the way from monomers to the large aggregates would mediate neurotoxicity, but the precise species and mechanism responsible for neuronal death are controversially debated. To study alpha-synuclein-mediated toxicity, we developed a new model in which moderate overexpression of wild-type alpha-synuclein led to gradual death of human postmitotic dopaminergic neurons. In accordance with findings in postmortem PD brains, small oligomeric species occurred and the autophagic flux was impaired in our model. The phenothiazine neuroleptic trifluoperazine, an activator of macroautophagy, selectively reduced one particular alpha-synuclein species and rescued cells. Inversely, blocking of autophagy led to an accumulation of this oligomeric species and increased cell death. These data show that activation of autophagy is a promising approach to protect against alpha-synuclein pathology and likely acts by targeting one specific alpha-synuclein species.

  9. Gravitropism and development of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Katembe, W. J.; Edelmann, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    The "starch-statolith" hypothesis has been used by plant physiologists to explain the gravity perception mechanism in higher plants. In order to help resolve some of the controversy associated with ground-based research that has supported this theory, we performed a spaceflight experiment during the January 1997 mission of the Space Shuttle STS-81. Seedlings of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, two reduced-starch strains, and a starchless mutant were grown in microgravity and then given a gravity stimulus on a centrifuge. In terms of development in space, germination was greater than 90% for seeds in microgravity, and flight seedlings were smaller (60% in total length) compared to control plants grown on the ground and to control plants on a rotating clinostat. Seedlings grown in space had two structural features that distinguished them from the controls: a greater density of root hairs and an anomalous hypocotyl hook structure. However, the slower growth and morphological changes observed in the flight seedlings may be due to the effects of ethylene present in the spacecraft. Nevertheless, during the flight hypocotyls of WT seedlings responded to a unilateral 60 min stimulus provided by a 1-g centrifuge while those of the starch-deficient strains did not. Thus the strain with the greatest amount of starch responded to the stimulus given in flight and therefore, these data support the starch-statolith model for gravity sensing.

  10. Cellular Distribution and Functions of Wild-Type and Constitutively Activated Dictyostelium PakBV⃞

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Marc; Mahasneh, Amjad; Lee, Sheu-Fen; Rivero, Francisco; Côté, Graham P.

    2005-01-01

    Dictyostelium PakB, previously termed myosin I heavy chain kinase, is a member of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family. Two-hybrid assays showed that PakB interacts with Dictyostelium Rac1a/b/c, RacA (a RhoBTB protein), RacB, RacC, and RacF1. Wild-type PakB displayed a cytosolic distribution with a modest enrichment at the leading edge of migrating cells and at macropinocytic and phagocytic cups, sites consistent with a role in activating myosin I. PakB fused at the N terminus to green fluorescent protein was proteolyzed in cells, resulting in removal of the catalytic domain. C-terminal truncated PakB and activated PakB lacking the p21-binding domain strongly localized to the cell cortex, to macropinocytic cups, to the posterior of migrating cells, and to the cleavage furrow of dividing cells. These data indicate that in its open, active state, the N terminus of PakB forms a tight association with cortical actin filaments. PakB-null cells displayed no significant behavioral defects, but cells expressing activated PakB were unable to complete cytokinesis when grown in suspension and exhibited increased rates of phagocytosis and pinocytosis. PMID:15509655

  11. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of silkwormBmovo-1 and wild type silkworm ovary

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Renyu; Hu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Liyuan; Cao, Guangli; Huang, Moli; Xue, Gaoxu; Song, Zuowei; Lu, Jiayu; Chen, Xueying; Gong, Chengliang

    2015-01-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism of Bmovo-1 regulation of ovary size is unclear. To uncover the mechanism of Bmovo-1 regulation of ovarian development and oogenesis using RNA-Seq, we compared the transcriptomes of wild type (WT) and Bmovo-1-overexpressing silkworm (silkworm+Bmovo-1) ovaries. Using a pair-end Illumina Solexa sequencing strategy, 5,296,942 total reads were obtained from silkworm+Bmovo-1 ovaries and 6,306,078 from WT ovaries. The average read length was about 100 bp. Clean read ratios were 98.79% for silkworm+Bmovo-1 and 98.87% for WT silkworm ovaries. Comparative transcriptome analysis showed 123 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes in silkworm+Bmovo-1 ovaries. These differentially expressed genes were enriched in the extracellular and extracellular spaces and involved in metabolism, genetic information processing, environmental information processing, cellular processes and organismal systems. Bmovo-1 overexpression in silkworm ovaries might promote anabolism for ovarian development and oogenesis and oocyte proliferation and transport of nutrients to ovaries by altering nutrient partitioning, which would support ovary development. Excessive consumption of nutrients for ovary development alters nutrient partitioning and deters silk protein synthesis. PMID:26643037

  12. Probing flagellar promoter occupancy in wild-type and mutant Caulobacter crescentus by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicole J; Viollier, Patrick H

    2011-06-01

    In the asymmetric predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus, TipF and TipN mark the cellular pole for future flagellar development. TipF is essential for motility and contains a cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase-like (EAL) domain that is necessary for proper function. TipN is localized to the flagellar pole before TipF and is essential for the proper placement of the flagellum in C. crescentus. Using β-galactosidase promoter-probe assays and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, we investigated the influence of the C. crescentus flagellar assembly regulator TipF on flagellar gene transcription. We compared the transcriptional activity of class II-fliF-lacZ, class III-flgE-lacZ, and class IV-fljL-lacZ fusions in a ΔtipF mutant with that of other flagellar mutants and the wild-type strain. We subsequently verified the in vivo occupancy of the fliF, flgE, and fljL flagellar promoters by the flagellar regulators CtrA, FlbD, and FliX in addition to RNA polymerase. We deduce that TipF contributes to proper expression of flagellar genes in C. crescentus by acting both within and outside of the canonical flagellar gene expression hierarchy.

  13. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P N; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus.

  14. Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Novel Insights From Advanced Imaging.

    PubMed

    Narotsky, David L; Castano, Adam; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter. Diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is often delayed, either because of the false assumption that it is a rare disease, or because of misdiagnosis as a result of mistaking it with other conditions. Clinicians must integrate clinical clues from history, physical examination, and common diagnostic tests to raise suspicion for ATTRwt. The historical gold standard for diagnosis of cardiac amyloid is endomyocardial biopsy analysis with pathological distinction of precursor protein type, but this method often results in delayed diagnosis because of the limited availability of expertise to perform and interpret the endomyocardial biopsy specimen. Emerging noninvasive imaging modalities provide easier, accurate screening for ATTRwt. These modalities include advanced echocardiography, using strain imaging and the myocardial contraction fraction; nuclear scintigraphy, which can differentiate between ATTR and light-chain cardiac amyloid; and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using extracellular volume measurement, late gadolinium enhancement, and distinct T1 mapping. These novel approaches reveal insights into the prevalence, clinical course, morphological effects, and prognosis of ATTRwt. PMID:27568874

  15. Molecular analysis of mutant and wild type alcohol dehydrogenase alleles from Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Wild type alcohol dehydrogenase polypeptides (ADH) from Drosophila melanogaster transformants were examined using western blots and polyclonal antiserum specific for Drosophila melanogaster ADH. Mutants induced in Drosophila spermatozoa at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus using X-rays, 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) or ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) were characterized using genetic complementation tests, western blots, Southern blots, northern blots and enzymatic amplification of the Adh locus. Genetic complementation tests showed that 22/30 X-ray-induced mutants, and 3/13 ENU and EMS induced mutants were multi-locus deficiencies. Western blot analysis of the intragenic mutations showed that 4/7 X-ray-induced mutants produced detectable polypeptides, one of which was normal in molecular weight and charge. In contrast 8/10 intragenic ENU and EMS induced mutants produced normal polypeptides. Southern blot analysis showed that 5/7 intragenic X-ray induced mutants and all 10 of the intragenic ENU and EMS induced mutants were normal with respect to the alleles they were derived from.

  16. Quantification of gait parameters in freely walking wild type and sensory deprived Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, César S; Bartos, Imre; Akay, Turgay; Márka, Szabolcs; Mann, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated walking in vertebrates and multi-legged invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster requires a complex neural network coupled to sensory feedback. An understanding of this network will benefit from systems such as Drosophila that have the ability to genetically manipulate neural activities. However, the fly's small size makes it challenging to analyze walking in this system. In order to overcome this limitation, we developed an optical method coupled with high-speed imaging that allows the tracking and quantification of gait parameters in freely walking flies with high temporal and spatial resolution. Using this method, we present a comprehensive description of many locomotion parameters, such as gait, tarsal positioning, and intersegmental and left-right coordination for wild type fruit flies. Surprisingly, we find that inactivation of sensory neurons in the fly's legs, to block proprioceptive feedback, led to deficient step precision, but interleg coordination and the ability to execute a tripod gait were unaffected. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00231.001 PMID:23326642

  17. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P. N.; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus. PMID:27030589

  18. Wild-type p53 controls cell motility and invasion by dual regulation of MET expression

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Matoso, Andres; Corney, David C.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Körner, Stefanie; Wang, Wei; Boccaccio, Carla; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Hermeking, Heiko; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that p53 mutations are responsible not only for growth of primary tumors but also for their dissemination. However, mechanisms involved in p53-mediated control of cell motility and invasion remain poorly understood. By using the primary ovarian surface epithelium cell culture, we show that conditional inactivation of p53 or expression of its mutant forms results in overexpression of MET receptor tyrosine kinase, a crucial regulator of invasive growth. At the same time, cells acquire increased MET-dependent motility and invasion. Wild-type p53 negatively regulates MET expression by two mechanisms: (i) transactivation of MET-targeting miR-34, and (ii) inhibition of SP1 binding to MET promoter. Both mechanisms are not functional in p53 absence, but mutant p53 proteins retain partial MET promoter suppression. Accordingly, MET overexpression, cell motility, and invasion are particularly high in p53-null cells. These results identify MET as a critical effector of p53 and suggest that inhibition of MET may be an effective antimetastatic approach to treat cancers with p53 mutations. These results also show that the extent of advanced cancer traits, such as invasion, may be determined by alterations in individual components of p53/MET regulatory network. PMID:21831840

  19. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment. PMID:26254692

  20. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  1. Subcellular potassium and sodium distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuolar mutants.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rito; Álvarez, María C; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José

    2013-09-15

    Living cells accumulate potassium (K⁺) to fulfil multiple functions. It is well documented that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows at very different concentrations of external alkali cations and keeps high and low intracellular concentrations of K⁺ and sodium (Na⁺) respectively. However less attention has been paid to the study of the intracellular distribution of these cations. The most widely used experimental approach, plasma membrane permeabilization, produces incomplete results, since it usually considers only cytoplasm and vacuoles as compartments where the cations are present in significant amounts. By isolating and analysing the main yeast organelles, we have determined the subcellular location of K⁺ and Na⁺ in S. cerevisiae. We show that while vacuoles accumulate most of the intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, the cytosol contains relatively low amounts, which is especially relevant in the case of Na⁺. However K⁺ concentrations in the cytosol are kept rather constant during the K⁺-starvation process and we conclude that, for that purpose, vacuolar K⁺ has to be rapidly mobilized. We also show that this intracellular distribution is altered in four different mutants with impaired vacuolar physiology. Finally, we show that both in wild-type and vacuolar mutants, nuclei contain and keep a relatively constant and important percentage of total intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, which most probably is involved in the neutralization of negative charges.

  2. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment.

  3. Fluorescent Trimethoprim Conjugate Probes To Assess Drug Accumulation in Wild Type and Mutant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria may result from multiple resistance mechanisms, including increased efflux pump activity or reduced porin protein expression. Up-regulation of the efflux pump system is closely associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). To help investigate the role of efflux pumps on compound accumulation, a fluorescence-based assay was developed using fluorescent derivatives of trimethoprim (TMP), a broad-spectrum synthetic antibiotic that inhibits an intracellular target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Novel fluorescent TMP probes inhibited eDHFR activity with comparable potency to TMP, but did not kill or inhibit growth of wild type Escherichia coli. However, bactericidal activity was observed against an efflux pump deficient E. coli mutant strain (ΔtolC). A simple and quick fluorescence assay was developed to measure cellular accumulation of the TMP probe using either fluorescence spectroscopy or flow cytometry, with validation by LC-MS/MS. This fluorescence assay may provide a simple method to assess efflux pump activity with standard laboratory equipment. PMID:27737551

  4. Rootcap structure in wild type and in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Rootcaps of the wild type (WT) and of a starchless, gravitropic mutant (TC7) of Arabidopsis thaliana L. were examined by electron microscopy to identify cellular polarities with respect to gravity. In columella cells, nuclei are located proximally, and the nuclear envelope is continuous with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that is in turn connected to nearby plasmodesmata. Impregnation of ER with osmium ferricyanide revealed numerous contacts between columella plastids and ER in both genotypes. ER is present mostly in the outer regions of the columella protoplast except in older columella cells that are developing into peripheral cells. In vertical roots, only columella cells that are intermediate in development (story 2 cells) have a higher surface density (S) of ER in the distal compared to proximal regions of the cell. The distal but not the proximal S of the ER is constant throughout columella development. Plastids are less sedimented in TC7 columella cells compared to those of the WT. It is hypothesized that plastid contact with the ER plays a role in gravity perception in both genotypes.

  5. Dietary supplementation with ipriflavone decreases hepatic iron stores in wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Patchen, Bonnie; Koppe, Tiago; Cheng, Aaron; Seo, Young Ah; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Fraenkel, Paula G

    2016-09-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide produced in the liver, decreases intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release by causing degradation of the iron exporter, ferroportin. Because its levels are inappropriately low in patients with iron overload syndromes, hepcidin is a potential drug target. We previously conducted a chemical screen that revealed ipriflavone, an orally available small molecule, as a potent inducer of hepcidin expression. To evaluate ipriflavone's effect on iron homeostasis, we placed groups of 5-week old wild type or thalassemia intermedia (Hbb(Th3+/-)) mice on a soy-free, iron-sufficient diet, AIN-93G containing 220mg iron and 0-750mgipriflavone/kg of food for 50days. Ipriflavone 500mg/kg significantly reduced liver iron stores and intestinal ferroportin expression in WT mice, while increasing the ratio of hepcidin transcript levels to liver iron stores. Ipriflavone supplementation in Hbb(Th3+/-) mice failed to alleviate iron overload and was associated with a milder reduction in intestinal ferroportin and a failure to alter the ratio of hepcidin transcript levels to liver iron stores or splenic expression of the hepcidin-regulatory hormone, erythroferrone. These data suggest that dietary supplementation with ipriflavone alone would not be sufficient to treat iron overload in thalassemia intermedia. PMID:27519943

  6. Intraperitoneal Infection of Wild-Type Mice with Synthetically Generated Mammalian Prion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhe; McGovern, Gillian; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Fei; Zha, Liang; Jeffrey, Martin; Ma, Jiyan

    2015-07-01

    The prion hypothesis postulates that the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is an unorthodox protein conformation based agent. Recent successes in generating mammalian prions in vitro with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein provide strong support for the hypothesis. However, whether the pathogenic properties of synthetically generated prion (rec-Prion) recapitulate those of naturally occurring prions remains unresolved. Using end-point titration assay, we showed that the in vitro prepared rec-Prions have infectious titers of around 104 LD50/μg. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation of wild-type mice with rec-Prion caused prion disease with an average survival time of 210-220 days post inoculation. Detailed pathological analyses revealed that the nature of rec-Prion induced lesions, including spongiform change, disease specific prion protein accumulation (PrP-d) and the PrP-d dissemination amongst lymphoid and peripheral nervous system tissues, the route and mechanisms of neuroinvasion were all typical of classical rodent prions. Our results revealed that, similar to naturally occurring prions, the rec-Prion has a titratable infectivity and is capable of causing prion disease via routes other than direct intra-cerebral challenge. More importantly, our results established that the rec-Prion caused disease is pathogenically and pathologically identical to naturally occurring contagious TSEs, supporting the concept that a conformationally altered protein agent is responsible for the infectivity in TSEs.

  7. Wild-type p53 binds to MYC promoter G-quadruplex

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Marek; Helma, Robert; Polášková, Alena; Krejčí, Aneta; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Kejnovská, Iva; Navrátilová, Lucie; Adámik, Matej; Vorlíčková, Michaela; Brázdová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded nucleic acid structures that are implicated in the regulation of transcription, translation and replication. Genome regions enriched in putative G-quadruplex motifs include telomeres and gene promoters. Tumour suppressor p53 plays a critical role in regulatory pathways leading to cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition to transcriptional regulation mediated via sequence-specific DNA binding, p53 can selectively bind various non-B DNA structures. In the present study, wild-type p53 (wtp53) binding to G-quadruplex formed by MYC promoter nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 region was investigated. Wtp53 binding to MYC G-quadruplex is comparable to interaction with specific p53 consensus sequence (p53CON). Apart from the full-length wtp53, its isolated C-terminal region (aa 320–393) as well, is capable of high-affinity MYC G-quadruplex binding, suggesting its critical role in this type of interaction. Moreover, wtp53 binds to MYC promoter region containing putative G-quadruplex motif in two wtp53-expressing cell lines. The results suggest that wtp53 binding to G-quadruplexes can take part in transcriptional regulation of its target genes. PMID:27634752

  8. Ultrastructural analysis of wild type and mutant Drosophila melanogaster using helium ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boseman, Adam; Nowlin, Kyle; Ashraf, Sarmadia; Yang, Jijin; Lajeunesse, Dennis

    2013-08-01

    Insects have evolved numerous adaptations to survive a variety of environmental conditions. Given that the primary interface between insects and the environment is mediated through their skin or cuticle, many of these adaptations are found in extraordinary cuticle diversity both in morphology and structure. Not all of these adaptions manifest themselves in changes in the chemical composition of the cuticle but rather as elaborations of the surface structures of the cuticle. Typically the examination of these micro- and nanoscale structures has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Typically, in order to decrease surface charging and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface, but this layer limits the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. In this paper we use a new technology, helium ion microscopy (HIM) to examine surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant Drosophila. Helium ion microscopy permits high resolution imaging of biological samples without the need for coating. We compare HIM to traditional SEM and demonstrate certain advantages of this type of microscopy, with our focus being high resolution characterization of nanostructures on the cuticle of Drosophila melanogaster and potentially other biological specimens.

  9. Comparative analysis of leg and antenna development in wild-type and homeotic Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Mark; Pueyo, Jose I; Greig, Steve A; Couso, Juan Pablo

    2003-07-01

    The insect leg and antenna are thought to be homologous structures, evolved from a common ancestral appendage. The homeotic transformations of antenna to leg in Drosophila produced by mutation of the Hox gene Antennapedia are position-specific, such that every particular antenna structure is transformed into a specific leg counterpart. This has been taken to suggest that the developmental programmes of these two appendages are still similar. In particular, the mechanisms for the specification of a cell's position within the appendage would be identical, only their interpretation would be different and subject to homeotic gene control. Here we explore the degree of conservation between the developmental programmes of leg and antenna in Drosophila and other dipterans, in wild-type and homeotic conditions. Most of the appendage pattern-forming genes are active in both appendages, and their expression domains are partially conserved. However, the regulatory relationships and interactions between these genes are different, and in fact cells change their expression while undergoing homeotic transformation. Thus, the positional information, and the mechanisms which generate it, are not strictly conserved between leg and antenna; and homeotic genes alter the establishment of positional clues, not only their interpretation. The partial conservation of pattern-forming genes in both appendages ensures a predictable re-specification of positional clues, producing the observed positional specificity of homeotic transformations.

  10. WILD-TYPE GROSS LEUKEMIA VIRUS AND THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE GLOMERULONEPHRITIS OF NEW ZEALAND MICE

    PubMed Central

    Mellors, Robert C.; Shirai, Toshikazu; Aoki, Tadao; Huebner, Robert J.; Krawczynski, Krzysztof

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the spontaneous glomerulonephritis of NZB and (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice is related at least in part to the formation of natural antibody against antigens of the G (Gross) system, and apparently to the deposition in the glomeruli of immune complexes of G natural antibody with G soluble antigen (GSA), type-specific antigen specified by wild-type Gross leukemia virus. G natural antibody and GSA are detectable in the acid-buffer eluate of the kidneys of NZB mice during the course of the glomerulonephritis. (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice develop glomerulonephritis and produce GSA and free G natural antibody earlier in life than do NZB mice. The proteinuria manifestation of the gomerulonephritis of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice becomes increasingly prevalent as GSA undergoes immune elimination from the circulation. Gross leukemia virus-specified antigens together with bound immunoglobulins are located in the glomerular lesions of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice, both in the mesangium as observed in NZB mice and also in the wall of the peripheral capillary loops of the glomeruli. PMID:4924198

  11. Drought stress-induced compositional changes in tolerant transgenic rice and its wild type.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Do-Young; Shin, Hee Jae; Nam, Ki Jung; An, Joo Hee; Pack, In-Soon; Park, Jung-Ho; Jeong, Soon-Chun; Kim, Ho Bang; Kim, Chang-Gi

    2014-06-15

    Comparing well-watered versus deficit conditions, we evaluated the chemical composition of grains harvested from wild-type (WT) and drought-tolerant, transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.). The latter had been developed by inserting AtCYP78A7, which encodes a cytochrome P450 protein. Two transgenic Lines, '10B-5' and '18A-4', and the 'Hwayoung' WT were grown under a rainout shelter. After the harvested grains were polished, their levels of key components, including proximates, amino acids, fatty acids, minerals and vitamins were analysed to determine the effect of watering system and genotype. Drought treatment significantly influenced the levels of some nutritional components in both transgenic and WT grains. In particular, the amounts of lignoceric acid and copper in the WT decreased by 12.6% and 39.5%, respectively, by drought stress, whereas those of copper and potassium in the transgenics rose by 88.1-113.3% and 10.4-11.9%, respectively, under water-deficit conditions.

  12. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection.

  13. Dynamic expression of TrkB receptor protein on proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael H.; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, presumably via its primary receptor, TrkB, but controversy exists about how BDNF affects neurogenesis (e.g. proliferation vs. survival/differentiation). This controversy arises, in part, due to the lack of information about if and when TrkB is expressed on adult neural precursors in vivo. Using multiple methods to analyze proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse subgranular zone (SGZ), we find that the proportion of proliferating cells that are TrkB-IR is low and it remains low for at least one week following BrdU labeling, but increases as neuroblasts mature. Use of the nestin-GFP transgenic mouse revealed the likelihood of being TrkB-IR increased with presumed maturity of the cell type. Stem-like cells, which rarely divide, were likely to express TrkB. However, early progenitors and late progenitors, which are still in the cell cycle had rare TrkB expression. Immature neuroblasts, however, were more likely to express TrkB, especially as their morphology became more mature. Taken together, these findings emphasize that expression of TrkB protein is closely linked to progression towards neuronal maturity. This provides evidence that maturing cells but not proliferating cells in the adult mouse SGZ have the molecular machinery necessary to respond directly to BDNF. Furthermore, these findings lay critical groundwork for further exploration of the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:18240316

  14. A comparative study of cytokinins in caryopsis development in the maize miniature 1 seed mutant and its wild type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here a comparative developmental profile of cytokinins, both total quantity and diversity of various forms, in relation to cell size, cell number and endoreduplication in developing caryopses of a cell wall invertase-deficient miniature1 (mn1) seed mutant and its wild type, Mn1, genotype. ...

  15. Responses of Wild-Type and Resistant Strains of the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima to Chloramphenicol Challenge▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Clemente I.; Johnson, Matthew R.; Chou, Chung-Jung; Conners, Shannon B.; Geouge, Sarah G.; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Nichols, Jason D.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptomes and growth physiologies of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima and an antibiotic-resistant spontaneous mutant were compared prior to and following exposure to chloramphenicol. While the wild-type response was similar to that of mesophilic bacteria, reduced susceptibility of the mutant was attributed to five mutations in 23S rRNA and phenotypic preconditioning to chloramphenicol. PMID:17557852

  16. Long-Term Treatment with Erlotinib for EGFR Wild-Type Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Polychronidou, Genovefa; Papakotoulas, Pavlos

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib are known to have greater efficacy in EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although erlotinib also has activity in wild-type disease. We report the successful long-term maintenance treatment of a patient with EGFR wild-type NSCLC with gefitinib and later erlotinib. The patient (male; 44 years old; smoker) was diagnosed with EGFR wild-type NSCLC after computer tomography had revealed a mediastinal mass, and histology and mutation testing had identified the tumor as an EGFR wild-type grade 3 adenocarcinoma. The patient received multiple rounds of chemotherapy, followed by gefitinib maintenance (3 years). Later on, he received erlotinib maintenance and developed a persistent rash (grade 1/2) that lasted throughout the treatment. The patient's condition has remained stable on erlotinib for more than 5 years, with no evidence of progression. We describe the patient's disease course and treatment in the context of EGFR TKI therapy and the prognostic factors for long-term clinical outcomes of NSCLC, including the development of erlotinib-induced rash.

  17. Cytoplasmic localization of wild-type p53 in glioblastomas correlates with expression of vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sembritzki, Olivier; Hagel, Christian; Lamszus, Katrin; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type p53 in tumor cells indicates that the tumor suppressor is inactive with regard to growth suppressive functions. Whether this occurs randomly during tumor development or characterizes a certain tumor cell subset is not known. Here we assayed primary glioblastomas for expression and subcellular localization of p53 and determined a correlation with expression of intermediate filament proteins characterizing glial cell development. Sixty-nine percent of the tumors were p53 positive in immunohistochemistry. A significant number of tumors (23%) accumulated wild-type p53 in the cytoplasm, which correlated with the presence of vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, except for 1 case. Tumors with exclusive nuclear p53 contained none or only one of these intermediate filament proteins. In an alternative approach, tumors positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein were screened for expression of p53 and vimentin. Thirty-eight percent of these tumors showed cytoplasmic p53, and all of those also expressed vimentin. Tumors with only nuclear p53 were vimentin negative, except for 1 case. No mutation was detected in p53 exons 5 to 8 in tumors with cytoplasmic p53, suggesting that they express wild-type p53. The data indicate that a cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type p53 in human primary glioblastomas correlates with a certain intermediate filament protein expression, suggesting that it identifies a certain subset of tumors. PMID:12084347

  18. Receptor usage and differential downregulation of CD46 by measles virus wild-type and vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schnorr, J J; Brinckmann, U; Dunster, L M; Baczko, K; Liebert, U G; Schneider-Schaulies, S; ter Meulen, V

    1995-04-25

    Recently, two cell surface molecules, CD46 and moesin, have been found to be functionally associated with measles virus (MV) infectivity of cells. We investigated the receptor usage of MV wild-type, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and vaccine strains and their effect on the down-regulation of CD46 after infection. We found that the infection of human cell lines with all 19 MV strains tested was inhibitable with antibodies against CD46. In contrast, not all strains of MV led to the downregulation of CD46 following infection. The group of CD46 non-downregulating strains comprised four lymphotropic wild-type isolates designated AB, DF, DL, and WTF. Since the downregulation of CD46 is caused by interaction with newly synthesized MV hemagglutinin (MV-H), we tested the capability of recombinant MV-H proteins to downregulate CD46. Recombinant MV-H proteins of MV strains Edmonston, Halle, and CM led to the down-regulation of CD46, whereas those of DL and WTF did not. This observed differential downregulation by different MV strains has profound consequences, since lack of CD46 on the cell surface leads to susceptibility of cells to complement lysis. These results suggest that lymphotropic wild-type strains of MV which do not downregulate CD46 may have an advantage for replication in vivo. The relatively weak immune response against attenuated vaccine strains of MV compared with wild-type strains might be related to this phenomenon. PMID:7732009

  19. Candida albicans Als3p is required for wild-type biofilm formation on silicone elastomer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaomin; Daniels, Karla J.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Green, Clayton B.; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Soll, David R.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans ALS3 encodes a large cell-surface glycoprotein that has adhesive properties. Immunostaining of cultured C. albicans germ tubes showed that Als3p is distributed diffusely across the germ tube surface. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy of model catheter biofilms grown using a PALS3-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strain showed GFP production in hyphae throughout the biofilm structure while biofilms grown using a PTPI1-GFP reporter strain showed GFP in both hyphae and yeast-form cells. Model catheter biofilms formed by an als3Δ/als3Δ strain were weakened structurally and had approximately half the biomass of a wild-type biofilm. Reintegration of a wild-type ALS3 allele restored biofilm mass and wild-type biofilm structure. Production of an Als3p-Agα1p fusion protein under control of the ALS3 promoter in the als3Δ/als3Δ strain restored some of the wild-type biofilm structural features, but not the wild-type biofilm mass. Despite its inability to restore wild-type biofilm mass, the Als3p-Agα1p fusion protein mediated adhesion of the als3Δ/als3Δ C. albicans strain to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs). The adhesive role of the Als3p N-terminal domain was further demonstrated by blocking adhesion of C. albicans to BECs with immunoglobulin reactive against the Als3p N-terminal sequences. Together, these data suggest that portions of Als3p that are important for biofilm formation may be different from those that are important in BEC adhesion, and that Als3p may have multiple functions in biofilm formation. Overexpression of ALS3 in an efg1Δ/efg1Δ strain that was deficient for filamentous growth and biofilm formation resulted in growth of elongated C. albicans cells, even under culture conditions that do not favour filamentation. In the catheter biofilm model, the ALS3 overexpression strain formed biofilm with a mass similar to that of a wild-type control. However, C. albicans cells in the biofilm had yeast-like morphology. This

  20. Selection for Evi1 activation in myelomonocytic leukemia induced by hyperactive signaling through wild-type NRas.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Rudolph, C; Morgan, M; Büsche, G; Salguero, G; Stripecke, R; Schlegelberger, B; Baum, C; Modlich, U

    2013-06-20

    Activation of NRas signaling is frequently found in human myeloid leukemia and can be induced by activating mutations as well as by mutations in receptors or signaling molecules upstream of NRas. To study NRas-induced leukemogenesis, we retrovirally overexpressed wild-type NRas in a murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model in C57BL/6J mice. Overexpression of wild-type NRas caused myelomonocytic leukemias ∼3 months after BMT in the majority of mice. A subset of mice (30%) developed malignant histiocytosis similar to mice that received mutationally activated NRas(G12D)-expressing bone marrow. Aberrant Ras signaling was demonstrated in cells expressing mutationally active or wild-type NRas, as increased activation of Erk and Akt was observed in both models. However, more NRas(G12D) were found to be in the activated, GTP-bound state in comparison with wild-type NRas. Consistent with observations reported for primary human myelomonocytic leukemia cells, Stat5 activation was also detected in murine leukemic cells. Furthermore, clonal evolution was detected in NRas wild-type-induced leukemias, including expansion of clones containing activating vector insertions in known oncogenes, such as Evi1 and Prdm16. In vitro cooperation of NRas and Evi1 improved long-term expansion of primary murine bone marrow cells. Evi1-positive cells upregulated Bcl-2 and may, therefore, provide anti-apoptotic signals that collaborate with the NRas-induced proliferative effects. As activation of Evi1 has been shown to coincide with NRAS mutations in human acute myeloid leukemia, our murine model recapitulates crucial events in human leukemogenesis. PMID:22847614

  1. Only minor differences in renal osteodystrophy features between wild-type and sclerostin knockout mice with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Daniel; Parada-Rodriguez, Diego; Pichler, Stefanie; Marculescu, Rodrig; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Gross, Thomas; Reisinger, Andreas; Pahr, Dieter; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Haas, Martin; Malluche, Hartmut H

    2016-10-01

    Renal osteodystrophy affects the majority of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is characterized by progressive bone loss. This study evaluated the effects of sclerostin knockout on bone in a murine model of severe, surgically induced CKD in both sclerostin knockout and wild-type mice. Mice of both genotypes with normal kidney function served as controls. Tibiae were analyzed using micro-computed tomography, and lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by histomorphometry. Results were tested for statistical significance by 2-way ANOVA to investigate whether bone of the knockout mice reacted differently to CKD compared with bone of wild-type mice. In the tibiae, there was no difference after creation of CKD between wild-type and knockout animals for cortical thickness or cross-sectional moment of inertia. Increases in cortical porosity induced by CKD differed significantly between genotypes in the tibial metaphysis but not in the diaphysis. In the trabecular compartment, no difference in reaction to CKD between genotypes was found for bone volume, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and trabecular separation. In the lumbar vertebrae, significant differences in response to CKD between wild-type and knockout mice were seen for both bone volume and trabecular thickness. Osteoblast parameters did not differ significantly, whereas osteoclast numbers significantly increased in the wild-type but significantly decreased in knockout mice with CKD. No differences in response to CKD between genotypes were found for bone formation rate or mineral apposition rate. Thus, complete absence of sclerostin has only minor effects on CKD-induced bone loss in mice. PMID:27528549

  2. Research on the ultrafast fluorescence property of thylakoid membranes of the wild-type and mutant rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhao-Yu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shui-Cai; Xin, Yue-Yong; He, Jun-Fang; Hou, Xun

    2003-10-01

    A high yielding rice variety mutant (Oryza sativa L., Zhenhui 249) with low chlorophyll b (Chl b) has been discovered in natural fields. It has a quality character controlled by a pair of recessive genes (nuclear gene). The partial loss of Chl b in content affects the efficiency of light harvest in a light harvest complex (LHC), thus producing the difference of the exciting energy transfer and the efficiency of photochemistry conversion between the mutant and wild-type rice in photosynthetic unit. The efficiency of utilizing light energy is higher in the mutant than that in the wild-type rice relatively. For further discussion of the above-mentioned difference and learning about the mechanism of the increase in the photochemical efficiency of the mutant, the pico-second resolution fluorescence spectrum measurement with delay-frame-scanning single photon counting technique is adopted. Thylakoid membranes of the mutant and the wild-type rice are excited by an Ar+ laser with a pulse width of 120 ps, repetition rate of 4 MHz and wavelength of 514 nm. Compared with the time and spectrum property of exciting fluorescence, conclusions of those ultrafast dynamic experiments are: 1) The speeds of the exciting energy transferred in photo-system I are faster than that in photo-system II in both samples. 2) The speeds of the exciting energy transfer of mutant sample are faster than those of the wild-type. This might be one of the major reasons why the efficiency of photosynthesis is higher in mutant than that in the wild-type rice.

  3. Genome editing with Cas9 in adult mice corrects a disease mutation and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hao; Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Bogorad, Roman L; Benedetti, Eric; Grompe, Markus; Koteliansky, Victor; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate CRISPR-Cas9–mediated correction of a Fah mutation in hepatocytes in a mouse model of the human disease hereditary tyrosinemia. Delivery of components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system by hydrodynamic injection resulted in initial expression of the wild-type Fah protein in ~1/250 liver cells. Expansion of Fah-positive hepatocytes rescued the body weight loss phenotype. Our study indicates that CRISPR-Cas9–mediated genome editing is possible in adult animals and has potential for correction of human genetic diseases. PMID:24681508

  4. Genome editing with Cas9 in adult mice corrects a disease mutation and phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hao; Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Bogorad, Roman L; Benedetti, Eric; Grompe, Markus; Koteliansky, Victor; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-06-01

    We demonstrate CRISPR-Cas9-mediated correction of a Fah mutation in hepatocytes in a mouse model of the human disease hereditary tyrosinemia. Delivery of components of the CRISPR-Cas9 system by hydrodynamic injection resulted in initial expression of the wild-type Fah protein in ∼1/250 liver cells. Expansion of Fah-positive hepatocytes rescued the body weight loss phenotype. Our study indicates that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing is possible in adult animals and has potential for correction of human genetic diseases.

  5. Fructose metabolism in the adult mouse optic nerve, a central white matter tract.

    PubMed

    Meakin, Paul J; Fowler, Maxine J; Rathbone, Alex J; Allen, Lynne M; Ransom, Bruce R; Ray, David E; Brown, Angus M

    2007-01-01

    Our recent report that fructose supported the metabolism of some, but not all axons, in the adult mouse optic nerve prompted us to investigate in detail fructose metabolism in this tissue, a typical central white matter tract, as these data imply efficient fructose metabolism in the central nervous system (CNS). In artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing 10 mmol/L glucose or 20 mmol/L fructose, the stimulus-evoked compound action potential (CAP) recorded from the optic nerve consisted of three stable peaks. Replacing 10 mmol/L glucose with 10 mmol/L fructose, however, caused delayed loss of the 1st CAP peak (the 2nd and 3rd CAP peaks were unaffected). Glycogen-derived metabolic substrate(s) temporarily sustained the 1st CAP peak in 10 mmol/L fructose, as depletion of tissue glycogen by a prior period of aglycaemia or high-frequency CAP discharge rendered fructose incapable of supporting the 1st CAP peak. Enzyme assays showed the presence of both hexokinase and fructokinase (both of which can phosphorylate fructose) in the optic nerve. In contrast, only hexokinase was expressed in cerebral cortex. Hexokinase in optic nerve had low affinity and low capacity with fructose as substrate, whereas fructokinase displayed high affinity and high capacity for fructose. These findings suggest an explanation for the curious fact that the fast conducting axons comprising the 1st peak of the CAP are not supported in 10 mmol/L fructose medium; these axons probably do not express fructokinase, a requirement for efficient fructose metabolism.

  6. Genetic influences on exercise-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis across 12 divergent mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are continuously born in the hippocampus of several mammalian species throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis represents a natural model for understanding how to grow and incorporate new nerve cells into pre-existing circuits in the brain. Finding molecules or biological pathways that increase neurogenesis has broad potential for regenerative medicine. One strategy is to identify mouse strains that display large versus small increases in neurogenesis in response to wheel running so the strains can be contrasted to find common genes or biological pathways associated with enhanced neuron formation. Therefore, mice from 12 different isogenic strains were housed with or without running wheels for 43 days to measure the genetic regulation of exercise-induced neurogenesis. The first 10 days mice received daily injections of BrdU to label dividing cells. Neurogenesis was measured as the total number of BrdU cells co-expressing NeuN mature neuronal marker in the hippocampal granule cell layer by immunohistochemistry. Exercise increased neurogenesis in all strains, but the magnitude significantly depended on genotype. Strain means for distance run on wheels, but not distance traveled in cages without wheels, were significantly correlated with strain mean level of neurogenesis. Further, certain strains displayed greater neurogenesis than others for a fixed level of running. Strain means for neurogenesis under sedentary conditions were not correlated with neurogenesis under runner conditions suggesting that different genes influence baseline versus exercise-induced neurogenesis. Genetic contributions to exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis suggest that it may be possible to identify genes and pathways associated with enhanced neuroplastic responses to exercise. PMID:21223504

  7. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds for Adult Mouse Neural Stem Cell 3-Dimensional Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gelain, Fabrizio; Bottai, Daniele; Vescovi, Angleo; Zhang, Shuguang

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical researchers have become increasingly aware of the limitations of conventional 2-dimensional tissue cell culture systems, including coated Petri dishes, multi-well plates and slides, to fully address many critical issues in cell biology, cancer biology and neurobiology, such as the 3-D microenvironment, 3-D gradient diffusion, 3-D cell migration and 3-D cell-cell contact interactions. In order to fully understand how cells behave in the 3-D body, it is important to develop a well-controlled 3-D cell culture system where every single ingredient is known. Here we report the development of a 3-D cell culture system using a designer peptide nanofiber scaffold with mouse adult neural stem cells. We attached several functional motifs, including cell adhesion, differentiation and bone marrow homing motifs, to a self-assembling peptide RADA16 (Ac-RADARADARADARADA-COHN2). These functionalized peptides undergo self-assembly into a nanofiber structure similar to Matrigel. During cell culture, the cells were fully embedded in the 3-D environment of the scaffold. Two of the peptide scaffolds containing bone marrow homing motifs significantly enhanced the neural cell survival without extra soluble growth and neurotrophic factors to the routine cell culture media. In these designer scaffolds, the cell populations with β-Tubulin+, GFAP+ and Nestin+ markers are similar to those found in cell populations cultured on Matrigel. The gene expression profiling array experiments showed selective gene expression, possibly involved in neural stem cell adhesion and differentiation. Because the synthetic peptides are intrinsically pure and a number of desired function cellular motifs are easy to incorporate, these designer peptide nanofiber scaffolds provide a promising controlled 3-D culture system for diverse tissue cells, and are useful as well for general molecular and cell biology. PMID:17205123

  8. Differences in Establishment of Persistence of Vaccine and Wild Type Rubella Viruses in Fetal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perelygina, Ludmila; Adebayo, Adebola; Metcalfe, Maureen; Icenogle, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Both wild type (WT) and vaccine rubella virus (RV) can pass through the placenta to infect a human fetus, but only wtRV routinely causes pathology. To investigate possible reasons for this, we compared establishment of persistence of wtRV and RA27/3 vaccine strains in fetal endothelial cells. We showed that yields of RA27/3 and wtRV were similar after the first round of replication, but then only vaccine-infected cultures went through a crisis characterized by partial cell loss and gradual decline of virus titer followed by recovery and establishment of persistent cultures with low levels of RA27/3 secretion. We compared various steps of virus replication, but we were unable to identify changes, which might explain the 2-log difference in RA27/3 and wtRV yields in persistently infected cultures. Whole genome sequencing did not reveal selection of virus variants in either the wtRV or RA27/3 cultures. Quantitative single-cell analysis of RV replication by in situ hybridization detected, on average, 1–4 copies of negative-strand RNA and ~50 copies of positive-strand genomic RNA in cells infected with both vaccine and WT viruses. The distinct characteristics of RA27/3 replication were the presence of large amounts of negative-strand RV RNA and RV dsRNA at the beginning of the crisis and the accumulation of high amounts of genomic RNA in a subpopulation of infected cells during crisis and persistence. These results suggest that RA27/3 can persist in fetal endothelial cells, but the characteristics of persistence and mechanisms for the establishment and maintenance of persistence are different from wtRV. PMID:26177032

  9. Targeting Mdmx to treat breast cancers with wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, S; Buckley, D; Pang, J-MB; Panimaya, J; Paul, P J; Gamell, C; Takano, E A; Ying Lee, Y; Hiddingh, S; Rogers, T-M; Teunisse, A F A S; Herold, M J; Marine, J-C; Fox, S B; Jochemsen, A; Haupt, Y

    2015-01-01

    The function of the tumor suppressor p53 is universally compromised in cancers. It is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers (reviewed). In cases where p53 is not mutated, alternative regulatory pathways inactivate its tumor suppressive functions. This is primarily achieved through elevation in the expression of the key inhibitors of p53: Mdm2 or Mdmx (also called Mdm4) (reviewed). In breast cancer (BrCa), the frequency of p53 mutations varies markedly between the different subtypes, with basal-like BrCas bearing a high frequency of p53 mutations, whereas luminal BrCas generally express wild-type (wt) p53. Here we show that Mdmx is unexpectedly highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and its expression is further elevated in most luminal BrCas, whereas p53 expression is generally low, consistent with wt p53 status. Inducible knockdown (KD) of Mdmx in luminal BrCa MCF-7 cells impedes the growth of these cells in culture, in a p53-dependent manner. Importantly, KD of Mdmx in orthotopic xenograft transplants resulted in growth inhibition associated with prolonged survival, both in a preventative model and also in a treatment model. Growth impediment in response to Mdmx KD was associated with cellular senescence. The growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was recapitulated in an additional luminal BrCa cell line MPE600, which expresses wt p53. Further, the growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was also demonstrated in the wt p53 basal-like cell line SKBR7 line. These results identify Mdmx growth dependency in wt p53 expressing BrCas, across a range of subtypes. Based on our findings, we propose that Mdmx targeting is an attractive strategy for treating BrCas harboring wt p53. PMID:26181202

  10. MicroRNA-based Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Mutant and Wild Type RAS in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sriganesh B.; Ruppert, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been causally implicated in the progression and development of a wide variety of cancers. miRs modulate the activity of key cell signaling networks by regulating the translation of pathway component proteins. Thus, the pharmacological targeting of miRs that regulate cancer cell signaling networks, either by promoting (using miR-supplementation) or by suppressing (using anti-sense oligonucleotide based strategies) miR activity is an area of intense research. The RAS-Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway represents a major miR-regulated signaling network that endows cells with some of the classical hallmarks of cancer, and is often inappropriately activated in malignancies by somatic genetic alteration through point mutation or alteration of gene copy number. In addition, recent progress indicates that many tumors may be deficient in GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) due to the collaborative action of oncogenic microRNAs. Recent studies also suggest that in tumors harboring a mutant RAS allele there is a critical role for wild type RAS proteins in determining overall RAS-ERK pathway activity. Together, these two advances comprise a new opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we evaluate miR-based therapeutic strategies for modulating RAS-ERK signaling in cancers, in particular for more direct modulation of RAS-GTP levels, with the potential to complement current strategies in order to yield more durable treatment responses. To this end, we discuss the potential for miR-based therapies focused on three prominent miRs including the pan-RAS regulator let-7 and the GAP regulator comprised of miR-206 and miR-21 (miR-206/21). PMID:26284568

  11. Crystal structure of wild-type human thrombin in the Na+-free state

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel J. D.; Adams, Ty E.; Li, Wei; Huntington, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Regulation of thrombin activity is critical for haemostasis and the prevention of thrombosis. Thrombin has several procoagulant substrates, including fibrinogen and platelet receptors, and essential cofactors for stimulating its own formation. However, thrombin is also capable of serving an anticoagulant function by activating protein C. The specificity of thrombin is primarily regulated by binding to the cofactor TM (thrombomodulin), but co-ordination of Na+ can also affect thrombin activity. The Na+-free form is often referred to as ‘slow’ because of reduced rates of cleavage of procoagulant substrates, but the slow form is still capable of rapid activation of protein C in the presence of TM. The molecular basis of the slow proteolytic activity of thrombin has remained elusive, in spite of two decades of solution studies and many published crystallographic structures. In the present paper, we report the first structure of wild-type unliganded human thrombin grown in the absence of co-ordinating Na+. The Na+-binding site is observed in a highly ordered position 6 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) removed from that seen in the Na+-bound state. The movement of the Na+ loop results in non-catalytic hydrogen-bonding in the active site and blocking of the S1 and S2 substrate-binding pockets. Similar, if more dramatic, changes were observed in a previous structure of the constitutively slow thrombin variant E217K. The slow behaviour of thrombin in solutions devoid of Na+ can now be understood in terms of an equilibrium between an inert species, represented by the crystal structure described in the present paper, and an active form, where the addition of Na+ populates the active state. PMID:16201969

  12. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  13. DR4 specific TRAIL variants are more efficacious than wild-type TRAIL in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Albarenque, Stella Maris; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J; Mohr, Andrea; Zwacka, Ralf M

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for pancreatic carcinoma afford only modest survival benefits. TRAIL, as a potent and specific inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells, would be a promising new treatment option. However, since not all pancreatic cancer cells respond to TRAIL, further improvements and optimizations are still needed. One strategy to improve the effectiveness of TRAIL-based therapies is to specifically target one of the 2 cell death inducing TRAIL-receptors, TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 to overcome resistance. To this end, we designed constructs expressing soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) variants that were rendered specific for either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 by amino acid changes in the TRAIL ectodomain. When we expressed these constructs, including wild-type sTRAIL (sTRAIL(wt)), TRAIL-R1 (sTRAIL(DR4)) and TRAIL-R2 (sTRAIL(DR5)) specific variants, in 293 producer cells we found all to be readily expressed and secreted into the supernatant. These supernatants were subsequently transferred onto target cancer cells and apoptosis measured. We found that the TRAIL-R1 specific variant had higher apoptosis-inducing activity in human pancreatic carcinoma Colo357 cells as well as PancTu1 cells that were additionally sensitized by targeting of XIAP. Finally, we tested TRAIL-R1 specific recombinant TRAIL protein (rTRAIL(DR4)) on Colo357 xenografts in nude mice and found them to be more efficacious than rTRAIL(wt). Our results demonstrate the benefits of synthetic biological approaches and show that TRAIL-R1 specific variants can potentially enhance the therapeutic efficacy of TRAIL-based therapies in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that they can possibly become part of individualized and tumor specific combination treatments in the future. PMID:25482930

  14. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  15. Vitamin D2-enriched button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) improves memory in both wild type and APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Kersaitis, Cindy; Macaulay, Stuart Lance; Münch, Gerald; Niedermayer, Garry; Nigro, Julie; Payne, Matthew; Sheean, Paul; Vallotton, Pascal; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Bird, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, affecting over 30% of adult Australians, and increasing up to 80% for at-risk groups including the elderly (age>65). The role for Vitamin D in development of the central nervous system is supported by the association between Vitamin D deficiency and incidence of neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). A reported positive relationship between Vitamin D status and cognitive performance suggests that restoring Vitamin D status might provide a cognitive benefit to those with Vitamin D deficiency. Mushrooms are a rich source of ergosterol, which can be converted to Vitamin D2 by treatment with UV light, presenting a new and convenient dietary source of Vitamin D2. We hypothesised that Vitamin D2-enriched mushrooms (VDM) could prevent the cognitive and pathological abnormalities associated with dementia. Two month old wild type (B6C3) and AD transgenic (APPSwe/PS1dE9) mice were fed a diet either deficient in Vitamin D2 or a diet which was supplemented with VDM, containing 1±0.2 µg/kg (∼54 IU/kg) vitamin D2, for 7 months. Effects of the dietary intervention on memory were assessed pre- and post-feeding. Brain sections were evaluated for amyloid β (Aβ) plaque loads and inflammation biomarkers using immuno-histochemical methods. Plasma vitamin D metabolites, Aβ40, Aβ42, calcium, protein and cholesterol were measured using biochemical assays. Compared with mice on the control diet, VDM-fed wild type and AD transgenic mice displayed improved learning and memory, had significantly reduced amyloid plaque load and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and elevated interleukin-10 in the brain. The results suggest that VDM might provide a dietary source of Vitamin D2 and other bioactives for preventing memory-impairment in dementia. This study supports the need for a randomised clinical trial to determine whether or not VDM consumption can benefit cognitive performance in the wider population. PMID:24204618

  16. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  17. Ultrasonic vocalizations of adult male Foxp2-mutant mice: behavioral contexts of arousal and emotion.

    PubMed

    Gaub, S; Fisher, S E; Ehret, G

    2016-02-01

    Adult mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) occur in multiple behavioral and stimulus contexts associated with various levels of arousal, emotion and social interaction. Here, in three experiments of increasing stimulus intensity (water; female urine; male interacting with adult female), we tested the hypothesis that USVs of adult males express the strength of arousal and emotion via different USV parameters (18 parameters analyzed). Furthermore, we analyzed two mouse lines with heterozygous Foxp2 mutations (R552H missense, S321X nonsense), known to produce severe speech and language disorders in humans. These experiments allowed us to test whether intact Foxp2 function is necessary for developing full adult USV repertoires, and whether mutations of this gene influence instinctive vocal expressions based on arousal and emotion. The results suggest that USV calling rate characterizes the arousal level, while sound pressure and spectrotemporal call complexity (overtones/harmonics, type of frequency jumps) may provide indices of levels of positive emotion. The presence of Foxp2 mutations did not qualitatively affect the USVs; all USV types that were found in wild-type animals also occurred in heterozygous mutants. However, mice with Foxp2 mutations displayed quantitative differences in USVs as compared to wild-types, and these changes were context dependent. Compared to wild-type animals, heterozygous mutants emitted mainly longer and louder USVs at higher minimum frequencies with a higher occurrence rate of overtones/harmonics and complex frequency jump types. We discuss possible hypotheses about Foxp2 influence on emotional vocal expressions, which can be investigated in future experiments using selective knockdown of Foxp2 in specific brain circuits.

  18. Comprehensive Analysis of Neonatal versus Adult Unilateral Decortication in a Mouse Model Using Behavioral, Neuroanatomical, and DNA Microarray Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Nakamachi, Tomoya; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, studying the development, especially of corticospinal neurons, it was concluded that the main compensatory mechanism after unilateral brain injury in rat at the neonatal stage was due in part to non-lesioned ipsilateral corticospinal neurons that escaped selection by axonal elimination or neuronal apoptosis. However, previous results suggesting compensatory mechanism in neonate brain were not correlated with high functional recovery. Therefore, what is the difference among neonate and adult in the context of functional recovery and potential mechanism(s) therein? Here, we utilized a brain unilateral decortication mouse model and compared motor functional recovery mechanism post-neonatal brain hemisuction (NBH) with adult brain hemisuction (ABH). Three analyses were performed: (1) Quantitative behavioral analysis of forelimb movements using ladder walking test; (2) neuroanatomical retrograde tracing analysis of unlesioned side corticospinal neurons; and (3) differential global gene expressions profiling in unlesioned-side neocortex (rostral from bregma) in NBH and ABH on a 8 × 60 K mouse whole genome Agilent DNA chip. Behavioral data confirmed higher recovery ability in NBH over ABH is related to non-lesional frontal neocortex including rostral caudal forelimb area. A first inventory of differentially expressed genes genome-wide in the NBH and ABH mouse model is provided as a resource for the scientific community. PMID:25490135

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of mouse livers from embryo to adult reveals an association with progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Leung, Kar-wai; Cheung, Nicole; Lam, Brian Y; Xu, Michelle Z; Sham, Pak C; Lau, George K; Poon, Ronnie T P; Fan, Sheung Tat; Luk, John M

    2008-05-01

    To identify potential oncofetal biomarkers that distinguish hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from healthy liver tissues, we compared and analyzed the proteomic profiles of mouse livers at different developmental stages. Fetal (E13.5, E16.5), newborn (NB), postnatal (3-week) and adult (3-month) livers were isolated and profiled by 2-D PAGE. Statistical analysis using linear regression and false discovery rate (FDR) revealed that 361 protein spots showed significant changes. Unsupervised hierarchical tree analysis segregated the proteins into fetal, NB, and postnatal-adult clusters. Distinctive protein markers were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS and the corresponding mRNA profiles were further determined by Q-PCR. Fetal markers (hPCNA, hHSP7C, hHEM6) and postnatal-adult markers (hARGI1, hASSY, hBHMT, hFABPL) were selected for testing against a panel of seven human hepatocyte/HCC cell lines and 59 clinical specimens. The fetal proteins were found to be overexpressed in the metastatic HCC cell lines and the tumor tissues, whereas the postnatal-adult proteins were expressed in non-tumor tissues and normal hepatocytes. This "Ying-Yang" pattern, as orchestrated by distinct fetal and adult markers, is hypothesized to indicate the progressive change of the liver from a growing, less-differentiated organ into a functional metabolic center. Thus, embryogenesis and tumorigenesis share certain oncofetal markers and adult "hepatic" phenotypes are lost in HCC.

  20. Multipotential stem cells from the adult mouse brain proliferate and self-renew in response to basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gritti, A; Parati, E A; Cova, L; Frolichsthal, P; Galli, R; Wanke, E; Faravelli, L; Morassutti, D J; Roisen, F; Nickel, D D; Vescovi, A L

    1996-02-01

    It has been established that the adult mouse forebrain contains multipotential (neuronal/glial) progenitor cells that can be induced to proliferate in vitro when epidermal growth factor is provided. These cells are found within the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles, together with other progenitor cell populations, whose requirements for proliferation remain undefined. Using basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), we have isolated multipotential progenitors from adult mouse striatum. These progenitors proliferate and can differentiate into cells displaying the antigenic properties of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons. The neuron-like cells possess neuronal features, exhibit neuronal electrophysiological properties, and are immunoreactive for GABA, substance P, choline acetyl-transferase, and glutamate. Clonal analysis confirmed the multipotency of these bFGF-dependent cells. Most significantly, subcloning experiments demonstrated that they were capable of self-renewal, which led to a progressive increase in population size over serial passaging. These results demonstrate that bFGF is mitogenic for multipotential cells from adult mammalian forebrain that possess stem cell properties. PMID:8558238

  1. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine.

  2. Wild-Type Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate Synthase (PRS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Bacterial Class II PRS?

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Ardala; Martinelli, Leonardo K. B.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Rosado, Leonardo A.; Borges, Caroline B.; Santos, Diógenes S.; Basso, Luiz A.

    2012-01-01

    The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP) metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS). Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of Pi. ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of Pi would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure determination of Mt

  3. Wild-type phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (PRS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a bacterial class II PRS?

    PubMed

    Breda, Ardala; Martinelli, Leonardo K B; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Rosado, Leonardo A; Borges, Caroline B; Santos, Diógenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2012-01-01

    The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP) metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS). Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of P(i). ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of P(i) would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure determination of

  4. PHEX Mimetic (SPR4-Peptide) Corrects and Improves HYP and Wild Type Mice Energy-Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V.; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context PHEX or DMP1 mutations cause hypophosphatemic-rickets and altered energy metabolism. PHEX binds to DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a complex with α5β3 integrin that suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptides increase FGF23 by disrupting the PHEX-DMP1-Integrin complex. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide/motif to study the DMP1-PHEX interaction and to assess SPR4 for the treatment of energy metabolism defects in HYP and potentially other bone-mineral disorders. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle (VE) into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice (PHEX mutation) for 4 weeks. Results SPR4 partially corrected HYP mice hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1.25(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23 remained high and PTH was unaffected. WT-SPR4 mice developed hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia with increased PTH, FGF23 and 1.25(OH)2D3. SPR4 increased GAPDH HYP-bone expression 60× and corrected HYP-mice hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. HYP-VE serum uric-acid (UA) levels were reduced and SPR4 infusion suppressed UA levels in WT-mice but not HYP-mice. SPR4 altered leptin, adiponectin, and sympathetic-tone and increased the fat mass/weight ratio for HYP and WT mice. Expression of perlipin-2 a gene involved in obesity was reduced in HYP-VE and WT-SPR4 mice but increased in HYP-SPR4 mice. Also, increased expression of two genes that inhibit insulin-signaling, ENPP1 and ESP, occurred with HYP-VE mice. In contrast, SPR4 reduced expression of both ENPP1 and ESP in WT mice and suppressed ENPP1 in HYP mice. Increased expression of FAM20C and sclerostin occurred with HYP-VE mice. SPR4 suppressed expression of FAM20C and sclerostin in HYP and WT mice. Conclusions ASARM peptides and motifs are physiological substrates for PHEX and modulate osteocyte PHEX-DMP1-α5β3-integrin interactions and thereby FGF23 expression. These interactions also provide a nexus that regulates bone and energy metabolism. SPR4 suppression of

  5. Cadmium tolerance, cysteine and thiol peptide levels in wild type and chromium-tolerant strains of Scenedesmus acutus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Elena; Gorbi, Gessica; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Di Toppi, Luigi Sanità; Corradi, Maria Grazia

    2004-07-14

    Two strains of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus acutus with different sensitivity to hexavalent chromium were compared for their tolerance of cadmium, by means of growth and recovery tests, and determination of cysteine, reduced glutathione and phytochelatin content, after short-term exposure to various cadmium concentrations (from 1.125 to 27 microM). Growth experiments showed that, after 7-day treatments with cadmium, the chromium-tolerant strain reached a significantly higher cell density and, after 24-h exposure to Cd, was able to resume growth significantly better than the wild type. Constitutive level of cysteine was higher in the chromium-tolerant strain, while glutathione levels were similar in the two strains. The higher content of cysteine and the maintenance of both reduced glutathione and phytochelatin high levels in the presence of cadmium, support the higher cadmium co-tolerance of the chromium-tolerant strain in comparison with the wild type one. PMID:15177949

  6. EXAFS of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase MoFe protein from wild-type and nif V mutant strains

    SciTech Connect

    Eidsness, M.K.; Flank, A.M.; Smith, B.E.; Flood, A.C.; Garner, C.D.; Cramer. S.P.

    1986-05-14

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N/sub 2/ to NH/sub 3/. In Klebsiella pneumoniae a cluster of 17 genes in seven transcriptional units has been associated with nitrogen fixation. The nitrogenase enzyme from the nif V mutants is relatively ineffective at dinitrogen reduction, is more efficient than the wild-type enzyme at HCN reduction, and has its hydrogen evolution activity inhibited up to 80% by CO. This altered substrate specificity has been shown to be associated with the iron-molybdenum cofactor, FeMo-co, of the enzyme. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been a valuable tool for probing the molybdenum environment of wild-type nitrogenase, and the authors report here similar studies on the Nif V/sup -/ enzyme.

  7. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-05-21

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learning paradigms. However, a growing body of evidence challenges this theory, in that additional sites of plasticity appear to contribute to motor adaptation. Here, we consider phase-reversal training of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a simple form of motor learning for which a large body of experimental data is available in wild-type and mutant mice, in which the excitability of granule cells or inhibition of Purkinje cells was affected in a cell-specific fashion. We present novel electrophysiological recordings of Purkinje cell activity measured in naive wild-type mice subjected to this VOR adaptation task. We then introduce a minimal model that consists of learning at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells with the help of the climbing fibers. Although the minimal model reproduces the behavior of the wild-type animals and is analytically tractable, it fails at reproducing the behavior of mutant mice and the electrophysiology data. Therefore, we build a detailed model involving plasticity at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells' synapse guided by climbing fibers, feedforward inhibition of Purkinje cells, and plasticity at the mossy fiber to vestibular nuclei neuron synapse. The detailed model reproduces both the behavioral and electrophysiological data of both the wild-type and mutant mice and allows for experimentally testable predictions.

  8. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  9. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  10. Siderophore receptor PupA as a marker to monitor wild-type Pseudomonas putida WCS358 in natural environments.

    PubMed Central

    Raaijmakers, J M; Bitter, W; Punte, H L; Bakker, P A; Weisbeek, P J; Schippers, B

    1994-01-01

    For application of genetically engineered fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., specific markers are required for monitoring of wild-type Pseudomonas strains and their genetically modified derivatives in natural environments. In this study, the specific siderophore receptor PupA of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida WCS358 was used as a marker to monitor wild-type strain WCS358. After introduction into natural soil and rhizosphere environments, strain WCS358 could be recovered efficiently on a medium amended with 300 microM pseudobactin 358. Although low population densisties of indigenous pseudomonads (less than or equal to 10(3)/g of soil or root) were recovered on the pseudobactin 358-amended medium, subsequent agglutination assays with a WCS358-specific polyclonal antiserum enabled accurate monitoring of populations of wild-type strain WCS358 over a range of approximately 10(3) to 10(7) CFU/g of soil or root. Genetic analysis of the background population by PCR and Southern hybridization revealed that natural occurrence of the pupA gene was limited to a very small number of indigenous Pseudomonas spp. which are very closely related to P. putida WCS358. The PupA marker system enabled the study of differences in rhizosphere colonization among wild-type strain WCS358, rifampin-resistant derivative WCS358rr, and Tn5 mutant WCS358::xylE. Chromosomally mediated rifampin resistance did not affect the colonizing ability of P. putida WCS358. However, Tn5 mutant WCS358::xylE colonized the radish rhizosphere significantly less than did its parental strain. Images PMID:8017914

  11. Efficient quiescent infection of normal human diploid fibroblasts with wild-type herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Robert; Walsh, Derek

    2008-10-01

    Quiescent infection of cultured cells with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) provides an important, amenable means of studying the molecular mechanics of a nonproductive state that mimics key aspects of in vivo latency. To date, establishing high-multiplicity nonproductive infection of human cells with wild-type HSV-1 has proven challenging. Here, we describe simple culture conditions that established a cell state in normal human diploid fibroblasts that supported efficient quiescent infection using wild-type virus and exhibited many important properties of the in vivo latent state. Despite the efficient production of immediate early (IE) proteins ICP4 and ICP22, the latter remained unprocessed, and viral late gene products were only transiently and inefficiently produced. This low level of virus activity in cultures was rapidly suppressed as the nonproductive state was established. Entry into quiescence was associated with inefficient production of the viral trans-activating protein ICP0, and the accumulation of enlarged nuclear PML structures normally dispersed during productive infection. Lytic replication was rapidly and efficiently restored by exogenous expression of HSV-1 ICP0. These findings are in agreement with previous models in which quiescence was established with HSV mutants disrupted in their expression of IE gene products that included ICP0 and, importantly, provide a means to study cellular mechanisms that repress wild-type viral functions to prevent productive replication. We discuss this model in relation to existing systems and its potential as a simple tool to study the molecular mechanisms of quiescent infection in human cells using wild-type HSV-1.

  12. Functional independence of monomeric CHIP28 water channels revealed by expression of wild-type mutant heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Shi, L B; Skach, W R; Verkman, A S

    1994-04-01

    CHIP28 is a major water transporting protein in erythrocytes and kidney which forms tetramers in membranes (Verbavatz, J. M., Brown, D., Sabolic, I., Valenti, G., Ausiello, D. A., Van Hoek, A. N., Ma, T., and Verkman, A. S. (1993) J. Cell Biol. 123, 605-618). To determine whether CHIP28 monomers function independently, chimeric cDNA dimers were constructed which contained wild-type CHIP28 in series with either wild-type CHIP28, a non-water transporting CHIP28 mutant (C189W), or a functional but mercurial-insensitive CHIP28 mutant (C189S). Transcribed cRNAs were injected in Xenopus oocytes and plasma membrane expression was assayed by quantitative immunofluorescence. Water channel function was measured by osmotically induced swelling. CHIP28 homo- and heterodimers were targeted to the oocyte plasma membrane and functioned as water channels. Relative osmotic water permeability (Pf) values (normalized for plasma membrane expression of monomeric subunits) were: 1.0 (CHIP28 monomer), 0.0 (C189W), 1.07 (C189S), 1.10 (CHIP28-CHIP28 dimer) and 0.52 (CHIP28-C189W). The increase in oocyte Pf was linearly related to plasma membrane expression of wild-type CHIP28 and C189S subunits. HgCl2 (0.3 mM) inhibited channel-mediated Pf in oocytes expressing wild-type CHIP28 monomers and dimers by 85-90%, but did not inhibit Pf in oocytes expressing C189S. HgCl2 inhibited Pf in oocytes expressing CHIP28-C189S dimers by 44 +/- 7%, consistent with one mercurial-sensitive and one insensitive subunit in the heterodimer. These results indicate that despite their assembly in tetramers, monomeric CHIP28 subunits function independently as water channels. PMID:7511600

  13. CAR-Engineered NK Cells Targeting Wild-Type EGFR and EGFRvIII Enhance Killing of Glioblastoma and Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Keung Chan, Wing; Zhang, Jianying; Wang, Youwei; Cohen, Justus B.; Victor, Aaron; Meisen, Walter H.; Kim, Sung-hak; Grandi, Paola; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Nakano, Ichiro; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Glorioso III, Joseph C.; Kaur, Balveen; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) remains the most aggressive primary brain malignancy. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells has emerged as a promising anti-cancer approach, yet the potential utility of CAR-engineered natural killer (NK) cells to treat GB has not been explored. Tumors from approximately 50% of GB patients express wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR) and in fewer cases express both wtEGFR and the mutant form EGFRvIII; however, previously reported CAR T cell studies only focus on targeting EGFRvIII. Here we explore whether both wtEGFR and EGFRvIII can be effectively targeted by CAR-redirected NK cells to treat GB. We transduced human NK cell lines NK-92 and NKL, and primary NK cells with a lentiviral construct harboring a second generation CAR targeting both wtEGFR and EGFRvIII and evaluated the anti-GB efficacy of EGFR-CAR-modified NK cells. EGFR-CAR-engineered NK cells displayed enhanced cytolytic capability and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with GB cells or patient-derived GB stem cells in an EGFR-dependent manner. In two orthotopic GB xenograft mouse models, intracranial administration of NK-92-EGFR-CAR cells resulted in efficient suppression of tumor growth and significantly prolonged the tumor-bearing mice survival. These findings support intracranial administration of NK-92-EGFR-CAR cells represents a promising clinical strategy to treat GB. PMID:26155832

  14. Scanning Ultrasound (SUS) Causes No Changes to Neuronal Excitability and Prevents Age-Related Reductions in Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Structure in Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Robert John; Leinenga, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Scanning ultrasound (SUS) is a noninvasive approach that has recently been shown to ameliorate histopathological changes and restore memory functions in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Although no overt neuronal damage was reported, the short- and long-term effects of SUS on neuronal excitability and dendritic tree morphology had not been investigated. To address this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice 2 and 24 hours after a single SUS treatment, and one week and 3 months after six weekly SUS treatments, including sham treatments as controls. In both treatment regimes, no changes in CA1 neuronal excitability were observed in SUS-treated neurons when compared to sham-treated neurons at any time-point. For the multiple treatment groups, we also determined the dendritic morphology and spine densities of the neurons from which we had recorded. The apical trees of sham-treated neurons were reduced at the 3 month time-point when compared to one week; however, surprisingly, no longitudinal change was detected in the apical dendritic trees of SUS-treated neurons. In contrast, the length and complexity of the basal dendritic trees were not affected by SUS treatment at either time-point. The apical dendritic spine densities were reduced, independent of the treatment group, at 3 months compared to one week. Collectively, these data suggest that ultrasound can be employed to prevent an age-associated loss of dendritic structure without impairing neuronal excitability. PMID:27727310

  15. Innate interferon response in macrophage and epithelial cells infected with wild-type compared to DNA adenine methylase and flagellin mutant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Simon, Raphael; Samuel, Charles E

    2007-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is highly virulent and mediates robust interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) induction, whereas bacterial mutants that lack the DNA adenine methylase (Dam) are attenuated, elicit a reduced ISG activation profile, and establish immunity to murine typhoid fever. We show here that in contrast to observations in mice, infection of macrophage cell cultures with either wild-type (WT) or dam(-) mutant Salmonella resulted in surprisingly similar kinetics and amplitudes of induction of IFN-beta, the type I IFN-alpha,beta beacon gene Mx, and the type II IFN-gamma beacon inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Likewise, activation of NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression in epithelial cells was comparable with WT and dam(-) mutant Salmonella. In contrast, the flagellin-deficient flhC(-) mutant did not activate NF-kappaB in epithelial cells but activated ISG expression comparable to that of WT Salmonella in macrophage cells. WT and dam(-) strains displayed a similar Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5)-dependent NF-kappaB activation, whereas the flhC(-) mutant lacked this activity. UV-inactivated Salmonella elicited similar ISG induction to that of viable Salmonella in macrophages and mediated the establishment of a functional antiviral state but displayed decreased cytocidal activity. These results establish that the inherent IFN system-inducing capacities of dam(-) and WT Salmonella strains in cultured macrophage and epithelial cells, unlike the mouse, are indistinguishable.

  16. The fusion protein of wild-type canine distemper virus is a major determinant of persistent infection

    SciTech Connect

    Plattet, Philippe; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Zuber, BenoIt; Brunner, Jean-Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo . E-mail: Riccardo.Wittek@unil.ch

    2005-07-05

    The wild-type A75/17 canine distemper virus (CDV) strain induces a persistent infection in the central nervous system but infects cell lines very inefficiently. In contrast, the genetically more distant Onderstepoort CDV vaccine strain (OP-CDV) induces extensive syncytia formation. Here, we investigated the roles of wild-type fusion (F{sub WT}) and attachment (H{sub WT}) proteins in Vero cells expressing, or not, the canine SLAM receptor by transfection experiments and by studying recombinants viruses expressing different combinations of wild-type and OP-CDV glycoproteins. We show that low fusogenicity is not due to a defect of the envelope proteins to reach the cell surface and that H{sub WT} determines persistent infection in a receptor-dependent manner, emphasizing the role of SLAM as a potent enhancer of fusogenicity. However, importantly, F{sub WT} reduced cell-to-cell fusion independently of the cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating that the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV strain plays a key role in determining persistent infection.

  17. Assessment of allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2006-02-28

    Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is therapeutically useful for specifically suppressing the expression of alleles associated with disease. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASPRNAi), the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital, but is also difficult. Here, we show ASP-RNAi against the Swedish- and London-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) variants related to familial Alzheimer's disease using two reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes and carrying mutant and wild-type allelic sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions. We examined the effects of siRNA duplexes against the mutant alleles in allele-specific gene silencing and off-target silencing against the wild-type allele under heterozygous conditions, which were generated by cotransfecting the reporter alleles and siRNA duplexes into cultured human cells. Consistently, the siRNA duplexes determined to confer ASP-RNAi also inhibited the expression of the bona fide mutant APP and the production of either amyloid beta 40- or 42-peptide in Cos-7 cells expressing both the full-length Swedish- and wild-type APP alleles. The present data suggest that the system with reporter alleles may permit the preclinical assessment of siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi, and thus contribute to the design and selection of the most suitable of such siRNA duplexes.

  18. Response to metal stress of Nicotiana langsdorffii plants wild-type and transgenic for the rat glucocorticoid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Fuoco, Roger; Bogani, Patrizia; Capodaglio, Gabriele; Del Bubba, Massimo; Abollino, Ornella; Giannarelli, Stefania; Spiriti, Maria Michela; Muscatello, Beatrice; Doumett, Saer; Turetta, Clara; Zangrando, Roberta; Zelano, Vincenzo; Buiatti, Marcello

    2013-05-01

    Recently our findings have shown that the integration of the gene coding for the rat gluco-corticoid receptor (GR receptor) in Nicotiana langsdorffii plants induced morphophysiological effects in transgenic plants through the modification of their hormonal pattern. Phytohormones play a key role in plant responses to many different biotic and abiotic stresses since a modified hormonal profile up-regulates the activation of secondary metabolites involved in the response to stress. In this work transgenic GR plants and isogenic wild type genotypes were exposed to metal stress by treating them with 30ppm cadmium(II) or 50ppm chromium(VI). Hormonal patterns along with changes in key response related metabolites were then monitored and compared. Heavy metal up-take was found to be lower in the GR plants. The transgenic plants exhibited higher values of S-abscisic acid (S-ABA) and 3-indole acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid and total polyphenols, chlorogenic acid and antiradical activity, compared to the untransformed wild type plants. Both Cd and Cr treatments led to an increase in hormone concentrations and secondary metabolites only in wild type plants. Analysis of the results suggests that the stress responses due to changes in the plant's hormonal system may derive from the interaction between the GR receptor and phytosteroids, which are known to play a key role in plant physiology and development.

  19. Cellular oxidative stress and the control of apoptosis by wild-type p53, cytotoxic compounds, and cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Peled-Kamar, M; Groner, Y; Sachs, L

    1996-01-01

    Apoptosis induced by wild-type p53 or cytotoxic compounds in myeloid leukemic cells can be inhibited by the cytokines interleukin 6, interleukin 3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interferon gamma and by antioxidants. The antioxidants and cytokines showed a cooperative protective effect against induction of apoptosis. Cells with a higher intrinsic level of peroxide production showed a higher sensitivity to induction of apoptosis and required a higher cytokine concentration to inhibit apoptosis. Decreasing the intrinsic oxidative stress in cells by antioxidants thus inhibited apoptosis, whereas increasing this intrinsic stress by adding H2O2 enhanced apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis by wild-type p53 was not preceded by increased peroxide production or lipid peroxidation and the protective effect of cytokines was not associated with a decrease in these properties. The results indicate that the intrinsic degree of oxidative stress can regulate cell susceptibility to wild-type p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of apoptosis and the ability of cytokines to protect cells against apoptosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8799172

  20. Cellular Oxidative Stress and the Control of Apoptosis by Wild-Type p53, Cytotoxic Compounds, and Cytokines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotem, Joseph; Peled-Kamar, Mira; Groner, Yoram; Sachs, Leo

    1996-08-01

    Apoptosis induced by wild-type p53 or cytotoxic compounds in myeloid leukemic cells can be inhibited by the cytokines interleukin 6, interleukin 3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interferon γ and by antioxidants. The antioxidants and cytokines showed a cooperative protective effect against induction of apoptosis. Cells with a higher sensitivity to induction of apoptosis and required a higher cytokine concentration to inhibit apoptosis. Decreasing the intrinsic oxidative stress in cells by antioxidants thus inhibited apoptosis, whereas increasing this intrinsic stress by adding H2O2 enhanced apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis by wild-type p53 was not preceded by increased peroxide production or lipid peroxidation and the protective effect of cytokines was not associated with a decrease in these properties. The results indicate that the intrinsic degree of oxidative stress can regulate cell susceptibility to wild-type p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of apoptosis and the ability of cytokines to protect cells against apoptosis.

  1. Sound transmission along the ossicular chain in common wild-type laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Varavva, Polina; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2013-07-01

    The use of genetically modified mice can accelerate progress in auditory research. However, the fundamental profile of mouse hearing has not been thoroughly documented. In the current study, we explored mouse middle ear transmission by measuring sound-evoked vibrations at several key points along the ossicular chain using a laser-Doppler vibrometer. Observations were made through an opening in pars flaccida. Simultaneously, the pressure at the tympanic membrane close to the umbo was monitored using a micro-pressure-sensor. Measurements were performed in C57BL mice, which are widely used in hearing research. Our results show that the ossicular local transfer function, defined as the ratio of velocity to the pressure at the tympanic membrane, was like a high-pass filter, almost flat at frequencies above ∼15 kHz, decreasing rapidly at lower frequencies. There was little phase accumulation along the ossicles. Our results suggested that the mouse ossicles moved almost as a rigid body. Based on these 1-dimensional measurements, the malleus-incus-complex primarily rotated around the anatomical axis passing through the gonial termination of the anterior malleus and the short process of the incus, but secondary motions were also present. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012".

  2. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein elicits protection in the interferon alpha/beta receptor knock-out mouse.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lyn M; Stokes, Margaret G; Lonsdale, Stephen G; Maslowski, David R; Smither, Sophie J; Lever, Mark S; Laws, Thomas R; Perkins, Stuart D

    2014-03-01

    The resistance of adult immunocompetent mice to infection with ebolaviruses has led to the development of alternative small animal models that utilise immunodeficient mice, for example the interferon α/β receptor knock-out mouse (IFNR(-/-)). IFNR(-/-) mice have been shown to be susceptible to infection with ebolaviruses by multiple routes but it is not known if this murine model is suitable for testing therapeutics that rely on the generation of an immune response for efficacy. We have tested recombinant adenovirus vectors for their ability to protect IFNR(-/-) mice from challenge with Ebola virus and have analysed the humoral response generated after immunisation. The recombinant vaccines elicited good levels of protection in the knock-out mouse and the antibody response in IFNR(-/-) mice was similar to that observed in vaccinated wild-type mice. These results indicate that the IFNR(-/-) mouse is a relevant small animal model for studying ebolavirus-specific therapeutics.

  3. Morphological phenotyping of mouse hearts using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cua, Michelle; Lin, Eric; Lee, Ling; Sheng, Xiaoye; Wong, Kevin S. K.; Tibbits, Glen F.; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2014-11-01

    Transgenic mouse models have been instrumental in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms behind many genetically based cardiovascular diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS). However, the characterization of their cardiac morphology has been hampered by the small size of the mouse heart. In this report, we adapted optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging fixed adult mouse hearts, and applied tools from computational anatomy to perform morphometric analyses. The hearts were first optically cleared and imaged from multiple perspectives. The acquired volumes were then corrected for refractive distortions, and registered and stitched together to form a single, high-resolution OCT volume of the whole heart. From this volume, various structures such as the valves and myofibril bundles were visualized. The volumetric nature of our dataset also allowed parameters such as wall thickness, ventricular wall masses, and luminal volumes to be extracted. Finally, we applied the entire acquisition and processing pipeline in a preliminary study comparing the cardiac morphology of wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of MFS.

  4. Age-Related Changes in Pre- and Postsynaptic Partners of the Cholinergic C-Boutons in Wild-Type and SOD1G93A Lumbar Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Léa; Courtand, Gilles; Cardoit, Laura; Masmejean, Frédérique; Barrière, Grégory; Cazalets, Jean-René; Garret, Maurice; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2015-01-01

    Large cholinergic synaptic terminals known as C-boutons densely innervate the soma and proximal dendrites of motoneurons that are prone to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Studies using the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mouse model of ALS have generated conflicting data regarding C-bouton alterations exhibited during ALS pathogenesis. In the present work, a longitudinal study combining immunohistochemistry, biochemical approaches and extra- and intra-cellular electrophysiological recordings revealed that the whole spinal cholinergic system is modified in the SOD1 mouse model of ALS compared to wild type (WT) mice as early as the second postnatal week. In WT motoneurons, both C-bouton terminals and associated M2 postsynaptic receptors presented a complex age-related dynamic that appeared completely disrupted in SOD1 motoneurons. Indeed, parallel to C-bouton morphological alterations, analysis of confocal images revealed a clustering process of M2 receptors during WT motoneuron development and maturation that was absent in SOD1 motoneurons. Our data demonstrated for the first time that the lamina X cholinergic interneurons, the neuronal source of C-boutons, are over-abundant in high lumbar segments in SOD1 mice and are subject to neurodegeneration in the SOD1 animal model. Finally, we showed that early C-bouton system alterations have no physiological impact on the cholinergic neuromodulation of newborn motoneurons. Altogether, these data suggest a complete reconfiguration of the spinal cholinergic system in SOD1 spinal networks that could be part of the compensatory mechanisms established during spinal development. PMID:26305672

  5. Effects of long-term treatment with pioglitazone on cognition and glucose metabolism of PS1-KI, 3xTg-AD, and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Masciopinto, F; Di Pietro, N; Corona, C; Bomba, M; Pipino, C; Curcio, M; Di Castelnuovo, A; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L M T; Sekler, I; Pandolfi, A; Sensi, S L

    2012-12-20

    In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term (9-month) treatment with pioglitazone (PIO; 20 mg/kg/d) in two animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related neural dysfunction and pathology: the PS1-KI(M146V) (human presenilin-1 (M146V) knock-in mouse) and 3xTg-AD (triple transgenic mouse carrying AD-linked mutations) mice. We also investigated the effects on wild-type (WT) mice. Mice were monitored for body mass changes, fasting glycemia, glucose tolerance, and studied for changes in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity (complexes I and IV) as well as energy metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)). Cognitive effects were investigated with the Morris water maze (MWM) test and the object recognition task (ORT). Behavioral analysis revealed that PIO treatment promoted positive cognitive effects in PS1-KI female mice. These effects were associated with normalization of peripheral gluco-regulatory abnormalities that were found in untreated PS1-KI females. PIO-treated PS1-KI females also showed no statistically significant alterations in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity but significantly increased reverse LDH activity.PIO treatment produced no effects on cognition, glucose metabolism, or mitochondrial functioning in 3xTg-AD mice. Finally, PIO treatment promoted enhanced short-term memory performance in WT male mice, a group that did not show deregulation of glucose metabolism but that showed decreased activity of complex I in hippocampal and cortical mitochondria. Overall, these results indicate metabolically driven cognitive-enhancing effects of PIO that are differentially gender-related among specific genotypes.

  6. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z-Y; McDowell, T; Wang, P; Alvarez, R; Gomez, T; Bjorling, D E

    2014-09-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100ng/ml) for 30 min significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca(2 +) concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling.

  7. Targeted deletion of Vglut2 expression in the embryonal telencephalon promotes an anxiolytic phenotype of the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nordenankar, Karin; Bergfors, Assar

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety is a natural emotion experienced by all individuals. However, when anxiety becomes excessive, it contributes to the substantial group of anxiety disorders that affect one in three people and thus are among the most common psychiatric disorders. Anxiolysis, the reduction of anxiety, is mediated via several large groups of therapeutical compounds, but the relief is often only temporary, and increased knowledge of the neurobiology underlying anxiety is needed in order to improve future therapies. Aim We previously demonstrated that mice lacking forebrain expression of the Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (Vglut2) from adolescence showed a strong anxiolytic behaviour as adults. In the current study, we wished to analyse if removal of Vglut2 expression already from mid-gestation of the mouse embryo would give rise to similar anxiolysis in the adult mouse. Methods We produced transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 from mid-gestation and analysed their affective behaviour, including anxiety, when they had reached adulthood. Results The transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 expression from mid-gestation showed certain signs of anxiolytic behaviour, but this phenotype was not as prominent as when Vglut2 was removed during adolescence. Conclusion Our results suggest that both embryonal and adolescent forebrain expression of Vglut2 normally contributes to balancing the level of anxiety. As the neurobiological basis for anxiety is similar across species, our results in mice may help improve the current understanding of the neurocircuitry of anxiety, and hence anxiolysis, also in humans. PMID:25857802

  8. PPARγ mRNA in the adult mouse hypothalamus: distribution and regulation in response to dietary challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Ying; Lee, Syann; Bookout, Angie L.; Castorena, Carlos M.; Wu, Hua; Gautron, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that was originally identified as a regulator of peroxisome proliferation and adipocyte differentiation. Emerging evidence suggests that functional PPARγ signaling also occurs within the hypothalamus. However, the exact distribution and identities of PPARγ-expressing hypothalamic cells remains under debate. The present study systematically mapped PPARγ mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. PPARγ mRNA was found to be expressed at high levels outside the hypothalamus including the neocortex, the olfactory bulb, the organ of the vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (VOLT), and the subfornical organ. Within the hypothalamus, PPARγ was present at moderate levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and the ependymal of the 3rd ventricle. In all examined feeding-related hypothalamic nuclei, PPARγ was expressed at very low levels that were close to the limit of detection. Using qPCR techniques, we demonstrated that PPARγ mRNA expression was upregulated in the SCh in response to fasting. Double in situ hybridization further demonstrated that PPARγ was primarily expressed in neurons rather than glia. Collectively, our observations provide a comprehensive map of PPARγ distribution in the intact adult mouse hypothalamus. PMID:26388745

  9. A generational study of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans on mouse fetal, postnatal, pubertal and adult testicular development.

    PubMed

    Brake, Denise G; Evenson, Donald P

    2004-01-01

    The health safety of transgenic soybeans (glyphosate-tolerant or Roundup Ready) was studied using the mammalian testis (mouse model) as a sensitive biomonitor of potential toxic effects. Pregnant mice were fed a transgenic soybean or a non-transgenic (conventional) diet through gestation and lactation. After weaning, the young male mice were maintained on the respective diets. At 8, 16, 26, 32, 63 and 87 days after birth, three male mice and an adult reference mouse were killed, the testes surgically removed, and the cell populations measured by flow cytometry. Multi-generational studies were conducted in the same manner. The results showed that the transgenic foodstuffs had no effect on macromolecular synthesis or cell growth and differentiation as evidenced by no differences in the percentages of testicular cell populations (haploid, diploid, and tetraploid) between the transgenic soybean-fed mice and those fed the conventional diet. Additionally, there were no differences in litter sizes and body weights of the two groups. It was concluded that the transgenic soybean diet had no negative effect on fetal, postnatal, pubertal or adult testicular development.

  10. Chronic serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake transporter inhibition modifies basal respiratory output in adult mouse in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kelly A.; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory disturbances are a common feature of panic disorder and present as breathing irregularity, hyperventilation, and increased sensitivity to carbon dioxide. Common therapeutic interventions, such as tricyclic (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, have been shown to ameliorate not only the psychological components of panic disorder but also the respiratory disturbances. These drugs are also prescribed for generalized anxiety and depressive disorders, neither of which are characterized by respiratory disturbances, and previous studies have demonstrated that TCAs and SSRIs exert effects on basal respiratory activity in animal models without panic disorder symptoms. Whether serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have similar effects on respiratory activity remains to be determined. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of the SNRI antidepressant venlafaxine (VHCL) on basal respiratory output. For these experiments, we recorded phrenic nerve discharge in an in vitro arterially-perfused adult mouse preparation and diaphragm electromyogram (EMG) activity in an in vivo urethane-anesthetized adult mouse preparation. We found that following 28-d VHCL administration, basal respiratory burst frequency was markedly reduced due to an increase in expiratory duration (TE), and the inspiratory duty cycle (TI/Ttot) was significantly shortened. In addition, post-inspiratory and spurious expiratory discharges were seen in vitro. Based on our observations, we suggest that drugs capable of simultaneously blocking both 5-HT and NE reuptake transporters have the potential to influence the respiratory control network in patients using SNRI therapy. PMID:22871263

  11. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  12. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for atrazine and its main metabolites in the adult male C57BL/6 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2011-02-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide that is widely used and relatively persistent in the environment. In laboratory rodents, excessive exposure to ATR is detrimental to the reproductive, immune, and nervous systems. To better understand the toxicokinetics of ATR and to fill the need for a mouse model, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for ATR and its main chlorotriazine metabolites (Cl-TRIs) desethyl atrazine (DE), desisopropyl atrazine (DIP), and didealkyl atrazine (DACT) was developed for the adult male C57BL/6 mouse. Taking advantage of all relevant and recently made available mouse-specific data, a flow-limited PBPK model was constructed. The ATR and DACT sub-models included blood, brain, liver, kidney, richly and slowly perfused tissue compartments, as well as plasma protein binding and red blood cell binding, whereas the DE and DIP sub-models were constructed as simple five-compartment models. The model adequately simulated plasma levels of ATR and Cl-TRIs and urinary dosimetry of Cl-TRIs at four single oral dose levels (250, 125, 25, and 5 mg/kg). Additionally, the model adequately described the dose dependency of brain and liver ATR and DACT concentrations. Cumulative urinary DACT amounts were accurately predicted across a wide dose range, suggesting the model's potential use for extrapolation to human exposures by performing reverse dosimetry. The model was validated using previously reported data for plasma ATR and DACT in mice and rats. Overall, besides being the first mouse PBPK model for ATR and its Cl-TRIs, this model, by analogy, provides insights into tissue dosimetry for rats. The model could be used in tissue dosimetry prediction and as an aid in the exposure assessment to this widely used herbicide.

  13. De novo Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Acremonium chrysogenum: High-Yield and Wild-Type Strains of Cephalosporin C Producer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Xie, Liping; Gong, Guihua; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Baoquan; Hu, Youjia

    2014-01-01

    β-lactam antibiotics are widely used in clinic. Filamentous fungus Acremonium chrysogenum is an important industrial fungus for the production of CPC, one of the major precursors of β-lactam antibiotics. Although its fermentation yield has been bred significantly over the past decades, little is known regarding molecular changes between the industrial strain and the wild type strain. This limits the possibility to improve CPC production further by molecular breeding. Comparative transcriptome is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms of CPC industrial high yield producer compared to wild type. A total of 57 million clean sequencing reads with an average length of 100 bp were generated from Illumina sequencing platform. 22,878 sequences were assembled. Among the assembled unigenes, 9502 were annotated and 1989 annotated sequences were assigned to 121 pathways by searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway (KEGG) database. Furthermore, we compared the transcriptome differences between a high-yield and a wild-type strain during fermentation. A total of 4329 unigenes with significantly different transcription level were identified, among which 1737 were up-regulated and 2592 were down-regulated. 24 pathways were subsequently determined which involve glycerolipid metabolism, galactose metabolism, and pyrimidine metabolism. We also examined the transcription levels of 18 identified genes, including 11 up-regulated genes and 7 down-regulated genes using reverse transcription quantitative -PCR (RT-qPCR). The results of RT-qPCR were consistent with the Illumina sequencing. In this study, the Illumina sequencing provides the most comprehensive sequences for gene expression profile of Acremonium chrysogenum and allows de novo transcriptome assembly while lacking genome information. Comparative analysis of RNA-seq data reveals the complexity of the transcriptome in the fermentation of different yield strains. This is an important

  14. Extracellular enzyme activities during lignocellulose degradation by Streptomyces spp. : a comparative study of wild-type and genetically manipulated strains

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandra, M.; Crawford, D.L.; Pometto, A.L. III

    1987-12-01

    The wild-type ligninolytic actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A and two genetically manipulated strains with enhanced abilities to produce a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate, an acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL), were grown on lignocellulose in solid-state fermentation cultures. Culture filtrates were periodically collected, analyzed for APPL, and assayed for extracellular lignocellulose-catabolizing enzyme activities. Two APPL-overproducing strains, UV irradiation mutant T7A-81 and protoplast fusion recombinant SR-10, had higher and longer persisting peroxidase, esterase, and endoglucanase activities than did the wild-type strain T7A. Results implicated one or more of these enzymes in lignin solubilization. Only mutant T7A-81 had higher xylanase activity than the wild type. The peroxidase was induced by both lignocellulose and APPL. This extracellular enzyme has some similarities to previously described ligninases in fungi. This is the first report of such an enzyme in Streptomyces spp. Four peroxidase isozymes were present, and all catalyzed the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, while one also catalyzed hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of homoprotocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. Three constitutive esterase isozymes were produced which differed in substrate specificity toward ..cap alpha..-naphthyl acetate and ..cap alpha..-naphthyl butyrate. Three endoglucanase bands, which also exhibited a low level of xylanase activity, were identified on polyacrylamide gels as was one xylanase-specific band. There were no major differences in the isoenzymes produced by the different strains. The probable role of each enzyme in lignocellulose degradation is discussed.

  15. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm.

  16. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm. PMID:27677553

  17. Novel software for analysis of root gravitropism: comparative response patterns of Arabidopsis wild-type and axr1 seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1997-01-01

    In an earlier study (Evans, Ishikawa & Estelle 1994, Planta 194, 215-222) we used a video digitizer system to compare the kinetics of auxin action on root elongation in wild-type seedlings and seedlings of auxin response mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. We have since modified the system software to allow determination of elongation on opposite sides of vertical or gravistimulated roots and to allow continuous measurement of the angle of orientation of sequential subsections of the root during the response. We used this technology to compare the patterns of differential growth that generate curvature in roots of the Columbia ecotype and in the mutants axr1-3, axr1-12 and axr2, which show reduced gravitropic responsiveness and reduced sensitivity to inhibition by auxin. The pattern of differential growth during gravitropism differed in roots of wild-type and axr1 seedlings. In wild-type roots, initial curvature resulted from differential inhibition of elongation in the distal elongation zone (DEZ). This was followed by an acceleration of elongation along the top side of the DEZ. In roots of axr1-3, curvature resulted from differential stimulation of elongation whereas in roots of axr1-12 the response was variable. Roots of axr2 did not exhibit gravitropic curvature. The observation that the pattern of differential growth causing curvature is dramatically altered by a change in sensitivity to auxin is consistent with the classical Cholodny-Went theory of gravitropism which maintains that differential growth patterns induced by gravistimulation are mediated primarily by gravi-induced shifts in auxin distribution. The new technology introduced with this report allows automated determination of stimulus response patterns in the small but experimentally popular roots of Arabidopsis.

  18. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  19. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Wissink, Erin M; Smith, Norah L; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  20. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wissink, Erin M.; Smith, Norah L.; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D.; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  1. Accumulation of a bioactive benzoisochromanequinone compound kalafungin by a wild type antitumor-medermycin-producing streptomycete strain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain. PMID:25695632

  2. Accumulation of a Bioactive Benzoisochromanequinone Compound Kalafungin by a Wild Type Antitumor-Medermycin-Producing Streptomycete Strain

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain. PMID:25695632

  3. Accumulation of a bioactive benzoisochromanequinone compound kalafungin by a wild type antitumor-medermycin-producing streptomycete strain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain.

  4. Inhibitory activity of oxyresveratrol on wild-type and drug-resistant varicella-zoster virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sasivimolphan, Pattaraporn; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Takemoto, Masaya; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2009-10-01

    The anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) compound, oxyresveratrol, purified from a Thai traditional medicinal plant of Artocarpus lakoocha, was evaluated for its anti-varicella-zoster virus (VZV) activity. This compound exhibited IC(50) values (50%-inhibitory concentrations for virus plaque formation) of 12.82, 12.80, 12.99 and 12.82 microg/ml against wild type, thymidine kinase-deficient and two types of DNA polymerase mutants with acyclovir-resistance, respectively. Thus oxyresveratrol showed a broad spectrum of anti-VZV activity with a mechanism of action different from that of acyclovir.

  5. Induction of lytic pathways in T cell clones derived from wild-type or protein tyrosine kinase Fyn mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lancki, D W; Fields, P; Qian, D; Fitch, F W

    1995-08-01

    The OVA-reactive CD4+ Th1 clones and alloreactive CD8+ clones derived from wild-type or fyn-/- mice serve as model systems which have allowed us to investigate several aspects of the molecular events associated with T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, including 1) the differential utilization of two distinct cytolytic pathways by CD4+ Th1 clones and CD8+ CTL, 2) a comparison of the pathways of lysis induced by stimulation of the TCR or by alternative stimuli, 3) the requirement of Fyn for derivation of antigen-specific T-cell clones having properties of CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ CTL cells 4) the differential requirement of Fyn in the induction of responses by TCR and the alternative stimuli. Stimulation through the TCR, either by APC bearing relevant antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 mAb, resulted in comparable levels of target cell lysis by clones from both wild-type and fyn-/- mice. These clones also utilize the Fas pathway to lyse target cells. Thus, Fyn does not appear to be required for expression of the Fas pathway when triggered through the TCR. In contrast, lysis of target cells by T-cell clones lacking Fyn was deficient when stimulated through Thy-1 or Ly-6C (using mAb) or with Con A or phorbol ester as compared to clones derived from wild-type mice. The basis for the defect in response to stimulation through the GPI-linked molecules appears to be a signaling defect which affects all of the functional responses we measured, while the defect in response to Con A stimulation appears to affect lysis but not lymphokine production. Thus, Fyn expression is selectively required for efficient activation of the Fas pathway of lysis through Thy-1, Ly-6C, and by Con A or phorbol ester in these T-cell clones. CD8+ clones derived from fyn-/- mutant mice, like clones derived from wild-type mice, display antigen-specific lysis, and appear to express perforin message and perforin protein. A Ca(++)-dependent (presumably perforin/exocytosis) component and Fas component of lysis was

  6. Events Surrounding the Early Development of Euglena Chloroplasts: 14. Biosynthesis of Cytochrome c-552 in Wild Type and Mutant Cells.

    PubMed

    Freyssinet, G; Harris, G C; Nasatir, M; Schiff, J A

    1979-05-01

    Lack of a suitable assay has thwarted attempts to measure cytochrome c-552 in dark-grown wild type cells of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris in mutants and in other situations where the concentrations are low. Purification methods are described based on electrofocusing which provide a cytochrome c-552 preparation homogeneous enough to elicit a single reactive antibody in rabbits; this antibody is then used as a specific and sensitive assay for cytochrome c-552. Dark-grown cells of wild type and of mutants O(1)BS, O(2)BX, G(1)BU and P(1)BXL (which make normal sized chloroplasts with abnormal internal structure in the light) have 0.02 to 0.1 x 10(-11) micromoles of cytochrome c-552 per cell, 10 to 150 times less than light-grown cells. Light-grown cells of these mutants and of wild type show a ratio of chlorophyll to cytochrome of about 300 (mole to mole). Cytochrome c-552 is undetectable in dark-grown Y(1)BXD, Y(3)BUD, and W(34)ZUD which cannot carry plastid development beyond the proplastid in light; the light-grown cells of these mutants have levels of cytochrome similar to or lower than dark-grown wild type cells. Cytochrome c-552 is undetectable in light- and dark-grown mutants in which plastid DNA is undetectable (such as Y(2)BUL, W(3)BUL, W(8)BHL, and W(10)BSmL) consistent with the view, but not proving, that this molecule may be coded, at least in part, in plastid DNA. During light-induced chloroplast development in resting cells, cytochrome c-552 formation behaves in all respects like chlorophyll except that the dark-grown cells contain low amounts of the cytochrome c-552 but lack chlorophyll. Thus, both cytochrome c-552 and chlorophyll show the same lag period even when the length is changed by nutritional manipulation; preillumination largely eliminates the lag in the formation of both molecules, cycloheximide and streptomycin both inhibit the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and cytochrome c-552 in the same manner, and the formation of both during chloroplast

  7. Different dynamic movements of wild-type and pathogenic VCPs and their cofactors to damaged mitochondria in a Parkin-mediated mitochondrial quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoko; Fukushi, Junpei; Hori, Seiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Okatsu, Kei; Kakiyama, Yukie; Kawawaki, Junko; Kakizuka, Akira; Tanaka, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    VCP/p97 is a hexameric ring-shaped AAA(+) ATPase that participates in various ubiquitin-associated cellular functions. Mis-sense mutations in VCP gene are associated with the pathogenesis of two inherited diseases: inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and front-temporal dementia (IBMPFD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These pathogenic VCPs have higher affinities for several cofactors, including Npl4, Ufd1 and p47. In Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control systems, VCP migrates to damaged mitochondria (e.g., those treated with uncouplers) to aid in the degradation of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and to eliminate mitochondria. We showed that endogenous Npl4 and p47 also migrate to mitochondria after uncoupler treatment, and Npl4, Ufd1 or p47 silencing causes defective mitochondria clearance after uncoupler treatment. Moreover, pathogenic VCPs show impaired migration to mitochondria, and the exogenous pathogenic VCP expression partially inhibits Npl4 and p47 localization to mitochondria. These results suggest that the increased affinities of pathogenic VCPs for these cofactors cause the impaired movement of pathogenic VCPs. In adult flies, exogenous expression of wild-type VCP, but not pathogenic VCPs, reduces the number of abnormal mitochondria in muscles. Failure of pathogenic VCPs to function on damaged mitochondria may be related to the pathogenesis of IBMPFD and ALS.

  8. Gender differences between hypocretin/orexin knockout and wild type mice: age, body weight, body composition, metabolic markers, leptin and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M

    2014-12-01

    Female hypocretin knockout (Hcrt KO) mice have increased body weight despite decreased food intake compared to wild type (WT) mice. In order to understand the nature of the increased body weight, we carried out a detailed study of Hcrt KO and WT, male, and female mice. Female KO mice showed consistently higher body weight than WT mice, from 4 to 20 months (20-60%). Fat, muscle, and free fluid levels were all significantly higher in adult (7-9 months) as well as old (18-20 months) female KO mice compared to age-matched WT mice. Old male KO mice showed significantly higher fat content (150%) compared to age-matched WT mice, but no significant change in body weight. Respiratory quotient (-19%) and metabolic rates (-14%) were significantly lower in KO mice compared to WT mice, regardless of gender or age. Female KO mice had significantly higher serum leptin levels (191%) than WT mice at 18-20 months, but no difference between male mice were observed. Conversely, insulin resistance was significantly higher in both male (73%) and female (93%) KO mice compared to age- and sex-matched WT mice. We conclude that absence of the Hcrt peptide has gender-specific effects. In contrast, Hcrt-ataxin mice and human narcoleptics, with loss of the whole Hcrt cell, show weight gain in both sexes.

  9. Daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity indicate different adaptive strategies to cold exposure in adult and aged mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Terrien, Jeremy; Zizzari, Philippe; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne

    2009-07-01

    Daily variations in core temperature (Tc) within the normothermic range imply thermoregulatory processes that are essential for optimal function and survival. Higher susceptibility towards cold exposure in older animals suggests that these processes are disturbed with age. In the mouse lemur, a long-day breeder, we tested whether aging affected circadian rhythmicity of Tc, locomotor activity (LA), and energy balance under long-day conditions when exposed to cold. Adult (N = 7) and aged (N = 5) mouse lemurs acclimated to LD14/10 were exposed to 10-day periods at 25 and 12 degrees C. Tc and LA rhythms were recorded by telemetry, and caloric intake (CI), body mass changes, and plasma IGF-1 were measured. During exposure to 25 degrees C, both adult and aged mouse lemurs exhibited strong daily variations in Tc. Aged animals exhibited lower levels of nocturnal LA and nocturnal and diurnal Tc levels in comparison to adults. Body mass and IGF-1 levels remained unchanged with aging. Under cold exposure, torpor bout occurrence was never observed whatever the age category. Adult and aged mouse lemurs maintained their Tc in the normothermic range and a positive energy balance. All animals exhibited increase in CI and decrease in IGF-1 in response to cold. The decrease in IGF-1 was delayed in aged mouse lemurs compared to adults. Moreover, both adult and aged animals responded to cold exposure by increasing their diurnal LA compared to those under Ta = 25 degrees C. However, aged animals exhibited a strong decrease in nocturnal LA and Tc, whereas cold effects were only slight in adults. The temporal organization and amplitude of the daily phase of low Tc were particularly well preserved under cold exposure in both age groups. Sexually active mouse lemurs exposed to cold thus seemed to prevent torpor exhibition and temporal disorganization of daily rhythms of Tc, even during aging. However, although energy balance was not impaired with age in mouse lemurs after cold exposure

  10. Vitamin D2-Enriched Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Improves Memory in Both Wild Type and APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Louise; Kersaitis, Cindy; Macaulay, Stuart Lance; Münch, Gerald; Niedermayer, Garry; Nigro, Julie; Payne, Matthew; Sheean, Paul; Vallotton, Pascal; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Bird, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, affecting over 30% of adult Australians, and increasing up to 80% for at-risk groups including the elderly (age>65). The role for Vitamin D in development of the central nervous system is supported by the association between Vitamin D deficiency and incidence of neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A reported positive relationship between Vitamin D status and cognitive performance suggests that restoring Vitamin D status might provide a cognitive benefit to those with Vitamin D deficiency. Mushrooms are a rich source of ergosterol, which can be converted to Vitamin D2 by treatment with UV light, presenting a new and convenient dietary source of Vitamin D2. We hypothesised that Vitamin D2-enriched mushrooms (VDM) could prevent the cognitive and pathological abnormalities associated with dementia. Two month old wild type (B6C3) and AD transgenic (APPSwe/PS1dE9) mice were fed a diet either deficient in Vitamin D2 or a diet which was supplemented with VDM, containing 1±0.2 µg/kg (∼54 IU/kg) vitamin D2, for 7 months. Effects of the dietary intervention on memory were assessed pre- and post-feeding. Brain sections were evaluated for amyloid β (Aβ) plaque loads and inflammation biomarkers using immuno-histochemical methods. Plasma vitamin D metabolites, Aβ40, Aβ42, calcium, protein and cholesterol were measured using biochemical assays. Compared with mice on the control diet, VDM-fed wild type and AD transgenic mice displayed improved learning and memory, had significantly reduced amyloid plaque load and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and elevated interleukin-10 in the brain. The results suggest that VDM might provide a dietary source of Vitamin D2 and other bioactives for preventing memory-impairment in dementia. This study supports the need for a randomised clinical trial to determine whether or not VDM consumption can benefit cognitive performance in the wider population. PMID

  11. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections.

    PubMed

    Cronan, Mark R; Rosenberg, Allison F; Oehlers, Stefan H; Saelens, Joseph W; Sisk, Dana M; Jurcic Smith, Kristen L; Lee, Sunhee; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique) methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ. PMID:26449262

  12. POD Nanoparticles Expressing GDNF Provide Structural and Functional Rescue of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in an Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Read, Sarah P; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-01-01

    Peptide for ocular delivery (POD) is a novel cationic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) which, when conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG-POD), can deliver plasmid DNA to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of adult murine retina. PEG-POD nanoparticles containing an expression cassette for glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (PEG–POD~GDNF) were investigated for their ability to inhibit light-induced photoreceptor apoptosis. PEG-POD~GDNF, control nanoparticles, or buffer were injected into the subretinal space of adult murine retina and retinal degeneration induced by blue light. Animals injected with PEG-POD~GDNF showed a significant reduction (3.9–7.7 fold) in apoptosis relative to control-injected animals. The thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the superior retina of PEG-POD~GDNF-injected eyes was significantly greater (23.6–39.3%) than control-injected retina 14 days post-light treatment. PEG-POD~GDNF-injected eyes showed a 27–39% greater functional response relative to controls, as measured by electroretinogram (ERG) 7 days post-light treatment. This is one of only two studies demonstrating histological and functional rescue of a mouse model of retinal degeneration following nonviral administration of a transgene into adult retina. Although rescue is short lived for clinical application, this study represents an important step in the development of nonviral gene therapy for retinal diseases. PMID:20700110

  13. Chronic Social Stress Affects Synaptic Maturation of Newly Generated Neurons in the Adult Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chiung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic stress has been found to suppress adult neurogenesis, but it remains unclear whether it may affect the maturation process of adult-born neurons. Here, we examined the influence of chronic social defeat stress on the morphological and electrophysiological properties of adult-born dentate granule cells at different developmental stages. Methods: Adult C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 10 days of chronic social defeat stress followed by a social interaction test 24 hours after the last defeat. Defeated mice were segregated into susceptible and unsusceptible subpopulations based on a measure of social interaction test. Combining electrophysiology with retrovirus-mediated birth-dating and labeling, we examined the impact of chronic social defeat stress on temporal regulation of synaptic plasticity of adult-born dentate granule cells along their maturation. Results: Chronic social defeat stress decreases the survival and dendritic complexity of adult-born dentate granule cells. While chronic social defeat stress doesn’t alter the intrinsic electrophysiological properties and synaptic transmission of surviving adult-born dentate granule cells, it promotes the developmental switch in synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors from predominant GluN2B- to GluN2A-containing receptors, which transform the immature synapse of adult-born dentate granule cells from one that exhibits enhanced long-term potentiation to one that has normal levels of long-term potentiation. Furthermore, chronic social defeat stress increases the level of endogenous repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor mRNA in adult-born dentate granule cells, and knockdown of the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor in adult-born dentate granule cells rescues chronic social defeat stress-induced morphological deficits and accelerated developmental switch in synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit composition. Conclusions: These results uncover a previously

  14. Formation of DNA adducts in wild-type and transgenic mice expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1 and 1A2 after oral exposure to furfuryl alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Høie, Anja Hortemo; Monien, Bernhard Hans; Sakhi, Amrit Kaur; Glatt, Hansruedi; Hjertholm, Hege; Husøy, Trine

    2015-01-01

    Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is present in many heat-treated foods as a result of its formation via dehydration of pentoses. It is also used legally as a flavouring agent. In an inhalation study conducted in the National Toxicology Program, FFA showed some evidence of carcinogenic activity in rats and mice. FFA was generally negative in conventional genotoxicity assays, which suggests that it may be a non-genotoxic carcinogen. However, it was recently found that FFA is mutagenic in Salmonella strains expressing appropriate sulfotransferases (SULTs), such as human or mouse SULT1A1. The same DNA adducts that were formed by FFA in these strains, mainly N 2-((furan-2-yl)methyl)-2′-deoxyguanosine (N 2-MF-dG), were also detected in tissues of FFA-exposed mice and even in human lung specimens. In the present study, a single oral dose of FFA (250mg/kg body weight) or saline was administered to FVB/N mice and transgenic mice expressing human SULT1A1/1A2 on the FVB/N background. The transgenic mice were used, since human and mouse SULT1A1 substantially differ in substrate specificity and tissue distribution. DNA adducts were studied in liver, kidney, proximal and distal small intestine as well as colon, using isotope-dilution ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC–MS/MS). Surprisingly, low levels of adducts that may represent N 2-MF-dG were detected even in tissues of untreated mice. FFA exposure enhanced the adduct levels in colon and liver, but not in the remaining investigated tissues of wild-type (wt) mice. The situation was similar in transgenic mice, except that N 2-MF-dG levels were also strongly enhanced in the proximal small intestine. These different results between wt and transgenic mice may be attributed to the fact that human SULT1A1, but not the orthologous mouse enzyme, is strongly expressed in the small intestine. PMID:25904584

  15. Coordinated Zinc Homeostasis Is Essential for the Wild-Type Virulence of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Lauren M.; Budnick, James A.; Roop, R. Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metal homeostasis in bacterial cells is a highly regulated process requiring intricately coordinated import and export, as well as precise sensing of intracellular metal concentrations. The uptake of zinc (Zn) has been linked to the virulence of Brucella abortus; however, the capacity of Brucella strains to sense Zn levels and subsequently coordinate Zn homeostasis has not been described. Here, we show that expression of the genes encoding the zinc uptake system ZnuABC is negatively regulated by the Zn-sensing Fur family transcriptional regulator, Zur, by direct interactions between Zur and the promoter region of znuABC. Moreover, the MerR-type regulator, ZntR, controls the expression of the gene encoding the Zn exporter ZntA by binding directly to its promoter. Deletion of zur or zntR alone did not result in increased zinc toxicity in the corresponding mutants; however, deletion of zntA led to increased sensitivity to Zn but not to other metals, such as Cu and Ni, suggesting that ZntA is a Zn-specific exporter. Strikingly, deletion of zntR resulted in significant attenuation of B. abortus in a mouse model of chronic infection, and subsequent experiments revealed that overexpression of zntA in the zntR mutant is the molecular basis for its decreased virulence. IMPORTANCE The importance of zinc uptake for Brucella pathogenesis has been demonstrated previously, but to date, there has been no description of how overall zinc homeostasis is maintained and genetically controlled in the brucellae. The present work defines the predominant zinc export system, as well as the key genetic regulators of both zinc uptake and export in Brucella abortus. Moreover, the data show the importance of precise coordination of the zinc homeostasis systems as disregulation of some elements of these systems leads to the attenuation of Brucella virulence in a mouse model. Overall, this study advances our understanding of the essential role of zinc in the pathogenesis of

  16. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M; Lau, Dawn H W; Mórotz, Gábor M; De Vos, Kurt J; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies.

  17. Embryonic Stem Cells Contribute to Mouse Chimeras in the Absence of Detectable Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Benjamin L.; Oseth, Leann; Miller, Shanna; Hirsch, Betsy; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into all embryonic and adult cell types following mouse chimera production. Although injection of diploid ES cells into tetraploid blastocysts suggests that tetraploid cells have a selective disadvantage in the developing embryo, tetraploid hybrid cells, formed by cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells, have been reported to contribute to mouse chimeras. In addition, other examples of apparent stem cell plasticity have recently been shown to be the result of cell fusion. Here we investigate whether ES cells contribute to mouse chimeras through a cell fusion mechanism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for X and Y chromosomes was performed on dissociated tissues from embryonic, neonatal, and adult wild-type, and chimeric mice to follow the ploidy distributions of cells from various tissues. FISH analysis showed that the ploidy distributions in dissociated tissues, notably the tetraploid cell number, did not differ between chimeric and wild-type tissues. To address the possibility that early cell fusion events are hidden by subsequent reductive divisions or other changes in cell ploidy, we injected Z/EG (lacZ/EGFP) ES cells into ACTB-cre blastocysts. Recombination can only occur as the result of cell fusion, and the recombined allele should persist through any subsequent changes in cell ploidy. We did not detect evidence of fusion in embryonic chimeras either by direct fluorescence microscopy for GFP or by PCR amplification of the recombined Z/EG locus on genomic DNA from ACTB-cre::Z/EG chimeric embryos. Our results argue strongly against cell fusion as a mechanism by which ES cells contribute to chimeras. PMID:18338954

  18. Embryonic stem cells contribute to mouse chimeras in the absence of detectable cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Kidder, Benjamin L; Oseth, Leann; Miller, Shanna; Hirsch, Betsy; Verfaillie, Catherine; Coucouvanis, Electra

    2008-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into all embryonic and adult cell types following mouse chimera production. Although injection of diploid ES cells into tetraploid blastocysts suggests that tetraploid cells have a selective disadvantage in the developing embryo, tetraploid hybrid cells, formed by cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells, have been reported to contribute to mouse chimeras. In addition, other examples of apparent stem cell plasticity have recently been shown to be the result of cell fusion. Here we investigate whether ES cells contribute to mouse chimeras through a cell fusion mechanism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for X and Y chromosomes was performed on dissociated tissues from embryonic, neonatal, and adult wild-type, and chimeric mice to follow the ploidy distributions of cells from various tissues. FISH analysis showed that the ploidy distributions in dissociated tissues, notably the tetraploid cell number, did not differ between chimeric and wild-type tissues. To address the possibility that early cell fusion events are hidden by subsequent reductive divisions or other changes in cell ploidy, we injected Z/EG (lacZ/EGFP) ES cells into ACTB-cre blastocysts. Recombination can only occur as the result of cell fusion, and the recombined allele should persist through any subsequent changes in cell ploidy. We did not detect evidence of fusion in embryonic chimeras either by direct fluorescence microscopy for GFP or by PCR amplification of the recombined Z/EG locus on genomic DNA from ACTB-cre::Z/EG chimeric embryos. Our results argue strongly against cell fusion as a mechanism by which ES cells contribute to chimeras.

  19. Depleting endogenous neurotrophin-3 enhances myelin formation in the Trembler-J mouse, a model of a peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Varma, Sushama; Tsao, David; Shooter, Eric M; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2007-10-01

    The heterozygous Trembler-J (TrJ/+) mouse, containing a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (Pmp22) gene, is characterized by severe hypomyelination and is a representative model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) disease/Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS). Given that the neurotrophin-3 (NT3)-TrkC signaling pathway is inhibitory to myelination during development, we investigated the role of the NT3-TrkC pathway in myelination and manipulated this pathway to improve myelin formation in the CMT1A/DSS mouse model. Injection of NT3 to the TrJ/+ mice decreased the myelin protein P(0) level in the sciatic nerves. Suppressing the NT3-TrkC pathway with TrkC-Fc, an NT3 scavenger, enhanced myelination in vitro and in vivo in the TrJ/+ mouse. Furthermore, we found that full-length TrkC was expressed in adult TrJ/+ mouse sciatic nerves but was not detected in the wild-type adults, suggesting that the full-length TrkC is a potential target of treatment to enhance myelination in the TrJ/+ mouse. PMID:17628499

  20. Combined 3DISCO clearing method, retrograde tracer and ultramicroscopy to map corneal neurons in a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Launay, Pierre-Serge; Godefroy, David; Khabou, Hanen; Rostene, William; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Baudouin, Christophe; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2015-10-01

    Tissue clearing and subsequent imaging of intact transparent tissues have provided an innovative way to analyze anatomical pathways in the nervous system. In this study, we combined a recent 3-dimensional imaging of solvent cleared organ (3DISCO) procedure, light-sheet microscopy, fluorescent retrograde tracer, and Imaris software to 3D map corneal sensory neurons within a whole adult mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG). We first established the optimized steps to easily and rapidly clear a fixed TG. We found that the 3DISCO procedure gave excellent results and took less than 3 h to clear the TG. In a second set of experiments, a retrograde tracer (cholera toxin B Alexa 594-conjugated) was applied to de-epithelialized cornea to retrograde-labeled corneal sensory neurons. Two days later, TGs were cleared by the 3DISCO method and serial imaging was performed using light-sheet ultramicroscopic technology. High-resolution images of labeled neurons can be easily and rapidly obtained from a 3D reconstructed whole mouse TG. We then provided a 3D reconstruction of corneal afferent neurons and analyzed their precise localization in the TG. Thus, we showed that neurons supplying corneal sensory innervation exhibit a highly specific limited dorsomedial localization within the TG. We report that our combined method offers the possibility to perform manual (on 20 μm sections) and automated (on 3D reconstructed TG) counting of labeled cells in a cleared mouse TG. To conclude, we illustrate that the combination of the 3DISCO clearing method with light-sheet microscopy, retrograde tracer, and automatic counting represents a rapid and reliable method to analyze a subpopulation of neurons within the peripheral and central nervous system.

  1. A key role for EZH2 and associated genes in mouse and human adult T-cell acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Camille; Chagraoui, Jalila; Krosl, Jana; Gendron, Patrick; Wilhelm, Brian; Lemieux, Sébastien; Boucher, Geneviève; Chagnon, Pierre; Drouin, Simon; Lambert, Raphaëlle; Rondeau, Claude; Bilodeau, Annie; Lavallée, Sylvie; Sauvageau, Martin; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we show the high frequency of spontaneous γδ T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) occurrence in mice with biallelic deletion of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2). Tumor cells show little residual H3K27 trimethylation marks compared with controls. EZH2 is a component of the PRC2 Polycomb group protein complex, which is associated with DNA methyltransferases. Using next-generation sequencing, we identify alteration in gene expression levels of EZH2 and acquired mutations in PRC2-associated genes (DNMT3A and JARID2) in human adult T-ALL. Together, these studies document that deregulation of EZH2 and associated genes leads to the development of mouse, and likely human, T-ALL.

  2. Combination of cetuximab and PP242 synergistically suppress the progression of wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Xia, Zuguang; Bian, Xinyu; Li, Guangchao; Hu, Jing; Cao, Ya; Wang, Qing; Qian, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been shown to be overactive in human colorectal cancer, but the first-generation mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, has failed to show clinical efficacy against colorectal cancer. On the other hand, although the second-generation mTOR inhibitor, PP242, has exerted substantial efficacy, it was revealed that independent inhibition by PP242 was transient, which could lead to positive-feedback loop to EGFR. Using wild-type KRAS colorectal cancer cells as models, we investigate the treatment efficacy of a widely used anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, and PP242, alone or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Results of cell viability assays confirmed the synergistic inhibitory effect of PP242 and cetuximab on the survival of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, the ability of cancer-cell invasion and proliferation was also significantly inhibited by the combination therapy when compared with cetuximab or PP242 alone. Interestingly, the percentage of CD44-positive cancer cells was substantially decreased by the combination therapy in comparison with PP242 alone through fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The growth of cancer stem-like cell spheres in vitro was also maximally inhibited by combination therapy, in terms of either diameter or number. More importantly, the efficacy of combination therapy was more prominent than either drug alone in established tumor xenografts. These findings supported the potential use of combination therapy of PP242 and cetuximab against wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinomas.

  3. Discovery of an inhibitor of the production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin in wild-type cells

    PubMed Central

    Morkunas, Bernardas; Gal, Balint; Galloway, Warren R J D; Hodgkinson, James T; Ibbeson, Brett M; Sing Tan, Yaw; Welch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pyocyanin is a small molecule produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of infections by this notorious opportunistic pathogen. The inhibition of pyocyanin production has been identified as an attractive antivirulence strategy for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Herein, we report the discovery of an inhibitor of pyocyanin production in cultures of wild-type P. aeruginosa which is based around a 4-alkylquinolin-2(1H)-one scaffold. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported example of pyocyanin inhibition by a compound based around this molecular framework. The compound may therefore be representative of a new structural sub-class of pyocyanin inhibitors, which could potentially be exploited in in a therapeutic context for the development of critically needed new antipseudomonal agents. In this context, the use of wild-type cells in this study is notable, since the data obtained are of direct relevance to native situations. The compound could also be of value in better elucidating the role of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa infections. Evidence suggests that the active compound reduces the level of pyocyanin production by inhibiting the cell–cell signalling mechanism known as quorum sensing. This could have interesting implications; quorum sensing regulates a range of additional elements associated with the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa and there is a wide range of other potential applications where the inhibition of quorum sensing is desirable. PMID:27559393

  4. Infection patterns in barley and wheat spikes inoculated with wild-type and trichodiene synthase gene disrupted Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Carin; von Wettstein, Diter; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Felk, Angelika; Maier, Frank J

    2005-11-15

    Fusarium head blight epidemics of wheat and barley cause heavy economic losses to farmers due to yield decreases and production of mycotoxin that renders the grain useless for flour and malt products. No highly resistant cultivars are available at present. Hyphae of germinating fungal spores use different paths of infection: After germination at the extruded tip of an ovary, the hyphae travel along the epicarp in the space between the lemma and palea. Infection of the developing kernel proceeds through the epicarp, successively destroying the layers of the fruit coat and finally the starch and protein accumulating endosperm. Hyphae reaching the rachis proceed to apically located developing kernels. Using a constitutively green fluorescence protein-expressing Fusarium wild-type strain, and its knockout mutant, preventing trichothecene synthesis, we demonstrate that trichothecenes are not a virulence factor during infection through the fruit coat. In the absence of trichothecenes, the fungus is blocked by the development of heavy cell wall thickenings in the rachis node of Nandu wheat, a defense inhibited by the mycotoxin. In barley hyphae of both wild-type and the trichothecene knockout mutant, are inhibited at the rachis node and rachilla, limiting infection of adjacent florets through the phloem and along the surface of the rachis. Effective resistance to Fusarium head blight requires expression of genes that combat these different pathways of infection.

  5. Lymphocyte invasion in IC10/Basal-like breast tumors is associated with wild-type TP53

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, David; Silwal-Pandit, Laxmi; Dannenfelser, Ruth; Langerød, Anita; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Vaske, Charles; Siegel, Josie Ursini; Troyanskaya, Olga; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Balmain, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better prognosis in several epithelial malignancies including breast cancer. The tumor suppressor TP53 is mutated in approximately 30% of breast adenocarcinomas, with varying frequency across molecular subtypes. In this study of 1,420 breast tumors, we tested for interaction between TP53 mutation status and tumor subtype determined by PAM50 and Integrative Cluster analysis. In Integrative Cluster 10 (IC10)/Basal-like breast cancer we identify an association between lymphocytic infiltration, determined by an expression score, and retention of wild-type TP53. The expression-derived score agreed with the degree of lymphocytic infiltration assessed by pathological review, and application of the Nanodissect algorithm was suggestive of this infiltration being primarily of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Elevated expression of this CTL signature was associated with longer survival in IC10/Basal-like tumors. These findings identify a new link between the TP53 pathway and the adaptive immune response in ER-negative breast tumors, suggesting a connection between TP53 inactivation and failure of tumor immunosurveillance. IMPLICATIONS The association of lymphocytic invasion of estrogen receptor-negative breast tumors with the retention of wild-type TP53 implies a novel protective connection between TP53 function and tumor immunosurveillance. PMID:25351767

  6. Infection patterns in barley and wheat spikes inoculated with wild-type and trichodiene synthase gene disrupted Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Carin; von Wettstein, Diter; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Felk, Angelika; Maier, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Fusarium head blight epidemics of wheat and barley cause heavy economic losses to farmers due to yield decreases and production of mycotoxin that renders the grain useless for flour and malt products. No highly resistant cultivars are available at present. Hyphae of germinating fungal spores use different paths of infection: After germination at the extruded tip of an ovary, the hyphae travel along the epicarp in the space between the lemma and palea. Infection of the developing kernel proceeds through the epicarp, successively destroying the layers of the fruit coat and finally the starch and protein accumulating endosperm. Hyphae reaching the rachis proceed to apically located developing kernels. Using a constitutively green fluorescence protein-expressing Fusarium wild-type strain, and its knockout mutant, preventing trichothecene synthesis, we demonstrate that trichothecenes are not a virulence factor during infection through the fruit coat. In the absence of trichothecenes, the fungus is blocked by the development of heavy cell wall thickenings in the rachis node of Nandu wheat, a defense inhibited by the mycotoxin. In barley hyphae of both wild-type and the trichothecene knockout mutant, are inhibited at the rachis node and rachilla, limiting infection of adjacent florets through the phloem and along the surface of the rachis. Effective resistance to Fusarium head blight requires expression of genes that combat these different pathways of infection. PMID:16263921

  7. Intra-host competition between nef-defective escape mutants and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Altes, H K; Jansen, V A

    2000-01-01

    Various forms of nef genes with deletions at conserved positions along the sequence have been reported to persist in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients. We investigate the forces maintaining such variants in the proviral population. The main selection pressures are preservation of function and host immune response. The crippled Nef protein might have fewer epitopes, and as such be less visible to the specific immune response, but it will lose some function. Does a trade-off between avoidance of the immune response and loss of function explain the dynamics of the crippled virus found in the patients? To answer this question, we formulated a deterministic model of the virus-host interactions. We found that when the crippled protein presents few epitopes and suffers little loss of function, the two viral types can coexist. Otherwise, the wild-type comes to prevail. The mutant form might initially dominate, but as the selective pressure by the CD84+ T cells decreases over the course of infection, the advantage for the crippled form of losing epitopes disappears. Hence, we go from a situation of coexistence of wild-type and mutant, to a situation of only full-length nef. The results are discussed in the context of the suggested use of live attenuated vaccines having deletions in nef. PMID:10687825

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin gene of current wild-type canine distemper viruses from South Africa: lineage Africa.

    PubMed

    Woma, Timothy Y; van Vuuren, Moritz; Bosman, Ana-Mari; Quan, Melvyn; Oosthuizen, Marinda

    2010-07-14

    There are no reports of CDV isolations in southern Africa, and although CDV is said to have geographically distinct lineages, molecular information of African strains has not yet been documented. Viruses isolated in cell cultures were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the complete H gene was sequenced and phylogenetically analysed with other strains from GenBank. Phylogenetic comparisons of the complete H gene of CDV isolates from different parts of the world (available in GenBank) with wild-type South African isolates revealed nine clades. All South African isolates form a separate African clade of their own and thus are clearly separated from the American, European, Asian, Arctic and vaccine virus clades. It is likely that only the 'African lineage' of CDV may be circulating in South Africa currently, and the viruses isolated from dogs vaccinated against CDV are not the result of reversion to virulence of vaccine strains, but infection with wild-type strains.

  9. Infection patterns in barley and wheat spikes inoculated with wild-type and trichodiene synthase gene disrupted Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Carin; von Wettstein, Diter; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Felk, Angelika; Maier, Frank J

    2005-11-15

    Fusarium head blight epidemics of wheat and barley cause heavy economic losses to farmers due to yield decreases and production of mycotoxin that renders the grain useless for flour and malt products. No highly resistant cultivars are available at present. Hyphae of germinating fungal spores use different paths of infection: After germination at the extruded tip of an ovary, the hyphae travel along the epicarp in the space between the lemma and palea. Infection of the developing kernel proceeds through the epicarp, successively destroying the layers of the fruit coat and finally the starch and protein accumulating endosperm. Hyphae reaching the rachis proceed to apically located developing kernels. Using a constitutively green fluorescence protein-expressing Fusarium wild-type strain, and its knockout mutant, preventing trichothecene synthesis, we demonstrate that trichothecenes are not a virulence factor during infection through the fruit coat. In the absence of trichothecenes, the fungus is blocked by the development of heavy cell wall thickenings in the rachis node of Nandu wheat, a defense inhibited by the mycotoxin. In barley hyphae of both wild-type and the trichothecene knockout mutant, are inhibited at the rachis node and rachilla, limiting infection of adjacent florets through the phloem and along the surface of the rachis. Effective resistance to Fusarium head blight requires expression of genes that combat these different pathways of infection. PMID:16263921

  10. Utilization of Whole-Cell MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry to Differentiate Burkholderia pseudomallei Wild-Type and Constructed Mutants.

    PubMed

    Niyompanich, Suthamat; Srisanga, Kitima; Jaresitthikunchai, Janthima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS) has been widely adopted as a useful technology in the identification and typing of microorganisms. This study employed the whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS to identify and differentiate wild-type and mutants containing constructed single gene mutations of Burkholderia pseudomallei, a pathogenic bacterium causing melioidosis disease in both humans and animals. Candidate biomarkers for the B. pseudomallei mutants, including rpoS, ppk, and bpsI isolates, were determined. Taxon-specific and clinical isolate-specific biomarkers of B. pseudomallei were consistently found and conserved across all average mass spectra. Cluster analysis of MALDI spectra of all isolates exhibited separate distribution. A total of twelve potential mass peaks discriminating between wild-type and mutant isolates were identified using ClinProTools analysis. Two peaks (m/z 2721 and 2748 Da) were specific for the rpoS isolate, three (m/z 3150, 3378, and 7994 Da) for ppk, and seven (m/z 3420, 3520, 3587, 3688, 4623, 4708, and 5450 Da) for bpsI. Our findings demonstrated that the rapid, accurate, and reproducible mass profiling technology could have new implications in laboratory-based rapid differentiation of extensive libraries of genetically altered bacteria. PMID:26656930

  11. An antibody raised against a pathogenic serpin variant induces mutant-like behaviour in the wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Irving, James A; Miranda, Elena; Haq, Imran; Perez, Juan; Kotov, Vadim R; Faull, Sarah V; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Lomas, David A

    2015-05-15

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to a transient intermediate may act as a catalyst for the corresponding reaction; here we show this principle can extend on a macro molecular scale to the induction of mutant-like oligomerization in a wild-type protein. Using the common pathogenic E342K (Z) variant of α1-antitrypsin as antigen-whose native state is susceptible to the formation of a proto-oligomeric intermediate-we have produced a mAb (5E3) that increases the rate of oligomerization of the wild-type (M) variant. Employing ELISA, gel shift, thermal stability and FRET time-course experiments, we show that mAb5E3 does not bind to the native state of α1-antitrypsin, but recognizes a cryptic epitope in the vicinity of the post-helix A loop and strand 4C that is revealed upon transition to the polymerization intermediate, and which persists in the ensuing oligomer. This epitope is not shared by loop-inserted monomeric conformations. We show the increased amenity to polymerization by either the pathogenic E342K mutation or the binding of mAb5E3 occurs without affecting the energetic barrier to polymerization. As mAb5E3 also does not alter the relative stability of the monomer to intermediate, it acts in a manner similar to the E342K mutant, by facilitating the conformational interchange between these two states.

  12. Isolation and characterization of DNA sequences that are specifically bound by wild-type p53 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Foord, O; Navot, N; Rotter, V

    1993-01-01

    Wild-type p53 was shown to function as a transcription factor. The N-terminal region of the protein contains the transcription activation domain, while the C terminus is responsible for DNA binding. Localization of the DNA-binding domain of the p53 protein to the highly conserved carboxy-terminal region suggests that the interaction of p53 with DNA is important for its function. We have developed a strategy for studying the DNA sequence specificity of p53-DNA binding that is based on random sequence selection. We report here on the isolation of murine genomic DNA clones that are specifically bound by the wild-type p53 protein but are not bound by mutant p53 protein forms. The isolated p53 target gene contains the unique DNA-binding sequence GACACTGGTCACACTTGGCTGCTTAGGAAT. This fragment exhibits promoter activity as measured by its capacity to activate transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. Our results suggest that p53 directly binds DNA and functions as a typical transcription factor. Images PMID:8441383

  13. Physcomitrella patens auxin conjugate synthetase (GH3) double knockout mutants are more resistant to Pythium infection than wild type.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jennifer; Šola, Ivana; Rusak, Gordana; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Auxin homeostasis is involved in many different plant developmental and stress responses. The auxin amino acid conjugate synthetases belonging to the GH3 family play major roles in the regulation of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels and the moss Physcomitrella patens has two GH3 genes in its genome. A role for IAA in several angiosperm--pathogen interactions was reported, however, in a moss--oomycete pathosystem it had not been published so far. Using GH3 double knockout lines we have investigated the role of auxin homeostasis during the infection of P. patens with the two oomycete species, Pythium debaryanum and Pythium irregulare. We show that infection with P. debaryanum caused stronger disease symptoms than with P. irregulare. Also, P. patens lines harboring fusion constructs of an auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) with a reporter (ß-glucuronidase) showed higher promoter induction after P. debaryanum infection than after P. irregulare, indicating a differential induction of the auxin response. Free IAA was induced upon P. debaryanum infection in wild type by 1.6-fold and in two GH3 double knockout (GH3-doKO) mutants by 4- to 5-fold. All GH3-doKO lines showed a reduced disease symptom progression compared to wild type. Since P. debaryanum can be inhibited in growth on medium containing IAA, these data might indicate that endogenous high auxin levels in P. patens GH3-doKO mutants lead to higher resistance against the oomycete.

  14. Accelerated telomere shortening and replicative senescence in human fibroblasts overexpressing mutant and wild-type lamin A

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectable WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes.

  15. Identification of enzymes and quantification of metabolic fluxes in the wild type and in a recombinant aspergillus oryzae strain

    PubMed

    Pedersen; Carlsen; Nielsen

    1999-01-01

    Two alpha-amylase-producing strains of Aspergillus oryzae, a wild-type strain and a recombinant containing additional copies of the alpha-amylase gene, were characterized with respect to enzyme activities, localization of enzymes to the mitochondria or cytosol, macromolecular composition, and metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism during glucose-limited chemostat cultivations. Citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found only in the mitochondria, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP) activities were found only in the cytosol, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, malate dehydrogenase, and glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. The measured biomass components and ash could account for 95% (wt/wt) of the biomass. The protein and RNA contents increased linearly with increasing specific growth rate, but the carbohydrate and chitin contents decreased. A metabolic model consisting of 69 fluxes and 59 intracellular metabolites was used to calculate the metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism at several specific growth rates, with ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway increased with increasing specific growth rate. The fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway were 15 to 26% higher for the recombinant strain than for the wild-type strain.

  16. A recombinant measles vaccine virus expressing wild-type glycoproteins: consequences for viral spread and cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Johnston, I C; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schneider-Schaulies, S

    1999-08-01

    Wild-type, lymphotropic strains of measles virus (MV) and tissue culture-adapted MV vaccine strains possess different cell tropisms. This observation has led to attempts to identify the viral receptors and to characterize the functions of the MV glycoproteins. We have functionally analyzed the interactions of MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of vaccine (Edmonston) and wild-type (WTF) strains in different combinations in transfected cells. Cell-cell fusion occurs when both Edmonston F and H proteins are expressed in HeLa or Vero cells. The expression of WTF glycoproteins in HeLa cells did not result in syncytia, yet they fused efficiently with cells of lymphocytic origin. To further investigate the role of the MV glycoproteins in virus cell entry and also the role of other viral proteins in cell tropism, we generated recombinant vaccine MVs containing one or both glycoproteins from WTF. These viruses were viable and grew similarly in lymphocytic cells. Recombinant viruses expressing the WTFH protein showed a restricted spread in HeLa cells but spread efficiently in Vero cells. Parental WTF remained restricted in both cell types. Therefore, not only differential receptor usage but also other cell-specific factors are important in determining MV cell tropism. PMID:10400788

  17. The Phospholipase D2 Knock Out Mouse Has Ectopic Purkinje Cells and Suffers from Early Adult-Onset Anosmia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Schrewe, Heinrich; Wakelam, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is an enzyme that produces phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid messenger molecule involved in a number of cellular events including, through its membrane curvature properties, endocytosis. The PLD2 knock out (PLD2KO) mouse has been previously reported to be protected from insult in a model of Alzheimer's disease. We have further analysed a PLD2KO mouse using mass spectrophotometry of its lipids and found significant differences in PA species throughout its brain. We have examined the expression pattern of PLD2 which allowed us to define which region of the brain to analyse for defect, notably PLD2 was not detected in glial-rich regions. The expression pattern lead us to specifically examine the mitral cells of olfactory bulbs, the Cornus Amonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We find that the change to longer PA species correlates with subtle architectural defect in the cerebellum, exemplified by ectopic Purkinje cells and an adult-onset deficit of olfaction. These observations draw parallels to defects in the reelin heterozygote as well as the effect of high fat diet on olfaction. PMID:27658289

  18. Deletion and replacement of the mouse adult beta-globin genes by a "plug and socket" repeated targeting strategy.

    PubMed

    Detloff, P J; Lewis, J; John, S W; Shehee, W R; Langenbach, R; Maeda, N; Smithies, O

    1994-10-01

    We describe a two-step strategy to alter any mouse locus repeatedly and efficiently by direct positive selection. Using conventional targeting for the first step, a functional neo gene and a nonfunctional HPRT minigene (the "socket") are introduced into the genome of HPRT- embryonic stem (ES) cells close to the chosen locus, in this case the beta-globin locus. For the second step, a targeting construct (the "plug") that recombines homologously with the integrated socket and supplies the remaining portion of the HPRT minigene is used; this homologous recombination generates a functional HPRT gene and makes the ES cells hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine resistant. At the same time, the plug provides DNA sequences that recombine homologously with sequences in the target locus and modifies them in the desired manner; the plug is designed so that correctly targeted cells also lose the neo gene and become G418 sensitive. We have used two different plugs to make alterations in the mouse beta-globin locus starting with the same socket-containing ES cell line. One plug deleted 20 kb of DNA containing the two adult beta-globin genes. The other replaced the same region with the human beta-globin gene containing the mutation responsible for sickle cell anemia.

  19. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus.

  20. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  1. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  2. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  3. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  4. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis.

  5. Bone Turnover in Wild Type and Pleiotrophin-Transgenic Mice Housed for Three Months in the International Space Station (ISS)

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Francesco; Canciani, Barbara; Manescu, Adrian; Marozzi, Katia; Cilli, Michele; Costa, Delfina; Liu, Yi; Piccardi, Federica; Tasso, Roberta; Tromba, Giuliana; Rustichelli, Franco; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2012-01-01

    Bone is a complex dynamic tissue undergoing a continuous remodeling process. Gravity is a physical force playing a role in the remodeling and contributing to the maintenance of bone integrity. This article reports an investigation on the alterations of the bone microarchitecture that occurred in wild type (Wt) and pleiotrophin-transgenic (PTN-Tg) mice exposed to a near-zero gravity on the International Space Station (ISS) during the Mice Drawer System (MDS) mission, to date, the longest mice permanence (91 days) in space. The transgenic mouse strain over-expressing pleiotrophin (PTN) in bone was selected because of the PTN positive effects on bone turnover. Wt and PTN-Tg control animals were maintained on Earth either in a MDS payload or in a standard vivarium cage. This study revealed a bone loss during spaceflight in the weight-bearing bones of both strains. For both Tg and Wt a decrease of the trabecular number as well as an increase of the mean trabecular separation was observed after flight, whereas trabecular thickness did not show any significant change. Non weight-bearing bones were not affected. The PTN-Tg mice exposed to normal gravity presented a poorer trabecular organization than Wt mice, but interestingly, the expression of the PTN transgene during the flight resulted in some protection against microgravity’s negative effects. Moreover, osteocytes of the Wt mice, but not of Tg mice, acquired a round shape, thus showing for the first time osteocyte space-related morphological alterations in vivo. The analysis of specific bone formation and resorption marker expression suggested that the microgravity-induced bone loss was due to both an increased bone resorption and a decreased bone deposition. Apparently, the PTN transgene protection was the result of a higher osteoblast activity in the flight mice. PMID:22438896

  6. Dysfunctional Presynaptic M2 Receptors in the Presence of Chronically High Acetylcholine Levels: Data from the PRiMA Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Franziska; Krejci, Eric; Zimmermann, Martina; Klein, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The muscarinic M2 receptor (M2R) acts as a negative feedback regulator in central cholinergic systems. Activation of the M2 receptor limits acetylcholine (ACh) release, especially when ACh levels are increased because acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is acutely inhibited. Chronically high ACh levels in the extracellular space, however, were reported to down-regulate M2R to various degrees. In the present study, we used the PRiMA knockout mouse which develops severely reduced AChE activity postnatally to investigate ACh release, and we used microdialysis to investigate whether the function of M2R to reduce ACh release in vivo was impaired in adult PRiMA knockout mice. We first show that striatal and hippocampal ACh levels, while strongly increased, still respond to AChE inhibitors. Infusion or injection of oxotremorine, a muscarinic M2 agonist, reduced ACh levels in wild-type mice but did not significantly affect ACh levels in PRiMA knockout mice or in wild-type mice in which ACh levels were artificially increased by infusion of neostigmine. Scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist, increased ACh levels in wild-type mice receiving neostigmine, but not in wild-type mice or in PRiMA knockout mice. These results demonstrate that M2R are dysfunctional and do not affect ACh levels in PRiMA knockout mice, likely because of down-regulation and/or loss of receptor-effector coupling. Remarkably, this loss of function does not affect cognitive functions in PRiMA knockout mice. Our results are discussed in the context of AChE inhibitor therapy as used in dementia. PMID:26506622

  7. Liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 DNA into human prostate cancer cells is improved by low-frequency ultrasound combined with microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    BAI, WEN-KUN; ZHANG, WEI; HU, BING; YING, TAO

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common type of cancer in elderly men. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound exposure in combination with SonoVue microbubbles on liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 genes into human prostate cancer cells. PC-3 human prostate cancer cells were exposed to ultrasound; duty cycle was controlled at 20% (2 sec on, 8 sec off) for 5 min with and without SonoVue microbubble echo-contrast agent using a digital sonifier (frequency, 21 kHz; intensity, 46 mW/cm2). The cells were divided into eight groups, as follows: Group A (SonoVue + wild-type P53), group B (ultrasound + wild-type P53), group C (SonoVue + ultrasound + wild-type P53), group D (liposome + wild-type P53), group E (liposome + SonoVue + wild-type P53), group F (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound), group G (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound + SonoVue) and the control group (wild-type P53). Following treatment, a hemocytometer was used to measure cell lysis, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed to detect P53 gene transfection efficiency, Cell Counting Kit-8 was employed to reveal cell proliferation and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining was used to determine cell apoptosis. Cell lysis was minimal in each group. Wild-type P53 gene and protein expression were significantly increased in the PC-3 cells in group G compared with the control and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed in group G compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis levels in group G were significantly improved compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Thus, the results of the present study indicate that the use of low-frequency and low-energy ultrasound in combination with SonoVue microbubbles may be a potent physical method for increasing liposome gene delivery efficiency. PMID:27313702

  8. Systems genomics of metabolic phenotypes in wild-type Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Reed, Laura K; Lee, Kevin; Zhang, Zhi; Rashid, Lubna; Poe, Amy; Hsieh, Benjamin; Deighton, Nigel; Glassbrook, Norm; Bodmer, Rolf; Gibson, Greg

    2014-06-01

    Systems biology is an approach to dissection of complex traits that explicitly recognizes the impact of genetic, physiological, and environmental interactions in the generation of phenotypic variation. We describe comprehensive transcriptional and metabolic profiling in Drosophila melanogaster across four diets, finding little overlap in modular architecture. Genotype and genotype-by-diet interactions are a major component of transcriptional variation (24 and 5.3% of the total variation, respectively) while there were no main effects of diet (<1%). Genotype was also a major contributor to metabolomic variation (16%), but in contrast to the transcriptome, diet had a large effect (9%) and the interaction effect was minor (2%) for the metabolome. Yet specific principal components of these molecular phenotypes measured in larvae are strongly correlated with particular metabolic syndrome-like phenotypes such as pupal weight, larval sugar content and triglyceride content, development time, and cardiac arrhythmia in adults. The second principal component of the metabolomic profile is especially informative across these traits with glycine identified as a key loading variable. To further relate this physiological variability to genotypic polymorphism, we performed evolve-and-resequence experiments, finding rapid and replicated changes in gene frequency across hundreds of loci that are specific to each diet. Adaptation to diet is thus highly polygenic. However, loci differentially transcribed across diet or previously identified by RNAi knockdown or expression QTL analysis were not the loci responding to dietary selection. Therefore, loci that respond to the selective pressures of diet cannot be readily predicted a priori from functional analyses.

  9. Structure and expression of wild-type and suppressible alleles of the Drosophila purple gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nacksung |; Park, Dongkook; Yim, John

    1996-04-01

    Viable mutant alleles of purple (pr), such as pr{sup bw}, exhibit mutant eye colors. This reflects low 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin (PTP) synthase activity required for pigment synthesis. PTP synthase is also required for synthesis of the enzyme cofactor biopterin; presumably this is why some pr alleles are lethal. The pr{sup bw} eye color phenotype is suppressed by suppressor of sable [su(s)] mutations. The pr gene was cloned to explore the mechanism of this suppression. pr produces two PTP synthase mRNAs: one constitutively from a distal promoter and one in late pupae and young adult heads from a proximal promoter. The latter presumably supports eye pigment synthesis. The pr{sup bw} allele has a 412 retrotransposon in an intron spliced from both mRNAs. However, the head-specific mRNA is reduced > 10-fold in pr{sup bw} and is restored by a su(s) mutation, while the constitutive transcript is barely affected. The Su(s) protein probably alters processing of RNA containing 412. Because the intron containing 412 is the first in the head-specific mRNA and the second in the constitutive mRNA, binding of splicing machinery to nascent transcripts before the 412 insertion is transcribed may preclude the effects of Su(s) protein. 43 refs., 9 figs.

  10. MAPK signaling determines anxiety in the juvenile mouse brain but depression-like behavior in adults.

    PubMed

    Wefers, Benedikt; Hitz, Christiane; Hölter, Sabine M; Trümbach, Dietrich; Hansen, Jens; Weber, Peter; Pütz, Benno; Deussing, Jan M; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Roenneberg, Till; Zheng, Fang; Alzheimer, Christian; Silva, Alcino; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    MAP kinase signaling has been implicated in brain development, long-term memory, and the response to antidepressants. Inducible Braf knockout mice, which exhibit protein depletion in principle forebrain neurons, enabled us to unravel a new role of neuronal MAPK signaling for emotional behavior. Braf mice that were induced during adulthood showed normal anxiety but increased depression-like behavior, in accordance with pharmacological findings. In contrast, the inducible or constitutive inactivation of Braf in the juvenile brain leads to normal depression-like behavior but decreased anxiety in adults. In juvenile, constitutive mutants we found no alteration of GABAergic neurotransmission but reduced neuronal arborization in the dentate gyrus. Analysis of gene expression in the hippocampus revealed nine downregulated MAPK target genes that represent candidates to cause the mutant phenotype.Our results reveal the differential function of MAPK signaling in juvenile and adult life phases and emphasize the early postnatal period as critical for the determination of anxiety in adults. Moreover, these results validate inducible gene inactivation as a new valuable approach, allowing it to discriminate between gene function in the adult and the developing postnatal brain. PMID:22529971

  11. Expression of the Argonaute protein PiwiL2 and piRNAs in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qiuling; Ma, Qi; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Wilson, Amber; Xia, Linghui; Yu, Hong; Webster, Keith A.

    2010-06-11

    Piwi (P-element-induced wimpy testis) first discovered in Drosophila is a member of the Argonaute family of micro-RNA binding proteins with essential roles in germ-cell development. The murine homologue of PiwiL2, also known as Mili is selectively expressed in the testes, and mice bearing targeted mutations of the PiwiL2 gene are male-sterile. PiwiL2 proteins are thought to protect the germ line genome by suppressing retrotransposons, stabilizing heterochromatin structure, and regulating target genes during meiosis and mitosis. Here, we report that PiwiL2 and associated piRNAs (piRs) may play similar roles in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells. We found that PiwiL2 is expressed in the cytoplasm of metaphase mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow of adult and aged mice. Knockdown of PiwiL2 with a specific siRNA enhanced cell proliferation, significantly increased the number of cells in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phases and was associated with increased expression of cell cycle genes CCND1, CDK8, microtubule regulation genes, and decreased expression of tumor suppressors Cables 1, LATS, and Cxxc4. The results suggest broader roles for Piwi in genome surveillance beyond the germ line and a possible role in regulating the cell cycle of mesenchymal stem cells.

  12. Deficits in Adult Neurogenesis, Contextual Fear Conditioning, and Spatial Learning in a Gfap Mutant Mouse Model of Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paylor, Richard; Messing, Albee

    2013-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the major intermediate filament of mature astrocytes in the mammalian CNS. Dominant gain of function mutations in GFAP lead to the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Alexander disease (AxD), which is characterized by cytoplasmic protein aggregates known as Rosenthal fibers along with variable degrees of leukodystrophy and intellectual disability. The mechanisms by which mutant GFAP leads to these pleiotropic effects are unknown. In addition to astrocytes, GFAP is also expressed in other cell types, particularly neural stem cells that form the reservoir supporting adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Here, we show that mouse models of AxD exhibit significant pathology in GFAP-positive radial glia-like cells in the dentate gyrus, and suffer from deficits in adult neurogenesis. In addition, they display impairments in contextual learning and spatial memory. This is the first demonstration of cognitive phenotypes in a model of primary astrocyte disease. PMID:24259590

  13. HETEROTOPICALLY TRANSPLANTED CVO NEURAL STEM CELLS GENERATE NEURONS AND MIGRATE WITH SVZ CELLS IN THE ADULT MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lori B.; Cai, Jingli; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Production of new neurons throughout adulthood has been well characterized in two brain regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. The neurons produced from these regions arise from neural stem cells (NSCs) found in highly regulated stem cell niches. We recently showed that midline structures called circumventricular organs (CVOs) also contain NSCs capable of neurogenesis and/or astrogliogenesis in vitro and in situ [3]. The present study demonstrates that NSCs derived from two astrogliogenic CVOs, the median eminence and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis of the Nestin-GFP mouse, possess the potential to integrate into the SVZ and differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. These NSCs, following expansion and BrdU-labeling in culture and heterotopic transplantation into a region proximal to the SVZ in adult mice, migrate caudally to the SVZ and express early neuronal markers (TUC-4, PSA-NCAM) as they migrate along the rostral migratory stream. CVO-derived BrdU+ cells ultimately reach the olfactory bulb where they express early (PSA-NCAM) and mature (NeuN) neuronal markers. Collectively, these data suggest that although NSCs derived from the ME and OVLT CVOs are astrogliogenic in situ, they produce cells phenotypic of neurons in vivo when placed in a neurogenic environment. These findings may have implications for neural repair in the adult brain. PMID:20298755

  14. Cardiomyocyte proliferation and progenitor cell recruitment underlie therapeutic regeneration after myocardial infarction in the adult mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, Konstantinos; Zhang, Yiqiang; Seinfeld, Jeffrey; Galang, Giselle; Tseliou, Eleni; Cheng, Ke; Sun, Baiming; Aminzadeh, Mohammad; Marbán, Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) have been shown to regenerate infarcted myocardium in patients after myocardial infarction (MI). However, whether the cells of the newly formed myocardium originate from the proliferation of adult cardiomyocytes or from the differentiation of endogenous stem cells remains unknown. Using genetic fate mapping to mark resident myocytes in combination with long-term BrdU pulsing, we investigated the origins of postnatal cardiomyogenesis in the normal, infarcted and cell-treated adult mammalian heart. In the normal mouse heart, cardiomyocyte turnover occurs predominantly through proliferation of resident cardiomyocytes at a rate of ∼1.3-4%/year. After MI, new cardiomyocytes arise from both progenitors as well as pre-existing cardiomyocytes. Transplantation of CDCs upregulates host cardiomyocyte cycling and recruitment of endogenous progenitors, while boosting heart function and increasing viable myocardium. The observed phenomena cannot be explained by cardiomyocyte polyploidization, bi/multinucleation, cell fusion or DNA repair. Thus, CDCs induce myocardial regeneration by differentially upregulating two mechanisms of endogenous cell proliferation.

  15. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstra