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Sample records for adult-born granule cells

  1. Adult-born hippocampal dentate granule cells undergoing maturation modulate learning and memory in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Saxe, Michael D.; Gallina, Iryna S.; Gage, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    Adult-born dentate granule cells (DGCs) contribute to learning and memory, yet it remains unknown when adult-born DGCs become involved in the cognitive processes. During neurogenesis, immature dentate granule cells (DGCs) display distinctive physiological characteristics while undergoing morphological maturation before final integration into the neural circuits. The survival and activity of the adult-born DGCs can be influenced by the experience of the animal during a critical period when newborn DGCs are still immature. To assess the temporal importance of adult neurogenesis, we developed a transgenic mouse model that allowed us to transiently reduce the numbers of adult-born DGCs in a temporally regulatable manner. We found that mice with a reduced population of adult-born DGCs at the immature stage were deficient in forming robust, long-term spatial memory and displayed impaired performance in extinction tasks. These results suggest that immature DGCs that undergo maturation make important contributions to learning and memory. PMID:19864566

  2. Adult-born granule cells mature through two functionally distinct states

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, János; Neubrandt, Máté; Van-Weert, Susan; Andrási, Tibor; Kleine Borgmann, Felix B; Jessberger, Sebastian; Szabadics, János

    2014-01-01

    Adult-born granule cells (ABGCs) are involved in certain forms of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. It has been proposed that young but functionally integrated ABGCs (4-weeks-old) specifically contribute to pattern separation functions of the dentate gyrus due to their heightened excitability, whereas old ABGCs (>8 weeks old) lose these capabilities. Measuring multiple cellular and integrative characteristics of 3- 10-week-old individual ABGCs, we show that ABGCs consist of two functionally distinguishable populations showing highly distinct input integration properties (one group being highly sensitive to narrow input intensity ranges while the other group linearly reports input strength) that are largely independent of the cellular age and maturation stage, suggesting that ‘classmate’ cells (born during the same period) can contribute to the network with fundamentally different functions. Thus, ABGCs provide two temporally overlapping but functionally distinct neuronal cell populations, adding a novel level of complexity to our understanding of how life-long neurogenesis contributes to adult brain function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03104.001 PMID:25061223

  3. Adult-born granule cells mature through two functionally distinct states.

    PubMed

    Brunner, János; Neubrandt, Máté; Van-Weert, Susan; Andrási, Tibor; Kleine Borgmann, Felix B; Jessberger, Sebastian; Szabadics, János

    2014-01-01

    Adult-born granule cells (ABGCs) are involved in certain forms of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. It has been proposed that young but functionally integrated ABGCs (4-weeks-old) specifically contribute to pattern separation functions of the dentate gyrus due to their heightened excitability, whereas old ABGCs (>8 weeks old) lose these capabilities. Measuring multiple cellular and integrative characteristics of 3- 10-week-old individual ABGCs, we show that ABGCs consist of two functionally distinguishable populations showing highly distinct input integration properties (one group being highly sensitive to narrow input intensity ranges while the other group linearly reports input strength) that are largely independent of the cellular age and maturation stage, suggesting that 'classmate' cells (born during the same period) can contribute to the network with fundamentally different functions. Thus, ABGCs provide two temporally overlapping but functionally distinct neuronal cell populations, adding a novel level of complexity to our understanding of how life-long neurogenesis contributes to adult brain function. PMID:25061223

  4. Potential implications of a monosynaptic pathway from mossy cells to adult-born granule cells of the dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, Helen E.; Bernstein, Hannah L.

    2015-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) is important to many aspects of hippocampal function, but there are many aspects of the DG that are incompletely understood. One example is the role of mossy cells (MCs), a major DG cell type that is glutamatergic and innervates the primary output cells of the DG, the granule cells (GCs). MCs innervate the GCs as well as local circuit neurons that make GABAergic synapses on GCs, so the net effect of MCs on GCs – and therefore the output of the DG – is unclear. Here we first review fundamental information about MCs and the current hypotheses for their role in the normal DG and in diseases that involve the DG. Then we review previously published data which suggest that MCs are a source of input to a subset of GCs that are born in adulthood (adult-born GCs). In addition, we discuss the evidence that adult-born GCs may support the normal inhibitory ‘gate’ functions of the DG, where the GCs are a filter or gate for information from the entorhinal cortical input to area CA3. The implications are then discussed in the context of seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In TLE, it has been suggested that the DG inhibitory gate is weak or broken and MC loss leads to insufficient activation of inhibitory neurons, causing hyperexcitability. That idea was called the “dormant basket cell hypothesis.” Recent data suggest that loss of normal adult-born GCs may also cause disinhibition, and seizure susceptibility. Therefore, we propose a reconsideration of the dormant basket cell hypothesis with an intervening adult-born GC between the MC and basket cell and call this hypothesis the “dormant immature granule cell hypothesis.” PMID:26347618

  5. Reliable Genetic Labeling of Adult-Born Dentate Granule Cells Using Ascl1CreERT2 and GlastCreERT2 Murine Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung M.; Alvarez, Diego D.

    2015-01-01

    Newly generated dentate granule cells (GCs) are relevant for input discrimination in the adult hippocampus. Yet, their precise contribution to information processing remains unclear. To address this question, it is essential to develop approaches to precisely label entire cohorts of adult-born GCs. In this work, we used genetically modified mice to allow conditional expression of tdTomato (Tom) in adult-born GCs and characterized their development and functional integration. Ascl1CreERT2;CAGfloxStopTom and GlastCreERT2;CAGfloxStopTom mice resulted in indelible expression of Tom in adult neural stem cells and their lineage upon tamoxifen induction. Whole-cell recordings were performed to measure intrinsic excitability, firing behavior, and afferent excitatory connectivity. Developing GCs were also staged by the expression of early and late neuronal markers. The slow development of adult-born GCs characterized here is consistent with previous reports using retroviral approaches that have revealed that a mature phenotype is typically achieved after 6–8 weeks. Our findings demonstrate that Ascl1CreERT2 and GlastCreERT2 mouse lines enable simple and reliable labeling of adult-born GC lineages within restricted time windows. Therefore, these mice greatly facilitate tagging new neurons and manipulating their activity, required for understanding adult neurogenesis in the context of network remodeling, learning, and behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study shows that Ascl1CreERT2 and GlastCreERT2 mice lines can be used to label large cohorts of adult-born dentate granule cells with excellent time resolution. Neurons labeled in this manner display developmental and functional profiles that are in full agreement with previous findings using thymidine analogs and retroviral labeling, thus providing an alternative approach to tackle fundamental questions on circuit remodeling. Because of the massive neuronal targeting and the simplicity of this method, genetic labeling will

  6. Running rewires the neuronal network of adult-born dentate granule cells.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Carmen; Peterson, Benjamin D; van Praag, Henriette

    2016-05-01

    Exercise improves cognition in humans and animals. Running increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, a brain area important for learning and memory. It is unclear how running modifies the circuitry of new dentate gyrus neurons to support their role in memory function. Here we combine retroviral labeling with rabies virus mediated trans-synaptic retrograde tracing to define and quantify new neuron afferent inputs in young adult male C57Bl/6 mice, housed with or without a running wheel for one month. Exercise resulted in a shift in new neuron networks that may promote sparse encoding and pattern separation. Neurogenesis increased in the dorsal, but not the ventral, dentate gyrus by three-fold, whereas afferent traced cell labeling doubled in number. Regional analysis indicated that running differentially affected specific inputs. Within the hippocampus the ratio of innervation from inhibitory interneurons and glutamatergic mossy cells to new neurons was reduced. Distal traced cells were located in sub-cortical and cortical regions, including perirhinal, entorhinal and sensory cortices. Innervation from entorhinal cortex (EC) was augmented, in proportion to the running-induced enhancement of adult neurogenesis. Within EC afferent input and short-term synaptic plasticity from lateral entorhinal cortex, considered to convey contextual information to the hippocampus was increased. Furthermore, running upregulated innervation from regions important for spatial memory and theta rhythm generation, including caudo-medial entorhinal cortex and subcortical medial septum, supra- and medial mammillary nuclei. Altogether, running may facilitate contextual, spatial and temporal information encoding by increasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis and by reorganization of new neuron circuitry. PMID:26589333

  7. Delayed coupling to feedback inhibition during a critical period for the integration of adult-born granule cells.

    PubMed

    Temprana, Silvio G; Mongiat, Lucas A; Yang, Sung M; Trinchero, Mariela F; Alvarez, Diego D; Kropff, Emilio; Giacomini, Damiana; Beltramone, Natalia; Lanuza, Guillermo M; Schinder, Alejandro F

    2015-01-01

    Developing granule cells (GCs) of the adult dentate gyrus undergo a critical period of enhanced activity and synaptic plasticity before becoming mature. The impact of developing GCs on the activity of preexisting dentate circuits remains unknown. Here we combine optogenetics, acute slice electrophysiology, and in vivo chemogenetics to activate GCs at different stages of maturation to study the recruitment of local target networks. We show that immature (4-week-old) GCs can efficiently drive distal CA3 targets but poorly activate proximal interneurons responsible for feedback inhibition (FBI). As new GCs transition toward maturity, they reliably recruit GABAergic feedback loops that restrict spiking of neighbor GCs, a mechanism that would promote sparse coding. Such inhibitory loop impinges only weakly in new cohorts of young GCs. A computational model reveals that the delayed coupling of new GCs to FBI could be crucial to achieve a fine-grain representation of novel inputs in the dentate gyrus. PMID:25533485

  8. GluN2B-Containg NMDA Receptors on Adult-Born Granule Cells Contribute to the Antidepressant Action of Fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Tannenholz, Lindsay; Hen, René; Kheirbek, Mazen A.

    2016-01-01

    Ablation of adult neurogenesis in mice has revealed that young adult-born granule cells (abGCs) are required for some of the behavioral responses to antidepressants (ADs), yet the mechanism by which abGCs contribute to AD action remains unknown. During their maturation process, these immature neurons exhibit unique properties that could underlie their ability to influence behavioral output. In particular, abGCs in the DG exhibit a period of heightened plasticity 4–6 weeks after birth that is mediated by GluN2B-expressing NMDA receptors. The functional contribution of this critical window to AD responsiveness is unclear. Here, we determined the behavioral and neurogenic responses to the AD fluoxetine (FLX) in mice lacking GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in abGCs. We found that these mice exhibited an attenuated response to FLX in a neurogenesis-dependent behavioral assay of FLX action, while neurogenesis-independent behaviors were unaffected by GluN2B deletion. In addition, deletion of GluN2B attenuated FLX-induced increases in dendritic complexity of abGCs suggesting that the blunted behavioral efficacy of FLX may be caused by impaired differentiation of young abGCs. PMID:27303260

  9. GluN2B-Containg NMDA Receptors on Adult-Born Granule Cells Contribute to the Antidepressant Action of Fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Tannenholz, Lindsay; Hen, René; Kheirbek, Mazen A

    2016-01-01

    Ablation of adult neurogenesis in mice has revealed that young adult-born granule cells (abGCs) are required for some of the behavioral responses to antidepressants (ADs), yet the mechanism by which abGCs contribute to AD action remains unknown. During their maturation process, these immature neurons exhibit unique properties that could underlie their ability to influence behavioral output. In particular, abGCs in the DG exhibit a period of heightened plasticity 4-6 weeks after birth that is mediated by GluN2B-expressing NMDA receptors. The functional contribution of this critical window to AD responsiveness is unclear. Here, we determined the behavioral and neurogenic responses to the AD fluoxetine (FLX) in mice lacking GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in abGCs. We found that these mice exhibited an attenuated response to FLX in a neurogenesis-dependent behavioral assay of FLX action, while neurogenesis-independent behaviors were unaffected by GluN2B deletion. In addition, deletion of GluN2B attenuated FLX-induced increases in dendritic complexity of abGCs suggesting that the blunted behavioral efficacy of FLX may be caused by impaired differentiation of young abGCs. PMID:27303260

  10. The effect of immature adult-born dentate granule cells on hyponeophagial behavior is related to their roles in learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    The neurogenesis hypothesis of depression is based on the correlation between the rate of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the affective status of rodents. However, studies investigating the role of neurogenesis in the causation of mood regulation have reported inconsistent results. Here, we explored whether the affective state can be affected differentially by adult-born neurons with distinctive physiological characteristics at different maturation stages. We revealed that reducing the immature newborn neuron population had no effect on anxiety- or depression-like behaviors in an array of tests; however, it enhanced hyponeophagia in a novelty suppressed feeding test, but only when the novel environment was drastically different from the home cage. We further demonstrated that reducing the immature newborn neuron population led to delayed habituation to a novel environment and impaired contextual learning. Hence, rather than being directly involved in mood regulation, our studies raise the possibility that adult neurogenesis may influence hyponeophagia through its role in mnemonic processing. PMID:25798094

  11. Young Dentate Granule Cells Mediate Pattern Separation whereas Old Granule Cells Contribute to Pattern Completion

    PubMed Central

    Nakashiba, Toshiaki; Cushman, Jesse D.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Renaudineau, Sophie; Buhl, Derek L.; McHugh, Thomas J.; Barrera, Vanessa Rodriguez; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBain, Chris J.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adult-born granule cells (GCs), a minor population of cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, are highly active during the first few weeks following functional integration into the neuronal network (young GCs), distinguishing them from less active older adult-born GCs and the major population of dentate GCs generated developmentally (together, old GCs). We created a transgenic mouse in which output of old GCs was specifically inhibited while leaving a substantial portion of young GCs intact. These mice exhibited enhanced or normal pattern separation between similar contexts that was reduced following removal of young GCs by X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, mutant mice exhibited deficits in rapid pattern completion. Therefore, pattern separation of similar contexts requires adult-born young GCs while old GCs are unnecessary, whereas older GCs contribute to the rapid recall by pattern completion. Our data suggest that as adult-born GCs age, their function switches from pattern separation to rapid pattern completion. PMID:22365813

  12. Principal cell activity induces spine relocation of adult-born interneurons in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Breton-Provencher, Vincent; Bakhshetyan, Karen; Hardy, Delphine; Bammann, Rodrigo Roberto; Cavarretta, Francesco; Snapyan, Marina; Côté, Daniel; Migliore, Michele; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2016-01-01

    Adult-born neurons adjust olfactory bulb (OB) network functioning in response to changing environmental conditions by the formation, retraction and/or stabilization of new synaptic contacts. While some changes in the odour environment are rapid, the synaptogenesis of adult-born neurons occurs over a longer time scale. It remains unknown how the bulbar network functions when rapid and persistent changes in environmental conditions occur but when new synapses have not been formed. Here we reveal a new form of structural remodelling where mature spines of adult-born but not early-born neurons relocate in an activity-dependent manner. Principal cell activity induces directional growth of spine head filopodia (SHF) followed by spine relocation. Principal cell-derived glutamate and BDNF regulate SHF motility and directional spine relocation, respectively; and spines with SHF are selectively preserved following sensory deprivation. Our three-dimensional model suggests that spine relocation allows fast reorganization of OB network with functional consequences for odour information processing. PMID:27578235

  13. SynCAM 1 improves survival of adult-born neurons by accelerating synapse maturation.

    PubMed

    Doengi, Michael; Krupp, Alexander J; Körber, Nils; Stein, Valentin

    2016-03-01

    The survival of adult-born dentate gyrus granule cells critically depends on their synaptic integration into the existing neuronal network. Excitatory inputs are thought to increase the survival rate of adult born neurons. Therefore, whether enhancing the stability of newly formed excitatory synapses by overexpressing the synaptic cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 improves the survival of adult-born neurons was tested. Here it is shown that overexpression of SynCAM 1 improves survival of adult-born neurons, but has no effect on the proliferation rate of precursor cells. As expected, overexpression of SynCAM 1 increased the synapse density in adult-born granule neurons. While adult-born granule neurons have very few functional synapses 15 days after birth, it was found that at this age adult-born neurons in SynCAM 1 overexpressing mice exhibited around three times more excitatory synapses, which were stronger than synapses of adult-born neurons of control littermates. In summary, the data indicated that additional SynCAM 1 accelerated synapse maturation, which improved the stability of newly formed synapses and in turn increased the likelihood of survival of adult-born neurons. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26332750

  14. Long-term in vivo single-cell tracking reveals the switch of migration patterns in adult-born juxtaglomerular cells of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajie; Li, Kaizhen; Riecken, Kristoffer; Maslyukov, Anatoliy; Gomez-Nicola, Diego; Kovalchuk, Yury; Fehse, Boris; Garaschuk, Olga

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of adult-born cells can be easily monitored in cell culture or in lower model organisms, but longitudinal observation of individual mammalian adult-born cells in their native microenvironment still proves to be a challenge. Here we have established an approach named optical cell positioning system for long-term in vivo single-cell tracking, which integrates red-green-blue cell labeling with repeated angiography. By combining this approach with in vivo two-photon imaging technique, we characterized the in vivo migration patterns of adult-born neurons in the olfactory bulb. In contrast to the traditional view of mere radial migration of adult-born cells within the bulb, we found that juxtaglomerular cells switch from radial migration to long distance lateral migration upon arrival in their destination layer. This unique long-distance lateral migration has characteristic temporal (stop-and-go) and spatial (migratory, unidirectional or multidirectional) patterns, with a clear cell age-dependent decrease in the migration speed. The active migration of adult-born cells coincides with the time period of initial fate determination and is likely to impact on the integration sites of adult-born cells, their odor responsiveness, as well as their survival rate. PMID:27174051

  15. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Huckleberry, Kylie A.; Kane, Gary A.; Mathis, Rita J.; Cook, Sarah G.; Clutton, Jonathan E.; Drew, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG), but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in the DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG) zif268 appears to be an important mediator of these effects, as its expression can be induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Richardson et al., 1992; Veyrac et al., 2013). Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs). We first quantified zif268 expression in doublecortin-positive (DCX+) immature neurons and in the general granule cell population after brief exposure to a novel environment (NE). In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 h after NE exposure and returned to baseline by 8 h post-exposure. However, in the DCX+ cells, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 h post-exposure. We next asked whether suppression of zif268 in DCX+ immature cells occurs in other behavioral paradigms that recruit the hippocampus. Exposure to Morris water maze (MWM) training, an enriched environment, or a NE caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 expression among the general granule cell population. The same behavioral procedures activated zif268 expression in 6-week-old BrdU-labeled adult-born neurons, indicating that zif268 suppression is specific to immature neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. NE exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly

  16. Activation of local inhibitory circuits in the dentate gyrus by adult-born neurons.

    PubMed

    Drew, Liam J; Kheirbek, Mazen A; Luna, Victor M; Denny, Christine A; Cloidt, Megan A; Wu, Melody V; Jain, Swati; Scharfman, Helen E; Hen, René

    2016-06-01

    Robust incorporation of new principal cells into pre-existing circuitry in the adult mammalian brain is unique to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). We asked if adult-born granule cells (GCs) might act to regulate processing within the DG by modulating the substantially more abundant mature GCs. Optogenetic stimulation of a cohort of young adult-born GCs (0 to 7 weeks post-mitosis) revealed that these cells activate local GABAergic interneurons to evoke strong inhibitory input to mature GCs. Natural manipulation of neurogenesis by aging-to decrease it-and housing in an enriched environment-to increase it-strongly affected the levels of inhibition. We also demonstrated that elevating activity in adult-born GCs in awake behaving animals reduced the overall number of mature GCs activated by exploration. These data suggest that inhibitory modulation of mature GCs may be an important function of adult-born hippocampal neurons. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26662922

  17. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc4) is required for BDNF-dependent survival of adult-born neurons and spatial memory formation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Quadrato, Giorgia; Benevento, Marco; Alber, Stefanie; Jacob, Carolin; Floriddia, Elisa M; Nguyen, Tuan; Elnaggar, Mohamed Y; Pedroarena, Christine M; Molkentin, Jeffrey D; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2012-06-01

    New neurons generated in the adult dentate gyrus are constantly integrated into the hippocampal circuitry and activated during encoding and recall of new memories. Despite identification of extracellular signals that regulate survival and integration of adult-born neurons such as neurotrophins and neurotransmitters, the nature of the intracellular modulators required to transduce those signals remains elusive. Here, we provide evidence of the expression and transcriptional activity of nuclear factor of activated T cell c4 (NFATc4) in hippocampal progenitor cells. We show that NFATc4 calcineurin-dependent activity is required selectively for survival of adult-born neurons in response to BDNF signaling. Indeed, cyclosporin A injection and stereotaxic delivery of the BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc in the mouse dentate gyrus reduce the survival of hippocampal adult-born neurons in wild-type but not in NFATc4(-/-) mice and do not affect the net rate of neural precursor proliferation and their fate commitment. Furthermore, associated with the reduced survival of adult-born neurons, the absence of NFATc4 leads to selective defects in LTP and in the encoding of hippocampal-dependent spatial memories. Thus, our data demonstrate that NFATc4 is essential in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and identify NFATc4 as a central player of BDNF-driven prosurvival signaling in hippocampal adult-born neurons. PMID:22586092

  18. In vivo imaging of dendritic pruning in dentate granule cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J Tiago; Bloyd, Cooper W; Shtrahman, Matthew; Johnston, Stephen T; Schafer, Simon T; Parylak, Sarah L; Tran, Thanh; Chang, Tina; Gage, Fred H

    2016-06-01

    We longitudinally imaged the developing dendrites of adult-born mouse dentate granule cells (DGCs) in vivo and found that they underwent over-branching and pruning. Exposure to an enriched environment and constraint of dendritic growth by disrupting Wnt signaling led to increased branch addition and accelerated growth, which were, however, counteracted by earlier and more extensive pruning. Our results indicate that pruning is regulated in a homeostatic fashion to oppose excessive branching and promote a similar dendrite structure in DGCs. PMID:27135217

  19. Assigning Function to Adult-Born Neurons: A Theoretical Framework for Characterizing Neural Manipulation of Learning

    PubMed Central

    Hersman, Sarah; Rodriguez Barrera, Vanessa; Fanselow, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscientists are concerned with neural processes or computations, but these may not be directly observable. In the field of learning, a behavioral procedure is observed to lead to performance outcomes, but differing inferences on underlying internal processes can lead to difficulties in interpreting conflicting results. An example of this challenge is how many functions have been attributed to adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus. Some of these functions were suggested by computational models of the properties of these neurons, while others were hypothesized after manipulations of adult-born neurons resulted in changes to behavioral metrics. This review seeks to provide a framework, based in learning theory classification of behavioral procedures, of the processes that may be underlying behavioral results after manipulating procedure and observing performance. We propose that this framework can serve to clarify experimental findings on adult-born neurons as well as other classes of neural manipulations and their effects on behavior. PMID:26778981

  20. RNA Granules in Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Seydoux, Geraldine; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Nagamori, Ippei

    2011-01-01

    “Germ granules” are cytoplasmic, nonmembrane-bound organelles unique to germline. Germ granules share components with the P bodies and stress granules of somatic cells, but also contain proteins and RNAs uniquely required for germ cell development. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of germ granule assembly, dynamics, and function. One hypothesis is that germ granules operate as hubs for the posttranscriptional control of gene expression, a function at the core of the germ cell differentiation program. PMID:21768607

  1. Autocrine action of BDNF on dendrite development of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Chang, Xingya; She, Liang; Xu, Duo; Huang, Wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-06-01

    Dendrite development of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus is critical for their incorporation into existing hippocampal circuits, but the cellular mechanisms regulating their dendrite development remains largely unclear. In this study, we examined the function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is expressed in adult-born GCs, in regulating their dendrite morphogenesis. Using retrovirus-mediated gene transfection, we found that deletion and overexpression of BDNF in adult-born GCs resulted in the reduction and elevation of dendrite growth, respectively. This effect was mainly due to the autocrine rather than paracrine action of BDNF, because deletion of BDNF only in the newborn GCs resulted in dendrite abnormality of these neurons to a similar extent as that observed in conditional knockout (cKO) mice with BDNF deleted in the entire forebrain. Furthermore, selective expression of BDNF in adult-born GCs in BDNF cKO mice fully restored normal dendrite development. The BDNF autocrine action was also required for the development of normal density of spines and normal percentage of spines containing the postsynaptic marker PSD-95, suggesting autocrine BDNF regulation of synaptogenesis. Furthermore, increased dendrite growth of adult-born GCs caused by voluntary exercise was abolished by BDNF deletion specifically in these neurons and elevated dendrite growth due to BDNF overexpression in these neurons was prevented by reducing neuronal activity with coexpression of inward rectifier potassium channels, consistent with activity-dependent autocrine BDNF secretion. Therefore, BDNF expressed in adult-born GCs plays a critical role in dendrite development by acting as an autocrine factor. PMID:26041908

  2. Cytogenesis in the adult monkey motor cortex: Perivascular NG2 cells are the major adult born cell type

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Gregory B; Kohler, Shawn J; Boklweski, Jennifer; Cameron, Judy L; Greenough, William T

    2015-01-01

    We used confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to look for new cells in the motor cortex of adult macaque monkeys that might form the cellular bases of improved brain function from exercise. Twenty-four female Macaca fascicularis monkeys divided into groups by age (10–12 years, 15–17 years), postexercise survival periods, and controls, received 10 weekly injections of the thymidine analog, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mark new cells. Sixteen monkeys survived 15 weeks (5 weeks postexercise) and 8 monkeys survived 27 weeks (12 weeks postexercise) after initial BrdU injections. Additionally, five Macaca mulatta female monkeys (∼5.5–7 years) received single injections of BrdU and survived 2 days, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks after BrdU injections. Neural and glial antibodies were used to identify new cell phenotypes and to look for changes in proportions of these cells with respect to time and experimental conditions. No BrdU+/DCx+ cells were found but about 7.5% of new cells were calretinin-positive (Cr+). BrdU+/GABA+ (gamma-aminobutyric acid) cells were also found but no new Cr+ or GABA+ cells colabeled with a mature neuron marker, NeuN or chondroitin sulfate antibody, NG2. The proportion of new cells that were NG2+ was about 85% for short and long survival monkeys of which two, newly described perivascular phenotypes (Pldv and Elu) and a small percentage of pericytes (2.5%) comprised 44% and 51% of the new NG2+ cells, respectively. Proportions of NG2+ phenotypes were affected by post-BrdU survival periods, monkey age, and possibly a postexercise sedentary period but no direct effect of exercise was found. PMID:25308320

  3. Iron granules in plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, M K; Madden, M

    1982-01-01

    The curious and unusual finding of coarse iron granules in marrow plasma cells is reported in 13 patients, in whom the finding was incidental. In 10 of these patients there was known alcohol abuse and serious medical complications of that abuse. Previous reports of the finding are reviewed. Haematological data of the 13 patients are presented. A hypothesis is outlined which may account for the finding. Images PMID:7068907

  4. Mature granule cells of the dentate gyrus-Passive bystanders or principal performers in hippocampal function?

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rojas, Jeffrey; Kreutz, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    The dentate gyrus is the main entrance of highly processed information to the hippocampus which derives from associative cortices and it is one of the few privileged areas in the brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. This creates the unique situation that neurons of diverse maturation stages are part of one neuronal network at any given point in life. While recently adult-born cells have a low induction threshold for long-term potentiation several studies suggest that following maturation granule cells are poorly excitable and they exhibit reduced Hebbian synaptic plasticity to an extent that it was even suggested that they functionally retire. Here, we review the functional properties of mature granule cells and discuss how plasticity of intrinsic excitability and alterations in excitation-inhibition balance might impact on their role in hippocampal information processing. PMID:26949226

  5. Mast cell secretory granules: armed for battle.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Sara; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells of the immune system and recent studies show that they have immunomodulatory roles in diverse processes in both health and disease. Mast cells are distinguished by their high content of electron-dense secretory granules, which are filled with large amounts of preformed and pre-activated immunomodulatory compounds. When appropriately activated, mast cells undergo degranulation, a process by which these preformed granule compounds are rapidly released into the surroundings. In many cases, the effects that mast cells have on an immune response are closely associated with the biological actions of the granule compounds that they release, as exemplified by the recent studies showing that mast cell granule proteases account for many of the protective and detrimental effects of mast cells in various inflammatory settings. In this Review, we discuss the current knowledge of mast cell secretory granules. PMID:24903914

  6. Modulation of adult-born neurons in the inflamed hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Belarbi, Karim; Rosi, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Throughout life new neurons are continuously added to the hippocampal circuitry involved with spatial learning and memory. These new cells originate from neural precursors in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, migrate into the granule cell layer, and integrate into neural networks encoding spatial and contextual information. This process can be influenced by several environmental and endogenous factors and is modified in different animal models of neurological disorders. Neuroinflammation, as defined by the presence of activated microglia, is a common key factor to the progression of neurological disorders. Analysis of the literature shows that microglial activation impacts not only the production, but also the migration and the recruitment of new neurons. The impact of microglia on adult-born neurons appears much more multifaceted than ever envisioned before, combining both supportive and detrimental effects that are dependent upon the activation phenotype and the factors being released. The development of strategies aimed to change microglia toward states that promote functional neurogenesis could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities against neurological disorders associated with cognitive deficits and neuroinflammation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on how production, distribution, and recruitment of new neurons into behaviorally relevant neural networks are modified in the inflamed hippocampus. PMID:24046730

  7. Maternal immune activation differentially impacts mature and adult-born hippocampal neurons in male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; van Praag, Henriette

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in the hippocampus, a brain area important for learning and memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus develops both before and after birth. To study the relative contribution of mature and adult-born DG granule cells to disease etiology, we compared both cell populations in a mouse model of psychiatric illness resulting from maternal immune activation. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (PolyIC, 5mg/kg) or saline was given on gestation day 15 to pregnant female C57Bl/6 mice. Male offspring (n=105), was administered systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, 50mg/kg) (n=52) or intracerebral retroviral injection into the DG (n=53), to label dividing cells at one month of age. Two months later behavioral tests were performed to evaluate disease phenotype. Immunohistochemistry and whole-cell patch clamping were used to assess morphological and physiological characteristics of DG cells. Three-month-old PolyIC exposed male offspring exhibited deficient pre-pulse inhibition, spatial maze performance and motor coordination, as well as increased depression-like behavior. Histological analysis showed reduced DG volume and parvalbumin positive interneuron number. Both mature and new hippocampal neurons showed modifications in intrinsic properties such as increased input resistance and lower current threshold, and decreased action potential number. Reduced GABAergic inhibitory transmission was observed only in mature DG neurons. Differential impairments in mature DG cells and adult-born new neurons may have implications for behavioral deficits associated with maternal immune activation. PMID:25449671

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor interacts with adult-born immature cells in the dentate gyrus during consolidation of overlapping memories

    PubMed Central

    Bekinschtein, Pedro; Kent, Brianne A; Oomen, Charlotte A; Clemenson, Gregory D; Gage, Fred H; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Successful memory involves not only remembering information over time but also keeping memories distinct and less confusable. The computational process for making representations of similar input patterns more distinct from each other has been referred to as “pattern separation.” Although adult-born immature neurons have been implicated in this memory feature, the precise role of these neurons and associated molecules in the processing of overlapping memories is unknown. Recently, we found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dentate gyrus is required for the encoding/consolidation of overlapping memories. In this study, we provide evidence that consolidation of these “pattern-separated” memories requires the action of BDNF on immature neurons specifically. PMID:24825389

  9. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  10. Different subsets of newborn granule cells: a possible role in epileptogenesis?

    PubMed

    Bielefeld, Pascal; van Vliet, Erwin A; Gorter, Jan A; Lucassen, Paul J; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    Several factors, including epileptic seizures, can strongly stimulate ongoing neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. Although adult-born granule cells generated after seizure activity have different physiological properties from their normal counterparts, they integrate into the existing, mature network of the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, the exact role of the neurogenic response during epilepsy and its possible involvement in epileptogenesis have remained elusive. Here, we discuss recent studies shedding new light on the interplay between epilepsy and neurogenesis, and try to explain discrepancies in this literature by proposing seizure severity-dependent induction of two subsets of newborn cells with different properties. We hypothesise that a low seizure intensity would stimulate neurogenesis to a 'physiological plasticity' level and have few pathological consequences. In contrast, a high initial seizure intensity may induce a specific subset of altered and/or ectopically located new granule cells with different electrophysiological properties that could initiate hyperexcitatory recurrent networks that could, in turn, contribute to chronic epilepsy. This hypothesis may clarify previously contradictory data in the literature, and could thereby aid in our understanding of the role of neurogenesis in epileptogenesis, and open up promising avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24387591

  11. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offset the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predicts a net increase in granule cell >> CA3 innervation. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell >> CA3 communication. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25600212

  12. Single granule cells excite Golgi cells and evoke feedback inhibition in the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Daniel B; Trussell, Laurence O

    2015-03-18

    In cerebellum-like circuits, synapses from thousands of granule cells converge onto principal cells. This fact, combined with theoretical considerations, has led to the concept that granule cells encode afferent input as a population and that spiking in individual granule cells is relatively unimportant. However, granule cells also provide excitatory input to Golgi cells, each of which provide inhibition to hundreds of granule cells. We investigated whether spiking in individual granule cells could recruit Golgi cells and thereby trigger widespread inhibition in slices of mouse cochlear nucleus. Using paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, trains of action potentials at 100 Hz in single granule cells was sufficient to evoke spikes in Golgi cells in ∼40% of paired granule-to-Golgi cell recordings. High-frequency spiking in single granule cells evoked IPSCs in ∼5% of neighboring granule cells, indicating that bursts of activity in single granule cells can recruit feedback inhibition from Golgi cells. Moreover, IPSPs mediated by single Golgi cell action potentials paused granule cell firing, suggesting that inhibitory events recruited by activity in single granule cells were able to control granule cell firing. These results suggest a previously unappreciated relationship between population coding and bursting in single granule cells by which spiking in a small number of granule cells may have an impact on the activity of a much larger number of granule cells. PMID:25788690

  13. Ultrastructural similarity between bat and human mast cell secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Oliani, S M; Vugman, I; Jamur, M C

    1993-01-01

    Mast cells in the tongue of the bat (Artibeus lituratus) show a well-developed Golgi area and abundant mitochondria in the granule-free perinuclear cytoplasm. Rough endoplasmic reticulum profiles, free ribosomes, mitochondria, bundles of filaments and a great number of secretory granules are found throughout the remaining cytoplasm. The granules, of various shapes and sizes, are simple containing an electron-dense, homogeneous matrix, coarse particles or cylindrical scrolls, or combinations (cylindrical scrolls with either electron-dense, homogeneous matrix or coarse particle contents). Up to now, scroll-containing granules have been considered to be a unique feature of human mast cells. PMID:8453310

  14. New insights into the role of hilar ectopic granule cells in the dentate gyrus based on quantitative anatomic analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, Helen E.; Pierce, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The dentate gyrus is one of two main areas of the mammalian brain where neurons are born throughout adulthood, a phenomenon called postnatal neurogenesis. Most of the neurons that are generated are granule cells (GCs), the major principal cell type in the dentate gyrus. Some adult-born granule cells develop in ectopic locations, such as the dentate hilus. The generation of hilar ectopic granule cells (HEGCs) is greatly increased in several animal models of epilepsy and has also been demonstrated in surgical specimens from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Herein we review the results of our quantitative neuroanatomic analysis of HEGCs that were filled with Neurobiotin following electrophysiologic characterization in hippocampal slices. The data suggest that two types of HEGCs exist, based on a proximal or distal location of the cell body relative to the granule cell layer, and based on the location of most of the dendrites, in the molecular layer or hilus. Three-dimensional reconstruction revealed that the dendrites of distal HEGCs can extend along the transverse and longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. Analysis of axons demonstrated that HEGCs have projections that contribute to the normal mossy fiber innervation of CA3 as well as the abnormal sprouted fibers in the inner molecular layer of epileptic rodents (mossy fiber sprouting). These data support the idea that HEGCs could function as a “hub” cell in the dentate gyrus and play a critical role in network excitability. PMID:22612815

  15. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas. PMID:26105026

  16. Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Kate; Mathy, Alexandre; Duguid, Ian; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.001 PMID:26083712

  17. Multimodal sensory integration in single cerebellar granule cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Taro; Shimuta, Misa; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is a highly multimodal structure, receiving inputs from multiple sensory modalities and integrating them during complex sensorimotor coordination tasks. Previously, using cell-type-specific anatomical projection mapping, it was shown that multimodal pathways converge onto individual cerebellar granule cells (Huang et al., 2013). Here we directly measure synaptic currents using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and confirm that a subset of single granule cells receive convergent functional multimodal (somatosensory, auditory, and visual) inputs via separate mossy fibers. Furthermore, we show that the integration of multimodal signals by granule cells can enhance action potential output. These recordings directly demonstrate functional convergence of multimodal signals onto single granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12916.001 PMID:26714108

  18. Accumulation of abnormal adult-generated hippocampal granule cells predicts seizure frequency and severity

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Michael S.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of abnormally integrated, adult-born, hippocampal dentate granule cells (DGC) is hypothesized to contribute to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). DGCs have long been implicated in TLE, as they regulate excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit neuroplastic changes during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, DGCs are unusual in that they are continually generated throughout life, with aberrant integration of new cells underlying the majority of restructuring in the dentate during epileptogenesis. While it is known that these abnormal networks promote abnormal neuronal firing and hyperexcitability, it has yet to be established whether they directly contribute to seizure generation. If abnormal DGCs do contribute, a reasonable prediction would be that the severity of epilepsy will be correlated with the number or load of abnormal DGCs. To test this prediction, we utilized a conditional, inducible transgenic mouse model to fate-map adult-generated DGCs. Mossy cell loss, also implicated in epileptogenesis, was assessed as well. Transgenic mice rendered epileptic using the pilocarpine-status epilepticus model of epilepsy were monitored 24/7 by video/EEG for four weeks to determine seizure frequency and severity. Positive correlations were found between seizure frequency and: 1) the percentage of hilar ectopic DGCs, 2) the amount of mossy fiber sprouting and 3) the extent of mossy cell death. In addition, mossy fiber sprouting and mossy cell death were correlated with seizure severity. These studies provide correlative evidence in support of the hypothesis that abnormal DGCs contribute to the development of TLE, and also support a role for mossy cell loss. PMID:23699504

  19. UNUSUAL EOSINOPHILIC GRANULE CELL PROLIFERATION IN COHO SALMON (ONCHORHYNCHUS KISUTCH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proliferative lesions comprised of eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) extended throughout the gastrointestinal tract of several mature, spawning coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum). istological examination of the tumour showed extensive proliferation and infiltration of EGC...

  20. Human NK cell lytic granules and regulation of their exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells form a subset of lymphocytes that play a key role in immuno-surveillance and host defense against cancer and viral infections. They recognize stressed cells through a variety of germline-encoded activating cell surface receptors and utilize their cytotoxic ability to eliminate abnormal cells. Killing of target cells is a complex, multi-stage process that concludes in the directed secretion of lytic granules, containing perforin and granzymes, at the immunological synapse. Upon delivery to a target cell, perforin mediates generation of pores in membranes of target cells, allowing granzymes to access target cell cytoplasm and induce apoptosis. Therefore, lytic granules of NK cells are indispensable for normal NK cell cytolytic function. Indeed, defects in lytic granule secretion lead or are related to serious and often fatal diseases, such as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) type 2–5 or Griscelli syndrome type 2. A number of reports highlight the role of several proteins involved in lytic granule release and NK cell-mediated killing of tumor cells. This review focuses on lytic granules of human NK cells and the advancements in understanding the mechanisms controlling their exocytosis. PMID:23162553

  1. Effects of spaced learning in the water maze on development of dentate granule cells generated in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Trinchero, Mariela F; Koehl, Muriel; Bechakra, Malik; Delage, Pauline; Charrier, Vanessa; Grosjean, Noelle; Ladeveze, Elodie; Schinder, Alejandro F; Abrous, D Nora

    2015-11-01

    New dentate granule cells (GCs) are generated in the hippocampus throughout life. These adult-born neurons are required for spatial learning in the Morris water maze (MWM). In rats, spatial learning shapes the network by regulating their number and dendritic development. Here, we explored whether such modulatory effects exist in mice. New GCs were tagged using thymidine analogs or a GFP-expressing retrovirus. Animals were exposed to a reference memory protocol for 10-14 days (spaced training) at different times after newborn cells labeling. Cell proliferation, cell survival, cell death, neuronal phenotype, and dendritic and spine development were examined using immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, spatial learning did not modify any of the parameters under scrutiny including cell number and dendritic morphology. These results suggest that although new GCs are required in mice for spatial learning in the MWM, they are, at least for the developmental intervals analyzed here, refractory to behavioral stimuli generated in the course of learning in the MWM. PMID:25740272

  2. Inhibition of Cerebellar Granule Cell Turning by Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Tatsuro; Komuro, Yutaro; Li, Ying; Hu, Taofang; Wang, Zhe; Littner, Yoav; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic neurons are often found in the brains of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) patients, suggesting that alcohol exposure impairs neuronal cell migration. Although it has been reported that alcohol decreases the speed of neuronal cell migration, little is known about whether alcohol also affects the turning of neurons. Here we show that ethanol exposure inhibits the turning of cerebellar granule cells in vivo and in vitro. First, in vivo studies using P10 mice demonstrated that a single i.p. injection of ethanol not only reduces the number of turning granule cells but also alters the mode of turning at the EGL-ML border of the cerebellum. Second, in vitro analysis using microexplant cultures of P0-P3 mouse cerebella revealed that ethanol directly reduces the frequency of spontaneous granule cell turning in a dose-dependent manner. Third, the action of ethanol on the frequency of granule cell turning was significantly ameliorated by stimulating Ca2+ and cGMP signaling or by inhibiting cAMP signaling. Taken together, these results indicate that ethanol affects the frequency and mode of cerebellar granule cell turning through alteration of the Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways, suggesting that the abnormal allocation of neurons found in the brains of FASD and FSA patients results, at least in part, from impaired turning of immature neurons by alcohol. PMID:20691765

  3. Characterization of Mast Cell Secretory Granules and Their Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition. PMID:24988214

  4. Abnormal ion content, hydration and granule expansion of the secretory granules from cystic fibrosis airway glandular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baconnais, S.; Delavoie, F. |; Zahm, J.M.; Milliot, M.; Castillon, N.; Terryn, C.; Banchet, V.; Michel, J.; Danos, O.; Merten, M.; Chinet, T.; Zierold, K.; Bonnet, N.; Puchelle, E. , E-Mail: edith.puchelle@univ-reims.fr; Balossier, G.

    2005-10-01

    The absence or decreased expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) induces increased Na{sup +} absorption and hyperabsorption of the airway surface liquid (ASL) resulting in a dehydrated and hyperviscous ASL. Although the implication of abnormal airway submucosal gland function has been suggested, the ion and water content in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) glandular secretory granules, before exocytosis, is unknown. We analyzed, in non-CF and CF human airway glandular cell lines (MM-39 and KM4, respectively), the ion content in the secretory granules by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and the water content by quantitative dark field imaging on freeze-dried cryosections. We demonstrated that the ion content (Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, P, S and Cl{sup -}) is significantly higher and the water content significantly lower in secretory granules from the CF cell line compared to the non-CF cell line. Using videomicroscopy, we observed that the secretory granule expansion was deficient in CF glandular cells. Transfection of CF cells with CFTR cDNA or inhibition of non-CF cells with CFTR{sub inh}-172, respectively restored or decreased the water content and granule expansion, in parallel with changes in ion content. We hypothesize that the decreased water and increased ion content in glandular secretory granules may contribute to the dehydration and increased viscosity of the ASL in CF.

  5. Asymmetric cell division of granule neuron progenitors in the external granule layer of the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Sivaprakasam, Iswariya; Periasamy, Vinod; Govindan, Subashika; Mani, Shyamala

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plane of division of granule neuron progenitors (GNPs) was analysed with respect to the pial surface in P0 to P14 cerebellum and the results showed that there was a significant bias towards the plane of cell division being parallel to pial surface across this developmental window. In addition, the distribution of β-Catenin in anaphase cells was analysed, which showed that there was a significant asymmetry in the distribution of β-Catenin in dividing GNPs. Further, inhibition of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signalling had an effect on plane of cell division. Asymmetric distribution of β-Catenin was shown to occur towards the source of a localized extracellular cue. PMID:25979710

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury Causes Aberrant Migration of Adult-Born Neurons in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Sara; Hu, Weipeng; Wang, Xiaoting; Gao, Xiang; He, Chunyan; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) promotes neural stem/progenitor cell (NSC) proliferation in an attempt to initiate innate repair mechanisms. However, all immature neurons in the CNS are required to migrate from their birthplace to their final destination to develop into functional neurons. Here we assessed the destination of adult-born neurons following TBI. We found that a large percentage of immature neurons migrated past their normal stopping site at the inner granular cell layer (GCL), and became misplaced in the outer GCL of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The aberrant migration of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus occurred 48 hours after TBI, and lasted for 8 weeks, resulting in a great number of newly generated neurons misplaced in the outer GCL in the hippocampus. Those misplaced neurons were able to become mature and differentiate into granular neurons, but located ectopically in the outer GCL with reduced dendritic complexity after TBI. The adult-born neurons at the misplaced position may make wrong connections with inappropriate nearby targets in the pre-existing neural network. These results suggest that although stimulation of endogenous NSCs following TBI might offer new avenues for cell-based therapy, additional intervention is required to further enhance successful neurogenesis for repairing the damaged brain. PMID:26898165

  7. Signal transduction pathways in mast cell granule-mediated endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Smirnova, Irina; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that incubation of human endothelial cells with mast cell granules results in potentiation of lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. AIMS: The objective of the present study was to identify candidate molecules and signal transduction pathways involved in the synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide on endothelial cell activation. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with rat mast cell granules in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and IL-6 production was quantified. The status of c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation and intracellular calcium levels were determined to identify the mechanism of synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccaride. RESULTS: Mast cell granules induced low levels of interleukin-6 production by endothelial cells, and this effect was markedly enhanced by lipopolysaccharide. The results revealed that both serine proteases and histamine present in mast cell granules were involved in this activation process. Mast cell granules increased intracellular calcium, and activated c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The combination of lipopolysaccharide and mast cell granules prolonged c-Jun amino-terminal kinase activity beyond the duration of induction by either stimulant alone and was entirely due to active proteases. However, both proteases and histamine contributed to calcium mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB proteins was of greater magnitude in endothelial cells treated with the combination of mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide. CONCLUSIONS:Mast cell granule serine proteases and histamine can amplify lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial cell activation, which involves calcium mobilization, mitogen

  8. Synaptic Integration of Adult-Born Hippocampal Neurons Is Locally Controlled by Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Sébastien; Li, Liyi; Moss, Jonathan; Petrelli, Francesco; Cassé, Frédéric; Gebara, Elias; Lopatar, Jan; Pfrieger, Frank W; Bezzi, Paola; Bischofberger, Josef; Toni, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Adult neurogenesis is regulated by the neurogenic niche, through mechanisms that remain poorly defined. Here, we investigated whether niche-constituting astrocytes influence the maturation of adult-born hippocampal neurons using two independent transgenic approaches to block vesicular release from astrocytes. In these models, adult-born neurons but not mature neurons showed reduced glutamatergic synaptic input and dendritic spine density that was accompanied with lower functional integration and cell survival. By taking advantage of the mosaic expression of transgenes in astrocytes, we found that spine density was reduced exclusively in segments intersecting blocked astrocytes, revealing an extrinsic, local control of spine formation. Defects in NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic transmission and dendrite maturation were partially restored by exogenous D-serine, whose extracellular level was decreased in transgenic models. Together, these results reveal a critical role for adult astrocytes in local dendritic spine maturation, which is necessary for the NMDAR-dependent functional integration of newborn neurons. PMID:26606999

  9. Rapid Feedforward Inhibition and Asynchronous Excitation Regulate Granule Cell Activity in the Mammalian Main Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Granule cell-mediated inhibition is critical to patterning principal neuron activity in the olfactory bulb, and perturbation of synaptic input to granule cells significantly alters olfactory-guided behavior. Despite the critical role of granule cells in olfaction, little is known about how sensory input recruits granule cells. Here, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute mouse olfactory bulb slices with biophysical multicompartmental modeling to investigate the synaptic basis of granule cell recruitment. Physiological activation of sensory afferents within single glomeruli evoked diverse modes of granule cell activity, including subthreshold depolarization, spikelets, and suprathreshold responses with widely distributed spike latencies. The generation of these diverse activity modes depended, in part, on the asynchronous time course of synaptic excitation onto granule cells, which lasted several hundred milliseconds. In addition to asynchronous excitation, each granule cell also received synchronous feedforward inhibition. This inhibition targeted both proximal somatodendritic and distal apical dendritic domains of granule cells, was reliably recruited across sniff rhythms, and scaled in strength with excitation as more glomeruli were activated. Feedforward inhibition onto granule cells originated from deep short-axon cells, which responded to glomerular activation with highly reliable, short-latency firing consistent with tufted cell-mediated excitation. Simulations showed that feedforward inhibition interacts with asynchronous excitation to broaden granule cell spike latency distributions and significantly attenuates granule cell depolarization within local subcellular compartments. Collectively, our results thus identify feedforward inhibition onto granule cells as a core feature of olfactory bulb circuitry and establish asynchronous excitation and feedforward inhibition as critical regulators of granule cell activity. SIGNIFICANCE

  10. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  11. The Role of Adult-Born Neurons in the Constantly Changing Olfactory Bulb Network

    PubMed Central

    Malvaut, Sarah; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2016-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain is remarkably plastic and constantly undergoes structurofunctional modifications in response to environmental stimuli. In many regions plasticity is manifested by modifications in the efficacy of existing synaptic connections or synapse formation and elimination. In a few regions, however, plasticity is brought by the addition of new neurons that integrate into established neuronal networks. This type of neuronal plasticity is particularly prominent in the olfactory bulb (OB) where thousands of neuronal progenitors are produced on a daily basis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) towards the OB. In the OB, these neuronal precursors differentiate into local interneurons, mature, and functionally integrate into the bulbar network by establishing output synapses with principal neurons. Despite continuous progress, it is still not well understood how normal functioning of the OB is preserved in the constantly remodelling bulbar network and what role adult-born neurons play in odor behaviour. In this review we will discuss different levels of morphofunctional plasticity effected by adult-born neurons and their functional role in the adult OB and also highlight the possibility that different subpopulations of adult-born cells may fulfill distinct functions in the OB neuronal network and odor behaviour. PMID:26839709

  12. Localization of human intestinal defensin 5 in Paneth cell granules.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, E M; Liu, L; Oren, A; Anton, P A; Ganz, T

    1997-01-01

    Antibiotic peptides of higher animals include the defensins, first discovered in phagocytic cells but recently also found to be produced by epithelial cells. We biosynthesized recombinant human intestinal defensin 5 (rHD-5) using the baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Since insect cells process defensin incompletely and secrete the precursor proHD-5, we substituted a methionine for an alanine at a likely processing site to allow selective chemical cleavage with cyanogen bromide, and rHD-5 was used to elicit polyclonal antibodies. By the immunoperoxidase-staining technique, the antibodies selectively stained Paneth cells of the normal adult small intestine. Immunogold electron microscopy further localized HD-5 to the Paneth cell secretory granules. Since some defensins exert activity cytotoxic to mammalian cells, we assayed the effect of rHD-5 on the human intestinal cell lines Caco2 and Int407. proHD-5 did not exert cytotoxic activity, and rHD-5 showed only minimal activity against Int407 and was inert against Caco2. Since Paneth cells release their granules adjacent to the mitotic cells of the intestinal crypts, HD could protect this cell population against invasion and parasitization by microbes. PMID:9169779

  13. Control of cerebellar granule cell output by sensory-evoked Golgi cell inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duguid, Ian; Branco, Tiago; Chadderton, Paul; Arlt, Charlotte; Powell, Kate; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Classical feed-forward inhibition involves an excitation–inhibition sequence that enhances the temporal precision of neuronal responses by narrowing the window for synaptic integration. In the input layer of the cerebellum, feed-forward inhibition is thought to preserve the temporal fidelity of granule cell spikes during mossy fiber stimulation. Although this classical feed-forward inhibitory circuit has been demonstrated in vitro, the extent to which inhibition shapes granule cell sensory responses in vivo remains unresolved. Here we combined whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in vivo and dynamic clamp recordings in vitro to directly assess the impact of Golgi cell inhibition on sensory information transmission in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. We show that the majority of granule cells in Crus II of the cerebrocerebellum receive sensory-evoked phasic and spillover inhibition prior to mossy fiber excitation. This preceding inhibition reduces granule cell excitability and sensory-evoked spike precision, but enhances sensory response reproducibility across the granule cell population. Our findings suggest that neighboring granule cells and Golgi cells can receive segregated and functionally distinct mossy fiber inputs, enabling Golgi cells to regulate the size and reproducibility of sensory responses. PMID:26432880

  14. Menin immunoreactivity in secretory granules of human pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Debelenko, Larisa V; Agarwal, Sunita; Du, Qiang; Yan, Wusheng; Erickson, Heidi S; Abu-Asab, Mones; Raffeld, Mark A; Libutti, Steven K; Marx, Stephen J; Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The protein product of the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I (MEN1) gene is thought to be involved in predominantly nuclear functions; however, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis data on cellular localization are conflicting. To further investigate menin expression, we analyzed human pancreas (an MEN1 target organ) using IHC analyses and 6 antibodies raised against full-length menin or its peptides. In 10 normal pancreas specimens, 2 independently raised antibodies showed unexpected cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in peripheral cells in each islet examined (over 100 total across all 10 patients). The staining exhibited a distinct punctate pattern and subsequent immunoelectron microscopy indicated the target antigen was in secretory granules. Exocrine pancreas and pancreatic stroma were not immunoreactive. In MEN1 patients, unaffected islets stained similar to those in normal samples but with a more peripheral location of positive cells, whereas hyperplastic islets and tumorlets showed increased and diffuse cytoplasmic staining, respectively. Endocrine tumors from MEN1 patients were negative for menin, consistent with a 2-hit loss of a tumor suppressor gene. Secretory granule localization of menin in a subset of islet cells suggests a function of the protein unique to a target organ of familial endocrine neoplasia, although the IHC data must be interpreted with some caution because of the possibility of antibody cross-reaction. The identity, cellular trafficking, and role of this putative secretory granule-form of menin warrant additional investigation. PMID:25153502

  15. Disinhibition of olfactory bulb granule cells accelerates odour discrimination in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells are the dominant cell type of the olfactory bulb inhibiting mitral and tufted cells via dendrodendritic synapses; yet the factors regulating the strength of their inhibitory output, and, therefore, their impact on odour discrimination, remain unknown. Here we show that GABAAR β3-subunits are distributed in a somatodendritic pattern, mostly sparing the large granule cell spines also known as gemmules. Granule cell-selective deletion of β3-subunits nearly abolishes spontaneous and muscimol-induced currents mediated by GABAA receptors in granule cells, yet recurrent inhibition of mitral cells is strongly enhanced. Mice with disinhibited granule cells require less time to discriminate both dissimilar as well as highly similar odourants, while discrimination learning remains unaffected. Hence, granule cells are controlled by an inhibitory drive that in turn tunes mitral cell inhibition. As a consequence, the olfactory bulb inhibitory network adjusts the speed of early sensory processing. PMID:26592770

  16. Disinhibition of olfactory bulb granule cells accelerates odour discrimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells are the dominant cell type of the olfactory bulb inhibiting mitral and tufted cells via dendrodendritic synapses; yet the factors regulating the strength of their inhibitory output, and, therefore, their impact on odour discrimination, remain unknown. Here we show that GABAAR β3-subunits are distributed in a somatodendritic pattern, mostly sparing the large granule cell spines also known as gemmules. Granule cell-selective deletion of β3-subunits nearly abolishes spontaneous and muscimol-induced currents mediated by GABAA receptors in granule cells, yet recurrent inhibition of mitral cells is strongly enhanced. Mice with disinhibited granule cells require less time to discriminate both dissimilar as well as highly similar odourants, while discrimination learning remains unaffected. Hence, granule cells are controlled by an inhibitory drive that in turn tunes mitral cell inhibition. As a consequence, the olfactory bulb inhibitory network adjusts the speed of early sensory processing. PMID:26592770

  17. Afferent-target cell interactions in the cerebellum: negative effect of granule cells on Purkinje cell development in lurcher mice.

    PubMed

    Doughty, M L; Lohof, A; Selimi, F; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N; Mariani, J

    1999-05-01

    Lurcher (Lc) is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor gene that results in a large, constitutive inward current in the cerebellar Purkinje cells of +/Lc mice. +/Lc Purkinje cells fail to differentiate fully and die during postnatal development. In normal mice, interactions with granule cells promote Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation. Partial destruction of the granule cell population in young +/Lc mice by x irradiation resulted in a significant increase in Purkinje cell dendritic growth and improved cytoplasmic structure but did not prevent Purkinje cell death. These results indicate two components to Purkinje cell abnormalities in +/Lc mice: a retardation/blockade of dendritic development that is mediated by interactions with granule cells and the death of the cell. Thus, the normal trophic effects of granule cell interaction on Purkinje cell development are absent in the +/Lc cerebellum, suggesting that granule cells are powerful regulators of Purkinje cell differentiation. PMID:10212305

  18. Adult-born neurons are necessary for extended contextual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Tronel, Sophie; Belnoue, Laure; Grosjean, Noelle; Revest, Jean-Michel; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo; Koehl, Muriel; Abrous, Djoher Nora

    2012-02-01

    New neurons are continuously produced in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. It has been shown that one of the functions of adult neurogenesis is to support spatial pattern separation, a process that transforms similar memories into nonoverlapping representations. This prompted us to investigate whether adult-born neurons are required for discriminating two contexts, i.e., for identifying a familiar environment and detect any changes introduced in it. We show that depleting adult-born neurons impairs the animal's ability to disambiguate two contexts after extensive training. These data suggest that the continuous production of new dentate neurons plays a crucial role in extracting and separating efficiently contextual representation in order to discriminate features within events. PMID:21049483

  19. Control over the morphology and segregation of Zebrafish germ cell granules during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Markus J; Mackenzie, Natalia C; Dumstrei, Karin; Nakkrasae, La-Iad; Stebler, Jürg; Raz, Erez

    2008-01-01

    Background Zebrafish germ cells contain granular-like structures, organized around the cell nucleus. These structures share common features with polar granules in Drosophila, germinal granules in Xenopus and chromatoid bodies in mice germ cells, such as the localization of the zebrafish Vasa, Piwi and Nanos proteins, among others. Little is known about the structure of these granules as well as their segregation in mitosis during early germ-cell development. Results Using transgenic fish expressing a fluorescently labeled novel component of Zebrafish germ cell granules termed Granulito, we followed the morphology and distribution of the granules. We show that whereas these granules initially exhibit a wide size variation, by the end of the first day of development they become a homogeneous population of medium size granules. We investigated this resizing event and demonstrated the role of microtubules and the minus-end microtubule dependent motor protein Dynein in the process. Last, we show that the function of the germ cell granule resident protein the Tudor domain containing protein-7 (Tdrd7) is required for determination of granule morphology and number. Conclusion Our results suggest that Zebrafish germ cell granules undergo a transformation process, which involves germ cell specific proteins as well as the microtubular network. PMID:18507824

  20. AMPA receptors in cerebellar granule cells during development in culture.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Sluiter, A A; Balázs, R

    1995-06-27

    The survival and maturation of differentiating cerebellar granule cells in culture are known to be promoted by excitatory amino acids (EAAs) which, however, compromise the survival of mature cells. In contrast to the trophic effect, the toxic effect of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropiate (AMPA) could only be elicited when the desensitisation of AMPA receptors was blocked, cyclothiazide being used in this study. Nevertheless, even under these conditions, toxicity induced by AMPA in contrast to kainate was, at 9 DIV, only half of the maximal toxicity attained by 13-16 DIV. Since cellular responses to AMPA depend so dramatically on the maturational stage of granule cells, we examined here whether this characteristic is related to developmental changes in AMPA receptor properties, which may result from changes in the subunit composition of the receptor. In contrast to toxicity, AMPA-induced 45Ca2+ influx (determined in the presence of cyclothiazide and the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801) reached a maximum already at 9 DIV. This also applied to a fraction of the 45Ca2+ uptake which persisted either after Cd2+ application or under Na(+)-free conditions and therefore presumably was mediated directly through AMPA receptor channels. Quantitative analysis of Western blots showed that the amounts of GluR4 and to a lesser extent GluR2/3/4c are substantial already at 2 DIV, remaining fairly constant until 9 DIV, followed by an increase by 16 DIV. However GluR1, which is hardly detectable in granule cells in vivo and is also low early in vitro, increased almost linearly with cultivation time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7554232

  1. Imaging of zymogen granules in fully wet cells: evidence for restricted mechanism of granule growth.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Anaby, Debbie

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of wet SEM imaging technology permits electron microscopy of wet samples. Samples are placed in sealed specimen capsules and are insulated from the vacuum in the SEM chamber by an impermeable, electron-transparent membrane. The complete insulation of the sample from the vacuum allows direct imaging of fully hydrated, whole-mount tissue. In the current work, we demonstrate direct inspection of thick pancreatic tissue slices (above 400 mum). In the case of scanning of the pancreatic surface, the boundaries of intracellular features are seen directly. Thus no unfolding is required to ascertain the actual particle size distribution based on the sizes of the sections. This method enabled us to investigate the true granule size distribution and confirm early studies of improved conformity to a Poisson-like distribution, suggesting that the homotypic granule growth results from a mechanism, which favors the addition of a single unit granule to mature granules. PMID:17557275

  2. Sustained Arc expression in adult-generated granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meconi, Alicia; Lui, Erika; Marrone, Diano F

    2015-08-31

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a critical role in memory formation and maintenance. Fitting this specialized role, the DG has many unique characteristics. In addition to being one of the few places in which new neurons are continually added in adulthood, the region also shows a unique long-term sustained transcriptional response of the immediate-early gene Arc to sensory input. Although we know that adult-generated granule cells are reliably recruited into behaviorally-driven neuronal network, it remains unknown whether they display robust late-phase sustained transcription in response to activity like their developmentally-generated counterparts. Since this late-phase of transcription is required for enduring plasticity, knowing if sustained transcription appears as soon as these cells are incorporated provides information on their potential for plasticity. To address this question, adult F344 rats were injected with BrdU (50mg/kg/day for 5 days) and 4 weeks later explored a novel environment. Arc expression in both BrdU- and BrdU+ neurons was determined 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h, 8h, 12h, or 24h following this behavior. Recently-generated granule cells showed a robust sustained Arc expression following a discrete behavioral experience. These data provide information on a potential mechanism to sculpt the representations of events occurring within hours of each other to create uncorrelated representations of episodes despite a highly excitable population of neurons. PMID:26219984

  3. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity. PMID:27262873

  4. A Mathematical Model of Granule Cell Generation During Mouse Cerebellum Development.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Shoshana R; Legué, Emilie; Aristizábal, Orlando; Joyner, Alexandra L; Peskin, Charles S; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2016-05-01

    Determining the cellular basis of brain growth is an important problem in developmental neurobiology. In the mammalian brain, the cerebellum is particularly amenable to studies of growth because it contains only a few cell types, including the granule cells, which are the most numerous neuronal subtype. Furthermore, in the mouse cerebellum granule cells are generated from granule cell precursors (gcps) in the external granule layer (EGL), from 1 day before birth until about 2 weeks of age. The complexity of the underlying cellular processes (multiple cell behaviors, three spatial dimensions, time-dependent changes) requires a quantitative framework to be fully understood. In this paper, a differential equation-based model is presented, which can be used to estimate temporal changes in granule cell numbers in the EGL. The model includes the proliferation of gcps and their differentiation into granule cells, as well as the process by which granule cells leave the EGL. Parameters describing these biological processes were derived from fitting the model to histological data. This mathematical model should be useful for understanding altered gcp and granule cell behaviors in mouse mutants with abnormal cerebellar development and cerebellar cancers. PMID:27125657

  5. Biochemical and microscopic evidence for the internalization and degradation of heparin-containing mast cell granules by bovine endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, F.M.; Friedman, M.M.; Metcalfe, D.D.

    1985-03-01

    Incubation of (/sup 35/S)heparin-containing mast cell granules with cultured bovine endothelial cells was followed by the appearance of /sup 35/S-granule-associated radioactivity within the endothelial cells and a decrease in radioactivity in the extracellular fluid. These changes occurred during the first 24 hours of incubation and suggested ingestion of the mast cell granules by the endothelial cells. Periodic electron microscopic examination of the monolayers confirmed this hypothesis by demonstrating apposition of the granules to the plasmalemma of endothelial cells, which was followed by the engulfment of the granules by cytoplasmic projections. Under light microscopic examination, mast cell granules within endothelial cells then appeared to undergo degradation. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)heparin in mast cell granules was demonstrated by a decrease in the amount of intracellular (/sup 35/S)heparin proteoglycan after 24 hours and the appearance of free (/sup 35/S)sulfate in the extracellular compartment. Intact endothelial cells were more efficient at degrading (/sup 35/S)heparin than were cell lysates or cell supernatants. These data provide evidence of the ability of endothelial cells to ingest mast cell granules and degrade native heparin that is presented as a part of the mast cell granule.

  6. Enhanced CREB phosphorylation in immature dentate gyrus granule cells precedes neurotrophin expression and indicates a specific role of CREB in granule cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R. A.; Lauterborn, J. C.; Gall, C. M.; Cariaga, W.; Baram, T. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation and maturation of dentate gyrus granule cells requires coordinated interactions of numerous processes. These must be regulated by protein factors capable of integrating signals mediated through diverse signalling pathways. Such integrators of inter and intracellular physiological stimuli include the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), a leucine-zipper class transcription factor that is activated through phosphorylation. Neuronal activity and neurotrophic factors, known to be involved in granule cell differentiation, are major physiologic regulators of CREB function. To examine whether CREB may play a role in governing coordinated gene transcription during granule cell differentiation, we determined the spatial and temporal profiles of phosphorylated (activated) CREB throughout postnatal development in immature rat hippocampus. We demonstrate that CREB activation is confined to discrete, early stages of granule cell differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation occurs prior to expression of the neurotrophins BDNF and NT-3. These data indicate that in a signal transduction cascade connecting CREB and neurotrophins in the process of granule cell maturation, CREB is located upstream of neurotrophins. Importantly, CREB may be a critical component of the machinery regulating the coordinated transcription of genes contributing to the differentiation of granule cells and their integration into the dentate gyrus network. PMID:11207803

  7. Sequestration of Highly Expressed mRNAs in Cytoplasmic Granules, P-Bodies, and Stress Granules Enhances Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lavut, Anna; Raveh, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses indicate that a core 10%–15% of the yeast genome is modulated by a variety of different stresses. However, not all the induced genes undergo translation, and null mutants of many induced genes do not show elevated sensitivity to the particular stress. Elucidation of the RNA lifecycle reveals accumulation of non-translating mRNAs in cytoplasmic granules, P-bodies, and stress granules for future regulation. P-bodies contain enzymes for mRNA degradation; under stress conditions mRNAs may be transferred to stress granules for storage and return to translation. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is elevated by stress; and here we analyzed the steady state levels, decay, and subcellular localization of the mRNA of the gene encoding the F-box protein, UFO1, that is induced by stress. Using the MS2L mRNA reporter system UFO1 mRNA was observed in granules that colocalized with P-bodies and stress granules. These P-bodies stored diverse mRNAs. Granules of two mRNAs transported prior to translation, ASH1-MS2L and OXA1-MS2L, docked with P-bodies. HSP12 mRNA that gave rise to highly elevated protein levels was not observed in granules under these stress conditions. ecd3, pat1 double mutants that are defective in P-body formation were sensitive to mRNAs expressed ectopically from strong promoters. These highly expressed mRNAs showed elevated translation compared with wild-type cells, and the viability of the mutants was strongly reduced. ecd3, pat1 mutants also exhibited increased sensitivity to different stresses. Our interpretation is that sequestration of highly expressed mRNAs in P-bodies is essential for viability. Storage of mRNAs for future regulation may contribute to the discrepancy between the steady state levels of many stress-induced mRNAs and their proteins. Sorting of mRNAs for future translation or decay by individual cells could generate potentially different phenotypes in a genetically identical population and enhance

  8. Calcium transients in cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, W G; Atluri, P P

    1995-01-01

    Calcium ions act presynaptically to modulate synaptic strength and to trigger neurotransmitter release. Here we detect stimulus-evoked changes in residual free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in rat cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals. Granule cell axons, known as parallel fibers, and their associated boutons, were labeled with several calcium indicators. When parallel fibers were extracellularly activated with stimulus trains, calcium accumulated in the terminals, producing changes in the fluorescence of the indicators. During the stimulus train, the fluorescence change per pulse became progressively smaller with the high affinity indicators Fura-2 and calcium green-2 but remained constant with the low affinity dyes BTC and furaptra. In addition, fluorescence transients of high affinity dyes were slower than those of low affinity indicators, which appear to accurately report the time course of calcium transients. Simulations show that differences in the observed transients can be explained by the different affinities and off rates of the fluorophores. The return of [Ca2+]i to resting levels can be approximated by an exponential decay with a time constant of 150 ms. On the basis of the degree of saturation in the response of high affinity dyes observed during trains, we estimate that each action potential increases [Ca2+]i in the terminal by several hundred nanomolar. These findings indicate that in these terminals [Ca2+]i transients are much larger and faster than those observed in larger boutons, such as those at the neuromuscular junction. Such rapid [Ca2+]i dynamics may be found in many of the terminals in the mammalian brain that are similar in size to parallel fiber boutons. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612860

  9. Innovative macroporous granules of nanostructured-hydroxyapatite agglomerates: bioactivity and osteoblast-like cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, M S; Fernandes, M H; Monteiro, F J

    2010-12-01

    To modulate the biological response of implantable granules, two types of bioactive porous granules composed of nanostructured-hydroxyapatite (HA) agglomerates and microstructured-HA, respectively, were prepared using a polyurethane sponge impregnation and burnout method. The resulting granules presented a highly porous structure with interconnected porosity. Both types of granules were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Results showed that nanostructed-HA granules presented higher surface area and porosity than microstructured-HA granules. In vitro testing using MG63 human osteoblast-like cells showed that on both types of surfaces cells were able to adhere, proliferate, and migrate through the macropores, and a higher growth rate was achieved on nanostructured-HA granules than on microstructured-HA granules (76 and 40%, respectively). In addition, these cells maintained similar expression levels of osteoblastic-associated markers namely collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein-2, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and osteoprotegerin. These innovative nanostructured-HA granules may be considered as promising bioceramic alternative matrixes for bone regeneration and drug release application. PMID:20845490

  10. Extracellular potassium concentration regulates proliferation of immature cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Borodinsky, L N; Fiszman, M L

    1998-04-17

    The present study examines the effect of depolarizing potassium concentrations on the proliferation of immature rat cerebellar neurons. Cells inoculated in serum free medium and 5 mM KCl (5 K) showed a high degree of 3H-thymidine incorporation that decreased 24-48 h after plating as differentiation began. During the first 24 h after inoculation, cells grown in high potassium (25 K), showed a 34 +/- 3% increase (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 12) in 3H-thymidine incorporation as compared with the values observed in 5 K. After 24 h in vitro, cells grown in 25 K showed 23 +/- 3% (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3) less DNA synthesis than those inoculated in 5 K. The increase in DNA synthesis due to 25 K was blocked by MgCl2 and nifedipine, but not by omega-conotoxin GVIA, suggesting that it is mediated by a Ca2+ influx via voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) of the L-subtype. High potassium-induced cell proliferation was blocked by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) inhibitor (PD98059, 75 microM). The number of neurons counted after 48 h in vitro in 25 K was 35-100% above of the number obtained with 5 K and this increase also was blocked by MgCl2 and nifedipine. These data support the hypothesis that depolarizing activity during neurogenesis plays a role in the modulation of cerebellar granule cells proliferation. PMID:9602050

  11. Selective Viral Transduction of Adult-born Olfactory Neurons for Chronic in vivo Optogenetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lepousez, Gabriel; Alonso, Mariana; Wagner, Sebastian; Gallarda, Benjamin W.; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Local interneurons are continuously regenerated in the olfactory bulb of adult rodents1-3. In this process, called adult neurogenesis, neural stem cells in the walls of the lateral ventricle give rise to neuroblasts that migrate for several millimeters along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to reach and incorporate into the olfactory bulb. To study the different steps and the impact of adult-born neuron integration into preexisting olfactory circuits, it is necessary to selectively label and manipulate the activity of this specific population of neurons. The recent development of optogenetic technologies offers the opportunity to use light to precisely activate this specific cohort of neurons without affecting surrounding neurons4,5. Here, we present a series of procedures to virally express Channelrhodopsin2(ChR2)-YFP in a temporally restricted cohort of neuroblasts in the RMS before they reach the olfactory bulb and become adult-born neurons. In addition, we show how to implant and calibrate a miniature LED for chronic in vivo stimulation of ChR2-expressing neurons. PMID:22231709

  12. The stealthy nano-machine behind mast cell granule size distribution.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Meilijson, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The classical model of mast cell secretory granule formation suggests that newly synthesized secretory mediators, transported from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, undergo post-transitional modification and are packaged for secretion by condensation within membrane-bound granules of unit size. These unit granules may fuse with other granules to form larger granules that reside in the cytoplasm until secreted. A novel stochastic model for mast cell granule growth and elimination (G&E) as well as inventory management is presented. Resorting to a statistical mechanics approach in which SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) REceptor (SNARE) components are viewed as interacting particles, the G&E model provides a simple 'nano-machine' of SNARE self-aggregation that can perform granule growth and secretion. Granule stock is maintained as a buffer to meet uncertainty in demand by the extracellular environment and to serve as source of supply during the lead time to produce granules of adaptive content. Experimental work, mathematical calculations, statistical modeling and a rationale for the emergence of nearly last-in, first out inventory management, are discussed. PMID:24629227

  13. Characterization of the T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    WANG, BING; CHENG, YING; XU, MIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential involvement of specific T-cell subpopulations in granulation tissue formation in chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Fifteen patients with CSOM were enrolled in this study. Granulation tissues were obtained from the middle ear cavity. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histopathological observation, and different T-cell subpopulations were characterized by immunohistochemistry. No evident association was identified between granulation tissue formation and disease course. The number of cluster of differentiation 8+ (CD8+) T cells, forkhead box P3+ (FOXP3+) regulatory T (Treg) cells and OX40+ T cells were significantly higher in granulation tissues from patients with ear discharge within the last 6 months compared to those without (P<0.05). Fresh granulation tissues had more CD8+ T cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells compared to the mature granulation tissues (P<0.05). There was a differential abundance of specific T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues in CSOM with different disease courses or with ear discharge, suggesting that T cell-mediated cellular immunity is involved in lesion formation of CSOM. PMID:27313854

  14. Clonal Analysis of Newborn Hippocampal Dentate Granule Cell Proliferation and Development in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy123

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; McAuliffe, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hippocampal dentate granule cells are among the few neuronal cell types generated throughout adult life in mammals. In the normal brain, new granule cells are generated from progenitors in the subgranular zone and integrate in a typical fashion. During the development of epilepsy, granule cell integration is profoundly altered. The new cells migrate to ectopic locations and develop misoriented “basal” dendrites. Although it has been established that these abnormal cells are newly generated, it is not known whether they arise ubiquitously throughout the progenitor cell pool or are derived from a smaller number of “bad actor” progenitors. To explore this question, we conducted a clonal analysis study in mice expressing the Brainbow fluorescent protein reporter construct in dentate granule cell progenitors. Mice were examined 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, a treatment that leads to the development of epilepsy. Brain sections were rendered translucent so that entire hippocampi could be reconstructed and all fluorescently labeled cells identified. Our findings reveal that a small number of progenitors produce the majority of ectopic cells following status epilepticus, indicating that either the affected progenitors or their local microenvironments have become pathological. By contrast, granule cells with “basal” dendrites were equally distributed among clonal groups. This indicates that these progenitors can produce normal cells and suggests that global factors sporadically disrupt the dendritic development of some new cells. Together, these findings strongly predict that distinct mechanisms regulate different aspects of granule cell pathology in epilepsy. PMID:26756038

  15. Studies on the pH gradient and histamine uptake of isolated mast cell granules

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, M.B.; Nemeth, E.F.; Scarpa, A.

    1986-05-01

    A purified preparation of mast cell granules with intact perigranular membranes was obtained using a method involving probe sonication of rat serosal mast cells followed by differential centrifugation and Percoll gradient separation of the granules. Purification was assessed with histamine and mast cell granule protease assays. Granule integrity was demonstrated by light and electron microscopy and quantitated with a ruthenium red binding assay. The low yield of granules (20 ..mu..g protein/4 rats) necessitated the development of two microanalytical techniques to demonstrate the existence of a pH gradient across the membrane: 9-aminoacridine fluorescence studies in a cuvet with 50 ..mu..l capacity and /sup 14/C-methylamine distribution studies on microgram quantities of granule protein. Quantitation of results from isotope studies were confounded by the presence of oil used for separating granules from the aqueous phase. Nonetheless, an extrapolation procedure calibrated by external pH yielded an internal pH value of 5.46 +/- .03 (n = 4), consistent with values observed in granules obtained from other secretory cells. Collapse of the pH gradient by NH/sub 4//sup +/ or nigericin/KCl was demonstrated using either technique. Addition of histamine depressed intragranular pH, suggesting that histamine transport may utilize the ..delta..pH as a driving force.

  16. Internalized Tau sensitizes cells to stress by promoting formation and stability of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Cecilia A.; Yan, Xu; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are membrane-less RNA- and RNA-binding protein-containing complexes that are transiently assembled in stressful conditions to promote cell survival. Several stress granule-associated RNA-binding proteins have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, a close link was recently identified between the stress granule core-nucleating protein TIA-1 and Tau. Tau is a central pathological protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and misfolded, aggregated Tau is capable of propagating pathology via cell-to-cell transmission. Here we show that following internalization hyperphosphorylated extracellular Tau associates with stress granules in a TIA-1 dependent manner. Cytosolic Tau normally only weakly interacts with TIA-1 but mutations mimicking abnormal phosphorylation promote this interaction. We show that internalized Tau significantly delays normal clearance of stress granules in the recipient cells sensitizing them to secondary stress. These results suggest that secreted Tau species may have properties, likely related to its hyperphosphorylation and oligomerization, which promote pathological association of internalized Tau with stress granules altering their dynamics and reducing cell viability. We suggest that stress granules and TIA-1 play a central role in the cell-to-cell transmission of Tau pathology. PMID:27460788

  17. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Stimulated by the Calcium Phosphate Porous Granules

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sunyoung; Won, Jong-Eun; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Effects of three-dimensional (3D) calcium phosphate (CaP) porous granules on the growth and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined for dental tissue engineering. hDPSCs isolated from adult human dental pulps were cultured for 3-4 passages, and populated on porous granules. Cell growth on the culture dish showed an ongoing increase for up to 21 days, whereas the growth on the 3D granules decreased after 14 days. This reduction in proliferative potential on the 3D granules was more conspicuous under the osteogenic medium conditions, indicating that the 3D granules may induce the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Differentiation behavior on the 3D granules was confirmed by the increased alkaline phosphatase activity, up-regulation of odontoblast-specific genes, including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and greater level of dentin sialoprotein synthesis by western blot. Moreover, the cellular mineralization, as assessed by Alizarin red S and calcium quantification, was significantly higher in the 3D CaP granules than in the culture dish. Taken all, the 3D CaP porous granules should be useful for dental tissue engineering in combination with hDPSCs by providing favorable 3D substrate conditions for cell growth and odontogenic development. PMID:21772958

  18. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. )

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  19. Granulated peripolar epithelial cells in the renal corpuscle of marine elasmobranch fish.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E R; Reale, E

    1989-07-01

    Granulated epithelial cells at the vascular pole of the renal corpuscle, peripolar cells, have been found in the kidneys of five species of elasmobranchs, the little skate (Raja erinacea), the smooth dogfish shark (Mustelus canis), the Atlantic sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae), the scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), and the cow-nosed ray (Rhinoptera bonasus). In a sixth elasmobranch, the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the peripolar cells could not be identified among numerous other granulated epithelial cells. The peripolar cells are located at the transition between the parietal epithelium of Bowman's capsule and the visceral epithelium (podocytes) of the glomerulus, thus forming a cuff-like arrangement surrounding the hilar vessels of the renal corpuscle. These cells may have granules and/or vacuoles. Electron microscopy shows that the granules are membrane-bounded, and contain either a homogeneous material or a paracrystalline structure with a repeating period of about 18 nm. The vacuoles are electron lucent or may contain remnants of a granule. These epithelial cells lie close to the granulated cells of the glomerular afferent arteriole. They correspond to the granular peripolar cells of the mammalian, avian and amphibian kidney. The present study is the first reported occurrence of peripolar cells in a marine organism or in either bony or cartilagenous fish. PMID:2519933

  20. Plasticity of intrinsic excitability in mature granule cells of the dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rojas, Jeffrey; Heine, Martin; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is the main entry gate for cortical input to the hippocampus and one of the few brain areas where adult neurogenesis occurs. Several studies have shown that it is relatively difficult to induce synaptic plasticity in mature but not in newborn dentate granule cells. In the present work we have systematically addressed how classical protocols to induce synaptic plasticity affect action potential firing and intrinsic excitability in mature granule cells. We found that stimulation paradigms considered to be relevant for learning processes consistently modified the probability to generate action potentials in response to a given synaptic input in mature cells, in some paradigms even without any modification of synaptic strength. Collectively the results suggest that plasticity of intrinsic dendritic excitability has a lower induction-threshold than synaptic plasticity in mature granule cells and that this form of plasticity might be an important mechanism by which mature granule cells contribute to hippocampal function. PMID:26857841

  1. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  2. 4–6 week old adult-born hippocampal neurons influence novelty-evoked exploration and contextual fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Christine A.; Burghardt, Nesha S.; Schachter, Daniel M.; Hen, René; Drew, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    To explore the role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in novelty processing, we assessed novel object recognition (NOR) in mice after neurogenesis was arrested using focal x-irradiation of the hippocampus, or a reversible, genetic method in which glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive neural progenitor cells are ablated with ganciclovir. Arresting neurogenesis did not alter general activity or object investigation during four exposures with two constant objects. However, when a novel object replaced a constant object, mice with neurogenesis arrested by either ablation method showed increased exploration of the novel object when compared with control mice. The increased novel object exploration did not manifest until 4–6 weeks after x-irradiation or 6 weeks following a genetic ablation, indicating that exploration of the novel object is increased specifically by the elimination of 4–6-week-old adult born neurons. The increased novel object exploration was also observed in older mice, which exhibited a marked reduction in neurogenesis relative to young mice. Mice with neurogenesis arrested by either ablation method were also impaired in 1-trial contextual fear conditioning (CFC) at 6 weeks but not at 4 weeks following ablation, further supporting the idea that 4–6-week old adult born neurons are necessary for specific forms of hippocampal-dependent learning, and suggesting that the NOR and CFC effects have a common underlying mechanism. These data suggest that the transient enhancement of plasticity observed in young adult-born neurons contributes to cognitive functions. PMID:21739523

  3. Neuroligin-2 accelerates GABAergic synapse maturation in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhanyan; Vicini, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Neuroligins (NLGs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are thought to function in synaptogenesis. To investigate the role of NLGs on synaptic transmission once the synapse is formed, we transfected neuroligin-2 (NLG-2) in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), and recorded GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptor mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). NLG-2 transfected cells had mIPSCs with faster decay than matching GFP expressing controls at young culture ages (days in vitro, DIV7-8). Down-regulation of NLG-2 by the isoform specific shRNA-NLG-2 resulted in an opposite effect. We and others have shown that the switch of alpha subunits of GABA(A)Rs from alpha2/3 to alpha1 underlies developmental speeding of the IPSC decay in various CNS regions, including the cerebellum. To assess whether the reduced decay time of mIPSCs by NLG-2 is due to the recruitment of more alpha1 containing GABA(A)Rs at the synapses, we examined the prolongation of current decay by the Zolpidem, which has been shown to preferentially enhance the activity of alpha1 subunit-containing GABA channel. The application of Zolpidem resulted in a significantly greater prolongation kinetics of synaptic currents in NLG-2 over-expressing cells than control cells, suggesting that NLG-2 over-expression accelerates synapse maturation by promoting incorporation of the alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs at postsynaptic sites in immature cells. In addition, the effect of NLG-2 on the speeding of decay time course of synaptic currents was abolished when we used CGC cultures from alpha1-/- mice. Lastly, to exclude the possibility that the fast decay of mIPSCs induced by NLG-2 could be also due to the impacts of NLG-2 on the GABA transient in synaptic cleft, we measured the sensitivity of mIPSCs to the fast-off competitive antagonists TPMPA. We found that TPMPA similarly inhibits mIPSCs in control and NLG-2 over-expressing CGCs both at young age (DIV8) and old age (DIV14) of

  4. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  5. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  6. Alcohol enhances GABAergic transmission to cerebellar granule cells via an increase in Golgi cell excitability.

    PubMed

    Carta, Mario; Mameli, Manuel; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2004-04-14

    Alcohol intoxication alters coordination and motor skills, and this is responsible for a significant number of traffic accident-related deaths around the world. Although the precise mechanism of action of ethanol (EtOH) is presently unknown, studies suggest that it acts, in part, by interfering with normal cerebellar functioning. An important component of cerebellar circuits is the granule cell. The excitability of these abundantly expressed neurons is controlled by the Golgi cell, a subtype of GABAergic interneuron. Granule cells receive GABAergic input in the form of phasic and tonic currents that are mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors, respectively. Using the acute cerebellar slice preparation and patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques, we found that ethanol induces a parallel increase in both the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs and the magnitude of the tonic current. EtOH (50 mm) did not produce this effect when spontaneous action potentials were blocked with tetrodotoxin. Recordings in the loose-patch cell-attached configuration demonstrated that ethanol increases the frequency of spontaneous action potentials in Golgi cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that ethanol enhances GABAergic inhibition of granule cells via a presynaptic mechanism that involves an increase in action potential-dependent GABA release from Golgi cells. This effect is likely to have an impact on the flow of information through the cerebellar cortex and may contribute to the mechanism by which acute ingestion of alcoholic beverages induces motor impairment. PMID:15084654

  7. Competition from newborn granule cells does not drive axonal retraction of silenced old granule cells in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Carla M.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Nakashiba, Toshiaki; Tóth, Katalin; Tonegawa, Susumu; McBain, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    In the developing nervous system synaptic refinement, typified by the neuromuscular junction where supernumerary connections are eliminated by axon retraction leaving the postsynaptic target innervated by a single dominant input, critically regulates neuronal circuit formation. Whether such competition-based pruning continues in established circuits of mature animals remains unknown. This question is particularly relevant in the context of adult neurogenesis where newborn cells must integrate into preexisting circuits, and thus, potentially compete with functionally mature synapses to gain access to their postsynaptic targets. The hippocampus plays an important role in memory formation/retrieval and the dentate gyrus (DG) subfield exhibits continued neurogenesis into adulthood. Therefore, this region contains both mature granule cells (old GCs) and immature recently born GCs that are generated throughout adult life (young GCs), providing a neurogenic niche model to examine the role of competition in synaptic refinement. Recent work from an independent group in developing animals indicated that embryonically/early postnatal generated GCs placed at a competitive disadvantage by selective expression of tetanus toxin (TeTX) to prevent synaptic release rapidly retracted their axons, and that this retraction was driven by competition from newborn GCs lacking TeTX. In contrast, following 3–6 months of selective TeTX expression in old GCs of adult mice we did not observe any evidence of axon retraction. Indeed ultrastructural analyses indicated that the terminals of silenced GCs even maintained synaptic contact with their postsynaptic targets. Furthermore, we did not detect any significant differences in the electrophysiological properties between old GCs in control and TeTX conditions. Thus, our data demonstrate a remarkable stability in the face of a relatively prolonged period of altered synaptic competition between two populations of neurons within the adult brain

  8. Mesenchymal cell activation is the rate-limiting step of granulation tissue induction.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, S. A.; Simon, M.; Jones, E.; Nandi, A.; Gailit, J. O.; Tonnesen, M. G.; Newman, D.; Clark, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    During wound repair a 3-day lag occurs between injury and granulation tissue development. When full-thickness, 8-mm-round, excisional wounds were made in the paravertebral skin of outbred Yorkshire pigs and harvested at various times, no granulation tissue was observed before day 4. Day 4 wounds were 3% filled with granulation tissue, day 5 wounds 48% filled, and day 7 wounds 88% filled. The prerequisites for granulation tissue induction are not known but hypothetically include fibrin matrix maturation or cell activation. To examine whether matrix maturation was necessary, wounds were allowed to heal for 5 or 7 days and then aggressively curetted, resulting in the formation of fresh fibrin clots in the newly formed wound spaces. In contrast to original wounds, no lag phase was observed; wounds curetted on day 5 were 23% filled with granulation tissue 1 day later and 99% filled 3 days later, whereas wounds curetted on day 7 were 47% filled 1 day later and completely filled within 2 days. Thus, granulation tissue formation resumed promptly and independently of fibrin clot matrix maturation. This observation suggested that mesenchymal cell activation might be the rate-limiting step in granulation tissue formation. To address this hypothesis more directly, cultured porcine or human fibroblasts, grown to 80% confluence in Dulbecco's minimal essential medium plus 10% fetal calf serum, were added to new wounds. These wounds were sealed with a freshly made exogenous fibrin clot. In some wounds, platelet releasate was added to the fibrin clot. Granulation tissue did not form in day 3 wounds, which had received either fibrin alone, fibrin and platelet releasate, or fibrin and fibroblasts. In contrast, granulation tissue was observed in wounds receiving fibrin, human fibroblasts, and platelet releasate. By day 4, wounds receiving cultured human fibroblasts, fibrin, and platelet releasate were 14% filled with granulation tissue compared with less than 4% granulation tissue in

  9. Measurement of the internal pH of mast cell granules using microvolumetric fluorescence and isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, M.B.; Nemeth, E.F.; Scarpa, A.

    1987-04-01

    The intragranular pH of isolated mast cell granules was measured. Because of the minute amounts of isolated granules available, two techniques were developed by modifying aminoacridine fluorescence and (/sup 14/C)methylamine accumulation techniques to permit measurements with microliter sample volumes. Granule purity was demonstrated by electron microscopy, ruthenium red exclusion, and biochemical (histamine, mast cell granule protease) analysis. The internal pH was determined to be 5.55 +/- 0.06, indicating that the pH environment within mast cell granules is not significantly different from that of previously studied granule types (i.e., chromaffin, platelet, pancreatic islet, and pituitary granules). Collapse of the pH gradient by NH+4 was demonstrated with both techniques. No evidence of Cl-/OH- or specific cation/H+ transport was found, and major chloride permeability could not be unequivocably demonstrated. Ca/sup 2 +/ and Cl- at concentrations normally present extracellularly destabilized granules in the presence of NH+4, but this phenomenon does not necessarily indicate a role for these ions in the exocytotic release of granule contents from intact cells. The pH measurement techniques developed for investigating the properties of granules in mast cells may be useful for studying other granules that can be obtained only in limited quantities.

  10. Murine granulated metrial gland cells are susceptible to Chlamydia psittaci infection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Buendía, A J; Salinas, J; Bernabé, A; Rodolakis, A; Stewart, I J

    1996-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are the most numerous lymphoid cells in the uteroplacental unit in rodent pregnancy. In an experimental murine model of abortion-causing infection, we have studied the responses of GMG cells to Chlamydia psittaci. Chlamydial inclusions have been found within GMG cells, both in apparently healthy cells and in cells with degenerative changes. Establishing the existence of GMG cells infected by C. psittaci opens a new and interesting chapter in the study of these cells. PMID:8751945

  11. Quantitative and morphological analysis of dentate granule cells with recurrent basal dendrites from normal and epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Dinh, Trinh T; Okazaki, Maxine M; Nadler, J Victor; Ribak, Charles E

    2002-01-01

    Granule cells with recurrent basal dendrites (RBDs) were previously reported in both control and epileptic rats. RBDs are dendrites that arise from the basal half of granule cell bodies and curve toward and extend into the molecular layer. They are increased in frequency in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. The present study was undertaken to analyze the distribution and morphology of granule cells with RBDs and the synaptic connections of RBDs. Granule cells were labeled by retrograde transport of biocytin. Those with an RBD were found throughout the granule cell layer, but were most numerous at the hilar border. The morphology of these cells varied in the different depths of the granule cell layer; the angle of their cell body's long axis was mainly vertical at the hilar margin, and changed to virtually horizontal close to the molecular layer border. Quantitative data on the distribution of granule cells with RBDs and the angle of the cell body's long axis confirmed these descriptions. At the electron microscopic level, RBDs showed the typical features of dendrites and formed numerous axodendritic and axospinous synapses with labeled and unlabeled axon terminals. These results showed that RBDs of granule cells from epileptic rats are postsynaptic to axon terminals, including mossy fibers, and thus are involved in a similar synaptic circuitry as apical dendrites of granule cells from these animals. PMID:12000120

  12. Neural correlates of executive attention in adults born very preterm

    PubMed Central

    Daamen, Marcel; Bäuml, Josef G.; Scheef, Lukas; Meng, Chun; Jurcoane, Alina; Jaekel, Julia; Sorg, Christian; Busch, Barbara; Baumann, Nicole; Bartmann, Peter; Wolke, Dieter; Wohlschläger, Afra; Boecker, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Very preterm birth is associated with an increased prevalence of attention problems and may especially impair executive attention, i.e., top-down control of attentional selection in situations where distracting information interferes with the processing of task-relevant stimuli. While there are initial findings linking structural brain alterations in preterm-born individuals with attention problems, the functional basis of these problems are not well understood. The present study used an fMRI adaptation of the Attentional Network Test to examine the neural correlates of executive attention in a large sample of N = 86 adults born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight (VP/VLBW), and N = 100 term-born controls. Executive attention was measured by comparing task behavior and brain activations associated with the processing of incongruent vs. congruent arrow flanker stimuli. Consistent with subtle impairments of executive attention, the VP/VLBW group showed lower accuracy and a tendency for increased response times during the processing of incongruent stimuli. Both groups showed similar activation patters, especially within expected fronto-cingulo-parietal areas, but no significant between-group differences. Our results argue for a maintained attention-relevant network organization in high-functioning preterm born adults in spite of subtle deficits in executive attention. Gestational age and neonatal treatment variables showed associations with task behavior, and brain activation in the dorsal ACC and lateral occipital areas, suggesting that the degree of prematurity (and related neonatal complications) has subtle modulatory influences on executive attention processing. PMID:26640769

  13. Neural correlates of executive attention in adults born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Daamen, Marcel; Bäuml, Josef G; Scheef, Lukas; Meng, Chun; Jurcoane, Alina; Jaekel, Julia; Sorg, Christian; Busch, Barbara; Baumann, Nicole; Bartmann, Peter; Wolke, Dieter; Wohlschläger, Afra; Boecker, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Very preterm birth is associated with an increased prevalence of attention problems and may especially impair executive attention, i.e., top-down control of attentional selection in situations where distracting information interferes with the processing of task-relevant stimuli. While there are initial findings linking structural brain alterations in preterm-born individuals with attention problems, the functional basis of these problems are not well understood. The present study used an fMRI adaptation of the Attentional Network Test to examine the neural correlates of executive attention in a large sample of N = 86 adults born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight (VP/VLBW), and N = 100 term-born controls. Executive attention was measured by comparing task behavior and brain activations associated with the processing of incongruent vs. congruent arrow flanker stimuli. Consistent with subtle impairments of executive attention, the VP/VLBW group showed lower accuracy and a tendency for increased response times during the processing of incongruent stimuli. Both groups showed similar activation patters, especially within expected fronto-cingulo-parietal areas, but no significant between-group differences. Our results argue for a maintained attention-relevant network organization in high-functioning preterm born adults in spite of subtle deficits in executive attention. Gestational age and neonatal treatment variables showed associations with task behavior, and brain activation in the dorsal ACC and lateral occipital areas, suggesting that the degree of prematurity (and related neonatal complications) has subtle modulatory influences on executive attention processing. PMID:26640769

  14. Multiple extra-synaptic spillover mechanisms regulate prolonged activity in cerebellar Golgi cell–granule cell loops

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Tahl; Sivam, Vanessa; Zhao, Tian; Frey, Oivier; van der Wal, Peter Dow; de Rooij, Nico F; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Edgley, Steve A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite a wealth of in vitro and modelling studies it remains unclear how neuronal populations in the cerebellum interact in vivo. We address the issue of how the cerebellar input layer processes sensory information, with particular focus on the granule cells (input relays) and their counterpart inhibitory interneurones, Golgi cells. Based on the textbook view, granule cells excite Golgi cells via glutamate forming a negative feedback loop. However, Golgi cells express inhibitory mGluR2 receptors suggesting an inhibitory role for glutamate. We set out to test this glutamatergic paradox in Golgi cells. Here we show that granule cells and Golgi cells interact through extra-synaptic signalling mechanisms during sensory information processing, as well as synaptic mechanisms. We demonstrate that such interactions depend on granule cell-derived glutamate acting via inhibitory mGluR2 receptors leading causally to the suppression of Golgi cell activity for several hundreds of milliseconds. We further show that granule cell-derived inhibition of Golgi cell activity is regulated by GABA-dependent extra-synaptic Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells, identifying a regulatory loop in which glutamate and GABA may be critical regulators of Golgi cell–granule cell functional activity. Thus, granule cells may promote their own prolonged activity via paradoxical feed-forward inhibition of Golgi cells, thereby enabling information processing over long timescales. PMID:21669981

  15. Serglycin determines secretory granule repertoire and regulates natural killer cell and cytotoxic T lymphocyte cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Vivien R; Brennan, Amelia J; Ellis, Sarah; Danne, Jill; Thia, Kevin; Jenkins, Misty R; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Pejler, Gunnar; Johnstone, Ricky W; Andrews, Daniel M; Trapani, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The anionic proteoglycan serglycin is a major constituent of secretory granules in cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)/natural killer (NK) cells, and is proposed to promote the safe storage of the mostly cationic granule toxins, granzymes and perforin. Despite the extensive defects of mast cell function reported in serglycin gene-disrupted mice, no comprehensive study of physiologically relevant CTL/NK cell populations has been reported. We show that the cytotoxicity of serglycin-deficient CTL and NK cells is severely compromised but can be partly compensated in both cell types when they become activated. Reduced intracellular granzyme B levels were noted, particularly in CD27(+) CD11b(+) mature NK cells, whereas serglycin(-/-) TCR-transgenic (OTI) CD8 T cells also had reduced perforin stores. Culture supernatants from serglycin(-/-) OTI T cells and interleukin-2-activated NK contained increased granzyme B, linking reduced storage with heightened export. By contrast, granzyme A was not significantly reduced in cells lacking serglycin, indicating differentially regulated trafficking and/or storage for the two granzymes. A quantitative analysis of different granule classes by transmission electronmicroscopy showed a selective loss of dense-core granules in serglycin(-/-) CD8(+) CTLs, although other granule types were maintained quantitatively. The findings of the present study show that serglycin plays a critical role in the maturation of dense-core cytotoxic granules in cytotoxic lymphocytes and the trafficking and storage of perforin and granzyme B, whereas granzyme A is unaffected. The skewed retention of cytotoxic effector molecules markedly reduces CTL/NK cell cytotoxicity, although this is partly compensated for as a result of activating the cells by physiological means. PMID:26756195

  16. Role of granule-cell transmission in memory trace of cerebellum-dependent optokinetic motor learning.

    PubMed

    Wada, Norio; Funabiki, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2014-04-01

    Adaptation of the optokinetic response (OKR) is an eye movement enhanced by repeated motion of a surrounding visual field and represents a prototype of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. Purkinje cells and vestibular nuclei (VN) receive optokinetic and retinal slip signals via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway and climbing-fiber projections, respectively. To explore the neural circuits and mechanisms responsible for OKR adaptation, we adopted the reversible neurotransmission-blocking (RNB) technique, in which granule-cell transmission to Purkinje cells was selectively and reversibly blocked by doxycycline-dependent expression of transmission-blocking tetanus toxin in granule cells. Blockade of granule-cell inputs abolished both short-term and long-term OKR adaptation induced by repeated OKR training, but normal levels of both responses were immediately evoked in the pretrained RNB mice by OKR retraining once granule-cell transmission had recovered. Importantly, eye movement elicited by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar focculus was elevated by long-term but not by short-term OKR training in adaptive OKR-negative RNB mice. Furthermore, when the flocculus of adaptive OKR-negative RNB mice was electrically excited in-phase with OKR stimulation, these mice exhibited long-term adaptive OKR. These results indicate that convergent information to the VN was critical for acquisition and storage of long-term OKR adaptation with conjunctive action of Purkinje cells for OKR expression. Interestingly, in contrast to conditioned eyeblink memory, the expression of once acquired adaptive long-term OKR was not abrogated by blockade of granule-cell transmission, suggesting that distinct forms of neural plasticity would operate in different forms of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. PMID:24706878

  17. Protein Kinases Are Associated with Multiple, Distinct Cytoplasmic Granules in Quiescent Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Khyati H.; Nostramo, Regina; Zhang, Bo; Varia, Sapna N.; Klett, Bethany M.; Herman, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    The cytoplasm of the eukaryotic cell is subdivided into distinct functional domains by the presence of a variety of membrane-bound organelles. The remaining aqueous space may be further partitioned by the regulated assembly of discrete ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that contain particular proteins and messenger RNAs. These RNP granules are conserved structures whose importance is highlighted by studies linking them to human disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, relatively little is known about the diversity, composition, and physiological roles of these cytoplasmic structures. To begin to address these issues, we examined the cytoplasmic granules formed by a key set of signaling molecules, the protein kinases of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, a significant fraction of these proteins, almost 20%, was recruited to cytoplasmic foci specifically as cells entered into the G0-like quiescent state, stationary phase. Colocalization studies demonstrated that these foci corresponded to eight different granules, including four that had not been reported previously. All of these granules were found to rapidly disassemble upon the resumption of growth, and the presence of each was correlated with cell viability in the quiescent cultures. Finally, this work also identified new constituents of known RNP granules, including the well-characterized processing body and stress granule. The composition of these latter structures is therefore more varied than previously thought and could be an indicator of additional biological activities being associated with these complexes. Altogether, these observations indicate that quiescent yeast cells contain multiple distinct cytoplasmic granules that may make important contributions to their long-term survival. PMID:25342717

  18. Ex vivo imaging of postnatal cerebellar granule cell migration using confocal macroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  19. Ex Vivo Imaging of Postnatal Cerebellar Granule Cell Migration Using Confocal Macroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  20. Seizure-Induced Motility of Differentiated Dentate Granule Cells Is Prevented by the Central Reelin Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Orcinha, Catarina; Münzner, Gert; Gerlach, Johannes; Kilias, Antje; Follo, Marie; Egert, Ulrich; Haas, Carola A.

    2016-01-01

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) represents a pathological widening of the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus and it is frequently observed in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Recent studies in human MTLE specimens and in animal epilepsy models have shown that a decreased expression and functional inactivation of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin correlates with GCD formation, but causal evidence is still lacking. Here, we used unilateral kainate (KA) injection into the mouse hippocampus, an established MTLE animal model, to precisely map the loss of reelin mRNA-synthesizing neurons in relation to GCD along the septotemporal axis of the epileptic hippocampus. We show that reelin mRNA-producing neurons are mainly lost in the hilus and that this loss precisely correlates with the occurrence of GCD. To monitor GCD formation in real time, we used organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) prepared from mice which express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) primarily in differentiated dentate granule cells. Using life cell microscopy we observed that increasing doses of KA resulted in an enhanced motility of eGFP-positive granule cells. Moreover, KA treatment of OHSC resulted in a rapid loss of Reelin-producing interneurons mainly in the hilus, as observed in vivo. A detailed analysis of the migration behavior of individual eGFP-positive granule cells revealed that the majority of these neurons actively migrate toward the hilar region, where Reelin-producing neurons are lost. Treatment with KA and subsequent addition of the recombinant R3–6 Reelin fragment significantly prevented the movement of eGFP-positive granule cells. Together, these findings suggest that GCD formation is indeed triggered by a loss of Reelin in hilar interneurons. PMID:27516734

  1. Seizure-Induced Motility of Differentiated Dentate Granule Cells Is Prevented by the Central Reelin Fragment.

    PubMed

    Orcinha, Catarina; Münzner, Gert; Gerlach, Johannes; Kilias, Antje; Follo, Marie; Egert, Ulrich; Haas, Carola A

    2016-01-01

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) represents a pathological widening of the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus and it is frequently observed in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Recent studies in human MTLE specimens and in animal epilepsy models have shown that a decreased expression and functional inactivation of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin correlates with GCD formation, but causal evidence is still lacking. Here, we used unilateral kainate (KA) injection into the mouse hippocampus, an established MTLE animal model, to precisely map the loss of reelin mRNA-synthesizing neurons in relation to GCD along the septotemporal axis of the epileptic hippocampus. We show that reelin mRNA-producing neurons are mainly lost in the hilus and that this loss precisely correlates with the occurrence of GCD. To monitor GCD formation in real time, we used organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) prepared from mice which express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) primarily in differentiated dentate granule cells. Using life cell microscopy we observed that increasing doses of KA resulted in an enhanced motility of eGFP-positive granule cells. Moreover, KA treatment of OHSC resulted in a rapid loss of Reelin-producing interneurons mainly in the hilus, as observed in vivo. A detailed analysis of the migration behavior of individual eGFP-positive granule cells revealed that the majority of these neurons actively migrate toward the hilar region, where Reelin-producing neurons are lost. Treatment with KA and subsequent addition of the recombinant R3-6 Reelin fragment significantly prevented the movement of eGFP-positive granule cells. Together, these findings suggest that GCD formation is indeed triggered by a loss of Reelin in hilar interneurons. PMID:27516734

  2. The econobiology of pancreatic acinar cells granule inventory and the stealthy nano-machine behind it.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Meilijson, Isaac

    2016-03-01

    The pancreatic gland secretes most of the enzymes and many other macromolecules needed for food digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. These molecules play an important role in digestion, host defense and lubrication. The secretion of pancreatic proteins ensures the availability of the correct mix of proteins when needed. This review describes model systems available for the study of the econobiology of secretory granule content. The secretory pancreatic molecules are stored in large dense-core secretory granules that may undergo either constitutive or evoked secretion, and constitute the granule inventory of the cell. It is proposed that the Golgi complex functions as a distribution center for secretory proteins in pancreatic acinar cells, packing the newly formed secretory molecules into maturing secretory granules, also known functionally as condensing vacuoles. Mathematical modelling brings forward a process underlying granule inventory maintenance at various physiological states of condensation and aggregation by homotypic fusion. These models suggest unique but simple mechanisms accountable for inventory buildup and size, as well as for the distribution of secretory molecules into different secretory pathways in pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:26702787

  3. Dependence of structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules on ATP and cell communication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yu

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic granules are dense and compact microbial aggregates with various bacterial species. Recently, aerobic granulation technology has been extensively explored for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. However, little information is currently available with regard to their structure stability and integrity at levels of energy metabolism and cell communication. In the present study, a typical chemical uncoupler, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide with the power to dissipate proton motive force and subsequently inhibit adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, was used to investigate possible roles of ATP and cell communication in maintaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. It was found that inhibited ATP synthesis resulted in the reduced production of autoinducer-2 and N-acylhomoserine lactones essential for cell communication, while lowered extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production was also observed. As a consequence, aerobic granules appeared to break up. This study showed that ATP-dependent quorum sensing and EPS were essential for sustaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. PMID:23011346

  4. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  5. The glycosylation pattern of secretory granules in binucleate trophoblast cells is highly conserved in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Klisch, K; Wooding, F B P; Jones, C J P

    2010-01-01

    The binucleate trophoblast cells (BNCs) in the ruminant placenta are a unique feature of this taxon. These cells produce several secretory proteins and transfer these across the fetomaternal barrier into the dam. We used lectin histochemistry with a panel of 24 lectins to characterise the glycosylation pattern of BNC secretory granules in a variety of ruminants. Seven species out of three ruminant families were thus investigated: greater malayan chevrotain (Tragulidae); fallow deer, red deer, chinese water deer (Cervidae); and domestic goat, springbok, impala (Bovidae). BNC granules in all species studied strongly expressed tri-/tetraantennary complex N-glycans and bisecting N-acetylglucosamine [GlcNAc] as shown by binding of leuco- and erythroagglutins of Phaseolus vulgaris respectively. The presence of terminal N-acetylgalactosamine [GalNAc]) in BNC granules is shown by intense staining with lectins from Dolichos biflorus, Vicia villosa and Wisteria floribunda. Terminal galactose or GalNAc was also present, bound by Glycine max agglutinin. Treatment of slides with neuraminidase strongly intensified staining of Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECA) to terminal lactosamine in all species studied; this was otherwise absent except in goat. Sambucus nigra-1 lectin bound to BNC granules in all species except in Impala, indicating the presence of abundant alpha2,6 linked sialic acid. These results indicate that these unusual highly branched glycans, with bisecting GlcNAc and terminal GalNAc are a general feature of BNC granules in Ruminants, including the most basal Tragulid branch. It therefore appears that the specific glycosylation pattern of BNC granules evolved early in ruminant phylogenesis, together with the appearance of BNC. The conserved glycan structure in BNC secretory granules indicates that this pattern of glycosylation is likely to be of considerable functional importance for the secretory glycoproteins of ruminant BNC. PMID:19959226

  6. Cytocompatibility of porous biphasic calcium phosphate granules with human mesenchymal cells by a multiparametric assay.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Fabio; Alves, Gutemberg; Fernandes, Gustavo; König, Bruno; Rossi, Alexandre J R; Granjeiro, Jose

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the cytocompatibility of injectable and moldable restorative biomaterials based on granules of dense or porous biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) with human primary mesenchymal cells, in order to validate them as tools for stem cell-induced bone regeneration. Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA/beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (60:40) granules were obtained by the addition of wax spheres and pressing at 20 MPa, while dense materials were compacted by pressing at 100 MPa, followed by thermal treatment (1100°C), grinding, and sieving. Extracts were prepared by 24-h incubation of granules on culture media, with subsequent exposition of human primary mesenchymal cells. Three different cell viability parameters were evaluated on the same samples. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the granules revealed distinct dense and porous surfaces. After cell exposition to extracts, no significant differences on mitochondrial activity (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenly)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) or cell density (Crystal Violet Dye Elution) were observed among groups. However, Neutral Red assay revealed that dense materials extracts induced lower levels of total viable cells to porous HA/β-TCP (P < 0.01). Calcium ion content was also significantly lower on the extracts of dense samples. Porogenic treatments on BCP composites do not affect cytocompatibility, as measured by three different parameters, indicating that these ceramics are well suited for further studies on future bioengineering applications. PMID:22372877

  7. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and (3H)-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP.

  8. Radioresistance of granulation tissue-derived cells from skin wounds combined with total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Tingyu; Chen, Zelin; Tan, Li; Shi, Chunmeng

    2016-04-01

    Combined radiation and wound injury (CRWI) occurs following nuclear explosions and accidents, radiological or nuclear terrorism, and radiation therapy combined with surgery. CRWI is complicated and more difficult to heal than single injuries. Stem cell‑based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for CRWI, however, sourcing stem cells remains a challenge. In the present study, the granulation tissue-derived cells (GTCs) from the skin wounds (SWs) of CRWI mice (C‑GTCs) demonstrated a higher radioresistance to the damage caused by combined injury, and were easier to isolate and harvest when compared with bone marrow‑derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs). Furthermore, the C-GTCs exhibited similar stem cell-associated properties, such as self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity, when compared with neonatal dermal stromal cells (DSCs) and GTCs from unirradiated SWs. Granulation tissue, which is easy to access, may present as an optimal autologous source of stem/progenitor cells for therapeutic applications in CRWI. PMID:26936439

  9. Structural, mass and elemental analyses of storage granules in methanogenic archaeal cells

    PubMed Central

    Toso, Daniel B.; Henstra, Anne M.; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2013-01-01

    Summary Storage granules are an important component of metabolism in many organisms spanning the bacterial, eukaryal and archaeal domains, but systematic analysis of their organization inside cells is lacking. In this study, we identify and characterize granulelike inclusion bodies in a methanogenic archaeon, Methanospirillum hungatei, an anaerobic microorganism that plays an important role in nutrient recycling in the ecosystem. Using cryo electron microscopy, we show that granules in mature M. hungatei are amorphous in structure with a uniform size. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis establishes that each granule is a polyphosphate body (PPB) that consists of high concentrations of phosphorous and oxygen, and increased levels of iron and magnesium. By scanning transmission electron tomography, we further estimate that the mass density within a PPB is a little less than metal titanium at room temperature and is about four times higher than that of the surrounding cytoplasm. Finally, three-dimensional cryo electron tomography reveals that PPBs are positioned off-centre in their radial locations relative to the cylindrical axis of the cell, and almost uniformly placed near cell ends. This positioning ability points to a genetic program that spatially and temporally directs the accumulation of polyphosphate into a storage granule, perhaps for energy-consuming activities, such as cell maintenance, division or motility. PMID:21854518

  10. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  11. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; Rhodes, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  12. Model cerebellar granule cells can faithfully transmit modulated firing rate signals

    PubMed Central

    Rössert, Christian; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio; Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2014-01-01

    A crucial assumption of many high-level system models of the cerebellum is that information in the granular layer is encoded in a linear manner. However, granule cells are known for their non-linear and resonant synaptic and intrinsic properties that could potentially impede linear signal transmission. In this modeling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e., uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode). A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fiber synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR). Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for. The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fiber synaptic inputs could transmit information faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. This was achieved most simply if the model neurons had a firing rate at least twice the highest required frequency of modulation, but lower rates were also adequate provided a population of neurons was utilized, especially in combination with push-pull coding. The exact number of neurons required for faithful transmission depended on the precise values of firing rate and noise. The model neurons were also able to combine excitatory and inhibitory signals linearly, and could be replaced by a simpler (modified) integrate-and-fire neuron in the case of high tonic firing rates. These findings suggest that granule cells can in principle code modulated firing-rate inputs in a linear manner, and are thus consistent with the high-level adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit. PMID:25352777

  13. Immunohistological comparison of granulated cell proteins in induced immediate urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria lesions.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, M T; Peterson, E A; Kobza-Black, A; English, J S; Dover, J S; Murphy, G M; Bhogal, B; Greaves, M W; Winkelmann, R K; Leiferman, K M

    1995-12-01

    Urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria are two forms of physical urticaria which are well defined clinically and histologically. Previous studies have shown eosinophil granule protein deposition in urticarial reactions, including chronic urticaria, solar urticaria and delayed pressure urticaria. To evaluate and compare the involvement of granulated inflammatory cells in urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria, we studied sequential biopsies of induced lesions of urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria by indirect immunofluorescence, to detect eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) and neutrophil granule elastase. Biopsies from dermographic lesions at time 0, 5 min, 15 min, 2 h and 24 h, showed few infiltrating eosinophils, with minimal extracellular MBP deposition, and a few infiltrating neutrophils, with minimal neutrophil elastase deposition, throughout the evolution of the lesions. Sequential biopsies of delayed pressure urticaria at time 0, 20 min, 6, 12 and 24 h, showed eosinophil infiltration with extensive MBP deposition beginning at 20 min, and neutrophil infiltration with variable elastase deposition beginning at 20 min. Control tissue specimens from normal volunteers showed neutrophil infiltration and slight degranulation, but no eosinophil infiltration or degranulation. Comparison of urticarial dermographism with delayed pressure urticaria showed marked differences in the patterns of infiltration. Delayed pressure urticaria, with eosinophil and neutrophil degranulation, was strikingly similar to the IgE-mediated late phase reaction. In contrast, eosinophil and neutrophil involvement in urticarial dermographism was minimal. Considering the extent of eosinophil granule protein deposition and the biological activities of the eosinophil granule proteins, the findings in delayed pressure urticaria point to an important pathophysiological role of eosinophils in the disease. PMID:8547035

  14. Local postsynaptic voltage-gated sodium channel activation in dendritic spines of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G; Patirniche, Dinu; Rupprecht, Vanessa; Stemmler, Martin; Herz, Andreas V M; Pálfi, Dénes; Rózsa, Balázs; Egger, Veronica

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal dendritic spines have been speculated to function as independent computational units, yet evidence for active electrical computation in spines is scarce. Here we show that strictly local voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) activation can occur during excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the spines of olfactory bulb granule cells, which we mimic and detect via combined two-photon uncaging of glutamate and calcium imaging in conjunction with whole-cell recordings. We find that local Nav activation boosts calcium entry into spines through high-voltage-activated calcium channels and accelerates postsynaptic somatic depolarization, without affecting NMDA receptor-mediated signaling. Hence, Nav-mediated boosting promotes rapid output from the reciprocal granule cell spine onto the lateral mitral cell dendrite and thus can speed up recurrent inhibition. This striking example of electrical compartmentalization both adds to the understanding of olfactory network processing and broadens the general view of spine function. PMID:25619656

  15. Localization of anionic constituents in mast cell granules of brachymorphic (bm/bm) mice by using avidin-conjugated colloidal gold

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Ilan; Shoichetman, Tanya; Amihai, Dina; Galli, Stephen J.; Skutelsky, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    We used the egg avidin gold complex as a polycationic probe for the localization of negatively charged sites in the secretory granules of mouse mast cells. We compared the binding of this reagent to mast cell granules in wild-type mice and in congenic brachymorphic mice in which mast cell secretory granules contained undersulfated proteoglycans. We localized anionic sites by post-embedding labeling of thin sections of mouse skin and tongue tissues fixed in Karnovsky's fixative and OsO4 and embedded in Araldite. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the mast cell granules of bm/bm mice had a lower optical density than those of wild-type mice (P<0.001) and a lower adivin gold binding density (by approximately 50%, P<0.001). The latter result provides additional evidence that the contents of mast cell granules in bm/bm mice were less highly sulfated than in those of wild type mice. In both wild type and bm/bm mast cells, the distribution of granule equivalent volumes was multimodal, but the unit granule volume was approximately 19% lower in bm/bm cells than in wild type cells (P < 0.05). Thus, bm/bm mast cells develop secretory granules that differ from those of wild type mice in exhibiting a lower optical density and slightly smaller unit granules, however the processes that contribute to granule maturation and granule-granule fusion in mast cells are operative in the bm/bm cells. PMID:20127366

  16. Dendritic morphology, synaptic transmission, and activity of mature granule cells born following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Song, Xueying; Zhu, Dexiao; Wang, Xiaochen; Hao, Aijun; Nadler, J. Victor; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the potential role of enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) in the development of epilepsy, we quantitatively analyzed the geometry of apical dendrites, synaptic transmission, and activation levels of normotopically distributed mature newborn granule cells in the rat. SE in male Sprague-Dawley rats (between 6 and 7 weeks old) lasting for more than 2 h was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. The complexity, spine density, miniature post-synaptic currents, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression of granule cells born 5 days after SE were studied between 10 and 17 weeks after CAG-GFP retroviral vector-mediated labeling. Mature granule cells born after SE had dendritic complexity similar to that of granule cells born naturally, but with denser mushroom-like spines in dendritic segments located in the outer molecular layer. Miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) were similar between the controls and rats subjected to SE; however, smaller miniature excitatory post-synaptic current (mEPSC) amplitude with a trend toward less frequent was found in mature granule cells born after SE. After maturation, granule cells born after SE did not show denser Arc expression in the resting condition or 2 h after being activated by pentylenetetrazol-induced transient seizure activity than vicinal GFP-unlabeled granule cells. Thus our results suggest that normotopic granule cells born after pilocarpine-induced SE are no more active when mature than age-matched, naturally born granule cells. PMID:26500490

  17. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  18. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M.; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T.; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  19. Cytokine signals through STAT3 promote expression of granulocyte secondary granule proteins in 32D cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Arcasoy, Murat O.; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Forget, Bernard G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study, we showed that activation of a transfected human erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) in the murine myeloid cell line 32D resulted in the development of morphologic features of granulocytic differentiation and expression of the neutrophil primary granule protein myeloperoxidase. We now studied if EPOR signaling could also mediate secondary granule protein gene expression and investigated the signal transduction requirements for induction of secondary granule gene expression in 32D cells. Materials and Methods Wild-type and variant 32D cells expressing normal or chimeric EPORs or receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSFRs) were stimulated with EPO or G-CSF and the expression of granulocyte-specific genes was analyzed by Northern blot analysis. To determine the signaling mechanisms required for secondary granule protein gene induction, the activation of STAT pathways following growth factor stimulation was studied by Western blot analysis. Results We found that EPO treatment of 32D cells engineered to express EPOR did not result in induction of the secondary granule protein genes encoding lactoferrin and 24p3 lipocalin, the mouse homolog of human N-Gal, or the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPε. Replacement of the intracellular domain of EPOR with the intracellular domain of G-CSFR in a chimeric receptor was associated with EPO-mediated induction of lactoferrin, 24p3 lipocalin, and C/EBPε genes. We found that STAT3 phosphorylation was mediated by the intracellular domain of G-CSFR, but not EPOR. Replacement of one or two of the STAT5 binding sites in the intracytoplasmic domain of the EPOR with STAT3 binding sites resulted in EPO-mediated STAT3 activation and a marked increase in the expression of the 24p3 lipocalin gene. Knockdown of STAT3 protein levels with siRNA caused significant decrease in 24p3 lipocalin gene induction. Conclusion These results indicate that EPOR signaling cannot substitute for G-CSFR signaling to

  20. Enterovirus 71 induces anti-viral stress granule-like structures in RD cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanmei; Wang, Bei; Huang, He; Zhao, Zhendong

    2016-08-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic cytoplasmic granules formed in response to a variety of stresses, including viral infection. Several viruses can modulate the formation of SG with different effects, but the relationship between SG formation and EV71 infection is poorly understood. In this study, we report that EV71 inhibits canonical SGs formation in infected cells and induces the formation of novel RNA granules that were distinguished from canonical SGs in composition and morphology, which we termed 'SG like structures'. Our results also demonstrated that EV71 triggered formation of SG-like structures is dependent on PKR and eIF2α phosphorylation and requires ongoing cellular mRNA synthesis. Finally, we found that SG-like structures are antiviral RNA granules that promote cellular apoptosis and suppress EV71 propagation. Taken together, our findings explain the formation mechanism of SG-like structures induced by EV71 and shed light on virus-host interaction and molecular mechanism underlying EV71 pathogenesis. PMID:27216457

  1. Eosinophil extracellular DNA trap cell death mediates lytic release of free secretion-competent eosinophil granules in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Shigeharu; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Ghiran, Ionita; Spencer, Lisa A.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils release their granule proteins extracellularly through exocytosis, piecemeal degranulation, or cytolytic degranulation. Findings in diverse human eosinophilic diseases of intact extracellular eosinophil granules, either free or clustered, indicate that eosinophil cytolysis occurs in vivo, but the mechanisms and consequences of lytic eosinophil degranulation are poorly understood. We demonstrate that activated human eosinophils can undergo extracellular DNA trap cell death (ETosis) that cytolytically releases free eosinophil granules. Eosinophil ETosis (EETosis), in response to immobilized immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA), cytokines with platelet activating factor, calcium ionophore, or phorbol myristate acetate, develops within 120 minutes in a reduced NADP (NADPH) oxidase-dependent manner. Initially, nuclear lobular formation is lost and some granules are released by budding off from the cell as plasma membrane–enveloped clusters. Following nuclear chromatolysis, plasma membrane lysis liberates DNA that forms weblike extracellular DNA nets and releases free intact granules. EETosis-released eosinophil granules, still retaining eosinophil cationic granule proteins, can be activated to secrete when stimulated with CC chemokine ligand 11 (eotaxin-1). Our results indicate that an active NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanism of cytolytic, nonapoptotic eosinophil death initiates nuclear chromatolysis that eventuates in the release of intact secretion-competent granules and the formation of extracellular DNA nets. PMID:23303825

  2. Quality of Life of Adolescents and Young Adults Born at High Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahan-Oliel, Noemi; Majnemer, Annette; Mazer, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Research on quality of life (QoL) of adolescents and young adults born preterm and those with congenital heart disease (CHD) was systematically reviewed, and factors associated with QoL were identified. Forty-five studies met the inclusion criteria for review. Although the majority of studies found that self-reported QoL of adolescents and young…

  3. Elemental levels in mast cell granules differ in sections from normal and diabetic rats: an X-ray microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, M.D.

    1988-03-01

    Mast cells around the thymus of rats stain red with alcian blue and safranin indicating that the mast cells are probably of the peritoneal (connective tissue) type. After the onset of streptozotocin induced diabetes some cells contain both red and blue granules and blue staining cells may appear. X-ray microanalysis of frozen freeze-dried sections from diabetic male CSE Wistar rats showed electron dense granules to have similar amounts of S to normal rat mast cell granules but reduced levels of Na, Mg, P, Cl and K. Two cells also had electron lucent granules with very high levels of Na, Cl, K and Ca and reduced concentrations of S. The differences in elemental composition suggest that the mast cells from diabetic rats are not immature, but are related to the condition of induced diabetes, and that granules of very different composition can occur within a single cell. X-ray microanalysis has given an insight into mast cell granule elemental content which was not possible by conventional biochemical methods.

  4. Parallel Computational Subunits in Dentate Granule Cells Generate Multiple Place Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ujfalussy, Balázs; Kiss, Tamás; Érdi, Péter

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental question in understanding neuronal computations is how dendritic events influence the output of the neuron. Different forms of integration of neighbouring and distributed synaptic inputs, isolated dendritic spikes and local regulation of synaptic efficacy suggest that individual dendritic branches may function as independent computational subunits. In the present paper, we study how these local computations influence the output of the neuron. Using a simple cascade model, we demonstrate that triggering somatic firing by a relatively small dendritic branch requires the amplification of local events by dendritic spiking and synaptic plasticity. The moderately branching dendritic tree of granule cells seems optimal for this computation since larger dendritic trees favor local plasticity by isolating dendritic compartments, while reliable detection of individual dendritic spikes in the soma requires a low branch number. Finally, we demonstrate that these parallel dendritic computations could contribute to the generation of multiple independent place fields of hippocampal granule cells. PMID:19750211

  5. Effects of zinc chloride on the RNP structures in HEp-2 cells: accumulation of perichromatin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera, J.; Baguena-Cervellera, R.; Martinez, A.

    1985-12-01

    The effects of zinc on the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) constituents of HEp-2 cells have been analyzed. Pulse-chase autoradiographic experiments show a preferential inhibition of nucleolar RNA synthesis and a block in the transport of nucleolar and extranucleolar RNA in zinc-treated cells. Concomitantly with the disturbance in RNA metabolism and in protein synthesis, nucleolar condensation, accumulation of perichromatin granules and fibrils, condensation of interchromatin fibrils, and appearance of dense granular bodies occur. Accumulation of perichromatin fibrils and condensation of interchromatin fibrils appear to be related to the block in the transport of heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Depletion of certain proteins required for the assembly of RNP particles could share in the abnormal behavior of RNA and lead to the accumulation of perichromatin granules and the appearance of dense granular bodies.

  6. Tethering of ICAM on target cells is required for LFA-1-dependent NK cell adhesion and granule polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Catharina C.; Brzostowski, Joseph A.; Liu, Dongfang; Long, Eric O.

    2013-01-01

    αLβ2 integrin (LFA-1) has an important role in the formation of T cell and NK cell cytotoxic immunological synapses and in target cell killing. Binding of LFA-1 to ICAM on target cells promotes not only adhesion, but also polarization of cytolytic granules in NK cells. Here we tested whether LFA-1-dependent NK cell responses are regulated by the distribution and mobility of ICAM at the surface of target cells. We show that depolymerization of F-actin in NK-sensitive target cells abrogated LFA-1-dependent conjugate formation and granule polarization in primary NK cells. Degranulation, which is not controlled by LFA-1, was not impaired. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and particle tracking by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 were distributed in largely immobile clusters. ICAM clusters were maintained and became highly mobile after actin depolymerization. Moreover, reducing ICAM-2 mobility on an NK-resistant target cell through expression of ezrin, an adapter molecule that tethers proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, enhanced LFA-1-dependent adhesion and granule polarization. Finally, while NK cells kept moving over freely diffusible ICAM-1 on a lipid bilayer, they bound and spread over solid-phase ICAM-1. We conclude that tethering, rather than clustering of ICAM promotes proper signaling by LFA-1 in NK cells. Our findings suggest that the lateral diffusion of integrin ligands on cells may be an important determinant of susceptibility to lysis by cytotoxic lymphocytes. PMID:20675589

  7. Adult-born dentate neurons are recruited in both spatial memory encoding and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Tronel, Sophie; Charrier, Vanessa; Sage, Cyrille; Maitre, Marlene; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Abrous, Djoher N

    2015-11-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which is a key structure in learning and memory. Adult-generated granule cells have been shown to play a role in spatial memory processes such as acquisition or retrieval, in particular during an immature stage when they exhibit a period of increased plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that immature and mature neurons born in the DG of adult rats are similarly activated in spatial memory processes. By imaging the activation of these two different neuron generations in the same rat and by using the immediate early gene Zif268, we show that these neurons are involved in both spatial memory acquisition and retrieval. These results demonstrate that adult-generated granule cells are involved in memory beyond their immaturity stage. PMID:25913775

  8. Fine Tuning of Synaptic Plasticity and Filtering by GABA Released from Hippocampal Autaptic Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Orlando, Marta; Raimondi, Andrea; Benfenati, Fabio; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    The functional consequence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release at mossy fiber terminals is still a debated topic. Here, we provide multiple evidence of GABA release in cultured autaptic hippocampal granule cells. In ∼50% of the excitatory autaptic neurons, GABA, VGAT, or GAD67 colocalized with vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive puncta, where both GABAB and GABAA receptors (Rs) were present. Patch-clamp recordings showed a clear enhancement of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents in response to the application of the GABABR antagonist CGP58845 only in neurons positive to the selective granule cell marker Prox1, and expressing low levels of GAD67. Indeed, GCP non-responsive excitatory autaptic neurons were both Prox1- and GAD67-negative. Although the amount of released GABA was not sufficient to activate functional postsynaptic GABAARs, it effectively activated presynaptic GABABRs that maintain a tonic "brake" on the probability of release and on the size of the readily releasable pool and contributed to resting potential hyperpolarization possibly through extrasynaptic GABAAR activation. The autocrine inhibition exerted by GABABRs on glutamate release enhanced both paired-pulse facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation. Such GABABR-mediated changes in short-term plasticity confer to immature granule cells the capability to modulate their filtering properties in an activity-dependent fashion, with remarkable consequences on the dynamic behavior of neural circuits. PMID:25576534

  9. Final steps in exocytosis observed in a cell with giant secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Breckenridge, L J; Almers, W

    1987-01-01

    Secretion by single mast cells was studied in normal and beige mice, a mutant with grossly enlarged secretory vesicles or granules. During degranulation, the membrane capacitance increased in steps, as single secretory vesicles fused with the cell membrane. The average step size was 10 times larger in beige than in normal mice, in agreement with the different granule sizes measured microscopically in the two preparations. Following individual capacitance steps in beige mice, individual granules of the appropriate size were observed to swell rapidly. Capacitance steps are frequently followed by the stepwise loss of a fluorescent dye loaded into the vesicles. Stepwise capacitance increases were occasionally intermittent before they became permanent, indicating the existence of an early, reversible, and incomplete state of vesicle fusion. During such "capacitance flicker," loss of fluorescent dye from vesicles did not occur, suggesting that the earliest aqueous connection between vesicle interior and cell exterior is a narrow channel. Our results support the view that the reversible formation of such a channel, which we term the fusion pore, is an early step in exocytosis. Images PMID:3470768

  10. Epithelial Cell Transforming 2 and Aurora Kinase B Modulate Formation of Stress Granule-Containing Transcripts from Diverse Cellular Pathways in Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Lymer, Jennifer; Chalil, Alan; Diaz, Roberto; Isik, Semra; Smith, Christian; Rutka, James T

    2016-06-01

    Stress granules are small RNA-protein granules that modify the translational landscape during cellular stress to promote survival. The RhoGTPase RhoA is implicated in the formation of RNA stress granules. Our data demonstrate that the cytokinetic proteins epithelial cell transforming 2 and Aurora kinase B (AurkB) are localized to stress granules in human astrocytoma cells. AurkB and its downstream target histone-3 are phosphorylated during arsenite-induced stress. Chemical (AZD1152-HQPA) and siRNA inhibition of AurkB results in fewer and smaller stress granules when analyzed using high-throughput fluorescent-based cellomics assays. RNA immunoprecipitation with the known stress granule aggregates TIAR and G3BP1 was performed on astrocytoma cells, and subsequent analysis revealed that astrocytoma stress granules harbor unique mRNAs for various cellular pathways, including cellular migration, metabolism, translation, and transcriptional regulation. Human astrocytoma cell stress granules contain mRNAs that are known to be involved in glioma signaling and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These data provide evidence that RNA stress granules are a novel form of epigenetic regulation in astrocytoma cells, which may be targetable by chemical inhibitors and enhance astrocytoma susceptibility to conventional therapy, such as radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:27106762

  11. Myosin Va facilitates the distribution of secretory granules in the F-actin rich cortex of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Kögel, Tanja; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Salm, Thorsten; Schlicker, Oliver; Hellwig, Andrea; Hammer, John A; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann

    2003-04-01

    Neuroendocrine secretory granules, the storage organelles for neuropeptides and hormones, are formed at the trans-Golgi network, stored inside the cell and exocytosed upon stimulation. Previously, we have reported that newly formed secretory granules of PC12 cells are transported in a microtubule-dependent manner from the trans-Golgi network to the F-actin-rich cell cortex, where they undergo short directed movements and exhibit a homogeneous distribution. Here we provide morphological and biochemical evidence that myosin Va is associated with secretory granules. Expression of a dominant-negative tail domain of myosin Va in PC12 cells led to an extensive clustering of secretory granules close to the cell periphery, a loss of their cortical restriction and a strong reduction in their motility in the actin cortex. Based on this data we propose a model that implies a dual transport system for secretory granules: after microtubule-dependent delivery to the cell periphery, secretory granules exhibit a myosin Va-dependent transport leading to their restriction and even dispersal in the F-actin-rich cortex of PC12 cells. PMID:12615975

  12. Rapid uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation accompanies glutamate toxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Minervini, G M; Marra, E; Passarella, S; Calissano, P

    1996-11-01

    A 100 microM glutamate pulse administered to rat cerebellar granule cells causes a very rapid and progressive decrease in both cell and mitochondrial oxygen consumption caused by glucose and succinate addition, respectively. The respiratory control ratio, which reflects the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP, is reduced by 50% within the first 30 min after glutamate addition. Subsequent to glutamate exposure, a progressive decrease of respiratory control ratio to almost 1 was found within the following 3-5 h. The addition of extra calcium had no effect per se on oxygen consumption by cell homogenate. PMID:8981415

  13. Study of Mast Cells and Granules from Primo Nodes Using Scanning Ionic Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeong-Yung; Jung, Goo-Eun; Kwon, Hee-Min; Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Cho, Sang-Joon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-12-01

    Acupuncture points have a notable characteristic in that they have a higher density of mast cells (MCs) compared with nonacupoints in the skin, which is consistent with the augmentation of the immune function by acupuncture treatment. The primo vascular system, which was proposed as the anatomical structure of the acupuncture points and meridians, also has a high density of MCs. We isolated the primo nodes from the surfaces of internal abdominal organs, and the harvested primo nodes were stained with toluidine blue. The MCs were easily recognized by their stained color and their characteristic granules. The MCs were classified into four stages according to the degranulation of histamine granules in the MCs. Using conventional optical microscopes details of the degranulation state of MCs in each stage were not observable. However, we were able to investigate the distribution of the granules on the surfaces of the MCs in each stage, and to demonstrate the height profiles and three-dimensional structures of the MCs without disturbance of the cell membrane by using the scanning ion conductance microscopy. PMID:26742911

  14. Synthetic mast-cell granules as adjuvants to promote and polarize immunity in lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, Ashley L.; Chan, Cheryl Y.; Staats, Herman F.; Leong, Kam W.; Abraham, Soman N.

    2012-03-01

    Granules of mast cells (MCs) enhance adaptive immunity when, on activation, they are released as stable particles. Here we show that submicrometre particles modelled after MC granules augment immunity when used as adjuvants in vaccines. The synthetic particles, which consist of a carbohydrate backbone with encapsulated inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor, replicate attributes of MCs in vivo including the targeting of draining lymph nodes and the timed release of the encapsulated mediators. When used as an adjuvant during vaccination of mice with haemagglutinin from the influenza virus, the particles enhanced adaptive immune responses and increased survival of mice on lethal challenge. Furthermore, differential loading of the particles with the cytokine IL-12 directed the character of the response towards Th1 lymphocytes. The synthetic MC adjuvants replicate and enhance the functions of MCs during vaccination, and can be extended to polarize the resulting immunity.

  15. A Reinforcing Circuit Action of Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptor Modulators on Cerebellar Granule Cell Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABARs) are the targets of a wide variety of modulatory drugs which enhance chloride flux through GABAR ion channels. Certain GABAR modulators appear to acutely enhance the function of δ subunit-containing GABAR subtypes responsible for tonic forms of inhibition. Here we identify a reinforcing circuit mechanism by which these drugs, in addition to directly enhancing GABAR function, also increase GABA release. Electrophysiological recordings in cerebellar slices from rats homozygous for the ethanol-hypersensitive (α6100Q) allele show that modulators and agonists selective for δ-containing GABARs such as THDOC, ethanol and THIP (gaboxadol) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in granule cells. Ethanol fails to augment granule cell sIPSC frequency in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that circuit mechanisms involving granule cell output contribute to ethanol-enhancement of synaptic inhibition. Additionally, GABAR antagonists decrease ethanol-induced enhancement of Golgi cell firing. Consistent with a role for glutamatergic inputs, THIP-induced increases in Golgi cell firing are abolished by glutamate receptor antagonists. Moreover, THIP enhances the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in Golgi cells. Analyses of knockout mice indicate that δ subunit-containing GABARs are required for enhancing GABA release in the presence of ethanol and THIP. The limited expression of the GABAR δ subunit protein within the cerebellar cortex suggests that an indirect, circuit mechanism is responsible for stimulating Golgi cell GABA release by drugs selective for extrasynaptic isoforms of GABARs. Such circuit effects reinforce direct actions of these positive modulators on tonic GABAergic inhibition and are likely to contribute to the potent effect of these compounds as nervous system depressants. PMID:23977374

  16. A reinforcing circuit action of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor modulators on cerebellar granule cell inhibition.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Meera, Pratap; Karakossian, Movses H; Otis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABARs) are the targets of a wide variety of modulatory drugs which enhance chloride flux through GABAR ion channels. Certain GABAR modulators appear to acutely enhance the function of δ subunit-containing GABAR subtypes responsible for tonic forms of inhibition. Here we identify a reinforcing circuit mechanism by which these drugs, in addition to directly enhancing GABAR function, also increase GABA release. Electrophysiological recordings in cerebellar slices from rats homozygous for the ethanol-hypersensitive (α6100Q) allele show that modulators and agonists selective for δ-containing GABARs such as THDOC, ethanol and THIP (gaboxadol) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in granule cells. Ethanol fails to augment granule cell sIPSC frequency in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that circuit mechanisms involving granule cell output contribute to ethanol-enhancement of synaptic inhibition. Additionally, GABAR antagonists decrease ethanol-induced enhancement of Golgi cell firing. Consistent with a role for glutamatergic inputs, THIP-induced increases in Golgi cell firing are abolished by glutamate receptor antagonists. Moreover, THIP enhances the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in Golgi cells. Analyses of knockout mice indicate that δ subunit-containing GABARs are required for enhancing GABA release in the presence of ethanol and THIP. The limited expression of the GABAR δ subunit protein within the cerebellar cortex suggests that an indirect, circuit mechanism is responsible for stimulating Golgi cell GABA release by drugs selective for extrasynaptic isoforms of GABARs. Such circuit effects reinforce direct actions of these positive modulators on tonic GABAergic inhibition and are likely to contribute to the potent effect of these compounds as nervous system depressants. PMID:23977374

  17. Selective autophagic degradation of maternally-loaded germline P granule components in somatic cells during C. elegans embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Tian, E; Zhang, Hong

    2009-07-01

    Germline P granules are specialized protein/RNA aggregates that are found exclusively in germ cells in C. elegans. During the early embryonic divisions that generate germ blastomeres, aggregate-prone P granule components PGL-1 and PGL-3 that remain in the cytoplasm destined for somatic daughters are selectively removed by autophagy. Loss-of-function of components of the autophagy pathway, including the VPS-34/BEC-1 complex, causes accumulation of PGL-1 and PGL-3 into aggregates in somatic cells (termed PGL granules). Formation of PGL granules depends on SEPA-1, which is an integral component of these granules. SEPA-1 is preferentially degraded by autophagy and is also required for the autophagic degradation of PGL-1 and PGL-3. SEPA-1 functions as a bridging molecule in mediating degradation of P granule components by directly interacting with PGL-3 and also with the autophagy protein LGG-1/Atg8. The defect in embryonic development in autophagy mutants is suppressed by mutation of sepa-1, suggesting that autophagic degradation of PGL granule components may provide nutrients for embryogenesis and/or also prevent the formation of aggregates that could be toxic for animal development. Our study reveals a specific physiological function of selective autophagic degradation during C. elegans development. PMID:19372764

  18. Bax inactivation in lurcher mutants rescues cerebellar granule cells but not purkinje cells or inferior olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Selimi, F; Vogel, M W; Mariani, J

    2000-07-15

    Lurcher is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor gene (Grid2) that turns the receptor into a leaky ion channel. The expression of the Lurcher gene in heterozygous (Grid2(Lc/+)) mutants induces the death of almost all Purkinje cells starting from the second postnatal week. Ninety percent of the granule cells and 60-75% of the inferior olivary neurons die because of the loss of their target neurons, the Purkinje cells. The apoptotic nature of the neurodegeneration has been demonstrated previously by the presence of activated caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, has been shown to be involved in developmental neuronal death. To study the role of Bax in Grid2(Lc/+) neurodegeneration, double mutants with Grid2(Lc/)+ mice and Bax knock-out mice (Bax-/-) were generated. Bax deletion had no effect on the death of Purkinje cells and inferior olivary neurons, although a temporary rescue of some Purkinje cells could be detected in P15 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- animals. From postnatal day 15 (P15) to P60, the number of granule cells in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/-mice did not significantly change and was significantly increased compared with the number found in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax+/+ mice. Granule cell number in P60 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- mice corresponded to 70% of the number found in wild-type mice. Our results show that Bax inactivation in Grid2(Lc/+) mice does not rescue intrinsic Purkinje cell death or the target-related cell death of olivary neurons, but Bax inactivation does inhibit persistently target-related cell death in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:10884318

  19. The survival of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells is not dependent on elevated potassium-ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, H S; Hack, N; Balázs, R; Jørgensen, O S

    1994-08-01

    The effects of K(+)-induced membrane depolarization were studied on the survival and biochemical parameters in mouse and rat cerebellar granule cells grown in micro-well cultures. Cell numbers were determined by estimating DNA content using the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome binding assay. DNA from degenerated cells was removed by prior DNAase treatment. These DNA estimates of cell numbers were comparable with values obtained by direct counting of fluorescein diacetate-stained viable cells. In agreement with previous studies, the survival of rat granule cells was promoted by increasing the concentration of K+ in the medium from 5 to 25 mM throughout a 7-day culture period. In contrast, mouse granule cells survived in culture containing 'low' K+ (5 or 10 mM), as well as in the presence of 'high' K+ (25 mM). On the other hand, several biochemical parameters in mouse granule cells were markedly increased by cultivation in 'high' as compared with 'low' K(+)-containing media, demonstrated by increased fluorescein diacetate esterase activity, enhanced rate of NADPH-dependent tetrazolium reduction, augmented 2-deoxy-D-glucose accumulation and increased N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked 45Ca2+ influx. It was concluded that although cultivation in 'high' K+ promotes biochemical differentiation in mouse cerebellar granule cells, these cells differ from their rat counterparts in that they do not develop a survival requirement for K(+)-induced membrane depolarization. PMID:7529458

  20. Differential dendritic Ca2+ signalling in young and mature hippocampal granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Stocca, Gabriella; Schmidt-Hieber, Christoph; Bischofberger, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal activity is critically important for development and plasticity of dendrites, axons and synaptic connections. Although Ca2+ is an important signal molecule for these processes, not much is known about the regulation of the dendritic Ca2+ concentration in developing neurons. Here we used confocal Ca2+ imaging to investigate dendritic Ca2+ signalling in young and mature hippocampal granule cells, identified by the expression of the immature neuronal marker polysialated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). Using the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye OGB-5N, we found that both young and mature granule cells showed large action-potential evoked dendritic Ca2+ transients with similar amplitude of ∼200 nm, indicating active backpropagation of action potentials. However, the decay of the dendritic Ca2+ concentration back to baseline values was substantially different with a decay time constant of 550 ms in young versus 130 ms in mature cells, leading to a more efficient temporal summation of Ca2+ signals during theta-frequency stimulation in the young neurons. Comparison of the peak Ca2+ concentration and the decay measured with different Ca2+ indicators (OGB-5N, OGB-1) in the two populations of neurons revealed that the young cells had an ∼3 times smaller endogenous Ca2+-binding ratio (∼75 versus∼220) and an ∼10 times slower Ca2+ extrusion rate (∼170 s−1versus∼1800 s−1). These data suggest that the large dendritic Ca2+ signals due to low buffer capacity and slow extrusion rates in young granule cells may contribute to the activity-dependent growth and plasticity of dendrites and new synaptic connections. This will finally support differentiation and integration of young neurons into the hippocampal network. PMID:18591186

  1. The composition of intracellular granules from the metal-accumulating cells of the common garden snail (Helix aspersa).

    PubMed Central

    Howard, B; Mitchell, P C; Ritchie, A; Simkiss, K; Taylor, M

    1981-01-01

    Certain cells in the hepatopancreas of the common garden snail (Helix aspersa) contain intracellular granules that are sites of metal-ion accumulation. These granules have been extracted and investigated by u.v. and i.r. spectroscopy, atomic-absorption spectroscopy, X-ray microanalysis, thermogravimetric analysis, enzymic assay and microanalysis. The deposits contain about 18% (w/w) water, 5% (w/w) organic matter and 76% (w/w) inorganic material of which the main components are Ca2+, Mg2+ and P2O7(4)-. The possible origin of these granules is discussed, as is their role in detoxifying heavy-metal ions. PMID:6272732

  2. Imaging exocytosis of single glucagon-like peptide-1 containing granules in a murine enteroendocrine cell line with total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kawakami, Hayato; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-12-04

    To analyze the exocytosis of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) granules, we imaged the motion of GLP-1 granules labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) fused to human growth hormone (hGH-Venus) in an enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1 cells, by total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF) microscopy. We found glucose stimulation caused biphasic GLP-1 granule exocytosis: during the first phase, fusion events occurred from two types of granules (previously docked granules and newcomers), and thereafter continuous fusion was observed mostly from newcomers during the second phase. Closely similar to the insulin granule fusion from pancreatic {beta} cells, the regulated biphasic exocytosis from two types of granules may be a common mechanism in glucose-evoked hormone release from endocrine cells.

  3. Rapid Signaling Actions of Environmental Estrogens in Developing Granule Cell Neurons Are Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoa H.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) constitute a diverse group of man-made chemicals and natural compounds derived from plants and microbial metabolism. Estrogen-like actions are mediated via the nuclear hormone receptor activity of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and rapid regulation of intracellular signaling cascades. Previous study defined cerebellar granule cell neurons as estrogen responsive and that granule cell precursor viability was developmentally sensitive to estrogens. In this study experiments using Western blot analysis and pharmacological approaches have characterized the receptor and signaling modes of action of selective and nonselective estrogen ligands in developing cerebellar granule cells. Estrogen treatments were found to briefly increase ERK1/2-phosphorylation and then cause prolonged depression of ERK1/2 activity. The sensitivity of granule cell precursors to estrogen-induced cell death was found to require the integrated activation of membrane and intracellular ER signaling pathways. The sensitivity of granule cells to selective and nonselective ER agonists and a variety of estrogenic and nonestrogenic EDCs was also examined. The ERβ selective agonist DPN, but not the ERα selective agonist 4,4′,4′-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol or other ERα-specific ligands, stimulated cell death. Only EDCs with selective or nonselective ERβ activities like daidzein, equol, diethylstilbestrol, and bisphenol A were observed to induce E2-like neurotoxicity supporting the conclusion that estrogen sensitivity in granule cells is mediated via ERβ. The presented results also demonstrate the utility of estrogen sensitive developing granule cells as an in vitro assay for elucidating rapid estrogen-signaling mechanisms and to detect EDCs that act at ERβ to rapidly regulate intracellular signaling. PMID:20926581

  4. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S.; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E.

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline—the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction—protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  5. The Stress Granule RNA-Binding Protein TIAR-1 Protects Female Germ Cells from Heat Shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huelgas-Morales, Gabriela; Silva-García, Carlos Giovanni; Salinas, Laura S; Greenstein, David; Navarro, Rosa E

    2016-01-01

    In response to stressful conditions, eukaryotic cells launch an arsenal of regulatory programs to protect the proteome. One major protective response involves the arrest of protein translation and the formation of stress granules, cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes containing the conserved RNA-binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR. The stress granule response is thought to preserve mRNA for translation when conditions improve. For cells of the germline-the immortal cell lineage required for sexual reproduction-protection from stress is critically important for perpetuation of the species, yet how stress granule regulatory mechanisms are deployed in animal reproduction is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the stress granule protein TIAR-1 protects the Caenorhabditis elegans germline from the adverse effects of heat shock. Animals containing strong loss-of-function mutations in tiar-1 exhibit significantly reduced fertility compared to the wild type following heat shock. Analysis of a heat-shock protein promoter indicates that tiar-1 mutants display an impaired heat-shock response. We observed that TIAR-1 was associated with granules in the gonad core and oocytes during several stressful conditions. Both gonad core and oocyte granules are dynamic structures that depend on translation; protein synthesis inhibitors altered their formation. Nonetheless, tiar-1 was required for the formation of gonad core granules only. Interestingly, the gonad core granules did not seem to be needed for the germ cells to develop viable embryos after heat shock. This suggests that TIAR-1 is able to protect the germline from heat stress independently of these structures. PMID:26865701

  6. Staufen1 impairs stress granule formation in skeletal muscle cells from myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Klein Gunnewiek, Amanda; Bélanger, Guy; Crawford Parks, Tara E.; Côté, Jocelyn; Jasmin, Bernard J.

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is caused by an expansion of CUG repeats (CUGexp) in the DMPK mRNA 3′UTR. CUGexp-containing mRNAs become toxic to cells by misregulating RNA-binding proteins. Here we investigated the consequence of this RNA toxicity on the cellular stress response. We report that cell stress efficiently triggers formation of stress granules (SGs) in proliferating, quiescent, and differentiated muscle cells, as shown by the appearance of distinct cytoplasmic TIA-1– and DDX3-containing foci. We show that Staufen1 is also dynamically recruited into these granules. Moreover, we discovered that DM1 myoblasts fail to properly form SGs in response to arsenite. This blockage was not observed in DM1 fibroblasts, demonstrating a cell type–specific defect. DM1 myoblasts display increased expression and sequestration of toxic CUGexp mRNAs compared with fibroblasts. Of importance, down-regulation of Staufen1 in DM1 myoblasts rescues SG formation. Together our data show that Staufen1 participates in the inhibition of SG formation in DM1 myoblasts. These results reveal that DM1 muscle cells fail to properly respond to stress, thereby likely contributing to the complex pathogenesis of DM1. PMID:27030674

  7. Generation and Characterization of an Nse-CreERT2 Transgenic Line Suitable for Inducible Gene Manipulation in Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Steller, Laura; May, Petra; Günther, Thomas; Schüle, Roland; Frotscher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We created an Nse-CreERT2 mouse line expressing the tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of the neuron-specific enolase (Nse) promoter. By using Cre reporter lines we could show that this Nse-CreERT2 line has recombination activity in the granule cells of all cerebellar lobules as well as in postmitotic granule cell precursors in the external granular layer of the developing cerebellum. A few hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells showed Cre-mediated recombination as well. Cre activity could be induced in both the developing and adult mouse brain. The established mouse line constitutes a valuable tool to study the function of genes expressed by cerebellar granule cells in the developing and adult brain. In combination with reporter lines it is a useful model to analyze the development and maintenance of the cerebellar architecture including granule cell distribution, migration, and the extension of granule cell fibers in vivo. PMID:24950299

  8. Procaspase-activating compound 1 induces a caspase-3-dependent cell death in cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Gulzeb; Akselsen, Oyvind W.; Hansen, Trond V.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2010-09-15

    Procaspase-activating compound 1, PAC-1, has been introduced as a direct activator of procaspase-3 and has been suggested as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Its activation of procaspase-3 is dependent on the chelation of zinc. We have tested PAC-1 and an analogue of PAC-1 as zinc chelators in vitro as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 and induce cell death in chicken cerebellar granule neuron cultures. These neurons are non-dividing, primary cells with normal caspase-3. The results reported herein show that PAC-1 chelates zinc, activates procaspase-3, and leads to caspase-3-dependent cell death in neurons, as the specific caspase-3-inhibitor Ac-DEVD-cmk inhibited both the caspase-3 activity and cell death. Thus, chicken cerebellar granule neurons is a suitable model to study mechanisms of interference with apoptosis of PAC-1 and similar compounds. Furthermore, the present study also raises concern about potential neurotoxicity of PAC-1 if used in cancer therapy.

  9. BACE2 is stored in secretory granules of mouse and rat pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Giovanna; Franzi, Francesca; Placidi, Claudia; Acquati, Francesco; Palumbo, Elisa; Russo, Antonella; Taramelli, Roberto; Sessa, Fausto; La Rosa, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    BACE2 is a protease homologous to BACE1 protein, an enzyme involved in the amyloid formation of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, despite the high homology between these two proteins, the biological role of BACE2 is still controversial, even though a few studies have suggested a pathogenetic role in sporadic inclusion-body myositis and hereditary inclusion-body myopathy, which are characterized by vacuolization of muscular fibers with intracellular deposits of proteins similar to those found in the brain of AD patients. Although BACE2 has also been identified in the pancreas, its function remains unknown and its specific localization in different pancreatic cell types has not been definitively ascertained. For these reasons, the authors have investigated the cellular and subcellular localization of BACE2 in normal rodent pancreases. BACE2 immunoreactivity was found in secretory granules of beta cells, co-stored with insulin and IAPP, while it was lacking in the other endocrine and exocrine cell types. The presence of BACE2 in secretory granules of beta cells suggests that it may play a role in diabetes-associated amyloidogenesis. PMID:19117266

  10. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D. PMID:26845357

  11. Entorhinal Denervation Induces Homeostatic Synaptic Scaling of Excitatory Postsynapses of Dentate Granule Cells in Mouse Organotypic Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Andreas; Becker, Denise; Jedlicka, Peter; Winkels, Raphael; Roeper, Jochen; Deller, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Denervation-induced changes in excitatory synaptic strength were studied following entorhinal deafferentation of hippocampal granule cells in mature (≥3 weeks old) mouse organotypic entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed an increase in excitatory synaptic strength in response to denervation during the first week after denervation. By the end of the second week synaptic strength had returned to baseline. Because these adaptations occurred in response to the loss of excitatory afferents, they appeared to be in line with a homeostatic adjustment of excitatory synaptic strength. To test whether denervation-induced changes in synaptic strength exploit similar mechanisms as homeostatic synaptic scaling following pharmacological activity blockade, we treated denervated cultures at 2 days post lesion for 2 days with tetrodotoxin. In these cultures, the effects of denervation and activity blockade were not additive, suggesting that similar mechanisms are involved. Finally, we investigated whether entorhinal denervation, which removes afferents from the distal dendrites of granule cells while leaving the associational afferents to the proximal dendrites of granule cells intact, results in a global or a local up-scaling of granule cell synapses. By using computational modeling and local electrical stimulations in Strontium (Sr2+)-containing bath solution, we found evidence for a lamina-specific increase in excitatory synaptic strength in the denervated outer molecular layer at 3–4 days post lesion. Taken together, our data show that entorhinal denervation results in homeostatic functional changes of excitatory postsynapses of denervated dentate granule cells in vitro. PMID:22403720

  12. Enhanced acoustic startle responding in rats with radiation-induced hippocampal granule cell hypoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Ferguson, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of the neonatal rat hippocampus reduces the proliferation of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and results in locomotor hyperactivity, behavioral preservation, and deficits on some learned tasks. In order to address the role of changes in stimulus salience and behavioral inhibition in animals with this type of brain damage, irradiated and normal rats were compared in their startle reactions to an acoustic stimulus. Irradiated rats startled with a consistently higher amplitude than control and were more likely to exhibit startle responses. These animals with hippocampal damage also failed to habituate to the startle stimulus and, under certain circumstances, showed potentiated startle responses after many tone presentations.

  13. [Microspectrofluorometric analysis of the effect of centrophenoxine on lipofuscin granules of hybridoma (Retrovirus-transformed) cells].

    PubMed

    Tatariunas, A B

    1990-04-01

    The increase of the own luminescence lipofuscin granules (LG) in the course of single and repeated ultraviolet (UV) excitations (365 nm) in hybridoma (retrovirus transformed) cells cultured with or without 5 x 10(-4) M centrophenoxine (CP) was studied by microspectrofluorometric method. It was shown that CP influences only the rate of photochemical changes of chromophores in LG. Kinetic patterns of the own luminescence intensity of LG at the wavelength of 540 nm during excitation by UV permit one to suggest the occurrence of the cyclic chromophore changes. PMID:2117472

  14. TIA1 oxidation inhibits stress granule assembly and sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto-Matsuzaki, Kyoko; Saito, Haruo; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs) are multimolecular aggregates of stalled translation pre-initiation complexes that prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins, and that are formed in response to certain types of stress including ER stress. SG formation contributes to cell survival not only by suppressing translation but also by sequestering some apoptosis regulatory factors. Because cells can be exposed to various stresses simultaneously in vivo, the regulation of SG assembly under multiple stress conditions is important but unknown. Here we report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 oxidize the SG-nucleating protein TIA1, thereby inhibiting SG assembly. Thus, when cells are confronted with a SG-inducing stress such as ER stress caused by protein misfolding, together with ROS-induced oxidative stress, they cannot form SGs, resulting in the promotion of apoptosis. We demonstrate that the suppression of SG formation by oxidative stress may underlie the neuronal cell death seen in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26738979

  15. Myeloperoxidase and Crystalline Bodies in the Granules of DMBA-Induced Rat Chloroma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ioachim, Harry L.; Keller, Steven; Sabbath, Marlene; Andersson, Barbro; Dorsett, Brent; Essner, Edward

    1972-01-01

    Chloroma (chloroleukemia) was induced in a splenectomized rat by repeatedly administering dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and was serially transplanted thereafter. Composed of immature myeloid cells, the tumor imparted a green discoloration to the tissues that it infiltrated extensively. Chloroma cells fluoresced red in ultraviolet light, produced a characteristic curve in spectrophotometry, and contained large amounts of myeloperoxidase. They included numerous intracytoplasmic granules of both types A and B, which contained occasional crystalline bars. Permanent lines of chloroma cells were established in tissue culture. These cells, while maintaining their initial morphology, ceased producing myeloperoxidase and subsequently induced white tumors when they were isotransplanted. ImagesFig 12Fig 13Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3 PMID:4333120

  16. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  17. Simulating Spinal Border Cells and Cerebellar Granule Cells under Locomotion – A Case Study of Spinocerebellar Information Processing

    PubMed Central

    Spanne, Anton; Geborek, Pontus; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The spinocerebellar systems are essential for the brain in the performance of coordinated movements, but our knowledge about the spinocerebellar interactions is very limited. Recently, several crucial pieces of information have been acquired for the spinal border cell (SBC) component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT), as well as the effects of SBC mossy fiber activation in granule cells of the cerebellar cortex. SBCs receive monosynaptic input from the reticulospinal tract (RST), which is an important driving system under locomotion, and disynaptic inhibition from Ib muscle afferents. The patterns of activity of RST neurons and Ib afferents under locomotion are known. The activity of VSCT neurons under fictive locomotion, i.e. without sensory feedback, is also known, but there is little information on how these neurons behave under actual locomotion and for cerebellar granule cells receiving SBC input this is completely unknown. But the available information makes it possible to simulate the interactions between the spinal and cerebellar neuronal circuitries with a relatively large set of biological constraints. Using a model of the various neuronal elements and the network they compose, we simulated the modulation of the SBCs and their target granule cells under locomotion and hence generated testable predictions of their general pattern of modulation under this condition. This particular system offers a unique opportunity to simulate these interactions with a limited number of assumptions, which helps making the model biologically plausible. Similar principles of information processing may be expected to apply to all spinocerebellar systems. PMID:25226298

  18. Calcium buffering in rodent olfactory bulb granule cells and mitral cells.

    PubMed

    Egger, Veronica; Stroh, Olga

    2009-09-15

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb, axonless granule cells (GCs) mediate self- and lateral inhibitory interactions between mitral cells (MCs) via reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses. Calcium signals in the GC dendrites and reciprocal spines appear to decay unusually slowly, hence GC calcium handling might contribute to the known asynchronous release at this synapse. By recording fluorescence transients of different Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes at variable concentrations evoked by backpropagating action potentials (APs) and saturating AP trains we extrapolated Ca(2+) dynamics to conditions of zero added buffer for juvenile rat GC apical dendrites and spines and MC lateral dendrites. Resting [Ca(2+)] was at approximately 50 nM in both GC dendrites and spines. The average endogenous GC buffer capacities (kappa(E)) were within a range of 80-90 in the dendrites and 110-140 in the spines. The extrusion rate (gamma) was estimated as 570 s(-1) for dendrites and 870 s(-1) for spines and the decay time constant as approximately 200 ms for both. Single-current-evoked APs resulted in a [Ca(2+)] elevation of approximately 250 nM. Calcium handling in juvenile and adult mouse GCs appeared mostly similar. In MC lateral dendrites, we found AP-mediated [Ca(2+)] elevations of approximately 130 nM with a similar decay to that in GC dendrites, while kappa(E) and gamma were roughly 4-fold higher. In conclusion, the slow GC Ca(2+) dynamics are due mostly to sluggish Ca(2+) extrusion. Under physiological conditions this slow removal may well contribute to delayed release and also feed into other Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms that foster asynchronous output from the reciprocal spine. PMID:19635818

  19. Acquisition of granule neuron precursor identity is a critical determinant of progenitor cell competence to form Hedgehog-induced medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, Ulrich; Heine, Vivi M.; Mao, Junhao; Kho, Alvin T.; Dillon, Allison K.; Han, Young-Goo; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Sun, Tao; Ligon, Azra H.; Qian, Ying; Ma, Qiufu; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; McMahon, Andrew P.; Rowitch, David H.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2008-01-01

    Origins of the brain tumor, medulloblastoma, from stem cells or restricted progenitor cells are unclear. To investigate this, we activated oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in multipotent and lineage-restricted CNS progenitors. We observed that normal unipotent cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNP) derive from hGFAP+ and Olig2+ RL progenitors. Hh activation in a spectrum of early and late stage CNS progenitors generated similar medulloblastomas, but not other brain cancers, indicating that acquisition of CGNP identity is essential for tumorigenesis. We show in human and mouse medulloblastoma that cells expressing the glia-associated markers Gfap and Olig2 are neoplastic and that they retain features of embryonic-type granule lineage progenitors. Thus, oncogenic Hh signaling promotes medulloblastoma from lineage-restricted granule cell progenitors. PMID:18691547

  20. Distribution and phenotypes of unipolar brush cells in relation to the granule cell system of the rat cochlear nuclear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Diño, Maria. R.; Mugnaini, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In most mammals the cochlear nuclear complex (CN) contains a distributed system of granule cells (GCS), whose parallel fiber axons innervate the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). Like their counterpart in cerebellum, CN granules are innervated by mossy fibers of various origins. The GCS is complemented by unipolar brush (UBCs) and Golgi cells, and by stellate and cartwheel cells of the DCN. This cerebellum-like microcircuit modulates the activity of the DCN’s main projection neurons, the pyramidal, giant and tuberculoventral neurons, and is thought to improve auditory performance by integrating acoustic and proprioceptive information. In this paper, we focus on the UBCs, a chemically heterogeneous neuronal population, using antibodies to calretinin, mGluR1α epidermal growth factor substrate 8 (Eps8) and the transcription factor Tbr2. Eps8 and Tbr2 labeled most of the CN’s UBCs, if not the entire population, while calretinin and mGluR1α distinguished two largely separate subsets with overlapping distributions. By double labeling with antibodies to Tbr2 and the α6 GABAA-receptor subunit, we found that UBCs populate all regions of the GCS and occur at remarkably high densities in the DCN and subpeduncular corner, but rarely in the lamina. Although GCS subregions likely share the same microcircuitry, their dissimilar UBC densities suggest they may be functionally distinct. UBCs and granules are also present in regions previously not included in the GCS, namely the rostrodorsal magnocellular portions of VCN, vestibular nerve root, trapezoid body, spinal tract and sensory and principal nuclei of the trigeminal nerve, and cerebellar peduncles. The UBC’s dendritic brush receives AMPA- and NMDA-mediated input from an individual mossy fiber, favoring singularity of input, and its axon most likely forms several mossy fiber-like endings that target numerous granule cells and other UBCs, as in the cerebellum. The UBCs therefore, may amplify afferent signals temporally and

  1. Cholinergic afferent stimulation induces axonal function plasticity in adult hippocampal granule cells.

    PubMed

    Martinello, Katiuscia; Huang, Zhuo; Lujan, Rafael; Tran, Baouyen; Watanabe, Masahiko; Cooper, Edward C; Brown, David A; Shah, Mala M

    2015-01-21

    Acetylcholine critically influences hippocampal-dependent learning. Cholinergic fibers innervate hippocampal neuron axons, dendrites, and somata. The effects of acetylcholine on axonal information processing, though, remain unknown. By stimulating cholinergic fibers and making electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells, we show that synaptically released acetylcholine preferentially lowered the action potential threshold, enhancing intrinsic excitability and synaptic potential-spike coupling. These effects persisted for at least 30 min after the stimulation paradigm and were due to muscarinic receptor activation. This caused sustained elevation of axonal intracellular Ca(2+) via T-type Ca(2+) channels, as indicated by two-photon imaging. The enhanced Ca(2+) levels inhibited an axonal KV7/M current, decreasing the spike threshold. In support, immunohistochemistry revealed muscarinic M1 receptor, CaV3.2, and KV7.2/7.3 subunit localization in granule cell axons. Since alterations in axonal signaling affect neuronal firing patterns and neurotransmitter release, this is an unreported cellular mechanism by which acetylcholine might, at least partly, enhance cognitive processing. PMID:25578363

  2. Characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Toms, N. J.; Jane, D. E.; Tse, H. W.; Roberts, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The pharmacology of excitatory amino acid (EAA)-stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, monitored via [3H]-inositol monophosphate accumulation, was investigated in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. 2. EAA-stimulated PI hydrolysis peaked after 4-5 days in vitro and subsequently declined. 3. The agonist order of potency was found to be (EC50): L-quisqualic acid (Quis) (2 microM) >> L-glutamate (50 microM) > (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD) (102 microM). L-Glutamate (Emax = 873% of basal activity) elicited the largest stimulation of PI hydrolysis, whereas Quis (Emax = 603%) and (1S,3R)-ACPD (Emax = 306%) produced somewhat lower stimulations. 4. Several phenylglycine derivatives were found to be active in inhibiting 2 microM Quis-stimulated PI hydrolysis, in order of potency (IC50): (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (41 microM) > or = (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (51 microM) >> (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (243 microM). 5. Cultured cerebellar granule cells of the rat appear to have Group I mGluR pharmacology similar to that reported for cloned mGluR1 and provide an ideal system for investigating novel mGluR1 ligands in a native environment. PMID:8680712

  3. The perinuclear factor, a rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantigen, is not present in keratohyalin granules of cultured buccal mucosa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hoet, R M; Voorsmit, R A; Van Venrooij, W J

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients have antibodies in their serum directed against the perinuclear factor, a protein component present in keratohyalin granules in the cytoplasm of human buccal mucosa cells. The anti-perinuclear factor (APF) can only be detected by an indirect immunofluorescence test performed on fresh buccal mucosa cells from 'selected donors'. To obtain a more reliable antigen source and to gain more insight into the origin and nature of the perinuclear factor we attempted to culture perinuclear factor-containing buccal mucosa cells. Here we describe the successful culturing of such cells, which, however, did not contain keratohyalin granules nor the perinuclear factor. By adding the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) we were able to induce keratohyalin granules in both cultured primary buccal mucosa cells and a squamous carcinoma cell line of the cheek (SqCC/Y1). These induced keratohyalin granules do contain the protein profilaggrin, which in vivo, in fresh buccal mucosa cells, co-localizes with the perinuclear factor. However, we were not able to demonstrate the presence of the perinuclear factor, not even after induction of terminal differentiation of the cultured cells nor after Epstein-Barr virus infection. Our results suggest that the perinuclear factor, in contrast to profilaggrin, is not an integral component of buccal mucosa cells. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1849807

  4. In vitro atrazine-exposure inhibits human natural killer cell lytic granule release

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B. . E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2007-06-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a known immunotoxicant and an inhibitor of human natural killer (NK) cell lytic function. The precise changes in NK cell lytic function following atrazine exposure have not been fully elucidated. The current study identifies the point at which atrazine exerts its affect on the stepwise process of human NK cell-mediated lyses of the K562 target cell line. Using intracellular staining of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, it was determined that a 24-h in vitro exposure to atrazine did not decrease the level of NK cell lytic proteins granzyme A, granzyme B or perforin. Thus, it was hypothesized that atrazine exposure was inhibiting the ability of the NK cells to bind to the target cell and subsequently inhibit the release of lytic protein from the NK cell. To test this hypothesis, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were employed to analyze NK cell-target cell co-cultures following atrazine exposure. These assays demonstrated no significant decrease in the level of target cell binding. However, the levels of NK intracellular lytic protein retained and the amount of lytic protein released were assessed following a 4-h incubation with K562 target cells. The relative level of intracellular lytic protein was 25-50% higher, and the amount of lytic protein released was 55-65% less in atrazine-treated cells than vehicle-treated cells following incubation with the target cells. These results indicate that ATR exposure inhibits the ability of NK cells to lyse target cells by blocking lytic granule release without affecting the ability of the NK cell to form stable conjugates with target cells.

  5. GABA induces functionally active low-affinity GABA receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meier, E; Drejer, J; Schousboe, A

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonists muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5-4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the development of GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was studied by cultivation of the cells in media containing these substances. It was found that the presence of 50 microM GABA in the culture media led to the induction of low-affinity GABA receptors (KD 546 +/- 117 nM) in addition to the high-affinity receptors (KD 7 +/- 0.5 nM) which were present regardless of the presence of GABA in the culture media. The functional activity of the GABA receptors was tested by investigating the ability of GABA to modulate evoked glutamate release from the cells. It was found that GABA could inhibit evoked glutamate release (ED50 10 +/- 3 microM) only when the cells had been cultured in the presence of 50 microM GABA, 50 microM muscimol, or 150 microM THIP, i.e., under conditions where low-affinity GABA receptors were present on the cells. This inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by 120 microM bicuculline and mimicked by 50 microM muscimol or 150 microM THIP whereas 150 microM (-)-baclofen had no effect. It is concluded that GABA acting extracellularly induces formation of low-affinity receptors on cerebellar granule cells and that these receptors are necessary for mediating an inhibitory effect of GABA on evoked glutamate release. The pharmacological properties of these GABA receptors indicate that they belong to the so-called GABAA receptors. PMID:6149269

  6. Telocytes as a Source of Progenitor Cells in Regeneration and Repair Through Granulation Tissue.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Pino García, Maria; González, Miriam; Díaz-Flores, Lucio; Francisco Madrid, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines the role of CD34+ stromal cells/telocytes (CD34+ SC/TCs) in repair and considers the following issues. Firstly, the conceptual aspects of repair, including regeneration and repair through granulation tissue (RTGT) as two types of repair, RTGT stages (inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling), and tissue in repair as a substrate to assess the in vivo behavior of activated CD34+ SC/TCs. Subsequently, current knowledge of CD34+ SC/TCs, such as identification, characteristics, and functions, as well as possible stages (quiescent and activated) are taken into account. We then consider the role in regeneration of quiescent CD34+ SC/TCs (in unperturbed physiological conditions) as a nurse of stem cells (e.g., in the heart, skin, respiratory tree, gastrointestinal tract, liver, eye, and choroid plexus). Special attention is paid to the characteristics of activated CD34+ SC/TCs and the overlapping steps of activation with and without loss of CD34 expression and with and without gain of αSMA expression. With this contribution, we establish the role of CD34+ SC/TCs as progenitor cells and as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in repair through granulation tissue, fibrosis, and tumor stroma. Activated CD34+ SC/TCs in encapsulation and other processes (e.g., Reinke's edema, cutaneous myxoid cyst, mixomatous mitral valve degeneration, and fibrous papula of the face) are also outlined. Finally, similarities between modifications of CD34+ SC/TCs during in vivo activation and of multipotent mesenchymal stromal/stem cells in culture are examined in order to correlate the growing literature on CD34+ SC/TCs and the exponential research in cultured mesenchymal stromal/stem cells. PMID:26423297

  7. Revisiting the single cell protein application of Cupriavidus necator H16 and recovering bioplastic granules simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Kunasundari, Balakrishnan; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Kaur, Gurjeet; Maurer, Frans H J; Sudesh, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly known as Hydrogenomonas eutropha) was famous as a potential single cell protein (SCP) in the 1970s. The drawback however was the undesirably efficient accumulation of non-nutritive polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) storage compound in the cytoplasm of this bacterium. Eventually, competition from soy-based protein resulted in SCP not receiving much attention. Nevertheless, C. necator H16 remained in the limelight as a producer of PHB, which is a material that resembles commodity plastics such as polypropylene. PHB is a 100% biobased and biodegradable polyester. Although tremendous achievements have been attained in the past 3 decades in the efficient production of PHB, this bioplastic is still costly. One of the main problems has been the recovery of PHB from the cell cytoplasm. In this study, we showed for the first time that kilogram quantities of PHB can be easily recovered in the laboratory without the use of any solvents and chemicals, just by using the cells as SCP. In addition, the present study also demonstrated the safety and tolerability of animal model used, Sprague Dawley given lyophilized cells of C. necator H16. The test animals readily produced fecal pellets that were whitish in color, as would be expected of PHB granules. The pellets were determined to contain about 82-97 wt% PHB and possessed molecular mass of around 930 kg/mol. The PHB granules recovered biologically possessed similar molecular mass compared to chloroform extracted PHB [950 kg/mol]. This method now allows the production and purification of substantial quantities of PHB for various experimental trials. The method reported here is easy, does not require expensive instrumentation, scalable and does not involve extensive use of solvents and strong chemicals. PMID:24205250

  8. Revisiting the Single Cell Protein Application of Cupriavidus necator H16 and Recovering Bioplastic Granules Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Kunasundari, Balakrishnan; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Kaur, Gurjeet; Maurer, Frans H. J.; Sudesh, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly known as Hydrogenomonas eutropha) was famous as a potential single cell protein (SCP) in the 1970s. The drawback however was the undesirably efficient accumulation of non-nutritive polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) storage compound in the cytoplasm of this bacterium. Eventually, competition from soy-based protein resulted in SCP not receiving much attention. Nevertheless, C. necator H16 remained in the limelight as a producer of PHB, which is a material that resembles commodity plastics such as polypropylene. PHB is a 100% biobased and biodegradable polyester. Although tremendous achievements have been attained in the past 3 decades in the efficient production of PHB, this bioplastic is still costly. One of the main problems has been the recovery of PHB from the cell cytoplasm. In this study, we showed for the first time that kilogram quantities of PHB can be easily recovered in the laboratory without the use of any solvents and chemicals, just by using the cells as SCP. In addition, the present study also demonstrated the safety and tolerability of animal model used, Sprague Dawley given lyophilized cells of C. necator H16. The test animals readily produced fecal pellets that were whitish in color, as would be expected of PHB granules. The pellets were determined to contain about 82-97 wt% PHB and possessed molecular mass of around 930 kg/mol. The PHB granules recovered biologically possessed similar molecular mass compared to chloroform extracted PHB [950 kg/mol]. This method now allows the production and purification of substantial quantities of PHB for various experimental trials. The method reported here is easy, does not require expensive instrumentation, scalable and does not involve extensive use of solvents and strong chemicals. PMID:24205250

  9. Stress Granules Modulate SYK to Cause Microglial Cell Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Geahlen, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Microglial cells in the brains of Alzheimer's patients are known to be recruited to amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques where they exhibit an activated phenotype, but are defective for plaque removal by phagocytosis. In this study, we show that microglia stressed by exposure to sodium arsenite or Aβ(1–42) peptides or fibrils form extensive stress granules (SGs) to which the tyrosine kinase, SYK, is recruited. SYK enhances the formation of SGs, is active within the resulting SGs and stimulates the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are toxic to neuronal cells. This sequestration of SYK inhibits the ability of microglial cells to phagocytose Escherichia coli or Aβ fibrils. We find that aged microglial cells are more susceptible to the formation of SGs; and SGs containing SYK and phosphotyrosine are prevalent in the brains of patients with severe Alzheimer's disease. Phagocytic activity can be restored to stressed microglial cells by treatment with IgG, suggesting a mechanism to explain the therapeutic efficacy of intravenous IgG. These studies describe a mechanism by which stress, including exposure to Aβ, compromises the function of microglial cells in Alzheimer's disease and suggest approaches to restore activity to dysfunctional microglial cells. PMID:26870803

  10. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, induces formation of stress granules in hepatocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Adjibade, Pauline; St-Sauveur, Valérie Grenier; Huberdeau, Miguel Quevillon; Fournier, Marie-Josée; Savard, Andreanne; Coudert, Laetitia; Khandjian, Edouard W.; Mazroui, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic RNA multimeric bodies that form under stress conditions known to inhibit translation initiation. In most reported stress cases, the formation of SGs was associated with the cell recovery from stress and survival. In cells derived from cancer, SGs formation was shown to promote resistance to either proteasome inhibitors or 5-Fluorouracil used as chemotherapeutic agents. Despite these studies, the induction of SGs by chemotherapeutic drugs contributing to cancer cells resistance is still understudied. Here we identified sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat hepatocarcinoma, as a potent chemotherapeutic inducer of SGs. The formation of SGs in sorafenib-treated hepatocarcionoma cells correlates with inhibition of translation initiation; both events requiring the phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α. Further characterisation of the mechanism of sorafenib-induced SGs revealed PERK as the main eIF2α kinase responsible for SGs formation. Depletion experiments support the implication of PERK-eIF2α-SGs pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells resistance to sorafenib. This study also suggests the existence of an unexpected complex regulatory balance between SGs and phospho-eIF2α where SGs dampen the activation of the phospho-eIF2α-downstream ATF4 cell death pathway. PMID:26556863

  11. Neuropsychological deficits in young adults born small-for-gestational age (SGA) at term.

    PubMed

    Østgård, Heidi Furre; Skranes, Jon; Martinussen, Marit; Jacobsen, Geir W; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Vik, Torstein; Pripp, Are H; Løhaugen, Gro C C

    2014-03-01

    Reduced IQ, learning difficulties and poor school performance have been reported in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) subjects. However, few studies include a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Our aim was to study neuropsychological functioning in young adults born SGA at term. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was administered to 58 SGA subjects (birth weight <10th centile) born at term, and 81 term non-SGA controls (birth weight ≥10th centile). The SGA group obtained significantly (p < .01) lower scores on the attention, executive and memory domains compared to non-SGA controls and showed higher risk of obtaining scores below -1.5 SD on the memory domain (odds ratio = 13.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.57, 112.47). At a subtest level, the SGA group obtained lower scores on most neuropsychological tests, with significant differences on 6 of 46 measures: the Trail Making Test 3 (letter sequencing), the Wechsler Memory Scale mental control and the auditory immediate memory scale, the Design Fluency, the Stroop 3 (inhibition) and the Visual Motor Integration (VMI) motor coordination subtest. Young adults born SGA score more poorly on neuropsychological tests compared with non-SGA controls. Differences were modest, with more significant differences in the memory domain. PMID:24559531

  12. Methylmercury differentially affects GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous IPSCs in Purkinje and granule cells of rat cerebellar slices

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yukun; Atchison, William D

    2003-01-01

    Using whole-cell recording techniques we compared effects of the environmental cerebellar neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg) on spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) of both Purkinje and granule cells in cerebellar slices of the rat. In Purkinje cells, bath application of 10, 20 or 100 μM MeHg initially increased then suppressed the frequency of sIPSCs to zero. In granule cells, the initial increase in frequency was not observed in ≈50 % of cells examined, but suppression of sIPSCs by MeHg occurred in every cell tested. For both cells, time to onset of effects of MeHg was inversely related to the concentration; moreover, the pattern of changes in mIPSCs induced by MeHg in the presence of tetrodotoxin was similar to that in sIPSCs. For each concentration of MeHg, it took 2–3 times longer to block sIPSCs in Purkinje cells than it did in granule cells. MeHg also initially increased then decreased amplitudes of sIPSCs to block in both cells; again the response was more variable in granule cells. In most Purkinje and some granule cells, MeHg induced a giant, slow inward current during the late stages of exposure. Appearance of this current appeared to be MeHg concentration dependent, and the direction of current flow was reversed by changing the holding potentials. Reduction of the [Cl−] in the internal solution caused inwardly directed, but not outwardly directed giant currents to disappear, suggesting that this current is a Cl−-mediated response. However, bicuculline and picrotoxin failed to block it. MeHg apparently acts at both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites to alter GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission. GABAA receptors in granule cells appear to be more sensitive to block by MeHg than are those in Purkinje cells, although the general patterns of effects on the two cells are similar. PMID:12879869

  13. Proneurotrophin-3 promotes cell cycle withdrawal of developing cerebellar granule cell progenitors via the p75 neurotrophin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Abercrombie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Wilma J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCP) proliferate extensively in the external granule layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum prior to differentiating and migrating. Mechanisms that regulate the appropriate timing of cell cycle withdrawal of these neuronal progenitors during brain development are not well defined. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is highly expressed in the proliferating GCPs, but is downregulated once the cells leave the cell cycle. This receptor has primarily been characterized as a death receptor for its ability to induce neuronal apoptosis following injury. Here we demonstrate a novel function for p75NTR in regulating proper cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors in the developing rat and mouse EGL, which is stimulated by proNT3. In the absence of p75NTR, GCPs continue to proliferate beyond their normal period, resulting in a larger cerebellum that persists into adulthood, with consequent motor deficits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16654.001 PMID:27434667

  14. Protective Effect of Edaravone in Primary Cerebellar Granule Neurons against Iodoacetic Acid-Induced Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinhua; Zhu, Longjun; Wang, Liang; Guo, Baojian; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Zhang, Zaijun; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Yu, Pei; Wang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Edaravone (EDA) is clinically used for treatment of acute ischemic stroke in Japan and China due to its potent free radical-scavenging effect. However, it has yet to be determined whether EDA can attenuate iodoacetic acid- (IAA-) induced neuronal death in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EDA on damage of IAA-induced primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and its possible underlying mechanisms. We found that EDA attenuated IAA-induced cell injury in CGNs. Moreover, EDA significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxidative stress production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase 3 activity induced by IAA. Taken together, EDA protected CGNs against IAA-induced neuronal damage, which may be attributed to its antiapoptotic and antioxidative activities. PMID:26557222

  15. Early release and subsequent caspase-mediated degradation of cytochrome c in apoptotic cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Atlante, A; Giannattasio, S; Sgaramella, G; Calissano, P; Marra, E

    1999-08-20

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) release was investigated in cerebellar granule cells used as an in vitro neuronal model of apoptosis. We have found that cyt c is released into the cytoplasm as an intact, functionally active protein, that this event occurs early, in the commitment phase of the apoptotic process, and that after accumulation, this protein is progressively degraded. Degradation, but not release, is fully blocked by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylchetone (z-VAD-fmk). On the basis of previous findings obtained in the same neuronal population undergoing excitotoxic death, it is hypothesized that release of cyt c may be part of a cellular attempt to maintain production of ATP via cytochrome oxidase, which is reduced by cytosolic NADH in a cytochrome b5-soluble cyt c-mediated fashion. PMID:10486578

  16. Mast cell procarboxypeptidase A. Molecular modeling and biochemical characterization of its processing within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Springman, E B; Dikov, M M; Serafin, W E

    1995-01-20

    Previously, we characterized murine mast cell procarboxypeptidase A (MC-proCPA) as an inactive zymogen. To investigate the mechanisms for this lack of enzymatic activity and the processing of the zymogen to the active form, we now have performed molecular modeling of the tertiary structure of murine MC-proCPA based on the x-ray crystallographic structures of porcine pancreatic procarboxypeptidases A and B. Our model predicts that MC-proCPA retains a high degree of structural similarity to its pancreatic homologues. The globular propeptide physically blocks access to the fully formed active site of the catalytic domain and contains a salt bridge to the substrate-binding region that precludes docking of even small substrates. Based on consideration of the predicted tertiary structure and charge field characteristics of the model, the activation site (between GluA94 and Ile1) appears to be highly exposed even after MC-proCPA binds to secretory granule proteoglycans. Based on the steady-state levels of MC-proCPA versus MC-CPA, cycloheximide inhibition of protein synthesis, and brefeldin A blockage of protein sorting, we show that MC-proCPA is processed rapidly in murine mast cell line KiSV-MC14 with a half-life of 26 +/- 5 min (mean +/- S.D., n = 3), and the processing occurs within the secretory granules. The enzyme responsible for this processing may be a thiol protease since treatment of the KiSV-MC14 with 200 microM E-64d, a selective thiol-protease inhibitor, increases MC-proCPA by 2.7 +/- 0.2-fold (mean +/- S.D., n = 3) within 6 h of application. PMID:7836395

  17. Object/Context-Specific Memory Deficits Associated with Loss of Hippocampal Granule Cells after Adrenalectomy in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanswick, Simon C.; Sutherland, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic adrenalectomy (ADX) causes a gradual and selective loss of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the rat. Here, we administered replacement corticosterone to rats beginning 10 wk after ADX. We then tested them in three discrimination tasks based on object novelty, location, or object/context association. Only during testing of the…

  18. Transient degradation of NF-kappaB proteins in macrophages after interaction with mast cell granules.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, N; Li, Y; Suzuki, T; Stechschulte, D J; Dileepan, K N

    1998-01-01

    The exposure of the macrophage cell line, J774 to mast cell granules (MCG) led to the formation of altered nuclear transcription factor proteins (NF-kappaBx), which had faster electrophoretic mobility than the p50 homodimer of NF-KB, but retained comparable DNA binding capacity. Antibodies to N-terminal peptides of p50, p52, p65 or c-Rel supershifted only a fraction of NF-kappaBx. Western blot analyses revealed that nuclear p65 and c-Rel were progressively degraded after exposure to MCG, whereas nuclear p50 appeared to be unaffected. In contrast, cytoplasmic p50, p65, c-Rel as well as IkBalpha remained intact after MCG treatment, although p52 was clearly degraded. In comparison to J774 cells, incubation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with MCG resulted in more extensive alterations to NF-KB proteins. The alterations in NF-KB proteins did not affect the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) or TNF-alpha mRNA inJ774 cells. These data indicate that exposure of J774 cells to MCG leads to generation of altered nuclear p52, p65 and c-Rel, which retain intact N-terminal peptides, specific oligonucleotide binding and transactivating activity. On the other hand, in peritoneal macrophages, MCG induce more extensive modifications to NF-KB proteins with associated inhibition of iNOS or TNF-alpha mRNA expression. PMID:9927232

  19. PERK Activation Promotes Medulloblastoma Tumorigenesis by Attenuating Premalignant Granule Cell Precursor Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yeung; Li, Xiting; Jamison, Stephanie; Harding, Heather P; McKinnon, Peter J; Ron, David; Lin, Wensheng

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests that activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress negatively or positively influences cell transformation by regulating apoptosis. Patched1 heterozygous deficient (Ptch1(+/-)) mice reproduce human Gorlin's syndrome and are regarded as the best animal model to study tumorigenesis of the sonic hedgehog subgroup of medulloblastomas. It is believed that medulloblastomas in Ptch1(+/-) mice results from the transformation of granule cell precursors (GCPs) in the developing cerebellum. Here, we determined the role of PERK signaling on medulloblastoma tumorigenesis by assessing its effects on premalignant GCPs and tumor cells. We found that PERK signaling was activated in both premalignant GCPs in young Ptch1(+/-) mice and medulloblastoma cells in adult mice. We demonstrated that PERK haploinsufficiency reduced the incidence of medulloblastomas in Ptch1(+/-) mice. Interestingly, PERK haploinsufficiency enhanced apoptosis of premalignant GCPs in young Ptch1(+/-) mice but had no significant effect on medulloblastoma cells in adult mice. Moreover, we showed that the PERK pathway was activated in medulloblastomas in humans. These results suggest that PERK signaling promotes medulloblastoma tumorigenesis by attenuating apoptosis of premalignant GCPs during the course of malignant transformation. PMID:27181404

  20. Clonal analysis reveals granule cell behaviors and compartmentalization that determine the folded morphology of the cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Legué, Emilie; Riedel, Elyn; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum consists of folds of different sizes and shapes that house distinct neural circuits. A crucial factor underlying foliation is the generation of granule cells (gcs), the most numerous neuron type in the brain. We used clonal analysis to uncover global as well as folium size-specific cellular behaviors that underlie cerebellar morphogenesis. Unlike most neural precursors, gc precursors divide symmetrically, accounting for their massive expansion. We found that oriented cell divisions underlie an overall anteroposteriorly polarized growth of the cerebellum and gc clone geometry. Clone geometry is further refined by mediolateral oriented migration and passive dispersion of differentiating gcs. Most strikingly, the base of each fissure acts as a boundary for gc precursor dispersion, which we propose allows each folium to be regulated as a developmental unit. Indeed, the geometry and size of clones in long and short folia are distinct. Moreover, in engrailed 1/2 mutants with shorter folia, clone cell number and geometry are most similar to clones in short folia of wild-type mice. Thus, the cerebellum has a modular mode of development that allows the plane of cell division and number of divisions to be differentially regulated to ensure that the appropriate number of cells are partitioned into each folium. PMID:25834018

  1. Regulation of synaptic transmission in the mossy fibre-granule cell pathway of rat cerebellum by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Vetter, P; Garthwaite, J; Batchelor, A M

    1999-06-01

    The role of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the mossy fibre-granule cell pathway in rat cerebellum was studied using slice preparations and electrophysiological techniques. Application of the group I selective agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) evoked, in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 33 microM), a depolarising/hyperpolarising complex response from granule cells which was preferentially inhibited by the group I selective antagonist (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (4CPG). The group III selective agonist L-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (AP4) evoked a hyperpolarising response (EC50 = 10 microM) which was inhibited by the group II/III selective antagonist (S)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG). The group II agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxylcyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) elicited no measurable voltage change. The amplitude of the synaptically-mediated mossy fibre response in granule cells was unaffected during application of AP4, was reduced by DHPG and was enhanced by DCG-IV (EC50 = 80 nM). These effects were inhibited by the group selective antagonists 4CPG and (2S,1'S,2'S,3'R)-2-(2'-carboxy-3'-phenylcyclopropyl)glycine (PCCG-4), respectively. Further investigation using patch-clamp recording revealed that DCG-IV potently inhibited spontaneous GABAergic currents. We conclude that group I and III (but not group II) mGluRs are functionally expressed by granule cells, whereas unexpectedly group II or III mGluRs do not appear to be present presynaptically on mossy fibre terminals. Group II mGluRs are located on Golgi cell terminals; when activated these receptors cause disinhibition, a function which may be important for gating information transfer from the mossy fibres to the granule cells. PMID:10465684

  2. Morphometric studies of secretory granule formation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Dissecting the early structural changes following pilocarpine injection

    PubMed Central

    HAMMEL, ILAN; SHOR-HAZAN, OSNAT; ELDAR, TORA; AMIHAI, DINA; LEW, SYLVIA

    1999-01-01

    Secretory granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells is known to involve massive membrane flow. In previous studies we have undertaken morphometry of the regranulation mechanism in these cells and in mast cells as a model for cellular membrane movement. In our current work, electron micrographs of pancreatic acinar cells from ICR mice were taken at several time points after extensive degranulation induced by pilocarpine injection in order to investigate the volume changes of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), nucleus, mitochondria and autophagosomes. At 2–4 h after stimulation, when the pancreatic cells demonstrated a complete loss of granules, this was accompanied by an increased proportion of autophagosomal activity. This change primarily reflected a greatly increased proportion of profiles retaining autophagic vacuoles containing recognisable cytoplasmic structures such as mitochondria, granule profiles and fragments of RER. The mitochondrial structures reached a significant maximal size 4 h following injection (before degranulation 0.178±0.028 μm3; at 4 h peak value, 0.535±0.109 μm3). Nucleus size showed an early volume increase approaching a maximum value 2 h following degranulation. The regranulation span was thus divided into 3 stages. The first was the membrane remodelling stage (0–2 h). During this period the volume of the RER and secretory granules was greatly decreased. At the intermediate stage (2–4 h) a significant increase of the synthesis zone was observed within the nucleus. The volume of the mitochondria was increasing. At the last step, the major finding was a significant granule accumulation in parallel with an active Golgi zone. PMID:10227666

  3. Translation suppression promotes stress granule formation and cell survival in response to cold shock

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sarah; Cherkasova, Valeria; Bankhead, Peter; Bukau, Bernd; Stoecklin, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Cells respond to different types of stress by inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequent assembly of stress granules (SGs), cytoplasmic aggregates that contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. Global translation is regulated through the translation initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and the mTOR pathway. Here we identify cold shock as a novel trigger of SG assembly in yeast and mammals. Whereas cold shock–induced SGs take hours to form, they dissolve within minutes when cells are returned to optimal growth temperatures. Cold shock causes eIF2α phosphorylation through the kinase PERK in mammalian cells, yet this pathway is not alone responsible for translation arrest and SG formation. In addition, cold shock leads to reduced mitochondrial function, energy depletion, concomitant activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Compound C, a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK, prevents the formation of SGs and strongly reduces cellular survival in a translation-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that cells actively suppress protein synthesis by parallel pathways, which induce SG formation and ensure cellular survival during hypothermia. PMID:22875991

  4. Tonic inhibition sets the state of excitability in olfactory bulb granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Labarrera, Christina; London, Michael; Angelo, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    GABAergic granule cells (GCs) regulate, via mitral cells, the final output from the olfactory bulb to piriform cortex and are central for the speed and accuracy of odour discrimination. However, little is known about the local circuits in which GCs are embedded and how GCs respond during functional network activity. We recorded inhibitory and excitatory currents evoked during a single sniff-like odour presentation in GCs in vivo. We found that synaptic excitation was extensively activated across cells, whereas phasic inhibition was rare. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that GCs are innervated by a persistent firing of deep short axon cells that mediated the inhibitory evoked responses. Blockade of GABAergic synaptic input onto GCs revealed a tonic inhibitory current mediated by furosemide-sensitive GABAA receptors. The average current associated with this tonic GABAergic conductance was 3-fold larger than that of phasic inhibitory postsynaptic currents. We show that the pharmacological blockage of tonic inhibition markedly increased the occurrence of supra-threshold responses during an odour-stimulated sniff. Our findings suggest that GCs mediate recurrent or lateral inhibition, depending on the ambient level of extracellular GABA. PMID:23318869

  5. Synaptotagmin-7 Functions to Replenish Insulin Granules for Exocytosis in Human Islet β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Dolai, Subhankar; Xie, Li; Zhu, Dan; Liang, Tao; Qin, Tairan; Xie, Huanli; Kang, Youhou; Chapman, Edwin R; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2016-07-01

    Synaptotagmin (Syt)-7, a major component of the exocytotic machinery in neurons, is also the major Syt in rodent pancreatic β-cells shown to mediate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, Syt-7's precise exocytotic actions in β-cells remain unknown. We show that Syt-7 is abundant in human β-cells. Adenovirus-short hairpin RNA knockdown (KD) of Syt-7 in human islets reduced first- and second-phase GSIS attributed to the reduction of exocytosis of predocked and newcomer insulin secretory granules (SGs). Glucose stimulation expectedly induced Syt-7 association in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with syntaxin-3 and syntaxin-1A soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes known to mediate exocytosis of newcomer and predocked SGs, respectively. However, Syt-7-KD did not disrupt SNARE complex assembly. Instead, electron microscopy analysis showed that Syt-7-KD reduced the recruitment of SGs to the plasma membrane after glucose-stimulated depletion, which could not be rescued by glucagon-like peptide 1 pretreatment. To assess the possibility that this new action of Syt-7 on SG recruitment may involve calmodulin (CaM), pretreatment of islets with CaM blocker calmidazolium showed effects very similar to those of Syt-7-KD. Syt-7 therefore plays a novel more dominant function in the replenishment of releasable SG pools in human β-cells than its previously purported role in exocytotic fusion per se. PMID:27207520

  6. A sensitive method to assay the xanthine oxidase activity in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Valenti, D; Gagliardi, S; Passarella, S

    2000-11-01

    Since xanthine oxidase (XO, Xanthine:oxidoreductase, E.C.1.2.3.22) is a key enzyme in reactive oxygen specie formation which plays a major role in cell oxidative stress, the availability of a sensitive and simple assay useful to detect its activity in monolayer cell cultures is worthwhile. In order to achieve this, we developed a method in which the conversion of pterine into isoxanthopterin is monitored fluorimetrically. Temperature assay was 50 degrees C. The activity of XO was detected in cerebellar granule cells exposed to glutamate. Since XO is formed from protease-dependent xanthine dehydrogenase processing, its activity appearance was found to be prevented by the protease inhibitor, leupeptin, as well as the glutamate NMDA-receptor inhibitor, MK-801, and the Ca(++) complexing agent, EGTA. The reported novel protocol, at variance with a conventional method, is shown to be a simple, fast, sensitive and relatively cheap method to assay XO activity. In addition, the reported assay can be applied to any cell type in culture. PMID:11086257

  7. Recovery of amorphous polyhydroxybutyrate granules from Cupriavidus necator cells grown on used cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Martino, Lucrezia; Cruz, Madalena V; Scoma, Alberto; Freitas, Filomena; Bertin, Lorenzo; Scandola, Mariastella; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-11-01

    Used cooking oil (UCO) was employed as the sole carbon source for the production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by cultivation in batch mode of Cupriavidus necator DSM 428. The produced biomass was used for extraction of the PHB granules with a solvent-free approach using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the enzyme Alcalase in an aqueous medium. The recovered PHB granules showed a degree of purity higher than 90% and no crystallization (i.e., granules were recovered in their 'native' amorphous state) as demonstrated by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXS). Granules were characterized according to their thermal properties and stability by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Results show that UCO can be used as a renewable resource to produce amorphous PHB granules with excellent properties in a biocompatible manner. PMID:24751509

  8. Granule membrane protein 140 (GMP140) binds to carcinomas and carcinoma-derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Aruffo, A; Dietsch, M T; Wan, H; Hellström, K E; Hellström, I

    1992-01-01

    The glycoproteins granule membrane protein 140 (GMP140), endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1), and Leu-8 are members of a family of glycoprotein receptors (selectins or LEC-CAMs) that play an important role in adhesive interactions between circulating leukocytes and vascular endothelium. Recently it has been reported that ELAM-1 is able to mediate the binding of the colon carcinoma cell line HT-29 to cytokine-activated vascular endothelium, suggesting that tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium, a prerequisite for tumor extravasation and metastasis, is in part the result of adhesive interactions between blood-borne tumor cells and cell surface proteins expressed by vascular endothelium. Here, using an approach in which soluble immunoglobulin chimeras of the GMP140 and ELAM-1 receptors were prepared and used to carry out immunohistological studies, we establish that GMP140 binds to tumor cells in a variety of human carcinoma tissue sections (colon, lung, and breast), whereas ELAM-1 binds exclusively to tumor cells in colon carcinoma tissue sections. In addition, GMP140 was found to bind to the cell surface of a number of cell lines derived from various carcinomas but not from melanomas, whereas ELAM-1 bound only colon carcinoma cell lines. We further investigated the nature of the ligands of GMP140 and ELAM-1 on the surface of the carcinoma cells and found that the GMP140 ligand on the surface of tumor cells appears to be distinct from that expressed on the myeloid cell line HL-60. Neuraminidase treatment of a breast carcinoma cell line does not affect, or in some instances increases, GMP140 binding, whereas it completely abolishes GMP140 binding to HL-60 cells. On the other hand, the ligand of ELAM-1 on both the colon carcinoma and HL-60 cells is neuraminidase sensitive in accord with its identification as sialyl-CD15. Parallel results were obtained with neuraminidase-treated frozen carcinoma tissue sections. The present findings form the basis

  9. Thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system involvement in cerebellar granule cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Casalino, E; Petragallo, V A; Atlante, A

    2014-10-01

    The involvement of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), a cellular system in which neurons are induced in apoptosis by the physiological stimulus of lowering extracellular potassium. Clarifying the sequence of events that occur during apoptosis is a critical issue as it can lead to the identification of those key events that, if blocked, can slow down or reverse the death process. The results reported in this work show that TrxR is involved in the early phase of CGC apoptosis with an increase in activity that coincides with the increased expression of the TrxR1 isoform and guarantees the maintenance of adequate level of Trx in its reduced, active form. However, in late apoptosis, when about 50 % of cells are dead, partial proteolysis of TrxR1 by calpain occurs and the reduction of TrxR1 mRNA, together with the overall decrease in TrxR activity, contribute to increase the levels of the oxidized form of Trx. When the reduced form of Trx is externally added to apoptotic cultures, a significant reduction in cell death is achieved confirming that a well-functioning thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system is required for survival of CGCs. PMID:25055978

  10. Raising cytosolic Cl− in cerebellar granule cells affects their excitability and vestibulo-ocular learning

    PubMed Central

    Seja, Patricia; Schonewille, Martijn; Spitzmaul, Guillermo; Badura, Aleksandra; Klein, Ilse; Rudhard, York; Wisden, William; Hübner, Christian A; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical throughput involved in motor control comprises granule cells (GCs) and Purkinje cells (PCs), both of which receive inhibitory GABAergic input from interneurons. The GABAergic input to PCs is essential for learning and consolidation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, but the role of GC excitability remains unclear. We now disrupted the Kcc2 K-Cl cotransporter specifically in either cell type to manipulate their excitability and inhibition by GABAA-receptor Cl− channels. Although Kcc2 may have a morphogenic role in synapse development, Kcc2 disruption neither changed synapse density nor spine morphology. In both GCs and PCs, disruption of Kcc2, but not Kcc3, increased [Cl−]i roughly two-fold. The reduced Cl− gradient nearly abolished GABA-induced hyperpolarization in PCs, but in GCs it merely affected excitability by membrane depolarization. Ablation of Kcc2 from GCs impaired consolidation of long-term phase learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, whereas baseline performance, short-term gain-decrease learning and gain consolidation remained intact. These functions, however, were affected by disruption of Kcc2 in PCs. GC excitability plays a previously unknown, but specific role in consolidation of phase learning. PMID:22252133

  11. Protective effect of fangchinoline on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon Ok; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2002-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effect of fangchinoline, a bis- benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which exhibits the characteristics of a Ca2+ channel blocker, on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. NaCN produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Pretreatment with fangchinoline over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the NaCN-induced neuronal cell death, glutamate release into medium, and elevation of [Ca2+]i and oxidants generation. These results suggest that fangchinoline may mitigate the harmful effects of cyanide-induced neuronal cell death by interfering with [Ca2+]i influx, due to its function as a Ca2+ channel blocker, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and oxidants generation. PMID:12135109

  12. Antiphospholipid antibodies bind to rat cerebellar granule cells: the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Andreassi, C; Eboli, M L

    1998-11-27

    IgGs from sera containing antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), detected as antibodies to cardiolipin, or control sera were incubated with rat cerebellar granule cells in primary culture. Using a mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity assay (MTT test), aPL IgGs were shown to decrease MTT metabolism after 24 h incubation with the cells, and to cause non-toxic amounts of glutamate to become neurotoxic when added to the cells for 45 min. Acute and chronic aPL toxicity were prevented by MK-801. Sera containing aPL bound to intact cerebellar neurons, as revealed by an immunofluorescent technique. These results suggest that antiphospholipid antibodies interfere with excitatory pathways in glutamatergic cerebellar granule cells by a mechanism involving overactivation of the NMDA glutamate receptor. PMID:9865941

  13. Restricted distribution of mrg-1 mRNA in C. elegans primordial germ cells through germ granule-independent regulation.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Takashi; Takasaki, Teruaki; Inoue, Kunio; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The chromodomain protein MRG-1 is an essential maternal factor for proper germline development that protects germ cells from cell death in C. elegans. Unlike germ granules, which are exclusively segregated to the germline blastomeres at each cell division from the first cleavage of the embryo, MRG-1 is abundant in all cells in early embryos and is then gradually restricted to the primordial germ cells (PGCs) by the morphogenesis stage. Here, we show that this characteristic spatiotemporal expression pattern is dictated by the mrg-1 3'UTR and is differentially regulated at the RNA level between germline and somatic cells. Asymmetric segregation of germ granules is not necessary to localize MRG-1 to the PGCs. We found that MES-4, an essential chromatin regulator in germ cells, also accumulates in the PGCs in a germ granule-independent manner. We propose that C.elegans PGCs have a novel mechanism to accumulate at least some chromatin-associated proteins that are essential for germline immortality. PMID:26537333

  14. Cardiovascular Responses to Psychosocial Stress Reflect Motivation State in Adults Born at Extremely Low Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Pyhälä, Riikka; Hovi, Petteri; Räikkönen, Katri; Van Lieshout, Ryan J.; Boyle, Michael H.; Saigal, Saroj; Morrison, Katherine M.; Kajantie, Eero; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adults born extremely preterm appear to have more difficulty managing the stresses of early adulthood than their term-born peers. Objective. To examine the effects of being born at extremely low birth weight (ELBW; birth weight < 1000 g) versus at full term on cardiovascular responses to stress. Method. Cardiovascular responses were elicited during administration of a widely used laboratory stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Results. Term-born adults exhibited a larger decrease in total peripheral resistance and larger increase in cardiac output for TSST performance, reflecting greater resilience, than did ELBW adults. Furthermore, in ELBW participants but not controls, cardiovascular responses were correlated with anxiety, suggesting that their responses reflected feelings of stress. Conclusions. Skills-training and practice with relevant stressors may be necessary to increase the personal resources of ELBW participants for managing stress as they transition to adulthood. PMID:27335948

  15. Cardiovascular Responses to Psychosocial Stress Reflect Motivation State in Adults Born at Extremely Low Birth Weight.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Karen J; Pyhälä, Riikka; Hovi, Petteri; Räikkönen, Katri; Van Lieshout, Ryan J; Boyle, Michael H; Saigal, Saroj; Morrison, Katherine M; Kajantie, Eero; Schmidt, Louis A

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adults born extremely preterm appear to have more difficulty managing the stresses of early adulthood than their term-born peers. Objective. To examine the effects of being born at extremely low birth weight (ELBW; birth weight < 1000 g) versus at full term on cardiovascular responses to stress. Method. Cardiovascular responses were elicited during administration of a widely used laboratory stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Results. Term-born adults exhibited a larger decrease in total peripheral resistance and larger increase in cardiac output for TSST performance, reflecting greater resilience, than did ELBW adults. Furthermore, in ELBW participants but not controls, cardiovascular responses were correlated with anxiety, suggesting that their responses reflected feelings of stress. Conclusions. Skills-training and practice with relevant stressors may be necessary to increase the personal resources of ELBW participants for managing stress as they transition to adulthood. PMID:27335948

  16. Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Regulates Granule Cell Pax6 Expression and Cell Proliferation in Early Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peter; Ha, Thomas; Larouche, Matt; Swanson, Douglas; Goldowitz, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Kruppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is a transcription factor that regulates many important cellular processes in stem cell biology, cancer, and development. We used histological and molecular methods to study the expression of Klf4 in embryonic development of the normal and Klf4 knockout cerebellum. We find that Klf4 is expressed strongly in early granule cell progenitor development but tails-off considerably by the end of embryonic development. Klf4 is also co-expressed with Pax6 in these cells. In the Klf4-null mouse, which is perinatal lethal, Klf4 positively regulates Pax6 expression and regulates the proliferation of neuronal progenitors in the rhombic lip, external granular layer and the neuroepithelium. This paper is the first to describe a role for Klf4 in the cerebellum and provides insight into this gene’s function in neuronal development. PMID:26226504

  17. Leukocyte Telomere Length in Young Adults Born Preterm: Support for Accelerated Biological Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Carolina C. J.; Codd, Veryan; Samani, Nilesh J.; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subjects born preterm have an increased risk for age-associated diseases, such as cardiovascular disease in later life, but the underlying causes are largely unknown. Shorter leukocyte telomere length (LTL), a marker of biological age, is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objectives To compare LTL between subjects born preterm and at term and to assess if LTL is associated with other putative cardiovascular risk factors at young adult age. Methods We measured mean LTL in 470 young adults. LTL was measured using a quantitative PCR assay and expressed as T/S ratio. We analyzed the influence of gestational age on LTL and compared LTL between subjects born preterm (n = 186) and at term (n = 284). Additionally, we analyzed the correlation between LTL and potential risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Results Gestational age was positively associated with LTL (r = 0.11, p = 0.02). Subjects born preterm had shorter LTL (mean (SD) T/S ratio = 3.12 (0.44)) than subjects born at term (mean (SD) T/S ratio = 3.25 (0.46)), p = 0.003). The difference remained significant after adjustment for gender and size at birth (p = 0.001). There was no association of LTL with any one of the putative risk factors analyzed. Conclusions Young adults born preterm have shorter LTL than young adults born at term. Although we found no correlation between LTL and risk for CVD at this young adult age, this biological ageing indicator may contribute to CVD and other adult onset diseases at a later age in those born preterm. PMID:26619005

  18. A method for detailed analysis of the structure of mast cell secretory granules by negative contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Secretory granules (SGs) in mast cells contain various molecules that elicit allergy symptoms and are generally considered therapeutic targets. However, the biogenesis, maintenance, regulation, and recycling of these granules remain controversial, mainly due to the lack of suitable live-cell imaging methods. In this study, we applied negative contrast imaging with soluble green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed in the cytoplasm as a method to validate structural information of mast cell SGs. We evaluated the accuracy of the method in detail, and we demonstrated that it can be used for quantitative analysis. Using this technique, secretory granules, the nucleus, mitochondria, and the cell body were visualized in individual RBL-2H3 mast cells without any influence. When combined with conventional multicolor fluorescence imaging, visualization of SG-associated proteins and SG–SG fusion was achieved. Moreover, 3D images were constructed based on this method, and detailed information on the number, size, and shape of individual SGs was obtained. We found that cell volume was correlated with SG number. In summary, the technique provides valuable and unique data, and will therefore advance SG research. PMID:26997316

  19. SORCS1 is necessary for normal insulin secretory granule biogenesis in metabolically stressed β cells

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Melkam A.; Oler, Angie T.; Gregg, Trillian; Balloon, Allison J.; Johnson, Adam; Mitok, Kelly; Rabaglia, Mary; Schueler, Kathryn; Stapleton, Donald; Thorstenson, Candice; Wrighton, Lindsay; Floyd, Brendan J.; Richards, Oliver; Raines, Summer; Eliceiri, Kevin; Seidah, Nabil G.; Rhodes, Christopher; Keller, Mark P.; Coon, Joshua L.; Audhya, Anjon; Attie, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    We previously positionally cloned Sorcs1 as a diabetes quantitative trait locus. Sorcs1 belongs to the Vacuolar protein sorting-10 (Vps10) gene family. In yeast, Vps10 transports enzymes from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the vacuole. Whole-body Sorcs1 KO mice, when made obese with the leptinob mutation (ob/ob), developed diabetes. β Cells from these mice had a severe deficiency of secretory granules (SGs) and insulin. Interestingly, a single secretagogue challenge failed to consistently elicit an insulin secretory dysfunction. However, multiple challenges of the Sorcs1 KO ob/ob islets consistently revealed an insulin secretion defect. The luminal domain of SORCS1 (Lum-Sorcs1), when expressed in a β cell line, acted as a dominant-negative, leading to SG and insulin deficiency. Using syncollin-dsRed5TIMER adenovirus, we found that the loss of Sorcs1 function greatly impairs the rapid replenishment of SGs following secretagogue challenge. Chronic exposure of islets from lean Sorcs1 KO mice to high glucose and palmitate depleted insulin content and evoked an insulin secretion defect. Thus, in metabolically stressed mice, Sorcs1 is important for SG replenishment, and under chronic challenge by insulin secretagogues, loss of Sorcs1 leads to diabetes. Overexpression of full-length SORCS1 led to a 2-fold increase in SG content, suggesting that SORCS1 is sufficient to promote SG biogenesis. PMID:25157818

  20. Detection of reactive oxygen species in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Passarella, S

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a novel procedure useful to detect the formation of two reactive oxygen species, i.e. superoxide and singlet oxygen, in neuron monolayer primary cultures, thus, making possible the investigation of the effect of certain compounds on reactive oxygen species formation. Thus, use was made of two reactive oxygen species detecting systems consisting of ferricytochrome c (Fe-cyt c) and imidazole-RNO (N, N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline) which allow for the photometric detection of superoxide anion and singlet oxygen, respectively. Both of them were used to assess the formation of reactive oxygen species in cerebellar granule cells exposed to glutamate: both superoxide anion and singlet oxygen proved to be generated in glutamate neurotoxicity in a way sensitive to glutamate NMDA-receptor inhibitor, MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a, d)cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate), to Ca(2+) complexing agent, EGTA, and to certain antioxidants. In principle, the reported protocol can be applied to any cell type in culture. PMID:10592334

  1. BDNF over-expression increases olfactory bulb granule cell dendritic spine density in vivo.

    PubMed

    McDole, B; Isgor, C; Pare, C; Guthrie, K

    2015-09-24

    Olfactory bulb granule cells (GCs) are axon-less, inhibitory interneurons that regulate the activity of the excitatory output neurons, the mitral and tufted cells, through reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses located on GC spines. These contacts are established in the distal apical dendritic compartment, while GC basal dendrites and more proximal apical segments bear spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the olfactory cortices. This synaptic connectivity is vital to olfactory circuit function and is remodeled during development, and in response to changes in sensory activity and lifelong GC neurogenesis. Manipulations that alter levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vivo have significant effects on dendritic spine morphology, maintenance and activity-dependent plasticity for a variety of CNS neurons, yet little is known regarding BDNF effects on bulb GC spine maturation or maintenance. Here we show that, in vivo, sustained bulbar over-expression of BDNF in transgenic mice produces a marked increase in GC spine density that includes an increase in mature spines on their apical dendrites. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that changes in spine density were most notable in the distal and proximal apical domains, indicating that multiple excitatory inputs are potentially modified by BDNF. Our results indicate that increased levels of endogenous BDNF can promote the maturation and/or maintenance of dendritic spines on GCs, suggesting a role for this factor in modulating GC functional connectivity within adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:26211445

  2. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma. PMID:23213239

  3. The effects of neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on cerebellar granule cell movement and neurite extension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Sekino, Y; Shirao, T

    2000-01-01

    Migration of the granule cells is a major stage of cerebellar maturation. Granule cells express neurotrophins and their receptors; however, their role in cell migration has not been defined. In this study we investigated the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on the movement and neurite extension of granule cells from glial-free cerebellar cell reaggregates in vitro. Our results provide direct evidence that neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially affect the granule cells. Neurotrophin-3 significantly affected granule cell movements by decreasing the migration index (the ratio of the number of cells that moved further than half the neurite length) and the speed of cell soma movement, but did not affect neurite length or growth cone migration. In contrast, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-4 acted on growing neurites and growth cones by significantly increasing neurite length and the speed of growth cone migration, but had no effect either on the migration index or on the speed of the cell soma movement. The results suggest that neurotrophins differentially affect neurite extension and the movements of cerebellar granule cells. PMID:10842017

  4. Quantification of endocrine cells and ultrastructural study of insulin granules in the large intestine of opossum Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied, 1826).

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane Cristina Marques; Cupertino, Marli do Carmo; Fialho, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Barbosa, Alfredo Jose Afonso; Fonseca, Cláudio Cesar; Sartori, Sirlene Souza Rodrigues; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the distribution of argyrophil, argentaffin, and insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the large intestine of opossums (Didelphis aurita) and to describe the ultrastructure of the secretory granules of insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells. Fragments of the large intestine of 10 male specimens of D. aurita were collected, processed, and subjected to staining, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. The argyrophil, the argentaffin, and the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were sparsely distributed in the intestinal glands of the mucous layer, among other cell types of the epithelium in all regions studied. Proportionally, the argyrophil, the argentaffin, and the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells represented 62.75%, 36.26%, and 0.99% of the total determined endocrine cells of the large intestine, respectively. Quantitatively, there was no difference between the argyrophil and the argentaffin endocrine cells, whereas insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were less numerous. The insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were elongated or pyramidal, with rounded nuclei of irregularly contoured, and large amounts of secretory granules distributed throughout the cytoplasm. The granules have different sizes and electron densities and are classified as immature and mature, with the mature granules in predominant form in the overall granular population. In general, the granule is shown with an external electron-lucent halo and electron-dense core. The ultrastructure pattern in the granules of the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells was similar to that of the B cells of pancreatic islets in rats. PMID:24359801

  5. AMP Kinase Activation Alters Oxidant-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Modulating Cell Signaling and Microtubule Organization.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Hicham; Koromilas, Antonis E; Stochaj, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells assemble stress granules (SGs) when translation initiation is inhibited. Different cell signaling pathways regulate SG production. Particularly relevant to this process is 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which functions as a stress sensor and is transiently activated by adverse physiologic conditions. Here, we dissected the role of AMPK for oxidant-induced SG formation. Our studies identified multiple steps of de novo SG assembly that are controlled by the kinase. Single-cell analyses demonstrated that pharmacological AMPK activation prior to stress exposure changed SG properties, because the granules became more abundant and smaller in size. These altered SG characteristics correlated with specific changes in cell survival, cell signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and the abundance of translation initiation factors. Specifically, AMPK activation increased stress-induced eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α phosphorylation and reduced the concentration of eIF4F complex subunits eIF4G and eIF4E. At the same time, the abundance of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) was diminished. This loss of HDAC6 was accompanied by increased acetylation of α-tubulin on Lys40. Pharmacological studies further confirmed this novel AMPK-HDAC6 interplay and its importance for SG biology. Taken together, we provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of SG formation. We propose that AMPK activation stimulates oxidant-induced SG formation but limits their fusion into larger granules. PMID:27430620

  6. Cognitive Enhancing Treatment with a PPARγ Agonist Normalizes Dentate Granule Cell Presynaptic Function in Tg2576 APP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nenov, Miroslav N.; Laezza, Fernanda; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Starkey, Jonathan M.; Spratt, Heidi; Luxon, Bruce A.; Dineley, Kelly T.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal network hyperexcitability is considered an early indicator of Alzheimer's disease (AD) memory impairment. Some AD mouse models exhibit similar network phenotypes. In this study we focused on dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell spontaneous and evoked properties in 9-month-old Tg2576 mice that model AD amyloidosis and cognitive deficits. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that Tg2576 DG granule cells exhibited spontaneous EPSCs that were higher in frequency but not amplitude compared with wild-type mice, suggesting hyperactivity of DG granule cells via a presynaptic mechanism. Further support of a presynaptic mechanism was revealed by increased I–O relationships and probability of release in Tg2576 DG granule cells. Since we and others have shown that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) axis improves hippocampal cognition in mouse models for AD as well as benefitting memory performance in some humans with early AD, we investigated how PPARγ agonism affected synaptic activity in Tg2576 DG. We found that PPARγ agonism normalized the I–O relationship of evoked EPSCs, frequency of spontaneous EPSCs, and probability of release that, in turn, correlated with selective expression of DG proteins essential for presynaptic SNARE function that are altered in patients with AD. These findings provide evidence that DG principal cells may contribute to early AD hippocampal network hyperexcitability via a presynaptic mechanism, and that hippocampal cognitive enhancement via PPARγ activation occurs through regulation of presynaptic vesicular proteins critical for proper glutamatergic neurotransmitter release, synaptic transmission, and short-term plasticity. PMID:24431460

  7. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  8. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  9. Tactile responses in the granule cell layer of cerebellar folium crus IIa of freely behaving rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.; Bower, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We recorded activity from the granule cell layer (GCL) of cerebellar folium Crus IIa as freely moving rats engaged in a variety of natural behaviors, including grooming, eating, and free tactile exploration. Multiunit responses in the 1000-4500 Hz range were found to be strongly correlated with tactile stimulation of lip and whisker (perioral) regions. These responses occurred regardless of whether the stimulus was externally or self-generated and during both active and passive touch. In contrast, perioral movements that did not tactually stimulate this region of the face (e.g., chewing) produced no detectable increases in GCL activity. In addition, GCL responses were not correlated with movement extremes. When rats used their lips actively for palpation and exploration, the tactile responses in the GCL were not detectably modulated by ongoing jaw movements. However, active palpation and exploratory behaviors did result in the largest and most continuous bursts of GCL activity: responses were on average 10% larger and 50% longer during palpation and exploration than during grooming or passive stimulation. Although activity levels differed between behaviors, the position and spatial extent of the peripheral receptive field was similar over all behaviors that resulted in tactile input. Overall, our data suggest that the 1000-4500 Hz multiunit responses in the Crus IIa GCL of awake rats are correlated with tactile input rather than with movement or any movement parameter and that these responses are likely to be of particular importance during the acquisition of sensory information by perioral structures.

  10. Dendritic patch-clamp recordings from cerebellar granule cells demonstrate electrotonic compactness

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Straub, Isabelle; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells (GCs), the smallest neurons in the brain, have on average four short dendrites that receive high-frequency mossy fiber inputs conveying sensory information. The short length of the dendrites suggests that GCs are electrotonically compact allowing unfiltered integration of dendritic inputs. The small average diameter of the dendrites (~0.7 µm), however, argues for dendritic filtering. Previous studies based on somatic recordings and modeling indicated that GCs are electrotonically extremely compact. Here, we performed patch-clamp recordings from GC dendrites in acute brain slices of mice to directly analyze the electrotonic properties of GCs. Strikingly, the input resistance did not differ significantly between dendrites and somata of GCs. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP) were similar in amplitude at dendritic and somatic recording sites. From the dendritic and somatic input resistances we determined parameters characterizing the electrotonic compactness of GCs. These data directly demonstrate that cerebellar GCs are electrotonically compact and thus ideally suited for efficient high-frequency information transfer. PMID:25852483

  11. Improved performance of microbial fuel cell using combination biocathode of graphite fiber brush and graphite granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-dong; Zhao, Qing-liang; Jiao, Yan; Zhang, Jin-na; Jiang, Jun-qiu; Ren, Nanqi; Kim, Byung Hong

    2011-08-01

    The efficiency and sustainability of microbial fuel cell (MFC) are heavily dependent on the cathode performance. We show here that the use of graphite fiber brush (GBF) together with graphite granules (GGs) as a basal material for biocathode (MFC reactor type R1) significantly improve the performance of a MFC compared with MFCs using GGs (MFC reactor type R2) or GFB (MFC reactor type R3) individually. Compared with R3, the use of the combination biocathode (R1) can shorten the start-up time by 53.75%, improve coulombic efficiencies (CEs) by 21.0 ± 2.7% at external resistance (REX) of 500 Ω, and increase maximum power densities by 38.2 ± 12.6%. Though the start-up time and open circuit voltage (OCV) of the reactor R2 are similar to R1, the CE (REX = 500 Ω) and maximum power density of R2 are 21.4 ± 1.7% and 38.2 ± 15.6% lower than that of R1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses indicate the bacteria on cathodes of R1 and R2 are richer than that of R3. Molecular taxonomic analyses reveal that the biofilm formed on the biocathode surface is dominated by strains belonging to Nitrobacter, Achromobacter, Acinetobacter, and Bacteroidetes. Combination of GFB and GGs as biocathode material in MFC is more efficient and can achieve sustainable electricity recovery from organic substances, which substantially increases the viability and sustainability of MFCs.

  12. PACAP modulation of calcium ion activity in developing granule cells of the neonatal mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Mavis; Greig, Ann; Tvrdik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ activity in the CNS is critical for the establishment of developing neuronal circuitry prior to and during early sensory input. In developing olfactory bulb (OB), the neuromodulators that enhance network activity are largely unknown. Here we provide evidence that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP)-specific PAC1 receptors (PAC1Rs) expressed in postnatal day (P)2–P5 mouse OB are functional and enhance network activity as measured by increases in calcium in genetically identified granule cells (GCs). We used confocal Ca2+ imaging of OB slices from Dlx2-tdTomato mice to visualize GABAergic GCs. To address whether the PACAP-induced Ca2+ oscillations were direct or indirect effects of PAC1R activation, we used antagonists for the GABA receptors (GABARs) and/or glutamate receptors (GluRs) in the presence and absence of PACAP. Combined block of GABARs and GluRs yielded a 66% decrease in the numbers of PACAP-responsive cells, suggesting that 34% of OB neurons are directly activated by PACAP. Similarly, immunocytochemistry using anti-PAC1 antibody showed that 34% of OB neurons express PAC1R. Blocking either GluRs or GABARs alone indirectly showed that PACAP stimulates release of both glutamate and GABA, which activate GCs. The appearance of PACAP-induced Ca2+ activity in immature GCs suggests a role for PACAP in GC maturation. To conclude, we find that PACAP has both direct and indirect effects on neonatal OB GABAergic cells and may enhance network activity by promoting glutamate and GABA release. Furthermore, the numbers of PACAP-responsive GCs significantly increased between P2 and P5, suggesting that PACAP-induced Ca2+ activity contributes to neonatal OB development. PMID:25475351

  13. Pharmacological characterization of mGlu1 receptors in cerebellar granule cells reveals biased agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Hannah A.; Pshenichkin, Sergey; Grajkowska, Ewa; Gelb, Tara; Emery, Andrew C.; Wolfe, Barry B.; Wroblewski, Jarda T.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of existing research on the function of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor 1 focuses on G protein-mediated outcomes. However, similar to other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), it is becoming apparent that mGlu1 receptor signaling is multi-dimensional and does not always involve G protein activation. Previously, in transfected CHO cells, we showed that mGlu1 receptors activate a G protein-independent, β-arrestin-dependent signal transduction mechanism and that some mGlu1 receptor ligands were incapable of stimulating this response. Here we set out to investigate the physiological relevance of these findings in a native system using primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells. We tested the ability of a panel of compounds to stimulate two mGlu1 receptor-mediated outcomes: (1) protection from decreased cell viability after withdrawal of trophic support and (2) G protein-mediated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis. We report that the commonly used mGlu1 receptor ligands quisqualate, DHPG, and ACPD are completely biased towards PI hydrolysis and do not induce mGlu1 receptor-stimulated neuroprotection. On the other hand, endogenous compounds including glutamate, aspartate, cysteic acid, cysteine sulfinic acid, and homocysteic acid stimulate both responses. These results show that some commonly used mGlu1 receptor ligands are biased agonists, stimulating only a fraction of mGlu1 receptor-mediated responses in neurons. This emphasizes the importance of utilizing multiple agonists and assays when studying GPCR function. PMID:25700650

  14. Characterisation of the biosynthesis and processing of the neutrophil granule membrane protein CD63 in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Ageberg, M; Lindmark, A

    2003-10-01

    The biosynthesis and processing of the neutrophil granule membrane protein CD63, present in azurophil granules, was investigated in four myeloid cell lines. The amount of CD63 synthesised differed, so did the amount of protein processed to high molecular weight forms, with the demonstration of a more prominent synthesis of CD63 in K562 cells. Newly synthesised CD63 was initially detected as two precursor forms with molecular weight of 32 and 35 kDa, respectively. These two initial forms were processed further to yield high molecular weight forms of CD63 with a mean molecular weight of 50 kDa. Treatment with endoglycosidase H or N-glycosidase F revealed a protein core, free from asparagine-linked carbohydrates, with a molecular weight of 23 kDa. Newly synthesised CD63 was susceptible to digestion with endoglycosidase H, and the protein was not completely resistant to endoglycosidase H until after 4 h of chase, indicating that transport through the medial and trans-Golgi complex with conversion of high-mannose carbohydrates to complex oligosaccharide side chains had occurred. This finding indicates a relatively long processing time for CD63 compared to that of soluble azurophil granule proteins. By digestion with O-glycanase, the existence of O-linked oligosaccharides on CD63 could not be demonstrated. Biosynthetic labelling of cells in the presence of brefeldin A showed the importance of a functional Golgi apparatus for processing of the protein to its high molecular weight forms. PMID:12974720

  15. Interaction and colocalization of HERMES/RBPMS with NonO, PSF, and G3BP1 in neuronal cytoplasmic RNP granules in mouse retinal line cells.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Mari T; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kunio

    2015-04-01

    HERMES, also called RBPMS, is a conserved RNA binding protein with a single RNA recognition motif (RRM) that is abundantly expressed in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and in the heart in vertebrates. Here, we identified NonO and PSF as the interacting proteins of HERMES only when the neuronal differentiation of the retinal cell line RGC-5 was induced. Although NonO and PSF are nuclear paraspeckle components, these proteins formed cytoplasmic granules with HERMES in the neurites. G3BP1, a component of stress granules, was also colocalized to the granules, interacting with NonO and HERMES even in the absence of cellular stress. Consistent with a previous report that KIF5 interacts with neuronal granules, the localization of KIF5A overlapped with the cytoplasmic granules in differentiated RGC-5 cells. Thus, our study strongly suggests that the cytoplasmic granule containing HERMES, NonO, PSF, and G3BP1 is a neuronal RNA-protein granule that is transported in neurites during retinal differentiation. PMID:25651939

  16. Effects of formaldehyde exposure on granule cell number and volume of dentate gyrus: a histopathological and stereological study.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Huseyin; Songur, Ahmet; Tunc, Ayten Turkkani; Ozen, Oguz Aslan; Bas, Orhan; Yagmurca, Murat; Turgut, Mehmet; Sarsilmaz, Mustafa; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2006-11-29

    The hippocampal formation is a complex region of the brain related to memory and learning. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether exposure of neonatal rats to formaldehyde (FA) had either early or delayed effects on the numbers of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG). After birth, the neonatal male Wistar rats were exposed throughout a 30-day period to various concentrations of FA: 0 (control group), 6 ppm (low concentration group) and 12 ppm (high concentration group). This was done by placing them for 6 h/day and 5 days per week in a glass chamber containing FA vapor. Then, five animals from each group were anesthetized and decapitated on postnatal day (PND) 30, and the remaining five animals were sacrificed on PND 90 by intracardiac perfusion using 10% neutral buffered FA solution. The Cavalieri principle of stereological approaches was used to determine the volume of the DG in these sections. The optical fractionator counting method was used to estimate the total number of granule cells in the DG. The appearance of granule cells was normal under light microscopy in all PND 30 and PND 90 groups. There were significant age-related reductions in the volume of the DG at PND 90 irrespective of which group was examined. Significant age-related neuron loss was also determined at PND 90 compared to that at PND 30. Rats treated with a high concentration FA were found to have fewer granule cells than either the animals treated with a low concentration FA or the control group (p<0.01 and p<0.01, respectively) at PND 90 but not at PND 30. These findings clearly indicate that granule cells in the DG may be vulnerable to stress and the concentration of FA to which they are exposed during early postnatal life, and also that a neurotoxic effect of high dose FA on cell number is only seen after a long time period. These results may explain why some disorders do not appear until later life. PMID:17011527

  17. The Etv1 transcription factor activity-dependently downregulates a set of genes controlling cell growth and differentiation in maturing cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Okazawa, Makoto; Abe, Haruka; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2016-05-13

    In the early postnatal period, cerebellar granule cells exhibit an activity-dependent downregulation of a set of immaturation genes involved in cell growth and migration and are shifted to establishment of a mature network formation. Through the use of a granule cell culture and both pharmacological and RNA interference (siRNA) analyses, the present investigation revealed that the downregulation of these immaturation genes is controlled by strikingly unified signaling mechanisms that operate sequentially through the stimulation of AMPA and NMDA receptors, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). This signaling cascade induces the Etv1 transcription factor, and knockdown of Etv1 by a siRNA technique prevented this activity-dependent downregulation of immaturation genes. Thus, taken into consideration the mechanism that controls the upregulation of maturation genes involved in synaptic formation, these results indicate that Etv1 orchestrates the activity-dependent regulation of both maturation and immaturation genes in developing granule cells and plays a key role in specifying the identity of mature granule cells in the cerebellum. PMID:27059140

  18. Evidence for recognition of novel islet T cell antigens by granule-specific T cell lines from new onset type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tree, T I M; O'Byrne, D; Tremble, J M; Macfarlane, W M; Haskins, K; James, R F L; Docherty, K; Hutton, J C; Banga, J P

    2000-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease where a number of islet β-cell target autoantigens have been characterized on the basis of reactivity with autoantibodies. Nevertheless, there remains uncertainty of the nature of another group of autoantigens associated with the secretory granule fraction of islet β-cells that appear to be targeted predominantly by autoreactive T cells. We have previously characterized CD4+, HLA-DR-restricted T cell lines from new onset type 1 diabetic patients that are specific for the secretory granule fraction of rat tumour insulinoma, RIN. The T cell line from the first patient, HS, proliferates in response to crude microsomal membranes prepared from a recently established, pure human islet β-cell line NES2Y. In addition, the HS line also responds to secretory granule fractions prepared from a murine tumour insulinoma grown in RIP-Tag mice, showing the recognition of species-conserved antigen(s) in β-cells. Using partially matched antigen-presenting cells, the HS T cells and another line derived from a second patient, MR, were shown to be restricted by disease-associated DRB1*0101 and DRB1*0404 alleles, respectively. Neither the HS or MR T cell lines proliferate in response to a large panel of candidate islet cell antigens, including insulin, proinsulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, the protein tyrosine phosphatase IA-2/phogrin, imogen-38, ICA69 or hsp60. Our data provide compelling evidence of the presence of a group of antigens associated with the secretory granule fraction of islet β-cells recognized by the T cell lines, whose definition may contribute to our knowledge of disease induction as well as to diagnosis. PMID:10886245

  19. In vivo 7 Tesla imaging of the dentate granule cell layer in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Ivan I.; Hardy, Caitlin J.; Matsuda, Kant; Messinger, Julie; Cankurtaran, Ceylan Z.; Warren, Melina; Wiggins, Graham C.; Perry, Nissa N.; Babb, James S.; Goetz, Raymond R.; George, Ajax; Malaspina, Dolores; Gonen, Oded

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The hippocampus is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Histology shows abnormalities in the dentate granule cell layer (DGCL), but its small size (~100 micron thickness) has precluded in vivo human studies. We used ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare DGCL morphology of schizophrenic patients to matched controls’. METHOD Bilateral hippocampi of 16 schizophrenia patients (10 male) 40.7±10.6 years old (mean ±standard deviation) were imaged at 7 Tesla MRI with heavily T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequence at 232 micron in-plane resolution (0.08 μL image voxels). Fifteen matched controls (8 male, 35.6±9.4 years old) and one ex vivo post mortem hippocampus (that also underwent histopathology) were scanned with same protocol. Three blinded neuroradiologists rated each DGCL on a qualitative scale of 1 to 6 (from “not discernible” to “easily visible, appearing dark gray or black”) and mean left and right DGCL scores were compared using a non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS MRI identification of the DGCL was validated with histopathology. Mean right and left DGCL ratings in patients (3.2±1.0 and 3.5±1.2) were not statistically different from controls’ (3.9±1.1 and 3.8±0.8), but patients’ had a trend for lower right DGCL score (p=0.07), which was significantly associated with patient diagnosis (p=0.05). The optimal 48% sensitivity and 80% specificity for schizophrenia was achieved with a DGCL rating of ≤2. CONCLUSION Decreased contrast in the right DGCL in schizophrenia was predictive of schizophrenia diagnosis. Better utility of this metric as a schizophrenia biomarker may be achieved in future studies of patients with homogeneous disease subtypes and progression rates. PMID:23664589

  20. Spatial information enhanced by non-spatial information in hippocampal granule cells.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Hirofumi; Samura, Toshikazu; Kamijo, Tadanobu Chuyo; Sakai, Yutaka; Aihara, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    The hippocampus organizes sequential memory composed of non-spatial information (such as objects and odors) and spatial information (places). The dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus receives two types of information from the lateral and medial entorhinal cortices. Non-spatial and spatial information is delivered respectively to distal and medial dendrites (MDs) of granule cells (GCs) within the molecular layer in the DG. To investigate the role of the association of those two inputs, we measured the response characteristics of distal and MDs of a GC in a rat hippocampal slice and developed a multi-compartment GC model with dynamic synapses; this model reproduces the response characteristics of the dendrites. Upon applying random inputs or input sequences generated by a Markov process to the computational model, it was found that a high-frequency random pulse input to distal dendrites (DDs) and, separately, regular burst inputs to MDs were effective for inducing GC activation. Furthermore, when the random and theta burst inputs were simultaneously applied to the respective dendrites, the pattern discrimination for theta burst input to MDs that caused slight GC activation was enhanced in the presence of random input to DDs. These results suggest that the temporal pattern discrimination of spatial information is originally involved in a synaptic characteristic in GCs and is enhanced by non-spatial information input to DDs. Consequently, the co-activation of two separate inputs may play a crucial role in the information processing on dendrites of GCs by usefully combing each temporal sequence. PMID:26052358

  1. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 mutation induces immaturity of the dentate granule cells of adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Synaptosomal-associated protein, 25 kDa (SNAP-25) regulates the exocytosis of neurotransmitters. Growing evidence suggests that SNAP-25 is involved in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and epilepsy. Recently, increases in anxiety-related behaviors and epilepsy have been observed in SNAP-25 knock-in (KI) mice, which have a single amino acid substitution of Ala for Ser187. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in this mutant remain unknown. Results In this study, we found that a significant number of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells was histologically and electrophysiologically similar to immature DG neurons in the dentate gyrus of the adult mutants, a phenomenon termed the “immature DG” (iDG). SNAP-25 KI mice and other mice possessing the iDG phenotype, i.e., alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II heterozygous mice, Schnurri-2 knockout mice, and mice treated with the antidepressant fluoxetine, showed similar molecular expression patterns, with over 100 genes similarly altered. A working memory deficit was also identified in mutant mice during a spontaneous forced alternation task using a modified T-maze, a behavioral task known to be dependent on hippocampal function. Chronic treatments with the antiepileptic drug valproate abolished the iDG phenotype and the working memory deficit in mutants. Conclusions These findings suggest that the substitution of Ala for Ser187 in SNAP-25 induces the iDG phenotype, which can also be caused by epilepsy, and led to a severe working memory deficit. In addition, the iDG phenotype in adulthood is likely an endophenotype for at least a part of some common psychiatric disorders. PMID:23497716

  2. Evidence that zymogen granules do not function as an intracellular Ca2+ store for the generation of the Ca2+ signal in rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nezu, Akihiro; Tanimura, Akihiko; Morita, Takao; Irie, Kazuharu; Yajima, Toshihiko; Tojyo, Yosuke

    2002-01-01

    Rat parotid acinar cells lacking zymogen granules were obtained by inducing granule discharge with the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol. To assess whether zymogen granules are involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) signalling as intracellular Ca(2+) stores, changes in cytosolic free Ca(2+) ion concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) were studied with imaging microscopy in fura-2-loaded parotid acinar cells lacking zymogen granules. The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by muscarinic receptor stimulation was initiated at the apical pole of the acinar cells, and rapidly spread as a Ca(2+) wave towards the basolateral region. The magnitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) response and the speed of the Ca(2+) wave were essentially similar to those in control acinar cells containing zymogen granules. Western blot analysis of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) was performed on zymogen granule membranes and microsomes using anti-IP(3)R antibodies. The immunoreactivity of all three IP(3)Rs was clearly observed in the microsomal preparations. Although a weak band of IP(3)R type-2 was detected in the zymogen granule membranes, this band probably resulted from contamination by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), because calnexin, a marker protein of the ER, was also detected in the same preparation. Furthermore, Western blotting and reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis failed to provide evidence for the expression of ryanodine receptors in rat parotid acinar cells, whereas expression was clearly detectable in rat skeletal muscle, heart and brain. These results suggest that zymogen granules do not have a critical role in Ca(2+) signalling in rat parotid acinar cells. PMID:11903047

  3. Nonspecific cytotoxic cells of teleosts are armed with multiple granzymes and other components of the granule exocytosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Kesavannair; Leary, John H; Evans, Donald L; Jaso-Friedmann, Liliana

    2006-03-01

    Granzymes are members of the serine protease family and major components of cytotoxic granules of professional killer cells. Multiple granzymes have been identified from human and rodents with different substrate specificities. Although the significance of granzymes A and B in cell-mediated cytotoxicity has been extensively investigated, recent reports suggest that other granzymes may have either equal or greater importance in mediating cell death. Studies on the evolution of these closely related proteases were hindered by the lack of sequence and biochemical information of granzymes from "lower vertebrates." Here we report the generation of a catalytically active recombinant granzyme identified in the cytotoxic cells of an ectothermic vertebrate. Fully active, soluble recombinant catfish granzyme-1 (CFGR-1) was generated using a yeast-based expression system. In vitro enzyme kinetic assays using various thiobenzyl ester substrates verified its tryptase activity in full agreement with previous observations by sequence comparison and molecular modeling. The tryptase activity that was secreted from catfish NCC during an in vitro cytotoxicity assay strongly correlated with the cytotoxicity induced by these cells. Evidence for additional granzymes with different substrate specificities in NCC was obtained by analysis of the protease activity of supernatants collected from in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Searches of the catfish EST database further confirmed the presence of teleost granzymes with different substrate specificities. Granzyme activity measurements suggested a predominance of chymase and tryptase activities in NCC. Further proof that the granule exocytosis pathway is one of the cytotoxic mechanisms in NCC was provided by the expression of granule components perforin, granulysin and serglycin detected by RT-PCR analysis. These results demonstrate the evidence for a parallel evolution of effector molecules of cell-mediated cytotoxicity in teleosts. PMID

  4. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong; Wang, Minglei; Wang, Jia; Huang, Xingxu; Yang, Ru; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed) and Patched+/− mice in which SHH signaling is activated, we find evidence for the existence of symmetric and asymmetric divisions that are closely associated with progenitor proliferation and differentiation. While activation of the SHH pathway enhances symmetric progenitor cell divisions, blockade of the SHH pathway reverses the cell division mode change in Math1-GFP;Dcx-DsRed;Patched+/− mice by promoting asymmetric divisions or terminal neuronal symmetric divisions. Thus, cell division mode change mediates the regulation of cerebellar granule neurogenesis controlled by SHH signaling. PMID:26527387

  5. Genetic manipulation of adult-born hippocampal neurons rescues memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Richetin, Kevin; Leclerc, Clémence; Toni, Nicolas; Gallopin, Thierry; Pech, Stéphane; Roybon, Laurent; Rampon, Claire

    2015-02-01

    In adult mammals, neural progenitors located in the dentate gyrus retain their ability to generate neurons and glia throughout lifetime. In rodents, increased production of new granule neurons is associated with improved memory capacities, while decreased hippocampal neurogenesis results in impaired memory performance in several memory tasks. In mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, neurogenesis is impaired and the granule neurons that are generated fail to integrate existing networks. Thus, enhancing neurogenesis should improve functional plasticity in the hippocampus and restore cognitive deficits in these mice. Here, we performed a screen of transcription factors that could potentially enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We identified Neurod1 as a robust neuronal determinant with the capability to direct hippocampal progenitors towards an exclusive granule neuron fate. Importantly, Neurod1 also accelerated neuronal maturation and functional integration of new neurons during the period of their maturation when they contribute to memory processes. When tested in an APPxPS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, directed expression of Neurod1 in cycling hippocampal progenitors conspicuously reduced dendritic spine density deficits on new hippocampal neurons, to the same level as that observed in healthy age-matched control animals. Remarkably, this population of highly connected new neurons was sufficient to restore spatial memory in these diseased mice. Collectively our findings demonstrate that endogenous neural stem cells of the diseased brain can be manipulated to become new neurons that could allow cognitive improvement. PMID:25518958

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of Newly Generated Dentate Granule Cells Using TU Tagging Reveals Pattern Shifts in Gene Expression during Circuit Integration1,2

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Shen, Rongkun; Goodman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite representing only a small fraction of hippocampal granule cells, adult-generated newborn granule cells have been implicated in learning and memory (Aimone et al., 2011). Newborn granule cells undergo functional maturation and circuit integration over a period of weeks. However, it is difficult to assess the accompanying gene expression profiles in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution using traditional methods. Here we used a novel method [“thiouracil (TU) tagging”] to map the profiles of nascent mRNAs in mouse immature newborn granule cells compared with mature granule cells. We targeted a nonmammalian uracil salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, to newborn neurons and mature granule cells using retroviral and lentiviral constructs, respectively. Subsequent injection of 4-TU tagged nascent RNAs for analysis by RNA sequencing. Several hundred genes were significantly enhanced in the retroviral dataset compared with the lentiviral dataset. We compared a selection of the enriched genes with steady-state levels of mRNAs using quantitative PCR. Ontology analysis revealed distinct patterns of nascent mRNA expression, with newly generated immature neurons showing enhanced expression for genes involved in synaptic function, and neural differentiation and development, as well as genes not previously associated with granule cell maturation. Surprisingly, the nascent mRNAs enriched in mature cells were related to energy homeostasis and metabolism, presumably indicative of the increased energy demands of synaptic transmission and their complex dendritic architecture. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our modified TU-tagging method provides a foundation for comparison with steady-state RNA analyses by traditional transcriptomic approaches in defining the functional roles of newborn neurons. PMID:27011954

  7. Endocytosis of secretory granules in mouse pancreatic beta-cells evoked by transient elevation of cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, L; Proks, P; Ammälä, C; Ashcroft, F M; Bokvist, K; Renström, E; Rorsman, P; Smith, P A

    1996-01-01

    1. To investigate the mechanisms regulating the reuptake of secretory granule membranes following regulated exocytosis, we have monitored changes in cell capacitance in single pancreatic beta-cells. 2. Membrane retrieval (endocytosis) occurred both in a continuous manner and in abrupt steps, corresponding to the simultaneous retrieval of 50-100 granules. The large endocytotic steps were associated with a conductance change of about 1 nS which we attribute to the formation of a fission pore with a pore radius of approximately 1 nm. 3. In some cells, we observed large amplitude capacitance fluctuations, suggesting that aggregates of granules are connected to the plasma membrane by a single pore and are subsequently retrieved as a single unit. 4. Endocytosis was evoked by elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+]i, but once initiated, a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was not required for endocytosis to continue. 5. The [Ca2+]i dependence of exo- and endocytosis was studied by photorelease of Ca2+ from the 'caged' precursor Ca(2+)-nitrophenyl-EGTA (Ca(2+)-NP-EGTA). Both exo- and endocytosis were initiated at between 0.5 and 2 microM Cai(2+). The rate of endocytosis saturated above 2 microM Cai(2+), whereas exocytosis continued to increase up to 4 microM Cai(2+). The maximum rate of endocytosis was < 25% of that of exocytosis. 6. Unlike exocytosis, endocytosis proceeded equally well in the presence or absence of Mg-ATP. 7. Our data indicate that in the pancreatic beta-cell, exocytosis and endocytosis are regulated by different mechanisms. Images Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8799897

  8. Endothelin-1 stimulates the release of preloaded ( sup 3 H)D-aspartate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.W.; Lee, C.Y.; Chuang, D.M. )

    1990-03-16

    We have recently reported that endothelin-1 (ET) induces phosphoinositide hydrolysis in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. Here we found that ET in a dose-dependent manner (1-30 nM) stimulated the release of preloaded ({sup 3}H)D-aspartate from granule cells. The ET-induced aspartate release was completely blocked in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}, but was unaffected by 1 mM Co{sup 2+} or 1 microM dihydropyridine derivatives (nisoldipine and nimodipine). At higher concentration (10 microM) of nisoldipine and nimodipine, the release was partially inhibited. Short-term pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) potentiated the ET-induced aspartate release, while long-term pretreatment with PDBu attenuated the release. Long-term exposure of cells to pertussis toxin (PTX), on the other hand, potentiated the ET-induced effects. Our results suggest that ET has a neuromodulatory function in the central nervous system.

  9. Reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission of cerebellar granule cells in vivo by genetically manipulated expression of tetanus neurotoxin light chain.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mutsuya; Wada, Norio; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Watanabe, Dai; Anzai, Masayuki; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Teranishi, Yutaka; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2003-07-30

    We developed a novel technique that allowed reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cerebellar network. We generated two lines of transgenic mice termed Tet and TeNT mice and crossed the two transgenic lines to produce the Tet/TeNT double transgenic mice. In the Tet mice, the tetracycline-controlled reverse activator (rtTA) was expressed selectively in cerebellar granule cells by the promoter function of the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit gene. In the TeNT mice, the fusion gene of tetanus neurotoxin light chain (TeNT) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was designed to be induced by the interaction of doxycycline (DOX)-activated rtTA with the tetracycline-responsive promoter. The Tet/TeNT mice grew normally even after DOX treatment and exhibited a restricted DOX-dependent expression of TeNT in cerebellar granule cells. Along with this expression, TeNT proteolytically cleaved the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP2 (also termed synaptobrevin2) and reduced glutamate release from granule cells. Both cleavage of VAMP2/synaptobrevin2 and reduction of glutamate release were reversed by removal of DOX. Among the four genotypes generated by heterozygous crossing of Tet and TeNT mice, only Tet/TeNT mice showed DOX-dependent reversible motor impairments as analyzed with fixed bar and rota-rod tests. Reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission thus can be manipulated with spatiotemporal accuracy by DOX treatment and removal. These transgenic mice will serve as an animal model to study the cerebellar function in motor coordination and learning. PMID:12890769

  10. Interactions between Inhibitory Interneurons and Excitatory Associational Circuitry in Determining Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Hippocampal Dentate Granule Cells: A Large-Scale Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Phillip J.; Yu, Gene J.; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a million-cell granule cell model of the rat dentate gyrus that was used to explore the contributions of local interneuronal and associational circuits to network-level activity. The model contains experimentally derived morphological parameters for granule cells, which each contain approximately 200 compartments, and biophysical parameters for granule cells, basket cells, and mossy cells that were based both on electrophysiological data and previously published models. Synaptic input to cells in the model consisted of glutamatergic AMPA-like EPSPs and GABAergic-like IPSPs from excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. The main source of input to the model was from layer II entorhinal cortical neurons. Network connectivity was constrained by the topography of the system, and was derived from axonal transport studies, which provided details about the spatial spread of axonal terminal fields, as well as how subregions of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices project to subregions of the dentate gyrus. Results of this study show that strong feedback inhibition from the basket cell population can cause high-frequency rhythmicity in granule cells, while the strength of feedforward inhibition serves to scale the total amount of granule cell activity. Results furthermore show that the topography of local interneuronal circuits can have just as strong an impact on the development of spatio-temporal clusters in the granule cell population as the perforant path topography does, both sharpening existing clusters and introducing new ones with a greater spatial extent. Finally, results show that the interactions between the inhibitory and associational loops can cause high frequency oscillations that are modulated by a low-frequency oscillatory signal. These results serve to further illustrate the importance of topographical constraints on a global signal processing feature of a neural network, while also illustrating how rich

  11. The Rab27 effector Rabphilin, unlike Granuphilin and Noc2, rapidly exchanges between secretory granules and cytosol in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Handley, Mark T W; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2008-08-22

    Rab proteins are GTPases that transit between GTP- and GDP-bound states. In the GTP-bound form they can recruit specific effector to membrane domains. It is possible that the exchange of Rab effectors between membranes and cytosol would be determined by the exchange of the particular Rab partner. We have compared the cycling of three Rab3/27 effectors, Granuphilin, Noc2, and Rabphilin, in PC12 cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of EGFP-tagged proteins. All three effectors become localised to secretory granules. Granuphilin and Noc2 showed little or no exchange between secretory granules and cytosol whereas Rabphilin showed rapid and complete exchange. Both Noc2 and Rabphilin were found to be recruited to granules by Rab27 but the data suggest that Rabphilin did not form stable complexes with Rab27 on secretory granules and so Rab effector cycling between membranes and cytosol can be independent of that of the Rab protein. PMID:18573236

  12. Pattern of rise in subplasma membrane Ca{sup 2+} concentration determines type of fusing insulin granules in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Sakurai, Takashi; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-07-31

    We simultaneously analyzed insulin granule fusion with insulin fused to green fluorescent protein and the subplasma membrane Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM}) with the Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fura Red in rat {beta} cells by dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We found that rapid and marked elevation in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM} caused insulin granule fusion mostly from previously docked granules during the high KCl-evoked release and high glucose-evoked first phase release. In contrast, the slow and sustained elevation in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM} induced fusion from newcomers translocated from the internal pool during the low KCl-evoked release and glucose-evoked second phase release. These data suggest that the pattern of the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM} rise directly determines the types of fusing granules.

  13. Tonic Inhibitory Control of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells by α5-Containing GABAA Receptors Reduces Memory Interference

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowska, Ewa D.; Benke, Dietmar; Tsvetkov, Evgeny; Sigal, Maksim; Keist, Ruth; Bolshakov, Vadim Y.; Pearce, Robert A.; Rudolph, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Interference between similar or overlapping memories formed at different times poses an important challenge on the hippocampal declarative memory system. Difficulties in managing interference are at the core of disabling cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders. Computational models have suggested that, in the normal brain, the sparse activation of the dentate gyrus granule cells maintained by tonic inhibitory control enables pattern separation, an orthogonalization process that allows distinct representations of memories despite interference. To test this mechanistic hypothesis, we generated mice with significantly reduced expression of the α5-containing GABAA (α5-GABAARs) receptors selectively in the granule cells of the dentate gyrus (α5DGKO mice). α5DGKO mice had reduced tonic inhibition of the granule cells without any change in fast phasic inhibition and showed increased activation in the dentate gyrus when presented with novel stimuli. α5DGKO mice showed impairments in cognitive tasks characterized by high interference, without any deficiencies in low-interference tasks, suggesting specific impairment of pattern separation. Reduction of fast phasic inhibition in the dentate gyrus through granule cell-selective knock-out of α2-GABAARs or the knock-out of the α5-GABAARs in the downstream CA3 area did not detract from pattern separation abilities, which confirms the anatomical and molecular specificity of the findings. In addition to lending empirical support to computational hypotheses, our findings have implications for the treatment of interference-related cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly considering the availability of pharmacological agents selectively targeting α5-GABAARs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Interference between similar memories poses a significant limitation on the hippocampal declarative memory system, and impaired interference management is a cognitive symptom in many disorders. Thus, understanding

  14. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiem, Anne Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  15. Difference in distribution of membrane proteins between low- and high-density secretory granules in parotid acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko . E-mail: yoshigaki.junko@nihon-u.ac.jp; Katsumata, Osamu; Matsuki, Miwako; Yoshigaki, Tomoyoshi; Furuyama, Shunsuke; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2006-05-26

    Secretory granules (SGs) are considered to be generated as immature granules and to mature by condensation of their contents. In this study, SGs of parotid gland were separated into low-, medium-, and high-density granule fractions by Percoll-density gradient centrifugation, since it was proposed that the density corresponds to the degree of maturation. The observation with electron microscopy showed that granules in the three fractions were very similar. The average diameter of high-density granules was a little but significantly larger than that of low-density granules. Although the three fractions contained amylase, suggesting that they are all SGs, distribution of membrane proteins was markedly different. Syntaxin6 and VAMP4 were localized in the low-density granule fraction, while VAMP2 was concentrated in the high-density granule fraction. Immunoprecipitation with anti-syntaxin6 antibody caused coprecipitation of VAMP2 from the medium-density granule fraction without solubilization, but not from Triton X-100-solubilized fraction, while VAMP4 was coprecipitated from both fractions. Therefore, VAMP2 is present on the same granules, but is separated from syntaxin6 and VAMP4, which are expected to be removed from immature granules. These results suggest that the medium-density granules are intermediates from low- to high-density granules, and that the membrane components of SGs dynamically change by budding and fusion during maturation.

  16. Glutamate neurotoxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells: a major role for xanthine oxidase in oxygen radical formation.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Minervini, G M; Ciotti, M T; Marra, E; Calissano, P

    1997-05-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism through which the neurotransmitter glutamate causally participates in several neurological diseases, in vitro cultured cerebellar granule cells were exposed to glutamate and oxygen radical production was investigated. To this aim, a novel procedure was developed to detect oxygen radicals; the fluorescent dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein was used to detect production of peroxides, and a specific search for the possible conversion of the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase after the excitotoxic glutamate pulse was undertaken. A 100 microM glutamate pulse administered to 7-day-old cerebellar granule cells is accompanied by the onset of neuronal death, the appearance of xanthine oxidase, and production of oxygen radicals. Xanthine oxidase activation and superoxide (O2.-) production are completely inhibited by concomitant incubation of glutamate with MK-801, a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, or by chelation of external calcium with EGTA. Partial inhibition of both cell death and parallel production of reactive oxygen species is achieved with allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, leupeptin, a protease inhibitor, reducing agents such as glutathione or dithiothreitol, antioxidants such as vitamin E and vitamin C, and externally added superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that glutamate-triggered, NMDA-mediated, massive Ca2+ influx induces rapid conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase with subsequent production of reactive oxygen species that most probably have a causal involvement in the initial steps of the series of intracellular events leading to neuronal degeneration and death. PMID:9109530

  17. Persistent Nav1.6 current at axon initial segments tunes spike timing of cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Nancy; Cathala, Laurence; Meisler, Miriam H; Crest, Marcel; Magistretti, Jacopo; Delmas, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar granule (CG) cells generate high-frequency action potentials that have been proposed to depend on the unique properties of their voltage-gated ion channels. To address the in vivo function of Nav1.6 channels in developing and mature CG cells, we combined the study of the developmental expression of Nav subunits with recording of acute cerebellar slices from young and adult granule-specific Scn8a KO mice. Nav1.2 accumulated rapidly at early-formed axon initial segments (AISs). In contrast, Nav1.6 was absent at early postnatal stages but accumulated at AISs of CG cells from P21 to P40. By P40–P65, both Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 co-localized at CG cell AISs. By comparing Na+ currents in mature CG cells (P66–P74) from wild-type and CG-specific Scn8a KO mice, we found that transient and resurgent Na+ currents were not modified in the absence of Nav1.6 whereas persistent Na+ current was strongly reduced. Action potentials in conditional Scn8a KO CG cells showed no alteration in threshold and overshoot, but had a faster repolarization phase and larger post-spike hyperpolarization. In addition, although Scn8a KO CG cells kept their ability to fire action potentials at very high frequency, they displayed increased interspike-interval variability and firing irregularity in response to sustained depolarization. We conclude that Nav1.6 channels at axon initial segments contribute to persistent Na+ current and ensure a high degree of temporal precision in repetitive firing of CG cells. PMID:20173079

  18. Morphological observations of small granule-containing (chromaffin) cells in the celiac ganglion of the guinea pig, with emphasis on cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Mascorro, J A; Breaux, T F; Yates, R D

    1994-10-01

    Utilizing electron microscopic observation, several contacts between small, granule-containing cells (SGC) and postganglionic neurons (PGN) in the celiac ganglion of the guinea pig have been observed. A SGC in very close association with a PGN was seen to receive a distinct synaptic contact that contained many vesicles with dense cores. This contact was morphologically unlike cholinergic synapses previously reported on chromaffin cells. Because the SGC and PGN were clearly separated by a thin rim of satellite cell cytoplasm mutual to both cells, it is not known how or if the SGC would possibly exert a synaptic or paracrine effect on the PGN. Also, intraganglion SGC existed as large well-vascularized islands within the celiac ganglion. These intraganglion clusters sometimes contained more than 50 cells and perhaps could be considered to function as localized neuroendocrine components within the ganglion by secreting granule products into the nearby blood vessels for local or distant effects, although this certainly is not known. This work reports a unique synaptic ending upon a single-occurring SGC, which, in turn, closely approximates a ganglion neuron in a soma-somatic relationship. In addition, a very close association (but no actual contact) was observed between granule-containing processes, presumably emanating from the intraganglion clusters, and PGN. Whatever the function of ganglionic SGC may be, the exact relationship between SGC and PGN presumably would be of great interest and potential importance. PMID:7812038

  19. Bestrophin1 Channels are Insensitive to Ethanol and Do not Mediate Tonic GABAergic Currents in Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Marvin R.; Wadleigh, Aya; Hughes, Benjamin A.; Woodward, John J.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The granule cell layer of the cerebellum functions in spatio-temporal encoding of information. Granule cells (GCs) are tonically inhibited by spillover of GABA released from Golgi cells and this tonic inhibition is facilitated by acute ethanol. Recently, it was demonstrated that a specialized Ca2+-activated anion-channel, bestrophin1 (Best1), found on glial cells, can release GABA that contributes up to 50–75% of the tonic GABAergic current. However, it is unknown if ethanol has any actions on Best1 function. Using whole-cell electrophysiology, we found that recombinant Best1 channels expressed in HEK-293 cells were insensitive to 40 and 80 mM ethanol. We attempted to measure the Best1-mediated component of the tonic current in slices using 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB). We confirmed that this agent blocks recombinant Best1 channels. Unexpectedly, we found that NPPB significantly potentiated the tonic current and the area and decay of GABAA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in GCs in rodent slices under two different recording conditions. To better isolate the Best1-dependent tonic current component, we blocked the Golgi cell component of the tonic current with tetrodotoxin and found that NPPB similarly and significantly potentiated the tonic current amplitude and decay time of miniature IPSCs. Two other Cl−-channel blockers were also tested: 4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid disodium salt hydrate (DIDS) showed no effect on GABAergic transmission, while niflumic acid (NFA) significantly suppressed the tonic current noise, as well as the mIPSC frequency, amplitude, and area. These data suggest that acute ethanol exposure does not modulate Best1 channels and these findings serve to challenge recent data indicating that these channels participate in the generation of tonic GABAergic currents in cerebellar GCs. PMID:22275879

  20. Glomerular and Mitral-Granule Cell Microcircuits Coordinate Temporal and Spatial Information Processing in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Cavarretta, Francesco; Marasco, Addolorata; Hines, Michael L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Migliore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb processes inputs from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) through two levels: the glomerular layer at the site of input, and the granule cell level at the site of output to the olfactory cortex. The sequence of action of these two levels has not yet been examined. We analyze this issue using a novel computational framework that is scaled up, in three-dimensions (3D), with realistic representations of the interactions between layers, activated by simulated natural odors, and constrained by experimental and theoretical analyses. We suggest that the postulated functions of glomerular circuits have as their primary role transforming a complex and disorganized input into a contrast-enhanced and normalized representation, but cannot provide for synchronization of the distributed glomerular outputs. By contrast, at the granule cell layer, the dendrodendritic interactions mediate temporal decorrelation, which we show is dependent on the preceding contrast enhancement by the glomerular layer. The results provide the first insights into the successive operations in the olfactory bulb, and demonstrate the significance of the modular organization around glomeruli. This layered organization is especially important for natural odor inputs, because they activate many overlapping glomeruli. PMID:27471461

  1. Granule Associated Serine Proteases of Hematopoietic Cells – An Analysis of Their Appearance and Diversification during Vertebrate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Akula, Srinivas; Thorpe, Michael; Boinapally, Vamsi; Hellman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases are among the most abundant granule constituents of several hematopoietic cell lineages including mast cells, neutrophils, cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. These proteases are stored in their active form in the cytoplasmic granules and in mammals are encoded from four different chromosomal loci: the chymase locus, the met-ase locus, the T cell tryptase and the mast cell tryptase locus. In order to study their appearance during vertebrate evolution we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of related genes and gene loci from a large panel of metazoan animals from sea urchins to placental mammals for three of these loci: the chymase, met-ase and granzyme A/K loci. Genes related to mammalian granzymes A and K were the most well conserved and could be traced as far back to cartilaginous fish. Here, the granzyme A and K genes were found in essentially the same chromosomal location from sharks to humans. However in sharks, no genes clearly identifiable as members of the chymase or met-ase loci were found. A selection of these genes seemed to appear with bony fish, but sometimes in other loci. Genes related to mammalian met-ase locus genes were found in bony fish. Here, the most well conserved member was complement factor D. However, genes distantly related to the neutrophil proteases were also identified in this locus in several bony fish species, indicating that this locus is also old and appeared at the base of bony fish. In fish, a few of the chymase locus-related genes were found in a locus with bordering genes other than the mammalian chymase locus and some were found in the fish met-ase locus. This indicates that a convergent evolution rather than divergent evolution has resulted in chymase locus-related genes in bony fish. PMID:26569620

  2. Tissue-specific expression of mast cell granule serine proteinases and their role in inflammation in the lung and gut

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Hugh R P; Pemberton, Alan D

    2002-01-01

    Serine proteinases with trypsin-like (tryptase) and chymotrypsin-like (chymase) properties are major constituents of mast cell granules. Several tetrameric tryptases with differing specificities have been characterized in humans, but only a single chymase. In other species there are larger families of chymases with distinct and narrow proteolytic specificities. Expression of chymases and tryptases varies between tissues. Human pulmonary and gastrointestinal mast cells express chymase at lower levels than tryptase, whereas rodent and ruminant gastrointestinal mast cells express uniquely mucosa-specific chymases. Local and systemic release of chymases and tryptases can be quantified by immunoassay, providing highly specific markers of mast cell activation. The expression and constitutive extracellular secretion of the mucosa-specific chymase, mouse mast cell proteinase-1 (mMCP-1), is regulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in vitro, but it is not clear how the differential expression of chymases and tryptases is regulated in other species. Few native inhibitors have been identified for tryptases but the tetramers dissociate into inactive subunits in the absence of heparin. Chymases are variably inhibited by plasma proteinase inhibitors and by secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) that is expressed in the airways. Tryptases and chymases promote vascular permeability via indirect and possibly direct mechanisms. They contribute to tissue remodelling through selective proteolysis of matrix proteins and through activation of proteinase-activated receptors and of matrix metalloproteinases. Chymase may modulate vascular tissues through its ability to process angiotensin-I to angiotensin-II. Mucosa-specific chymases promote epithelial permeability and are involved in the immune expulsion of intestinal nematodes. Importantly, granule proteinases released extracellularly contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells and may thus be involved in

  3. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin-2 is associated with dense core secretory granules in PC12 neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Papini, E; Rossetto, O; Cutler, D F

    1995-01-20

    The presence and intracellular distribution of vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1) and VAMP-2 were investigated in the PC12 neuroendocrine cell line using isotype-specific polyclonal antibodies. VAMP-2 was detected in the total membrane fraction, while VAMP-1 was undetectable. Subcellular fractionation demonstrates that a substantial amount of the VAMP-2 (24-36%) is associated with dense core, catecholamine-containing granules (DCGs). This was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The L chain of tetanus neurotoxin, known to inhibit granule mediated secretion in permeabilized PC12 cells, as well as botulinum neurotoxins F and G, effectively cleaved DCG-associated VAMP-2. These data demonstrate that VAMP-2 is present on the secretory granules of PC12 cells. PMID:7836399

  4. LXR agonist rescued the deficit in the proliferation of the cerebellar granule cells induced by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xuting; Zhong, Hongyu; Li, Fen; Cai, Yulong; Li, Xin; Wang, Lian; Fan, Xiaotang

    2016-09-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) exposure during early postnatal life produces permanent neuromotor and intellectual deficits and stunts cerebellar growth. The liver X receptor (LXR) plays important roles in CNS development. However, the effects of LXR on the DEX-mediated impairment of cerebellar development remain undetermined. Thus, mice were pretreated with LXR agonist TO901317 (TO) and were later exposed to DEX to evaluate its protective effects on DEX-mediated deficit during cerebellar development. The results showed that an acute exposure of DEX on postnatal day 7 resulted in a significant impairment in cerebellar development and decreased the proliferation of granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer of cerebellum. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with TO. We further found that the decrease in the proliferation caused by DEX occurred via up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor and p27kip1, which could be partially prevented by LXR agonist pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that LXR agonist pretreatment could protect against DEX-induced deficits in cerebellar development in postnatal mice and may thus be perspective recruited to counteract such GC side effects. PMID:27369072

  5. Population imaging at subcellular resolution supports specific and local inhibition by granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Wienisch, Martin; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-01-01

    Information processing in early sensory regions is modulated by a diverse range of inhibitory interneurons. We sought to elucidate the role of olfactory bulb interneurons called granule cells (GCs) in odor processing by imaging the activity of hundreds of these cells simultaneously in mice. Odor responses in GCs were temporally diverse and spatially disperse, with some degree of non-random, modular organization. The overall sparseness of activation of GCs was highly correlated with the extent of glomerular activation by odor stimuli. Increasing concentrations of single odorants led to proportionately larger population activity, but some individual GCs had non-monotonic relations to concentration due to local inhibitory interactions. Individual dendritic segments could sometimes respond independently to odors, revealing their capacity for compartmentalized signaling in vivo. Collectively, the response properties of GCs point to their role in specific and local processing, rather than global operations such as response normalization proposed for other interneurons. PMID:27388949

  6. Population imaging at subcellular resolution supports specific and local inhibition by granule cells in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Wienisch, Martin; Murthy, Venkatesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Information processing in early sensory regions is modulated by a diverse range of inhibitory interneurons. We sought to elucidate the role of olfactory bulb interneurons called granule cells (GCs) in odor processing by imaging the activity of hundreds of these cells simultaneously in mice. Odor responses in GCs were temporally diverse and spatially disperse, with some degree of non-random, modular organization. The overall sparseness of activation of GCs was highly correlated with the extent of glomerular activation by odor stimuli. Increasing concentrations of single odorants led to proportionately larger population activity, but some individual GCs had non-monotonic relations to concentration due to local inhibitory interactions. Individual dendritic segments could sometimes respond independently to odors, revealing their capacity for compartmentalized signaling in vivo. Collectively, the response properties of GCs point to their role in specific and local processing, rather than global operations such as response normalization proposed for other interneurons. PMID:27388949

  7. PTBP1 is required for glucose-stimulated cap-independent translation of insulin granule proteins and Coxsackieviruses in beta cells.

    PubMed

    Knoch, Klaus-Peter; Nath-Sain, Suchita; Petzold, Antje; Schneider, Hendryk; Beck, Mike; Wegbrod, Carolin; Sönmez, Anke; Münster, Carla; Friedrich, Anne; Roivainen, Merja; Solimena, Michele

    2014-08-01

    Glucose and GLP-1 stimulate not only insulin secretion, but also the post-transcriptional induction of insulin granule biogenesis. This process involves the nucleocytoplasmic translocation of the RNA binding protein PTBP1. Binding of PTBP1 to the 3'-UTRs of mRNAs for insulin and other cargoes of beta cell granules increases their stability. Here we show that glucose enhances also the binding of PTBP1 to the 5'-UTRs of these transcripts, which display IRES activity, and their translation exclusively in a cap-independent fashion. Accordingly, glucose-induced biosynthesis of granule cargoes was unaffected by pharmacological, genetic or Coxsackievirus-mediated inhibition of cap-dependent translation. Infection with Coxsackieviruses, which also depend on PTBP1 for their own cap-independent translation, reduced instead granule stores and insulin release. These findings provide insight into the mechanism for glucose-induction of insulin granule production and on how Coxsackieviruses, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, can foster beta cell failure. PMID:25061557

  8. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca2+ response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca2+ channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca2+]i response, whereas the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca2+]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca2+ channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  9. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca(2+) response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca(2+)]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca(2+) channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca(2+)]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca(2+)]i response, whereas the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca(2+) channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  10. Radiation-induced alterations in synaptic neurotransmission of dentate granule cells depend on the dose and species of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Marty, V N; Vlkolinsky, R; Minassian, N; Cohen, T; Nelson, G A; Spigelman, I

    2014-12-01

    The evaluation of potential health risks associated with neuronal exposure to space radiation is critical for future long duration space travel. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of low-dose proton and high-energy charged particle (HZE) radiation on electrophysiological parameters of the granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and its associated functional consequences. We examined excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in DG granule cells (DGCs) in dorsal hippocampal slices from male C57BL/6 mice at 3 months after whole body irradiation with accelerated proton, silicon or iron particles. Multielectrode arrays were used to investigate evoked field synaptic potentials, an extracellular measurement of synaptic excitability in the perforant path to DG synaptic pathway. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were used to measure miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in DGCs. Exposure to proton radiation increased synaptic excitability and produced dose-dependent decreases in amplitude and charge transfer of mIPSCs, without affecting the expression of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor α2, β3 and γ2 subunits determined by Western blotting. Exposure to silicon radiation had no significant effects on synaptic excitability, mEPSCs or mIPSCs of DGCs. Exposure to iron radiation had no effect on synaptic excitability and mIPSCs, but significantly increased mEPSC frequency at 1 Gy, without changes in mEPSC kinetics, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Overall, the data suggest that proton and HZE exposure results in radiation dose- and species-dependent long-lasting alterations in synaptic neurotransmission, which could cause radiation-induced impairment of hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. PMID:25402556

  11. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters synaptic activity of adult hippocampal dentate granule cells under conditions of enriched environment.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Kenta; Valenzuela, C Fernando; Allan, Andrea M; Ge, Shaoyu; Gu, Yan; Cunningham, Lee Anna

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) results in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), which is characterized by a wide range of cognitive and behavioral deficits that may be linked to impaired hippocampal function and adult neurogenesis. Preclinical studies in mouse models of FASD indicate that PAE markedly attenuates enrichment-mediated increases in the number of adult-generated hippocampal dentate granule cells (aDGCs), but whether synaptic activity is also affected has not been studied. Here, we utilized retroviral birth-dating coupled with whole cell patch electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of PAE on enrichment-mediated changes in excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity as a function of DGC age. We found that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) had no effect on baseline synaptic activity of 4- or 8-week-old aDGCs from control mice, but significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in 8-week-old aDGCs from PAE mice. In contrast, exposure to EE significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in older pre-existing DGCs situated in the outer dentate granule cell layer (i.e., those generated during embryonic development; dDGCs) in control mice, an effect that was blunted in PAE mice. These findings indicate distinct electrophysiological responses of hippocampal DGCs to behavioral challenge based on cellular ontogenetic age, and suggest that PAE disrupts EE-mediated changes in overall hippocampal network activity. These findings may have implications for future therapeutic targeting of hippocampal dentate circuitry in clinical FASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27009742

  12. Glutamate neurotoxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells involves cytochrome c release from mitochondria and mitochondrial shuttle impairment.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Marra, E; Calissano, P; Passarella, S

    1999-07-01

    To gain some insight into the mechanism by which glutamate neurotoxicity takes place in cerebellar granule cells, two steps of glucose oxidation were investigated: the electron flow via respiratory chain from certain substrates to oxygen and the transfer of extramitochondrial reducing equivalents via the mitochondrial shuttles. However, cytochrome c release from intact mitochondria was found to occur in glutamate-treated cells as detected photometrically in the supernatant of the cell homogenate suspension. As a result of cytochrome c release, an increase of the oxidation of externally added NADH was found, probably occurring via the NADH-b5 oxidoreductase of the outer mitochondrial membrane. When the two mitochondrial shuttles glycerol 3-phosphate/dihydroxyacetone phosphate and malate/oxaloacetate, devoted to oxidizing externally added NADH, were reconstructed, both were found to be impaired under glutamate neurotoxicity. Consistent early activation in two NADH oxidizing mechanisms, i.e., lactate production and plasma membrane NADH oxidoreductase activity, was found in glutamate-treated cells. In spite of this, the increase in the cell NADH fluorescence was found to be time-dependent, an index of the progressive damage of the cell. PMID:10386976

  13. Modulation by protein kinase C of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP poffation in cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Esposito, E; Eboli, M L

    1996-04-29

    The possible modulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) activity by protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated in primary cultures of rat cerebellar neurons. Incubation of the cells with L-arginine and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) produced detectable levels of NO, as quantified by photometric assay [0.14 +/- 0.03 nmol/h/dish (2.5 x 10(6) cells)]. The NO producing activity was paralleled by concomitant accumulation of cyclic GMP (cGMP) (0.12 +/- 0.02 pmol/dish). Downregulation of PKC by prolonged treatment with phorbol esters or inhibition of the kinase by treatment with 4taurosporine raised the basal levels of NO and cGMP five fold. When granule cells were incubated in the absence of extracellular Mg2+, N-methyl-D-aspartate and to a lesser extent, glutamate became effective in enhancing NO formation and cGMP accumulation with respect to the control. The NO and cGMP increases induced by the two agonists were almost doubled by treatment of the cells with staurosporine or depletion of PKC. Calphostin C. an inhibitor of the regulatory domain of PKC, was as effective as staurosporine in increasing the formation of NO in both resting and excited cells. These results indicate that downregulation or inhibition of PKC increase NOS activity in cerebellar neurons, and suggest that phosphorylation of NOS by PKC negatively modulates the catalytic activity of the enzyme in these cells. PMID:8773779

  14. Restricted diffusion of calretinin in cerebellar granule cell dendrites implies Ca2+-dependent interactions via its EF-hand 5 domain

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Oliver; Schwaller, Beat; Brown, Edward B; Eilers, Jens; Schmidt, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs) are important regulators of neuronal Ca2+ signalling, acting either as buffers that shape Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ diffusion and/or as Ca2+ sensors. The diffusional mobility represents a crucial functional parameter of CaBPs, describing their range-of-action and possible interactions with binding partners. Calretinin (CR) is a CaBP widely expressed in the nervous system with strong expression in cerebellar granule cells. It is involved in regulating excitability and synaptic transmission of granule cells, and its absence leads to impaired motor control. We quantified the diffusional mobility of dye-labelled CR in mouse granule cells using two-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We found that movement of macromolecules in granule cell dendrites was not well described by free Brownian diffusion and that CR diffused unexpectedly slow compared to fluorescein dextrans of comparable size. During bursts of action potentials, which were associated with dendritic Ca2+ transients, the mobility of CR was further reduced. Diffusion was significantly accelerated by a peptide embracing EF-hand 5 of CR. Our results suggest long-lasting, Ca2+-dependent interactions of CR with large and/or immobile binding partners. These interactions render CR a poorly mobile Ca2+ buffer and point towards a Ca2+ sensor function of CR. PMID:23732647

  15. Selective sorting of alpha-granule proteins

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, J.E.; Battinelli, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary One of the main functions of blood platelets is to secrete a variety of substances that can modify a developing thrombus, regulate the growth of the vasculature, promote wound repair, and contribute to cell-adhesive events. The majority of this vast array of secreted proteins is stored in alpha-granules. Until recently, it was assumed that platelets contained one homogeneous population of alpha-granules that undergo complete de-granulation during platelet activation. This review focuses on the mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis and secretion, with a particular emphasis on recent findings that clearly demonstrate that platelets contain distinct subpopulations of alpha-granules that undergo differential release during activation. We consider the implications of this new paradigm of platelet secretion, discuss mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis, and review the molecular basis of transport and delivery of alpha-granules to assembling platelets. PMID:19630794

  16. Calcium spatial distribution in aerobic granules and its effects on granule structure, strength and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ting-Ting; Liu, Li; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Zhang, Ming-Chuan; Zhu, Jian-Rong

    2008-07-01

    Calcium-rich aerobic granules were cultivated after 3-month operation. The chemical form and spatial distribution of calcium in the granules and their physicochemical characteristics were explored. Examination with a scanning electron microscope combined energy dispersive X-ray detector (SEM-EDX) shows that Ca was mainly accumulated in the core of the granules. CaCO(3) was found to be the main calcium precipitate in the granules. The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis shows that the cells were crowded in the outer layer and gathered in clusters. Compared with the granules without Ca accumulation, the Ca-rich granules had more rigid structure and a higher strength. However, their specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) reduced after the Ca accumulation inside them. Comparison between the SOUR values of the granules with and without Ca accumulation suggests that Ca accumulated in the aerobic granules might have a negative effect on their bioactivity. PMID:18514253

  17. Isolation of neuromelanin granules.

    PubMed

    Tribl, Florian

    2008-12-01

    Neuromelanin granules are pigmented organelles in the human midbrain that give name to a brain area, substantia nigra pars compacta, which macroscopically appears as a dark brown region in the midbrain due to the insoluble pigment neuromelanin. The substantia nigra pars compacta massively degenerates in Parkinson's disease and gives rise to severely disabling movement symptoms. It has been suggested that neuromelanin granules play an important role in the neurodegenerative events in Parkinson's disease: redox-active iron is bound to neuromelanin and thereby retained within this compartment, but in Parkinson's disease it is thought to be increasingly released into the cytosol, promoting oxidative stress. This unit includes a methodological workflow for the isolation of neuromelanin granules from the human midbrain. This top-down approach (describes an approach that reduces the complexity of the sample stepwise from the level of tissue to cell, and from cell to organelle) encompasses the organelle isolation by sequential density gradient centrifugation and the assessment of the isolation efficacy by western blotting. PMID:19085988

  18. Enduring changes in tonic GABAA receptor signaling in dentate granule cells after controlled cortical impact brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Boychuk, Jeffery A; Butler, Corwin R; Halmos, Katalin Cs; Smith, Bret N

    2016-03-01

    Changes in functional GABAAR signaling in hippocampus have previously been evaluated using pre-clinical animal models of either diffuse brain injury or extreme focal brain injury that precludes measurement of cells located ipsilateral to injury. As a result, there is little information about the status of functional GABAAR signaling in dentate granule cells (DGCs) located ipsilateral to focal brain injury, where significant cellular changes have been documented. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal slices to measure changes in GABAARs in dentate granule cells (DGCs) at 1-2, 3-5, and 8-13 weeks after controlled cortical impact (CCI) brain injury. Synaptic and tonic GABAAR currents (ITonicGABA) were measured in DGCs at baseline conditions and during application of the GABAAR agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol hydrochloride (THIP) to assess in the function of δ subunit-containing GABAARs. DGCs ipsilateral to CCI exhibited no changes in the amplitude of resting ITonicGABA relative to DGCs after sham-injury or contralateral to CCI. In contrast, there was a significant reduction in the THIP-evoked ITonicGABA in DGCs ipsilateral to CCI at both time-points. Tonic GABAergic inhibition of DGCs ipsilateral to injury also exhibited reduced responsiveness to the neurosteroid THDOC. ITonicGABA in DGCs ipsilateral to CCI did not exhibit a change in sensitivity to L655,708, an inverse agonist with selectivity for α5 subunit-containing GABAARs, suggesting a lack of functional change in GABAARs containing this subunit. At the 8-13 week time-point, gene expression of GABAAR subunits expected to contribute to ITonicGABA (i.e., α4, α5 and δ) was not significantly altered by CCI injury in isolated dentate gyrus. Collectively, these results demonstrate enduring functional changes in ITonicGABA in DGCs ipsilateral to focal brain injury that occur independent of altered gene expression. PMID:26772635

  19. ALS mutant FUS proteins are recruited into stress granules in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Jessica; De Santis, Riccardo; de Turris, Valeria; Morlando, Mariangela; Laneve, Pietro; Calvo, Andrea; Caliendo, Virginia; Chiò, Adriano; Rosa, Alessandro; Bozzoni, Irene

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an opportunity to study human diseases mainly in those cases for which no suitable model systems are available. Here, we have taken advantage of in vitro iPSCs derived from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and carrying mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS to study the cellular behavior of the mutant proteins in the appropriate genetic background. Moreover, the ability to differentiate iPSCs into spinal cord neural cells provides an in vitro model mimicking the physiological conditions. iPSCs were derived from FUSR514S and FUSR521C patient fibroblasts, whereas in the case of the severe FUSP525L mutation, in which fibroblasts were not available, a heterozygous and a homozygous iPSC line were raised by TALEN-directed mutagenesis. We show that aberrant localization and recruitment of FUS into stress granules (SGs) is a prerogative of the FUS mutant proteins and occurs only upon induction of stress in both undifferentiated iPSCs and spinal cord neural cells. Moreover, we show that the incorporation into SGs is proportional to the amount of cytoplasmic FUS, strongly correlating with the cytoplasmic delocalization phenotype of the different mutants. Therefore, the available iPSCs represent a very powerful system for understanding the correlation between FUS mutations, the molecular mechanisms of SG formation and ALS ethiopathogenesis. PMID:26035390

  20. ALS mutant FUS proteins are recruited into stress granules in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Jessica; De Santis, Riccardo; de Turris, Valeria; Morlando, Mariangela; Laneve, Pietro; Calvo, Andrea; Caliendo, Virginia; Chiò, Adriano; Rosa, Alessandro; Bozzoni, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an opportunity to study human diseases mainly in those cases for which no suitable model systems are available. Here, we have taken advantage of in vitro iPSCs derived from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and carrying mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS to study the cellular behavior of the mutant proteins in the appropriate genetic background. Moreover, the ability to differentiate iPSCs into spinal cord neural cells provides an in vitro model mimicking the physiological conditions. iPSCs were derived from FUS(R514S) and FUS(R521C) patient fibroblasts, whereas in the case of the severe FUS(P525L) mutation, in which fibroblasts were not available, a heterozygous and a homozygous iPSC line were raised by TALEN-directed mutagenesis. We show that aberrant localization and recruitment of FUS into stress granules (SGs) is a prerogative of the FUS mutant proteins and occurs only upon induction of stress in both undifferentiated iPSCs and spinal cord neural cells. Moreover, we show that the incorporation into SGs is proportional to the amount of cytoplasmic FUS, strongly correlating with the cytoplasmic delocalization phenotype of the different mutants. Therefore, the available iPSCs represent a very powerful system for understanding the correlation between FUS mutations, the molecular mechanisms of SG formation and ALS ethiopathogenesis. PMID:26035390

  1. Characterization of Phospholipids in Insulin Secretory Granules and Mitochondria in Pancreatic Beta Cells and Their Changes with Glucose Stimulation*

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Michael J.; Ade, Lacmbouh; Ntambi, James M.; Ansari, Israr-Ul H.; Stoker, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The lipid composition of insulin secretory granules (ISG) has never previously been thoroughly characterized. We characterized the phospholipid composition of ISG and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells without and with glucose stimulation. The phospholipid/protein ratios of most phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids were higher in ISG than in whole cells and in mitochondria. The concentrations of negatively charged phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol in ISG were 5-fold higher than in the whole cell. In ISG phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin, fatty acids 12:0 and 14:0 were high, as were phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol containing 18-carbon unsaturated FA. With glucose stimulation, the concentration of many ISG phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylinositols increased; unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylserine increased; and most phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and lysophosphatidylcholines were unchanged. Unsaturation and shorter fatty acid length in phospholipids facilitate curvature and fluidity of membranes, which favors fusion of membranes. Recent evidence suggests that negatively charged phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, act as coupling factors enhancing the interaction of positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in synaptic or secretory vesicle membrane lipid bilayers with positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane lipid bilayer to facilitate docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. The results indicate that ISG phospholipids are in a dynamic state and are consistent with the idea that changes in ISG phospholipids facilitate fusion of ISG with the plasma membrane-enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin exocytosis. PMID:25762724

  2. Starch granule formation and protein deposition in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) starchy endosperm cells is altered by high temperature during grain fill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkman, William J.; Wood, Delilah F.

    2010-06-01

    High temperatures during wheat grain fill decrease starch and protein levels, adversely affecting wheat yield and flour quality. To determine the effect of high temperature on starchy endosperm cell development, grain (Triticum aestivum L. 'Butte 86') was produced under a 24/17°C or 37/28°C day/night regimen imposed from flowering to maturity and starch and protein deposition examined using scanning electron microscopy. The high temperature regimen shortened the duration of grain fill from 40 to 18 days. Under the 37/28°C regimen, A- and B-type starch granules decreased in size. A-type starch granules also exhibited pitting, suggesting enhanced action of starch degradative enzymes. Under both temperature regimens, protein bodies originated early in development and coalesced during mid to late development to form a continuous protein matrix surrounding the starch granules. Under the 37/28°C regimen, the proportion of protein matrix increased in endosperm cells of mature grain. Taken together, the changes in starch granule number and size and in protein matrix amount provide clues for understanding how high temperature during grain fill can affect end use properties of wheat flour.

  3. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network. PMID:26391451

  4. Granule cell excitability regulates gamma and beta oscillations in a model of the olfactory bulb dendrodendritic microcircuit.

    PubMed

    Osinski, Bolesław L; Kay, Leslie M

    2016-08-01

    Odors evoke gamma (40-100 Hz) and beta (20-30 Hz) oscillations in the local field potential (LFP) of the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB). Gamma (and possibly beta) oscillations arise from interactions in the dendrodendritic microcircuit between excitatory mitral cells (MCs) and inhibitory granule cells (GCs). When cortical descending inputs to the OB are blocked, beta oscillations are extinguished whereas gamma oscillations become larger. Much of this centrifugal input targets inhibitory interneurons in the GC layer and regulates the excitability of GCs, which suggests a causal link between the emergence of beta oscillations and GC excitability. We investigate the effect that GC excitability has on network oscillations in a computational model of the MC-GC dendrodendritic network with Ca(2+)-dependent graded inhibition. Results from our model suggest that when GC excitability is low, the graded inhibitory current mediated by NMDA channels and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) is also low, allowing MC populations to fire in the gamma frequency range. When GC excitability is increased, the activation of NMDA receptors and other VDCCs is also increased, allowing the slow decay time constants of these channels to sustain beta-frequency oscillations. Our model argues that Ca(2+) flow through VDCCs alone could sustain beta oscillations and that the switch between gamma and beta oscillations can be triggered by an increase in the excitability state of a subpopulation of GCs. PMID:27121582

  5. Iron and cell death in Parkinson's disease: a nuclear microscopic study into iron-rich granules in the parkinsonian substantia nigra of primate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, P. S. P.; Watt, F.; Ponraj, D.; Leong, S. K.; He, Y.; Lee, T. K. Y.

    1999-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative brain disease characterised by a loss of cells in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain and accompanying biochemical changes such as inhibition of mitochondrial function, increased iron concentrations and decreased glutathione levels in the parkinsonian SN. Though the aetiology of the disease is still unknown, the observed biochemical changes point to the involvement of oxidative stress. In particular, iron is suspected to play a role by promoting free radical production, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. The increase in iron in the parkinsonian SN has been confirmed by several research groups, both in human post-mortem brains and in brain tissue from parkinsonian animal models. However, the question remains as to whether the observed increase in iron is a cause or a consequence of the SN cell death process. Our previous study using unilaterally 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-pyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys in a time sequence experiment has shown that the increase in bulk iron concentrations follow rather than precede dopaminergic cell death. However, changes in the localised iron concentrations, which may play a more direct role in SN cell death, may not be reflected at the bulk level. Indeed, we have observed iron-rich granules in parkinsonian SNs. From this time sequence study into the iron content of iron-rich granules in the SNs of an untreated control and unilaterally MPTP-lesioned parkinsonian models, we present the following observations: (1) Iron-rich granules are found in both control and parkinsonian SNs and are variable in size and iron content in any one model. (2) These iron-rich granules may be associated with neuromelanin granules found in the SN and are known to accumulate transition metal ions such as iron. (3) The early onset of bulk SN cell loss (35%) was accompanied by a significant elevation of iron in granules found in the MPTP-injected SN compared to the contra-lateral SN. This

  6. More Docked Vesicles and Larger Active Zones at Basket Cell-to-Granule Cell Synapses in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Yamawaki, Ruth; Thind, Khushdev

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common and challenging clinical problem, and its pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is insufficient inhibition in the hippocampal formation where seizures tend to initiate. Normally, hippocampal basket cells provide strong and reliable synaptic inhibition at principal cell somata. In a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy, basket cell-to-granule cell (BC→GC) synaptic transmission is more likely to fail, but the underlying cause is unknown. At some synapses, probability of release correlates with bouton size, active zone area, and number of docked vesicles. The present study tested the hypothesis that impaired GABAergic transmission at BC→GC synapses is attributable to ultrastructural changes. Boutons making axosomatic symmetric synapses in the granule cell layer were reconstructed from serial electron micrographs. BC→GC boutons were predicted to be smaller in volume, have fewer and smaller active zones, and contain fewer vesicles, including fewer docked vesicles. Results revealed the opposite. Compared with controls, epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats displayed boutons with over twice the average volume, active zone area, total vesicles, and docked vesicles and with more vesicles closer to active zones. Larger active zones in epileptic rats are consistent with previous reports of larger amplitude miniature IPSCs and larger BC→GC quantal size. Results of this study indicate that transmission failures at BC→GC synapses in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats are not attributable to smaller boutons or fewer docked vesicles. Instead, processes following vesicle docking, including priming, Ca2+ entry, or Ca2+ coupling with exocytosis, might be responsible. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT One in 26 people develops epilepsy, and temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form. Up to one-third of patients are resistant to currently available treatments. This study tested a potential underlying mechanism for previously reported

  7. Expression and traffic of cellular prolyl oligopeptidase are regulated during cerebellar granule cell differentiation, maturation, and aging.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Baylach, M J; Felipo, V; Männistö, P T; García-Horsman, J A

    2008-10-15

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is an endopeptidase which cleaves short proline-containing neuropeptides, and it is involved in memory and learning. POP also has an intercellular function mediated through the inositol pathway, and has been involved in cell death. POP has been early considered as a housekeeping enzyme, but the recent research indicates that POP expression is regulated across tissues and intracellularly. In the brain, POP is exclusively expressed in neurons and most abundantly in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex, in the CA1 field neurons of hippocampus and in cerebellar Purkinje's cells. Intracellularly, POP is mainly present in the cytoplasm and some in intracellular membranes, like rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In this paper, we systematically studied the levels of expression of POP along the life of cerebellar granule cells (CGC) in culture and the distribution of POP within different intracellular compartments. We used the tight-binding inhibitor JTP-4819 covalently coupled with fluorescein (FJTP) as a tool to study the changes on expression and localization of POP protein. Our results indicate that POP activity levels are regulated during the life of the neurons. POP was found mainly in cytoplasm and neuronal projections, but at an early developmental phase significant amounts were found also in nuclei. Along the life of the neurons, POP activity fluctuated in 7-day cycles. In young neurons, the cytosolic POP activity was low but increased by maturation so that the activity peak coincided with full differentiation. Over aging, cytoplasmic POP was concentrated around nucleus, but the activity decreased with time. POP was also present in vesicles across the neuron. No major changes were seen in the nuclear or membrane bound POP over aging until activity disappeared upon neuronal death. This is the first time when POP was found in the nuclei of human neuronal cells. PMID:18718510

  8. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  9. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  10. Voluntary exercise followed by chronic stress strikingly increases mature adult-born hippocampal neurons and prevents stress-induced deficits in 'what-when-where' memory.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rosell-Valle, Cristina; Pedraza, Carmen; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín, Luis J

    2014-03-01

    We investigated whether voluntary exercise prevents the deleterious effects of chronic stress on episodic-like memory and adult hippocampal neurogenesis. After bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) administration, mice were assigned to receive standard housing, chronic intermittent restraint stress, voluntary exercise or a combination of both (stress starting on the seventh day of exercise). Twenty-four days later, mice were tested in a 'what-when-where' object recognition memory task. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis) and c-Fos expression in the hippocampus and extra-hippocampal areas (medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, accumbens and perirhinal cortex) were assessed after behavior. Chronic intermittent restraint stress impaired neurogenesis and the 'when' memory, while exercise promoted neurogenesis and improved the 'where' memory. The 'when' and 'where' memories correlated with c-Fos expression in CA1 and the dentate gyrus, respectively. Furthermore, analysis suggested that each treatment induced a distinct pattern of functional connectivity among the areas analyzed for c-Fos. In the animals in which stress and exercise were combined, stress notably reduced the amount of voluntary exercise performed. Nevertheless, exercise still improved memory and counteracted the stress induced-deficits in neurogenesis and behavior. Interestingly, compared with the other three treatments, the stressed exercising animals showed a larger increase in cell survival, the maturation of new neurons and apoptosis in the dentate gyrus, with a considerable increase in the number of 24-day-old BrdU+cells that differentiated into mature neurons. The interaction between exercise and stress in enhancing the number of adult-born hippocampal neurons supports a role of exercise-induced neurogenesis in stressful conditions. PMID:24333647

  11. The Rab-binding protein Noc2 is associated with insulin-containing secretory granules and is essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cheviet, Séverine; Coppola, Thierry; Haynes, Lee P; Burgoyne, Robert D; Regazzi, Romano

    2004-01-01

    The small GTPases Rab3 and Rab27 are associated with secretory granules of pancreatic beta-cells and regulate insulin exocytosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Noc2, a potential partner of these two GTPases, in insulin secretion. In the beta-cell line INS-1E wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, and Noc258A, a mutant capable of interacting with Rab27 but not Rab3, colocalized with insulin-containing vesicles. In contrast, two mutants (Noc2138S,141S and Noc2154A,155A,156A) that bind neither Rab3 nor Rab27 did not associate with secretory granules and were uniformly distributed throughout the cell cytoplasm. Overexpression of wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, or Noc258A inhibited hormone secretion elicited by insulin secretagogues. In contrast, overexpression of the mutants not targeted to secretory granules was without effect. Silencing of the Noc2 gene by RNA interference led to a strong impairment in the capacity of INS-1E cells to respond to insulin secretagogues, indicating that appropriate levels of Noc2 are essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis. The defect was already detectable in the early secretory phase (0-10 min) but was particularly evident during the sustained release phase (10-45 min). Protein-protein binding studies revealed that Noc2 is a potential partner of Munc13, a component of the machinery that controls vesicle priming and insulin exocytosis. These data suggest that Noc2 is involved in the recruitment of secretory granules at the plasma membrane possibly via the interaction with Munc13. PMID:14593078

  12. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane: correlation with transcriptome profiling of neutrophil precursors.

    PubMed

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels H H; Borregaard, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable in the innate immune defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils contain SVs and several subsets of granules that are essential for their function. Proteins present in neutrophil SVs and granules are synthesized during terminal granulopoiesis in the bone marrow. The heterogeneity of granules, as determined by marker proteins characteristic of each granule subset, is thought to result from differences in the biosynthetic windows of major classes of granule proteins, a process referred to as targeting by timing. Qualitative proteomic analysis of neutrophil granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in-gel-digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analyzed using LTQ Orbitrap XL tandem MS. A total of 1292 unique proteins were identified and grouped, according to the neutrophil fraction, in which they displayed maximal expression. In addition to various known neutrophil proteins, several uncharacterized proteins were found, as well as proteins not described previously in neutrophils. To study the correlation between mRNA expression in neutrophil precursors and the localization of their cognate proteins, the distribution of 126 identified proteins was compared with their mRNA expression profiles. The neutrophil subcellular proteome profiles presented here may be used as a database in combination with the mRNA array database to predict and test the presence and localization of proteins in neutrophil granules and membranes. PMID:23650620

  13. Balanced effect of PACAP and FasL on granule cell death during cerebellar development: a morphological, functional and behavioural characterization.

    PubMed

    Allais, Aurélie; Burel, Delphine; Roy, Vincent; Arthaud, Sébastien; Galas, Ludovic; Isaac, Emma Rachel; Desfeux, Arnaud; Parent, Bénédicte; Fournier, Alain; Chapillon, Pierre; Sherwood, Nancy McKeown; Vaudry, Hubert; Gonzalez, Bruno José

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that the development of the CNS requires equilibrium between cell survival and apoptosis. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exerts a powerful protective effect on cerebellar granule cells by inhibiting the caspase 3. In contrast, Fas ligand (FasL) plays an essential role during ontogenesis in eliminating supernumerary neurons by apoptosis. To determine if PACAP and FasL interact during cerebellar development, we characterized the effects of these factors on cerebellar morphogenesis and caspase 3 activity in PACAP+/+ and PACAP-/- mice. First, we demonstrated in vivo that PACAP is able to reverse the diminution of internal granule cell layer thickness induced by FasL in PACAP+/+ and PACAP-/- mice. Second, ex vivo and immunohistochemical studies revealed that interaction between FasL and PACAP occurs through the caspase 3 activity. Third, behavioural study showed a significant difference for the PACAP + FasL group in the righting reflex test at P8 which does not persist at P60. Finally, a time course study revealed that the pro-apoptotic effect of FasL characterized at P8 was followed by a progressive compensatory mechanism in caspase 3 activity and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. These data suggest that PACAP and FasL interact during cerebellar development to control apoptosis of granule cells and may affect some motor cerebellar functions. PMID:20050979

  14. Vgl1, a multi-KH domain protein, is a novel component of the fission yeast stress granules required for cell survival under thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wei-Ling; Stevenson, Abigail L.; Wang, Chun-Yu; Chen, Hsiang-Ju; Kearsey, Stephen E.; Norbury, Chris J.; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Wang, Shao-Win

    2010-01-01

    Multiple KH-domain proteins, collectively known as vigilins, are evolutionarily highly conserved proteins that are present in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to metazoa. Proposed roles for vigilins include chromosome segregation, messenger RNA (mRNA) metabolism, translation and tRNA transport. As a step toward understanding its biological function, we have identified the fission yeast vigilin, designated Vgl1, and have investigated its role in cellular response to environmental stress. Unlike its counterpart in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found no indication that Vgl1 is required for the maintenance of cell ploidy in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Instead, Vgl1 is required for cell survival under thermal stress, and vgl1Δ mutants lose their viability more rapidly than wild-type cells when incubated at high temperature. As for Scp160 in S. cerevisiae, Vgl1 bound polysomes accumulated at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but in a microtubule-independent manner. Under thermal stress, Vgl1 is rapidly relocalized from the ER to cytoplasmic foci that are distinct from P-bodies but contain stress granule markers such as poly(A)-binding protein and components of the translation initiation factor eIF3. Together, these observations demonstrated in S. pombe the presence of RNA granules with similar composition as mammalian stress granules and identified Vgl1 as a novel component that required for cell survival under thermal stress. PMID:20547592

  15. AMPA receptors serum-dependently mediate GABAA receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunit down-regulation in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Kallinen, Sampsa A; Salonen, Virpi

    2010-04-01

    Depolarization of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells with potassium or kainate results in developmentally arrested state that includes down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha6 and beta2 subunit expression. These subunits are normally strongly expressed in cerebellar granule cells from second postnatal week throughout the adulthood. In the present study we demonstrate that selective activation of AMPA subtype of glutamate receptors down-regulates alpha1 and alpha6 subunit mRNA expression. Removal of AMPA agonist from culture medium restores expression of these subunits indicating reversibility of the down-regulation. In serum-free culture medium AMPA receptor activation did not down-regulate alpha1 or alpha6 subunit expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation was strongly attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of dialysed fetal calf serum. The results indicate that down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunits by AMPA receptor activation is dependent on the presence of low molecular weight compounds present in fetal calf serum. In order to study mouse cerebellar granule cell maturation and/or regulation of GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in culture, the experiments should be performed in the absence of fetal calf serum. PMID:20170697

  16. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  17. Naringin attenuates granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hannah; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Morphological abnormalities of the dentate gyrus (DG) are an important phenotype in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We recently reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, exerts beneficial effects in the kainic acid (KA) mouse model of epilepsy. We found that naringin treatment reduced seizure activities and decreased autophagic stress and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus following in vivo lesion with KA. However, it remains unclear whether naringin may also attenuate seizure-induced morphological changes in the DG, collectively known as granule cell dispersion (GCD). To clarify whether naringin treatment reduces GCD, we evaluated the effects of intraperitoneal injection of naringin on GCD and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), an important regulator of GCD, following intrahippocampal injection of KA. Our results showed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which was confirmed by assessing the phosphorylated form of the mTORC1 substrate, 4E-BP1, in the hippocampus. These results suggest that naringin treatment may help prevent epilepsy-induced hippocampal injury by inhibiting mTORC1 activation and thereby reducing GCD in the hippocampus in vivo. PMID:27040812

  18. The GABAA antagonist DPP-4-PIOL selectively antagonises tonic over phasic GABAergic currents in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Frølund, Bente; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2014-11-01

    GABAA receptors mediate two different types of inhibitory currents: phasic inhibitory currents when rapid and brief presynaptic GABA release activates postsynaptic GABAA receptors and tonic inhibitory currents generated by low extrasynaptic GABA levels, persistently activating extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. The two inhibitory current types are mediated by different subpopulations of GABAA receptors with diverse pharmacological profiles. Selective antagonism of tonic currents is of special interest as excessive tonic inhibition post-stroke has severe pathological consequences. Here we demonstrate that phasic and tonic GABAA receptor currents can be selectively inhibited by the antagonists SR 95531 and the 4-PIOL derivative, 4-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol hydrobromide (DPP-4-PIOL), respectively. In dentate gyrus granule cells, SR 95531 was found approximately 4 times as potent inhibiting phasic currents compared to tonic currents (IC50 values: 101 vs. 427 nM). Conversely, DPP-4-PIOL was estimated to be more than 20 times as potent inhibiting tonic current compared to phasic current (IC50 values: 0.87 vs. 21.3 nM). Consequently, we were able to impose a pronounced reduction in tonic GABA mediated current (>70 %) by concentrations of DPP-4-PIOL, at which no significant effect on the phasic current was seen. Our findings demonstrate that selective inhibition of GABA mediated tonic current is possible, when targeting a subpopulation of GABAA receptors located extrasynaptically using the antagonist, DPP-4-PIOL. PMID:25103229

  19. Early postnatal exposure to methylphenidate alters stress reactivity and increases hippocampal ectopic granule cells in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gray, Jason D; Melton, Jay T; Punsoni, Michael; Tabori, Nora E; Ward, Mary J; Frys, Kelly; Iadecola, Costantino; Milner, Teresa A

    2009-03-16

    To mimic clinical treatment with methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), rat pups were injected with MPH (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or placebo twice daily during their nocturnal active phase from postnatal day (PND) 7-35. Thirty-nine days after the last MPH administration (PND 76), four litters of rats experienced stressful conditions during the 2003 New York City blackout. MPH-treated rats that endured the blackout lost more weight and regained it at a slower pace than controls (p<0.05; N=7-11 per group). Furthermore, MPH-treated rats had elevated systolic arterial blood pressure (from 115.6+/-1.2 to 126+/-1.8 mmHg; p<0.05), assessed on PND 130 by tail cuff plethysmography. Immunocytochemical studies of transmitter systems in the brain demonstrated rearrangements of catecholamine and neuropeptide Y fibers in select brain regions at PND 135, which did not differ between blackout and control groups. However, MPH-treated rats that endured the blackout had more ectopic granule cells in the hilus of the dorsal hippocampal dentate gyrus compared to controls at PND 135 (p<0.05; N=6 per group). These findings indicate that early postnatal exposure to high therapeutic doses of MPH can have long lasting effects on the plasticity of select brain regions and can induce changes in the reactivity to stress that persist into adulthood. PMID:19100815

  20. Distinct expression patterns of inwardly rectifying potassium currents in developing cerebellar granule cells of the hemispheres and the vermis.

    PubMed

    Brandalise, Federico; Lujan, Rafael; Leone, Roberta; Lodola, Francesco; Cesaroni, Valentina; Romano, Chiara; Gerber, Urs; Rossi, Paola

    2016-06-01

    G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels play a crucial role during the migration and maturation of cerebellar granule cells (GCs) in the vermis. In the cerebellar hemispheres, however, only minor effects on the development of GCs are observed in mice with GIRK channel impairment. This regional difference may reflect distinct ontogenetic expression patterns of GIRK channels. Therefore, inwardly rectifying responses in mice were characterized at different stages of development in the vermis and the hemispheres. In the vermis, GCs in the premigratory zone (PMZ) at P7-P15 exhibit GIRK current but not constitutive inwardly rectifying potassium (CIRK) current, and are relatively depolarized at rest. In contrast, premigratory GCs in the hemispheres express only CIRK channels, which accounts for their more hyperpolarized resting membrane potential. Furthermore, the pattern of voltage-dependent inward currents in the PMZ GCs of cerebellar hemispheres is consistent with a more mature stage of development than the corresponding GCs in the vermis, resulting in robust firing properties mediated by sodium channels. Later in development (P21-P22), CIRK current is then observed in the majority of vermis GCs. This developmental pattern, revealed by electrophysiological recordings, was confirmed by immunohistological experiments that showed greater reactivity for GIRK2 in the PMZ of the vermis than in the hemispheres during development (P7-P15). These findings suggest that regional differences in development are responsible for the differential expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels in the vermis and in the hemispheres. PMID:26921581

  1. Neurotensinergic Excitation of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells via Gαq-Coupled Inhibition of TASK-3 Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haopeng; Dong, Hailong; Cilz, Nicholas I; Kurada, Lalitha; Hu, Binqi; Wada, Etsuko; Bayliss, Douglas A; Porter, James E; Lei, Saobo

    2016-03-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a 13-amino acid peptide and serves as a neuromodulator in the brain. Whereas NT has been implicated in learning and memory, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are ill-defined. Because the dentate gyrus receives profound innervation of fibers containing NT and expresses high density of NT receptors, we examined the effects of NT on the excitability of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs). Our results showed that NT concentration dependently increased action potential (AP) firing frequency of the GCs by the activation of NTS1 receptors resulting in the depolarization of the GCs. NT-induced enhancement of AP firing frequency was not caused indirectly by releasing glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, or dopamine, but due to the inhibition of TASK-3 K(+) channels. NT-mediated excitation of the GCs was G protein dependent, but independent of phospholipase C, intracellular Ca(2+) release, and protein kinase C. Immunoprecipitation experiment demonstrates that the activation of NTS1 receptors induced the association of Gαq/11 and TASK-3 channels suggesting a direct coupling of Gαq/11 to TASK-3 channels. Endogenously released NT facilitated the excitability of the GCs contributing to the induction of long-term potentiation at the perforant path-GC synapses. Our results provide a cellular mechanism that helps to explain the roles of NT in learning and memory. PMID:25405940

  2. Selective silencing of individual dendritic branches by an mGlu2-activated potassium conductance in dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, János; Ster, Jeanne; Van-Weert, Susan; Andrási, Tibor; Neubrandt, Máté; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Ferraguti, Francesco; Gerber, Urs; Szabadics, János

    2013-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu-IIs) modulate hippocampal information processing through several presynaptic actions. We describe a novel postsynaptic inhibitory mechanism mediated by the mGlu2 subtype that activates an inwardly-rectifying potassium conductance in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs) of rats and mice. Data from glutamate uncaging experiments and simulations indicate that the mGlu2-activated potassium conductance uniformly reduces the peak amplitude of synaptic inputs arriving in the distal two-thirds of dendrites with only minor effects on proximal inputs. This unique shunting profile is consistent with a peak expression of the mGlu2-activated conductance at the transition between the proximal and middle third of the dendrites. Further simulations under various physiologically relevant conditions show that when a shunting conductance is activated in the proximal third of a single dendrite it effectively modulates input to this specific branch while leaving inputs in neighboring dendrites relatively unaffected. Thus, the restricted expression of the mGlu2-activated potassium conductance in the proximal third of GC dendrites represents an optimal localization for achieving the opposing biophysical requirements for uniform yet selective modulation of individual dendritic branches. PMID:23616537

  3. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  4. NMDA receptors amplify mossy fiber synaptic inputs at frequencies up to at least 750 Hz in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Baade, Carolin; Byczkowicz, Niklas; Hallermann, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Neuronal integration of high-frequency signals is important for rapid information processing. Cerebellar mossy fiber axons (MFs) can fire action potentials (APs) at frequencies of more than one kilohertz. However, it is unclear whether and how the postsynaptic cerebellar granule cells (GCs) are able to process these high-frequency MF inputs. Here, we measured AP firing in GCs during high-frequency MF stimulation and show that GC firing frequency increased non-linearly when MF stimulation frequency was increased from 100 to 750 Hz. To investigate the mechanisms enabling such high-frequency signaling, we analyzed the role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), which have been implicated in synaptic signaling at lower frequencies. Application of D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), a potent inhibitor of NMDARs, strongly impaired the GC firing frequency during high-frequency MF stimulation. APV had no significant effect on single excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) or currents (EPSCs) evoked at 1 Hz at resting membrane potentials. However, the time course of EPSCs evoked at 1 Hz at depolarized potentials or following high-frequency MF stimulation was accelerated by APV. Thus, our results show that NMDAR-mediated currents amplify high-frequency MF inputs by prolonging the time courses of synaptic inputs, thereby causing greater synaptic summation of inputs. Hence, NMDARs support the integration of MF synaptic input at frequencies up to at least 750 Hz. Synapse 70:269-276, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26887562

  5. Inhibitory effect of fangchinoline on excitatory amino acids-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, S D; Oh, S K; Kim, H S; Seong, Y H

    2001-04-01

    Glutamate receptors-mediated excitotoxicity is believed to play a role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fangchinoline, a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which has a characteristic as a Ca2+ channel blocker, on excitatory amino acids (EAAs)-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule neuron. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 1 mM) and kainate (100 microM)-induced neuronal cell death which was measured by trypan blue exclusion test. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate release into medium induced by NMDA (1 mM) and kainate (100 microM), which was measured by HPLC. And fangchinoline (5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM)-induced elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. These results suggest that inhibition of Ca2+ influx by fangchinoline may contribute to the beneficial effects on neurodegenerative effect of glutamate in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11339637

  6. Relationship between lipophilicity of C6-10 hydrocarbon solvents and their ROS-inducing potency in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Dreiem, A; Myhre, O; Fonnum, F

    2002-12-01

    We have studied the effects of aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic C6-10 solvents on the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat cerebellar granule cell cultures. ROS formation was assessed by monitoring oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) to the fluorescent compound 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). We found that aromatic solvents with C > 7, and aliphatic and alicyclic solvents with C > or = 7 induce ROS formation in rat cerebellar granule cells in vitro. The response increased with increasing solvent concentration. The potency of the compounds within each homologous group seemed to be correlated to their octanol water partition-coefficients. The aromatic solvents were generally less efficient in inducing ROS formation than the aliphatic and the alicyclic compounds. PMID:12520760

  7. ONTOGENY OF PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH NEURITE GROWTH AND SYNAPTOGENESIS IN CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS IN VITRO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro techniques may be useful in screening for effects of developmental neurotoxicants. Previously, we characterized changes in biochemical markers associated with neuronal development in a PC12 cell model of differentiation and growth. The current research extended these stu...

  8. Mosaic organization of the hippocampal neuroepithelium and the multiple germinal sources of dentate granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, J.; Bayer, S.A. )

    1990-11-15

    This study deals with the site of origin, migration, and settling of the principal cell constituents of the rat hippocampus during the embryonic period. The results indicate that the hippocampal neuroepithelium consists of three morphogenetically discrete components--the Ammonic neuroepithelium, the primary dentate neuroepithelium, and the fimbrial glioepithelium--and that these are discrete sources of the large neurons of Ammon's horn, the smaller granular neurons of the dentate gyrus, and the glial cells of the fimbria. The putative Ammonic neuroepithelium is marked in short-survival thymidine radiograms by a high level of proliferative activity and evidence of interkinetic nuclear migration from day E16 until day E19. On days E16 and E17 a diffuse band of unlabeled cells forms outside the Ammonic neuroepithelium. These postmitotic cells are considered to be stratum radiatum and stratum oriens neurons, which are produced in large numbers as early as day E15. A cell-dense layer, the incipient stratum pyramidale, begins to form on day E18 and spindle-shaped cells can be traced to it from the Ammonic neuroepithelium. This migratory band increases in size for several days, then declines, and finally disappears by day E22. It is inferred that this migration contains the pyramidal cells of Ammon's horn that are produced mostly on days E17 through E20. The putative primary dentate neuroepithelium is distinguished from the Ammonic neuroepithelium during the early phases of embryonic development by its location, shape, and cellular dynamics. It is located around a ventricular indentation, the dentate notch, contains fewer mitotic cells near the lumen of the ventricle than the Ammonic neuroepithelium, and shows a different labeling pattern both in short-survival and sequential-survival thymidine radiograms.

  9. Odour enrichment increases adult-born dopaminergic neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Fasolo, Aldo; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is the first brain region involved in the processing of olfactory information. In adult mice, the OB is highly plastic, undergoing cellular/molecular dynamic changes that are modulated by sensory experience. Odour deprivation induces down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in OB dopaminergic interneurons located in the glomerular layer (GL), resulting in decreased dopamine in the OB. Although the effect of sensory deprivation is well established, little is known about the influence of odour enrichment on dopaminergic cells. Here we report that prolonged odour enrichment on C57BL/6J strain mice selectively increases TH-immunopositive cells in the GL by nearly 20%. Following odour enrichment on TH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, in which GFP identified both mature TH-positive cells and putative immature dopaminergic cells expressing TH mRNA but not TH protein, we found a similar 20% increase in GFP-expressing cells, with no changes in the ratio between TH-positive and TH-negative cells. These data suggest that enriched conditions induce an expansion in the whole dopaminergic lineage. Accordingly, by using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine injections to label adult-generated cells in the GL of TH-GFP mice, we found an increase in the percentage of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive dopaminergic cells in enriched compared with control conditions, whereas no differences were found for calretinin- and calbindin-positive subtypes. Strikingly, the fraction of newborn cells among the dopaminergic population doubled in enriched conditions. On the whole, our results demonstrate that odour enrichment drives increased integration of adult-generated dopaminergic cells that could be critical to adapt the OB circuits to the environmental incoming information. PMID:25216299

  10. Beneficial effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on spatial learning and the dendritic tree of dentate gyrus granule cells in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Sharifabad, Mohammad; Kamali-Ardakani, Razieh; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The hippocampal formation, particularly the dentate gyrus (DG), shows age-related morphological changes that could cause memory decline. It is indicated that Boswellia resins attenuates memory deficits and the major component of Boswellia serrata (Bs) gum resin, beta boswellic acid increased neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. This study was designed to investigate the effect of Boswellia treatment on spatial learning performance and the morphology of dentate granule cells in aged rats. Materials and Methods: Sixteen male Wistar rats (24 months old) were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group was intragastrically administered with the aqueous extract of Bs (100 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks) and control group received a similar volume of water. Spatial learning performance of rats was tested using Morris water maze task. At the end of experiment, the brain was removed and the right hippocampus was serially sectioned for morphometric analysis. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volume of the DG. A quantitative Golgi study was used to analyze the dendritic trees of dentate granule cells. Results: Chronic treatment with Bs improved spatial learning capability during the three acquisition days. Comparisons also revealed that Bs-treated aged rat had greater DG with increased dendritic complexity in the dentate granule cells than control rats. Hippocampal granule cells of Bs-treated aged rats had more dendritic segments, larger arbors, more numerical branching density and more dendritic spines in comparison to control animals. Conclusion: This study provided a neuro-anatomical basis for memory improvement due to chronic treatment with Bs. PMID:27222832

  11. Excitatory amino acid stimulation of the survival of rat cerebellar granule cells in culture is associated with an increase in SMN, the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene product.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, C; Patrizi, A L; Brahe, C; Eboli, M L

    2000-01-01

    Excitatory amino acids which promote the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture, also promote the expression of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. Immunolocalization studies using SMN monoclonal antibody showed that SMN is decreased in cultures grown in low K+ or chemically defined medium with respect to cultures grown in high K+ medium and that an increase of SMN can be induced by treatment of low K+ cultures with glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate. PMID:10901626

  12. Localized hypoxia within the subgranular zone determines the early survival of newborn hippocampal granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Schnell, Eric; Westbrook, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    The majority of adult hippocampal newborn cells die during early differentiation from intermediate progenitors (IPCs) to immature neurons. Neural stem cells in vivo are located in a relative hypoxic environment, and hypoxia enhances their survival, proliferation and stemness in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that migration of IPCs away from hypoxic zones within the SGZ might result in oxidative damage, thus triggering cell death. Hypoxic niches were observed along the SGZ, composed of adult NSCs and early IPCs, and oxidative byproducts were present in adjacent late IPCs and neuroblasts. Stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1α with dimethyloxallyl glycine increased early survival, but not proliferation or differentiation, in neurospheres in vitro and in newly born SGZ cells in vivo. Rescue experiments in Baxfl/flmutants supported these results. We propose that localized hypoxia within the SGZ contributes to the neurogenic microenvironment and determines the early, activity-independent survival of adult hippocampal newborn cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08722.001 PMID:26476335

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists protect cerebellar granule cells from cytokine-induced apoptotic cell death by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Heneka, M T; Feinstein, D L; Galea, E; Gleichmann, M; Wüllner, U; Klockgether, T

    1999-12-01

    Cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) can express the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to inflammatory stimuli. We demonstrate that induction of iNOS in CGCs by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and pro-inflammatory cytokines results in cell death that was potentiated by excess L-arginine and inhibited by the selective iNOS inhibitor, 2-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine. The NO-mediated cell death was accompanied by increased caspase-3-like activity, DNA fragmentation and positive terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), suggesting that apoptosis mediates CGC cell death. Incubation of CGCs with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), ibuprofen or indomethacin, or with 15-deoxy-delta12,14 prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2) downregulates iNOS expression and reduces subsequent cell death. Since in other cell types, both NSAIDs and PGJ2 can activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) and downregulate cytokine levels and iNOS expression, and since CGCs express PPARgamma in vivo and in vitro, our data suggest that activation of CGC PPARgamma mediates iNOS suppression and reduced cell death. Because PPARgamma is expressed in brains of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients, in which neuronal iNOS expression and apoptotic cell death have been described, these results may help explain the basis for the beneficial effects of NSAIDs in AD. PMID:10695726

  14. COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF TWO POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL CONGENERS ON CALCIUM HOMEOSTASIS IN RAT CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been reported to alter locomotor activity and decrease brain dopamine function in laboratory animals. CBs with orth- and/or para-chlorine substitutions are reportedly most potent in decreasing cell dopamine content in vitro and were dete...

  15. Mefenamic acid bi-directionally modulates the transient outward K{sup +} current in rat cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Man; Shi Wenjie; Fei Xiaowei; Liu Yarong; Zeng Ximin; Mei Yanai

    2008-02-01

    The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on ion channels has been widely studied in several cell models, but less is known about their modulatory mechanisms. In this report, the effect of mefenamic acid on voltage-activated transient outward K{sup +} current (I{sub A}) in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was investigated. At a concentration of 5 {mu}M to 100 {mu}M, mefenamic acid reversibly inhibited I{sub A} in a dose-dependent manner. However, mefenamic acid at a concentration of 1 {mu}M significantly increased the amplitude of I{sub A} to 113 {+-} 1.5% of the control. At more than 10 {mu}M, mefenamic acid inhibited the amplitude of I{sub A} without any effect on activation or inactivation. In addition, a higher concentration of mefenamic acid induced a significant acceleration of recovery from inactivation with an increase of the peak amplitude elicited by the second test pulse. Intracellular application of mefenamic acid could significantly increase the amplitude of I{sub A}, but had no effect on the inhibition induced by extracellular mefenamic acid, implying that mefenamic acid may exert its effect from both inside and outside the ion channel. Furthermore, the activation of current induced by intracellular application of mefenamic acid was mimicked by other cyclooxygenase inhibitors and arachidonic acid. Our data demonstrate that mefenamic acid is able to bi-directionally modulate I{sub A} channels in neurons at different concentrations and by different methods of application, and two different mechanisms may be involved.

  16. Effect of heart failure on catecholamine granule morphology and storage in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Sushil K; Zheng, Hong; Mahata, Sumana; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P

    2016-09-01

    One of the key mechanisms involved in sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure (HF) is the activation of the adrenal glands. Impact of the elevated catecholamines on the hemodynamic parameters has been previously demonstrated. However, studies linking the structural effects of such overactivation with secretory performance and cell metabolism in the adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in vivo have not been previously reported. In this study, HF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the left coronary artery. Five weeks after surgery, cardiac function was assessed by ventricular hemodynamics. HF rats showed increased adrenal weight and adrenal catecholamine levels (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) compared with sham-operated rats. Rats with HF demonstrated increased small synaptic and dense core vesicle in splanchnic-adrenal synapses indicating trans-synaptic activation of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes, increased endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi lumen width to meet the demand of increased catecholamine synthesis and release, and more mitochondria with dilated cristae and glycogen to accommodate for the increased energy demand for the increased biogenesis and exocytosis of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. These findings suggest that increased trans-synaptic activation of the chromaffin cells within the adrenal medulla may lead to increased catecholamines in the circulation which in turn contributes to the enhanced neurohumoral drive, providing a unique mechanistic insight for enhanced catecholamine levels in plasma commonly observed in chronic HF condition. PMID:27402067

  17. Synaptic commitment: developmentally regulated reciprocal changes in hippocampal granule cell NMDA and AMPA receptors over the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Krause, Michael; Rao, Geeta; McNaughton, Bruce L; Barnes, C A

    2008-06-01

    Synaptic transmission in hippocampal field CA1 is largely N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA(R)) dependent during the early postnatal period. It becomes increasingly mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA) receptors until an adult ratio of AMPA to NMDA receptors is achieved. It is shown here that increases in the AMPA receptor (AMPA(R))-mediated field potential response continue over the life span of the F-344 rat at the perforant path-granule cell synapse in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, the NMDA(R)-dependent component of the response decreases with age between 1 and 27 mo, leading to an increase of AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio with age. One possible explanation of this age difference is that the AMPA(R)/NMDA(R) ratio can be modified by experience. To test the idea that the changed ratio is caused by the old rats' longer lives, an intensive 10-mo period of enrichment treatment was given to a group of animals, beginning at 3 mo of age. Compared with animals housed in standard cages, the enrichment treatment did not alter the glutamatergic response ratio measured with field potential recording methods. These data provide support for the conclusion that the observed change with age is developmentally regulated rather than experience dependent. Given the role of the NMDA(R) in synaptic plasticity, these changes suggest a progressive commitment of perforant path synapses to particular weights over the life span. One possible implication of this effect includes preservation of selected memories, ultimately at the expense of a reduced capacity to store new information. PMID:18417629

  18. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:26788851

  19. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:26788851

  20. Effect of neurotrophin-3 precursor on glutamate-induced calcium homeostasis deregulation in rat cerebellum granule cells.

    PubMed

    Safina, Dina R; Surin, Alexander M; Pinelis, Vsevolod G; Kostrov, Sergey V

    2015-12-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) belongs to the family of highly conserved dimeric growth factors that controls the differentiation and activity of various neuronal populations. Mammals contain both the mature (NT-3) and the precursor (pro-NT-3) forms of neurotrophin. Members of the neurotrophin family are involved in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in neurons; however, the role of NT-3 and pro-NT-3 in this process remains unclear. The current study explores the effects of NT-3 and pro-NT-3 on disturbed calcium homeostasis and decline of mitochondrial potential induced by a neurotoxic concentration of glutamate (Glu; 100 µM) in the primary culture of rat cerebellar granule cells. In this Glu excitotoxicity model, mature NT-3 had no effect on the induced changes in Ca²⁺ homeostasis. In contrast, pro-NT-3 decreased the period of delayed calcium deregulation (DCD) and concurrent strong mitochondrial depolarization. According to the amplitude of the increase in the intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]i ) and Fura-2 fluorescence quenching by Mn²⁺ within the first 20 sec of exposure to Glu, pro-NT-3 had no effect on the initial rate of Ca²⁺ entry into neurons. During the lag period preceding DCD, the mean amplitude of [Ca²⁺]i rise was 1.2-fold greater in the presence of pro-NT-3 than in the presence of Glu alone (1.67 ±  0.07 and 1.39 ± 0.04, respectively, P < 0.05). The Glu-induced changes in Са²⁺ homeostasis in the presence of pro-NT-3 likely are due to the decreased rate of Са²⁺ removal from the cytosol during the DCD latency period. PMID:26346533

  1. Conditional Reduction of Adult Born Doublecortin-Positive Neurons Reversibly Impairs Selective Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Lillian; Zhang, Jingzhong; Zimprich, Annemarie; Niedermeier, Kristina M.; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Vogt Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) along the walls of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. While a burgeoning body of research implicates adult neurogenesis in olfactory bulb (OB)- and hippocampal-related behaviors, the precise function continues to elude. To further assess the behavioral importance of adult neurogenesis, we herein generated a novel inducible transgenic mouse model of adult neurogenesis reduction where mice with CreERT2 under doublecortin (DCX) promoter control were crossed with mice where diphtheria toxin A (DTA) was driven by the Rosa26 promoter. Activation of DTA, through the administration of tamoxifen (TAM), results in a specific reduction of DCX+ immature neurons in both the hippocampal dentate gyrus and OB. We show that the decrease of DCX+ cells causes impaired social discrimination ability in both young adult (from 3 months) and middle aged (from 10 months) mice. Furthermore, these animals showed an age-independent altered coping behavior in the Forced Swim Test without clear changes in anxiety-related behavior. Notably, these behavior changes were reversible on repopulating the neurogenic zones with DCX+ cells on cessation of the TAM treatment, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Overall, these results support the notion that adult neurogenesis plays a role in social memory and in stress coping but not necessarily in anxiety-related behavior. PMID:26617501

  2. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  3. Label-free distinguishing between neurons and glial cells based on two-photon excited fluorescence signal of neuron perinuclear granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huiping; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Neurons and glial cells are two critical cell types of brain tissue. Their accurate identification is important for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, distinguishing between neurons and glial cells by using the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals of intracellular intrinsic sources was performed. TPEF microscopy combined with TUJ-1 and GFAP immunostaining and quantitative image analysis demonstrated that the perinuclear granules of neurons in the TPEF images of brain tissue and the primary cultured cortical cells were a unique characteristic of neurons compared to glial cells which can become a quantitative feature to distinguish neurons from glial cells. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope (‘two-photon fiberscopes’) imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effective diagnostic and monitoring tool for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

  4. Cleavage of a rat serosal mast cell membrane component during degranulation mediated by chymase, a secretory granule protease.

    PubMed Central

    Schick, B

    1990-01-01

    Exogenous addition of purified chymase, a rat serosal mast cell (RSMC) chymotryptic enzyme, results in RSMC degranulation at 37 degrees, but not at 1 degree. Chymase can cause an active site-dependent inducing event at 1 degree such that RSMC degranulation occurs if the cells are later incubated at 37 degrees. RSMC exposed to chymase or other stimuli were surface radiolabelled using 125I and Iodo-Gen, solubilized with 1% Nonidet-40, and the resulting 25,000 g supernatants analysed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. A 125I-labelled RSMC membrane protein of approximate 90,000 MW decreased upon exposure to either chymase or alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT) for 5 min at 37 degrees or to chymase for 60 min at 1 degree. Exposure of RSMC to the secretagogues ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, and anti-IgE for 5 min at 37 degrees resulted in beta-hexosaminidase (a secretory granule enzyme) release, but did not cause a detectable change in the 90,000 MW surface-labelled protein. Lima bean trypsin inhibitor, which inhibits both the esterase and RSMC degranulation activities of chymase and alpha-CT, prevented the disappearance of the 125I-labelled 90,000 MW band when added with chymase or alpha-CT. Exposure of RSMC to chymase at 1 degree for 0-10 min, prior to addition of LBTI, led to a progressive disappearance of the 90,000 MW band, which corresponded to the kinetics of priming for subsequent RSMC degranulation at 37 degrees. When RSMC were exposed to trypsin (2.5 micrograms/ml) for 0-120 min at 1 degree, a progressive disappearance of the 90,000 MW band occurred, in association with a loss of sensitivity to subsequent activation by chymase at 37 degrees. The disappearance of the 90,000 MW determinant in association with chymase-mediated priming for degranulation and the inability of chymase to mediate degranulation of trypsin-treated RSMC, which lack this membrane protein, suggests that it is involved in chymase-mediated RSMC degranulation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

  5. A dual mechanism for impairment of GABAA receptor activity by NMDA receptor activation in rat cerebellum granule cells.

    PubMed

    Robello, M; Amico, C; Cupello, A

    1997-01-01

    The function of the GABAA receptor has been studied using the whole cell voltage clamp recording technique in rat cerebellum granule cells in culture. Activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors causes a reduction in the effect of GABA. Full GABAA receptor activity was recovered after washing out NMDA and NMDA action was prevented in a Mg+2 containing medium. The NMDA effect was also absent when extracellular Ca+2 was replaced by Ba+2 and when 10 mM Bapta was present in the intracellular solution. Charge accumulations via voltage activated Ca+2 channels greater than the ones via NMDA receptors do not cause any reduction in GABAA receptor function, suggesting that Ca+2 influx through NMDA receptor channels is critical for the effect. The NMDA effect was reduced by including adenosine-5'-O-3-thiophosphate (ATP-gamma-S) in the internal solution and there was a reduction in the NMDA effect caused by deltamethrin, a calcineurin inhibitor. Part of the NMDA induced GABAA receptor impairment was prevented by prior treatment with L-arginine. Analogously, part of the NMDA effect was prevented by blockage of NO-synthase activity by N omega-nitro-L-arginine. A combination of NO-synthase and calcineurin inhibitors completely eliminated the NMDA action. An analogous result was obtained by combining the NO-synthase inhibitor with the addition of ATP-gamma-S to the pipette medium. The additivity of the prevention of the NMDA impairment of GABAA receptor by blocking the L-arginine/NO pathway and inhibiting calcineurin activity suggests an independent involvement of these two pathways in the interaction between NMDA and the GABAA receptor. On the one hand Ca+2 influx across NMDA channels activates calcineurin and dephosphorylates the GABAA receptor complex directly or dephosphorylates proteins critical for the function of the receptor. On the other hand, Ca+2 influx activates NO-synthase and induces nitric oxide production, which regulates such receptors via protein kinase G

  6. The natural scorpion peptide, BmK NT1 activates voltage-gated sodium channels and produces neurotoxicity in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohan; He, Yuwei; Qiao, Jinping; Zhang, Chunlei; Cao, Zhengyu

    2016-01-01

    The scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat neuronal diseases such as neuropathic pain, paralysis and epilepsy for thousands of years. Studies have demonstrated that scorpion venom is the primary active component. Although scorpion venom can effectively attenuate pain in the clinic, it also produces neurotoxic response. In this study, toxicity guided purification led to identify a mammalian toxin termed BmK NT1 comprising of 65 amino acid residues and an amidated C-terminus, a mature peptide encoded by the nucleotide sequence (GenBank No. AF464898). In contract to the recombinant product of the same nucleotide sequence, BmK AGAP, which displayed analgesic and anti-tumor effect, intravenous injection (i.v.) of BmK NT1 produced acute toxicity in mice with an LD50 value of 1.36 mg/kg. In primary cultured cerebellar granule cells, BmK NT1 produced a concentration-dependent cell death with an IC50 value of 0.65 μM (0.41-1.03 μM, 95% Confidence Intervals, 95% CI) which was abolished by TTX, a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) blocker. We also demonstrated that BmK NT1 produced modest sodium influx in cerebellar granule cell cultures with an EC50 value of 2.19 μM (0.76-6.40 μM, 95% CI), an effect similar to VGSC agonist, veratridine. The sodium influx response was abolished by TTX suggesting that BmK NT1-induced sodium influx is solely through activation of VGSC. Considered these data together, we demonstrated that BmK NT1 activated VGSC and produced neurotoxicity in cerebellar granule cell cultures. PMID:26598793

  7. Postnatal dysregulation of Notch signal disrupts dendrite development of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus and contributes to memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xue-Feng; Gao, Xiang; Ding, Xin-Chun; Fan, Ming; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in the Notch pathway are involved in a number of neurologic diseases associated with mental retardation or/and dementia. The mechanisms by which Notch dysregulation are associated with mental retardation and dementia are poorly understood. We found that Notch1 is highly expressed in the adult-born immature neurons in the hippocampus of mice. Retrovirus mediated knockout of notch1 in single adult-born immature neurons decreases mTOR signaling and compromises their dendrite morphogenesis. In contrast, overexpression of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD), to constitutively activate Notch signaling in single adult-born immature neurons, promotes mTOR signaling and increases their dendrite arborization. Using a unique genetic approach to conditionally and selectively knockout notch 1 in the postnatally born immature neurons in the hippocampus decreases mTOR signaling, compromises their dendrite morphogenesis, and impairs spatial learning and memory. Conditional overexpression of NICD in the postnatally born immature neurons in the hippocampus increases mTOR signaling and promotes dendrite arborization. These data indicate that Notch signaling plays a critical role in dendrite development of immature neurons in the postnatal brain, and dysregulation of Notch signaling in the postnatally born neurons disrupts their development and thus contributes to the cognitive deficits associated with neurological diseases. PMID:27173138

  8. Postnatal dysregulation of Notch signal disrupts dendrite development of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus and contributes to memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xue-Feng; Gao, Xiang; Ding, Xin-Chun; Fan, Ming; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in the Notch pathway are involved in a number of neurologic diseases associated with mental retardation or/and dementia. The mechanisms by which Notch dysregulation are associated with mental retardation and dementia are poorly understood. We found that Notch1 is highly expressed in the adult-born immature neurons in the hippocampus of mice. Retrovirus mediated knockout of notch1 in single adult-born immature neurons decreases mTOR signaling and compromises their dendrite morphogenesis. In contrast, overexpression of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD), to constitutively activate Notch signaling in single adult-born immature neurons, promotes mTOR signaling and increases their dendrite arborization. Using a unique genetic approach to conditionally and selectively knockout notch 1 in the postnatally born immature neurons in the hippocampus decreases mTOR signaling, compromises their dendrite morphogenesis, and impairs spatial learning and memory. Conditional overexpression of NICD in the postnatally born immature neurons in the hippocampus increases mTOR signaling and promotes dendrite arborization. These data indicate that Notch signaling plays a critical role in dendrite development of immature neurons in the postnatal brain, and dysregulation of Notch signaling in the postnatally born neurons disrupts their development and thus contributes to the cognitive deficits associated with neurological diseases. PMID:27173138

  9. Dietary intake in young adults born small or appropriate for gestational age: data from the Haguenau cohort

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Joane; Carette, Claire; Levy Marchal, Claire; Bertrand, Julien; Pétéra, Mélanie; Zins, Marie; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Comte, Blandine; Czernichow, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Compare the dietary intake of young adults born small for gestational age (SGA) versus those born appropriate for gestational age (AGA). Design Cross-sectional analysis. Setting Data at the 8-year follow-up Haguenau cohort (France). Data from 229 AGA-born adults and 172 SGA-born adults with available dietary information are presented. Methods Dietary intake was based on a food questionnaire including 19 items. The χ2 test was run to compare intake between SGA-born and AGA-born individuals. An a priori score was calculated based on the adherence to recommendations from the French Nutrition and Health Program and included 8 components with the lowest value indicating a lower adherence to recommendations. The score was then divided into quartiles. Relative risks and 95% CIs, controlling for age and sex in multivariate analysis, were calculated in order to determine the risk of belonging to the first versus the second to the fourth quartiles in SGA-born and AGA-born individuals. Results Intakes of SGA-born adults indicated that they consumed more meat, sugar and less fish than AGA-born individuals (all p<0.05). Multivariate analyses with adjustment for age and sex showed that the relative risk of belonging to the first quartile versus the other three quartiles did not disclose any significant difference in SGA-born versus AGA-born participants: RR=0.92 (95% CI 0.65 to 1.30). Conclusions Aside from the differences found by univariate analyses, no significant differences were obtained in multivariate analyses. Findings suggest that parameters of fetal programming are more associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in adulthood rather than dietary patterns. PMID:27473954

  10. The expression of GABAA beta subunit isoforms in synaptic and extrasynaptic receptor populations of mouse dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Herd, Murray B; Haythornthwaite, Alison R; Rosahl, Thomas W; Wafford, Keith A; Homanics, Gregg E; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia

    2008-02-15

    The subunit composition of GABA(A) receptors influences their biophysical and pharmacological properties, dictates neuronal location and the interaction with associated proteins, and markedly influences the impact of intracellular biochemistry. The focus has been on alpha and gamma subunits, with little attention given to beta subunits. Dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGCs) express all three beta subunit isoforms and exhibit both synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors that mediate 'phasic' and 'tonic' transmission, respectively. To investigate the subcellular distribution of the beta subunits we have utilized the patch-clamp technique to compare the properties of 'tonic' and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) recorded from DGGCs of hippocampal slices of P20-26 wild-type (WT), beta(2)(-/-), beta(2N265S) (etomidate-insensitive), alpha(1)(-/-) and delta(-/-) mice. Deletion of either the beta(2) or the delta subunit produced a significant reduction of the tonic current and attenuated the increase of this current induced by the delta subunit-preferring agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP). By contrast, mIPSCs were not influenced by deletion of these genes. Enhancement of the tonic current by the beta(2/3) subunit-selective agent etomidate was significantly reduced for DGGCs derived from beta(2N265S) mice, whereas this manipulation had no effect on the prolongation of mIPSCs produced by this anaesthetic. Collectively, these observations, together with previous studies on alpha(4)(-/-) mice, identify a population of extrasynaptic alpha(4)beta(2)delta receptors, whereas synaptic GABA(A) receptors appear to primarily incorporate the beta(3) subunit. A component of the tonic current is diazepam sensitive and is mediated by extrasynaptic receptors incorporating alpha(5) and gamma(2) subunits. Deletion of the beta(2) subunit had no effect on the diazepam-induced current and therefore these extrasynaptic receptors do not contain this

  11. Methylmercury disrupts the balance between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated cofilin in primary cultures of mice cerebellar granule cells A proteomic study

    SciTech Connect

    Vendrell, Iolanda; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental contaminant that is particularly toxic to the developing central nervous system; cerebellar granule neurons are especially vulnerable. Here, primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were continuously exposed to methylmercury for up to 16 days in vitro (div). LC50 values were 508 +- 199, 345 +- 47, and 243 +- 45 nM after exposure for 6, 11, and 16 div, respectively. Proteins from cultured mouse CGCs were separated by 2DE. Seventy-one protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and MALDI-TOF/TOF sequencing. Prolonged exposure to a subcytotoxic concentration of methylmercury significantly increased non-phosphorylated cofilin both in cell protein extracts (1.4-fold; p < 0.01) and in mitochondrial-enriched fractions (1.7-fold; p < 0.01). The decrease in P-cofilin induced by methylmercury was concentration-dependent and occurred after different exposure times. The percentage of P-cofilin relative to total cofilin significantly decreased to 49 +- 13% vs. control cells after exposure to 300 nM methylmercury for 5 div. The balance between the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated form of cofilin regulates actin dynamics and facilitates actin filament turnover. Filamentous actin dynamics and reorganization are responsible of neuron shape change, migration, polarity formation, regulation of synaptic structures and function, and cell apoptosis. An alteration of the complex regulation of the cofilin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pathway could be envisaged as an underlying mechanism compatible with reported signs of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity.

  12. A Novel Function of Noc2 in Agonist-Induced Intracellular Ca2+ Increase during Zymogen-Granule Exocytosis in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Sho; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Tamai, Seiichi; Kasai, Haruo; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2012-01-01

    Noc2, a putative Rab effector, contributes to secretory-granule exocytosis in neuroendocrine and exocrine cells. Here, using two-photon excitation live-cell imaging, we investigated its role in Ca2+-dependent zymogen granule (ZG) exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells from wild-type (WT) and Noc2-knockout (KO) mice. Imaging of a KO acinar cell revealed an expanded granular area, indicating ZG accumulation. In our spatiotemporal analysis of the ZG exocytosis induced by agonist (cholecystokinin or acetylcholine) stimulation, the location and rate of progress of ZG exocytosis did not differ significantly between the two strains. ZG exocytosis from KO acinar cells was seldom observed at physiological concentrations of agonists, but was normal (vs. WT) at high concentrations. Flash photolysis of a caged calcium compound confirmed the integrity of the fusion step of ZG exocytosis in KO acinar cells. The decreased ZG exocytosis present at physiological concentrations of agonists raised the possibility of impaired elicitation of calcium spikes. When calcium spikes were evoked in KO acinar cells by a high agonist concentration: (a) they always started at the apical portion and traveled to the basal portion, and (b) calcium oscillations over the 10 µM level were observed, as in WT acinar cells. At physiological concentrations of agonists, however, sufficient calcium spikes were not observed, suggesting an impaired [Ca2+]i-increase mechanism in KO acinar cells. We propose that in pancreatic acinar cells, Noc2 is not indispensable for the membrane fusion of ZG per se, but instead performs a novel function favoring agonist-induced physiological [Ca2+]i increases. PMID:22615885

  13. A novel function of Noc2 in agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase during zymogen-granule exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sho; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Tamai, Seiichi; Kasai, Haruo; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2012-01-01

    Noc2, a putative Rab effector, contributes to secretory-granule exocytosis in neuroendocrine and exocrine cells. Here, using two-photon excitation live-cell imaging, we investigated its role in Ca(2+)-dependent zymogen granule (ZG) exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells from wild-type (WT) and Noc2-knockout (KO) mice. Imaging of a KO acinar cell revealed an expanded granular area, indicating ZG accumulation. In our spatiotemporal analysis of the ZG exocytosis induced by agonist (cholecystokinin or acetylcholine) stimulation, the location and rate of progress of ZG exocytosis did not differ significantly between the two strains. ZG exocytosis from KO acinar cells was seldom observed at physiological concentrations of agonists, but was normal (vs. WT) at high concentrations. Flash photolysis of a caged calcium compound confirmed the integrity of the fusion step of ZG exocytosis in KO acinar cells. The decreased ZG exocytosis present at physiological concentrations of agonists raised the possibility of impaired elicitation of calcium spikes. When calcium spikes were evoked in KO acinar cells by a high agonist concentration: (a) they always started at the apical portion and traveled to the basal portion, and (b) calcium oscillations over the 10 µM level were observed, as in WT acinar cells. At physiological concentrations of agonists, however, sufficient calcium spikes were not observed, suggesting an impaired [Ca(2+)](i)-increase mechanism in KO acinar cells. We propose that in pancreatic acinar cells, Noc2 is not indispensable for the membrane fusion of ZG per se, but instead performs a novel function favoring agonist-induced physiological [Ca(2+)](i) increases. PMID:22615885

  14. Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I exerts a trophic action and confers glutamate sensitivity on glutamate-resistant cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Calissano, P; Ciotti, M T; Battistini, L; Zona, C; Angelini, A; Merlo, D; Mercanti, D

    1993-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells grown in the presence of a serum complex differentiate but are resistant to the lethal action of excitatory amino acids. When these cells are grown also in the presence of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) they become fully susceptible to the toxic, lethal action of glutamate. The glutamate-sensitizing action of IGF-I is dependent on concentration (half-maximal effect at 2-4 ng/ml) and time (half-maximal effect at 2-4 days in vitro) and is paralleled by the appearance of functionally active, glutamate-activated, Ca2+ channels and of voltage-gated Na+ and late K+ channels. IGF-I-induced glutamate sensitivity is rapidly reversible (t1/2 = 30-60 min) after removal of this somatomedin. The action of IGF-I is not mimicked by IGF-II, nerve growth factor, basic or acidic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or tumor necrosis factor alpha. We postulate that the constitutive phenotype of cerebellar granule cells is glutamate-resistant and becomes responsive to excitatory amino acids under the action of epigenetic cues among which IGF-I may be one of those operative in vivo. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8104340

  15. YB-1 is elevated in medulloblastoma and drives proliferation in Sonic hedgehog-dependent cerebellar granule neuron progenitor cells and medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dey, A; Robitaille, M; Remke, M; Maier, C; Malhotra, A; Gregorieff, A; Wrana, J L; Taylor, M D; Angers, S; Kenney, A M

    2016-08-11

    Postnatal proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs), proposed cells of origin for the SHH-associated subgroup of medulloblastoma, is driven by Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) in the developing cerebellum. Shh induces the oncogene Yes-associated protein (YAP), which drives IGF2 expression in CGNPs and mouse Shh-associated medulloblastomas. To determine how IGF2 expression is regulated downstream of YAP, we carried out an unbiased screen for transcriptional regulators bound to IGF2 promoters. We report that Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1), an onco-protein regulating transcription and translation, binds to IGF2 promoter P3. We observed that YB-1 is upregulated across human medulloblastoma subclasses as well as in other varieties of pediatric brain tumors. Utilizing the cerebellar progenitor model for the Shh subgroup of medulloblastoma in mice, we show for the first time that YB-1 is induced by Shh in CGNPs. Its expression is YAP-dependent and it is required for IGF2 expression in CGNPs. Finally, both gain-of function and loss-of-function experiments reveal that YB-1 activity is required for sustaining CGNP and medulloblastoma cell (MBC) proliferation. Collectively, our findings describe a novel role for YB-1 in driving proliferation in the developing cerebellum and MBCs and they identify the SHH:YAP:YB1:IGF2 axis as a powerful target for therapeutic intervention in medulloblastomas. PMID:26725322

  16. Roles of granule size in over-granulation during high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2010-08-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the over-granulation problem during high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process can guide efficient development of robust formulation and manufacturing process. Using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a model compound, we demonstrate that size enlargement is an important mechanism for over-granulation in HSWG. A higher granulation water level results in larger granules and lower tabletability. With increasing water, granules enlarge sharply when water level is higher than 65%. Granule tabletability deteriorates with increasing granule size and becomes over-granulated when more than 70% water is used. For a batch of over-granulated granule that is ground and sieved, tabletability of the sieved fractions decreases with increasing granule size. The tabletability of the finest fraction (45-90 microm) is nearly four times that of the largest fraction (300-425 microm). These results show that size reduction can be an effective strategy to address the problem of over-granulation. PMID:20232456

  17. The Netrin/RGM receptor, Neogenin, controls adult neurogenesis by promoting neuroblast migration and cell cycle exit.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Conor J; Bradford, DanaKai; Chen, Min; White, Amanda; Blackmore, Daniel G; Cooper, Helen M

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive understanding of adult neurogenesis is essential for the development of effective strategies to enhance endogenous neurogenesis in the damaged brain. Olfactory interneurons arise throughout life from stem cells residing in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle. Neural precursors then migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to the olfactory bulb. To ensure a continuous supply of adult-born interneurons, precursor proliferation, migration, and differentiation must be tightly coordinated. Here, we show that the netrin/repulsive guidance molecule receptor, Neogenin, is a key regulator of adult neurogenesis. Neogenin loss-of-function (Neo(gt/gt)) mice exhibit a specific reduction in adult-born calretinin interneurons in the olfactory granule cell layer. In the absence of Neogenin, neuroblasts fail to migrate into the olfactory bulb and instead accumulate in the RMS. In vitro migration assays confirmed that Neogenin is required for Netrin-1-mediated neuroblast migration and chemoattraction. Unexpectedly, we also identified a novel role for Neogenin as a regulator of the neuroblast cell cycle. We observed that those neuroblasts able to reach the Neo(gt/gt) olfactory bulb failed to undergo terminal differentiation. Cell cycle analysis revealed an increase in the number of S-phase neuroblasts within the Neo(gt/gt) RMS and a significant reduction in the number of neuroblasts exiting the cell cycle, providing an explanation for the loss of mature calretinin interneurons in the granule cell layer. Therefore, Neogenin acts to synchronize neuroblast migration and terminal differentiation through the regulation of neuroblast cell cycle kinetics within the neurogenic microenvironment of the RMS. PMID:25308084

  18. Phospholipase C treatment of certain human target cells reduces their susceptibility to NK lysis without affecting binding or sensitivity to lytic granules.

    PubMed

    Une, C; Grönberg, A; Axberg, I; Jondal, M; Orn, A

    1991-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) is an enzyme that has the capacity to release glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol (G-PI)-anchored proteins from the cells surface. Pretreatment of the human T-cell leukemia cell line Molt-4 with PI-PLC resulted in a decrease in the susceptibility to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Treatment of the erythroleukemia cell line K562 with PI-PLC had no effect on its NK susceptibility. PI-PLC-treated and untreated Molt-4 bound equally well to lymphocytes in target-binding studies with effector cell preparations enriched for NK cells. Susceptibility to cytolytic granules isolated from rat LGL tumor cells remained the same after treatment of Molt-4 or K562 with PI-PLC. Combined treatment of Molt-4 with PI-PLC and rlFN-alpha or rlFN-gamma resulted in additive reductions of the NK susceptibility, suggesting that PI-PLC and interferons act on different mechanisms to protect cells from NK lysis. When expression of a number of antigens on Molt-4 and K562 was analyzed in flow cytometry, only the expression of CD58 was reduced after PI-PLC treatment. The susceptibility of Con A blasts to MLR derived cytotoxic T-cells was not altered by treatment with phospholipase. These data suggest that PI-PLC treatment reduces the capacity of some target cells to activate NK cells upon contract. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is presently unclear. PMID:1703925

  19. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  20. Selective isolation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from autotrophic nitrifying granules by applying cell-sorting and sub-culturing of microcolonies

    PubMed Central

    Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Kumagai, Asami; Ushiki, Norisuke; Momiuchi, Kengo; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle and biological wastewater treatment that consists of two stepwise reactions, ammonia oxidation by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) or archaea followed by nitrite oxidation by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. One of the representatives of the AOB group is Nitrosomonas mobilis species. Although a few pure strains of this species have been isolated so far, approaches to their preservation in pure culture have not been established. Here, we report isolation of novel members of the N. mobilis species from autotrophic nitrifying granules used for ammonia-rich wastewater treatment. We developed an isolation method focusing on microcolonies formation of nitrifying bacteria. Two kinds of distinctive light scattering signatures in a cell-sorting system enabled to separate microcolonies from single cells and heterogeneous aggregates within granule samples. Inoculation of a pure microcolony into 96-well microtiter plates led to successful sub-culturing and increased probability of isolation. Obtained strain Ms1 is cultivated in the liquid culture with relatively high ammonia or nitrite concentration, not extremely slow growing. Considering environmental clones that were closely related to N. mobilis and detected in various environments, the availability of this novel strain would facilitate to reveal this member’s ecophysiology in a variety of habitats. PMID:26528282

  1. Endogenous zinc depresses GABAergic transmission via T-type Ca2+ channels and broadens the time window for integration of glutamatergic inputs in dentate granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Grauert, Antonia; Engel, Dominique; Ruiz, Arnaud J

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Zinc actions on synaptic transmission span the modulation of neurotransmitter receptors, transporters, activation of intracellular cascades and alterations in gene expression. Whether and how zinc affects inhibitory synaptic signalling in the dentate gyrus remains largely unexplored. We found that mono- and di-synaptic GABAergic inputs onto dentate granule cells were reversibly depressed by exogenous zinc application and enhanced by zinc chelation. Blocking T-type Ca2+ channels prevented the effect of zinc chelation. When recording from dentate fast-spiking interneurones, zinc chelation facilitated T-type Ca2+ currents, increased action potential half-width and decreased spike threshold. It also increased the offset of the input–output relation in a manner consistent with enhanced excitability. In granule cells, chelation of zinc reduced the time window for the integration of glutamatergic inputs originating from perforant path synapses, resulting in reduced spike transfer. Thus, zinc-mediated modulation of dentate interneurone excitability and GABA release regulates information flow to local targets and hippocampal networks. PMID:24081159

  2. Age-Dependent Labeling and Imaging of Insulin Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  3. Age-dependent labeling and imaging of insulin secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  4. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  5. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  6. Understanding size enlargement and hardening of granules on tabletability of unlubricated granules prepared by dry granulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Dahiya, Sandeepkumar; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2011-02-01

    The mechanism of loss of "reworkability" or tabletability of dry granulated microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was investigated in relation to both granule size enlargement and granule hardness. Slugs of MCC were prepared under three pressures (12.5, 37.5, and 93.8 MPa) and tabletability (tensile strength vs. pressure) of respective granules (three different sizes) was determined. Nominal single granule fracture strength and granule friability were measured. The reduction in tabletability was profound for harder granules, which were obtained from higher slugging pressure. This is consistent with their ability to resist granule fragmentation during tableting. Variation in granule size exhibits negligible effect on tabletability for the lowest slugging pressure and only a small effect for the middle and highest slugging pressure. This observation is again related to different tendency to granule fragmentation during compaction. The results suggest that granule-hardening negatively affects tensile strength more than that of granule size enlargement for MCC. PMID:20803605

  7. Role of Microtubules in Stress Granule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Konstantin G.; Barbet, Aurélie; Hamon, Loic; Ovchinnikov, Lev P.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Pastré, David

    2009-01-01

    Following exposure to various stresses (arsenite, UV, hyperthermia, and hypoxia), mRNAs are assembled into large cytoplasmic bodies known as “stress granules,” in which mRNAs and associated proteins may be processed by specific enzymes for different purposes like transient storing, sorting, silencing, or other still unknown processes. To limit mRNA damage during stress, the assembly of micrometric granules has to be rapid, and, indeed, it takes only ∼10–20 min in living cells. However, such a rapid assembly breaks the rules of hindered diffusion in the cytoplasm, which states that large cytoplasmic bodies are almost immobile. In the present work, using HeLa cells and YB-1 protein as a stress granule marker, we studied three hypotheses to understand how cells overcome the limitation of hindered diffusion: shuttling of small messenger ribonucleoprotein particles from small to large stress granules, sliding of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles along microtubules, microtubule-mediated stirring of large stress granules. Our data favor the two last hypotheses and underline that microtubule dynamic instability favors the formation of micrometric stress granules. PMID:19843517

  8. Gene Expression Profiles Underlying Selective T-Cell-Mediated Immunity Activity of a Chinese Medicine Granule on Mice Infected with Influenza Virus H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na-na; Liu, Qi; Gu, Li-gang; Ge, Shi-jie; Wu, Jun; Ze-ji, Qiu; Qiu, Ze-ji; Zhang, Hong-chun; Chao, En-xiang; Yu, Zhuo-nan

    2014-01-01

    A Chinese medicine granule, Shu-Feng-Xuan-Fei (SFXF), is critical for viral clearance in early phase of influenza virus infection. In this study, 72 ICR mice were randomly divided into six groups: normal control group, virus control group, Oseltamivir group, low-dose SFXF, medium-dose SFXF, and high-dose SFXF. Mice were anesthetized and inoculated with 4LD50 of influenza virus A (H1N1) except normal control group. Oseltamivir group received 11.375 mg·kg−1·d−1 Oseltamivir Phosphate. SFXF 3.76, 1.88 and 0.94 g·kg−1·d−1 were administrated to mice in all SFXF groups. Each group was in equal dose of 0.2ml daily for 4 consecutive days. Mice were sacrificed and then total RNA was extracted in lung tissue. Some genes involved in T-cell-mediated immunity were selected by DNA microarray. These candidate genes were verified by Real-Time PCR and western immunoblotting. Compared with virus control group, in Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, 12 virus-altered genes were significantly reduced following medium-dose SFXF treatment. Eighteen antigen processing presentation-associated genes were upregulated by medium-dose SFXF. In the process of T cell receptor signaling pathway, 19 genes were downregulated by medium-dose SFXF treatment. On exploration into effector T cells activation and cytokines, all of altered genes in virus control group were reversed by medium-dose SFXF. Real-time PCR and western immunoblotting showed that the regulation of medium-dose SFXF in IL-4, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, TLR7, MyD88, p38, and JNK was superior to Oseltamivir and high-dose SFXF group. Therefore, SFXF granules could reduce influenza infected cells and activation of T cells. PMID:24527057

  9. A novel regulatory mechanism for trimeric GTP-binding proteins in the membrane and secretory granule fractions of human and rodent beta cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Rhodes, C J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Recently we described roles for heterotrimeric and low-molecular-mass GTP-binding proteins in insulin release from normal rat islets. During these studies, we observed that a protein with an apparent molecular mass (37 kDa) similar to that of the beta subunit of trimeric GTP-binding proteins underwent phosphorylation in each of five classes of insulin-secreting cells. Incubation of the beta cell total membrane fraction or the isolated secretory granule fraction (but not the cytosolic fraction) with [gamma-32P]ATP or [gamma-32P]GTP resulted in the phosphorylation of this protein, which was selectively immunoprecipitated by an anti-serum directed against the common beta subunit of trimeric G-proteins. Disruption of the alpha beta gamma trimer (by pretreatment with either fluoroaluminate or guanosine 5'(-)[gamma-thio]triphosphate) prevented beta subunit phosphorylation. Based on differential sensitivities to pH, heat and the histidine-selective reagent diethyl pyrocarbonate (and reversal of the latter by hydroxylamine), the phosphorylated amino acid was presumptively identified as histidine. Incubation of pure beta subunit alone or in combination with the exogenous purified alpha subunit of transducin did not result in the phosphorylation of the beta subunit, but addition of the islet cell membrane fraction did support this event, suggesting that membrane localization (or a membrane-associated factor) is required for beta subunit phosphorylation. Incubation of phosphorylated beta subunit with G alpha.GDP accelerated the dephosphorylation of the beta subunit, accompanied by the formation of G alpha-GTP. Immunoblotting detected multiple alpha subunits (of Gi, G(o) and Gq) and at least one beta subunit in the secretory granule fraction of normal rat islets and insulinoma cells. These data describe a potential alternative mechanism for the activation of GTP-binding proteins in beta cells which contrasts with the classical receptor-agonist mechanism: G beta undergoes

  10. The type 1 Interleukin 1 receptor is not required for the death of murine hippocampal dentate granule cells and microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Harry, G. Jean; Funk, Jason; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Aoyama, Mineyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in the inflammatory process, neuronal death, and glia response have been observed under manipulation of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine and subsequent signaling through the type 1 IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1). To investigate the influence of IL-1R1 activation in the pathophysiology of a chemical-induced injury to the murine hippocampus, we examined the level and pattern of neuronal death and neuroinflammation in 25-day-old male mice exposed to trimethyltin hydroxide (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.). In IL-1R1 null (IL-1R1−/−) mice, the pattern and severity of dentate granule cell death was similar as compared to wild type mice. In both groups of mice, mRNA levels for TNFα and MIP-1α were elevated and the early activation of microglia, including their ability to progress to a phagocytic phenotype, was maintained. Compared to WT mice, IL-1R1−/− mice displayed a limited glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) astrocytic response, as well as a preferential induction in mRNA levels of Fas signaling components. Cumulatively, these results indicate that IL-1R1 activation is not necessary for TMT-induced death of dentate granule neurons or local activation of microglia; however, IL-1R1 signaling is involved in mediating the structural response of astrocytes to injury and may also regulate apoptotic mechanisms by influencing Fas signaling components. PMID:18191113

  11. A p21-activated kinase (PAK1) signaling cascade coordinately regulates F-actin remodeling and insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalwat, Michael A.; Yoder, Stephanie M.; Wang, Zhanxiang; Thurmond, Debbie C.

    2012-01-01

    Human islet studies implicate an important signaling role for the Cdc42 effector protein p21-activated kinase (PAK1) in the sustained/second-phase of insulin secretion. Because human islets from type 2 diabetic donors lack ~80% of normal PAK1 protein levels, the mechanistic requirement for PAK1 signaling in islet function was interrogated. Similar to MIN6 β cells, human islets elicited glucose-stimulated PAK1 activation that was sensitive to the PAK1 inhibitor, IPA3. Given that sustained insulin secretion has been correlated with glucose-induced filamentous actin (F-actin) remodeling, we tested the hypothesis that a Cdc42-activated PAK1 signaling cascade is required to elicit F-actin remodeling to mobilize granules to the cell surface. Live-cell imaging captured the glucose-induced cortical F-actin remodeling in MIN6 β cells; IPA3-mediated inhibition of PAK1 abolished this remodeling. IPA3 also ablated glucose-stimulated insulin granule accumulation at the plasma membrane, consistent with its role in sustained/second-phase insulin release. Both IPA3 and a selective inhibitor of the Cdc42 GTPase, ML-141, blunted the glucose-stimulated activation of Raf-1, suggesting Raf-1 to be downstream of Cdc42→PAK1. IPA3 also inhibited MEK1/2 activation, implicating the MEK1/2→ERK1/2 cascade to occur downstream of PAK1. Importantly, PD0325901, a new selective inhibitor of MEK1/2→ERK1/2 activation, impaired F-actin remodeling and the sustained/amplification pathway of insulin release. Taken together, these data suggest that glucose-mediated activation of Cdc42 leads to activation of PAK1 and prompts activation of its downstream targets Raf-1, MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 to elicit F-actin remodeling and recruitment of insulin granules to the plasma membrane to support the sustained phase of insulin release. PMID:23246867

  12. High frequency burst firing of granule cells ensures transmission at the parallel fiber to purkinje cell synapse at the cost of temporal coding.

    PubMed

    van Beugen, Boeke J; Gao, Zhenyu; Boele, Henk-Jan; Hoebeek, Freek; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells (GrCs) convey information from mossy fibers (MFs) to Purkinje cells (PCs) via their parallel fibers (PFs). MF to GrC signaling allows transmission of frequencies up to 1 kHz and GrCs themselves can also fire bursts of action potentials with instantaneous frequencies up to 1 kHz. So far, in the scientific literature no evidence has been shown that these high-frequency bursts also exist in awake, behaving animals. More so, it remains to be shown whether such high-frequency bursts can transmit temporally coded information from MFs to PCs and/or whether these patterns of activity contribute to the spatiotemporal filtering properties of the GrC layer. Here, we show that, upon sensory stimulation in both un-anesthetized rabbits and mice, GrCs can show bursts that consist of tens of spikes at instantaneous frequencies over 800 Hz. In vitro recordings from individual GrC-PC pairs following high-frequency stimulation revealed an overall low initial release probability of ~0.17. Nevertheless, high-frequency burst activity induced a short-lived facilitation to ensure signaling within the first few spikes, which was rapidly followed by a reduction in transmitter release. The facilitation rate among individual GrC-PC pairs was heterogeneously distributed and could be classified as either "reluctant" or "responsive" according to their release characteristics. Despite the variety of efficacy at individual connections, grouped activity in GrCs resulted in a linear relationship between PC response and PF burst duration at frequencies up to 300 Hz allowing rate coding to persist at the network level. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that the cerebellar granular layer acts as a spatiotemporal filter between MF input and PC output (D'Angelo and De Zeeuw, 2009). PMID:23734102

  13. [Hemocompatibility of various synthetic granulates].

    PubMed

    Jung, F; Mrowietz, C; Seyfert, U T; Franke, R P

    1997-06-01

    The adherence of platelets to different polymer granulates was examined in a perfusion chamber filled with platelet-rich plasma. The surface area of each of the granulates was of a standardised size. The results were compared with those found for a non-thrombogenic and a highly thrombogenic foreign-body surface. The three polymers examined-Cryolite, Styrolux and Zylar-must be considered non-thrombogenic. Platelet adherence to these substances is significantly less (3%) than that to a highly thrombogenic surface such as glass (95%). The three materials did not differ in terms of platelet adherence, and would appear to be suitable potential materials for use in cell separators. PMID:9312306

  14. Somatostatin inhibits exocytosis in rat pancreatic α-cells by Gi2-dependent activation of calcineurin and depriming of secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    Gromada, Jesper; Høy, Marianne; Buschard, Karsten; Salehi, Albert; Rorsman, Patrik

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of cell capacitance were used to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which somatostatin inhibits Ca2+-induced exocytosis in single rat glucagon-secreting pancreatic α-cells. Somatostatin decreased the exocytotic responses elicited by voltage-clamp depolarisations by 80 % in the presence of cyclic AMP-elevating agents such as isoprenaline and forskolin. Inhibition was time dependent and half-maximal within 22 s. The inhibitory action of somatostatin was concentration dependent with an IC50 of 68 nm and prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin. The latter effect was mimicked by intracellular dialysis with specific antibodies to Gi1/2 and by antisense oligonucleotides against G proteins of the subtype Gi2. Somatostatin lacked inhibitory action when applied in the absence of forskolin or in the presence of the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine. The size of the ω-conotoxin-sensitive and forskolin-independent component of exocytosis was limited to 60 fF. By contrast, somatostatin abolished L-type Ca2+ channel-dependent exocytosis in α-cells exposed to forskolin. The magnitude of the latter pool amounted to 230 fF. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on exocytosis was mediated by activation of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase calcineurin and was prevented by pretreatment with cyclosporin A and deltamethrin or intracellularly applied calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide. Experiments using the stable ATP analogue AMP-PCP indicate that somatostatin acts by depriming of granules. We propose that somatostatin receptors associate with L-type Ca2+ channels and couple to Gi2 proteins leading to a localised activation of calcineurin and depriming of secretory granules situated close to the L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:11533141

  15. Transcriptomic and Physiological Insights into the Robustness of Long Filamentous Cells of Methanosaeta harundinacea, Prevalent in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Granules

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liguang; Yu, Haiying; Ai, Guomin; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Songnian

    2014-01-01

    Methanosaeta spp. are widely distributed in natural environments, and their filamentous cells contribute significantly to sludge granulation and the good performance of anaerobic reactors. A previous study indicated that Methanosaeta harundinacea 6Ac displays a quorum sensing-regulated morphological transition from short to long filaments, and more acetate is channeled into methane production in long filaments, whereas more is channeled into biomass synthesis in short filaments. Here, we performed transcriptomic and physiological analysis to gain insights into active methanogenesis in long filaments of M. harundinacea 6Ac. Both RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR indicated that transcription of the genes involved in aceticlastic methanogenesis and energy metabolism was upregulated 1.2- to 10.3-fold in long filaments, while transcription of the genes for the methyl oxidative shunt was upregulated in short filaments. [2-13C]acetate trace experiments demonstrated that a relatively higher portion of the acetate methyl group was oxidized to CO2 in short filaments than in long filaments. The long filaments exhibited higher catalase activity and oxygen tolerance than the short ones, which is consistent with increased transcription of the oxidant-scavenging genes. Moreover, transcription of genes for cell surface structures was upregulated in the long filaments, and transmission electron microscopy revealed a thicker cell envelope in the filaments. RNA-seq determined a >2-fold upregulation of a variety of antistress genes in short filaments, like those encoding chaperones and DNA repair systems, which implies that the short filaments can be stressed. This study reveals the genetic basis for the prevalence of the long filamentous morphology of M. harundinacea cells in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket granules. PMID:25398869

  16. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids.

    PubMed

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) in dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells compared to group-housed (GH) mice. In the present study, together with the SI-induced decrease in plasma concentration of both progesterone and 3α,5α-THP, and an increase in THIP-stimulated GABAergic tonic currents, patch-clamp analysis of DG granule cells revealed a significant decrease in membrane input resistance and action potential (AP) firing rate, in SI compared to GH mice, suggesting that SI exerts an inhibitory action on neuronal excitability of these neurons. Voltage-clamp recordings of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) revealed a SI-associated decrease in frequency as well as a shift from paired-pulse (PP) depression to PP facilitation (PPF) of evoked EPSCs, indicative of a reduced probability of glutamate release. Daily administration of progesterone during isolation reverted the changes in plasma 3α,5α-THP as well as in GABAergic tonic currents and neuronal excitability caused by SI, but it had only a limited effect on the changes in the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Overall, the results obtained in this work, together with those previously published, indicate that exposure of mice to SI during adolescence reduces neuronal excitability of DG granule cells, an effect that may be linked to the increased GABAergic tonic currents as a consequence of the sustained decrease in plasma and hippocampal levels of neurosteroids. All these

  17. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) in dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells compared to group-housed (GH) mice. In the present study, together with the SI-induced decrease in plasma concentration of both progesterone and 3α,5α-THP, and an increase in THIP-stimulated GABAergic tonic currents, patch-clamp analysis of DG granule cells revealed a significant decrease in membrane input resistance and action potential (AP) firing rate, in SI compared to GH mice, suggesting that SI exerts an inhibitory action on neuronal excitability of these neurons. Voltage-clamp recordings of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) revealed a SI-associated decrease in frequency as well as a shift from paired-pulse (PP) depression to PP facilitation (PPF) of evoked EPSCs, indicative of a reduced probability of glutamate release. Daily administration of progesterone during isolation reverted the changes in plasma 3α,5α-THP as well as in GABAergic tonic currents and neuronal excitability caused by SI, but it had only a limited effect on the changes in the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Overall, the results obtained in this work, together with those previously published, indicate that exposure of mice to SI during adolescence reduces neuronal excitability of DG granule cells, an effect that may be linked to the increased GABAergic tonic currents as a consequence of the sustained decrease in plasma and hippocampal levels of neurosteroids. All these

  18. Methylmercury-Dependent Increases in Fluo4 Fluorescence in Neonatal Rat Cerebellar Slices Depend on Granule Cell Migrational Stage and GABAA Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Aaron B; Mancini, Jayme D; Atchison, William D

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) disrupts cerebellar function, especially during development. Cerebellar granule cells (CGC), which are particularly susceptible to MeHg by unknown mechanisms, migrate during this process. Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) i) are crucial to proper migration, and MeHg is well known to disrupt CGC Ca(2+) i regulation. Acutely prepared slices of neonatal rat cerebellum in conjunction with confocal microscopy and fluo4 epifluorescence were used to track changes induced by MeHg in CGC Ca(2+) i regulation in the external (EGL) and internal granule cell layers (IGL) as well as the molecular layer (ML). MeHg caused no cytotoxicity but did cause a time-dependent increase in fluo4 fluorescence that depended on the stage of CGC development. CGCs in the EGL were most susceptible to MeHg-induced increases in fluo4 fluorescence. MeHg increased fluorescence in CGC processes but only diffusely; Purkinje cells rarely fluoresced in these slices. Neither muscimol nor bicuculline alone altered baseline fluo4 fluorescence in any CGC layer, but each delayed the onset and reduced the magnitude of effect of MeHg on fluo4 fluorescence in the EGL and ML. In the IGL, both muscimol and bicuculline delayed the onset of MeHg-induced increases in fluo4 fluorescence but did not affect fluorescence magnitude. Thus, acute exposure to MeHg causes developmental stage-dependent increases in Ca(2+) i in CGCs. Effects are most prominent in CGCs during development or early stages of migration. GABAA receptors participate in an as yet unclear manner to MeHg-induced Ca(2+) i dysregulation of CGCs. PMID:26514794

  19. Regulation of action potential delays via voltage-gated potassium Kv1.1 channels in dentate granule cells during hippocampal epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kirchheim, Florian; Tinnes, Stefanie; Haas, Carola A.; Stegen, Michael; Wolfart, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Action potential (AP) responses of dentate gyrus granule (DG) cells have to be tightly regulated to maintain hippocampal function. However, which ion channels control the response delay of DG cells is not known. In some neuron types, spike latency is influenced by a dendrotoxin (DTX)-sensitive delay current (ID) mediated by unidentified combinations of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels of the Kv1 family Kv1.1–6. In DG cells, the ID has not been characterized and its molecular basis is unknown. The response phenotype of mature DG cells is usually considered homogenous but intrinsic plasticity likely occurs in particular in conditions of hyperexcitability, for example during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In this study, we examined response delays of DG cells and underlying ion channel molecules by employing a combination of gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp recordings in acute brain slices and single-cell reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SC RT-qPCR) experiments. An in vivo mouse model of TLE consisting of intrahippocampal kainate (KA) injection was used to examine epilepsy-related plasticity. Response delays of DG cells were DTX-sensitive and strongly increased in KA-injected hippocampi; Kv1.1 mRNA was elevated 10-fold, and the response delays correlated with Kv1.1 mRNA abundance on the single cell level. Other Kv1 subunits did not show overt changes in mRNA levels. Kv1.1 immunolabeling was enhanced in KA DG cells. The biophysical properties of ID and a delay heterogeneity within the DG cell population was characterized. Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs), where KA incubation also induced ID upregulation, the homeostatic reversibility and neuroprotective potential for DG cells were tested. In summary, the AP timing of DG cells is effectively controlled via scaling of Kv1.1 subunit transcription. With this antiepileptic mechanism, DG cells delay their responses during hyperexcitation. PMID:24367293

  20. Protective effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative neuronal cell damage in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sang Bum; Ban, Ju Yeon; Lee, Bo Young; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2003-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the neuroprotective effects of fangchinoline (FAN) and tetrandrine (TET), bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, which exhibit the characteristics of Ca 2+ channel blockers, on H2O2 -induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. H2O2 produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by (5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), an N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, and NG-nitro- L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Pretreatment with FAN and TET over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death as assessed by a trypan blue exclusion test, a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the number of apoptotic nuclei. In addition, FAN and TET inhibited the H2O2 -induced elevation of glutamate release into the medium, elevation of the cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+] c ), and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that FAN and TET may mitigate the harmful effects of H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death by interfering with the increase of [Ca 2+] c, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and generation of ROS. Abbreviations. AP5:D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid DMSO:dimethyl sulfoxide FAN:fangchinoline H 2 DCF-DA:2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate MK-801:(5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,20-imine MTT:3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide L-NAME: NG-Nitro- L-arginine methyl ester NMDA: N-methyl- D-aspartate TET:tetrandrine PMID:12865967

  1. Control of Granule Cell Dispersion by Natural Materials Such as Eugenol and Naringin: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy Against Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-08-01

    The hippocampus is an important brain area where abnormal morphological characteristics are often observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), typically showing the loss of the principal neurons in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus. TLE is frequently associated with widening of the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), termed granule cell dispersion (GCD), in the hippocampus, suggesting that the control of GCD with protection of hippocampal neurons may be useful for preventing and inhibiting epileptic seizures. We previously reported that eugenol (EUG), which is an essential component of medicinal herbs and has anticonvulsant activity, is beneficial for treating epilepsy through its ability to inhibit GCD via suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in the hippocampal DG in a kainic acid (KA)-treated mouse model of epilepsy in vivo. In addition, we reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in citrus fruits, could exert beneficial effects, such as antiautophagic stress and antineuroinflammation, in the KA mouse model of epilepsy, even though it was unclear whether naringin might also attenuate the seizure-induced morphological changes of GCD in the DG. Similar to the effects of EUG, we recently observed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which are both involved in epileptic seizures, in the hippocampus of mouse brain. Therefore, these observations suggest that the utilization of natural materials, which have beneficial properties such as inhibition of GCD formation and protection of hippocampal neurons, may be useful in developing a novel therapeutic agent against TLE. PMID:27404051

  2. Analysis of hedgehog signaling in cerebellar granule cell precursors in a conditional Nsdhl allele demonstrates an essential role for cholesterol in postnatal CNS development.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, David; DeBarber, Andrea E; Bir, Natalie; Binkley, Laura; Merkens, Louise S; Steiner, Robert D; Herman, Gail E

    2015-05-15

    NSDHL is a 3β-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase that is involved in the removal of two C-4 methyl groups in one of the later steps of cholesterol biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme are responsible for the X-linked, male lethal mouse mutations bare patches and striated, as well as most cases of human CHILD syndrome. Rare, hypomorphic NSDHL mutations are also associated with X-linked intellectual disability in males with CK syndrome. Since hemizygous male mice with Nsdhl mutations die by midgestation, we generated a conditional targeted Nsdhl mutation (Nsdhl(tm1.1Hrm)) to investigate the essential role of cholesterol in the early postnatal CNS. Ablation of Nsdhl in radial glia using GFAP-cre resulted in live-born, normal appearing affected male pups. However, the pups develop overt ataxia by postnatal day 8-10 and die shortly thereafter. Histological abnormalities include progressive loss of cortical and hippocampal neurons, as well as deficits in the proliferation and migration of cerebellar granule precursors and subsequent massive apoptosis of the cerebellar cortex. We replicated the granule cell precursor proliferation defect in vitro and demonstrate that it results from defective signaling by SHH. Furthermore, this defect is almost completely rescued by supplementation of the culture media with exogenous cholesterol, while methylsterol accumulation above the enzymatic block appears to be associated with increased cell death. These data support the absolute requirement for cholesterol synthesis in situ once the blood-brain-barrier forms and cholesterol transport to the fetus is abolished. They further emphasize the complex ramifications of cholesterogenic enzyme deficiency on cellular metabolism. PMID:25652406

  3. Analysis of hedgehog signaling in cerebellar granule cell precursors in a conditional Nsdhl allele demonstrates an essential role for cholesterol in postnatal CNS development

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, David; DeBarber, Andrea E.; Bir, Natalie; Binkley, Laura; Merkens, Louise S.; Steiner, Robert D.; Herman, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    NSDHL is a 3β-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase that is involved in the removal of two C-4 methyl groups in one of the later steps of cholesterol biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme are responsible for the X-linked, male lethal mouse mutations bare patches and striated, as well as most cases of human CHILD syndrome. Rare, hypomorphic NSDHL mutations are also associated with X-linked intellectual disability in males with CK syndrome. Since hemizygous male mice with Nsdhl mutations die by midgestation, we generated a conditional targeted Nsdhl mutation (Nsdhltm1.1Hrm) to investigate the essential role of cholesterol in the early postnatal CNS. Ablation of Nsdhl in radial glia using GFAP-cre resulted in live-born, normal appearing affected male pups. However, the pups develop overt ataxia by postnatal day 8–10 and die shortly thereafter. Histological abnormalities include progressive loss of cortical and hippocampal neurons, as well as deficits in the proliferation and migration of cerebellar granule precursors and subsequent massive apoptosis of the cerebellar cortex. We replicated the granule cell precursor proliferation defect in vitro and demonstrate that it results from defective signaling by SHH. Furthermore, this defect is almost completely rescued by supplementation of the culture media with exogenous cholesterol, while methylsterol accumulation above the enzymatic block appears to be associated with increased cell death. These data support the absolute requirement for cholesterol synthesis in situ once the blood-brain-barrier forms and cholesterol transport to the fetus is abolished. They further emphasize the complex ramifications of cholesterogenic enzyme deficiency on cellular metabolism. PMID:25652406

  4. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF NEUTROPHILS AND EOSINOPHILS GRANULES IN SAPPHIRE MINKS].

    PubMed

    Uzenbaeva, L B; Kizhina, A G; Ilyukha, V A

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that sapphire minks have abnormality of subcellular structure of blood and bone marrow neutrophils and eosinophils. The abnormality consists in forming of abnormal "giant" granules. The si- ze and the number of abnormal granules significantly change during maturation of leucocytes in bone marrow. We have found differences between abnormal granules forming in neutrophils and eosinophils that depend on the maturing stage and the cells life cycle duration as well as morphofunctional features of these granulocytes. PMID:26863773

  5. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  6. Insulin Granule Biogenesis, Trafficking and Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, June Chunqiu; Min, Le; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that beta cell dysfunction resulting in abnormal insulin secretion is the essential element in the progression of patients from a state of impaired glucose tolerance to frank type 2 diabetes (Del Prato, 2003; Del Prato and Tiengo, 2001). Although extensive studies have examined the molecular, cellular and physiologic mechanisms of insulin granule biogenesis, sorting, and exocytosis the precise mechanisms controlling these processes and their dysregulation in the developed of diabetes remains an area of important investigation. We now know that insulin biogenesis initiates with the synthesis of preproinsulin in rough endoplastic reticulum and conversion of preproinsulin to proinsulin. Proinsulin begins to be packaged in the Trans-Golgi Network and is sorting into immature secretory granules. These immature granules become acidic via ATP-dependent proton pump and proinsulin undergoes proteolytic cleavage resulting the formation of insulin and C-peptide. During the granule maturation process, insulin is crystallized with zinc and calcium in the form of dense-core granules and unwanted cargo and membrane proteins undergo selective retrograde trafficking to either the constitutive trafficking pathway for secretion or to degradative pathways. The newly formed mature dense-core insulin granules populate two different intracellular pools, the readily releasable pools (RRP) and the reserved pool. These two distinct populations are thought to be responsible for the biphasic nature of insulin release in which the RRP granules are associated with the plasma membrane and undergo an acute calcium-dependent release accounting for first phase insulin secretion. In contrast, second phase insulin secretion requires the trafficking of the reserved granule pool to the plasma membrane. The initial trigger for insulin granule fusion with the plasma membrane is a rise in intracellular calcium and in the case of glucose stimulation results from

  7. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  8. Identification of SNAREs that mediate zymogen granule exocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, James A.; Campos-Toimil, Manuel; Thomas, Paul; Edwardson, J. Michael . E-mail: jme1000@cam.ac.uk

    2007-08-03

    A secretagogue-stimulated pancreatic acinar cell releases digestive enzymes from its apical pole. We attempted to identify the SNAREs involved in zymogen granule exocytosis. Antibodies against syntaxins 2 and 3, SNAP-23 and VAMP 8, and the corresponding recombinant SNAREs, inhibited amylase secretion from streptolysin O-permeabilised acini; other anti-SNARE antibodies and SNAREs had no effect. Botulinum neurotoxin C, which cleaved syntaxin 2 and (to a lesser extent) syntaxin 3, but not syntaxins 4, 7 or 8, also inhibited exocytosis. We propose that syntaxin 2, SNAP-23 and VAMP 8 mediate primary granule-plasma membrane fusion. Syntaxin 3 may be involved in secondary granule-granule fusion.

  9. mRNP granules

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granules are dynamic, self-assembling structures that harbor non-translating mRNAs bound by various proteins that regulate mRNA translation, localization, and turnover. Their importance in gene expression regulation is far reaching, ranging from precise spatial-temporal control of mRNAs that drive developmental programs in oocytes and embryos, to similarly exquisite control of mRNAs in neurons that underpin synaptic plasticity, and thus, memory formation. Analysis of mRNP granules in their various contexts has revealed common themes of assembly, disassembly, and modes of mRNA regulation, yet new studies continue to reveal unexpected and important findings, such as links between aberrant mRNP granule assembly and neurodegenerative disease. Continued study of these enigmatic structures thus promises fascinating new insights into cellular function, and may also suggest novel therapeutic strategies in various disease states. PMID:25531407

  10. Granuphilin exclusively mediates functional granule docking to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Fujita, Takuji; Gomi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    In regulated exocytosis, it is generally assumed that vesicles must stably “dock” at the plasma membrane before they are primed to become fusion-competent. However, recent biophysical analyses in living cells that visualize fluorescent secretory granules have revealed that exocytic behaviors are not necessarily uniform: some granules beneath the plasma membrane are resistant to Ca2+ -triggered release, while others are accelerated to fuse without a pause for stable docking. These findings suggest that stable docking is unnecessary, and can even be inhibitory or nonfunctional, for fusion. Consistently, pancreatic β cells deficient in the Rab27 effector, granuphilin, lack insulin granules directly attached to the plasma membrane in electron micrographs but nevertheless exhibit augmented exocytosis. Here we directly compare the exocytic behaviors between granuphilin-positive and -negative insulin granules. Although granuphilin makes granules immobile and fusion-reluctant beneath the plasma membrane, those granuphilin-positive, docked granules release a portion of granuphilin upon fusion, and fuse at a frequency and time course similar to those of granuphilin-negative undocked granules. Furthermore, granuphilin forms a 180-nm cluster at the site of each docked granule, along with granuphilin-interacting Rab27a and Munc18-1 clusters. These findings indicate that granuphilin is an exclusive component of the functional and fusion-inhibitory docking machinery of secretory granules. PMID:27032672

  11. Formation of volutin granules in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Pallerla, Srinivas Reddy; Knebel, Sandra; Polen, Tino; Klauth, Peter; Hollender, Juliane; Wendisch, Volker F; Schoberth, Siegfried M

    2005-02-01

    Volutin granules are intracellular storages of complexed inorganic polyphosphate (poly P). Histochemical staining procedures differentiate between pathogenic corynebacteria such as Corynebacterum diphtheriae (containing volutin) and non-pathogenic species, such as C. glutamicum. Here we report that strains ATCC13032 and MH20-22B of the non-pathogenic C. glutamicum also formed subcellular entities (18-37% of the total cell volume) that had the typical characteristics of volutin granules: (i) volutin staining, (ii) green UV fluorescence when stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, (iii) electron-dense and rich in phosphorus when determined with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis, and (iv) 31P NMR poly P resonances of isolated granules dissolved in EDTA. MgCl2 addition to the growth medium stimulated granule formation but did not effect expression of genes involved in poly P metabolism. Granular volutin fractions from lysed cells contained polyphosphate glucokinase as detected by SDS-PAGE/MALDI-TOF, indicating that this poly P metabolizing enzyme is present also in intact poly P granules. The results suggest that formation of volutin is a more widespread phenomenon than generally accepted. PMID:15668011

  12. Boric acid induces cytoplasmic stress granule formation, eIF2α phosphorylation, and ATF4 in prostate DU-145 cells.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kimberly A; Kobylewski, Sarah E; Yamada, Kristin E; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2015-02-01

    Dietary boron intake is associated with reduced prostate and lung cancer risk and increased bone mass. Boron is absorbed and circulated as boric acid (BA) and at physiological concentrations is a reversible competitive inhibitor of cyclic ADP ribose, the endogenous agonist of the ryanodine receptor calcium (Ca(+2)) channel, and lowers endoplasmic reticulum (ER) [Ca(2+)]. Low ER [Ca(2+)] has been reported to induce ER stress and activate the eIF2α/ATF4 pathway. Here we report that treatment of DU-145 prostate cells with physiological levels of BA induces ER stress with the formation of stress granules and mild activation of eIF2α, GRP78/BiP, and ATF4. Mild activation of eIF2α and its downstream transcription factor, ATF4, enables cells to reconfigure gene expression to manage stress conditions and mild activation of ATF4 is also required for the differentiation of osteoblast cells. Our results using physiological levels of boric acid identify the eIF2α/ATF pathway as a plausible mode of action that underpins the reported health effects of dietary boron. PMID:25425213

  13. Simultaneous determination of purine nucleotides, their metabolites and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in cerebellar granule cells by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Gagliardi, Sara; Samaja, Michele; Marra, Ersilia

    2003-02-01

    The method described here allows the quantitative simultaneous determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine, guanosine 5'-triphosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, uric acid, xanthine, hypoxanthine and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography. The chromatographic analysis requires 26 min per sample and allows the separation of the mentioned metabolites in a time as short as 16 min. Primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing 25 mM KCl for 1.5-48 h and their acid extracts were injected onto column. Uric acid, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-triphosphate were identified and quantified, while hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanosine were below the detection limit. This method makes use of a single-step sample pre-treatment procedure which allows a greater than 91% recovery of the compounds of interest and provides the assay of the metabolites of interest in little amounts of cell extracts. Therefore, this method is suitable to evaluate the energetic state in a variety of cell types, both under normal and dismetabolic conditions, such as after the induction of apoptosis or necrosis. PMID:12565687

  14. Reduction of the immunostainable length of the hippocampal dentate granule cells' primary cilia in 3xAD-transgenic mice producing human A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Gaudet, Chantal; Menard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor; LaFerla, Frank M.; Ito, Shingo; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Whitfield, James

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} and tau-induced neurofibrillary tangles play a key role in Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}{sub 1-42} and mutant tau protein together reduce the primary cilium length. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This shortening likely reduces cilium-dependent neurogenesis and memory function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This provides a model of an A{beta}/tau targeting of a neuronal signaling organelle. -- Abstract: The hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of the two sites of continuous neurogenesis in adult rodents and humans. Virtually all dentate granule cells have a single immobile cilium with a microtubule spine or axoneme covered with a specialized cell membrane loaded with receptors such as the somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75{sup NTR}). The signals from these receptors have been reported to stimulate neuroprogenitor proliferation and the post-mitotic maturation of newborn granule cells into functioning granule cells. We have found that in 6-24-months-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg-AD) producing both A{beta}{sub 1-42} and the mutant human tau protein tau{sub P301L,} the dentate granule cells still had immunostainable SSTR3- and p75{sup NTR}-bearing cilia but they were only half the length of the immunostained cilia in the corresponding wild-type mice. However, the immunostainable length of the granule cell cilia was not reduced either in 2xTg-AD mice accumulating large amounts of A{beta}{sub 1-42} or in mice accumulating only a mutant human tau protein. Thus it appears that a combination of A{beta}{sub 1-42} and tau protein accumulation affects the levels of functionally important receptors in 3xTg-AD mice. These observations raise the important possibility that structural and functional changes in granule cell cilia might have a role in AD.

  15. Abnormal UP/DOWN Membrane Potential Dynamics Coupled with the Neocortical Slow Oscillation in Dentate Granule Cells during the Latent Phase of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy123

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, David W.; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Marti, Geoffrey; Robbe, David; Crépel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus, a major entry point to the hippocampus, gates (or filters) incoming information from the cortex. During sleep or anesthesia, the slow-wave oscillation (SWO) orchestrates hippocampus–neocortex communication, which is important for memory formation. The dentate gate is altered in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) early during epileptogenesis, which favors the propagation of pathological activities. Yet, whether the gating of physiological SWO by dentate granule cells (DGCs) is altered in TLE has remained unexplored. We combined intracellular recordings of membrane potential (Vm) of DGCs and local field potential recordings of the SWO in parietal cortex in anesthetized rats early during epileptogenesis [post-status epilepticus (SE) rats]. As expected, in control rats, the Vm of DGCs weakly and rarely oscillated in the SWO frequency range. In contrast, in post-SE rats, the Vm of DGCs displayed strong and long-lasting SWO. In these cells, clear UP and DOWN states, in phase with the neocortical SWO, led to a bimodal Vm distribution. In post-SE rats, the firing of DGCs was increased and more temporally modulated by the neocortical SWO. We conclude that UP/DOWN state dynamics dominate the Vm of DGCs and firing early during epileptogenesis. This abnormally strong neocortical influence on the dynamics of DGCs may profoundly modify the hippocampus–neocortex dialogue during sleep and associated cognitive functions. PMID:27257629

  16. Toxoplasma secretory granules: one population or more?

    PubMed

    Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, dense granules are known as the storage secretory organelles of the so-called GRA proteins (for dense granule proteins), which are destined to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and the PV-derived cyst wall. Recently, newly annotated GRA proteins targeted to the host cell nucleus have enlarged this view. Here we provide an update on the latest developments on the Toxoplasma secreted proteins, which to date have been mainly studied at both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages, and we point out that recent discoveries could open the issue of a possible, yet uncharacterized, distinct secretory pathway in Toxoplasma. PMID:25599584

  17. Profilin 1 Associates with Stress Granules and ALS-Linked Mutations Alter Stress Granule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Figley, Matthew D.; Bieri, Gregor; Kolaitis, Regina-Maria; Taylor, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the PFN1 gene encoding profilin 1 are a rare cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Profilin 1 is a well studied actin-binding protein but how PFN1 mutations cause ALS is unknown. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has one PFN1 ortholog. We expressed the ALS-linked profilin 1 mutant proteins in yeast, demonstrating a loss of protein stability and failure to restore growth to profilin mutant cells, without exhibiting gain-of-function toxicity. This model provides for simple and rapid screening of novel ALS-linked PFN1 variants. To gain insight into potential novel roles for profilin 1, we performed an unbiased, genome-wide synthetic lethal screen with yeast cells lacking profilin (pfy1Δ). Unexpectedly, deletion of several stress granule and processing body genes, including pbp1Δ, were found to be synthetic lethal with pfy1Δ. Mutations in ATXN2, the human ortholog of PBP1, are a known ALS genetic risk factor and ataxin 2 is a stress granule component in mammalian cells. Given this genetic interaction and recent evidence linking stress granule dynamics to ALS pathogenesis, we hypothesized that profilin 1 might also associate with stress granules. Here we report that profilin 1 and related protein profilin 2 are novel stress granule-associated proteins in mouse primary cortical neurons and in human cell lines and that ALS-linked mutations in profilin 1 alter stress granule dynamics, providing further evidence for the potential role of stress granules in ALS pathogenesis. PMID:24920614

  18. Type II PKAs are anchored to mature insulin secretory granules in INS-1 β-cells and required for cAMP-dependent potentiation of exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Villalpando, Sabrina; Cazevieille, Chantal; Fernandez, Anne; Lamb, Ned J; Hani, El-Habib

    2016-06-01

    Specificity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway relies on an extremely sophisticated compartmentalization mechanism of the kinase within a given cell, based on high-affinity binding of PKA tetramer pools to different A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs). We and others have previously shown that AKAPs-dependent PKA subcellular targeting is a requisite for optimal cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin exocytosis. We thus hypothesized that a PKA pool may directly anchor to the secretory compartment to potentiate insulin exocytosis. Here, using immunofluorescence analyses combined to subcellular fractionations and purification of insulin secretory granules (ISGs), we identified discrete subpools of type II PKAs, RIIα and RIIβ PKAs, along with the catalytic subunit, physically associated with ISGs within pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells. Ultrastructural analysis of native rodent β-cells confirmed in vivo the occurrence of PKA on dense-core ISGs. Isoform-selective disruption of binding of PKAs to AKAPs reinforced the requirement of type II PKA isoforms for cAMP potentiation of insulin exocytosis. This granular localization of PKA was of critical importance since siRNA-mediated depletion of either RIIα or RIIβ PKAs resulted in a significant reduction of cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin release. The present work provides evidence for a previously unrecognized pool of type II PKAs physically anchored to the β-cell ISGs compartment and supports a non-redundant function for type II PKAs during cAMP potentiation of exocytosis. PMID:26898328

  19. The terpenoids Myrtenol and Verbenol act on δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors and enhance tonic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    van Brederode, Johannes; Atak, Sinem; Kessler, Artur; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Villmann, Carmen; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-08-15

    Sideritis plants and their extracts have been used in traditional medicine as sedatives, anxiolytics and anticonvulsant agents. Pinenes are the most prevalent of the volatile aroma components in Siderites extracts and the pinene metabolites myrtenol and verbenol have been identified as the most potent positive allosteric modulators of synaptic GABAA receptors composed of α1β2 and α1β2γ2 subunits. In view of their therapeutic spectrum, we wondered whether these two terpenoids would also augment tonic GABA currents mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors containing the δ subunit. When we expressed α4β2δ receptors in HEK293 cells, we found that co-application of myrtenol or verbenol enhanced whole-cell current responses to GABA by up to 100%. Consistent with their effects on heterologous α1β2γ2 receptors, we found that myrtenol and verbenol, when co-applied with GABA via local perfusion, increased the amplitude and area of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSCs) recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from granule cells in the dentate gyrus of mouse hippocampal brain slices. In addition, co-application of terpenoids with GABA was also able to enhance tonic GABA current, measured from the change in baseline current and current noise, compared to GABA perfusion alone. Our results suggest that myrtenol and verbenol act as positive allosteric modulators at synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, thereby augmenting phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition. Thus, our study reveals an important pharmacological and therapeutic target of bicyclic monoterpenoids. PMID:27312536

  20. Review: granulation and fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.

    1981-01-01

    The history of granulation techniques is very long; however, the systematic study of the granulation phenomenon began only after 1950. The first, distinguished paper treating the fundamental binding mechanism of granules was published by Rumpf in 1958. Although there are several binding forces, the discussion in this paper is confined to granulation involving the capillary energy of a liquid-particle system. This technique has been applied widely and successfully to various fields of powder technology because of its advantages of simplicity and economy (ref. 2). Granules with diameters larger than 5 mm can be prepared efficiently by rotating-type granulators, such as a pan or a trommel (ref. 3, 4, 5). On the other hand, the purpose of fluidized-bed granulators (hereafter abbreviated as FBG) is to produce small granules with diameters from 0.3 to 3 mm (ref. 6). Because it contains a small amount of liquid, a fluidized-bed granulator has a fluidization state differing significantly from that of an ordinary fluidized bed. The dispersion of liquid and powder in the bed plays an important role in the granulation mechanism. This mechanism is compared to that of pan granulators, and the differences in characteristics are discussed.

  1. Nonreutilizaton of adrenal chromaffin granule membranes following secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nobiletti, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular postexocytotic fate of the adrenal chromaffin granule membrane (reutilization vs. nonreutilization) was addressed through two experimental approaches. First, (/sup 3/H) leucine pulse-chase labeling experiments were conducted in two systems - the isolated retrograde perfused cat adrenal gland and cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to compare chromaffin granule soluble dopamine-B-hydroxylase (DBH) turnover (marker for granule soluble content turnover) to that of membrane-bound DBH (marker for granule membrane turnover). Experiments in cat adrenal glands showed that at all chase periods the granule distribution of radiolabeled DBH was in agreement with the DBH activity distribution (73% membrane-bound/27% soluble) - a result consistent with parallel turnover of soluble and membrane-bound DBH. Experiments in cultured bovine cells showed that labeled soluble and membrane-bound DBH had parallel turnover patterns and at all chase period, the distribution of radiolabeled DBH between the soluble contents and membranes was similar to the DBH activity distribution (50% soluble/50% membrane-bound). The above experiments showed that the soluble contents and membranes turnover in parallel and are consistent with nonreutilization of chromaffin granule membranes following exocytosis. Isolated retrograde perfused bovine adrenal glands were subjected to repetitive acetylcholine stimulation to induce exocytosis and then the dense and less-dense chromaffin granule fractions were isolated. Since both approaches gave results consistent with membrane nonreutilization, the authors conclude that once a chromaffin granule is involved in exocytosis, its membrane is not reutilized for the further synthesis, storage, and secretion of catecholamines.

  2. Shigella flexneri modulates stress granule composition and inhibits stress granule aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vonaesch, Pascale; Campbell-Valois, François-Xavier; Dufour, Alexandre; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Schnupf, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    Invasion and multiplication of the facultative, cytosolic, enteropathogen Shigella flexneri within the colonic epithelial lining leads to an acute inflammatory response, fever and diarrhea. During the inflammatory process, infected cells are subjected to numerous stresses including heat, oxidative stress and genotoxic stress. The evolutionarily conserved pathway of cellular stress management is the formation of stress granules that store translationally inactive cellular mRNAs and interfere with cellular signalling pathways by sequestering signalling components. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. flexneri-infected cells to form stress granules in response to exogenous stresses. We found that S. flexneri infection inhibits movement of the stress granule markers eIF3 and eIF4B into stress granules and prevents the aggregation of G3BP1 and eIF4G-containing stress granules. This inhibition occurred only with invasive, but not with non-invasive bacteria and occurred in response to stresses that induce translational arrest through the phosphorylation of eIF2α and by treating cells with pateamine A, a drug that induces stress granules by inhibiting the eIF4A helicase. The S. flexneri-mediated stress granule inhibition could be largely phenocopied by the microtubule-destabilizing drug nocodazole and while S. flexneri infection did not lead to microtubule depolymerization, infection greatly enhanced acetylation of alpha-tubulin. Our data suggest that qualitative differences in the microtubule network or subversion of the microtubule-transport machinery by S. flexneri may be involved in preventing the full execution of this cellular stress response. PMID:27282465

  3. Acute effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP) of perforant path-dentate gyrus granule cells synapse related to memory.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaokuo; Yan, Tiebin; Chen, Rongfa; Ran, Dongzhi

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture, a traditional Chinese therapeutic method, has been widely used in clinical practice to treat diseases such as stroke, Bell's palsy, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson diseases, dysmenorrhea and chronic pain. Mounting lab data had suggested that electro-acupuncture could alleviate dementia and restore long term potentiation of hippocampus in rat. Clinical data also indicated that electro-acupuncture could improve electrical activity of brain in vascular dementia patients. However, its biological basis and acute effects on hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP) remain not well understood. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acute electro-acupuncture (acupoints: ST36 and SP6; continuous wave, 2 mV, 2Hz; lasted 20 min) could enhance LTP of perforant path-dentate gyrus granule cells in anesthetized rat and explore its underlying mechanisms. We found that electro-acupuncture could significantly increase PS2/PS 1 in pair pulse test (P <0.05, inter-pulse interval: 20ms and 90ms). When compared to control group, electro-acupuncture could significantly enhance LTP to about 234% which was about 143% of that in control group (P <0.05). It suggested that electro-acupuncture could modulate the function of interneurons in hippocampus hence increase LTP. PMID:23156202

  4. Complementary functions of SK and Kv7/M potassium channels in excitability control and synaptic integration in rat hippocampal dentate granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Aparicio, Pedro; Murphy, Ricardo; Storm, Johan F

    2014-01-01

    The dentate granule cells (DGCs) form the most numerous neuron population of the hippocampal memory system, and its gateway for cortical input. Yet, we have only limited knowledge of the intrinsic membrane properties that shape their responses. Since SK and Kv7/M potassium channels are key mechanisms of neuronal spiking and excitability control, afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and synaptic integration, we studied their functions in DGCs. The specific SK channel blockers apamin or scyllatoxin increased spike frequency (excitability), reduced early spike frequency adaptation, fully blocked the medium-duration AHP (mAHP) after a single spike or spike train, and increased postsynaptic EPSP summation after spiking, but had no effect on input resistance (Rinput) or spike threshold. In contrast, blockade of Kv7/M channels by XE991 increased Rinput, lowered the spike threshold, and increased excitability, postsynaptic EPSP summation, and EPSP–spike coupling, but only slightly reduced mAHP after spike trains (and not after single spikes). The SK and Kv7/M channel openers 1-EBIO and retigabine, respectively, had effects opposite to the blockers. Computational modelling reproduced many of these effects. We conclude that SK and Kv7/M channels have complementary roles in DGCs. These mechanisms may be important for the dentate network function, as CA3 neurons can be activated or inhibition recruited depending on DGC firing rate. PMID:24366266

  5. Mice deficient in carbonic anhydrase type 8 exhibit motor dysfunctions and abnormal calcium dynamics in the somatic region of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Matthew G; Weber, John T

    2015-06-01

    The waddles (wdl) mouse is characterized by a namesake "side-to-side" waddling gait due to a homozygous mutation of the Car8 gene. This mutation results in non-functional copies of the protein carbonic anhydrase type 8. Rota-rod testing was conducted to characterize the wdl mutations' effect on motor output. Results indicated that younger homozygotes outperformed their older cohorts, an effect not seen in previous studies. Heterozygotes, which were thought to be free of motor impairment, displayed motor learning deficiencies when compared with wild type performance. Acute cerebellar slices were then utilized for fluorescent calcium imaging experiments, which revealed significant alterations in cerebellar granule cell somatic calcium signaling when exposed to glutamate. The contribution of GABAergic signaling to these alterations was also verified using bath application of bicuculline. Changes in somatic calcium signals were found to be applicable to an in vivo scenario by comparing group responses to electrical stimulation of afferent mossy fiber projections. Finally, intracellular calcium store function was also found to be altered by the wdl mutation when slices were treated with thapsigargin. These findings, taken together with previous work on the wdl mouse, indicate a widespread disruption in cerebellar circuitry hampering proper neuronal communication. PMID:25721739

  6. COMPARISON OF NEUROSCREEN-1 AND CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELL CULTURES FOR EVALUATING NEURITE OUTGROWTH USING THE ARRAYSCAN HIGH CONTENT ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major challenge facing the Environmental Protection Agency is the development of high-throughput screening assays amendable to resource-efficient developmental neurotoxicity for chemical screening and toxicity prioritization. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which...

  7. Cell Signaling and Neurotoxicity: 3H-Arachidonic acid release (Phospholipase A2) in cerebellar granule neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell signaling is a complex process which controls basic cellular activities and coordinates actions to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Alterations in signaling processes have been associated with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and cerebellar ataxia, as well as, ...

  8. Bulk-like endocytosis plays an important role in the recycling of insulin granules in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Du; Xue, Yanhong; Liang, Kuo; Yuan, Tianyi; Lu, Jingze; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Tao; Chen, Liangyi

    2012-08-01

    Although bulk endocytosis has been found in a number of neuronal and endocrine cells, the molecular mechanism and physiological function of bulk endocytosis remain elusive. In pancreatic beta cells, we have observed bulk-like endocytosis evoked both by flash photolysis and trains of depolarization. Bulk-like endocytosis is a clathrin-independent process that is facilitated by enhanced extracellular Ca(2+) entry and suppressed by the inhibition of dynamin function. Moreover, defects in bulk-like endocytosis are accompanied by hyperinsulinemia in primary beta cells dissociated from diabetic KKAy mice, which suggests that bulk-like endocytosis plays an important role in maintaining the exo-endocytosis balance and beta cell secretory capability. PMID:22729398

  9. Nos2 Inactivation Promotes the Development of Medulloblastoma in Ptch1+/− Mice by Deregulation of Gap43–Dependent Granule Cell Precursor Migration

    PubMed Central

    Westrich, Viola; Karra, Daniela; Pfleger, Karin; Toedt, Grischa; Blond, Frederik; Delhomme, Nicolas; Hahn, Meinhard; Reifenberger, Julia; Reifenberger, Guido; Lichter, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. A subset of medulloblastoma originates from granule cell precursors (GCPs) of the developing cerebellum and demonstrates aberrant hedgehog signaling, typically due to inactivating mutations in the receptor PTCH1, a pathomechanism recapitulated in Ptch1+/− mice. As nitric oxide may regulate GCP proliferation and differentiation, we crossed Ptch1+/− mice with mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2) to investigate a possible influence on tumorigenesis. We observed a two-fold higher medulloblastoma rate in Ptch1+/− Nos2−/− mice compared to Ptch1+/− Nos2+/+ mice. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this finding, we performed gene expression profiling of medulloblastomas from both genotypes, as well as normal cerebellar tissue samples of different developmental stages and genotypes. Downregulation of hedgehog target genes was observed in postnatal cerebellum from Ptch1+/+ Nos2−/− mice but not from Ptch1+/− Nos2−/− mice. The most consistent effect of Nos2 deficiency was downregulation of growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43). Functional studies in neuronal progenitor cells demonstrated nitric oxide dependence of Gap43 expression and impaired migration upon Gap43 knock-down. Both effects were confirmed in situ by immunofluorescence analyses on tissue sections of the developing cerebellum. Finally, the number of proliferating GCPs at the cerebellar periphery was decreased in Ptch1+/+ Nos2−/− mice but increased in Ptch1+/− Nos2−/− mice relative to Ptch1+/− Nos2+/+ mice. Taken together, these results indicate that Nos2 deficiency promotes medulloblastoma development in Ptch1+/− mice through retention of proliferating GCPs in the external granular layer due to reduced Gap43 expression. This study illustrates a new role of nitric oxide signaling in cerebellar development and demonstrates that the localization of pre-neoplastic cells during

  10. Weaker control of the electrical properties of cerebellar granule cells by tonically active GABAA receptors in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Down’s syndrome (DS) is caused by triplication of all or part of human chromosome 21 and is characterized by a decrease in the overall size of the brain. One of the brain regions most affected is the cerebellum, in which the number of granule cells (GCs) is markedly decreased. GCs process sensory information entering the cerebellum via mossy fibres and pass it on to Purkinje cells and inhibitory interneurons. How GCs transform incoming signals depends on their input–output relationship, which is adjusted by tonically active GABAA receptor channels. Results We report that in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, in which cerebellar volume and GC number are decreased as in DS, the tonic GABAA receptor current in GCs is smaller than in wild-type mice and is less effective in moderating input resistance and raising the minimum current required for action potential firing. We also find that tonically active GABAA receptors curb the height and broaden the width of action potentials in wild-type GCs but not in Ts65Dn GCs. Single-cell real-time quantitative PCR reveals that these electrical differences are accompanied by decreased expression of the gene encoding the GABAA receptor β3 subunit but not genes coding for some of the other GABAA receptor subunits expressed in GCs (α1, α6, β2 and δ). Conclusions Weaker moderation of excitability and action potential waveform in GCs of the Ts65Dn mouse by tonically active GABAA receptors is likely to contribute to atypical transfer of information through the cerebellum. Similar changes may occur in DS. PMID:23870245

  11. Germ-granule components prevent somatic development in the C. elegans germline

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Andrew Kekūpa'a; Egelhofer, Thea A.; Campbell, Anne C.; Strome, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Specialized ribonucleoprotein organelles collectively known as germ granules are found in the germline cytoplasm from worms to humans [1]. In Drosophila, germ granules have been implicated in germline determination [2]. C. elegans germ granules, known as P granules, do not appear to be required for primordial germ cell (PGC) determination [3], but their components are still needed for fertility [4–6]. One potential role for P granules is to maintain germline fate and totipotency. This is suggested by the loss of P granules from germ cells that transform into somatic cell types, e.g. in germlines lacking MEX-3 and GLD-1 or upon neuronal induction by CHE-1 [7, 8]. However, it has not been established whether loss of P granules is the cause or effect of cell-fate transformation. To test cause-effect, we severely compromised P granules by simultaneously knocking down factors that nucleate granule formation (PGL-1 and PGL-3) and promote their perinuclear localization (GLH-1 and GLH-4) [9], and investigated if that causes germ cells to lose totipotency and initiate somatic reprogramming. We found that compromising P granules causes germ cells to express neuronal and muscle markers and send out neurite-like projections, suggesting that P granules maintain totipotency and germline identity by antagonizing somatic fate. PMID:24746798

  12. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals. PMID:22088197

  13. Comparison of PC12 and Cerebellar Granule Cell Cultures for Evaluating Neurite Outgrowth Using High Content Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of high-throughput assays for chemical screening and hazard identification is a pressing priority worldwide. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which recapitulate biological events observed in vivo. Neurite outgrowth is one such critical cellular process un...

  14. Effects of depolarization and NMDA antagonists on the role survival of cerebellar granule cells: a pivotal role for protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lin, W W; Wang, C W; Chuang, D M

    1997-06-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) grown in high-K+ (25 mM; K25) medium progressively differentiate in vitro. Differentiation is noticeable after 3-4 days in vitro (DIV) and reach a mature stage after 8 DIV. Longer cultivation of CGCs (>13 DIV) triggers the processes of spontaneous cell death. However, if cultured in normal physiological K concentration (5 mM; K5), a significant proportion of the cells dies by the end of the first week in culture. To address the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the development of CGCs, we measured the kinase activity as well as the protein level of the kinase isoforms. As the K25 CGC culture proceeded, the PKC activity time-dependently increased by 3.2-fold, reaching a steady state at 8 DIV. Western blot analysis using PKC isoform-specific antibodies revealed an increase in levels of PKC alpha, gamma, mu, lambda, and iota from 2 to 8 DIV. A slight increase or decrease at 4 DIV was observed for PKC epsilon and betaII, respectively, whereas no significant change was observed for betaI. The isoforms of delta, theta, eta, and zeta were not detected. Comparing the 14 DIV cultures with the 10 DIV cultures, the immunoreactivities of PKC iota and epsilon were decreased, those of PKC alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, and lambda were unchanged, whereas that of PKC mu was still increased. In K5 cultures, the immunoreactivity of each PKC isoform at 2-4 DIV was similar to that observed in K25 cells, although no remarkable differentiation features were observed. Coordinated with the appearance of cell death at 8 DIV in low-K+ cultures, levels of PKC alpha, mu, lambda, and iota, but not the others, were markedly decreased. The NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801 and 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid markedly prevented the age-induced apoptosis of CGCs, and the cells survived >18 DIV under these conditions. The cytoprotective effect of MK-801 was concomitant with the increases in levels of PKC gamma, lambda, iota, and mu at 10 and 14 DIV

  15. Differential effects of rapamycin treatment on tonic and phasic GABAergic inhibition in dentate granule cells after focal brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Butler, Corwin R; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Smith, Bret N

    2016-06-01

    The cascade of events leading to post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unclear. Altered inhibition in the hippocampal formation and dentate gyrus is a hallmark of several neurological disorders, including TBI and PTE. Inhibitory synaptic signaling in the hippocampus is predominately driven by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission, and is prominently mediated by postsynaptic type A GABA receptors (GABAAR's). Subsets of these receptors involved in tonic inhibition of neuronal membranes serve a fundamental role in maintenance of inhibitory state, and GABAAR-mediated tonic inhibition is altered functionally in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy. In this study, we assessed the effect of mTOR inhibition on hippocampal hilar inhibitory interneuron loss and synaptic and tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells (DGCs) after controlled cortical impact (CCI) to determine if mTOR activation after TBI modulates GABAAR function. Hilar inhibitory interneuron density was significantly reduced 72h after CCI injury in the dorsal two-thirds of the hemisphere ipsilateral to injury compared with the contralateral hemisphere and sham controls. Rapamycin treatment did not alter this reduction in cell density. Synaptic and tonic current measurements made in DGCs at both 1-2 and 8-13weeks post-injury indicated reduced synaptic inhibition and THIP-induced tonic current density in DGCs ipsilateral to CCI injury at both time points post-injury, with no change in resting tonic GABAAR-mediated currents. Rapamycin treatment did not alter the reduced synaptic inhibition observed in ipsilateral DGCs 1-2weeks post-CCI injury, but further reduced synaptic inhibition of ipsilateral DGCs at 8-13weeks post-injury. The reduction in THIP-induced tonic current after injury, however, was prevented by rapamycin treatment at both time points. Rapamycin treatment thus differentially modifies CCI-induced changes in synaptic and tonic GABAAR

  16. Calcium permeable AMPA receptor-dependent long lasting plasticity of intrinsic excitability in fast spiking interneurons of the dentate gyrus decreases inhibition in the granule cell layer.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Debanjan; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The local fast-spiking interneurons (FSINs) are considered to be crucial for the generation, maintenance, and modulation of neuronal network oscillations especially in the gamma frequency band. Gamma frequency oscillations have been associated with different aspects of behavior. But the prolonged effects of gamma frequency synaptic activity on the FSINs remain elusive. Using whole cell current clamp patch recordings, we observed a sustained decrease of intrinsic excitability in the FSINs of the dentate gyrus (DG) following repetitive stimulations of the mossy fibers at 30 Hz (gamma bursts). Surprisingly, the granule cells (GCs) did not express intrinsic plastic changes upon similar synaptic excitation of their apical dendritic inputs. Interestingly, pairing the gamma bursts with membrane hyperpolarization accentuated the plasticity in FSINs following the induction protocol, while the plasticity attenuated following gamma bursts paired with membrane depolarization. Paired pulse ratio measurement of the synaptic responses did not show significant changes during the experiments. However, the induction protocols were accompanied with postsynaptic calcium rise in FSINs. Interestingly, the maximum and the minimum increase occurred during gamma bursts with membrane hyperpolarization and depolarization respectively. Including a selective blocker of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the bath; significantly attenuated the calcium rise and blocked the membrane potential dependence of the calcium rise in the FSINs, suggesting their involvement in the observed phenomenon. Chelation of intracellular calcium, blocking HCN channel conductance or blocking CP-AMPARs during the experiment forbade the long lasting expression of the plasticity. Simultaneous dual patch recordings from FSINs and synaptically connected putative GCs confirmed the decreased inhibition in the GCs accompanying the decreased intrinsic excitability in the FSINs. Experimentally constrained network

  17. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements. PMID:25124058

  18. Proteoglycan modifications by granulation tissue in culture.

    PubMed

    Quintner, M I; Kollar, E J; Rossomando, E F

    1982-01-01

    To study the process of tissue remodeling that occurs during wound healing, radioactive proteoglycan ([35S]-PGS) was used to assay for enzymatic activities present in the extracellular fluid of healing tissue. Mice, wounded by removal of a 2 x 1.5 cm patch of skin from the dorsal surface, were sacrificed after 3 days of healing. Granulation tissue (1 cm2) was removed, spread onto a sterile wire mesh support and placed in the center well of an organ culture dish. To each well was added 1 ml MCDB medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and antibiotics and 5-20 microliters of [35S]-PGS (100,000 cpm/10 microliters). Medium, removed from the well by aspiration after 24 and 48 h of culture, was boiled 5 min at 100 degrees C and stored frozen at -20 degrees C. Alterations of the PGS were assayed with a Sepharose 4B column (1 x 50 cm) which had an excluded and included volume of 17 and 46 ml, respectively. PGS, incubated without cells or with tissues from unwounded animals, eluted at 26 ml. PGS, incubated with granulation tissue and cultured for either 24 or 48 h, eluted from the Sepharose 4B at 29 ml, a 10% increase in elution volume, suggesting that the size or shape of the PGS has been altered by enzymes secreted by the cells of the granulation tissue. In contrast, PGS incubated with tissues from unwounded animals or without granulation tissue showed no changes. These data suggest that enzymatic activities secreted by cells of granulation tissue may be involved in remodeling during healing. PMID:6749574

  19. The mechanical properties of p-granule components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawerth, Louise; Saha, Shambaditya; Jahnel, Marcus; Juelicher, Frank; Hyman, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    We study the major constituents of liquid droplets called ``p-granules''. During the one-cell stage of Caenorhabditis elegans development, these p-granules preferentially form on the posterior side of the cell and remain there preferentially as the cell divides leading to the majority of droplets remaining in one of the daughter cells. This process repeats during subsequent cell divisions with, again, the majority of droplets being maintained in one cell. When this process concludes and the worm continues to develop, the cell containing the p-granule droplets will eventually become the gonad of the adult worm. Previous work has suggested that the spatial segregation of p-granules that occurs at each stage is the result of a phase separation analogous to classic liquid-liquid demixing. We study this process under various buffer conditions in vitro by using a model system consisting of purified p-granule components. We find that these form liquid droplets under physiological conditions which resemble p-granules. We further report on the physical properties of these liquids and how they compare to their in vivo counterparts. In particular, we measure their surface tension and viscosity. We find surface tensions around 10-7 N/m and viscosities much higher than that of water.

  20. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  1. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for interneuron connectivity at specific subcellular compartments of granule cells.

    PubMed

    Beuter, Simone; Ardi, Ziv; Horovitz, Omer; Wuchter, Jennifer; Keller, Stefanie; Saha, Rinki; Tripathi, Kuldeep; Anunu, Rachel; Kehat, Orli; Kriebel, Martin; Richter-Levin, Gal; Volkmer, Hansjürgen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal transmission is regulated by the local circuitry which is composed of principal neurons targeted at different subcellular compartments by a variety of interneurons. However, mechanisms that contribute to the subcellular localisation and maintenance of GABAergic interneuron terminals are poorly understood. Stabilization of GABAergic synapses depends on clustering of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and its interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Lentiviral knockdown experiments in adult rats indicated that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for the stabilisation of basket cell terminals on proximal dendritic and somatic compartments of granular cells of the dentate gyrus. EphA7 deficiency and concomitant destabilisation of GABAergic synapses correlated with impaired long-term potentiation and reduced hippocampal learning. Reduced GABAergic innervation may be explained by an impact of EphA7 on gephyrin clustering. Overexpression or ephrin stimulation of EphA7 induced gephyrin clustering dependent on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is an interaction partner of gephyrin. Gephyrin interactions with mTOR become released after mTOR activation while enhanced interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin was observed in parallel. In conclusion, EphA7 regulates gephyrin clustering and the maintenance of inhibitory synaptic connectivity via mTOR signalling. PMID:27405707

  2. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for interneuron connectivity at specific subcellular compartments of granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Beuter, Simone; Ardi, Ziv; Horovitz, Omer; Wuchter, Jennifer; Keller, Stefanie; Saha, Rinki; Tripathi, Kuldeep; Anunu, Rachel; Kehat, Orli; Kriebel, Martin; Richter-Levin, Gal; Volkmer, Hansjürgen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal transmission is regulated by the local circuitry which is composed of principal neurons targeted at different subcellular compartments by a variety of interneurons. However, mechanisms that contribute to the subcellular localisation and maintenance of GABAergic interneuron terminals are poorly understood. Stabilization of GABAergic synapses depends on clustering of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and its interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Lentiviral knockdown experiments in adult rats indicated that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA7 is required for the stabilisation of basket cell terminals on proximal dendritic and somatic compartments of granular cells of the dentate gyrus. EphA7 deficiency and concomitant destabilisation of GABAergic synapses correlated with impaired long-term potentiation and reduced hippocampal learning. Reduced GABAergic innervation may be explained by an impact of EphA7 on gephyrin clustering. Overexpression or ephrin stimulation of EphA7 induced gephyrin clustering dependent on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) which is an interaction partner of gephyrin. Gephyrin interactions with mTOR become released after mTOR activation while enhanced interaction with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin was observed in parallel. In conclusion, EphA7 regulates gephyrin clustering and the maintenance of inhibitory synaptic connectivity via mTOR signalling. PMID:27405707

  3. Kinetic and functional analysis of transient, persistent and resurgent sodium currents in rat cerebellar granule cells in situ: an electrophysiological and modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Magistretti, Jacopo; Castelli, Loretta; Forti, Lia; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellar neurones show complex and differentiated mechanisms of action potential generation that have been proposed to depend on peculiar properties of their voltage-dependent Na+ currents. In this study we analysed voltage-dependent Na+ currents of rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs) by performing whole-cell, patch-clamp experiments in acute rat cerebellar slices. A transient Na+ current (INaT) was always present and had the properties of a typical fast-activating/inactivating Na+ current. In addition to INaT, robust persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na+ currents were observed. INaP peaked at ∼−40 mV, showed half-maximal activation at ∼−55 mV, and its maximal amplitude was about 1.5% of that of INaT. INaR was elicited by repolarizing pulses applied following step depolarizations able to activate/inactivate INaT, and showed voltage- and time-dependent activation and voltage-dependent decay kinetics. The conductance underlying INaR showed a bell-shaped voltage dependence, with peak at −35 mV. A significant correlation was found between GC INaR and INaT peak amplitudes; however, GCs expressing INaT of similar size showed marked variability in terms of INaR amplitude, and in a fraction of cells INaR was undetectable. INaT, INaP and INaR could be accounted for by a 13-state kinetic scheme comprising closed, open, inactivated and blocked states. Current-clamp experiments carried out to identify possible functional correlates of INaP and/or INaR revealed that in GCs single action potentials were followed by depolarizing afterpotentials (DAPs). In a majority of cells, DAPs showed properties consistent with INaR playing a role in their generation. Computer modelling showed that INaR promotes DAP generation and enhances high-frequency firing, whereas INaP boosts near-threshold firing activity. Our findings suggest that special properties of voltage-dependent Na+ currents provides GCs with mechanisms suitable for shaping activity patterns, with potentially

  4. Application of high OLR-fed aerobic granules for the treatment of low-strength wastewater: performance, granule morphology and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyun; Quan, Xiangchun; Li, Huai

    2013-08-01

    Aerobic granules, pre-cultivated at the organic loading rate (OLR) of 3.0 kg COD/(m3 x day), were used to treat low-strength wastewater in two sequencing batch reactors at low OLRs of 1.2 and 0.6 kg COD/(m3 x day), respectively. Reactor performance, evolution of granule morphology, structure and microbial community at low OLRs under long-term operation (130 days) were investigated. Results showed that low OLRs did not cause significant damage to granule structure as a dominant granule morphology with size over 540 microm was maintained throughout the operation. Aerobic granules at sizes of about 750 microm were finally obtained at the low OLRs. The granule reactors operated at low OLRs demonstrated effective COD and ammonia removals (above 90%), smaller granule sizes and less biomass. The contents of extracellular polymeric substances in the granules were decreased while the ratios of exopolysaccharide/exoprotein were increased (above 1.0). The granules cultivated at the low OLRs showed a smoother surface and more compact structure than the seeded granules. A significant shift in microbial community was observed but the microbial diversity remained relatively stable. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy observation showed that the live cells were spread throughout the whole granule, while the dead cells were mainly concentrated in the outer layer of the granule, and the proteins, polysaccharides and lipids were mainly located in the central regime of the granule. In conclusion, granules cultivated at high OLRs show potential for treating low-strength organic wastewater steadily under long-term operation. PMID:24520692

  5. MicroRNA profiles in hippocampal granule cells and plasma of rats with pilocarpine-induced epilepsy – comparison with human epileptic samples

    PubMed Central

    Roncon, Paolo; Soukupovà, Marie; Binaschi, Anna; Falcicchia, Chiara; Zucchini, Silvia; Ferracin, Manuela; Langley, Sarah R.; Petretto, Enrico; Johnson, Michael R.; Marucci, Gianluca; Michelucci, Roberto; Rubboli, Guido; Simonato, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers of the transformation of normal to epileptic tissue would help to stratify patients at risk of epilepsy following brain injury, and inform new treatment strategies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an attractive option in this direction. In this study, miRNA microarrays were performed on laser-microdissected hippocampal granule cell layer (GCL) and on plasma, at different time points in the development of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in the rat: latency, first spontaneous seizure and chronic epileptic phase. Sixty-three miRNAs were differentially expressed in the GCL when considering all time points. Three main clusters were identified that separated the control and chronic phase groups from the latency group and from the first spontaneous seizure group. MiRNAs from rats in the chronic phase were compared to those obtained from the laser-microdissected GCL of epileptic patients, identifying several miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-23a-5p, miR-146a-5p and miR-181c-5p) that were up-regulated in both human and rat epileptic tissue. Analysis of plasma samples revealed different levels between control and pilocarpine-treated animals for 27 miRNAs. Two main clusters were identified that segregated controls from all other groups. Those miRNAs that are altered in plasma before the first spontaneous seizure, like miR-9a-3p, may be proposed as putative biomarkers of epileptogenesis. PMID:26382856

  6. Increased expression of axogenesis-related genes and mossy fibre length in dentate granule cells from adult HuD overexpressor mice.

    PubMed

    Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I; Tanner, Daniel C; Mounce, Joanna; Bolognani, Federico

    2011-01-01

    The neuronal RNA-binding protein HuD plays a critical role in the post-transcriptional regulation of short-lived mRNAs during the initial establishment and remodelling of neural connections. We have generated transgenic mice overexpressing this protein (HuD-Tg) in adult DGCs (dentate granule cells) and shown that their mossy fibres contain high levels of GAP-43 (growth-associated protein 43) and exhibit distinct morphological and electrophysiological properties. To investigate the basis for these changes and identify other molecular targets of HuD, DGCs from HuD-Tg and control mice were collected by LCM (laser capture microscopy) and RNAs analysed using DNA microarrays. Results show that 216 known mRNAs transcripts and 63 ESTs (expressed sequence tags) are significantly up-regulated in DGCs from these transgenic mice. Analyses of the 3'-UTRs (3'-untranslated regions) of these transcripts revealed an increased number of HuD-binding sites and the presence of several known instability-conferring sequences. Among these, the mRNA for TTR (transthyretin) shows the highest level of up-regulation, as confirmed by qRT-PCR (quantitative reverse transcription-PCR) and ISH (in situ hybridization). GO (gene ontology) analyses of up-regulated transcripts revealed a large over-representation of genes associated with neural development and axogenesis. In correlation with these gene expression changes, we found an increased length of the infrapyramidal mossy fibre bundle in HuD-Tg mice. These results support the notion that HuD stabilizes a number of developmentally regulated mRNAs in DGCs, resulting in increased axonal elongation. PMID:22004431

  7. MicroRNA profiles in hippocampal granule cells and plasma of rats with pilocarpine-induced epilepsy--comparison with human epileptic samples.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Paolo; Soukupovà, Marie; Binaschi, Anna; Falcicchia, Chiara; Zucchini, Silvia; Ferracin, Manuela; Langley, Sarah R; Petretto, Enrico; Johnson, Michael R; Marucci, Gianluca; Michelucci, Roberto; Rubboli, Guido; Simonato, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers of the transformation of normal to epileptic tissue would help to stratify patients at risk of epilepsy following brain injury, and inform new treatment strategies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an attractive option in this direction. In this study, miRNA microarrays were performed on laser-microdissected hippocampal granule cell layer (GCL) and on plasma, at different time points in the development of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in the rat: latency, first spontaneous seizure and chronic epileptic phase. Sixty-three miRNAs were differentially expressed in the GCL when considering all time points. Three main clusters were identified that separated the control and chronic phase groups from the latency group and from the first spontaneous seizure group. MiRNAs from rats in the chronic phase were compared to those obtained from the laser-microdissected GCL of epileptic patients, identifying several miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-23a-5p, miR-146a-5p and miR-181c-5p) that were up-regulated in both human and rat epileptic tissue. Analysis of plasma samples revealed different levels between control and pilocarpine-treated animals for 27 miRNAs. Two main clusters were identified that segregated controls from all other groups. Those miRNAs that are altered in plasma before the first spontaneous seizure, like miR-9a-3p, may be proposed as putative biomarkers of epileptogenesis. PMID:26382856

  8. In vitro study of uptake and synthesis of creatine and its precursors by cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes suggests some hypotheses on the physiopathology of the inherited disorders of creatine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of the inherited disorders of creatine (Cr) synthesis and transport in the last few years disclosed the importance of blood Cr supply for the normal functioning of the brain. These putatively rare diseases share a common pathogenetic mechanism (the depletion of brain Cr) and similar phenotypes characterized by mental retardation, language disturbances, seizures and movement disorders. In the effort to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating Cr pool inside the nervous tissue, Cr transport and synthesis and related gene transcripts were explored in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes. Methods Cr uptake and synthesis were explored in vitro by incubating monotypic primary cultures of rat type I astrocytes and cerebellar granule cells with: a) D3-Creatine (D3Cr) and D3Cr plus β-guanidinopropionate (GPA, an inhibitor of Cr transporter), and b) labelled precursors of Guanidinoacetate (GAA) and Cr (Arginine, Arg; Glycine, Gly). Intracellular D3Cr and labelled GAA and Cr were assessed by ESI-MS/MS. Creatine transporter (CT1), L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT), and S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT) gene expression was assessed in the same cells by real time PCR. Results D3Cr signal was extremely high in cells incubated with this isotope (labelled/unlabelled Cr ratio reached about 10 and 122, respectively in cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes) and was reduced by GPA. Labelled Arg and Gly were taken up by the cells and incorporated in GAA, whose concentration paralleled that of these precursors both in the extracellular medium and inside the cells (astrocytes). In contrast, the increase of labelled Cr was relatively much more limited since labelled Cr after precursors' supplementation did not exceed 2,7% (cerebellar granule cells) and 21% (astrocytes) of unlabelled Cr. Finally, AGAT, GAMT and SLC6A8 were expressed in both kind of cells. Conclusions Our results

  9. The absence of pleiotrophin modulates gene expression in the hippocampus in vivo and in cerebellar granule cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, Celia; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Márquez-Aguirre, Ana Laura; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Pallás, Mercé; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E

    2016-09-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted growth factor recently proposed to act as a neuromodulatory peptide in the Central Nervous System. PTN appears to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neural disorders, and it has also been implicated in learning and memory. Specifically, PTN-deficient mice exhibit a lower threshold for LTP induction in the hippocampus, which is attenuated in mice overexpressing PTN. However, there is little information about the signaling systems recruited by PTN to modulate neural activity. To address this issue, the gene expression profile in hippocampus of mice lacking PTN was analyzed using microarrays of 22,000 genes. In addition, we corroborated the effect of the absence of PTN on the expression of these genes by silencing this growth factor in primary neuronal cultures in vitro. The microarray analysis identified 102 genes that are differentially expressed (z-score>3.0) in PTN null mice, and the expression of eight of those modified in the hippocampus of KO mice was also modified in vitro after silencing PTN in cultured neurons with siRNAs. The data obtained indicate that the absence of PTN affects AKT pathway response and modulates the expression of genes related with neuroprotection (Mgst3 and Estrogen receptor 1, Ers 1) and cell differentiation (Caspase 6, Nestin, and Odz4), both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27468976

  10. Bax siRNA promotes survival of cultured and allografted granule cell precursors through blockade of caspase-3 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, S S; Desfeux, A; Aubert, N; Falluel-Morel, A; Fournier, A; Laudenbach, V; Vaudry, H; Gonzalez, B J

    2008-06-01

    Transplantation of neuronal precursor cells (NPCs) into the central nervous system could represent a powerful therapeutical tool against neurodegenerative diseases. Unfortunately, numerous NPCs die shortly after transplantation, predominantly due to caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using a culture of cerebellar neuronal precursors, we have previously demonstrated protective effect of the neuropeptide PACAP, which suppresses ceramide-induced apoptosis by blockade of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The main objective of this study was to determine whether Bax repression can promote survival of NPCs allotransplanted into a host animal. In vivo and ex vivo experiments revealed that C2-ceramide increases Bax expression, while PACAP reverses this effect. In vitro tests using cerebellar NPCs demonstrated that the Bax-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) could reduce their death and caspase-3 cleavage within the first 24 h. BrdU-labelled NPCs were subjected to transfection procedure with or without siRNA introduction before using for in vivo transplantation. Twenty-four hours after, the allografted NPCs containing siRNA showed significantly reduced level of caspase-3 cleavage, and the volume of their implants was almost twofold higher than in the case of empty-transfected precursors. These data evidence an important role of Bax in life/death decision of grafted NPCs and suggest that RNA interference strategy may be applicable for maintaining NPCs survival within the critical first hours after their transplantation. PMID:18323863

  11. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  12. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  13. Development of maize starch granules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize kernels of self-pollinated inbred line B73 harvested on various days after pollination (DAP) were subjected for starch granule development studies. Starch in endosperms was first observed on 6 DAP. A small amount of starch granules (<2% of dry weight) was found in the endosperm on 12 DAP. S...

  14. [Research of aerobic granule characteristics with different granule age].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Man; Yang, Chang-Zhu; Pu, Wen-Hong; Luo, Ying-Dong; Gong, Jian-Yu

    2012-03-01

    In the SBR reactor, we studied the different style, physicochemical characteristic, pollutants removal and microbial activity between the short age and long age aerobic granule, respectively. The short age aerobic granule was cultivated from activated floccules sludge and the other was gotten from aerobic granular sludge which was operated stably more than one year. The results indicated that the wet density, the specific gravity and integrated coefficient (IC) of the short age aerobic granule were 1.066 g x cm(-1), 1.013 g x cm(-3) and 98.7%, respectively. And that of long age were 1.026 g x cm(-3), 1.010 g x cm(-3) and 98.4%, respectively. All of them were higher than the long age aerobic granule. The mean diameters of them were 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively. The settling velocity of short age and long age aerobic granule were 0.005-0.032 m x s(-1) and 0.003-0.028 m x s(-1), respectively, and two kinds of aerobic granule settling velocity increased with the diameter increased. SVI of the former was lower. The COD removal rates of two aerobic granules were above 90%, and the NH4(+) -N removal rates of them were about 85%. The results of the COD effluent concentration, NH4(+) -N effluent concentration and the pollutants concentration in a typical cycle indicated that the short age aerobic granule had better pollutants removal efficiency. The TP removal rates of them were between 40% -90% and 32% -85%, respectively. The TN removal rates of them were about 80%. The SOUR(H) SOUR(NH4) and SOUR(NO2) of the short age aerobic granule were 26.4, 14.8 and 11.2 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. And that of long age were 25.2, 14.4 and 8.4 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. In summary, the aerobic granule had significantly different physical and chemical characteristics because of different granule age, and the short age aerobic granule exhibited better pollutants removal ability, higher microbial activity and more stability than the long age aerobic granule. PMID:22624385

  15. Statistical properties of solar granulation from the SOUP instrument on Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Shine, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 collected movies of solar granulation completely free from atmospheric blurring, and are not degraded by pointint jitter (the pointing stability was 0.003 sec root mean square). The movies illustrate that the solar five minute oscillation has a major role in the appearance of solar granulation and that exploding granules are a common feature of the granule evolution. Using 3-D Fourier filtering techniques the oscillations were removed and it was demonstrated that the autocorrelation lifetime of granulation is a factor of two greater in magnetic field regions than in field-free quiet sun. Horizontal velocities were measured and flow patterns were observed on the scale of meso- and super granulation. In quiet regions the mean flow velocity is 370 m/s while in the magnetic regions it is about 125 m/s. It was also found that the root mean square (RMS) fluctuating horizonal velocity field is substantially greater in quiet sun than in strong magnetic field regions. By superimposing the location of exploding granules on the average flow maps it was found that they appear almost exclusively in the center of mesogranulation size flow cells. Because of the nonuniformity of the distribution of exploding granules, the evolution of the granulation pattern in mesogranule cell centers and boundaries differs fundamentally. It is clear from this study there is neither a typical granule nor a typical granule evolution.

  16. Heparinized nanohydroxyapatite/collagen granules for controlled release of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina C; Sousa, Susana R; Monteiro, Fernando J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a bone substitute material capable of preventing or treating osteomyelitis through a sustainable release of vancomycin and simultaneously inducing bone regeneration. Porous heparinized nanohydroxyapatite (nanoHA)/collagen granules were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, micro-computed tomography and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. After vancomycin adsorption onto the granules, its releasing profile was studied by UV molecular absorption spectroscopy. The heparinized granules presented a more sustainable release over time, in comparison with nonheparinized nanoHA and nanoHA/collagen granules. Vancomycin was released for 360 h and proved to be bioactive until 216 h. Staphylococcus aureus adhesion was higher on granules containing collagen, guiding the bacteria to the material with antibiotic, improving their eradication. Moreover, cytotoxicity of the released vancomycin was assessed using osteoblast cultures, and after 14 days of culture in the presence of vancomycin, cells were able to remain viable, increasing their metabolic activity and colonizing the granules, as observed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. These findings suggest that heparinized nanoHA/collagen granules are a promising material to improve the treatment of osteomyelitis, as they are capable of releasing vancomycin, eliminating the bacteria, and presented morphological and chemical characteristics to induce bone regeneration. PMID:25778540

  17. Behavior and Properties of Mature Lytic Granules at the Immunological Synapse of Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Min; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Stevens, David R.; Rettig, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Killing of virally infected cells or tumor cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires targeting of lytic granules to the junction between the CTL and its target. We used whole-cell patch clamp to measure the cell capacitance at fixed intracellular [Ca2+] to study fusion of lytic granules in human CTLs. Expression of a fluorescently labeled human granzyme B construct allowed identification of lytic granule fusion using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this way capacitance steps due to lytic granule fusion were identified. Our goal was to determine the size of fusing lytic granules and to describe their behavior at the plasma membrane. On average, 5.02 ± 3.09 (mean ± s.d.) lytic granules were released per CTL. The amplitude of lytic granule fusion events was ~ 3.3 fF consistent with a diameter of about 325 nm. Fusion latency was biphasic with time constants of 15.9 and 106 seconds. The dwell time of fusing lytic granules was exponentially distributed with a mean dwell time of 28.5 seconds. Fusion ended in spite of the continued presence of granules at the immune synapse. The mobility of fusing granules at the membrane was indistinguishable from that of lytic granules which failed to fuse. While dwelling at the plasma membrane lytic granules exhibit mobility consistent with docking interspersed with short periods of greater mobility. The failure of lytic granules to fuse when visible in TIRF at the membrane may indicate that a membrane-confined reaction is rate limiting. PMID:26296096

  18. Saline storage of aerobic granules and subsequent reactivation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Lin, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Loss of structural stability and bioactivity during long-term storage and operation is primary challenge to field applications of aerobic granular processes. This study for the first time stored aerobic granules in 5%w/w NaCl solution at 4°C for 187d. The stored granules were then successfully reactivated and used for 85d in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) and continuous-flow reactors (CFR) at varying levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD). High-throughput sequencing results reveal that Thauera sp., Paracoccus sp., and Nitrosomonas sp. were the predominant in the stored aerobic granules, and Pseudoxanthomonas sp. accumulated during the reactivation process. Saline storage, in which cells are in an unculturable state by saline stress, is a promising storage process for aerobic granules. PMID:25270079

  19. Feasibility and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 granules for local advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinsuke; Honda, Kohei; Sato, Teruyuki; Yamazaki, Kazuharu; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    S-1 granulated powder has recently been released to the market as an additional format to that of the capsule. Patients who previously found it difficult to swallow the capsules are now able to take S-1 in powder form. This study evaluated the feasibility of S-1 granulated powder as adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer. S-1 was orally administered for 2  weeks, followed by 1  week of rest (one course) for 12  months (16 courses). Twenty-four stage III and IV head and neck cancer patients were enrolled in this study. In total, 10 (47.6%) of the patients follow the planned schedule and dose. Severe adverse events were observed in 22 patients (91.7%), whereas no grade 4 adverse events were observed. S-1 granulated powder should be presented as an additional option for the treatment of head and neck cancer, especially for patients experiencing difficulty in swallowing oral medications. PMID:25971448

  20. Observation of polyphosphate granules in cable bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Nielsen, L. P.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Cable bacteria are long filamentous bacteria that capable for long distance electron transport: transporting electrons derived from oxidizing sulfide in anoxic layers, to oxygen at the sediment surface, over a distance of centimeters. Cable bacteria are found in many types of freshwater and marine sediment all over the world, with density of approximately thousands of kilometers per square meter. These long filaments are composed by individual cells closely related to Desulfobulbaceae, connected with a shared outer membrane inside which the strings structure are presumed to be highly conductive. The observed doubling time of cells within the filament is about 20 min, which is among the shortest compare to other bacteria. In these cable cells, we constantly observed polyphosphate granules (poly-P), regardless of cell dimension and shape. This is very interesting since it has long been recognized that the microbial polyP content is low during rapid growth and increases under unfavorable conditions, for example, increasing sulfide concentration and anoxia resulted in a decomposition of poly-P in Beggiatoa. Here, we investigated marine cable bacteria from Netherland and Aarhus Bay, focusing on the poly-P dynamics under various redox conditions. In poly-P stained cells, typically there are two big poly-P granules locate at each polar. In dividing cells, however, the morphology of poly-P changed to six small granules precisely arranged to two row. Moreover, the cells seem be able to continuously divide more than one time without elongation step. These varied poly-P morphologies demonstrate that poly-P is closely related to the cell growth and cell division, by an unknown mechanism. Individual cable filaments were picked up and were exposed to different redox conditions; our primary data indicated the cable cells could suffer anoxic condition better than oxic condition. We also detected decomposition of poly-P under anoxia. These results call for an in-depth examination

  1. Incorporation of a circulating protein into megakaryocyte and platelet granules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handagama, P. J.; George, J. N.; Shuman, M. A.; McEver, R. P.; Bainton, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether or not proteins circulating in plasma can be incorporated into megakaryocytes and platelets, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected intravenously into guinea pigs and these cells were examined for its uptake by electron microscopy and cytochemistry. Enriched samples of megakaryocytes enabled ultrastructural analysis of large numbers of these rare cells. In megakaryocytes, 50% of alpha granules contained HRP between 75 min and 7 hr after injection. At 24 hr, 25% of the megakaryocyte granules were peroxidase-positive, less were positive by 48 hr, and there were none at 4 days. Thus, the findings demonstrate that a circulating protein can be endocytosed by megakaryocytes and rapidly packaged into alpha granules. Platelet granules also contain HRP by 7 hr after injection, and they can secrete it in response to thrombin. Unfortunately, our present studies do not allow us to distinguish between direct endocytosis by the platelet and/or shedding of new platelets from recently labeled megakaryocytes. It is concluded that while some alpha granule proteins are synthesized by megakaryocytes, others may be acquired from plasma by endocytosis. In addition to providing evidence that some of the proteins of alpha granules may be of exogenous origin, this study has allowed the definition of a pathway whereby plasma proteins may be temporarily sequestered in megakaryocytes before reentering the circulation in platelets.

  2. Granule consolidation during compaction.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M H

    1976-03-01

    The deformation of small cylindrical aggregates of dibasic calcium phosphate was measured during compaction. An analogy between these aggregates and cylindrical granules was proposed. No change in the original shape of the aggregates occurred; the cylindrical shape was maintained even at high compaction pressures. Relaxation of the aggregates occurred at pressures higher than 420 MNm-2 (60.9 x 10(3) lb in.-2) when removed from the compacts, but no relaxation took place at pressures below this value. In addition, the aggregates relaxed by an increase in thickness only; there was no corresponding change in diameter. Up to a pressure of 200 MNm-2 (29.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), an increase in aggregate diameter occurred, which was accompanied by a reduction in thickness. This change produced only a small reduction in volume, which was attributable to interparticulate slippage resulting in a closer packed arrangement. At a pressure of 200 MNm-2, the aggregate diameter no longer increased because solid bridges were formed between the particles and the die wall, preventing further spreading. From 200 to 420 MNm-2, failure of the material occurred by plastic deformation, which produced only a decrease in aggregate thickness. From 420 to 800 MNm-2 (116.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), a structure was formed that could support the applied load without further reduction of thickness, and this structure was shown to behave elastically. PMID:1263085

  3. Interactive effects of environmentally relevant polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins on [3H]phorbol ester binding in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kodavanti, P R; Ward, T R

    1998-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent contaminants that exist as complex mixtures in the environment. One problem faced by risk assessors is that the possible interactive effects of specific PCB congeners and related chemicals found in environmental and biological samples have not been systematically investigated. Some PCBs perturb Ca2+ homeostasis and cause protein kinase C (PKC) translocation in neuronal cell cultures and in brain homogenate preparations at concentrations where no cytotoxicity is observed, and these systems are necessary for the growth and normal functioning of neurons. The changes in second messenger systems appear to be associated with the extent of noncoplanarity of the PCB molecule. We studied the interactive effects of selected PCB congeners, a PCB metabolite, and a dioxin on PKC translocation, as determined by [3H]phorbol ester binding in cerebellar granule cells. The binary combinations included coplanar and noncoplanar PCB congeners or PCB congeners with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)/PCB metabolite. In addition, we tested the interactive effects of several PCB congeners (three or more) found in environmental samples such as human milk and blood, contaminated fish, and brain samples from PCB-treated animals. The results indicated that 1) the coplanar congener [3,3',4, 4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TeCB)] did not alter the in vitro activity of the noncoplanar (2,2',5,5'-TeCB) or coplanar [4, 4'-dichlorobiphenyl (DCB)] congeners; 2) binary mixtures of active PCB congeners (2,2',4,4'-TeCB and 2,2'-DCB; 2,2'-DCB and 3,5-DCB; 2,2',3,5',6-PeCB and 2,2',4,4',5-PeCB) interact in a dose-additive manner; 3) TCDD did not alter the activity of either coplanar (3,3', 4,4'-TeCB) or noncoplanar (2,2',5,5'-TeCB) congeners; 4) the interaction between the parent PCB congener and hydroxy metabolite of PCB is additive; 5) PCB congener mixtures at the ratios found in environmental samples are biologically active; and 6) there was no indication

  4. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. PMID:27558325

  5. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Poblete-Durán, Natalia; Prades-Pérez, Yara; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis) and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs), which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs), which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). PMID:27367717

  6. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  7. Grafting of neural stem and progenitor cells to the hippocampus of young, irradiated mice causes gliosis and disrupts the granule cell layer

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y; Shinjyo, N; Sato, M; Osato, K; Zhu, C; Pekna, M; Kuhn, H G; Blomgren, K

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation persistently reduces the pool of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, which may explain some of the learning deficits observed in patients treated with radiotherapy, particularly pediatric patients. A single dose of 8 Gy irradiation (IR) was administered to the brains of postnatal day 14 (P14) C57BL/6 mice and 1.0 × 105 bromodeoxyuridine-labeled, syngeneic NSPCs were injected into the hippocampus 1 day, 1 week or 6 weeks after IR. Cell survival and phenotype were evaluated 5 weeks after grafting. When grafted 1 day post-IR, survival and neuronal differentiation of the transplanted NSPCs were lower in irradiated brains, whereas the survival and cell fate of grafted cells were not significantly different between irradiated and control brains when transplantation was performed 1 or 6 weeks after IR. A young recipient brain favored neuronal development of grafted cells, whereas the older recipient brains displayed an increasing number of cells developing into astrocytes or unidentified cells. Injection of NSPCs, but not vehicle, induced astrogliosis and reduced thickness of the dorsal blade of the GCL after 5 months. In summary, we demonstrate that age and interval between IR and grafting can affect survival and differentiation of grafted NSPCs. The observed long-term gliosis and degeneration warrant caution in the context of NSPC grafting for therapeutical purposes. PMID:23598403

  8. Performance of single carbon granules as perspective for larger scale capacitive bioanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsje, Casper; Liu, Dandan; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Buisman, Cees J. N.; ter Heijne, Annemiek

    2016-09-01

    The use of high surface area electrodes, like carbon-based felt or granules, in Bioelectrochemical Systems is crucial for high volumetric current production. In case activated carbon granules are used, charge can also be stored in the form of an electric double layer in the pores, which has been shown to improve bioanode performance. So far, it is not known how much current can be generated by a single granule. In this study, we investigate the current production and charge storage behavior of a single carbon granule. Two types of activated carbon granules and one graphite granule are tested to find the untapped potential of granular bioanodes. A single activated carbon granule produces up to 0.6 mA, corresponding to 60 mA cm-3 granule volume at -300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl anode potential. Charge - discharge experiments show that capacitive granules produced 1.3-2.0 times more charge compared to a graphite granule with low surface area. When extrapolated to other granular systems, our study indicates that the current generated by granular bioanodes can be improved with several orders of magnitude, which could form the basis of an economically feasible Microbial Fuel Cell.

  9. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Hogberg, Helena T.; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hartung, Thomas; Coecke, Sandra; Bal-Price, Anna K.

    2009-03-15

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100{beta}) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABA{sub A} receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100{beta}) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity.

  10. Resistance of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to the lytic effects of their toxic granules.

    PubMed

    Verret, C R; Firmenich, A A; Kranz, D M; Eisen, H N

    1987-11-01

    A cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) characteristically kills target cells one after the other by releasing toxic granules that contain one or more cytolytic components. To determine how CTLs avoid destroying themselves when they release granules and lyse target cells, 7 murine CD8+ CTL cell lines were compared with 19 other cell lines for susceptibility to lysis by the isolated toxic granules. Murine CD8+ CTLs were clearly the most resistant cells: granules did not lyse them even after they were exposed to azide, cyanide, and 2-deoxyglucose, conditions that were found to enhance the susceptibility of all the other cells tested, including other T cells. Thus, resistance of CD8+ CTLs to cytotoxic granules appears to be independent of cellular ATP. To reconcile these findings with other observations that, under some circumstances, CTLs can be lysed by other CTLs, we suggest a model in which a CTL releases only a limited proportion of its toxic granules at each antigen-specific encounter with a target cell; the amount released is sufficient to kill most target cells but to leave the CTL undamaged and with enough granules to attack other target cells. PMID:2445890

  11. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium. PMID:26432265

  12. In vitro stability of pancreatic zymogen granules: roles of pH and calcium.

    PubMed

    Lebel, D; Grondin, G; Paquette, J

    1988-01-01

    Purified preparations of pancreatic zymogen granules have the peculiar property of lysing instantaneously at neutral pH, a property clearly irreconcilable with the cytoplasmic pH of the acinar cell. Two important factors known for regulating the stability of secretory granules are calcium and pH. Fluorescence microscopy of acinar cells in the presence of weak bases showed that zymogen granules have an acidic pH. In vivo, abolition of the delta pH by NH4Cl did not induce any lysis of the granules. In vitro, with purified granules, an acidic intragranular pH was measured. This delta pH was produced by a Donnan potential. The importance for granule stability of keeping the intragranular pH acidic has been confirmed in vitro by addition of K+ and nigericin to the suspension medium. These conditions produced alkalinization of the granule matrix and caused instantaneous solubilization of the granules. Concentrations of 15 mM total, and 10 mM free calcium were measured in purified granules. The importance of intragranular Ca2+ was evaluated by means of the ionophore A23187 which induced calcium efflux and granule lysis. The lysis induced by the calcium ionophore was in direct relation with the calcium efflux, since addition of Ca2+ to the medium, at concentrations corresponding to that measured in the granule, relieved the effect. The role of calcium-binding sites on the cytoplasmic surface of the granules was investigated with Ca2+, EGTA, and La3+. Calcium did not have any damaging effects; EGTA induced a slight lysis, while lanthanum yielded a strong and spontaneous lysis at micromolar concentrations. In addition to calcium-binding sites, La3+ would bind to specific sites on the granule that would be directly coupled to maintenance of its stability. These findings suggest that the intragranular acidic pH and calcium are both important for the in vitro stability of the zymogen granule and that purified granules have lost, in the course of purification, some cytoplasmic

  13. TDP-43 is directed to stress granules by sorbitol, a novel physiological osmotic and oxidative stressor.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Colleen M; Cenik, Basar; Sephton, Chantelle F; Dries, Daniel R; Mayer, Paul; Good, Shannon K; Johnson, Brett A; Herz, Joachim; Yu, Gang

    2011-03-01

    TDP-43, or TAR DNA-binding protein 43, is a pathological marker of a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions. TDP-43 is an RNA/DNA-binding protein implicated in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Recent work also suggests that TDP-43 associates with cytoplasmic stress granules, which are transient structures that form in response to stress. In this study, we establish sorbitol as a novel physiological stressor that directs TDP-43 to stress granules in Hek293T cells and primary cultured glia. We quantify the association of TDP-43 with stress granules over time and show that stress granule association and size are dependent on the glycine-rich region of TDP-43, which harbors the majority of pathogenic mutations. Moreover, we establish that cells harboring wild-type and mutant TDP-43 have distinct stress responses: mutant TDP-43 forms significantly larger stress granules, and is incorporated into stress granules earlier, than wild-type TDP-43; in striking contrast, wild-type TDP-43 forms more stress granules over time, but the granule size remains relatively unchanged. We propose that mutant TDP-43 alters stress granule dynamics, which may contribute to the progression of TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:21173160

  14. Multiple Poliovirus Proteins Repress Cytoplasmic RNA Granules

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Jonathan D.; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that poliovirus (PV) infection induces stress granule (SG) formation early in infection and then inhibits the formation of SG and disperses processing bodies (PBs) by the mid-phase of infection. Loss of SG was linked to cleavage of G3BP1 by viral 3C proteinase (3Cpro), however dispersal of PBs was not strongly linked to cleavage of specific factors by viral proteinases, suggesting other viral proteins may play roles in inhibition of SG or PB formation. Here we have screened all viral proteins for roles in inducing or inhibiting the formation of RNA granules by creating fusions with mCherry and expressing them individually in cells. Expression of viral proteins separately revealed that the capsid region P1, 2Apro, 3A, 3Cpro, the protease precursor 3CD and 3D polymerase all affect RNA granules to varying extents, whereas 2BC does not. 2Apro, which cleaves eIF4GI, induced SGs as expected, and entered novel foci containing the SG nucleating protein G3BP1. Of the two forms of G3BP, only G3BP1 is cleaved by a virus proteinase, 3Cpro, whereas G3BP2 is not cleaved by 3Cpro or 2Apro. Surprisingly, 3CD, which contains proteinase activity, differentially repressed PBs but not SGs. Further, both 2Apro and 3Cpro expression dispersed PBs, however molecular targets were different since PB dispersal due to 2Apro and heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibition but not 3Cpro, could be rescued by application of oxidative stress to cells. The data indicate that PV repression of SGs and PBs is multifactorial, though protease function is dominant. PMID:26610553

  15. Kinetic Studies of Polyhydroxybutyrate Granule Formation in Wautersia eutropha H16 by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jiamin; Sinskey, Anthony J.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2005-01-01

    Wautersia eutropha, formerly known as Ralstonia eutropha, a gram-negative bacterium, accumulates polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) as insoluble granules inside the cell when nutrients other than carbon are limited. In this paper, we report findings from kinetic studies of granule formation and degradation in W. eutropha H16 obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In nitrogen-limited growth medium, the phenotype of the cells at the early stages of granule formation was revealed for the first time. At the center of the cells, dark-stained “mediation elements” with small granules attached were observed. These mediation elements are proposed to serve as nucleation sites for granule initiation. TEM images also revealed that when W. eutropha cells were introduced into nitrogen-limited medium from nutrient-rich medium, the cell size increased two- to threefold, and the cells underwent additional volume changes during growth. Unbiased stereology was used to analyze the two-dimensional TEM images, from which the average volume of a W. eutropha H16 cell and the total surface area of granules per cell in nutrient-rich and PHB production media were obtained. These parameters were essential in the calculation of the concentration of proteins involved in PHB formation and utilization and their changes with time. The extent of protein coverage of the granule surface area is presented in the accompanying paper (J. Tian, A. He, A. Lawrence, P. Liu, N. Watson, A. J. Sinskey, and J. Stubbe, J. Bacteriol. 187:3825-3832, 2005). PMID:15901706

  16. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with bilateral middle cerebellar peduncle lesions confirmed by repeated CSF-JC virus tests and coexistence of JC virus granule cell neuronopathy. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Takahashi, Akira

    2016-07-28

    A 65 year-old woman with small lymphocytic leukemia presented with subacute cerebellar ataxia. Six months after rituximab chemotherapy, a cranial MRI revealed lesions in the bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles. Both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) JC virus (JCV)-DNA PCR test on three occasions and brain biopsy were negative. CSF tests were repeated. The fourth test performed 6 months after the onset showed positive JCV-DNA, and a definite diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) was made. Neuroimaging of cerebellar atrophy was considered to be coexistence of granule cell neuronopathy. Medication with mirtazapine and mefloquine was temporarily effective for several months. Little are known solitary bilateral MRI lesions of the middle cerebellar peduncle in PML. JCV-PCR test of CSF may be negative at an earlier stage of PML. Repeated CSF tests should be essential to confirming the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:27356732

  17. Not All Secretory Granules Are Created Equal: Partitioning of Soluble Content Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sobota, Jacqueline A.; Ferraro, Francesco; Bäck, Nils; Eipper, Betty A.

    2006-01-01

    Secretory granules carrying fluorescent cargo proteins are widely used to study granule biogenesis, maturation, and regulated exocytosis. We fused the soluble secretory protein peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) to green fluorescent protein (GFP) to study granule formation. When expressed in AtT-20 or GH3 cells, the PHM-GFP fusion protein partitioned from endogenous hormone (adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone) into separate secretory granule pools. Both exogenous and endogenous granule proteins were stored and released in response to secretagogue. Importantly, we found that segregation of content proteins is not an artifact of overexpression nor peculiar to GFP-tagged proteins. Neither luminal acidification nor cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains play essential roles in soluble content protein segregation. Our data suggest that intrinsic biophysical properties of cargo proteins govern their differential sorting, with segregation occurring during the process of granule maturation. Proteins that can self-aggregate are likely to partition into separate granules, which can accommodate only a few thousand copies of any content protein; proteins that lack tertiary structure are more likely to distribute homogeneously into secretory granules. Therefore, a simple “self-aggregation default” theory may explain the little acknowledged, but commonly observed, tendency for both naturally occurring and exogenous content proteins to segregate from each other into distinct secretory granules. PMID:17005911

  18. Common spectrum of polypeptides occurs in secretion granule membranes of different exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, R.S.; Cameron, P.L.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-10-01

    A highly purified membrane preparation from rat parotid secretion granules has been used as a comparative probe to examine the extent of compositional overlap in granule membranes of three other exocrine secretory tissues - pancreatic, lacrimal, and submandibular - from several standpoints. First, indirect immunofluorescent studies using a polyclonal polyspecific anti-parotid granule membrane antiserum has indicated a selective staining of granule membrane profiles in all acinar cells of all tissues. Second, highly purified granule membrane subfractions have been isolated from each exocrine tissue; comparative two-dimensional (isoelectric focusing; SDS) PAGE of radioiodinated granule membranes has identified 10-15 polypeptides of identical pI and apparent molecular mass. These species are likely to be integral membrane components since they are not extracted by either saponin-sodium sulfate or sodium carbonate (pH 11.5) treatments, and they do not have counterparts in the granule content. Finally, the identity among selected parotid and pancreatic radioiodinated granule membrane polypeptides has been documented using two-dimensional peptide mapping of chymotryptic and tryptic digests. These findings clearly indicate that exocrine secretory granules, irrespective of the nature of stored secretion, comprise a type of vesicular carrier with a common (and probably refined) membrane composition. Conceivably, the polypeptides identified carry out general functions related to exocrine secretion.

  19. Increased Vascular permeability produced by human platelet granule cationic extract

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Ralph L.; Weksler, Babette; Ferris, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    A cationic protein extract obtained from isolated human platelet granules increased vascular permeability in mouse and rabbit skin. The permeability-enhancing effect was not inhibited by soybean trypsin and pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, methylsergide maleate, carboxypeptidase B, and C[unk]1 inactivator. Permeability-enhancing activity was blocked by prior treatment of challenged animals with antihistamine. The nondializable relatively heat-stable cationic granule protein extract possessed potent mastocytolytic activity. The experiments described suggest that human platelets exert a permeability-enhancing effect by lysosomal release of cationic proteins which cause histamine release from adjacent tissue mast cells. Images PMID:4391559

  20. Deubiquitination and the regulation of stress granule assembly.

    PubMed

    Nostramo, R; Herman, P K

    2016-08-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are evolutionarily conserved ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structures that form in response to a variety of environmental and cellular cues. The presence of these RNP granules has been linked to a number of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (Li et al., J Cell Biol 201:361-372, 2013; Nonhoff et al., Mol Biol Cell 18:1385-1396, 2007). Understanding how the assembly of these granules is controlled could, therefore, suggest possible routes of therapy for patients afflicted with these conditions. Interestingly, several reports have identified a potential role for protein deubiquitination in the assembly of these RNP granules. In particular, recent work has found that a specific deubiquitinase enzyme, Ubp3, is required for efficient SG formation in S. cerevisiae (Nostramo et al., Mol Cell Biol 36:173-183, 2016). This same enzyme has been linked to SGs in other organisms, including humans and the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Takahashi et al., Mol Cell Biol 33:815-829, 2013; Wang et al., RNA 18:694-703, 2012). At first glance, these observations suggest that a striking degree of conservation exists for a ubiquitin-based mechanism controlling SG assembly. However, the devil is truly in the details here, as the precise nature of the involvement of this deubiquitinating enzyme seems to vary in each organism. Here, we briefly review these differences and attempt to provide an overarching model for the role of ubiquitin in SG formation. PMID:26852120

  1. Cystatin F Ensures Eosinophil Survival by Regulating Granule Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Stephen P.; McMillan, Sarah J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Lawrence, Rachel A.; Watts, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are now recognized as multifunctional leukocytes that provide critical homeostatic signals to maintain other immune cells and aid tissue repair. Paradoxically, eosinophils also express an armory of granule-localized toxins and hydrolases believed to contribute to pathology in inflammatory disease. How eosinophils deliver their supporting functions while avoiding self-inflicted injury is poorly understood. We have demonstrated that cystatin F (CF) is a critical survival factor for eosinophils. Eosinophils from CF null mice had reduced lifespan, reduced granularity, and disturbed granule morphology. In vitro, cysteine protease inhibitors restored granularity, demonstrating that control of cysteine protease activity by CF is critical for normal eosinophil development. CF null mice showed reduced pulmonary pathology in a model of allergic lung inflammation but also reduced ability to combat infection by the nematode Brugia malayi. These data identify CF as a “cytoprotectant” that promotes eosinophil survival and function by ensuring granule integrity. Video Abstract PMID:27067058

  2. The VPS33B-binding protein VPS16B is required in megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Denisa; Li, Ling; Christensen, Hilary; Pluthero, Fred G.; Chen, Shao Zun; Puhacz, Michael; Garg, Parvesh M.; Lanka, Kiran K.; Cummings, James J.; Kramer, Helmut; Wasmuth, James D.; Parkinson, John

    2012-01-01

    Patients with platelet α or dense δ-granule defects have bleeding problems. Although several proteins are known to be required for δ-granule development, less is known about α-granule biogenesis. Our previous work showed that the BEACH protein NBEAL2 and the Sec1/Munc18 protein VPS33B are required for α-granule biogenesis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, mass spectrometry, coimmunoprecipitation, and bioinformatics studies, we identified VPS16B as a VPS33B-binding protein. Immunoblotting confirmed VPS16B expression in various human tissues and cells including megakaryocytes and platelets, and also in megakaryocytic Dami cells. Characterization of platelets from a patient with arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome containing mutations in C14orf133 encoding VPS16B revealed pale-appearing platelets in blood films and electron microscopy revealed a complete absence of α-granules, whereas δ-granules were observed. Soluble and membrane-bound α-granule proteins were reduced or undetectable, suggesting that both releasable and membrane-bound α-granule constituents were absent. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Dami cells stably expressing GFP-VPS16B revealed that similar to VPS33B, GFP-VPS16B colocalized with markers of the trans-Golgi network, late endosomes and α-granules. We conclude that VPS16B, similar to its binding partner VPS33B, is essential for megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis. PMID:23002115

  3. The VPS33B-binding protein VPS16B is required in megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Urban, Denisa; Li, Ling; Christensen, Hilary; Pluthero, Fred G; Chen, Shao Zun; Puhacz, Michael; Garg, Parvesh M; Lanka, Kiran K; Cummings, James J; Kramer, Helmut; Wasmuth, James D; Parkinson, John; Kahr, Walter H A

    2012-12-13

    Patients with platelet α or dense δ-granule defects have bleeding problems. Although several proteins are known to be required for δ-granule development, less is known about α-granule biogenesis. Our previous work showed that the BEACH protein NBEAL2 and the Sec1/Munc18 protein VPS33B are required for α-granule biogenesis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, mass spectrometry, coimmunoprecipitation, and bioinformatics studies, we identified VPS16B as a VPS33B-binding protein. Immunoblotting confirmed VPS16B expression in various human tissues and cells including megakaryocytes and platelets, and also in megakaryocytic Dami cells. Characterization of platelets from a patient with arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome containing mutations in C14orf133 encoding VPS16B revealed pale-appearing platelets in blood films and electron microscopy revealed a complete absence of α-granules, whereas δ-granules were observed. Soluble and membrane-bound α-granule proteins were reduced or undetectable, suggesting that both releasable and membrane-bound α-granule constituents were absent. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Dami cells stably expressing GFP-VPS16B revealed that similar to VPS33B, GFP-VPS16B colocalized with markers of the trans-Golgi network, late endosomes and α-granules. We conclude that VPS16B, similar to its binding partner VPS33B, is essential for megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis. PMID:23002115

  4. Process optimization for continuous extrusion wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Carella, Anthony J; Ren, Yukun; Lo, Julian B

    2011-08-01

    Three granulating binders in high drug-load acetaminophen blends were evaluated using high shear granulation and extrusion granulation. A polymethacrylate binder enhanced tablet tensile strength with rapid disintegration in simulated gastric fluid, whereas polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydroxypropyl cellulose binders produced less desirable tablets. Using the polymethacrylate binder, the extrusion granulation process was studied regarding the effects of granulating liquid, injection rate and screw speed on granule properties. A full factorial experimental design was conducted to allow the statistical analysis of interactions between extrusion process parameters. Response variables considered in the study included extruder power consumption (screw loading), granule bulk/tapped density, particle size distribution, tablet hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution. PMID:20367553

  5. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  6. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme. PMID:25661308

  7. Isoforms of alpha1E voltage-gated calcium channels in rat cerebellar granule cells--detection of major calcium channel alpha1-transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schramm, M; Vajna, R; Pereverzev, A; Tottene, A; Klöckner, U; Pietrobon, D; Hescheler, J; Schneider, T

    1999-01-01

    In primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells, transcripts of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels have been amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and identified by sequencing of subcloned polymerase chain reaction products. In these neurons cultured for six to eight days in vitro, fragments of the three major transcripts alpha1C, alpha1A, and alpha1E are detected using degenerated oligonucleotide primer pairs under highly stringent conditions. Whole-cell Ca2+ current recordings from six to eight days in vitro granule cells show that most of the current is due to L-type (25%), P-type (33%) and R-type (30%) Ca2+ channels. These data support the correlation between alpha1A and P-type Ca2+ channels (G1) and between alpha1E and R-type channels (G2 and G3). By including specific primer pairs for alpha1E the complimentary DNA fragments of indicative regions of alpha1E isoforms are amplified corresponding to the three most variable regions of alpha1E, the 5'-end, the II/III-loop, and the central part of the 3'-end. Although the complementary DNA fragments of the 5'-end of rat alpha1E yield a uniform reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction product, its structure is unusual in the sense that it is longer than in the cloned rat alpha1E complementary DNA. It corresponds to the alpha1E isoform reported for mouse and human brain and is also expressed in cerebellum and cerebrum of rat brain as the major or maybe even the only variant of alpha1E. While fragments of a new rat alpha1E isoform are amplified from the 5'-end, three known fragments of the II/III-loop and two known isoforms homologue to the 3'-coding region are detected, which in the last case are discriminated by a 129 base pair insertion. The shift of the alpha1E expression from a pattern seen in cerebellum (alpha1Ee) to a pattern identified in other regions of the brain (alpha1E-3) is discussed. These data show that: (i) alpha1E is expressed in rat brain as a structural homologue to the

  8. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G L; Fletcher-Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cowley, Sally A; Talbot, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC-derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca(2+) homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC-derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063-2078. PMID:27097283

  9. Core structure, internal osmotic pressure and irreversible structural changes of chromaffin granules during osmometer behaviour.

    PubMed

    Südhof, T C

    1982-01-01

    In the adrenal medullary cells, catecholamines are stored in and secreted from specialized secretory vesicles, the chromaffin granules. In order to gain some understanding of both functions of chromaffin granules, it is important to characterize their biophysical organization. Using isolated bovine chromaffin granules we have investigated the osmometer behaviour of chromaffin granules by 31P-NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy, by turbidity measurements and by electron-microscopic determination of chromaffin granule size distributions. On the basis of the osmometer model we have formulated equations predicting the behaviour of the native catecholamine fluorescence quenching and of the size of chromaffin granules a a function of osmolarity and have shown experimentally that the granules' behaviour conforms to these. It was possible to estimate the osmotic activity of the chromaffin granule core solution and the mean absolute water space in chromaffin granules from the determination of the size distributions as a function of osmotic pressure. With NMR spectroscopy a selective line-broadening of the alpha-resonances was observed with increasing osmolarities, while the gamma-phosphorus resonances remained virtually unchanged. Possibly there is an increase in core viscosity with osmolarity which affects only the alpha- and beta-phosphorus groups. While suspending chromaffin granules from lower to higher osmolarities causes no lysis, moving them back to their original osmolarity at which they were previously stable lyses them, thereby releasing a maximum of 70% of their releasable protein. This 'hyperosmolar' lysis is independent of preincubation times in the higher osmolarities and of the absolute dilution applied but depends on dilution beyond the 405 to 322 mosM sucrose range. Under the experiment conditions no uptake of sucrose from the medium into the granules could be measured, thereby suggesting that hyperosmolar lysis is a phenomenon not due to solute penetration

  10. GDF15 regulates Kv2.1-mediated outward K+ current through the Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in rat cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang-Ying; Huang, An-Qi; Zhou, Meng-Hua; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2014-01-01

    GDF15 (growth/differentiation factor 15), a novel member of the TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) superfamily, plays critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, but the signal transduction pathways and receptor subtypes involved are not well understood. In the present paper, we report that GDF15 specifically increases the IK (delayed-rectifier outward K+ current) in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons) in time- and concentration-dependent manners. The GDF15-induced amplification of the IK is mediated by the increased expression and reduced lysosome-dependent degradation of the Kv2.1 protein, the main α-subunit of the IK channel. Exposure of CGNs to GDF15 markedly induced the phosphorylation of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), Akt and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), but the GDF15-induced IK densities and increased expression of Kv2.1 were attenuated only by Akt and mTOR, and not ERK, inhibitors. Pharmacological inhibition of the Src-mediated phosphorylation of TGFβR2 (TGFβ receptor 2), not TGFβR1, abrogated the effect of GDF15 on IK amplification and Kv2.1 induction. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that GDF15 increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of TGFβRII in the CGN lysate. The results of the present study reveal a novel regulation of Kv2.1 by GDF15 mediated through the TGFβRII-activated Akt/mTOR pathway, which is a previously uncharacterized Smad-independent mechanism of GDF15 signalling. PMID:24597762

  11. TDP-43 Aggregation In Neurodegeneration: Are Stress Granules The Key?

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Colleen M.; Cenik, Basar; Sephton, Chantelle F.; Johnson, Brett A.; Herz, Joachim; Yu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 is strongly linked to neurodegeneration. Not only are mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 associated with ALS and FTLD, but this protein is also a major constituent of pathological intracellular inclusions in these diseases. Recent studies have significantly expanded our understanding of TDP-43 physiology. TDP-43 is now known to play important roles in neuronal RNA metabolism. It binds to and regulates the splicing and stability of numerous RNAs encoding proteins involved in neuronal development, synaptic function and neurodegeneration. Thus, a loss of these essential functions is an attractive hypothesis regarding the role of TDP-43 in neurodegeneration. Moreover, TDP-43 is an aggregation-prone protein and, given the role of toxic protein aggregates in neurodegeneration, a toxic gain-of-function mechanism is another rational hypothesis. Importantly, ALS related mutations modulate the propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate in cell culture. Several recent studies have documented that cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregates co-localize with stress granule markers. Stress granules are cytoplasmic inclusions that repress translation of a subset of RNAs in times of cellular stress, and several proteins implicated in neurodegeneration (i.e. Ataxin-2 and SMN) interact with stress granules. Thus, understanding the interplay between TDP-43 aggregation, stress granules and the effect of ALS-associated TDP-43 mutations may be the key to understanding the role of TDP-43 in neurodegeneration. We propose two models of TDP-43 aggregate formation. The “independent model” stipulates that TDP-43 aggregation is independent of stress granule formation, in contrast to the “precursor model” which presents the idea that stress granule formation contributes to a TDP-43 aggregate “seed” and that chronic stress leads to concentration-dependent TDP-43 aggregation. PMID:22405725

  12. Disrupted dynamics of F-actin and insulin granule fusion in INS-1 832/13 beta-cells exposed to glucotoxicity: partial restoration by glucagon-like peptide 1.

    PubMed

    Quinault, Aurore; Gausseres, Blandine; Bailbe, Danielle; Chebbah, Nella; Portha, Bernard; Movassat, Jamileh; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cecile

    2016-08-01

    Actin dynamics in pancreatic β-cells is involved in insulin exocytosis but the molecular mechanisms of this dynamics and its role in biphasic insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells is largely unknown. Moreover, the impact of a glucotoxic environment on the sub-cortical actin network dynamics is poorly studied. In this study, we investigate the behavior of insulin granules and the subcortical actin network dynamics in INS-1 832/13 β-cells submitted to a normal or glucotoxic environment. Our results show that glucose stimulation leads to a reorganization of the subcortical actin network with a rupture of its interactions with t-SNARE proteins (Syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25), promoting insulin secretion in INS-1 832/13 β-cells. Prolonged exposure of INS-1 832/13 β-cells to high-glucose levels (glucotoxicity) leads to the densification of the cortical actin network, which prevents its reorganization under acute glucose, and diminishes the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, as shown by the decreased number of fusion events. The most interesting in our results is the partial restoration by GLP-1 of the insulin secretion ability from high-glucose treated INS-1 832/13 cells. This improved insulin exocytosis is associated with partial restored actin dynamics and fusion events during the two phases of the secretion, with a preferential involvement of Epac2 signaling in the first phase and a rather involvement of PKA signaling in the second phase of insulin exocytosis. All these data provide some new insights into the mechanism by which current therapeutics may be improving insulin secretion. PMID:27101990

  13. Microtubule-dependent association of AKAP350A and CCAR1 with RNA stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Kolobova, Elena; Efimov, Andrey; Kaverina, Irina; Rishi, Arun K.; Schrader, John W.; Ham, Amy-Joan; Larocca, M. Cecilia; Goldenring, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent investigations have highlighted the importance of subcellular localization of mRNAs to cell function. While AKAP350A, a multifunctional scaffolding protein, localizes to the Golgi apparatus and centrosomes, we have now identified a cytosolic pool of AKAP350A. Analysis of AKAP350A scaffolded complexes revealed two novel interacting proteins, CCAR1 and caprin-1. CCAR1, caprin-1 and AKAP350A along with G3BP, a stress granule marker, relocate to RNA stress granules after arsenite treatment. Stress also caused loss of AKAP350 from the Golgi and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Disruption of microtubules with nocodazole altered stress granule formation and changed their morphology by preventing fusion of stress granules. In the presence of nocodazole, arsenite induced smaller granules with the vast majority of AKAP350A and CCAR1 separated from G3BP-containing granules. Similar to nocodazole treatment, reduction of AKAP350A or CCAR1 expression also altered the size and number of G3BP-containing stress granules induced by arsenite treatment. A limited set of 69 mRNA transcripts was immunisolated with AKAP350A even in the absence of stress, suggesting the association of AKAP350A with mRNA transcripts. These results provide the first evidence for the microtubule dependent association of AKAP350A and CCAR1 with RNA stress granules. PMID:19073175

  14. HIV-2 genomic RNA accumulates in stress granules in the absence of active translation

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Garcia-de-Gracia, Francisco; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Limousin, Taran; Décimo, Didier; Mouland, Andrew J.; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2014-01-01

    During the post-transcriptional events of the HIV-2 replication cycle, the full-length unspliced genomic RNA (gRNA) is first used as an mRNA to synthesize Gag and Gag-Pol proteins and then packaged into progeny virions. However, the mechanisms responsible for the coordinate usage of the gRNA during these two mutually exclusive events are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence showing that HIV-2 expression induces stress granule assembly in cultured cells. This contrasts with HIV-1, which interferes with stress granules assembly even upon induced cellular stress. Moreover, we observed that the RNA-binding protein and stress granules assembly factor TIAR associates with the gRNA to form a TIAR-HIV-2 ribonucleoprotein (TH2RNP) complex localizing diffuse in the cytoplasm or aggregated in stress granules. Although the assembly of TH2RNP in stress granules did not require the binding of the Gag protein to the gRNA, we observed that increased levels of Gag promoted both translational arrest and stress granule assembly. Moreover, HIV-2 Gag also localizes to stress granules in the absence of a ‘packageable’ gRNA. Our results indicate that the HIV-2 gRNA is compartmentalized in stress granules in the absence of active translation prior to being selected for packaging by the Gag polyprotein. PMID:25352557

  15. Neuronal RNA granule contains ApCPEB1, a novel cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein, in Aplysia sensory neuron.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yeon-Su; Lee, Seung-Hee; Cheang, Ye-Hwang; Lee, Nuribalhae; Rim, Young-Soo; Jang, Deok-Jin; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2010-01-31

    The cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE)-binding protein (CPEB) binds to CPE containing mRNAs on their 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). This RNA binding protein comes out many important tasks, especially in learning and memory, by modifying the translational efficiency of target mRNAs via poly (A) tailing. Overexpressed CPEB has been reported to induce the formation of stress granules (SGs), a sort of RNA granule in mammalian cell lines. RNA granule is considered to be a potentially important factor in learning and memory. However, there is no study about RNA granule in Aplysia. To examine whether an Aplysia CPEB, ApCPEB1, forms RNA granules, we overexpressed ApCPEB1-EGFP in Aplysia sensory neurons. Consistent with the localization of mammalian CPEB, overexpressed ApCPEB1 formed granular structures, and was colocalized with RNAs and another RNA binding protein, ApCPEB, showing that ApCPEB1 positive granules are RNA-protein complexes. In addition, ApCPEB1 has a high turnover rate in RNA granules which were mobile structures. Thus, our results indicate that overexpressed ApCPEB1 is incorporated into RNA granule which is a dynamic structure in Aplysia sensory neuron. We propose that ApCPEB1 granule might modulate translation, as other RNA granules do, and furthermore, influence memory. PMID:19887896

  16. Balloon-borne imagery of the solar granulation. II - The lifetime of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehltretter, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Phenomenological aspects of the temporal evolution of photospheric granulation are reported as derived from time series of granulation photographs obtained during a flight of a balloon-borne telescope. The distribution of granule lifetime probabilities is determined, and it is found that the data can be represented by an exponential decrease with a 'decay constant' of 5.9 min. The general properties of granular evolution are described along with the way individual granules evolve with time. The most common type of granule is shown to be a medium-sized or small fragment, and it is suggested that all granules are produced by fragmentation of preexisting granules. The relative frequencies of granule destruction by fragmentation, fading, and merging are determined to be 51%, 21%, and 28%, respectively. An average radial velocity of 0.8 km/s is computed for conglomerates with an average diameter of 2.25 arcsec.

  17. Variations of both bacterial community and extracellular polymers: the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from biofloc to aerobic granule sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Yu, Xin; Wei, Bo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the inducements of increase of cell hydrophobicity from aerobic biofloc (ABF) and granular sludge (AGS), in this study, as the first time the hydrophilic and hydrophobic bacterial communities were analyzed independently. Meanwhile, the effect of extracellular polymers (EPS) on the cell hydrophobicity is also studied. Few Bacteroidetes were detected (1.35% in ABF and 3.84% in AGS) in hydrophilic bacteria, whereas they are abundant in the hydrophobic cells (47.8% and 43% for ABF and AGS, respectively). The main species of Bacteroidetes changed from class Sphingobacteria to Flavobacteria in AGS. On the other hand, EPS is directly responsible to cell hydrophobicity. For AGS, cell hydrophobicity was sharply decreased after EPS extraction. Both quantity and property of the extracellular protein are related to hydrophobicity. Our results showed the variation of cell hydrophobicity was resulted from variations of both bacterial population and EPS. PMID:21482465

  18. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-02-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  19. Chromosome replication and segregation govern the biogenesis and inheritance of inorganic polyphosphate granules

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan T.; Crosson, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotes and eukaryotes synthesize long chains of orthophosphate, known as polyphosphate (polyP), which form dense granules within the cell. PolyP regulates myriad cellular functions and is often localized to specific subcellular addresses through mechanisms that remain undefined. In this study, we present a molecular-level analysis of polyP subcellular localization in the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We demonstrate that biogenesis and localization of polyP is controlled as a function of the cell cycle, which ensures regular partitioning of granules between mother and daughter. The enzyme polyphosphate kinase 1 (Ppk1) is required for granule production, colocalizes with granules, and dynamically localizes to the sites of new granule synthesis in nascent daughter cells. Localization of Ppk1 within the cell requires an intact catalytic active site and a short, positively charged tail at the C-terminus of the protein. The processes of chromosome replication and segregation govern both the number and position of Ppk1/polyP complexes within the cell. We propose a multistep model in which the chromosome establishes sites of polyP coalescence, which recruit Ppk1 to promote the in situ synthesis of large granules. These findings underscore the importance of both chromosome dynamics and discrete protein localization as organizing factors in bacterial cell biology. PMID:23985321

  20. Dynamics of Microbial Community Structure of and Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal by Aerobic Granules Cultivated on Propionate or Acetate▿

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Holliger, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic granules are dense microbial aggregates with the potential to replace floccular sludge for the treatment of wastewaters. In bubble-column sequencing batch reactors, distinct microbial populations dominated propionate- and acetate-cultivated aerobic granules after 50 days of reactor operation when only carbon removal was detected. Propionate granules were dominated by Zoogloea (40%), Acidovorax, and Thiothrix, whereas acetate granules were mainly dominated by Thiothrix (60%). Thereafter, an exponential increase in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) activity was observed in the propionate granules, but a linear and erratic increase was detected in the acetate ones. Besides Accumulibacter and Competibacter, other bacterial populations found in both granules were associated with Chloroflexus and Acidovorax. The EBPR activity in the propionate granules was high and stable, whereas EBPR in the acetate granules was erratic throughout the study and suffered from a deterioration period that could be readily reversed by inducing hydrolysis of polyphosphate in presumably saturated Accumulibacter cells. Using a new ppk1 gene-based dual terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) approach revealed that Accumulibacter diversity was highest in the floccular sludge inoculum but that when granules were formed, propionate readily favored the dominance of Accumulibacter type IIA. In contrast, acetate granules exhibited transient shifts between type I and type II before the granules were dominated by Accumulibacter type IIA. However, ppk1 gene sequences from acetate granules clustered separately from those of propionate granules. Our data indicate that the mere presence of Accumulibacter is not enough to have consistently high EBPR but that the type of Accumulibacter determines the robustness of the phosphate removal process. PMID:21926195

  1. SEPA-1 mediates the specific recognition and degradation of P granule components by autophagy in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yan, Libo; Zhou, Zhi; Yang, Peiguo; Tian, E; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Yu; Li, Zhipeng; Song, Bing; Han, Jinghua; Miao, Long; Zhang, Hong

    2009-01-23

    How autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved intracellular catabolic system for bulk degradation, selectively degrades protein aggregates is poorly understood. Here, we show that several maternally derived germ P granule components are selectively eliminated by autophagy in somatic cells during C. elegans embryogenesis. The activity of sepa-1 is required for the degradation of these P granule components and for their accumulation into aggregates, termed PGL granules, in autophagy mutants. SEPA-1 forms protein aggregates and is also a preferential target of autophagy. SEPA-1 directly binds to the P granule component PGL-3 and also to the autophagy protein LGG-1/Atg8. SEPA-1 aggregates consistently colocalize with PGL granules and with LGG-1 puncta. Thus, SEPA-1 functions as a bridging molecule in mediating the specific recognition and degradation of P granule components by autophagy. Our study reveals a mechanism for preferential degradation of protein aggregates by autophagy and emphasizes the physiological significance of selective autophagy during animal development. PMID:19167332