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Sample records for adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder

  1. Predictive Medicine: Recombinant DNA Technology and Adult-Onset Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Genetic factors are of great importance in common adult-onset disorders such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and neuro-degenerative diseases. Advances in DNA technology now allow identification of persons at high-risk of developing some of these diseases. This advance is leading to predictive medicine. In some genetic disorders, such as those leading to atherosclerosis and cancer, identification of high-risk individuals allows intervention which alters the natural history of the disorder. In other diseases, for which there is no treatment, such as Huntington's disease, the application of this technology provides information that relieves uncertainty and may affect quality of life, but does not alter the course of the illness. General implementation of predictive testing programs awaits the results of pilot projects, which will demonstrate the needs, appropriate levels of support, and guidelines for delivery of such testing. PMID:21253100

  2. Early Pathogenesis in the Adult-Onset Neurodegenerative Disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    van Zundert, Brigitte; Izaurieta, Pamela; Fritz, Elsa; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motor neurons starting in adulthood. Most of our knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms of ALS comes from transgenic mice models that emulate a subgroup of familial ALS cases (FALS), with mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD1). In the more than 15 years since these mice were generated, a large number of abnormal cellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration have been identified, but to date this effort has led to few improvements in therapy, and no cure. Here, we consider that this surfeit of mechanisms is best interpreted by current insights that suggest a very early initiation of pathology in motor neurons, followed by a diversity of secondary cascades and compensatory mechanisms that mask symptoms for decades, until trauma and/or aging overloads their protective function. This view thus posits that adultonset ALS is the consequence of processes initiated during early development. In fact, motor neurons in neonatal mutant SOD mice display important alterations in their intrinsic electrical properties, synaptic inputs and morphology that are accompanied by subtle behavioral abnormalities. We consider evidence that human mutant SOD1 protein in neonatal hSOD1G93A mice instigates motor neuron degeneration by increasing persistent sodium currents and excitability, in turn altering synaptic circuits that control excessive motor neuron firing and leads to excitotoxicity. We also discuss how therapies that are aimed at suppressing abnormal neuronal activity might effectively mitigate or prevent the onset of irreversible neuronal damage in adulthood. PMID:22740507

  3. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability. PMID:26251896

  4. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-08-05

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability.

  5. Bile Acids in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Hayley D.; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, a structurally related group of molecules derived from cholesterol, have a long history as therapeutic agents in medicine, from treatment for primarily ocular diseases in ancient Chinese medicine to modern day use as approved drugs for certain liver diseases. Despite evidence supporting a neuroprotective role in a diverse spectrum of age-related neurodegenerative disorders, including several small pilot clinical trials, little is known about their molecular mechanisms or their physiological roles in the nervous system. We review the data reported for their use as treatments for neurodegenerative diseases and their underlying molecular basis. While data from cellular and animal models and clinical trials support potential efficacy to treat a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, the relevant bile acids, their origin, and the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which they confer neuroprotection are not known delaying translation to the clinical setting. PMID:27920719

  6. Neurodegenerative disorders and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Germaine

    2013-08-01

    Most genetic causes of neurodegenerative disorders in childhood are due to neurometabolic disease. There are over 200 disorders, including aminoacidopathies, creatine disorders, mitochondrial cytopathies, peroxisomal disorders and lysosomal storage disorders. However, diagnosis can pose a challenge to the clinician when patients present with non-specific problems like epilepsy, developmental delay, autism, dystonia and ataxia. The variety of specialist tests involved can also be daunting. This review aims to give a practical approach to the investigation and diagnosis of neurometabolic disease from the neonatal period to late childhood while prioritising disorders where there are therapeutic options. In particular, patients who have a complex clinical picture of several neurological and non-neurological features should be investigated.

  7. Molecular diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Megha; Biswas, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics provide a powerful method to detect and diagnose various neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The confirmation of such diagnosis allows early detection and subsequent medical counseling that help specific patients to undergo clinically important drug trials. This provides a medical pathway to have better insight of neurogenesis and eventual cure of the neurodegenerative diseases. In this short review, we present recent advances in molecular diagnostics especially biomarkers and imaging spectroscopy for neurological diseases. We describe advances made in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Huntington's disease (HD), and finally present a perspective on the future directions to provide a framework for further developments and refinements of molecular diagnostics to combat neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Tsallis statistics and neurodegenerative disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliopoulos, Aggelos C.; Tsolaki, Magdalini; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we perform statistical analysis of time series deriving from four neurodegenerative disorders, namely epilepsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD). The time series are concerned with electroencephalograms (EEGs) of healthy and epileptic states, as well as gait dynamics (in particular stride intervals) of the ALS, PD and HDs. We study data concerning one subject for each neurodegenerative disorder and one healthy control. The analysis is based on Tsallis non-extensive statistical mechanics and in particular on the estimation of Tsallis q-triplet, namely {qstat, qsen, qrel}. The deviation of Tsallis q-triplet from unity indicates non-Gaussian statistics and long-range dependencies for all time series considered. In addition, the results reveal the efficiency of Tsallis statistics in capturing differences in brain dynamics between healthy and epileptic states, as well as differences between ALS, PD, HDs from healthy control subjects. The results indicate that estimations of Tsallis q-indices could be used as possible biomarkers, along with others, for improving classification and prediction of epileptic seizures, as well as for studying the gait complex dynamics of various diseases providing new insights into severity, medications and fall risk, improving therapeutic interventions.

  9. Parkin Regulation and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hang, Liting; Yao, Tso-Pang; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Parkin is a unique, multifunctional ubiquitin ligase whose various roles in the cell, particularly in neurons, are widely thought to be protective. The pivotal role that Parkin plays in maintaining neuronal survival is underscored by our current recognition that Parkin dysfunction represents not only a predominant cause of familial parkinsonism but also a formal risk factor for the more common, sporadic form of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Accordingly, keen research on Parkin over the past decade has led to an explosion of knowledge regarding its physiological roles and its relevance to PD. However, our understanding of Parkin is far from being complete. Indeed, surprises emerge from time to time that compel us to constantly update the paradigm of Parkin function. For example, we now know that Parkin’s function is not confined to mere housekeeping protein quality control (QC) roles but also includes mitochondrial homeostasis and stress-related signaling. Furthermore, emerging evidence also suggest a role for Parkin in several other major neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Yet, it remains truly amazing to note that a single enzyme could serve such multitude of functions and cellular roles. Clearly, its activity has to be tightly regulated. In this review, we shall discuss this and how dysregulated Parkin function may precipitate neuronal demise in various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26793099

  10. Zinc homeostasis and neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element, whose importance to the function of the central nervous system (CNS) is increasingly being appreciated. Alterations in zinc dyshomeostasis has been suggested as a key factor in the development of several neuropsychiatric disorders. In the CNS, zinc occurs in two forms: the first being tightly bound to proteins and, secondly, the free, cytoplasmic, or extracellular form found in presynaptic vesicles. Under normal conditions, zinc released from the synaptic vesicles modulates both ionotropic and metabotropic post-synaptic receptors. While under clinical conditions such as traumatic brain injury, stroke or epilepsy, the excess influx of zinc into neurons has been found to result in neurotoxicity and damage to postsynaptic neurons. On the other hand, a growing body of evidence suggests that a deficiency, rather than an excess, of zinc leads to an increased risk for the development of neurological disorders. Indeed, zinc deficiency has been shown to affect neurogenesis and increase neuronal apoptosis, which can lead to learning and memory deficits. Altered zinc homeostasis is also suggested as a risk factor for depression, Alzheimer's disease (AD), aging, and other neurodegenerative disorders. Under normal CNS physiology, homeostatic controls are put in place to avoid the accumulation of excess zinc or its deficiency. This cellular zinc homeostasis results from the actions of a coordinated regulation effected by different proteins involved in the uptake, excretion and intracellular storage/trafficking of zinc. These proteins include membranous transporters (ZnT and Zip) and metallothioneins (MT) which control intracellular zinc levels. Interestingly, alterations in ZnT and MT have been recently reported in both aging and AD. This paper provides an overview of both clinical and experimental evidence that implicates a dysfunction in zinc homeostasis in the pathophysiology of depression, AD, and aging. PMID:23882214

  11. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary "myopathic" changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions.

  12. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  13. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  14. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions.

  15. Epigenetics-Based Therapeutics for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zihui; Li, He; Jin, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation and histone modification, is implicated in the aberrant changes in gene expression that occur during the progression of neurodegeneration. Many epigenetics-based drugs have been developed recently for the treatment of some neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases. Here we review recent studies that highlight the role of epigenetic modifications in neurodegeneration, among them DNA methylation and demethylation and histone acetylation and deacetylation; we also explore the possibility of using epigenetics-based therapeutics to treat neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23526405

  16. Neurodegenerative disorders and nanoformulated drug development

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Kosloski, Lisa M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    Degenerative and inflammatory diseases of the CNS include, but are not limited to, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, multiple sclerosis and HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. These are common, debilitating and, unfortunately, hold few therapeutic options. In recent years, the application of nanotechnologies as commonly used or developing medicines has served to improve pharmacokinetics and drug delivery specifically to CNS-diseased areas. In addition, nanomedical advances are leading to therapies that target CNS pathobiology and as such, can interrupt disordered protein aggregation, deliver functional neuroprotective proteins and alter the oxidant state of affected neural tissues. This article focuses on the pathobiology of common neurodegenerative disorders with a view towards how nanomedicine may be used to improve the clinical course of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19572820

  17. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment.

  18. Autophagy and apoptosis dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Saeid; Shojaei, Shahla; Yeganeh, Behzad; Ande, Sudharsana R; Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan R; Mehrpour, Maryam; Christoffersson, Jonas; Chaabane, Wiem; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Kashani, Hessam H; Hashemi, Mohammad; Owji, Ali A; Łos, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are basic physiologic processes contributing to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy encompasses pathways that target long-lived cytosolic proteins and damaged organelles. It involves a sequential set of events including double membrane formation, elongation, vesicle maturation and finally delivery of the targeted materials to the lysosome. Apoptotic cell death is best described through its morphology. It is characterized by cell rounding, membrane blebbing, cytoskeletal collapse, cytoplasmic condensation, and fragmentation, nuclear pyknosis, chromatin condensation/fragmentation, and formation of membrane-enveloped apoptotic bodies, that are rapidly phagocytosed by macrophages or neighboring cells. Neurodegenerative disorders are becoming increasingly prevalent, especially in the Western societies, with larger percentage of members living to an older age. They have to be seen not only as a health problem, but since they are care-intensive, they also carry a significant economic burden. Deregulation of autophagy plays a pivotal role in the etiology and/or progress of many of these diseases. Herein, we briefly review the latest findings that indicate the involvement of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases. We provide a brief introduction to autophagy and apoptosis pathways focusing on the role of mitochondria and lysosomes. We then briefly highlight pathophysiology of common neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Then, we describe functions of autophagy and apoptosis in brain homeostasis, especially in the context of the aforementioned disorders. Finally, we discuss different ways that autophagy and apoptosis modulation may be employed for therapeutic intervention during the maintenance of neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Role of FET proteins in neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Svetoni, Francesca; Frisone, Paola; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and multiple sclerosis (MS) affect different neuronal cells, and have a variable age of onset, clinical symptoms, and pathological features. Despite the great progress in understanding the etiology of these disorders, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Among the processes affected in neurodegenerative diseases, alteration in RNA metabolism is emerging as a crucial player. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved at all stages of RNA metabolism and display a broad range of functions, including modulation of mRNA transcription, splicing, editing, export, stability, translation and localization and miRNA biogenesis, thus enormously impacting regulation of gene expression. On the other hand, aberrant regulation of RBP expression or activity can contribute to disease onset and progression. Recent reports identified mutations causative of neurological disorders in the genes encoding a family of RBPs named FET (FUS/TLS, EWS and TAF15). This review summarizes recent works documenting the involvement of FET proteins in the pathology of ALS, FTLD, essential tremor (ET) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, clinical implications of recent advances in FET research are critically discussed. PMID:27415968

  20. Diffusion-MRI in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Goveas, Joseph; O'Dwyer, Laurence; Mascalchi, Mario; Cosottini, Mirco; Diciotti, Stefano; De Santis, Silvia; Passamonti, Luca; Tessa, Carlo; Toschi, Nicola; Giannelli, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The ability to image the whole brain through ever more subtle and specific methods/contrasts has come to play a key role in understanding the basis of brain abnormalities in several diseases. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), "diffusion" (i.e. the random, thermally-induced displacements of water molecules over time) represents an extraordinarily sensitive contrast mechanism, and the exquisite structural detail it affords has proven useful in a vast number of clinical as well as research applications. Since diffusion-MRI is a truly quantitative imaging technique, the indices it provides can serve as potential imaging biomarkers which could allow early detection of pathological alterations as well as tracking and possibly predicting subtle changes in follow-up examinations and clinical trials. Accordingly, diffusion-MRI has proven useful in obtaining information to better understand the microstructural changes and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying various neurodegenerative disorders. In this review article, we summarize and explore the main applications, findings, perspectives as well as challenges and future research of diffusion-MRI in various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease and degenerative ataxias.

  1. Neuroinflammation in Neurodegenerative Disorders-a Review.

    PubMed

    Schain, Martin; Kreisl, William Charles

    2017-03-01

    The potential for positron emission tomography (PET) to detect neuroinflammation in vivo has sparked a remarkable interest in various disciplines of neuroscience. Early PET radioligands, such as [(11)C]PK(R)-11195 for the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) and [(11)C]L-deprenyl for monoamine oxidase B, have been used in studies designed to clarify the role of neuroinflammation in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Recent years have witnessed the development of several second-generation PET radioligands for TSPO and radioligands to measure endogenous targets that are active in various stages of the inflammatory cascade, such as cyclooxygenase and arachidonic acid. Here, we discuss some of the biomarkers for neuroinflammation that are available for quantification with PET, as well as recent findings from studies where neuroinflammation has been assessed in neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, we highlight the challenges to accurate interpretation of PET studies of neuroinflammation.

  2. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  3. Neurodegenerative Models in Drosophila: Polyglutamine Disorders, Parkinson Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Roy, Bidisha; Jackson, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases encompass a large group of neurological disorders. Clinical symptoms can include memory loss, cognitive impairment, loss of movement or loss of control of movement, and loss of sensation. Symptoms are typically adult onset (although severe cases can occur in adolescents) and are reflective of neuronal and glial cell loss in the central nervous system. Neurodegenerative diseases also are considered progressive, with increased severity of symptoms over time, also reflective of increased neuronal cell death. However, various neurodegenerative diseases differentially affect certain brain regions or neuronal or glial cell types. As an example, Alzheimer disease (AD) primarily affects the temporal lobe, whereas neuronal loss in Parkinson disease (PD) is largely (although not exclusively) confined to the nigrostriatal system. Neuronal loss is almost invariably accompanied by abnormal insoluble aggregates, either intra- or extracellular. Thus, neurodegenerative diseases are categorized by (a) the composite of clinical symptoms, (b) the brain regions or types of brain cells primarily affected, and (c) the types of protein aggregates found in the brain. Here we review the methods by which Drosophila melanogaster has been used to model aspects of polyglutamine diseases, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and key insights into that have been gained from these models; Alzheimer disease and the tauopathies are covered elsewhere in this special issue. PMID:20561920

  4. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation.

  5. Comparative Incidence of Conformational, Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Rábano, Alberto; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Almazán-Isla, Javier; Avellanal, Fuencisla; Calero, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify incidence and survival patterns in conformational neurodegenerative disorders (CNDDs). Methods We identified 2563 reports on the incidence of eight conditions representing sporadic, acquired and genetic, protein-associated, i.e., conformational, NDD groups and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We selected 245 papers for full-text examination and application of quality criteria. Additionally, data-collection was completed with detailed information from British, Swedish, and Spanish registries on Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) forms, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and sporadic rapidly progressing neurodegenerative dementia (sRPNDd). For each condition, age-specific incidence curves, age-adjusted figures, and reported or calculated median survival were plotted and examined. Findings Based on 51 valid reported and seven new incidence data sets, nine out of eleven conditions shared specific features. Age-adjusted incidence per million person-years increased from ≤1.5 for sRPNDd, different CJD forms and Huntington's disease (HD), to 1589 and 2589 for AMD and Alzheimer's disease (AD) respectively. Age-specific profiles varied from (a) symmetrical, inverted V-shaped curves for low incidences to (b) those increasing with age for late-life sporadic CNDDs and for sRPNDd, with (c) a suggested, intermediate, non-symmetrical inverted V-shape for fronto-temporal dementia and Parkinson's disease. Frequently, peak age-specific incidences from 20–24 to ≥90 years increased with age at onset and survival. Distinct patterns were seen: for HD, with a low incidence, levelling off at middle age, and long median survival, 20 years; and for sRPNDd which displayed the lowest incidence, increasing with age, and a short median disease duration. Interpretation These results call for a unified population view of NDDs, with an age-at-onset-related pattern for acquired and sporadic CNDDs. The pattern linking age at onset to

  6. Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Separation Anxiety Disorder Across Countries in the World Mental Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Silove, Derrick; Alonso, Jordi; Bromet, Evelyn; Gruber, Mike; Sampson, Nancy; Scott, Kate; Andrade, Laura; Benjet, Corina; de Almeida, Jose Miguel Caldas; De Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Fiestas, Fabian; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; He, Yanling; Karam, Elie; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Murphy, Sam; Villa-Posada, Jose; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The age-at-onset criterion for separation anxiety disorder was removed in DSM-5, making it timely to examine the epidemiology of separation anxiety disorder as a disorder with onsets spanning the life course, using cross-country data. Method The sample included 38,993 adults in 18 countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health Surveys. The WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess a range of DSM-IV disorders that included an expanded definition of separation anxiety disorder allowing onsets in adulthood. Analyses focused on prevalence, age at onset, comorbidity, predictors of onset and persistence, and separation anxiety-related role impairment. Results Lifetime separation anxiety disorder prevalence averaged 4.8% across countries (interquartile range [25th–75th percentiles]=1.4%–6.4%), with 43.1% of lifetime onsets occurring after age 18. Significant time-lagged associations were found between earlier separation anxiety disorder and subsequent onset of internalizing and externalizing DSM-IV disorders and conversely between these disorders and subsequent onset of separation anxiety disorder. Other consistently significant predictors of lifetime separation anxiety disorder included female gender, retrospectively reported childhood adversities, and lifetime traumatic events. These predictors were largely comparable for separation anxiety disorder onsets in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood and across country income groups. Twelve-month separation anxiety disorder prevalence was considerably lower than lifetime prevalence (1.0% of the total sample; interquartile range=0.2%–1.2%). Severe separation anxiety-related 12-month role impairment was significantly more common in the presence (42.4%) than absence (18.3%) of 12-month comorbidity. Conclusions Separation anxiety disorder is a common and highly comorbid disorder that can have onset across the lifespan. Childhood adversity and lifetime trauma are

  7. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  8. Childhood pegboard task predicts adult-onset psychosis-spectrum disorder among a genetic high-risk sample.

    PubMed

    Rakhshan, Pamela; Sørensen, Holger; DeVylder, Jordan; Mittal, Vijay; Mortensen, Erik L; Michelsen, Niels M; Ekstrøm, Morten; Pitts, Steven C; Mednick, Sarnoff A; Schiffman, Jason

    2016-12-01

    Motor abnormalities have been established as a core aspect of psychosis-spectrum disorders, with numerous studies identifying deficits prior to clinical symptom presentation. Additional research is needed to pinpoint standardized motor assessments associated with psychosis-spectrum disorders prior to illness onset to enhance prediction and understanding of etiology. With a long history of findings among people with diagnosable psychosis-spectrum disorders, but little research conducted during the premorbid phase, pegboard tasks are a viable and understudied measure of premorbid for psychosis motor functioning. In the current study, examining data from the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort, the Simultaneous Pegs Test was performed with children (n=244, aged 10-13) at genetic high risk for psychosis (n=94) and controls (n=150). Findings suggest that children who eventually developed a psychosis-spectrum disorder (n=33) were less likely to successfully complete the task within time limit relative to controls (χ(2)(2, N=244)=6.94, p=0.03, ϕ=0.17). Additionally, children who eventually developed a psychosis-spectrum disorder took significantly longer to complete the task relative to controls (χ(2)(2, N=244)=7.06, p=0.03, ϕ=0.17). As pegboard performance is thought to tap both diffuse and specific brain networks, findings suggest that pegboard tests may be useful premorbid measures of motor functioning among those on a trajectory towards a psychosis-spectrum disorder.

  9. SRD5A3-CDG: Expanding the phenotype of a congenital disorder of glycosylation with emphasis on adult onset features

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Patricia G.; Ng, Bobby G.; Sanford, Laura; Sutton, V. Reid; Bartholomew, Dennis W.; Pastore, Matthew T.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Kircher, Martin; Buckingham, Kati J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Freeze, Hudson H.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) have been reported recently resulting in an expansion of the phenotypes associated with this group of disorders. SRD5A3 codes for polyprenol reductase which converts polyprenol to dolichol. This is a major pathway for dolichol biosynthesis for N-glycosylation, O-mannosylation, C-mannosylation, and GPI anchor synthesis. We present the features of five individuals (three children and two adults) with mutations in SRD5A3 focusing on the variable eye and skin involvement. We compare that to 13 affected individuals from the literature including five adults allowing us to delineate the features that may develop over time with this disorder including kyphosis, retinitis pigmentosa, and cataracts. PMID:27480077

  10. Heterogeneity and frequency of movement disorders in juvenile and adult-onset Niemann-Pick C disease.

    PubMed

    Anheim, Mathieu; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaïd; Fleury-Lesaunier, Marie-Céline; Valenti-Hirsch, Maria-Paola; Hirsch, Edouard; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Thobois, Stéphane; Vanier, Marie T; Latour, Philippe; Tranchant, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a recessive neurolipidosis. We report five adolescent and adult NPC cases to underscore the frequency and heterogeneity of movement disorders in NPC. Clinical, morphologic, biochemical and genetic study was performed in the five patients. Disease onset was between 8 and 50 years. Movement disorders were present in all cases, were heterogeneous and often combined [cerebellar ataxia (5/5), myoclonus (3/5), dystonia (2/5), chorea (1/5) and tremor (1/5)] and were the first sign in 4/5. Two patients were reported to have no vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP) at the first examination. Two patients experienced acute neuropsychiatric signs leading to death in one case due to myoclonic storm. Filipin staining was always positive. Two NPC1 mutations were identified in three patients, only one in two siblings. NPC should be considered in case of unexplained movement disorders, even when VSGP or cataplexy are not reported. Filipin staining remains a strong support for the diagnosis. Treatment with miglustat should be considered which is currently the only approved disease-specific treatment of NPC in children and adults.

  11. Adult-onset Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Amrinder Jit

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset atopic dermatitis is still an under recognized condition as there are only few studies regarding this entity. As compared to childhood onset atopic dermatitis, clinical features of adult onset atopic dermatitis are still not categorized. Adult atopic dermatitis can present for the first time in adult age with atypical morphology or may progress from childhood onset. This article reviews the characteristic clinical features of adult atopic dermatitis, associated risk factors and management. PMID:27904186

  12. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yajin; Dong, Yuan; Cheng, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU)—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28208618

  13. Neurodegenerative disorders: insights from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Hart, Anne C.

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases impose a burden on society, yet for the most part, the mechanisms underlying neuronal dysfunction and death in these disorders remain unclear despite the identification of relevant disease genes. Given the molecular conservation in neuronal signaling pathways across vertebrate and invertebrate species, many researchers have turned to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to identify the mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disease pathology. C. elegans can be engineered to express human proteins associated with neurodegeneration; additionally, the function of C. elegans orthologs of human neurodegenerative disease genes can be dissected. Herein, we examine major C. elegans neurodegeneration models that recapitulate many aspects of human neurodegenerative disease and we survey the screens that have identified modifier genes. This review highlights how the C. elegans community has used this versatile organism to model several aspects of human neurodegeneration and how these studies have contributed to our understanding of human disease. PMID:20493260

  14. Global warming and neurodegenerative disorders: speculations on their linkage.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Laleh; Perry, George; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is having considerable impact on biological systems. Eras of ice ages and warming shaped the contemporary earth and origin of creatures including humans. Warming forces stress conditions on cells. Therefore, cells evolved elaborate defense mechanisms, such as creation of heat shock proteins, to combat heat stress. Global warming is becoming a crisis and this process would yield an undefined increasing rate of neurodegenerative disorders in future decades. Since heat stress is known to have a degenerative effects on neurons and, conversely, cold conditions have protective effect on these cells, we hypothesize that persistent heat stress forced by global warming might play a crucial role in increasing neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Global warming and neurodegenerative disorders: speculations on their linkage

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Laleh; Perry, George; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is having considerable impact on biological systems. Eras of ice ages and warming shaped the contemporary earth and origin of creatures including humans. Warming forces stress conditions on cells. Therefore, cells evolved elaborate defense mechanisms, such as creation of heat shock proteins, to combat heat stress. Global warming is becoming a crisis and this process would yield an undefined increasing rate of neurodegenerative disorders in future decades. Since heat stress is known to have a degenerative effects on neurons and, conversely, cold conditions have protective effect on these cells, we hypothesize that persistent heat stress forced by global warming might play a crucial role in increasing neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25671171

  16. Cerebral Toxocariasis: Silent Progression to Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Celia V.; Loxton, Karen; Barghouth, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toxocara canis and T. cati are highly prevalent nematode infections of the intestines of dogs and cats. In paratenic hosts, larvae do not mature in the intestine but instead migrate through the somatic tissues and organs of the body. The presence of these migrating larvae can contribute to pathology. Toxocara larvae can invade the brains of humans, and while case descriptions of cerebral toxocariasis are historically rare, improved diagnosis and greater awareness have contributed to increased detection. Despite this, cerebral or neurological toxocariasis (NT) remains a poorly understood phenomenon. Furthermore, our understanding of cognitive deficits due to toxocariasis in human populations remains particularly deficient. Recent data describe an enhanced expression of biomarkers associated with brain injury, such as GFAP, AβPP, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), NF-L, S100B, tTG, and p-tau, in mice receiving even low doses of Toxocara ova. Finally, this review outlines a hypothesis to explore the relationship between the presence of T. canis larvae in the brain and the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to enhanced AD-associated neurodegenerative biomarker expression. PMID:26062575

  17. Cerebral Toxocariasis: Silent Progression to Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed

    Fan, Chia-Kwung; Holland, Celia V; Loxton, Karen; Barghouth, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    Toxocara canis and T. cati are highly prevalent nematode infections of the intestines of dogs and cats. In paratenic hosts, larvae do not mature in the intestine but instead migrate through the somatic tissues and organs of the body. The presence of these migrating larvae can contribute to pathology. Toxocara larvae can invade the brains of humans, and while case descriptions of cerebral toxocariasis are historically rare, improved diagnosis and greater awareness have contributed to increased detection. Despite this, cerebral or neurological toxocariasis (NT) remains a poorly understood phenomenon. Furthermore, our understanding of cognitive deficits due to toxocariasis in human populations remains particularly deficient. Recent data describe an enhanced expression of biomarkers associated with brain injury, such as GFAP, AβPP, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), NF-L, S100B, tTG, and p-tau, in mice receiving even low doses of Toxocara ova. Finally, this review outlines a hypothesis to explore the relationship between the presence of T. canis larvae in the brain and the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to enhanced AD-associated neurodegenerative biomarker expression.

  18. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413] PMID:27222125

  19. Clinical Translation of Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lindvall, Olle; Barker, Roger A.; Brüstle, Oliver; Isacson, Ole; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells and their derivatives show tremendous potential for treating many disorders, including neurode-generative diseases. We discuss here the challenges and potential for the translation of stem-cell-based approaches into treatments for Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:22305565

  20. Biometals in rare neurodegenerative disorders of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Sarah J.; Koistinaho, Jari; White, Anthony R.; Kanninen, Katja M.

    2013-01-01

    Copper, iron, and zinc are just three of the main biometals critical for correct functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). They have diverse roles in many functional processes including but not limited to enzyme catalysis, protein stabilization, and energy production. The range of metal concentrations within the body is tightly regulated and when the balance is perturbed, debilitating effects ensue. Homeostasis of brain biometals is mainly controlled by various metal transporters and metal sequestering proteins. The biological roles of biometals are vastly reviewed in the literature with a large focus on the connection to neurological conditions associated with ageing. Biometals are also implicated in a variety of debilitating inherited childhood disorders, some of which arise soon following birth or as the child progresses into early adulthood. This review acts to highlight what we know about biometals in childhood neurological disorders such as Wilson's disease (WD), Menkes disease (MD), neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), and neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Also discussed are some of the animal models available to determine the pathological mechanisms in these childhood disorders, which we hope will aid in our understanding of the role of biometals in disease and in attaining possible therapeutics in the future. PMID:23531702

  1. Nanomedicine and neurodegenerative disorders: so close yet so far.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Giovanni; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio; Ruozi, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    This editorial provides an overview of the main advantages of the use of nanomedicine-based approach for innovation in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Besides these aspects, a critical analysis on the main causes that slow the application of nanomedicine to brain disorders is given along with the identification of possible solutions and possible interventions. Better communication between the main players of research in this field and a detailed understanding of the most critical issues to be addressed should help in defining future directions towards the improvement and, finally, the clinical application of nanomedicine to neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. [Neurodegenerative disorders: review of current classification and diagnostic neuropathological criteria].

    PubMed

    Matej, R; Rusina, R

    2012-04-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are progressive diseases characterized by loss of specific neuronal populations followed by a clinical picture of a different neurodegenerative entity. Current classification of these diseases respects the names of the main pathophysiological processes involved in the groups of disorders. This is the reason why key proteins which represent neuropathological and biochemical hallmarks of diseases are found in their names. Neuropathological diagnosis is a synthesis of neurohistological changes in the brain and spinal cord and identification of pathological proteinaceous aggregates in neurons and/or glial cells. These inclusions are predominant diagnostic micromorphological and biochemical markers of disease. In the text, there is a brief summary of current knowledge about pathophysiology of neurodegenerations and diagnostic criteria for the most frequent entities.

  3. Prions and prion-like pathogens in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Peggion, Caterina; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2014-02-18

    Prions are unique elements in biology, being able to transmit biological information from one organism to another in the absence of nucleic acids. They have been identified as self-replicating proteinaceous agents responsible for the onset of rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorders-known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases-which affect humans and other animal species. More recently, it has been proposed that other proteins associated with common neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, can self-replicate like prions, thus sustaining the spread of neurotoxic entities throughout the nervous system. Here, we review findings that have contributed to expand the prion concept, and discuss if the involved toxic species can be considered bona fide prions, including the capacity to infect other organisms, or whether these pathogenic aggregates share with prions only the capability to self-replicate.

  4. Hyperactive Somatostatin Interneurons Contribute to Excitotoxicity in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bo; Schroeder, David; Zhang, Zhong-wei; Cox, Gregory A.; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping neurodegenerative disorders whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Here using TDP-43A315T mice, an ALS and FTD model with profound cortical pathology, we demonstrated that hyperactive somatostatin interneurons disinhibited layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5-PN) and contributed to their excitotoxicity. Focal ablation of somatostatin interneurons efficiently restored normal excitability of L5-PN and alleviated neurodegeneration, suggesting a novel therapeutic target for ALS and FTD. PMID:26900927

  5. Adult-onset food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shmuel

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is increasing in both the pediatric and adult populations. While symptom onset occurs mostly during childhood, there are a considerable number of patients whose symptoms first begin to appear after the age of 18 years. The majority of patients with adult-onset food allergy suffer from the pollen-plant allergy syndromes. Many of them manifest their allergy after exercise and consuming food to which they are allergic. Eosinophilic esophagitis, an eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus affecting individuals of all ages, recently emerged as another allergic manifestation, with both immediate and late response to the ingested food. This review provides a condensed update of the current data in the literature on adult-onset allergy.

  6. Metabolic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-na; Ji, Sunggoan; Rothman, Sarah; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases are highly debilitating disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Efforts towards developing effective treatments for these disorders have shown limited efficacy at best, with no true cure to this day being present. Recent work, both clinical and experimental, indicates that many neurodegenerative disorders often display a coexisting metabolic dysfunction which may exacerbate neurological symptoms. It stands to reason therefore that metabolic pathways may themselves contain promising therapeutic targets for major neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the most recent evidence for metabolic dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease, and discuss several potential mechanisms that may underlie the potential relationships between metabolic dysfunction and etiology of nervous system degeneration. We also highlight some prominent signaling pathways involved in the link between peripheral metabolism and the central nervous system that are potential targets for future therapies, and we will review some of the clinical progress in this field. It is likely that in the near future, therapeutics with combinatorial neuroprotective and 'eumetabolic' activities may possess superior efficacies compared to less pluripotent remedies.

  7. Interplay of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu; Arikkath, Jyothi; Yang, Lu; Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    The common underlying feature of most neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), prion diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) involves accumulation of misfolded proteins leading to initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and stimulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Additionally, ER stress more recently has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Autophagy plays an essential role in the clearance of aggregated toxic proteins and degradation of the damaged organelles. There is evidence that autophagy ameliorates ER stress by eliminating accumulated misfolded proteins. Both abnormal UPR and impaired autophagy have been implicated as a causative mechanism in the development of various neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights recent advances in the field on the role of ER stress and autophagy in AD, prion diseases, PD, ALS and HAND with the involvement of key signaling pathways in these processes and implications for future development of therapeutic strategies.

  8. Prions and Prion-Like Pathogens in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Peggion, Caterina; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Prions are unique elements in biology, being able to transmit biological information from one organism to another in the absence of nucleic acids. They have been identified as self-replicating proteinaceous agents responsible for the onset of rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorders—known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases—which affect humans and other animal species. More recently, it has been proposed that other proteins associated with common neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, can self-replicate like prions, thus sustaining the spread of neurotoxic entities throughout the nervous system. Here, we review findings that have contributed to expand the prion concept, and discuss if the involved toxic species can be considered bona fide prions, including the capacity to infect other organisms, or whether these pathogenic aggregates share with prions only the capability to self-replicate. PMID:25437612

  9. Connected Speech in Neurodegenerative Language Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Boschi, Veronica; Catricalà, Eleonora; Consonni, Monica; Chesi, Cristiano; Moro, Andrea; Cappa, Stefano F.

    2017-01-01

    Language assessment has a crucial role in the clinical diagnosis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The analysis of extended speech production is a precious source of information encompassing the phonetic, phonological, lexico-semantic, morpho-syntactic, and pragmatic levels of language organization. The knowledge about the distinctive linguistic variables identifying language deficits associated to different neurodegenerative diseases has progressively improved in the last years. However, the heterogeneity of such variables and of the way they are measured and classified limits any generalization and makes the comparison among studies difficult. Here we present an exhaustive review of the studies focusing on the linguistic variables derived from the analysis of connected speech samples, with the aim of characterizing the language disorders of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases, including primary progressive aphasia, Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A total of 61 studies have been included, considering only those reporting group analysis and comparisons with a group of healthy persons. This review first analyzes the differences in the tasks used to elicit connected speech, namely picture description, story narration, and interview, considering the possible different contributions to the assessment of different linguistic domains. This is followed by an analysis of the terminologies and of the methods of measurements of the variables, indicating the need for harmonization and standardization. The final section reviews the linguistic domains affected by each different neurodegenerative disease, indicating the variables most consistently impaired at each level and suggesting the key variables helping in the differential diagnosis among diseases. While a large amount of valuable information is already available, the review highlights the need of further work, including the development of automated methods, to

  10. [Neuroprotective mechanisms of cannabinoids in brain ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders].

    PubMed

    Osuna-Zazuetal, Marcela Amparo; Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Pérez-Neri, Iván

    2015-06-01

    One of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality is neurologic dysfunction; its high incidence has led to an intense research of the mechanisms that protect the central nervous system from hypoxia and ischemia. The mayor challenge is to block the biochemical events leading to neuronal death. This may be achieved by neuroprotective mechanisms that avoid the metabolic and immunologic cascades that follow a neurological damage. When it occurs, several pathophysiological events develop including cytokine release, oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Neuroprotective effects of cannabinoids to all those mechanisms have been reported in animal models of brain ischemia, excitotoxicity, brain trauma and neurodegenerative disorders. Some endocannabinoid analogs are being tested in clinical studies (I-III phase) for acute disorders involving neuronal death (brain trauma and ischemia). The study of the cannabinoid system may allow the discovery of effective neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  11. Neurodegenerative Eye Disorders: Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Genomics.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Kuldeep; Dada, Rima; Dada, Tanuj

    2016-01-01

    As a major source of cellular energy, mitochondria are critical for optimal ocular function. They are also essential for cell differentiation and survival. Mitochondrial mutations and oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA are important factors underlying the pathology of many ocular disorders. With increasing age, mitochondrial DNA damage accumulates and results in several eye diseases. It is evident that the mitochondrial genome is more susceptible to stress and damage than the nuclear genome, as it lacks histone protection, a nucleotide excision repair system, and recombination repair, and it is the source and target of free radicals. Accumulation of mitochondrial mutations beyond a certain threshold explains the marked variations in phenotypes seen in mitochondrial diseases and the molecular mechanisms related to the pathogenesis of several chronic disorders in the eye. This review details the structure and function of mitochondria and the mitochondrial genome along with the mitochondrial involvement in various neurodegenerative ophthalmic disorders.

  12. Pathogenic protein seeding in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Jucker, Mathias; Walker, Lary C

    2011-10-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins is a seminal occurrence in a remarkable variety of neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer disease (the most prevalent cerebral proteopathy), the two principal aggregating proteins are β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. The abnormal assemblies formed by conformational variants of these proteins range in size from small oligomers to the characteristic lesions that are visible by optical microscopy, such as senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Pathologic similarities with prion disease suggest that the formation and spread of these proteinaceous lesions might involve a common molecular mechanism-corruptive protein templating. Experimentally, cerebral β-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by exposure to dilute brain extracts containing aggregated Aβ seeds. The amyloid-inducing agent probably is Aβ itself, in a conformation generated most effectively in the living brain. Once initiated, Aβ lesions proliferate within and among brain regions. The induction process is governed by the structural and biochemical nature of the Aβ seed, as well as the attributes of the host, reminiscent of pathogenically variant prion strains. The concept of prionlike induction and spreading of pathogenic proteins recently has been expanded to include aggregates of tau, α-synuclein, huntingtin, superoxide dismutase-1, and TDP-43, which characterize such human neurodegenerative disorders as frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Parkinson/Lewy body disease, Huntington disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our recent finding that the most effective Aβ seeds are small and soluble intensifies the search in bodily fluids for misfolded protein seeds that are upstream in the proteopathic cascade, and thus could serve as predictive diagnostics and the targets of early, mechanism-based interventions. Establishing the clinical implications of corruptive protein templating will require further mechanistic and epidemiologic investigations

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Pathology in a Neurodegenerative Disorders Brain Bank

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Kevin F.; Ross, Owen A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Walton, Ronald L.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E.; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Wszolek, Zbignbiew K.; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F.; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1,721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    PubMed

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  15. Imaging of Microglia in Patients with Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Politis, Marios; Su, Paul; Piccini, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Microglia constitute the main immune defense in the central nervous system. In response to neuronal injury, microglia become activated, acquire phagocytic properties, and release a wide range of pro-inflammatory mediators that are essential for the annihilation of the neuronal insult. Although the role of microglial activation in acute neuronal damage is well defined, the pathophysiological processes underlying destructive or protective role to neurons following chronic exposure to microglial activation is still a subject of debate. It is likely that chronic exposure induces detrimental effects by promoting neuronal death through the release of neurotoxic factors. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the use of translocator protein (TSPO) radioligands provides an in vivo tool for tracking the progression and severity of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disease. TSPO expression is correlated to the extent of microglial activation and the measurement of TSPO uptake in vivo with PET is a useful indicator of active disease. Although understanding of the interaction between radioligands and TSPO is not completely clear, there is a wide interest in application of TSPO imaging in neurodegenerative disease. In this article, we aim to review the applications of in vivo microglia imaging in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Dementias, and Multiple Sclerosis. PMID:22661951

  16. Targeting phospholipase D in cancer, infection and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Brown, H Alex; Thomas, Paul G; Lindsley, Craig W

    2017-02-17

    Lipid second messengers have essential roles in cellular function and contribute to the molecular mechanisms that underlie inflammation, malignant transformation, invasiveness, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious and other pathophysiological processes. The phospholipase D (PLD) isoenzymes PLD1 and PLD2 are one of the major sources of signal-activated phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) generation downstream of a variety of cell-surface receptors, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and integrins. Recent advances in the development of isoenzyme-selective PLD inhibitors and in molecular genetics have suggested that PLD isoenzymes in mammalian cells and pathogenic organisms may be valuable targets for the treatment of several human diseases. Isoenzyme-selective inhibitors have revealed complex inter-relationships between PtdOH biosynthetic pathways and the role of PtdOH in pathophysiology. PLD enzymes were once thought to be undruggable owing to the ubiquitous nature of PtdOH in cell signalling and concerns that inhibitors would be too toxic for use in humans. However, recent promising discoveries suggest that small-molecule isoenzyme-selective inhibitors may provide novel compounds for a unique approach to the treatment of cancers, neurodegenerative disorders and other afflictions of the central nervous system, and potentially serve as broad-spectrum antiviral and antimicrobial therapeutics.

  17. Iron biomineralization of brain tissue and neurodegenerative disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova (Mikhailova), Albina

    The brain is an organ with a high concentration of iron in specific areas, particularly in the globus pallidus, the substantia nigra, and the red nucleus. In certain pathological states, such as iron overload disease and neurodegenerative disorders, a disturbed iron metabolism can lead to increased accumulation of iron not only in these areas, but also in the brain regions that are typically low in iron content. Recent studies of the physical and magnetic properties of metalloproteins, and in particular the discovery of biogenic magnetite in human brain tissue, have raised new questions about the role of biogenic iron formations in living organisms. Further investigations revealed the presence of magnetite-like crystalline structures in human ferritin, and indicated that released ferritin iron might act as promoter of oxidative damage to tissue, therefore contributing to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The purpose of this work was to examine the elemental composition and structure of iron deposits in normal brain tissue as well as tissue affected by neurodegenerative disorders. Employing the methods of X-ray microfocus fluorescence mapping, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (XAFS), and light and electron microscopic examinations allows one to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative data with respect to the cellular distribution and chemical state of iron at levels not detected previously. The described tissue preparation technique allows not only satisfactory XAS iron elemental imaging in situ but also multimodal examination with light and electron microscopes of the same samples. The developed protocol has assured consistent and reproducible results on relatively large sections of flat-embedded tissue. The resulting tissue samples were adequate for XAS examination as well as sufficiently well-preserved for future microscopy studies

  18. Few patients with neurodegenerative disorders require spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Gottesman, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few patients with neurodegenerative disorders (ND) (e.g., Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and Postpolio Syndrome (PPS)) require spinal surgery. Typically, their neurological symptoms and signs reflect their underlying neurologic disorders rather than structural spinal pathology reported on magnetic resonance images (MR) or computed tomographic scans (CT). Methods: The first author, a neurosurgeon, reviewed 437 spinal consultations performed over a 20-month period. Of 254 patients seen in first opinion (e.g., had not been seen by a spinal surgeon), 9 had MS, while 2 had ALS. Of 183 patients seen in second opinion (e.g., prior spinal surgeons recommended surgery), 4 had MS, 2 had ALS, and 1 had PPS. We performed this study to establish how often patients with ND, seen in first or second opinion, require spinal surgery. We focused on whether second opinions from spinal surgeons would limit the number of operations offered to these patients. Results: Two of 11 patients with ND seen in first opinion required surgery. The first patient required a C5-7 laminectomy/C2-T2 fusion, followed by a L2-S1 laminectomy/L5S1 fusion. The second patient required a L2-L3 laminectomy/diskectomy/fusion. However, none of the seven patients seen in second opinion, who were previously told by outside surgeons they needed spinal surgery, required operations. Conclusions: Few patients with neurodegenerative syndromes (MS, ALS, PPS) and reported “significant” spondyloitic spinal disease interpreted on MR/CT studies required surgery. Great caution should be exercised in offering patients with ND spinal surgery, and second opinions should be encouraged to limit “unnecessary” procedures. PMID:24843817

  19. Nanomedicine in the diagnosis and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kabanov, A.V.; Gendelman, H.E.

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative and infectious disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke are rapidly increasing as population’s age. Alzheimer’s disease alone currently affects 4.5 million Americans, and more than $100 billion is spent per year on medical and institutional care for affected people. Such numbers will double in the ensuing decades. Currently disease diagnosis for all disorders is made, in large measure, on clinical grounds as laboratory and neuroimaging tests confirm what is seen by more routine examination. Achieving early diagnosis would enable improved disease outcomes. Drugs, vaccines or regenerative proteins present “real” possibilities for positively affecting disease outcomes, but are limited in that their entry into the brain is commonly restricted across the blood–brain barrier. This review highlights how these obstacles can be overcome by polymer science and nanotechnology. Such approaches may improve diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes. New developments in polymer science coupled with cell-based delivery strategies support the notion that diseases that now have limited therapeutic options can show improved outcomes by advances in nanomedicine. PMID:20234846

  20. Repeat expansion and autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders: consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Dobrila D; Margolis, Russell L

    2003-08-22

    Repeat-expansion mutations cause 13 autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders falling into three groups. Huntington's disease (HD), dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) types 1, 2, 3, 7 and 17 are each caused by a CAG repeat expansion that encodes polyglutamine. Convergent lines of evidence demonstrate that neurodegeneration in these diseases is a consequence of the neurotoxic effects of abnormally long stretches of glutamines. How polyglutamine induces neurodegeneration, and why neurodegeneration occurs in only select neuronal populations, remains a matter of intense investigation. SCA6 is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in CACNA1A, a gene that encodes a subunit of the P/Q-type calcium channel. The threshold length at which the repeat causes disease is much shorter than in the other polyglutamine diseases, and neurodegeneration may arise from expansion-induced change of function in the calcium channel. Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) and SCAs 8, 10 and 12 are rare disorders in which the repeats (CAG, CTG or ATTCT) are not in protein-coding regions. Investigation into these diseases is still at an early stage, but it is now reasonable to hypothesise that the net effect of each expansion is to alter gene expression. The different pathogenic mechanisms in these three groups of diseases have important implications for the development of rational therapeutics.

  1. Adult Onset Still's Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Persad, Paul; Patel, Rajendrakumar; Patel, Niki

    2010-01-01

    Adult Still's Disease was first described in 1971 by Bywaters in fourteen adult female patients who presented with symptoms indistinguishable from that of classic childhood Still's Disease (Bywaters, 1971). George Still in 1896 first recognized this triad of quotidian (daily) fevers, evanescent rash, and arthritis in children with what later became known as juvenile inflammatory arthritis (Still, 1990). Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory condition of unknown etiology characterized by an evanescent rash, quotidian fevers, and arthralgias. Numerous infectious agents have been associated with its presentation. This case is to our knowledge the first presentation of AOSD in the setting of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Although numerous infectious agents have been suggested, the etiology of this disorder remains elusive. Nevertheless, infection may in fact play a role in triggering the onset of symptoms in those with this disorder. Our case presentation is, to our knowledge, the first case of Adult Onset Still's Disease associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF).

  2. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  3. Advances in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders employing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Spuch, Carlos; Saida, Ortolano; Navarro, Carmen

    2012-04-01

    Nanoparticles could potentially revolutionise treatment for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and strokes. Nanotechnologies hold great promise in brain therapy as they protect the therapeutic agent and allow its sustained release; the nanoparticles can be used as gene delivery vehicles. The application of neurotrophic factors is able to modulate neuronal survival and synaptic connectivity and it is a promising therapeutic approach for many neurodegenerative diseases, however, due to limitations posed by the restrictive blood brain barrier (BBB), it is very difficult to ensure long-term administration in the brain. Drug delivery to the brain remains the major challenge for the treatment of all neurodegenerative diseases because of the numerous protective barriers surrounding the central nervous system (CNS). New therapeutics with the capacity to cross the BBB is critically needed for treatment of these diseases. In recent years, nanotechnology had patented new formulations and has evolved as a new treatment for brain diseases, especially for neurodegenerative diseases, where genetically engineered cells can be used to deliver specific growth factors to target cells. Overall, the aim of this review is to summarize the last patents, clinical trials and news related with nanoparticles technology for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-02

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.).

  5. Gene Therapy-Based Modeling of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Young, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by impairments in motor control, and cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. In this chapter, viral vector-mediated approaches used in modeling the key neuropathological features of the disease including the production of abnormal intracellular protein aggregates, neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and motor impairments in rodents are described.

  6. [Kimura's disease: an unrecognized cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease].

    PubMed

    Shehwaro, N; Langlois, A-L; Gueutin, V; Debchi, L; Charlotte, F; Rouvier, P; Rottembourg, J; Izzedine, H

    2014-02-01

    Kimura's disease (KD) is an angiolymphoid proliferative disorder of soft tissue with eosinophilia, with a predilection for head and neck regions in young Oriental men. Kidney disease is thought to be rare in KD. About a case of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease, we comment Kimura's disease and its associated kidney damage. Kimura disease should be suspected and included in the diagnosis of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease.

  7. Clinicopathological features of adult-onset neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease

    PubMed Central

    Sone, Jun; Mori, Keiko; Inagaki, Tomonori; Katsumata, Ryu; Takagi, Shinnosuke; Yokoi, Satoshi; Araki, Kunihiko; Kato, Toshiyasu; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Koike, Haruki; Takashima, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Kohno, Yutaka; Kurashige, Takashi; Kuriyama, Masaru; Takiyama, Yoshihisa; Tsuchiya, Mai; Kitagawa, Naoyuki; Kawamoto, Michi; Yoshimura, Hajime; Suto, Yutaka; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Uehara, Naoko; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kokubun, Norito; Konno, Takuya; Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by eosinophilic hyaline intranuclear inclusions in the central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the visceral organs. NIID has been considered to be a heterogeneous disease because of the highly variable clinical manifestations, and ante-mortem diagnosis has been difficult. However, since we reported the usefulness of skin biopsy for the diagnosis of NIID, the number of NIID diagnoses has increased, in particular adult-onset NIID. In this study, we studied 57 cases of adult-onset NIID and described their clinical and pathological features. We analysed both NIID cases diagnosed by post-mortem dissection and by ante-mortem skin biopsy based on the presence of characteristic eosinophilic, hyaline and ubiquitin-positive intanuclear inclusion: 38 sporadic cases and 19 familial cases, from six families. In the sporadic NIID cases with onset age from 51 to 76, dementia was the most prominent initial symptom (94.7%) as designated ‘dementia dominant group’, followed by miosis, ataxia and unconsciousness. Muscle weakness and sensory disturbance were also observed. It was observed that, in familial NIID cases with onset age less than 40 years, muscle weakness was seen most frequently (100%), as designated ‘limb weakness group’, followed by sensory disturbance, miosis, bladder dysfunction, and dementia. In familial cases with more than 40 years of onset age, dementia was most prominent (100%). Elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein and abnormal nerve conduction were frequently observed in both sporadic and familial NIID cases. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity signal in corticomedullary junction in diffusion-weighted image in both sporadic and familial NIID cases, a strong clue to the diagnosis. All of the dementia dominant cases presented with this type of leukoencephalopathy on head magnetic resonance imaging. Both sporadic and

  8. Prions, prion-like prionoids, and neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the misfolded prion protein in the brain. α-synuclein (α-syn)-associated multiple system atrophy has been recently shown to be caused by a bona fide α-syn prion strain. Several other misfolded native proteins such as β-amyloid, tau and TDP-43 share some aspects of prions although none of them is shown to be transmissible in nature or in experimental animals. However, these prion-like “prionoids” are causal to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The remarkable recent discovery of at least two new α-syn prion strains and their transmissibility in transgenic mice and in vitro cell models raises a distinct question as to whether some specific strain of other prionoids could have the capability of disease transmission in a manner similar to prions. In this overview, we briefly describe human and other mammalian prion diseases and comment on certain similarities between prion and prionoid and the possibility of prion-like transmissibility of some prionoid strains. PMID:27293325

  9. Adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Yapp, Liam Z; McClymont, Liusaidh; Beggs, Ian; Gaston, Paul; Salter, Donald M

    2017-05-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old man diagnosed with adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip. Chondrolysis of the hip is a disorder most frequently seen in children who have suffered with slipped capital femoral epiphyses. Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip is extremely rare and to our knowledge, its onset has never been documented in adults aged over 20. With reference to the available medical literature, we summarise the current clinical management of this unusual but important cause of young adult hip pain.

  10. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Torequl

    2017-01-01

    Reactive species play an important role in physiological functions. Overproduction of reactive species, notably reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species along with the failure of balance by the body's antioxidant enzyme systems results in destruction of cellular structures, lipids, proteins, and genetic materials such as DNA and RNA. Moreover, the effects of reactive species on mitochondria and their metabolic processes eventually cause a rise in ROS/RNS levels, leading to oxidation of mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. Oxidative stress has been considered to be linked to the etiology of many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) such as Alzheimer diseases, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia, Huntington's disease, Multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's diseases. In addition, oxidative stress causing protein misfold may turn to other NDDs include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, Kuru, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome, and Fatal Familial Insomnia. An overview of the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked NDDs has been summarized in this review.

  11. Multi-target therapeutics for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Bawa, Priya; Pradeep, Priyamvada; Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2016-12-01

    Historically, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disease treatments focused on the 'magic bullet' concept; however multi-targeted strategies are increasingly attractive gauging from the escalating research in this area. Because these diseases are typically co-morbid, multi-targeted drugs capable of interacting with multiple targets will expand treatment to the co-morbid disease condition. Despite their theoretical efficacy, there are significant impediments to clinical success (e.g., difficulty titrating individual aspects of the drug and inconclusive pathophysiological mechanisms). The new and revised diagnostic frameworks along with studies detailing the endophenotypic characteristics of the diseases promise to provide the foundation for the circumvention of these impediments. This review serves to evaluate the various marketed and nonmarketed multi-targeted drugs with particular emphasis on their design strategy.

  12. Neurodegenerative Disorder Risk in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Study in 174 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Iranzo, Alex; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Tolosa, Eduard; Serradell, Mónica; Molinuevo, José Luis; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Gelpi, Ellen; Vilaseca, Isabel; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gaig, Carles; Santamaría, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the risk for developing a defined neurodegenerative syndrome in a large cohort of idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) patients with long follow-up. Methods Using the Kaplan-Meier method, we estimated the disease-free survival rate from defined neurodegenerative syndromes in all the consecutive IRBD patients diagnosed and followed-up in our tertiary referal sleep center between November 1991 and July 2013. Results The cohort comprises 174 patients with a median age at diagnosis of IRBD of 69 years and a median follow-up of four years. The risk of a defined neurodegenerative syndrome from the time of IRBD diagnosis was 33.1% at five years, 75.7% at ten years, and 90.9% at 14 years. The median conversion time was 7.5 years. Emerging diagnoses (37.4%) were dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in 29 subjects, Parkinson disease (PD) in 22, multiple system atrophy (MSA) in two, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in 12. In six cases, in whom postmortem was performed, neuropathological examination disclosed neuronal loss and widespread Lewy-type pathology in the brain in each case. Conclusions In a large IRBD cohort diagnosed in a tertiary referal sleep center, prolonged follow-up indicated that the majority of patients are eventually diagnosed with the synucleinopathies PD, DLB and less frequently MSA. IRBD represented the prodromal period of these conditions. Our findings in IRBD have important implications in clinical practice, in the investigation of the early pathological events occurring in the synucleinopathies, and for the design of interventions with potential disease-modifying agents. PMID:24587002

  13. Novel Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Behavioral Disturbances and Psychoses Associated With Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Masand, Prakash S.

    2000-01-01

    Behavioral disturbances and psychosis are common features of neurodegenerative disorders and may be drug induced, intrinsic to the underlying pathology, or both. These disturbances, including psychotic and mood symptoms, apathy, aggression and other behavioral symptoms, and superimposed delirium, cause a great amount of disability to the patient and stress on the caregiver. Conventional neuroleptics have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these symptoms, but unacceptable side effects may occur. However, the novel antipsychotics, with their lower risk of inducing extrapyramidal symptoms, have shown promise in the treatment of behavioral disturbances and psychosis associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:15014653

  14. Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders: From Pathogenesis to a Promising Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Tommaso; Calcagnini, Silvio; Pace, Lorenzo; De Marco, Federico; Romano, Adele; Gaetani, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of an increasingly aging population, the number of people affected by neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease, is rapidly increasing. Although the etiology of these diseases has not been completely defined, common molecular mechanisms including neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction have been confirmed and can be targeted therapeutically. Moreover, recent studies have shown that endogenous cannabinoid signaling plays a number of modulatory roles throughout the central nervous system (CNS), including the neuroinflammation and neurogenesis. In particular, the up-regulation of type-2 cannabinoid (CB2) receptors has been found in a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, the modulation of CB2 receptor signaling may represent a promising therapeutic target with minimal psychotropic effects that can be used to modulate endocannabinoid-based therapeutic approaches and to reduce neuronal degeneration. For these reasons this review will focus on the CB2 receptor as a promising pharmacological target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28210207

  15. Recent Updates in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders Using Natural Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Mahmood; Malik, Arif; Qureshi, Muhammad Saeed; Manan, Abdul; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Asif, Muhammad; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Qazi, Aamer Mahmood; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Gan, Siew Hua; Sheikh, Ishfaq Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by protein aggregates and inflammation as well as oxidative stress in the central nervous system (CNS). Multiple biological processes are linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as depletion or insufficient synthesis of neurotransmitters, oxidative stress, abnormal ubiquitination. Furthermore, damaging of blood brain barrier (BBB) in the CNS also leads to various CNS-related diseases. Even though synthetic drugs are used for the management of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, autism, and many other chronic illnesses, they are not without side effects. The attentions of researchers have been inclined towards the phytochemicals, many of which have minimal side effects. Phytochemicals are promising therapeutic agents because many phytochemicals have anti-inflammatory, antioxidative as well as anticholinesterase activities. Various drugs of either synthetic or natural origin applied in the treatment of brain disorders need to cross the BBB before they can be used. This paper covers various researches related to phytochemicals used in the management of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24864161

  16. Exogenous melatonin for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xue-yan; Su, Su-wen; Jia, Qing-zhong; Ding, Tao; Zhu, Zhong-ning; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the efficacy of exogenous melatonin in the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with neurodegenerative disease. We searched Pubmed, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov, from inception to July 2015. We included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that compared melatonin with placebo and that had the primary aim of improving sleep in people with neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). We pooled data with the weighted mean difference in sleep outcomes. To assess heterogeneity in results of individual studies, we used Cochran's Q statistic and the I (2) statistic. 9 RCTs were included in this research. We found that the treatment with exogenous melatonin has positive effects on sleep quality as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in PD patients (MD: 4.20, 95 % CI: 0.92-7.48; P = 0.01), and by changes in PSQI component 4 in AD patients (MD: 0.67, 95 % CI: 0.04-1.30; P = 0.04), but not on objective sleep outcomes in both AD and PD patients. Treatment with melatonin effectively improved the clinical and neurophysiological aspects of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), especially elderly individuals with underlying neurodegenerative disorders. This meta-analysis provided some evidence that melatonin improves sleep quality in patients with AD and PD, and melatonin can be considered as a possible sole or add-on therapy in neurodegenerative disorders patients with RBD.

  17. Pathophysiological Role of Neuroinflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Brain diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and addiction lead to reduced quality of daily life through abnormal thoughts, perceptions, emotional states, and behavior. While the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood, human and animal studies have supported a role of neuroinflammation in the etiology of these diseases. In the central nervous system, an increased inflammatory response is capable of activating microglial cells, leading to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. In turn, the pro-inflammatory cytokines aggravate and propagate neuroinflammation, degenerating healthy neurons and impairing brain functions. Therefore, activated microglia may play a key role in neuroinflammatory processes contributing to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders and neurodegeneration. PMID:27230456

  18. Exploring the power of yeast to model aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana V; Vilaça, Rita; Santos, Cláudia N; Costa, Vítor; Menezes, Regina

    2017-02-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process determined by molecular, cellular and systemic factors and it is well established that advancing age is a leading risk factor for several neurodegenerative diseases. In fact, the close association of aging and neurodegenerative disorders has placed aging as the greatest social and economic challenge of the 21st century, and age-related diseases have also become a key priority for countries worldwide. The growing need to better understand both aging and neurodegenerative processes has led to the development of simple eukaryotic models amenable for mechanistic studies. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an unprecedented experimental model to study the fundamental aspects of aging and to decipher the intricacies of neurodegenerative disorders greatly because the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. Moreover, yeast offers several methodological advantages allowing a rapid and relatively easy way of establishing gene-protein-function associations. Here we review different aging theories, common cellular pathways driving aging and neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the major contributions of yeast to the state-of-art knowledge in both research fields.

  19. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klaas, James P; Ahlskog, J Eric; Pittock, Sean J; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Aksamit, Allen J; Bartleson, J D; Kumar, Rajeev; McEvoy, Kathleen F; McKeon, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) outside of individual case reports. OBJECTIVE To describe adult-onset OMS. DESIGN Review of medical records (January 1, 1990, through December 31, 2011), prospective telephone surveillance, and literature review (January 1, 1967, through December 31, 2011). SETTING Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. PATIENTS Twenty-one Mayo Clinic patients and 116 previously reported patients with adult-onset OMS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Clinical course and longitudinal outcomes. RESULTS The median age at onset of the 21 OMS patients at the Mayo Clinic was 47 years (range, 27-78 years); 11 were women. Symptoms reported at the first visit included dizziness, 14 patients; balance difficulties, 14; nausea and/or vomiting, 10; vision abnormalities, 6; tremor/tremulousness, 4; and altered speech, 2. Myoclonus distribution was extremities, 15 patients; craniocervical, 8; and trunk, 4. Cancer was detected in 3 patients (breast adenocarcinoma, 2; and small cell lung carcinoma, 1); a parainfectious cause was assumed in the remainder of the patients. Follow-up of 1 month or more was available for 19 patients (median, 43 months; range, 1-187 months). Treatment (median, 6 weeks) consisted of immunotherapy and symptomatic therapy in 16 patients, immunotherapy alone for 2, and clonazepam alone for 1. Of these 19 patients, OMS remitted in 13 and improved in 3; 3 patients died (neurologic decline, 1; cancer, 1; and myocardial infarction, 1). The cause of death was of paraneoplastic origin in 60 of 116 literature review patients, with the most common carcinomas being lung (33 patients) and breast (7); the most common antibody was antineuronal nuclear antibody type 2 (anti-Ri, 15). Other causes were idiopathic in origin, 38 patients; parainfectious, 15 (human immunodeficiency virus, 7); toxic/metabolic, 2; and other autoimmune, 1. Both patients with N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody had

  20. Systems biology and gene networks in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Gandal, Michael J.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and genomic approaches have implicated hundreds of genetic loci in neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegeneration, but mechanistic understanding continues to lag behind the pace of gene discovery. Understanding the role of specific genetic variants in the brain involves dissecting a functional hierarchy that encompasses molecular pathways, diverse cell types, neural circuits and, ultimately, cognition and behaviour. With a focus on transcriptomics, this Review discusses how high-throughput molecular, integrative and network approaches inform disease biology by placing human genetics in a molecular systems and neurobiological context. We provide a framework for interpreting network biology studies and leveraging big genomics data sets in neurobiology. PMID:26149713

  1. Patient fibroblasts-derived induced neurons demonstrate autonomous neuronal defects in adult-onset Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Oh, Ki-Wook; Nahm, Minyeop; Xue, Yuanchao; Choi, Jae Hyeok; Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Young-Eun; Chung, Ki Wha; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by defective β-galactosylceramidase (GALC), a lysosomal enzyme responsible for cleavage of several key substrates including psychosine. Accumulation of psychosine to the cytotoxic levels in KD patients is thought to cause dysfunctions in myelinating glial cells based on a comprehensive study of demyelination in KD. However, recent evidence suggests myelin-independent neuronal death in the murine model of KD, thus indicating defective GALC in neurons as an autonomous mechanism for neuronal cell death in KD. These observations prompted us to generate induced neurons (iNeurons) from two adult-onset KD patients carrying compound heterozygous mutations (p.[K563*];[L634S]) and (p.[N228_S232delinsTP];[G286D]) to determine the direct contribution of autonomous neuronal toxicity to KD. Here we report that directly converted KD iNeurons showed not only diminished GALC activity and increased psychosine levels, as expected, but also neurite fragmentation and abnormal neuritic branching. The lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 (LAMP1) was expressed at higher levels than controls, LAMP1-positive vesicles were significantly enlarged and fragmented, and mitochondrial morphology and its function were altered in KD iNeurons. Strikingly, we demonstrated that psychosine was sufficient to induce neurite defects, mitochondrial fragmentation, and lysosomal alterations in iNeurons derived in healthy individuals, thus establishing the causal effect of the cytotoxic GALC substrate in KD and the autonomous neuronal toxicity in KD pathology. PMID:27780934

  2. Targeting midkine and pleiotrophin signalling pathways in addiction and neurodegenerative disorders: recent progress and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Herradón, G; Pérez-García, C

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are two neurotrophic factors that are highly up-regulated in different brain regions after the administration of various drugs of abuse and in degenerative areas of the brain. A deficiency in both MK and PTN has been suggested to be an important genetic factor, which confers vulnerability to the development of the neurodegenerative disorders associated with drugs of abuse in humans. In this review, evidence demonstrating that MK and PTN limit the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse and, potentially, prevent drug relapse is compiled. There is also convincing evidence that MK and PTN have neuroprotective effects against the neurotoxicity and development of neurodegenerative disorders induced by drugs of abuse. Exogenous administration of MK and/or PTN into the CNS by means of non-invasive methods is proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for addictive and neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of new molecular targets downstream of the MK and PTN signalling pathways or pharmacological modulation of those already known may also provide a more traditional, but probably effective, therapeutic strategy for treating addictive and neurodegenerative disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:23889475

  3. ROCK in CNS: Different Roles of Isoforms and Therapeutic Target for Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Ai, Nana; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) is a serine-threonine kinase originally identified as a crucial regulator of actin cytoskeleton. Recent studies have defined new functions of ROCK as a critical component of diverse signaling pathways in neurons. In addition, inhibition of ROCK causes several biological events such as increase of neurite outgrowth, axonal regeneration, and activation of prosurvival Akt. Thus, it has attracted scientist's strong attentions and considered ROCK as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington';s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, ROCK has two highly homologous isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2. Accumulated evidences indicate that ROCK1 and ROCK2 might involve in distinct cellular functions in central nervous system (CNS) and neurodegenerative processes. This review summarizes recent updates regarding ROCK isoformspecific functions in CNS and the progress of ROCK inhibitors in preclinical studies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. The therapeutic potential of cell identity reprogramming for the treatment of aging-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek K; He, Miao; Zhang, Chun-Li; Zheng, Jialin C

    2016-02-01

    Neural cell identity reprogramming strategies aim to treat age-related neurodegenerative disorders with newly induced neurons that regenerate neural architecture and functional circuits in vivo. The isolation and neural differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells provided the first in vitro models of human neurodegenerative disease. Investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying stem cell pluripotency revealed that somatic cells could be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and these cells could be used to model Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington disease, and Parkinson disease. Additional neural precursor and direct transdifferentiation strategies further enabled the induction of diverse neural linages and neuron subtypes both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we highlight neural induction strategies that utilize stem cells, iPSCs, and lineage reprogramming to model or treat age-related neurodegenerative diseases, as well as, the clinical challenges related to neural transplantation and in vivo reprogramming strategies.

  5. Selective manipulation of aging: a novel strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Moll, Lorna; El-Ami, Tayir; Cohen, Ehud

    2014-02-13

    Aging is the major risk factor for the development of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases, and prion disorders, all of which stem from toxic protein aggregation. Although sporadic cases typically onset during the patient's seventh decade of life or later, mutation-linked, familial disorders manifest during the fifth or sixth decade of life. This common temporal emergence pattern suggests that slowing aging can postpone the onset of these maladies and alleviate their symptoms once emerged. Studies in worms and flies that express disease-linked aggregative proteins revealed that reducing the activity of the insulin / insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects these animals from toxic protein aggregation. The therapeutic potential of this approach has been tested and confirmed in mammals as reducing the activity of the IGF1 signalling cascade partially protects Alzheimer's-model mice from premature death, and behavioural and pathological impairments associated with the disorder. Here we review the recent advances in the field, describe the known mechanistic links between toxic protein aggregation, neurodegenerative disorders and the aging process and delineate recent studies that point at IGF1 signalling inhibitors as promising therapies for the treatment of various late-onset neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Trends in the Molecular Pathogenesis and Clinical Therapeutics of Common Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; Pillay, Viness; du Toit, Lisa C.; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Ndesendo, Valence M.K.; Sibambo, Sibongile R.

    2009-01-01

    The term neurodegenerative disorders, encompasses a variety of underlying conditions, sporadic and/or familial and are characterized by the persistent loss of neuronal subtypes. These disorders can disrupt molecular pathways, synapses, neuronal subpopulations and local circuits in specific brain regions, as well as higher-order neural networks. Abnormal network activities may result in a vicious cycle, further impairing the integrity and functions of neurons and synapses, for example, through aberrant excitation or inhibition. The most common neurodegenerative disorders are Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Huntington’s disease. The molecular features of these disorders have been extensively researched and various unique neurotherapeutic interventions have been developed. However, there is an enormous coercion to integrate the existing knowledge in order to intensify the reliability with which neurodegenerative disorders can be diagnosed and treated. The objective of this review article is therefore to assimilate these disorders’ in terms of their neuropathology, neurogenetics, etiology, trends in pharmacological treatment, clinical management, and the use of innovative neurotherapeutic interventions. PMID:19582217

  7. The molecular bases of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, R B; Muñoz, J P; Barbeito, L

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the cause of one of the most common types of dementia, is a brain disorder affecting the elderly and is characterized by the formation of two main protein aggregates: senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which are involved in the process leading to progressive neuronal degeneration and death. Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease is a pathologic condition of cells rather than an accelerated way of aging. The senile plaques are generated by a deposition in the human brain of fibrils of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), a fragment derived from the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Tau protein is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs), which form a compact filamentous network described as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Experiments with hippocampal cells in culture have indicated a relationship between fibrillary amyloid and the cascade of molecular signals that trigger tau hyperphosphorylations. Two main protein kinases have been shown to be involved in anomalous tau phosphorylations: the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk5 and glycogen synthase kinase GSK3beta. Cdk5 plays a critical role in brain development and is associated with neurogenesis as revealed by studies in brain cells in culture and neuroblastoma cells. Deregulation of this protein kinase as induced by extracellular amyloid loading results in tau hyperphosphorylations, thus triggering a sequence of molecular events that lead to neuronal degeneration. Inhibitors of Cdk5 and GSK3beta and antisense oligonucleotides exert protection against neuronal death. On the other hand, there is cumulative evidence from studies in cultured brain cells and on brains that oxidative stress constitutes a main factor in the modification of normal signaling pathways in neuronal cells, leading to biochemical and structural abnormalities and neurodegeneration as related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This review is focused on the main protein

  8. Redox proteomics in selected neurodegenerative disorders: from its infancy to future applications.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia; Reed, Tanea; Muharib, Tasneem; Hughes, Christopher P; Robinson, Renã A S; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2012-12-01

    Several studies demonstrated that oxidative damage is a characteristic feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. The accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins may disrupt cellular functions by affecting protein expression, protein turnover, cell signaling, and induction of apoptosis and necrosis, suggesting that protein oxidation could have both physiological and pathological significance. For nearly two decades, our laboratory focused particular attention on studying oxidative damage of proteins and how their chemical modifications induced by reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species correlate with pathology, biochemical alterations, and clinical presentations of Alzheimer's disease. This comprehensive article outlines basic knowledge of oxidative modification of proteins and lipids, followed by the principles of redox proteomics analysis, which also involve recent advances of mass spectrometry technology, and its application to selected age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Redox proteomics results obtained in different diseases and animal models thereof may provide new insights into the main mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis and progression of oxidative-stress-related neurodegenerative disorders. Redox proteomics can be considered a multifaceted approach that has the potential to provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of a disease, to find disease markers, as well as to identify potential targets for drug therapy. Considering the importance of a better understanding of the cause/effect of protein dysfunction in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders, this article provides an overview of the intrinsic power of the redox proteomics approach together with the most significant results obtained by our laboratory and others during almost 10 years of research on neurodegenerative disorders since we initiated the field of redox proteomics.

  9. Redox Proteomics in Selected Neurodegenerative Disorders: From Its Infancy to Future Applications

    PubMed Central

    Perluigi, Marzia; Reed, Tanea; Muharib, Tasneem; Hughes, Christopher P.; Robinson, Renã A.S.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Several studies demonstrated that oxidative damage is a characteristic feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. The accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins may disrupt cellular functions by affecting protein expression, protein turnover, cell signaling, and induction of apoptosis and necrosis, suggesting that protein oxidation could have both physiological and pathological significance. For nearly two decades, our laboratory focused particular attention on studying oxidative damage of proteins and how their chemical modifications induced by reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species correlate with pathology, biochemical alterations, and clinical presentations of Alzheimer's disease. This comprehensive article outlines basic knowledge of oxidative modification of proteins and lipids, followed by the principles of redox proteomics analysis, which also involve recent advances of mass spectrometry technology, and its application to selected age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Redox proteomics results obtained in different diseases and animal models thereof may provide new insights into the main mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis and progression of oxidative-stress-related neurodegenerative disorders. Redox proteomics can be considered a multifaceted approach that has the potential to provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of a disease, to find disease markers, as well as to identify potential targets for drug therapy. Considering the importance of a better understanding of the cause/effect of protein dysfunction in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders, this article provides an overview of the intrinsic power of the redox proteomics approach together with the most significant results obtained by our laboratory and others during almost 10 years of research on neurodegenerative disorders since we initiated the field of redox proteomics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1610–1655. PMID:22115501

  10. Disorders of lysosomal acidification-The emerging role of v-ATPase in aging and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Colacurcio, Daniel J; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-12-01

    Autophagy and endocytosis deliver unneeded cellular materials to lysosomes for degradation. Beyond processing cellular waste, lysosomes release metabolites and ions that serve signaling and nutrient sensing roles, linking the functions of the lysosome to various pathways for intracellular metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. Each of these lysosomal behaviors is influenced by the intraluminal pH of the lysosome, which is maintained in the low acidic range by a proton pump, the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). New reports implicate altered v-ATPase activity and lysosomal pH dysregulation in cellular aging, longevity, and adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, including forms of Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Genetic defects of subunits composing the v-ATPase or v-ATPase-related proteins occur in an increasingly recognized group of familial neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the expanding roles of the v-ATPase complex as a platform regulating lysosomal hydrolysis and cellular homeostasis. We discuss the unique vulnerability of neurons to persistent low level lysosomal dysfunction and review recent clinical and experimental studies that link dysfunction of the v-ATPase complex to neurodegenerative diseases across the age spectrum.

  11. Adult-onset Still's disease and cardiac tamponade: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Carrilho-Ferreira, Pedro; Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-06-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity.

  12. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  13. [Adult onset Still's disease as a diagnostics challenge in case of fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Debski, Marcin; Stepniewski, Piotr; Wróbel, Michał

    2013-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin is often a diagnostic challenge. Here we present a case of 55-year-old woman with a history of a few months fever, progressing weakness and salmon-coloured, macular skin rash. The differential diagnosis included neoplasmatic conditions, infections and connective tissue disorders. Finally adult onset Still's disease was suspected. Glucocorticosteroid treatment was induced. During the therapy a central nervous system infection occurred, which was fatal for the patient. The presented clinical case shows that among many causes of fever of unknown origin, adult onset Still's disease should be taken into account.

  14. ‘The clocks that time us’—circadian rhythms in neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Lazar, Alpar S.; Barker, Roger A.; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioural cycles generated by an endogenous biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The circadian system influences the majority of physiological processes, including sleep–wake homeostasis. Impaired sleep and alertness are common symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders, and circadian dysfunction might exacerbate the disease process. The pathophysiology of sleep–wake disturbances in these disorders remains largely unknown, and is presumably multifactorial. Circadian rhythm dysfunction is often observed in patients with Alzheimer disease, in whom it has a major impact on quality of life and represents one of the most important factors leading to institutionalization of patients. Similarly, sleep and circadian problems represent common nonmotor features of Parkinson disease and Huntington disease. Clinical studies and experiments in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have revealed the progressive nature of circadian dysfunction throughout the course of neurodegeneration, and suggest strategies for the restoration of circadian rhythmicity involving behavioural and pharmacological interventions that target the sleep–wake cycle. In this Review, we discuss the role of the circadian system in the regulation of the sleep–wake cycle, and outline the implications of disrupted circadian timekeeping in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25385339

  15. Are neurodegenerative disorder and psychotic manifestations avoidable brain dysfunctions with adequate dietary omega-3?

    PubMed

    Saugstad, Letten F

    2006-01-01

    The present mismatch between what our brain needs, and the modern diet neglects our marine heritage. Last century, the priority in nutrition and food production was to achieve a high protein diet and somatic growth and function. The dietary content of omega-3 (N-3) required by the brain was neglected although evidence for the essentiality of certain fatty acids was published in 1929 and specifically re-affirmed for omega 3 in the brain in the 1970s. Cognitive decline with age and neurodegenerative disorder with dementia are now rising. This review describes signs of N-3 deficit in Alzheimer and Parkinson Disease, where maximum change involves the primary sites: olfactory cortex and the hippocampus. The olfactory agnosia observed in schizophrenia supports an N-3 deficit as does a reduction of key ologodendrocyte- and myelin-related genes in this disorder and affective disorder, where a rise in dementia accords with a deficit of N-3 also in this disorder. N-3 normalizes cerebral excitability at all levels. That the two disorders are localized at the extremes of excitability, is supported by their opposing treatments: convulsant neuroleptics and anti-epileptic antidepressants. An adequate N-3 diet will probably prevent most psychotic episodes and prove that neurodegenerative disorder with dementia is also to a large extent not only preventable but avoidable.

  16. Are neurodegenerative disorder and psychotic manifestations avoidable brain dysfunctions with adequate dietary omega-3?

    PubMed

    Saugstad, Letten F

    2006-01-01

    The present mismatch between what our brain needs, and the modern diet neglects our marine heritage. Last century, the priority in nutrition and food production was to achieve a high protein diet and somatic growth and function. The dietary content of omega-3 (N-3) required by the brain was neglected although evidence for the essentiality of certain fatty acids was published in 1929 and specifically re-affirmed for omega 3 in the brain in the 1970s. Cognitive decline with age and neurodegenerative disorder with dementia are now rising. This review describes signs of N-3 deficit in Alzheimer and Parkinson Disease, where maximum change involves the primary sites: olfactory cortex and the hippocampus. The olfactory agnosia observed in schizophrenia supports an N-3 deficit as does a reduction of key ologodendrocyte- and myelin-related genes in this disorder and affective disorder, where a rise in dementia accords with a deficit of N-3 also in this disorder. N-3 normalizes cerebral excitability at all levels. That the two disorders are localized at the extremes of excitability, is supported by their opposing treatments: convulsant neuroleptics and anti-epileptic anti-depressants. An adequate N-3 diet will probably prevent most psychotic episodes and prove that neurodegenerative disorder with dementia is also to a large extent not only preventable but avoidable.

  17. The impact of personality characteristics on the clinical expression in neurodegenerative disorders--a review.

    PubMed

    von Gunten, Armin; Pocnet, Cornelia; Rossier, Jérôme

    2009-10-28

    Clinical experience suggests that longstanding personality characteristics as a person's most distinctive features of all are likely to play a role in how someone with dementia copes with his increasing deficiencies. Personality characteristics may have a pathoplastic effect on both behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPS) or on cognition as well as cognitive decline. Cognitive disorders accompanied by BPS are a tremendous burden for both the patient and their proxies. This review suggests that premorbid personality characteristics are co-determinants of BPS in cognitive disorders, but much effort is needed to clarify whether or not specific premorbid personality traits are associated with specific BPS as no strong links have so far emerged. This review further shows that a growing field of research is interested in the links not only between quite short-lived emotional states and cognitive processes, but also between longstanding personality traits and cognition in both healthy individuals and patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, a few studies found that specific premorbid personality traits may be risk factors for neurodegenerative diseases. However, research findings in this area remain scarce despite a huge literature on personality and cognitive disorders in general. An important shortcoming that hampers so far the progress of our understanding in these domains is the confusion in the literature between longstanding premorbid personality traits and transient personality changes observed in neurodegenerative diseases. Few studies have based their assessments on accepted personality theories and carefully investigated premorbid personality traits in patients with cognitive disorders, although assessing personality may be complicated in these patients. Studying the impact of personality characteristics in cognitive disorders is an especially promising field of research in particular when concomitantly using neurobiological approaches, in

  18. Supplemental substances derived from foods as adjunctive therapeutic agents for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and disorders.

    PubMed

    Bigford, Gregory E; Del Rossi, Gianluca

    2014-07-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders and diseases (NDDs) that are either chronically acquired or triggered by a singular detrimental event are a rapidly growing cause of disability and/or death. In recent times, there have been major advancements in our understanding of various neurodegenerative disease states that have revealed common pathologic features or mechanisms. The many mechanistic parallels discovered between various neurodegenerative diseases suggest that a single therapeutic approach may be used to treat multiple disease conditions. Of late, natural compounds and supplemental substances have become an increasingly attractive option to treat NDDs because there is growing evidence that these nutritional constituents have potential adjunctive therapeutic effects (be it protective or restorative) on various neurodegenerative diseases. Here we review relevant experimental and clinical data on supplemental substances (i.e., curcuminoids, rosmarinic acid, resveratrol, acetyl-L-carnitine, and ω-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids) that have demonstrated encouraging therapeutic effects on chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and neurodegeneration resulting from acute adverse events, such as traumatic brain injury.

  19. Endocannabinoids and Neurodegenerative Disorders: Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Chorea, Alzheimer's Disease, and Others.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Romero, Julián; Ramos, José A

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of the endocannabinoid signaling system in controlling neuronal survival, an extremely important issue to be considered when developing new therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. First, we will describe the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and the signaling pathways, underlying these neuroprotective properties, including the control of glutamate homeostasis, calcium influx, the toxicity of reactive oxygen species, glial activation and other inflammatory events; and the induction of autophagy. We will then concentrate on the preclinical studies and the few clinical trials that have been carried out targeting endocannabinoid signaling in three important chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, and Alzheimer's disease), as well as in other less well-studied disorders. We will end by offering some ideas and proposals for future research that should be carried out to optimize endocannabinoid-based treatments for these disorders. Such studies will strengthen the possibility that these therapies will be investigated in the clinical scenario and licensed for their use in specific disorders.

  20. Targeting molecules to medicine with mTOR, autophagy and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are significantly increasing in incidence as the age of the global population continues to climb with improved life expectancy. At present, more than 30 million individuals throughout the world are impacted by acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders with limited treatment strategies. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), also known as the mammalian target of rapamycin, is a 289 kDa serine/threonine protein kinase that offers exciting possibilities for novel treatment strategies for a host of neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, epilepsy, stroke and trauma. mTOR governs the programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy that can determine neuronal stem cell development, precursor cell differentiation, cell senescence, cell survival and ultimate cell fate. Coupled to the cellular biology of mTOR are a number of considerations for the development of novel treatments involving the fine control of mTOR signalling, tumourigenesis, complexity of the apoptosis and autophagy relationship, functional outcome in the nervous system, and the intimately linked pathways of growth factors, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), silent mating type information regulation two homologue one (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1) and others. Effective clinical translation of the cellular signalling mechanisms of mTOR offers provocative avenues for new drug development in the nervous system tempered only by the need to elucidate further the intricacies of the mTOR pathway.

  1. Phenotypes, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Genetic factors, atopy, and early respiratory tract infections are well-recognized factors predisposing to childhood-onset asthma. Adult-onset asthma is more often associated with obesity, smoking, depression, or other life-style or environmental factors, even though genetic factors and respiratory tract infections may also play a role in adult-onset disease. Adult-onset asthma is characterized by absence of atopy and is often severe requiring treatment with high dose of inhaled and/or oral steroids. Variety of risk factors and nonatopic nature of adult-onset disease suggest that variety of mechanisms is involved in the disease pathogenesis and that these mechanisms differ from the pathobiology of childhood-onset asthma with prevailing Th2 airway inflammation. Recognition of the mechanisms and mediators that drive the adult-onset disease helps to develop novel strategies for the treatment. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of adult-onset asthma and to concentrate on the mechanisms and mediators involved in establishing adult-onset asthma in response to specific risk factors. We also discuss the involvement of these mechanisms in the currently recognized phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. PMID:26538828

  2. Changes in mitochondrial function are pivotal in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders: How important is BDNF?

    PubMed Central

    Markham, A; Bains, R; Franklin, P; Spedding, M

    2014-01-01

    The brain is at the very limit of its energy supply and has evolved specific means of adapting function to energy supply, of which mitochondria form a crucial link. Neurotrophic and inflammatory processes may not only have opposite effects on neuroplasticity, but also involve opposite effects on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic processes, respectively, modulated by stress and glucocorticoids, which also have marked effects on mood. Neurodegenerative processes show marked disorders in oxidative metabolism in key brain areas, sometimes decades before symptoms appear (Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases). We argue that brain-derived neurotrophic factor couples activity to changes in respiratory efficiency and these effects may be opposed by inflammatory cytokines, a key factor in neurodegenerative processes. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24720259

  3. Exome Sequencing Links Corticospinal Motor Neuron Disease to Common Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hofree, Matan; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Heiberg, Andrew D.; Abdellateef, Mostafa; Rosti, Basak; Scott, Eric; Mansour, Lobna; Masri, Amira; Kayserili, Hulya; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M. H.; Karminejad, Ariana; Kara, Majdi; Kara, Bulent; Bozorgmehri, Bita; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Mojahedi, Faezeh; El Din Mahmoud, Iman Gamal; Bouslam, Naima; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Benomar, Ali; Hanein, Sylvain; Raymond, Laure; Forlani, Sylvie; Mascaro, Massimo; Selim, Laila; Shehata, Nabil; Al-Allawi, Nasir; Bindu, P.S.; Azam, Matloob; Gunel, Murat; Caglayan, Ahmet; Bilguvar, Kaya; Tolun, Aslihan; Issa, Mahmoud Y.; Schroth, Jana; Spencer, Emily G.; Rosti, Rasim O.; Akizu, Naiara; Vaux, Keith K.; Johansen, Anide; Koh, Alice A.; Megahed, Hisham; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Gabriel, Stacy B.; Ideker, Trey; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are neurodegenerative motor neuron diseases characterized by progressive age-dependent loss of corticospinal motor tract function. Although the genetic basis is partly understood, only a fraction of cases can receive a genetic diagnosis, and a global view of HSP is lacking. By using whole-exome sequencing in combination with network analysis, we identified 18 previously unknown putative HSP genes and validated nearly all of these genes functionally or genetically. The pathways highlighted by these mutations link HSP to cellular transport, nucleotide metabolism, and synapse and axon development. Network analysis revealed a host of further candidate genes, of which three were mutated in our cohort. Our analysis links HSP to other neurodegenerative disorders and can facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of disease. PMID:24482476

  4. The role of trace metallic elements in neurodegenerative disorders: quantitative analysis using XRF and XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Rabionet, Mariona

    2005-07-01

    The present paper focuses on the analysis of trace metallic elements and their role in neurodegenerative disorders. The use of synchrotron radiation microbeams allows investigation of pathological tissues from Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases in a nondestructive manner and at cellular level. By employing X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) technique, the chemical state of the investigated elements can be determined, while energy-selective X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy provides the spatial distribution of each element in each oxidative state selectively. The investigated tissues (derived from human, monkey and mouse specimens) show distinct imbalances of metallic elements such as Zn and Cu as well as Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) redox pair, which point to oxidative stress as a crucial factor in the development or progress of these neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Refractory Coats’ Disease of Adult Onset

    PubMed Central

    Beselga, D.; Campos, A.; Mendes, S.; Carvalheira, F.; Castro, M.; Castanheira, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We present the case of an 18-year-old Caucasian male with a unilateral macular star and retinal vascular anomalies compatible with adult onset Coats’ disease. Methods Diagnosis was based on fundoscopic, fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography findings. Results The patient presented to our emergency department with complaints of low vision in his left eye (LE) detected 10 days before. The best-corrected visual acuity in the LE was 20/50. Fundoscopy of the LE evidenced a complete macular star. Optical coherence tomography showed increased retinal thickness, infiltration of the retinal wall, and detachment of the neuroepithelium. Angiography revealed no appreciable diffusion in the macula. Above the superior temporal (ST) arcade, anomalies in the retinal vasculature were found, with interruption of the peripheral vessels and vessels which were ‘sausage’-like. After 1 month, the LE vision evolved to hand movements. Laser photocoagulation was performed in the ST quadrant. Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab 1.25 mg/0.05 ml and photodynamic therapy were performed without any significant changes, progression of ST serous detachment of the neuroepithelium, and finally progression to macular fibrosis. Discussion Coats’ disease is usually diagnosed in childhood, but rare cases may occur in adults. Those cases usually have a more indolent course which was not observed in our patient. When there is macular involvement, prognosis is more guarded, despite treatment. PMID:22548045

  6. Stem cells in neuroinjury and neurodegenerative disorders: challenges and future neurotherapeutic prospects.

    PubMed

    Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Kobeissy, Firas H; Itani, Muhieddine; Nokkari, Amaly; Wang, Kevin K W

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases and neural injury disorders is increasing worldwide. Research is now focusing on improving current neurogenesis techniques including neural stem cell therapy and other biochemical drug-based approaches to ameliorate these disorders. Unfortunately, we are still facing many obstacles that are rendering current neurotherapies ineffective in clinical trials for reasons that are yet to be discovered. That is why we should start by fully understanding the complex mechanisms of neurogenesis and the factors that affect it, or else, all our suggested therapies would fail since they would not be targeting the essence of the neurological disorder but rather the symptoms. One possible paradigm shift is to switch from neuroprotectant therapies towards neurodegeneration/neurorestorative approaches. In addition, other and our laboratories are increasingly focusing on combining the use of pharmacological agents (such as Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors or other growth factors (such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)) and stem cell treatment to enhance the survivability and/or differentiation capacity of transplanted stem cells in neurotrauma or other neurodegeneration animal models. Ongoing stem cell research is surely on the verge of a breakthrough of multiple effective therapeutic options for neurodegenerative disorders. Once, we fully comprehend the process of neurogenesis and its components, we will fully be capable of manipulating and utilizing it. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge of neuroregenerative therapies and their associated challenges.

  7. Endogenous neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders: with particular regard to the kynurenines

    PubMed Central

    Zádori, Dénes; Klivényi, Péter; Plangár, Imola; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are progressive chronic neurodegenerative disorders that are accompanied by a considerable impairment of the motor functions. PD may develop for familial or sporadic reasons, whereas HD is based on a definite genetic mutation. Nevertheless, the pathological processes involve oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity in both cases. A number of metabolic routes are affected in these disorders. The decrease in antioxidant capacity and alterations in the kynurenine pathway, the main pathway of the tryptophan metabolism, are features that deserve particular interest, because the changes in levels of neuroactive kynurenine pathway compounds appear to be strongly related to the oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity involved in the disease pathogenesis. Increase of the antioxidant capacity and pharmacological manipulation of the kynurenine pathway are therefore promising therapeutic targets in these devastating disorders. PMID:21155972

  8. Visual Hallucinations in the Psychosis Spectrum and Comparative Information From Neurodegenerative Disorders and Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Flavie; Collerton, Daniel; ffytche, Dominic H.; Jardri, Renaud; Pins, Delphine; Dudley, Robert; Blom, Jan Dirk; Mosimann, Urs Peter; Eperjesi, Frank; Ford, Stephen; Larøi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Much of the research on visual hallucinations (VHs) has been conducted in the context of eye disease and neurodegenerative conditions, but little is known about these phenomena in psychiatric and nonclinical populations. The purpose of this article is to bring together current knowledge regarding VHs in the psychosis phenotype and contrast this data with the literature drawn from neurodegenerative disorders and eye disease. The evidence challenges the traditional views that VHs are atypical or uncommon in psychosis. The weighted mean for VHs is 27% in schizophrenia, 15% in affective psychosis, and 7.3% in the general community. VHs are linked to a more severe psychopathological profile and less favorable outcome in psychosis and neurodegenerative conditions. VHs typically co-occur with auditory hallucinations, suggesting a common etiological cause. VHs in psychosis are also remarkably complex, negative in content, and are interpreted to have personal relevance. The cognitive mechanisms of VHs in psychosis have rarely been investigated, but existing studies point to source-monitoring deficits and distortions in top-down mechanisms, although evidence for visual processing deficits, which feature strongly in the organic literature, is lacking. Brain imaging studies point to the activation of visual cortex during hallucinations on a background of structural and connectivity changes within wider brain networks. The relationship between VHs in psychosis, eye disease, and neurodegeneration remains unclear, although the pattern of similarities and differences described in this review suggests that comparative studies may have potentially important clinical and theoretical implications. PMID:24936084

  9. [Epigenetic heredity (deoxyribonucleic acid methylation): Clinical context in neurodegenerative disorders and ATXN2 gene].

    PubMed

    Laffita-Mesa, José Miguel; Bauer, Peter

    2014-10-21

    Epigenetics is the group of changes in the phenotype which are related with the process independently of the primary DNA sequence. These changes are intimately related with changes in the gene expression level and its profile across the body. These are mediated by histone tail modifications, DNA methylation, micro-RNAs, with chromatin remodeling remaining as the foundation of epigenetic changes. DNA methylation involves the covalent addition of methyl group to cytosine of the DNA, which is mediated by methyltransferases enzymes. DNA methylation regulates gene expression by repressing transcription, while de-methylation activates gene transcription. Several human diseases are related with the epigenetic process: cancer, Alzheimer disease, stroke, Parkinson disease, and diabetes. We present here the basis of epigenetic inheritance and show the pathogenic mechanisms relating epigenetics in human diseases, specifically with regard to neurodegeneration. We discuss current concepts aimed at understanding the contribution of epigenetics to human neurodegenerative diseases. We also discuss recent findings obtained in our and other centers regarding the ATXN2 gene that causes spinocerebellar ataxia 2 and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Epigenetics play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of human diseases and in several neurodegenerative disorders, and this knowledge will illuminate the pathways in the diagnostic and therapeutic field, which ultimately will be translated into the clinic context of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Small-molecule modulation of HDAC6 activity: The propitious therapeutic strategy to vanquish neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad

    2017-02-08

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are epigenetic enzymes creating the transcriptionally inactive state of chromatin by erasing acetyl moiety from histone and non-histone substrates. HDAC6 modulates several biological pathways in dividing cells as well as in post-mitotic neurons, and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. The distinct cellular functions and survival in these cells are reliant on HDAC6-mediated processes including intracellular trafficking, chaperone-mediated stress responses, anti-oxidation and protein degradation. Consequently, the interest in HDAC6 as a promising therapeutic target to tackle neurodegenerative disorders has escalated markedly over the last decade. Taking these grim facts into consideration the current article focuses on structural organization of HDAC6. Importantly, we discuss the general role of HDACs in cognition and neuronal death. Further, we describe the unique involvement of HDAC6 in eliminating protein aggregates, oxidative stress and mitochondrial transport. Moreover, the article rigorously details how the impaired activity of HDAC6 culminates in neurodegenerative complications like Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Lastly, we provide crystal clear view regarding the fascinating research areas which may lead to development of novel small-molecules for enhanced therapeutic benefit against these therapeutically arduous neurodegenerative maladies.

  11. Aging, Protein Aggregation, Chaperones, and Neurodegenerative Disorders: Mechanisms of Coupling and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Late onset is a key unifying feature of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and prion disorders. While sporadic cases typically emerge during the patient’s seventh decade of life or later, mutation-linked, familial cases manifest during the fifth or sixth decade. This common temporal emergence pattern raises the prospect that slowing aging may prevent the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates that lead to the development of these disorders, postpone the onset of these maladies, and alleviate their symptoms once emerged. Invertebrate-based studies indicated that reducing the activity of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects from neurodegeneration-linked toxic protein aggregation. The validity of this approach has been tested and confirmed in mammals as reducing the activity of the IGF-1 signaling pathway-protected Alzheimer’s model mice from the behavioral and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here I review the recent advances in the field, describe the known mechanistic links between toxic protein aggregation and the aging process, and delineate the future therapeutic potential of IIS reduction as a treatment for various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23908845

  12. Hippocampal-Prefrontal Circuit and Disrupted Functional Connectivity in Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, the hippocampus has been studied extensively as part of a brain system responsible for learning and memory, and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) participates in numerous cognitive functions including working memory, flexibility, decision making, and rewarding learning. The neuronal projections from the hippocampus, either directly or indirectly, to the PFC, referred to as the hippocampal-prefrontal cortex (Hip-PFC) circuit, play a critical role in cognitive and emotional regulation and memory consolidation. Although in certain psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, structural connectivity viewed by imaging techniques has been consistently found to be associated with clinical phenotype and disease severity, the focus has moved towards the investigation of connectivity correlates of molecular pathology and coupling of oscillation. Moreover, functional and structural connectivity measures have been emerging as potential intermediate biomarkers for neuronal disorders. In this review, we summarize progress on the anatomic, molecular, and electrophysiological characters of the Hip-PFC circuit in cognition and emotion processes with an emphasis on oscillation and functional connectivity, revealing a disrupted Hip-PFC connectivity and electrical activity in psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders as a promising candidate of neural marker for neuronal disorders. PMID:25918722

  13. Aging, protein aggregation, chaperones, and neurodegenerative disorders: mechanisms of coupling and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ehud

    2012-10-01

    Late onset is a key unifying feature of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and prion disorders. While sporadic cases typically emerge during the patient's seventh decade of life or later, mutation-linked, familial cases manifest during the fifth or sixth decade. This common temporal emergence pattern raises the prospect that slowing aging may prevent the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates that lead to the development of these disorders, postpone the onset of these maladies, and alleviate their symptoms once emerged. Invertebrate-based studies indicated that reducing the activity of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects from neurodegeneration-linked toxic protein aggregation. The validity of this approach has been tested and confirmed in mammals as reducing the activity of the IGF-1 signaling pathway-protected Alzheimer's model mice from the behavioral and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here I review the recent advances in the field, describe the known mechanistic links between toxic protein aggregation and the aging process, and delineate the future therapeutic potential of IIS reduction as a treatment for various neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Pig models of neurodegenerative disorders: Utilization in cell replacement-based preclinical safety and efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Dolezalova, Dasa; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Bjarkam, Carsten R; Sørensen, Jens Christian H; Cunningham, Miles; Weingarten, David; Ciacci, Joseph D; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Hefferan, Michael P; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson; Bui, Jack; Strnadel, Jan; Marsala, Martin

    2014-08-15

    An important component for successful translation of cell replacement-based therapies into clinical practice is the utilization of large animal models to conduct efficacy and/or safety cell dosing studies. Over the past few decades, several large animal models (dog, cat, nonhuman primate) were developed and employed in cell replacement studies; however, none of these models appears to provide a readily available platform to conduct effective and large-scale preclinical studies. In recent years, numerous pig models of neurodegenerative disorders were developed using both a transgenic approach as well as invasive surgical techniques. The pig model (naïve noninjured animals) was recently used successfully to define the safety and optimal dosing of human spinal stem cells after grafting into the central nervous system (CNS) in immunosuppressed animals. The data from these studies were used in the design of a human clinical protocol used in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients in a Phase I clinical trial. In addition, a highly inbred (complete major histocompatibility complex [MHC] match) strain of miniature pigs is available which permits the design of comparable MHC combinations between the donor cells and the graft recipient as used in human patients. Jointly, these studies show that the pig model can represent an effective large animal model to be used in preclinical cell replacement modeling. This review summarizes the available pig models of neurodegenerative disorders and the use of some of these models in cell replacement studies. The challenges and potential future directions in more effective use of the pig neurodegenerative models are also discussed.

  15. Contribution of TNF-α to the development of retinal neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Al-Gayyar, M M; Elsherbiny, N M

    2013-03-01

    During the late 1970s, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was initially recognized as an endotoxin-induced substance that was mainly produced by macrophages, and able to cause the lysis of certain tumor cells. Subsequent research demonstrated that TNF-α mediates a broad range of cellular activities, including proliferation, survival, differentiation and apoptosis. It is also considered to be essential for the induction and maintenance of the inflammatory immune responses. Meanwhile, visual impairment imposes a substantial disease burden on society. It is associated with both significant economic impact and reduction in quality of life. Visual impairment raises serious social challenges for both patients and their families, interfering with day-to-day life, and can limit employment possibilities. Many of the most common, irreversible blinding pathologies involve neuronal loss from the retina, which is the light-sensing tissue of the eye. The retina, being part of the central nervous system, is unable to regenerate neurons lost to disease. Therefore, in the current review we will discuss the association between increased expression of TNF-α with neurodegenerative disorders, downstream cellular signaling mechanisms following interaction of TNF-α with its receptors, and the role of TNF-α as a possible target in the treatment of retinal neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in neurodegenerative disorders: focus on HIV-associated neurological complications

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Yang, Lu; Cai, Yu; Niu, Fang; Mezzacappa, Frank; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane-enriched extracellular vesicles with a proposed diameter in the range of 30–100 nm. They are released during both normal homeostasis as well as under pathological conditions by most cell types. In recent years, there has been robust interest in the study of these vesicles as conduits for the delivery of information between cells in both analogous as well as disparate tissues. Their ability to transport specialized cargo including signaling mediators, proteins, messenger RNA and miRNAs characterizes these vesicles as primary facilitators of cell-to-cell communication and regulation. Exosomes have also been demonstrated to have important roles in the field of cancer biology and metastasis. More recently, their role in several neurodegenerative disorders has been gaining increased momentum as these particles have been shown to promote the spread of toxic factors such as amyloid beta and prions, adding further validity to their role as important regulators of disease pathogenesis. This review briefly summarizes current findings and thoughts on exosome biology in the context of neurodegenerative disorders and the manipulation of these particles for the development of potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27882942

  17. Quetiapine for Psychosis in Parkinson Disease and Neurodegenerative Parkinsonian Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Desmarais, Philippe; Massoud, Fadi; Filion, Josée; Nguyen, Quoc Dinh; Bajsarowicz, Paulina

    2016-07-01

    We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to assess the high-level evidence regarding the role of quetiapine in the treatment of psychosis in patients with neurodegenerative parkinsonian disorders. Studies were included in the qualitative review if they (1) enrolled participants with diagnosis of Parkinson disease, Lewy body dementia, or any other neurodegenerative parkinsonian disorders; (2) assessed the efficacy of quetiapine; and (3) evaluated psychotic and motor outcomes using validated tools. Of the 341 manuscripts identified, 7 studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The studies' risk of bias was considered low. A total of 241 participants enrolled in these trials. Heterogeneity was high due to inclusion criteria, user definitions, assessment tools, and study design. Although not causing any motor deterioration, quetiapine failed to significantly reduce psychotic symptoms compared to placebo when objectively assessed on the Brief Psychotic Rating Scale, the most frequently reported scale in these studies. High loss to follow-up and dropout rates as well as significant improvement in psychotic symptoms in the placebo groups may have affected measurements of possible positive medication effects.

  18. Epidemic spreading model to characterize misfolded proteins propagation in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Sotero, Roberto C; Toussaint, Paule J; Evans, Alan C

    2014-11-01

    Misfolded proteins (MP) are a key component in aging and associated neurodegenerative disorders. For example, misfolded Amyloid-ß (Aß) and tau proteins are two neuropathogenic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying intra-brain MP propagation/deposition remain essentially uncharacterized. Here, is introduced an epidemic spreading model (ESM) for MP dynamics that considers propagation-like interactions between MP agents and the brain's clearance response across the structural connectome. The ESM reproduces advanced Aß deposition patterns in the human brain (explaining 46∼56% of the variance in regional Aß loads, in 733 subjects from the ADNI database). Furthermore, this model strongly supports a) the leading role of Aß clearance deficiency and early Aß onset age during Alzheimer's disease progression, b) that effective anatomical distance from Aß outbreak region explains regional Aß arrival time and Aß deposition likelihood, c) the multi-factorial impact of APOE e4 genotype, gender and educational level on lifetime intra-brain Aß propagation, and d) the modulatory impact of Aß propagation history on tau proteins concentrations, supporting the hypothesis of an interrelated pathway between Aß pathophysiology and tauopathy. To our knowledge, the ESM is the first computational model highlighting the direct link between structural brain networks, production/clearance of pathogenic proteins and associated intercellular transfer mechanisms, individual genetic/demographic properties and clinical states in health and disease. In sum, the proposed ESM constitutes a promising framework to clarify intra-brain region to region transference mechanisms associated with aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Lysine acetyltransferases CBP and p300 as therapeutic targets in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Valor, Luis M; Viosca, Jose; Lopez-Atalaya, Jose P; Barco, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases and neurodevelopmental syndromes, are frequently associated with dysregulation of various essential cellular mechanisms, such as transcription, mitochondrial respiration and protein degradation. In these complex scenarios, it is difficult to pinpoint the specific molecular dysfunction that initiated the pathology or that led to the fatal cascade of events that ends with the death of the neuron. Among the possible original factors, epigenetic dysregulation has attracted special attention. This review focuses on two highly related epigenetic factors that are directly involved in a number of neurological disorders, the lysine acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and E1A-associated protein p300 (p300). We first comment on the role of chromatin acetylation and the enzymes that control it, particularly CBP and p300, in neuronal plasticity and cognition. Next, we describe the involvement of these proteins in intellectual disability and in different neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we discuss the potential of ameliorative strategies targeting CBP/p300 for the treatment of these disorders.

  20. RTP801/REDD1: a stress coping regulator that turns into a troublemaker in neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Mercè; Romaní-Aumedes, Joan; Martín-Flores, Núria; Pérez-Fernández, Víctor; Malagelada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates essential processes directed to preserve cellular homeostasis, such as cell growth, proliferation, survival, protein synthesis and autophagy. Importantly, mTOR pathway deregulation has been related to many diseases. Indeed, it has become a hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, since a fine-tuned regulation of mTOR activities is crucial for neuron function and survival. RTP801/REDD1/Dig2 has become one of the most puzzling regulators of mTOR. Although the mechanism is not completely understood, RTP801 inactivates mTOR and Akt via the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC1/TSC2) in many cellular contexts. Intriguingly, RTP801 protects dividing cells from hypoxia or H2O2-induced apoptosis, while it sensitizes differentiated cells to stress. Based on experimental models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), it has been proposed that at early stages of the disease, stress-induced RTP801 upregulation contributes to mTOR repression, in an attempt to maintain cell function and viability. However, if RTP801 elevation is sustained, it leads to neuron cell death by a sequential inhibition of mTOR and Akt. Here, we will review RTP801 deregulation of mTOR in a context of PD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25324725

  1. Exposure to lipophilic chemicals as a cause of neurological impairments, neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Zeliger, Harold I

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have associated environmental exposure to chemicals with neurological impairments (NIs) including neuropathies, cognitive, motor and sensory impairments; neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) including autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); neurodegenerative diseases (NDGs) including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The environmental chemicals shown to induce all these diseases include persistent organic pollutants (POPs), the plastic exudates bisphenol A and phthalates, low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHCs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It is reported here that though these chemicals differ widely in their chemical properties, reactivities and known points of attack in humans, a common link does exist between them. All are lipophilic species found in serum and they promote the sequential absorption of otherwise non-absorbed toxic hydrophilic species causing these diseases.

  2. Exposure to lipophilic chemicals as a cause of neurological impairments, neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have associated environmental exposure to chemicals with neurological impairments (NIs) including neuropathies, cognitive, motor and sensory impairments; neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) including autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); neurodegenerative diseases (NDGs) including Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The environmental chemicals shown to induce all these diseases include persistent organic pollutants (POPs), the plastic exudates bisphenol A and phthalates, low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWHCs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). It is reported here that though these chemicals differ widely in their chemical properties, reactivities and known points of attack in humans, a common link does exist between them. All are lipophilic species found in serum and they promote the sequential absorption of otherwise non-absorbed toxic hydrophilic species causing these diseases. PMID:24678247

  3. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Akbarian, Schahram

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of brain epigenomes, which consist of various types of DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications, is providing new and unprecedented insights into the mechanisms of normal neural development, neurological disease and aging. Traditionally, chromatin defects in brain were considered static lesions of early development that occurred in the context of rare genetic syndromes but it is now clear that mutations and maladaptations of the epigenetic machinery cover a much wider continuum, including adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Here, we describe how recent advances in neuroepigenetics have contributed to an improved mechanistic understanding of developmental and degenerative brain disorders, as well as how they could influence the development of future therapies for these conditions. PMID:22869198

  4. Adult onset Still’s disease with dermatopathic lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ahmad Z.; AlSheef, Mohammad; Qureshi, Waqas T.; Amjad, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving multiple systems. The symptoms mimic those of lymphomas, therefore, the diagnosis of lymphoma needs to be excluded prior to establishing the diagnosis of AOSD. Another similar condition is dermatopathic lymphadenopathy (DL). In DL, the histopathological appearance of lymph node biopsy may also mimic AOSD. The DL is associated with several systemic pathologies, such as malignant lymphomas, and rarely AOSD. We present a case of a 43-year-old male presented with 3 months history of fatigue, fever, and lymphadenopathy. Initial work-up satisfactorily met the criteria for diagnosis of AOSD. But considering the well-known association of DL with hematological malignancies, detailed pathological studies were considered, including tumor markers to rule out the possibility of malignancy. The patient was started on steroids and showed remarkable recovery within 2 weeks. Evaluation of malignant lymphomas in a patient with DL is important, in order to diagnose AOSD and rule out hematological malignancy. PMID:27761568

  5. Adult-onset hypophosphatemic osteomalacia associated with Sjogren syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guohua; Zhang, Yuwei; Hu, Shuang; Liu, Bin; Kuang, Anren

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hypophosphatemic osteomalacia (HO) is a metabolic bone disease, exhibiting different etiologies such as genetic mutation, tumor induction, dysimmunity, or renal disease. Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a connective tissue disorder commonly involving exocrine glands; however kidney involvement is also encountered, leading to abnormal phosphorus metabolism, even HO. Patient concerns: A 47-year-old female patient presented progressively worsening pain in the chest wall, back and bilateral lower extremities as well as muscle weakness was referred to our department. Diagnoses, interventions and outcomes: Due to the laboratory test results, radiographic findings and pathologic results, she was diagnosed with adult-onset HO associated with SS. She was then treated with alkalinization, steroids, neutral phosphate, calcium supplements together with activated vitamin D. So far, she recovered uneventfully with relieved pain and increased serum phosphorus level. Lessons: HO may be secondary to renal tubular acidosis of SS patients, and it might be a diagnostic challenge when the kidney involvement in SS is latent and precede the typical sicca symptoms. PMID:28353596

  6. Epigenetic Research of Neurodegenerative Disorders Using Patient iPSC-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a role in human disease but their involvement in pathologies from the central nervous system has been hampered by the complexity of the brain together with its unique cellular architecture and diversity. Until recently, disease targeted neural types were only available as postmortem materials after many years of disease evolution. Current in vitro systems of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated by cell reprogramming of somatic cells from patients have provided valuable disease models recapitulating key pathological molecular events. Yet whether cell reprogramming on itself implies a truly epigenetic reprogramming, the epigenetic mechanisms governing this process are only partially understood. Moreover, elucidating epigenetic regulation using patient-specific iPSC-derived neural models is expected to have a great impact to unravel the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and to hopefully expand future therapeutic possibilities. Here we will critically review current knowledge of epigenetic involvement in neurodegenerative disorders focusing on the potential of iPSCs as a promising tool for epigenetic research of these diseases. PMID:26697081

  7. Proline-rich polypeptides in Alzheimer's disease and neurodegenerative disorders -- therapeutic potential or a mirage?

    PubMed

    Gladkevich, A; Bosker, F; Korf, J; Yenkoyan, K; Vahradyan, H; Aghajanov, M

    2007-10-01

    The development of effective and safe drugs for a growing Alzheimer disease population is an increasing need at present. Both experimental and clinical evidence support a beneficial effect of proline-rich polypeptides in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. Experimental data have shown that proline-rich polypeptides isolated from bovine neurohypophisis possess neuroprotective and neuromodulatory properties in mice with aluminum neurotoxicosis or neuronal damage caused by venoms and toxins. Proline-rich polypeptides from ovine colostrums, so called Colostrinin, have been shown to produce cognitive improvement in an experimental model and in patients with Alzheimer disease. However, the precise mechanism underlying the neuroprotective action of proline-rich polypeptides is not very well established. Moreover, studies pointing at a neuroprotective effect of proline-rich polypeptides from bovine neurohypophisis in humans have not been reported thus far. The authors conclude that more detailed information on the mode of action of proline-rich polypeptides is needed as well as confirmation of their efficacy in broad clinical trials before this approach can really show its potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Is Alzheimer's disease a neurodegenerative or a vascular disorder? Data, dogma, and dialectics.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Jack C

    2004-03-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unknown. This gap in knowledge has created a stumbling block in the search for a genuinely effective treatment or cure for this dementia. This article summarises the arguments for a causal role for either amyloid deposition or cerebrovascular pathology as the primary trigger in the development of non-genetic AD. A bare-bones survey of the published research reveals no compelling evidence that amyloid deposition is neurotoxic in human beings or that it results in neurodegenerative changes involving synaptic, metabolic, or neuronal loss in human or transgenic-mouse brains. By contrast, the data supporting AD as a primary vascular disorder are more convincing. Findings suggesting a vascular cause of AD come from epidemiological, neuroimaging, pathological, pharmacotherapeutic, and clinical studies. The consensus of these studies indicates that chronic brain hypoperfusion is linked to AD risk factors, AD preclinical detection and pharmacotherapeutic action of AD symptoms.

  9. Metabolic control of the proteotoxic stress response: implications in diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuo-Hui; Dai, Chengkai

    2016-11-01

    Proteome homeostasis, or proteostasis, is essential to maintain cellular fitness and its disturbance is associated with a broad range of human health conditions and diseases. Cells are constantly challenged by various extrinsic and intrinsic insults, which perturb cellular proteostasis and provoke proteotoxic stress. To counter proteomic perturbations and preserve proteostasis, cells mobilize the proteotoxic stress response (PSR), an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional program mediated by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). The HSF1-mediated PSR guards the proteome against misfolding and aggregation. In addition to proteotoxic stress, emerging studies reveal that this proteostatic mechanism also responds to cellular energy state. This regulation is mediated by the key cellular metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In this review, we present an overview of the maintenance of proteostasis by HSF1, the metabolic regulation of the PSR, particularly focusing on AMPK, and their implications in the two major age-related diseases-diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Committing to Memory: Memory Prosthetics Show Promise in Helping Those with Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Solis, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Cell phone chimes, sticky notes, even the proverbial string around a finger-these timehonored external cues help guard against our inevitable memory lapses. But some internal help to the brain itself may be on the way in the form of what's being called memory prosthetics. Once considered to be on the fringes of neuroscience, the idea of adding hardware to the brain to help with memory has gathered steam. In 2014, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) made a US$30 million investment in memory prosthetic research as part of the Obama administration's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies initiative. In August 2016, Kernel, a startup based in Los Angeles, California, announced its goal to develop a clinical memory device for those debilitated by neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Brain Atrophy of Secondary REM-Sleep Behavior Disorder in Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Im, Hyung Kyun; Kim, Juhan; Han, Jee-young; de Leon, Mony; Deshpande, Anup; Moon, Won-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Background Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) may present as an early manifestation of an evolving neurodegenerative disorder with alpha-synucleinopathy. Objective We investigated that dementia with RBD might show distinctive cortical atrophic patterns. Methods A total of 31 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD), 23 with clinically probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and 36 healthy controls participated in this study. Patients with AD and IPD were divided into two groups according to results of polysomnography and rated with a validated Korean version of the RBD screening questionnaire (RBDSQ-K), which covers the clinical features of RBD. Voxel-based morphometry was adapted for detection of regional brain atrophy among groups of subjects. Results Scores on RBDSQ-K were higher in the IPD group (3.54 ± 2.8) than in any other group (AD, 2.94 ± 2.4; healthy controls, 2.31 ± 1.9). Atrophic changes according to RBDSQ-K scores were characteristically in the posterior part of the brain and brain stem, including the hypothalamus and posterior temporal region including the hippocampus and bilateral occipital lobe. AD patients with RBD showed more specialized atrophic patterns distributed in the posterior and inferior parts of the brain including the bilateral temporal and occipital cortices compared to groups without RBD. The IPD group with RBD showed right temporal cortical atrophic changes. Conclusion The group of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and RBD showed distinctive brain atrophy patterns, especially in the posterior and inferior cortices. These results suggest that patients diagnosed with clinically probable AD or IPD might have mixed pathologies including α-synucleinopathy. PMID:27060938

  12. Role of neurotrophic factor alterations in the neurodegenerative process in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Fields, Jerel; Dumaop, Wilmar; Langford, T D; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, E

    2014-03-01

    Migration of HIV infected cells into the CNS is associated with a spectrum of neurological disorders, ranging from milder forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) to HIV-associated dementia (HAD). These neuro-psychiatric syndromes are related to the neurodegenerative pathology triggered by the release of HIV proteins and cytokine/chemokines from monocytes/macrophages into the CNS -a condition known as HIV encephalitis (HIVE). As a result of more effective combined anti-retroviral therapy patients with HIV are living longer and thus the frequency of HAND has increased considerably, resulting in an overlap between the neurodegenerative pathology associated with HIV and that related to aging. In fact, HIV infection is believed to hasten the aging process. The mechanisms through which HIV and aging lead to neurodegeneration include: abnormal calcium flux, excitotoxicity, signaling abnormalities, oxidative stress and autophagy defects. Moreover, recent studies have shown that defects in the processing and transport of neurotrophic factors such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), neural growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived growth factor (BDNF) might also play a role. Recent evidence implicates alterations in neurotrophins in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration associated with HAND in the context of aging. Here, we report FGF overexpression curtails gp120-induced neurotoxicity in a double transgenic mouse model. Furthermore, our data show disparities in brain neurotrophic factor levels may be exacerbated in HIV patients over 50 years of age. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on neurotrophins and HAND in the context of developing new therapies to combat HIV infection in the aging population.

  13. Insulin, IGF-1 and GLP-1 signaling in neurodegenerative disorders: targets for disease modification?

    PubMed

    Bassil, Fares; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Bezard, Erwan; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2014-07-01

    Insulin and Insulin Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) play a major role in body homeostasis and glucose regulation. They also have paracrine/autocrine functions in the brain. The Insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to the control of neuronal excitability, nerve cell metabolism and cell survival. Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), known as an insulinotropic hormone has similar functions and growth like properties as insulin/IGF-1. Growing evidence suggests that dysfunction of these pathways contribute to the progressive loss of neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), the two most frequent neurodegenerative disorders. These findings have led to numerous studies in preclinical models of neurodegenerative disorders targeting insulin/IGF-1 and GLP-1 signaling with currently available anti-diabetics. These studies have shown that administration of insulin, IGF-1 and GLP-1 agonists reverses signaling abnormalities and has positive effects on surrogate markers of neurodegeneration and behavioral outcomes. Several proof-of-concept studies are underway that attempt to translate the encouraging preclinical results to patients suffering from AD and PD. In the first part of this review, we discuss physiological functions of insulin/IGF-1 and GLP-1 signaling pathways including downstream targets and receptors distribution within the brain. In the second part, we undertake a comprehensive overview of preclinical studies targeting insulin/IGF-1 or GLP-1 signaling for treating AD and PD. We then detail the design of clinical trials that have used anti-diabetics for treating AD and PD patients. We close with future considerations that treat relevant issues for successful translation of these encouraging preclinical results into treatments for patients with AD and PD.

  14. The role of iron in neurodegenerative disorders: insights and opportunities with synchrotron light

    PubMed Central

    Collingwood, Joanna F.; Davidson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence for iron dysregulation in many forms of disease, including a broad spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. In order to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological role of iron, it is helpful to be able to determine in detail the distribution of iron as it relates to metabolites, proteins, cells, and tissues, the chemical state and local environment of iron, and its relationship with other metal elements. Synchrotron light sources, providing primarily X-ray beams accompanied by access to longer wavelengths such as infra-red, are an outstanding tool for multi-modal non-destructive analysis of iron in these systems. The micro- and nano-focused X-ray beams that are generated at synchrotron facilities enable measurement of iron and other transition metal elements to be performed with outstanding analytic sensitivity and specificity. Recent developments have increased the scope for methods such as X-ray fluorescence mapping to be used quantitatively rather than semi-quantitatively. Burgeoning interest, coupled with technical advances and beamline development at synchrotron facilities, has led to substantial improvements in resources and methodologies in the field over the past decade. In this paper we will consider how the field has evolved with regard to the study of iron in proteins, cells, and brain tissue, and identify challenges in sample preparation and analysis. Selected examples will be used to illustrate the contribution, and future potential, of synchrotron X-ray analysis for the characterization of iron in model systems exhibiting iron dysregulation, and for human cases of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25191270

  15. Pharmacoinformatic and molecular docking studies reveal potential novel antidepressants against neurodegenerative disorders by targeting HSPB8

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Mannan, Shazia; Ali, Sannia

    2016-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuromuscular disorder characterized by length-dependent and progressive degeneration of peripheral nerves, leading to muscular weakness. Research has shown that mutated HSPB8 may be responsible for depression, neurodegenerative disorders, and improper functioning of peripheral nerves, resulting in neuromuscular disorders like CMT. In the current work, a hybrid approach of virtual screening and molecular docking studies was followed by homology modeling and pharmacophore identification. Detailed screening analyses were carried out by 2-D similarity search against prescribed antidepressant drugs with physicochemical properties. LigandScout was employed to ascertain novel molecules and pharmacophore properties. In this study, we report three novel compounds that showed maximum binding affinity with HSPB8. Docking analysis elucidated that Met37, Ser57, Ser58, Trp60, Thr63, Thr114, Lys115, Asp116, Gly117, Val152, Val154, Leu186, Asp189, Ser190, Gln191, and Glu192 are critical residues for ligand–receptor interactions. Our analyses suggested paroxetine as a potent compound for targeting HSPB8. Selected compounds have more effective energy scores than the selected drug analogs. Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis could be significant for further analysis of the binding pocket. The novel findings based on an in silico approach may be momentous for potent drug design against depression and CMT. PMID:27226709

  16. Siblings with the adult-onset slowly progressive type of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and a novel mutation, Ile346Ser, in PANK2: clinical features and (99m)Tc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT findings.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hiroshi; Koyano, Shigeru; Miyatake, Satoko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Tomita, Atsuko; Miyaji, Yosuke; Suzuki, Yume; Sawaishi, Yukio; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2010-03-15

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome (HSS), is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene are known to be responsible for PKAN. Several studies have revealed correlations between clinical phenotypes and particular PANK2 mutations. The adult-onset slowly progressive type of PKAN with PANK2 mutations is very rare. In this report, we describe siblings with the adult-onset slowly progressive type of PKAN with a novel mutation, Ile346Ser, in PANK2. The siblings had the same mutation in PANK2 and had common clinical signs such as misalignment of teeth, a high arched palate, hollow feet, a slight cognitive decline, and an apparent executive dysfunction, although they showed different patterns of movement disorders. Thus, even if PKAN patients have identical mutations, it is likely that they will present with different types of movement disorders. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in both patients showed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral frontoparietal lobes, the globus pallidus, the striatum, and around the ventriculus quartus. Cardiac uptake of [(123)I] meta-iodobenzylguanidine was normal in both patients. Analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations and the elucidation of mutational effects on pantothenate kinase 2 function, expression, and structure are important for understanding the mechanisms of PKAN.

  17. [Pathophysiology, subtypes, and treatments of adult-onset Still's disease: An update].

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Sève, P; Hot, A; Broussolle, C; Jamilloux, Y

    2015-05-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare and difficult to diagnose multisystemic disorder considered as a multigenic autoinflammatory syndrome. Its immunopathogenesis seems to be at the crossroads between inflammasomopathies and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, the most severe manifestation of the disease. According to recent insights in the pathophysiology and thanks to cohort studies and therapeutic trials, two phenotypes of adult-onset Still's disease may be distinguished: a systemic pattern, initially highly symptomatic and with a higher risk to exhibit life-threatening complications such as reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, where interleukin-1 blockade seems to be very effective, a chronic articular pattern, more indolent with arthritis in the foreground and less severe systemic manifestations, which would threat functional outcome and where interleukin-6 blockade seems to be more effective. This review focuses on these data.

  18. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied. PMID:27407236

  19. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dudziec, Ewa; Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied.

  20. Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders and Brain and Body Donation Program.

    PubMed

    Beach, Thomas G; Adler, Charles H; Sue, Lucia I; Serrano, Geidy; Shill, Holly A; Walker, Douglas G; Lue, LihFen; Roher, Alex E; Dugger, Brittany N; Maarouf, Chera; Birdsill, Alex C; Intorcia, Anthony; Saxon-Labelle, Megan; Pullen, Joel; Scroggins, Alexander; Filon, Jessica; Scott, Sarah; Hoffman, Brittany; Garcia, Angelica; Caviness, John N; Hentz, Joseph G; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Jacobson, Sandra A; Davis, Kathryn J; Belden, Christine M; Long, Kathy E; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Powell, Jessica J; Gale, Lisa D; Nicholson, Lisa R; Caselli, Richard J; Woodruff, Bryan K; Rapscak, Steven Z; Ahern, Geoffrey L; Shi, Jiong; Burke, Anna D; Reiman, Eric M; Sabbagh, Marwan N

    2015-08-01

    The Brain and Body Donation Program (BBDP) at Banner Sun Health Research Institute (http://www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org) started in 1987 with brain-only donations and currently has banked more than 1600 brains. More than 430 whole-body donations have been received since this service was commenced in 2005. The collective academic output of the BBDP is now described as the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders (AZSAND). Most BBDP subjects are enrolled as cognitively normal volunteers residing in the retirement communities of metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Specific recruitment efforts are also directed at subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cancer. The median age at death is 82. Subjects receive standardized general medical, neurological, neuropsychological and movement disorders assessments during life and more than 90% receive full pathological examinations by medically licensed pathologists after death. The Program has been funded through a combination of internal, federal and state of Arizona grants as well as user fees and pharmaceutical industry collaborations. Subsets of the Program are utilized by the US National Institute on Aging Arizona Alzheimer's Disease Core Center and the US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Brain and Tissue Resource for Parkinson's Disease and Related Disorders. Substantial funding has also been received from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research. The Program has made rapid autopsy a priority, with a 3.0-hour median post-mortem interval for the entire collection. The median RNA Integrity Number (RIN) for frozen brain and body tissue is 8.9 and 7.4, respectively. More than 2500 tissue requests have been served and currently about 200 are served annually. These requests have been made by more than 400 investigators located in 32 US states and 15 countries. Tissue from the BBDP has contributed to more than 350 publications and more than 200

  1. Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders and Brain and Body Donation Program

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Thomas G.; Adler, Charles H.; Sue, Lucia I.; Serrano, Geidy; Shill, Holly A.; Walker, Douglas G.; Lue, LihFen; Roher, Alex E.; Dugger, Brittany N.; Maarouf, Chera; Birdsill, Alex C.; Intorcia, Anthony; Saxon-Labelle, Megan; Pullen, Joel; Scroggins, Alexander; Filon, Jessica; Scott, Sarah; Hoffman, Brittany; Garcia, Angelica; Caviness, John N.; Hentz, Joseph G.; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Davis, Kathryn J.; Belden, Christine M.; Long, Kathy E.; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Powell, Jessica J.; Gale, Lisa D.; Nicholson, Lisa R.; Caselli, Richard J.; Woodruff, Bryan K.; Rapscak, Steven Z.; Ahern, Geoffrey L.; Shi, Jiong; Burke, Anna D.; Reiman, Eric M.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.

    2015-01-01

    The Brain and Body Donation Program (BBDP) at Banner Sun Health Research Institute (http://www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org) started in 1987 with brain-only donations and currently has banked more than 1600 brains. More than 430 whole-body donations have been received since this service was commenced in 2005. The collective academic output of the BBDP is now described as the Arizona Study of Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders (AZSAND). Most BBDP subjects are enrolled as cognitively normal volunteers residing in the retirement communities of metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Specific recruitment efforts are also directed at subjects with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and cancer. The median age at death is 82. Subjects receive standardized general medical, neurological, neuropsychological and movement disorders assessments during life and more than 90% receive full pathological examinations by medically licensed pathologists after death. The Program has been funded through a combination of internal, federal and state of Arizona grants as well as user fees and pharmaceutical industry collaborations. Subsets of the Program are utilized by the US National Institute on Aging Arizona Alzheimer’s Disease Core Center and the US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Brain and Tissue Resource for Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders. Substantial funding has also been received from the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. The Program has made rapid autopsy a priority, with a 3.0-hour median postmortem interval for the entire collection. The median RNA Integrity Number (RIN) for frozen brain and body tissue is 8.9 and 7.4, respectively. More than 2500 tissue requests have been served and currently about 200 are served annually. These requests have been made by more than 400 investigators located in 32 US states and 15 countries. Tissue from the BBDP has contributed to more than 350 publications and more than

  2. Mitochondria, metabolic disturbances, oxidative stress and the kynurenine system, with focus on neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Sas, Katalin; Robotka, Hermina; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2007-06-15

    The mitochondria have several important functions in the cell. A mitochondrial dysfunction causes an abatement in ATP production, oxidative damage and the induction of apoptosis, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of numerous disorders. This review focuses on mitochondrial dysfunctions and discusses their consequences and potential roles in the pathomechanism of neurodegenerative disorders. Other pathogenetic factors are also briefly surveyed. The second part of the review deals with the kynurenine metabolic pathway, its alterations and their potential association with cellular energy impairment in certain neurodegenerative diseases. During energy production, most of the O(2) consumed by the mitochondria is reduced fully to water, but 1-2% of the O(2) is reduced incompletely to give the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)). If the function of one or more respiratory chain complexes is impaired for any reason, the enhanced production of free radicals further worsens the mitochondrial function by causing oxidative damage to macromolecules, and by opening the mitochondrial permeability transition pores thereby inducing apoptosis. These high-conductance pores offer a pathway which can open in response to certain stimuli, leading to the induction of the cells' own suicide program. This program plays an essential role in regulating growth and development, in the differentiation of immune cells, and in the elimination of abnormal cells from the organism. Both failure and exaggeration of apoptosis in a human body can lead to disease. The increasing amount of superoxide anions can react with nitric oxide to yield the highly toxic peroxynitrite anion, which can destroy cellular macromolecules. The roles of oxidative, nitrative and nitrosative damage are discussed. Senescence is accompanied by a higher degree of reactive oxygen species production, and by diminished functions of the endoplasmic reticulum and the proteasome system, which are responsible for maintenance of the

  3. Effects of omega 3 fatty acids supplementation in behavior and non-neurodegenerative neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ortega, R M; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, E; López-Sobaler, A M

    2012-06-01

    This work provides a systematic review of all published randomised, controlled clinical trials (RCT) investigating the effects of n-3 PUFA intake on the prevention and treatment of non-neurodegenerative neuropsychiatric disorders. Five databases (PubMed, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL and The Cochrane Database) were searched for RCT in this area published up to April 2011. The selected studies all involved human participants and included a comparison group. Thirty eight studies were identified, which examined the influence of n-3 PUFA supplementation on the prevention/treatment of depression (non-perinatal) (n 23), perinatal depression (n 6) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (n 9). Great heterogeneity was noticed in terms of study design, the doses of n-3 PUFA administered, and study duration. Some benefit was noted with respect to the treatment of hyperactivity and depression in over half the examined studies, although the evidence was not conclusive. For any firm conclusions to be drawn, further studies will be needed that take into account the initial n-3 PUFA status of the subjects. Excessive n-3 PUFA intakes might be associated with a greater risk of peroxidation events and therefore neuropsychiatric deterioration. Indeed, some studies only recorded benefits when lower doses were administered. It is therefore important that the dose required to achieve any potential benefit be determined.

  4. Yoga as Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders: A Case Report of Therapeutic Yoga for Adrenomyeloneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Charlene Marie; Moonaz, Steffany Haaz

    2014-06-01

    Yoga is a promising therapeutic modality for neurodegenerative diseases. This case study presents a therapeutic yoga protocol for adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and its effect on a patient's quality of life (QOL), agility, balance, and peripheral dexterity. A 61-y-old man diagnosed with AMN who was experiencing (1) peripheral neuropathy in his legs and feet, (2) lower-back pain (LBP), and (3) osteoarthritis received 60-min weekly therapeutic yoga sessions for a 10-mo period. Yoga therapy included hatha yoga asanas (poses) and pranayama (breathing exercises). Hatha yoga asanas were aligned with 7 Berg Balance Scale (BBS) indicators to measure improvement in balance and range of motion. The 10-mo course of therapeutic yoga resulted in improved LBP; improved flexion of the patient's hips, knees, and ankles; improved propulsion phase of walking; and improvement in the patient's ability to stand and balance without an assistive device. The effect of yoga therapy on the patient in this case study aligns with current QOL improvements noted in current research on yoga therapy for neurological disorders. The described concepts and methods of employing therapeutic yoga provide insights for clinicians into a modality that is low risk and low cost and that can support individuals with other neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), fibromyalgia (FM), and diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Further study is warranted to help determine the safety and efficacy of yoga therapy for these conditions.

  5. Yoga as Therapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders: A Case Report of Therapeutic Yoga for Adrenomyeloneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Charlene Marie; Moonaz, Steffany Haaz

    2014-01-01

    Yoga is a promising therapeutic modality for neurodegenerative diseases. This case study presents a therapeutic yoga protocol for adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and its effect on a patient’s quality of life (QOL), agility, balance, and peripheral dexterity. A 61-y-old man diagnosed with AMN who was experiencing (1) peripheral neuropathy in his legs and feet, (2) lower-back pain (LBP), and (3) osteoarthritis received 60-min weekly therapeutic yoga sessions for a 10-mo period. Yoga therapy included hatha yoga asanas (poses) and pranayama (breathing exercises). Hatha yoga asanas were aligned with 7 Berg Balance Scale (BBS) indicators to measure improvement in balance and range of motion. The 10-mo course of therapeutic yoga resulted in improved LBP; improved flexion of the patient’s hips, knees, and ankles; improved propulsion phase of walking; and improvement in the patient’s ability to stand and balance without an assistive device. The effect of yoga therapy on the patient in this case study aligns with current QOL improvements noted in current research on yoga therapy for neurological disorders. The described concepts and methods of employing therapeutic yoga provide insights for clinicians into a modality that is low risk and low cost and that can support individuals with other neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), fibromyalgia (FM), and diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Further study is warranted to help determine the safety and efficacy of yoga therapy for these conditions. PMID:26770098

  6. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  7. Non-motor symptoms in patients with adult-onset focal dystonia: Sensory and psychiatric disturbances.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonella; Berardelli, Isabella; Ferrazzano, Gina; Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Fabbrini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by the presence of involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and posture. Adult onset focal dystonia include cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, arm dystonia and laryngeal dystonia. Besides motor manifestations, patients with focal dystonia frequently also display non-motor signs and symptoms. In this paper, we review the evidence of sensory and psychiatric disturbances in adult patients with focal dystonia. Clinical studies and neurophysiological investigations consistently show that the sensory system is involved in dystonia. Several studies have also demonstrated that neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, are more frequent in patients with focal dystonia, whereas data on obsessive compulsive disorders are more contrasting.

  8. Genetic architecture differences between pediatric and adult-onset inflammatory bowel diseases in the Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Lazowska, Izabella; Ambrozkiewicz, Filip; Goryca, Krzysztof; Kulecka, Maria; Rawa, Tomasz; Karczmarski, Jakub; Dabrowska, Michalina; Zeber-Lubecka, Natalia; Tomecki, Roman; Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Katarzyna; Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Socha, Piotr; Lodyga, Michal; Rydzewska, Grazyna; Klopocka, Maria; Mierzwa, Grazyna; Iwanczak, Barbara; Krzesiek, Elzbieta; Bak-Drabik, Katarzyna; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Klincewicz, Beata; Radwan, Piotr; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Korczowski, Bartosz; Starzynska, Teresa; Albrecht, Piotr; Mikula, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Most inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are classic complex disorders represented by common alleles. Here we aimed to define the genetic architecture of pediatric and adult-onset IBDs for the Polish population. A total of 1495 patients were recruited, including 761 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD; 424 pediatric), 734 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC; 390 pediatric), and 934 healthy controls. Allelotyping employed a pooled-DNA genome-wide association study (GWAS) and was validated by individual genotyping. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on 44 IBD patients diagnosed before 6 years of age, 45 patients diagnosed after 40 years of age, and 18 healthy controls. Altogether, out of 88 selected SNPs, 31 SNPs were replicated for association with IBD. A novel BRD2 (rs1049526) association reached significance of P = 5.2 × 10−11 and odds ratio (OR) = 2.43. Twenty SNPs were shared between pediatric and adult patients; 1 and 7 were unique to adult-onset and pediatric-onset IBD, respectively. WES identified numerous rare and potentially deleterious variants in IBD-associated or innate immunity-associated genes. Deleterious alleles in both groups were over-represented among rare variants in affected children. Our GWAS revealed differences in the polygenic architecture of pediatric- and adult-onset IBD. A significant accumulation of rare and deleterious variants in affected children suggests a contribution by yet unexplained genetic components. PMID:28008999

  9. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment.

  10. Anatomically defined neuron-based rescue of neurodegenerative Niemann-Pick type C disorder.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Manuel E; Klein, Andres D; Dimbil, Ubah J; Scott, Matthew P

    2011-03-23

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is a fatal lysosomal storage disorder caused by loss of NPC1 function. The disorder severely affects multiple body systems, particularly the nervous system. To test whether rescue of NPC1 activity in neurons, astrocytes, or other cell types can correct the neurological defects, a Tet-inducible Npc1-YFP transgene was introduced into Npc1(-/-) mice for the cell type-specific rescue of NPC1 loss. NPC1-YFP produced in neurons prevented neuron degeneration, slowed reactive glial activity, and ameliorated the disease. NPC1-YFP produced in astrocytes or in cells of visceral tissue did not. These results suggest that loss of NPC1 activity from neurons is the primary cause of the neuropathology and that rescue of NPC1 function in neurons is sufficient to mitigate the disease. The ability of neurons to survive and function in a cell-autonomous fashion allowed the use of this newly engineered rescue system to further define the brain regions or neuron populations required to ameliorate a neurological symptom. NPC1-YFP produced specifically in cerebellar Purkinje neurons reduced ataxia, increased weight, and prolonged life, but it did not prevent the eventual decline and premature death of Npc1(-/-) mice. Significant increase in lifespan correlated with sustained reduction of inflammation in the thalamus. Neuron rescue of other forebrain areas provided little benefit. Future work targeting increasingly discrete neuronal networks should reveal which CNS areas are critical for survival. This work may have broad implications for understanding the anatomical and cellular basis of neurological signs and symptoms of other neurodegenerative and lysosomal disorders.

  11. Pharmacological Alternatives for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Wasp and Bee Venoms and Their Components as New Neuroactive Tools

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Juliana; Monge-Fuentes, Victoria; Gomes, Flávia; Lopes, Kamila; dos Anjos, Lilian; Campos, Gabriel; Arenas, Claudia; Biolchi, Andréia; Gonçalves, Jacqueline; Galante, Priscilla; Campos, Leandro; Mortari, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are relentlessly progressive, severely impacting affected patients, families and society as a whole. Increased life expectancy has made these diseases more common worldwide. Unfortunately, available drugs have insufficient therapeutic effects on many subtypes of these intractable diseases, and adverse effects hamper continued treatment. Wasp and bee venoms and their components are potential means of managing or reducing these effects and provide new alternatives for the control of neurodegenerative diseases. These venoms and their components are well-known and irrefutable sources of neuroprotectors or neuromodulators. In this respect, the present study reviews our current understanding of the mechanisms of action and future prospects regarding the use of new drugs derived from wasp and bee venom in the treatment of major neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. PMID:26295258

  12. Neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions of glucagon-like peptide-1: an emerging opportunity to treat neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Isidro; Tweedie, David; Li, Yazhou; Greig, Nigel H

    2012-01-01

    Like type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), neurodegenerative disorders and stroke are an ever increasing, health, social and economic burden for developed Westernized countries. Age is an important risk factor in all of these; due to the rapidly increasing rise in the elderly population T2DM and neurodegenerative disorders, both represent a looming threat to healthcare systems. Whereas several efficacious drugs are currently available to ameliorate T2DM, effective treatments to counteract pathogenic processes of neurodegenerative disorders are lacking and represent a major scientific and pharmaceutical challenge. Epidemiological data indicate an association between T2DM and most major neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Likewise, there is an association between T2DM and stroke incidence. Studies have revealed that common pathophysiological features, including oxidative stress, insulin resistance, abnormal protein processing and cognitive decline, occur across these. Based on the presence of shared mechanisms and signalling pathways in these seemingly distinct diseases, one could hypothesize that an effective treatment for one disorder could prove beneficial in the others. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based anti-diabetic drugs have drawn particular attention as an effective new strategy to not only regulate blood glucose but also to reduce apoptotic cell death of pancreatic beta cells in T2DM. Evidence supports a neurotrophic and neuroprotective role of GLP-1 receptor (R) stimulation in an increasing array of cellular and animal neurodegeneration models as well as in neurogenesis. Herein, we review the physiological role of GLP-1 in the nervous system, focused towards the potential benefit of GLP-1R stimulation as an immediately translatable treatment strategy for acute and chronic neurological disorders. PMID:22519295

  13. Old Things New View: Ascorbic Acid Protects the Brain in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias-Pinto, Adriana; Acuña, Aníbal Ignacio; Beltrán, Felipe Andrés; Torres-Díaz, Leandro; Castro, Maite Aintzane

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is a key antioxidant of the Central Nervous System (CNS). Under brain activity, ascorbic acid is released from glial reservoirs to the synaptic cleft, where it is taken up by neurons. In neurons, ascorbic acid scavenges reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during synaptic activity and neuronal metabolism where it is then oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid and released into the extracellular space, where it can be recycled by astrocytes. Other intrinsic properties of ascorbic acid, beyond acting as an antioxidant, are important in its role as a key molecule of the CNS. Ascorbic acid can switch neuronal metabolism from glucose consumption to uptake and use of lactate as a metabolic substrate to sustain synaptic activity. Multiple evidence links oxidative stress with neurodegeneration, positioning redox imbalance and ROS as a cause of neurodegeneration. In this review, we focus on ascorbic acid homeostasis, its functions, how it is used by neurons and recycled to ensure antioxidant supply during synaptic activity and how this antioxidant is dysregulated in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26633354

  14. A mutation in the serine protease TMPRSS4 in a novel pediatric neurodegenerative disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To elucidate the genetic basis of a novel neurodegenerative disorder in an Old Order Amish pedigree by combining homozygosity mapping with exome sequencing. Methods and results We identified four individuals with an autosomal recessive condition affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Neuroimaging studies identified progressive global CNS tissue loss presenting early in life, associated with microcephaly, seizures, and psychomotor retardation; based on this, we named the condition Autosomal Recessive Cerebral Atrophy (ARCA). Using two unbiased genetic approaches, homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we narrowed the candidate region to chromosome 11q and identified the c.995C > T (p.Thr332Met) mutation in the TMPRSS4 gene. Sanger sequencing of additional relatives confirmed that the c.995C > T genotype segregates with the ARCA phenotype. Residue Thr332 is conserved across species and among various ethnic groups. The mutation is predicted to be deleterious, most likely due to a protein structure alteration as demonstrated with protein modelling. Conclusions This novel disease is the first to demonstrate a neurological role for a transmembrane serine proteases family member. This study demonstrates a proof-of-concept whereby combining exome sequencing with homozygosity mapping can find the genetic cause of a rare disease and acquire better understanding of a poorly described protein in human development. PMID:23957953

  15. Neurodevelopmental Versus Neurodegenerative Model of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: Comparison with Physiological Brain Development and Aging.

    PubMed

    Buoli, Massimiliano; Serati, Marta; Caldiroli, Alice; Cremaschi, Laura; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo

    2017-03-01

    Available data support a contribution of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative factors in the etiology of schizophrenia (SCH) and bipolar disorder (BD). Of note, one of the most important issue of the current psychiatric research is to identify the specific factors that contribute to impaired brain development and neurodegeneration in SCH and BD, and especially how these factors alter normal brain development and physiological aging process. Our hypothesis is that only specific damages, taking place in precise brain development stages, are associated with future SCH /BD onset and that neurodegeneration consists of an acceleration of brain aging after SCH /BD onset. In support of our hypothesis, the results of the present narrative mini-review shows as neurodevelopmental damages generally contribute to neuropsychiatric syndromes (e.g. hypothyroidism or treponema pallidum), but only some of them are specifically associated with adult SCH and BD (e.g. toxoplasma or substance abuse), particularly if they happen in specific stages of brain development. On the other hand, cognitive impairment and brain changes, associated with long duration of SCH /BD, look like what happens during aging: memory, executive domains and prefrontal cortex are implicated both in aging and in SCH /BD progression. Future research will explore possible validity of this etiological model for SCH and BD.

  16. Recent Updates on the Dynamic Association Between Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Khan, Taqi A; Hassan, Iftekhar; Ahmad, Ausaf; Perveen, Asma; Aman, Shazia; Quddusi, Saima; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Ashraf, Ghulam M; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2016-01-01

    Free radicals are generated as byproduct of our body metabolism, and their adverse effect on normal functioning of our body is prevented by body's own antioxidant machinery. Any perturbation in the defense mechanism of antioxidants inside body, its abnormal production or its induction from environment to our body lead to serious threats and is responsible for the development of various neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Perturbed antioxidants result in sensory and functional impairments in neuronal cells, which in turn cause NDDs. Free radical attack on neuronal cells plays a catastrophic role in NDDs. Impaired metabolism and generation of excessive reactive oxygen species also lead to a range of NDDs. Free radical induced toxicity is responsible for DNA injury, protein degradation, damage to tissue inflammation and cell death. Besides various genetic and environmental factors, free radical induced oxidative stress is also a major cause of NDDs. Application of upstream and downstream antioxidant therapy to counter oxidative stress can be an effective option in alteration of any neuronal impairment besides free radical scavenging. In the present manuscript, we have presented a comprehensive update on the symptoms, causes and cures of NDDs in relation with their dynamic association with oxidative stress.

  17. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  18. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  19. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what's wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to control

  20. Cannabidiol for neurodegenerative disorders: important new clinical applications for this phytocannabinoid?

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; García, Concepción; Pertwee, Roger; Mechoulam, Raphael; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2013-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a phytocannabinoid with therapeutic properties for numerous disorders exerted through molecular mechanisms that are yet to be completely identified. CBD acts in some experimental models as an anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, anti-oxidant, anti-emetic, anxiolytic and antipsychotic agent, and is therefore a potential medicine for the treatment of neuroinflammation, epilepsy, oxidative injury, vomiting and nausea, anxiety and schizophrenia, respectively. The neuroprotective potential of CBD, based on the combination of its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, is of particular interest and is presently under intense preclinical research in numerous neurodegenerative disorders. In fact, CBD combined with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol is already under clinical evaluation in patients with Huntington's disease to determine its potential as a disease-modifying therapy. The neuroprotective properties of CBD do not appear to be exerted by the activation of key targets within the endocannabinoid system for plant-derived cannabinoids like Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, i.e. CB1 and CB2 receptors, as CBD has negligible activity at these cannabinoid receptors, although certain activity at the CB2 receptor has been documented in specific pathological conditions (i.e. damage of immature brain). Within the endocannabinoid system, CBD has been shown to have an inhibitory effect on the inactivation of endocannabinoids (i.e. inhibition of FAAH enzyme), thereby enhancing the action of these endogenous molecules on cannabinoid receptors, which is also noted in certain pathological conditions. CBD acts not only through the endocannabinoid system, but also causes direct or indirect activation of metabotropic receptors for serotonin or adenosine, and can target nuclear receptors of the PPAR family and also ion channels. PMID:22625422

  1. Neurotransmitter, peptide and cytokine processes in relation to depressive disorder: comorbidity between depression and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul; Hayley, Shawn

    2008-05-01

    Given the array of biological changes induced by stressors, it is not surprising that these experiences may provoke a variety of illnesses. Among others things, stressors promote functional changes of neuropeptide and classical neurotransmitter systems. The peptidergic changes, for instance, include alterations of corticotropin releasing hormone, arginine vasopressin, and bombesin-like peptides at specific brain sites. Similarly some of the neurotransmitter systems influenced by stressors include GABAergic and monoamine functioning. Variations of these processes may limit neurogenesis (and dysregulation of growth factors such as BDNF) and influence cellular viability (through NFkappaB and MAP kinase pathways). As well, stressors activate the inflammatory immune system, notably the release of signaling molecules (cytokines), which may provoke many of the same neuropeptide (and other neurotransmitter) changes. By virtue of their actions on neuronal functioning, inflammatory processes may influence stress-related illness, such as depression, and may be a common denominator for the comorbidity that exists between depression and neurological conditions, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, as well as cardiovascular-related pathology. The present report provides an overview of biological endophenotypes associated with stressors that are thought to be related to major depressive disorder and related comorbid conditions. The view is taken that synergy between stressors and inflammatory factors may promote pathological outcomes through their actions on neuropeptides and several neurotransmitters. As well, stressful events may result in the sensitization of neurochemical and cytokine processes, so that later re-exposure to these stimuli may promote rapid and exaggerated responses that favor illness recurrence.

  2. Adult-onset Still disease with peculiar persistent plaques and papules.

    PubMed

    Yoshifuku, A; Kawai, K; Kanekura, T

    2014-06-01

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized clinically by high spiking fever, polyarthralgia/arthritis, a salmon-pink evanescent rash, predominantly neutrophilic leucocytosis, lymphadenopathy, liver dysfunction, and splenomegaly. Recently, a nonclassic, nonevanescent skin rash has been reported. We report a 27-year-old woman with AOSD showing persistent pruritic papular lesions. Histologically, dyskeratotic keratinocytes were seen in the upper epidermis. We describe this case in detail and review the previous literature. Nonclassic pruritic eruptions with characteristic dyskeratotic keratinocytes might provide an important clue for the diagnosis of AOSD.

  3. Drivers: A Biologically Contextualized, Cross-Inferential View of the Epidemiology of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Rábano, Alberto; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; José García López, Fernando; Almazán-Isla, Javier; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Medrano, Maria-José; Avellanal, Fuencisla; Calero, Olga; Calero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sutherland et al. (2011) suggested that, instead of risk factors for single neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs), there was a need to identify specific “drivers”, i.e., risk factors with impact on specific deposits, such as amyloid-β, tau, or α-synuclein, acting across entities. Objectives and Methods: Redefining drivers as “neither protein/gene- nor entity-specific features identifiable in the clinical and general epidemiology of conformational NDDs (CNDDs) as potential footprints of templating/spread/transfer mechanisms”, we conducted an analysis of the epidemiology of ten CNDDs, searching for patterns. Results: We identified seven potential drivers, each of which was shared by at least two CNDDs: 1) an age-at-exposure-related susceptibility to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and several late-life CNDDs; 2) a relationship between age at onset, survival, and incidence; 3) shared genetic risk factors for CJD and late-life CNNDs; 4) partly shared personal (diagnostic, educational, behavioral, and social risk factors) predating clinical onset of late-life CNDDs; 5) two environmental risk factors, namely, surgery for sporadic CJD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Bordetella pertussis infection for Parkinson’s disease; 6) reticulo-endothelial system stressors or general drivers (andropause or premenopausal estrogen deficiency, APOEɛ4, and vascular risk factors) for late-life CNDDs such as dementia/Alzheimer’s disease, type-2 diabetes mellitus, and some sporadic cardiac and vascular degenerative diseases; and 7) a high, invariant incidence ratio of sporadic to genetic forms of mid- and late-life CNDDs, and type-2 diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: There might be a systematic epidemiologic pattern induced by specific proteins (PrP, TDP-43, SOD1, α-synuclein, amyloid-β, tau, Langerhans islet peptide, and transthyretin) or established combinations of these. PMID:26923014

  4. Adult onset pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy with ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Verghese, J; Weidenheim, K; Malik, S; Rapin, I

    2002-11-01

    Pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) is an adult-onset leukodystrophy, characterized pathologically by the presence of glial and microglial cytoplasmic pigment inclusions. The complete phenotype, genotype and pathogenetic mechanisms in POLD have not been elucidated. We followed for 18 years a woman with autopsy-proven POLD, who presented with 'frontal' dementia and spasticity. Her further course was marked by progressive mutism, apraxia and seizures. Her sister had died of the same disease after a much more rapidly progressing course. These sisters had primary infertility with pathologic evidence of streak ovaries. Diagnosis was confirmed in both cases by post-mortem examination. POLD is a rare cause of adult-onset leukodystrophy presenting with dementia. Ovarian dysgenesis is extremely rare in the absence of demonstrable chromosomal abnormalities and extends the clinical spectrum of POLD.

  5. Supplemental Substances Derived from Foods as Adjunctive Therapeutic Agents for Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Disorders12

    PubMed Central

    Bigford, Gregory E.; Del Rossi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders and diseases (NDDs) that are either chronically acquired or triggered by a singular detrimental event are a rapidly growing cause of disability and/or death. In recent times, there have been major advancements in our understanding of various neurodegenerative disease states that have revealed common pathologic features or mechanisms. The many mechanistic parallels discovered between various neurodegenerative diseases suggest that a single therapeutic approach may be used to treat multiple disease conditions. Of late, natural compounds and supplemental substances have become an increasingly attractive option to treat NDDs because there is growing evidence that these nutritional constituents have potential adjunctive therapeutic effects (be it protective or restorative) on various neurodegenerative diseases. Here we review relevant experimental and clinical data on supplemental substances (i.e., curcuminoids, rosmarinic acid, resveratrol, acetyl-l-carnitine, and ω-3 (n–3) polyunsaturated fatty acids) that have demonstrated encouraging therapeutic effects on chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and neurodegeneration resulting from acute adverse events, such as traumatic brain injury. PMID:25022989

  6. Deregulation of subcellular biometal homeostasis through loss of the metal transporter, Zip7, in a childhood neurodegenerative disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant biometal metabolism is a key feature of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Metal modulating compounds are promising therapeutics for neurodegeneration, but their mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), caused by mutations in CLN genes, are fatal childhood neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases without a cure. We previously showed biometal accumulation in ovine and murine models of the CLN6 variant NCL, but the mechanism is unknown. This study extended the concept that alteration of biometal functions is involved in pathology in these disorders, and investigated molecular mechanisms underlying impaired biometal trafficking in CLN6 disease. Results We observed significant region-specific biometal accumulation and deregulation of metal trafficking pathways prior to disease onset in CLN6 affected sheep. Substantial progressive loss of the ER/Golgi-resident Zn transporter, Zip7, which colocalized with the disease-associated protein, CLN6, may contribute to the subcellular deregulation of biometal homeostasis in NCLs. Importantly, the metal-complex, ZnII(atsm), induced Zip7 upregulation, promoted Zn redistribution and restored Zn-dependent functions in primary mouse Cln6 deficient neurons and astrocytes. Conclusions This study demonstrates the central role of the metal transporter, Zip7, in the aberrant biometal metabolism of CLN6 variants of NCL and further highlights the key contribution of deregulated biometal trafficking to the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Importantly, our results suggest that ZnII(atsm) may be a candidate for therapeutic trials for NCLs. PMID:24581221

  7. Amyloid precursor protein gene isoforms in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, P K; Zafiris-Toufexis, K; Kakulas, B A

    2000-02-15

    Differential expression of the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP) may be important in the development of amyloidosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and experimentally in the brain's response to injury. Controversial data suggests that APP isoforms containing the Kunitz protease inhibitor isoform (APP KPI+) are over expressed in the brains of patients with AD when compared to the non-Kunitz protease inhibitor containing isoforms (APP KPI-). We have investigated this hypothesis using a quantitative analysis of gene expression on brain tissue collected at post-mortem. In situ hybridization has been used with synthetic oligonucleotide probes labelled with 35S to detect the two principal splice variants of APP: APP 695 (KPI-) and APP 751 (KPI+). A prospective brain bank of frozen brain specimens has been established and includes pathologically proven AD (n=15) and other neurodegenerative disorders as controls (n=18). The controls consist of frontal lobe atrophy (n=4), Huntington's disease (n=5), Parkinson's disease (n=4), motor neuron disease (n=2), multi-infarct dementia (n=1), multisystem atrophy (n=1), and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (n=1). We have observed no significant differences in the expression of APP 695 KPI- mRNA in frontal lobe: 17.49+/-3.26 optical density (OD) units of mRNA expression in AD vs. 16.13+/-1.76 OD units mRNA in controls (P=0.80, linear regression); or temporal lobe: 14.73+/-2.96 in AD vs. 16.49+/-2.15 in controls (P=0.55). No significant differences have been found in APP 751 KPI+ in frontal lobe: 12.86+/-2.98 in AD vs. 13.70+/-2.88 in controls (P=0.97); and temporal lobe: 13.31+/-4.93 in AD vs. 11.07+/-1.99 in controls (P=0. 65). Analysis of the ratios of APP 751 KPI+ OD units of mRNA to APP 695 KPI- mRNA revealed a trend to an increased ratio which did not reach statistical significance: frontal lobe APP 751 KPI+/APP 695 KPI- 1.92+/-1.04 in AD vs. 0.86+/-0.17 in controls (P=0.54); temporal lobe 2.54+/-1.59 in AD vs. 0

  8. Hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Mossad, S; Hoffman, G

    2000-07-01

    Fever, rash, and arthritis may be components of the prodrome of viral hepatitis. In the absence of jaundice and abnormal liver function tests, this form of polyarthritis is easily confused with primary autoimmune diseases. Whereas the association of systemic illness with musculoskeletal symptoms and numerous viral infections is well known, such an association with hepatitis A has only been rarely reported. We describe a case of hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease, and review the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of Still's disease and the extraarticular manifestations of hepatitis.

  9. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  10. Type A and B monoamine oxidase in age-related neurodegenerative disorders: their distinct roles in neuronal death and survival.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Makoto; Maruyama, Wakako; Inaba-Hasegawa, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B) has been proposed to play a primary role though generating reactive oxygen species in oxidation of monoamine substrates. MAO-B oxidizes MPTP into MPP+, and an MAO-B inhibitor, deprenyl, prevents the MPTP oxidation and also MPP+neutotoxicity. These results suggest the association of MAO-B with neuronal death in neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, deprenyl and rasagiline, selective MAO-B inhibitors, have been proved to protect neuronal cells in cellular and animal models of neurodegeneration. These inhibitors decrease oxidation of the substrates, scavenge oxygen radicals, intervene apoptosis signal pathway in mitochondria and induce pro-survival genes coding anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors. However, the association of MAO-B itself with the neuroprotective function of MAO-B inhibitors remains enigmatic. Recently, the involvement of type A MAO (MAO-A) in neuronal death has been shown by upregulation MAO-A expression in cellular models. MAO-A is a target of an endogenous neurotoxin, Nmethyl( R)salsolinol, and MAO-A knockdown (KO) with short interfering (si)RNA protects neuronal death from apoptosis. In addition, MAO-A mediates the increased expression of genes for anti-apoptotic, pro-survival Bcl-2 and neurotrophic factors by MAO-B inhibitors, whereas MAO-B doe not. In this review, we present our recent results on the novel role of MAO-A and MAO-B in neuronal death and also in the neuroprotective gene induction by MAO inhibitors. The future development of new series of neuroprotective drugs is discussed among compounds, which have high affinity to MAO-A and can induce pro-survival genes. MAO-A is expected to play a role in disease-modifying therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. [Multiple system atrophy and Alzheimer's disease: a case report of a rare association of two neuro-degenerative disorders].

    PubMed

    Rusina, R; Bourdain, F; Matej, R

    2007-12-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder typically characterised by cerebellar dysfunction, parkinsonism, pyramidal signs and dysautonomy. Cognitive impairement is usually limited to a moderate subcortical dysexecutive syndrom. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman suffering from MSA who progressively developed severe dementia. Neuropathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of definite MSA and also showed histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. This association is extremely rare in the literature. Our observation confirmes that franc dementia in MSA should prompt a search for another associated cause and underlines the usefulness of neuropathological verifications in atypical clinical pictures.

  12. FDTD-based Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation model applied to specific neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is particularly challenging in Western countries, where the population age is increasing. In this work, magnetic propagation in human head is modelled by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, taking into account specific characteristics of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in neurodegenerative diseases. It uses a realistic high-resolution three-dimensional human head mesh. The numerical method is applied to the analysis of magnetic radiation distribution in the brain using two realistic magnetic source models: a circular coil and a figure-8 coil commonly employed in TMS. The complete model was applied to the study of magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases (AD, PD). The results show the electrical field distribution when magnetic stimulation is supplied to those brain areas of specific interest for each particular disease. Thereby the current approach entails a high potential for the establishment of the current underdeveloped TMS dosimetry in its emerging application to AD and PD.

  13. AMPD2 Regulates GTP Synthesis and is Mutated in a Potentially-Treatable Neurodegenerative Brainstem Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Akizu, Naiara; Cantagrel, Vincent; Schroth, Jana; Cai, Na; Vaux, Keith; McCloskey, Douglas; Naviaux, Robert K.; Vleet, Jeremy Van; Fenstermaker, Ali G.; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Scheliga, Judith S.; Toyama, Keiko; Morisaki, Hiroko; Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Celep, Figen; Oraby, Azza; Zaki, Maha S.; Al-Baradie, Raidah; Faqeih, Eissa; Saleh, Mohammad; Spencer, Emily; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Scott, Eric; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Gabriel, Stacey; Morisaki, Takayuki; Holmes, Edward W.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Purine biosynthesis and metabolism, conserved in all living organisms, is essential for cellular energy homeostasis and nucleic acids synthesis. The de novo synthesis of purine precursors is under tight negative feedback regulation mediated by adenosine and guanine nucleotides. We describe a new distinct early-onset neurodegenerative condition resulting from mutations in the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 2 gene (AMPD2). Patients have characteristic brain imaging features of pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH), due to loss of brainstem and cerebellar parenchyma. We found that AMPD2 plays an evolutionary conserved role in the maintenance of cellular guanine nucleotide pools by regulating the feedback inhibition of adenosine derivatives on de novo purine synthesis. AMPD2 deficiency results in defective GTP-dependent initiation of protein translation, which can be rescued by administration of purine precursors. These data suggest AMPD2-related PCH as a new, potentially treatable early-onset neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23911318

  14. Are human neurodegenerative disorders linked to environmental chemicals with excitotoxic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, P.S.; Ludolph, A.C.; Kisby, G.E. )

    1992-05-11

    At the present time, it seems unlikely that progressive neurodegenerative diseases, such as ALS, Parkinson's disease, and dementia of the Alzheimer type, are triggered by environmental agents with excitotoxic potential. These include excitotoxic agents that behave as glutamate agonists or disrupt energy metabolism: both types elicit permanent but self-limiting neuronal diseases with patterns of neuronal deficit that reflect selective chemical exposure (MPP+ and parkinsonism), differential susceptibility to energy dysmetabolism (NPA and dystonia), or the distribution of glutamate-receptors (domoic acid and memory loss). If environmental agents play an etiologic role in progressive neurodegenerative diseases, they are likely to target a critical, irreplaceable neuronal molecule that is required to maintain long-term neuronal integrity.41 references.

  15. Bioinformatics Mining and Modeling Methods for the Identification of Disease Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Ball, Gordon; Gebel, Stephan; Bagewadi, Shweta; de Bono, Bernard; Schneider, Reinhard; Page, Matt; Kodamullil, Alpha Tom; Younesi, Erfan; Ebeling, Christian; Tegnér, Jesper; Canard, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Since the decoding of the Human Genome, techniques from bioinformatics, statistics, and machine learning have been instrumental in uncovering patterns in increasing amounts and types of different data produced by technical profiling technologies applied to clinical samples, animal models, and cellular systems. Yet, progress on unravelling biological mechanisms, causally driving diseases, has been limited, in part due to the inherent complexity of biological systems. Whereas we have witnessed progress in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, the area of neurodegenerative diseases has proved to be very challenging. This is in part because the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s disease or Parkinson´s disease is unknown, rendering it very difficult to discern early causal events. Here we describe a panel of bioinformatics and modeling approaches that have recently been developed to identify candidate mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases based on publicly available data and knowledge. We identify two complementary strategies—data mining techniques using genetic data as a starting point to be further enriched using other data-types, or alternatively to encode prior knowledge about disease mechanisms in a model based framework supporting reasoning and enrichment analysis. Our review illustrates the challenges entailed in integrating heterogeneous, multiscale and multimodal information in the area of neurology in general and neurodegeneration in particular. We conclude, that progress would be accelerated by increasing efforts on performing systematic collection of multiple data-types over time from each individual suffering from neurodegenerative disease. The work presented here has been driven by project AETIONOMY; a project funded in the course of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI); which is a public-private partnership of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industry Associations (EFPIA) and the European

  16. High-speed video gait analysis reveals early and characteristic locomotor phenotypes in mouse models of neurodegenerative movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Preisig, Daniel F; Kulic, Luka; Krüger, Maik; Wirth, Fabian; McAfoose, Jordan; Späni, Claudia; Gantenbein, Pascal; Derungs, Rebecca; Nitsch, Roger M; Welt, Tobias

    2016-09-15

    Neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system frequently affect the locomotor system resulting in impaired movement and gait. In this study we performed a whole-body high-speed video gait analysis in three different mouse lines of neurodegenerative movement disorders to investigate the motor phenotype. Based on precise computerized motion tracking of all relevant joints and the tail, a custom-developed algorithm generated individual and comprehensive locomotor profiles consisting of 164 spatial and temporal parameters. Gait changes observed in the three models corresponded closely to the classical clinical symptoms described in these disorders: Muscle atrophy due to motor neuron loss in SOD1 G93A transgenic mice led to gait characterized by changes in hind-limb movement and positioning. In contrast, locomotion in huntingtin N171-82Q mice modeling Huntington's disease with basal ganglia damage was defined by hyperkinetic limb movements and rigidity of the trunk. Harlequin mutant mice modeling cerebellar degeneration showed gait instability and extensive changes in limb positioning. Moreover, model specific gait parameters were identified and were shown to be more sensitive than conventional motor tests. Altogether, this technique provides new opportunities to decipher underlying disease mechanisms and test novel therapeutic approaches.

  17. Environmental pollutants as risk factors for neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chin-Chan, Miguel; Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer (AD) and Parkinson (PD) have attracted attention in last decades due to their high incidence worldwide. The etiology of these diseases is still unclear; however the role of the environment as a putative risk factor has gained importance. More worryingly is the evidence that pre- and post-natal exposures to environmental factors predispose to the onset of neurodegenerative diseases in later life. Neurotoxic metals such as lead, mercury, aluminum, cadmium and arsenic, as well as some pesticides and metal-based nanoparticles have been involved in AD due to their ability to increase beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide and the phosphorylation of Tau protein (P-Tau), causing senile/amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) characteristic of AD. The exposure to lead, manganese, solvents and some pesticides has been related to hallmarks of PD such as mitochondrial dysfunction, alterations in metal homeostasis and aggregation of proteins such as α-synuclein (α-syn), which is a key constituent of Lewy bodies (LB), a crucial factor in PD pathogenesis. Common mechanisms of environmental pollutants to increase Aβ, P-Tau, α-syn and neuronal death have been reported, including the oxidative stress mainly involved in the increase of Aβ and α-syn, and the reduced activity/protein levels of Aβ degrading enzyme (IDE)s such as neprilysin or insulin IDE. In addition, epigenetic mechanisms by maternal nutrient supplementation and exposure to heavy metals and pesticides have been proposed to lead phenotypic diversity and susceptibility to neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses data from epidemiological and experimental studies about the role of environmental factors in the development of idiopathic AD and PD, and their mechanisms of action. PMID:25914621

  18. Cellular Stress Responses, The Hormesis Paradigm, and Vitagenes: Novel Targets for Therapeutic Intervention in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Calabrese, Edward J.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite the capacity of chaperones and other homeostatic components to restore folding equilibrium, cells appear poorly adapted for chronic oxidative stress that increases in cancer and in metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Modulation of endogenous cellular defense mechanisms represents an innovative approach to therapeutic intervention in diseases causing chronic tissue damage, such as in neurodegeneration. This article introduces the concept of hormesis and its applications to the field of neuroprotection. It is argued that the hormetic dose response provides the central underpinning of neuroprotective responses, providing a framework for explaining the common quantitative features of their dose–response relationships, their mechanistic foundations, and their relationship to the concept of biological plasticity, as well as providing a key insight for improving the accuracy of the therapeutic dose of pharmaceutical agents within the highly heterogeneous human population. This article describes in mechanistic detail how hormetic dose responses are mediated for endogenous cellular defense pathways, including sirtuin and Nrf2 and related pathways that integrate adaptive stress responses in the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. Particular attention is given to the emerging role of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide gases in hormetic-based neuroprotection and their relationship to membrane radical dynamics and mitochondrial redox signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1763–1811. PMID:20446769

  19. REM sleep behavior disorder: Updated review of the core features, the REM sleep behavior disorder-neurodegenerative disease association, evolving concepts, controversies, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Boeve, Bradley F

    2010-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia manifested by vivid, often frightening dreams associated with simple or complex motor behavior during REM sleep. The polysomnographic features of RBD include increased electromyographic tone +/- dream enactment behavior during REM sleep. Management with counseling and pharmacologic measures is usually straightforward and effective. In this review, the terminology, clinical and polysomnographic features, demographic and epidemiologic features, diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, and management strategies are discussed. Recent data on the suspected pathophysiologic mechanisms of RBD are also reviewed. The literature and our institutional experience on RBD are next discussed, with an emphasis on the RBD-neurodegenerative disease association and particularly the RBD-synucleinopathy association. Several issues relating to evolving concepts, controversies, and future directions are then reviewed, with an emphasis on idiopathic RBD representing an early feature of a neurodegenerative disease and particularly an evolving synucleinopathy. Planning for future therapies that impact patients with idiopathic RBD is reviewed in detail.

  20. Refractory Genital HPV Infection and Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Zheng, Heyi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic autoimmune disease (AIID) that can develop after exposure to infectious agents. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been reported to induce or exacerbate AIIDs, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No guidelines are available for the management of genital warts in AOSD. Case report and literature review. We report a patient who was diagnosed AOSD in the setting of refractory and recurrent genital HPV infection, demonstrating a possible link between HPV infection and AOSD. In addition, we also discuss the management of genital warts in patients with AOSD. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of AOSD with genital HPV infection have been reported in literature. We then conclude that the patient AOSD may be triggered by primary HPV infection. Larger number of patient samples is needed to confirm whether HPV could trigger AOSD. PMID:27082556

  1. Adult-onset Still's disease and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: a hitherto undescribed manifestation of autoinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rech, J; Manger, B; Lang, B; Schett, G; Wilhelm, M; Birkmann, J

    2012-06-01

    Still's disease and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) are febrile rheumatic diseases of unknown etiology, which predominantly affect children but can also have their initial manifestation in adults. Both can present as intermittent, relapsing episodes and are considered potential candidates within the expanding spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders, although no genetic abnormalities have been described for either of them. Here, we describe a man with an initial manifestation of abacterial multifocal osteitis at the age of 41. During a relapsing-remitting course of his illness, he increasingly developed symptoms of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), and the diagnosis was established according to the Yamaguchi criteria. When treated with anakinra, not only the acute symptoms disappeared promptly, but also the osteitis went into complete remission. This is to our knowledge the first description of a simultaneous occurrence of these two manifestations of autoinflammation in adulthood.

  2. Mitochondrial Hsp60 Chaperonopathy Causes an Autosomal-Recessive Neurodegenerative Disorder Linked to Brain Hypomyelination and Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Daniella; Georgopoulos, Costa; Bross, Peter; Ang, Debbie; Segev, Yardena; Goldsher, Dorit; Nemirovski, Alexandra; Shahar, Eli; Ravid, Sarit; Luder, Anthony; Heno, Bayan; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Skorecki, Karl; Mandel, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) are disorders involving aberrant myelin formation. The prototype of primary HMLs is the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by mutations in PLP1. Recently, homozygous mutations in GJA12 encoding connexin 47 were found in patients with autosomal-recessive Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD). However, many patients of both genders with PMLD carry neither PLP1 nor GJA12 mutations. We report a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred with clinical and radiological findings compatible with PMLD, in which linkage to PLP1 and GJA12 was excluded. Using homozygosity mapping and mutation analysis, we have identified a homozygous missense mutation (D29G) not previously described in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) in all affected individuals. The D29G mutation completely segregates with the disease-associated phenotype. The pathogenic effect of D29G on Hsp60-chaperonin activity was verified by an in vivo E. coli complementation assay, which demonstrated compromised ability of the D29G-Hsp60 mutant protein to support E. coli survival, especially at high temperatures. The disorder, which we have termed MitCHAP-60 disease, can be distinguished from spastic paraplegia 13 (SPG13), another Hsp60-associated autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, by its autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern, as well as by its early-onset, profound cerebral involvement and lethality. Our findings suggest that Hsp60 defects can cause neurodegenerative pathologies of varying severity, not previously suspected on the basis of the SPG13 phenotype. These findings should help to clarify the important role of Hsp60 in myelinogenesis and neurodegeneration. PMID:18571143

  3. A Perspective on Roles Played by Innate and Adaptive Immunity in the Pathobiology of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Mosley, R. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant innate and adaptive immune responses are neurodegenerative disease effectors. Disease is heralded by a generalized but subtle immune activation orchestrated by the release of extracellular prion-like aggregated and oxidized or otherwise modified proteins. These are responsible for an inflammatory neurotoxic cascade. The perpetrators of such events include effector T cells and activated microglia. What ensues are Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke with changed frequencies of effector T cell and reduced numbers or function of regulatory lymphocytes. The control of such immune responses could lead to new therapeutic strategies and the means to effectively combat a composite of diseases that have quite limited therapeutic options. PMID:26520433

  4. A novel mouse model that recapitulates adult-onset glycogenosis type 4

    PubMed Central

    Orhan Akman, H.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Kurt, Yasemin Gülcan; Kurt, Bülent; Sheiko, Tatiana; DiMauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age at onset. Complete loss of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy and affects primarily the muscle and the liver. However, residual enzyme activity as low as 5–20% leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects the central and peripheral nervous system and muscles and in the latter is termed adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD). Here, we describe a mouse model of GSD IV that reflects this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to knock in the most common GBE1 mutation p.Y329S c.986A > C found in APBD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish decent. Mice homozygous for this allele (Gbe1ys/ys) exhibit a phenotype similar to APBD, with widespread accumulation of PG. Adult mice exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. While the onset of symptoms is limited to adult mice, PG accumulates in tissues of newborn mice but is initially absent from the cerebral cortex and heart muscle. Thus, PG is well tolerated in most tissues, but the eventual accumulation in neurons and their axons causes neuropathy that leads to hind limb spasticity and premature death. This mouse model mimics the pathology and pathophysiologic features of human adult-onset branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:26385640

  5. S-Nitrosylation and uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug therapy in neurodegenerative disorders of protein misfolding.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Lipton, S A

    2007-07-01

    Although activation of glutamate receptors is essential for normal brain function, excessive activity leads to a form of neurotoxicity known as excitotoxicity. Key mediators of excitotoxic damage include overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, resulting in excessive Ca(2+) influx with production of free radicals and other injurious pathways. Overproduction of free radical nitric oxide (NO) contributes to acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. NO can react with cysteine thiol groups to form S-nitrosothiols and thus change protein function. S-nitrosylation can result in neuroprotective or neurodestructive consequences depending on the protein involved. Many neurodegenerative diseases manifest conformational changes in proteins that result in misfolding and aggregation. Our recent studies have linked nitrosative stress to protein misfolding and neuronal cell death. Molecular chaperones - such as protein-disulfide isomerase, glucose-regulated protein 78, and heat-shock proteins - can provide neuroprotection by facilitating proper protein folding. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence that NO contributes to degenerative conditions by S-nitrosylating-specific chaperones that would otherwise prevent accumulation of misfolded proteins and neuronal cell death. In contrast, we also review therapeutics that can abrogate excitotoxic damage by preventing excessive NMDA receptor activity, in part via S-nitrosylation of this receptor to curtail excessive activity.

  6. Progressive and self-limiting neurodegenerative disorders in Africa: a new prominent field of research led by South Africa but without strong health policy

    PubMed Central

    Poreau, Brice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neurodegenerative disorders are involved in mortality and morbidity of every country. A high prevalence is estimated in Africa. Neurodegenerative disorders are defined by a progressive or self-limiting alteration of neurons implied in specific functional and anatomical functions. It encompasses a various range of clinical disorders from self-limiting to progressive. Focus on public health policies and scientific research is needed to understand the mechanisms to reduce this high prevalence. We use bibliometrics and mapping tools to explore the area studies and countries involved in scientific research on neurodegenerative disorders in Africa. Methods We used two databases: Web of Science and Pubmed. We analyzed the journals, most cited articles, authors, publication years, organizations, funding agencies, countries and keywords in Web of Science Core collection database and publication years and Medical Subject Headings in Pubmed database. We mapped the data using VOSviewer. Results We accessed 44 articles published between 1975 and 2014 in Web of Science Core collection Database and 669 from Pubmed database. The majority of which were after 2006. The main countries involved in research on neurodegenerative disorders in Africa the USA, the United Kingdom, France and South Africa representing the main network collaboration. Clinical neurology and Genetics hereditary are the main Web of Science categories whereas Neurosciences and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology are the main Web of Science categories for the general search “neurodegenerative disorders” not restrained to Africa. This is confirmed by Medical Subject Headings analysis from Pubmed with one more area study: Treatment. Conclusion Neurodegenerative disorders research is leaded by South Africa with a network involving the USA, the UK, as well as African countries such Zambia. The chief field that emerged was on patient and hereditary as well as treatment. Public health policies were

  7. Pharmacological targets in the ubiquitin system offer new ways of treating cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Mariola J.; Nicholson, Benjamin; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the development and discovery of pharmacological interventions within the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) have uncovered an enormous potential for possible novel treatments of neurodegenerative disease, cancer, immunological disorder and microbial infection. Interference with proteasome activity, although initially considered unlikely to be exploitable clinically, has already proved to be very effective against haematological malignancies, and more specific derivatives that target subsets of proteasomes are emerging. Recent small-molecule screens have revealed inhibitors against ubiquitin-conjugating and -deconjugating enzymes, many of which have been evaluated for their potential use as therapeutics, either as single agents or in synergy with other drugs. Here, we discuss recent advances in the characterisation of novel UPS modulators (in particular, inhibitors of ubiquitin-conjugating and -deconjugating enzymes) and how they pave the way towards new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of proteotoxic disease, cancer and microbial infection. PMID:22088887

  8. In search of innovative therapeutics for neuropsychiatric disorders: the case of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Féger, J; Hirsch, E C

    2015-01-01

    The recent medical literature highlights the lack of new drugs able to prevent or treat neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease or Parkinson disease. Yet, the prevalence of these diseases is growing, related to increasing life expectancy, and is leading to a rise in their economic and social cost. At the same time, pharmaceutical companies are reducing or halting their investment in neuropharmacological research. Why have advances in basic neuroscience and our understanding of these diseases not allowed innovative discoveries in drug research? This review will try to explain this failure and suggest possible solutions: develop basic and clinical research but with the emphasis on translational and truly collaborative research; improve preclinical studies by developing more appropriate animal models, using new biomarkers and methodologies such as imaging suitable for clinical trials, providing worthwhile information on the ability of the drug to reach its intended target and induce significant pharmacological changes; build a new system of research management, based on stronger interdisciplinary relations between preclinical and clinical research and including the introduction of international precompetitive research between academic teams, start-up companies and pharmaceutical laboratories; hold early discussions with the regulatory authorities during preclinical studies and at the beginning of clinical trials in order to validate the methodological approaches; involve patients' associations in this new organization of research. These changes should help to ensure the discovery of effective treatments for these pathologies.

  9. Changes in the mitochondrial antioxidant systems in neurodegenerative diseases and acute brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress (ONS) contributes to the pathogenesis of most brain maladies, and the magnitude of ONS is related to the ability of cellular antioxidants to neutralize the accumulating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). While the major ROS/RNS scavengers and regenerators of bio-oxidized molecules, superoxide dysmutases (SODs), glutathione (GSH), thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx), are distributed in all cellular compartments. This review specifically focuses on the role of the systems operating in mitochondria. There is a growing consensus that the mitochondrial SOD isoform - SOD2 and GSH are critical for the cellular antioxidant defense. Variable changes of the expression or activities of one or more of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems have been documented in the brains derived from human patients and/or in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), cerebral ischemia, toxic brain cell damage associated with overexposure to mercury or excitotoxins, or hepatic encephalopathy. In many cases, ambiguity of the responses of the different antioxidant systems in one and the same disease needs to be more conclusively evaluated before the balance of the changes is viewed as beneficial or detrimental. Modulation of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems may in the future become a target of antioxidant therapy.

  10. Cellular and Biochemical Actions of Melatonin which Protect Against Free Radicals: Role in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Genaro G; Benítez-King, Gloria A; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E

    2008-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is toxic for anaerobic organisms but it is also obvious that oxygen is poisonous to aerobic organisms as well, since oxygen plays an essential role for inducing molecular damage. Molecular oxygen is a triplet radical in its ground-stage (.O-O.) and has two unpaired electrons that can undergoes consecutive reductions of one electron and generates other more reactive forms of oxygen known as free radicals and reactive oxygen species. These reactants (including superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals) possess variable degrees of toxicity. Nitric oxide (NO•) contains one unpaired electron and is, therefore, a radical. NO• is generated in biological tissues by specific nitric oxide synthases and acts as an important biological signal. Excessive nitric oxide production, under pathological conditions, leads to detrimental effects of this molecule on tissues, which can be attributed to its diffusion-limited reaction with superoxide to form the powerful and toxic oxidant, peroxynitrite. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are molecular “renegades”; these highly unstable products tend to react rapidly with adjacent molecules, donating, abstracting, or even sharing their outer orbital electron(s). This reaction not only changes the target molecule, but often passes the unpaired electron along to the target, generating a second free radical, which can then go on to react with a new target amplifying their effects. This review describes the mechanisms of oxidative damage and its relationship with the most highly studied neurodegenerative diseases and the roles of melatonin as free radical scavenger and neurocytoskeletal protector. PMID:19506721

  11. Cellular and biochemical actions of melatonin which protect against free radicals: role in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Genaro G; Benítez-King, Gloria A; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E

    2008-09-01

    Molecular oxygen is toxic for anaerobic organisms but it is also obvious that oxygen is poisonous to aerobic organisms as well, since oxygen plays an essential role for inducing molecular damage. Molecular oxygen is a triplet radical in its ground-stage (.O-O.) and has two unpaired electrons that can undergoes consecutive reductions of one electron and generates other more reactive forms of oxygen known as free radicals and reactive oxygen species. These reactants (including superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals) possess variable degrees of toxicity. Nitric oxide (NO*) contains one unpaired electron and is, therefore, a radical. NO* is generated in biological tissues by specific nitric oxide synthases and acts as an important biological signal. Excessive nitric oxide production, under pathological conditions, leads to detrimental effects of this molecule on tissues, which can be attributed to its diffusion-limited reaction with superoxide to form the powerful and toxic oxidant, peroxynitrite.Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are molecular "renegades"; these highly unstable products tend to react rapidly with adjacent molecules, donating, abstracting, or even sharing their outer orbital electron(s). This reaction not only changes the target molecule, but often passes the unpaired electron along to the target, generating a second free radical, which can then go on to react with a new target amplifying their effects.This review describes the mechanisms of oxidative damage and its relationship with the most highly studied neurodegenerative diseases and the roles of melatonin as free radical scavenger and neurocytoskeletal protector.

  12. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  13. Optogenetics for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vann, Kiara T; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating conditions that lead to progressive degeneration of neurons. Neurodegeneration may result in ataxia, dementia, and muscle atrophies, etc. Despite enormous research efforts that have been made, there is lack of effective therapeutic interventions for most of these diseases. Optogenetics is a recently developed novel technique that combines optics and genetics to modulate the activity of specific neurons. Optogenetics has been implemented in various studies including neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the recent advance in using this technique for the studies of common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27186317

  14. Periocular xanthogranulomas associated with severe adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A; Mills, M D; Hidayat, A A; Dallow, R L; Townsend, D J; Brinker, E A; Charles, N C

    1993-01-01

    This article describes six patients who presented, usually bilaterally, with yellow-orange, elevated, indurated, and nonulcerated xanthomatous eyelid lesions, typically extending into the anterior orbital fat, and sometimes involving the extraocular muscles and the lacrimal gland. Because the eyelids remained intact and because the process did not reach the deep orbital and perioptic connective tissues, visual acuity was well preserved. There is cosmetic morbidity and occasionally motility restriction with advancing involvement of the extraocular muscles. All patients had variably severe adult-onset asthma that required treatment with systemic prednisone and inhalants. No evidence of Erdheim-Chester disease was found in any patient, but the appearance in one patient, after 25 years of follow-up, of a separate subcutaneous necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous lesion in the mandibular region with an associated paraproteinemia, suggests that at least some of our cases might be a mild form of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. For this reason, we would suggest repeated periodic serum protein immunoelectrophoretic studies as well as evaluation for lymphoma. Therapy probably should consist of low doses of periorbital radiotherapy coupled with high doses of corticosteroids. Should this not be successful, then systemic administration of corticosteroids with chemotherapeutic agents might be efficacious, as in necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:8140711

  15. Inflammatory events at blood-brain barrier in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders: implications for clinical disease.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Helga E; Kooij, Gijs; Frenkel, Dan; Georgopoulos, Spiros; Monsonego, Alon; Janigro, Damir

    2012-11-01

    Proper function of the neurovasculature is required for optimal brain function and preventing neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Within this review, we discuss alterations of the function of the blood-brain barrier in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease and address potential underlying mechanisms.

  16. Young-onset parkinsonism in a Hong Kong Chinese man with adult-onset Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chloe Miu; Sheng, Bun; Lee, Hencher Han-chih; Lau, Kwok-kwong; Chan, Wing-tak; Lam, Ching-wan; Chan, Yan-wo

    2011-04-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of disorders varied in genetic etiologies, clinical presentations, and radiological features. NBIA is an iron homeostasis disorder with progressive iron accumulation in the central nervous systems and is clinically characterized by extrapyramidal movement abnormalities, retinal pigmentary changes, and cognitive impairment. Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is the commonest disorder of NBIA with a prevalence of one-three per million. Clinically, it is classified into early-onset childhood, atypical late-onset, and adult-onset type. Adult-onset type is rarer. We report the first case of adult-onset panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration in Hong Kong in a 28-year-old Chinese man who presented with pure young-onset parkinsonism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed the presence of eye-of-the-tiger sign. Two compound heterozygous mutations PANK2 NM_153638.2: c.445G > T; NP_705902.2: p.E149X and PANK2 NM_153638.2: c.1133A > G; NP_705902.2: p.D378G were detected. Parkinsonism per se is a very heterogeneous phenotypic group. In view of the readily available genetic analysis of PANK2, panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration should be considered in adult patients with young-onset parkinsonism with or without the eye-of-the-tiger sign. The exact diagnosis offers a different management approach and genetic counseling. NBIA is likely under- or misdiagnosed in Hong Kong Chinese.

  17. The kynurenine pathway as a therapeutic target in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Trevor W; Darlington, L Gail

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the neurochemical basis for cognitive function is one of the major goals of neuroscience, with a potential impact on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of a range of psychiatric and neurological disorders. In this review, the focus will be on a biochemical pathway that remains under-recognized in its implications for brain function, even though it can be responsible for moderating the activity of two neurotransmitters fundamentally involved in cognition – glutamate and acetylcholine. Since this pathway – the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism – is induced by immunological activation and stress, it also stands in a unique position to mediate the effects of environmental factors on cognition and behaviour. Targeting the pathway for new drug development could, therefore, be of value not only for the treatment of existing psychiatric conditions, but also for preventing the development of cognitive disorders in response to environmental pressures. PMID:23647169

  18. Does PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF Elicit the Beneficial Effects of Exercise on Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed

    Jodeiri Farshbaf, Mohammad; Ghaedi, Kamran; Megraw, Timothy L; Curtiss, Jennifer; Shirani Faradonbeh, Mahsa; Vaziri, Pooneh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have high prevalence among the elderly. Many strategies have been established to alleviate the symptoms experienced by affected individuals. Recent studies have shown that exercise helps patients with neurological disorders to regain lost physical abilities. PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF has emerged recently as a critical pathway for neuroprotection. PGC1α is a highly conserved co-activator of transcription factors that preserves and protects neurons against destruction. PGC1α regulates FNDC5 and its processed and secreted peptide Irisin, which has been proposed to play a critical role in energy expenditure and to promote neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. FNDC5 may also increase the expression of the neurotrophic factor BDNF, a neuroprotective agent, in the hippocampus. BDNF is secreted from hippocampus, amygdala, cerebral cortex and hypothalamus neurons and initiates intracellular signaling pathways through TrkB receptors. These pathways have positive feedback on CREB activities and lead to enhancement in PGC1α expression in neurons. Therefore, FNDC5 could behave as a key regulator in neuronal survival and development. This review presents recent findings on the PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF pathway and its role in neuroprotection, and discusses the controversial promise of irisin as a mediator of the positive benefits of exercise.

  19. Increased Understanding of Stem Cell Behavior in Neurodegenerative and Neuromuscular Disorders by Use of Noninvasive Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Holvoet, Bryan; De Waele, Liesbeth; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Gheysens, Olivier; Sampaolesi, Maurillio; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Deroose, Christophe M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders are associated with cell-specific depletion in the human body. This imbalance in tissue homeostasis is in healthy individuals repaired by the presence of endogenous stem cells that can replace the lost cell type. However, in most disorders, a genetic origin or limited presence or exhaustion of stem cells impairs correct cell replacement. During the last 30 years, methods to readily isolate and expand stem cells have been developed and this resulted in a major change in the regenerative medicine field as it generates sufficient amount of cells for human transplantation applications. Furthermore, stem cells have been shown to release cytokines with beneficial effects for several diseases. At present however, clinical stem cell transplantations studies are struggling to demonstrate clinical efficacy despite promising preclinical results. Therefore, to allow stem cell therapy to achieve its full potential, more insight in their in vivo behavior has to be achieved. Different methods to noninvasively monitor these cells have been developed and are discussed. In some cases, stem cell monitoring even reached the clinical setting. We anticipate that by further exploring these imaging possibilities and unraveling their in vivo behavior further improvement in stem cell transplantations will be achieved. PMID:26997958

  20. Ethical and legal dilemmas arising during predictive testing for adult-onset disease: the experience of Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, M; Bloch, M; Kanani, S; Quarrell, O W; Theilman, J; Hedrick, A; Dickens, B; Lynch, A; Hayden, M

    1990-01-01

    The goal of predictive testing is to modify the risk for currently healthy individuals to develop a genetic disease in the future. Such testing using polymorphic DNA markers has had major application in Huntington disease. The Canadian Collaborative Study of Predictive Testing for Huntington Disease has been guided by major principles of medical ethics, including autonomy, beneficence, confidentiality, and justice. Numerous ethical and legal dilemmas have arisen in this program, challenging these principles and occasionally casting them into conflict. The present report describes these dilemmas and offers our approach to resolving them. These issues will have relevance to predictive-testing programs for other adult-onset disorders. PMID:1971997

  1. [Recurrent effusive pericarditis in the course of adult-onset Still's disease--case reports of two patients].

    PubMed

    Bilska, Anna; Wilińska, Ewelina; Szturmowicz, Monika; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Fijałkowska, Anna; Oniszh, Karina; Swiatowiec, Andrzej; Wsół, Agnieszka; Torbicki, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Pericardial effusion is caused by various pathological agents. In differential diagnosis infectious as well as non-infectious factors have to be considered. Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD)--relatively uncommon systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology--is among possible diagnosis. The disease typically affects patients in the age between 16-35 years and is characterized by spiking fever, arthralgia, evanescent salmon rash with other abnormalities including pharingitis, serositis (especially pleuritis and pericarditis) and leucocytosis as well as increased serum levels of inflammatory indicators. We present two patients with recurrent pericardial effusion in the course of AOSD.

  2. Beyond the Cherry-Red Spot: Ocular Manifestations of Sphingolipid-mediated Neurodegenerative and Inflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Donald U.; Mandal, Nawajes A.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a ubiquitous membrane lipid present in every cell and found most abundantly in neural tissues. Disorders such as Tay Sachs or Niemann Pick disease are the most familiar examples of dysfunction in sphingolipid metabolism and are typically associated with neurodegeneration and ocular findings such as blindness. More recently, the role of bioactive sphingolipids has been established in a multitude of cellular events, including cell survival, growth, senescence and apoptosis, inflammation, and neovascularization. We discuss our current knowledge and understanding of sphingolipid metabolism and signaling in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. PMID:24011710

  3. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  4. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971–2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases. Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non–PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort). AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD. PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  5. Interleukin 6 SNP rs1800797 associates with the risk of adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, T K; Jaakkola, J J K; Jaakkola, M S

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL6) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been suggested to have an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with levels of IL6, and with childhood and prevalent adult asthma. A recent study also suggested that IL6 SNPs associate especially with atopic asthma. However, association of IL6 SNPs with adult-onset asthma has not been studied. In a population-based study of 467 incident adult-onset asthma cases and 613 disease-free controls from South Finland, we analyzed association of 6 tagging SNPs of the IL6 locus with the risk of adult-onset asthma and with atopy. Asthma was clinically diagnosed, and atopy was defined based on Phadiatop test. IL6 SNP rs1800797 associated with the risk of adult-onset asthma in a log additive model, with adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.09-1.57), and especially with the risk of atopic adult-onset asthma when compared with non-atopic controls, aOR 1.46 (95% CI 1.12-1.90). This is the first study to show an association of IL6 with adult-onset asthma, and especially with atopic adult-onset asthma.

  6. Transgenic zebrafish as a novel animal model to study tauopathies and other neurodegenerative disorders in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Dominik; Schmid, Bettina; Haass, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Our ageing society is confronted with a dramatic increase in patients suffering from tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and others. Typical neuropathological lesions including tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein as well as severe neuronal cell death characterize these disorders. No mechanism-based cures are available at present. Genetically modified animals are invaluable models to understand the molecular disease mechanisms and to screen for modifying compounds. We recently introduced tau-transgenic zebrafish as a novel model for tauopathies. Our model allows recapitulating key pathological features of tauopathies within an extremely short time. Moreover, life imaging of tau-dependent neuronal cell death was performed for the very first time. This demonstrated tau-dependent neuronal cell loss independent of tangle formation. Finally, we exemplified that the zebrafish frontotemporal dementia model can be used to screen for drugs that prevent abnormal tau phosphorylation and neuronal cell death.

  7. Variation in genes related to cochlear biology is strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in border collies.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Lam, Ernest T; Ruhe, Alison L; Erdman, Carolyn A; Robertson, Kathryn R; Webb, Aubrey A; Williams, D Colette; Chang, Melanie L; Hytönen, Marjo K; Lohi, Hannes; Hamilton, Steven P; Neff, Mark W

    2012-09-01

    Domestic dogs can suffer from hearing losses that can have profound impacts on working ability and quality of life. We have identified a type of adult-onset hearing loss in Border Collies that appears to have a genetic cause, with an earlier age of onset (3-5 years) than typically expected for aging dogs (8-10 years). Studying this complex trait within pure breeds of dog may greatly increase our ability to identify genomic regions associated with risk of hearing impairment in dogs and in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to detect loci underlying adult-onset deafness in a sample of 20 affected and 28 control Border Collies. We identified a region on canine chromosome 6 that demonstrates extended support for association surrounding SNP Chr6.25819273 (p-value = 1.09 × 10(-13)). To further localize disease-associated variants, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of one affected and two unaffected dogs was performed. Through additional validation based on targeted genotyping of additional cases (n = 23 total) and controls (n = 101 total) and an independent replication cohort of 16 cases and 265 controls, we identified variants in USP31 that were strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in Border Collies, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB pathway. We found additional support for involvement of RBBP6, which is critical for cochlear development. These findings highlight the utility of GWAS-guided fine-mapping of genetic loci using targeted NGS to study hereditary disorders of the domestic dog that may be analogous to human disorders.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid alpha-synuclein in neurodegenerative disorders-a marker of synapse loss?

    PubMed

    Ohrfelt, Annika; Grognet, Pierre; Andreasen, Niels; Wallin, Anders; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2009-02-06

    The association of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) neuropathology with Parkinson's disease (PD) and several related disorders has led to an intense research effort to develop cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)- or blood-based alpha-syn biomarkers for these types of diseases. Recent studies show that alpha-syn is present in CSF and possible to measure using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here, we describe a novel ELISA that allows for quantification of alpha-syn in CSF down to 50pg/mL. The diagnostic value of the test was assessed using CSF samples from 66 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 15PD patients, 15 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and 55 cognitively normal controls. PD and DLB patients and controls displayed similar CSF alpha-syn levels. AD patients had significantly lower alpha-syn levels than controls (median [inter-quartile range] 296 [234-372] and 395 [298-452], respectively, p<0.001). Moreover, AD patients with mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores below 20 had significantly lower alpha-syn than AD patients with MMSE scores of 20 or higher (p=0.02). There was also a tendency towards a negative correlation between alpha-syn levels and disease duration in the AD group (r=-0.247, p=0.06). Altogether, our results speak against CSF alpha-syn as a reliable biomarker for PD and DLB. The lower alpha-syn levels in AD, as well as the association of alpha-syn reduction with AD severity, approximated by MMSE, suggests that it may be a general marker of synapse loss, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation.

  9. Adult-onset Still's disease with atypical cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Narváez Garcia, Francisco Javier; Pascual, María; López de Recalde, Mercè; Juarez, Pablo; Morales-Ivorra, Isabel; Notario, Jaime; Jucglà, Anna; Nolla, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) can be very difficult. There are no specific tests available, and diagnosis is usually based on a symptom complex and the well-described typical evanescent rash seen in the majority of patients. However, in recent years, other atypical cutaneous manifestations of AOSD have been reported. These atypical skin eruptions often present in addition to the typical evanescent rash but may also be the only skin manifestation, resulting in delayed diagnosis because of under-recognition. In this study, we present 3 new cases of AOSD with atypical cutaneous manifestations diagnosed during a 30-year period in our department and review 78 additional cases previously reported (PubMed 1990–2016). These 81 patients form the basis of the present analysis. The overall prevalence of atypical cutaneous manifestations in our AOSD population was 14%. These manifestations may appear at any time over the course of the disease, and usually occur in patients who have persistent and severe disease, with a considerable frequency of clinical complications (23%), including serositis, myopericarditis, lung involvement, abdominal pain, neurologic involvement, and reactive hemophagocytic syndrome. The most representative and frequent lesion among the nonclassical skin rashes is the development of persistent pruritic papules and/or plaques. Interestingly, these lesions show a distinctive histological pattern. Other, less frequently observed lesions include urticaria and urticaria-like eruptions, generalized or widespread non-pruritic persistent erythema, vesiculopustular eruptions, a widespread peau d’orange appearance of the skin, and edema of the eyelids mimicking dermatomyositis without any accompanying skin lesion. The great majority of these patients required medium or high doses of glucocorticoids (including intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy in some cases) and, in nearly 40%, a more potent or maintenance immunotherapy

  10. Up-regulation of neurotrophic factors by cinnamon and its metabolite sodium benzoate: therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Jana, Arundhati; Modi, Khushbu K; Roy, Avik; Anderson, John A; van Breemen, Richard B; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-06-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a widely-used food spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB), a widely-used food preservative and a FDA-approved drug against urea cycle disorders in humans, in increasing the levels of neurotrophic factors [e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3)] in the CNS. NaB, but not sodium formate (NaFO), dose-dependently induced the expression of BDNF and NT-3 in primary human neurons and astrocytes. Interestingly, oral administration of ground cinnamon increased the level of NaB in serum and brain and upregulated the levels of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in mouse CNS. Accordingly, oral feeding of NaB, but not NaFO, also increased the level of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in the CNS of mice. NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), but not protein kinase C (PKC), and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced increase in neurotrophic factors. Furthermore, activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein, but not NF-κB, by NaB, abrogation of NaB-induced expression of neurotrophic factors by siRNA knockdown of CREB and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the BDNF promoter by NaB suggest that NaB exerts its neurotrophic effect through the activation of CREB. Accordingly, cinnamon feeding also increased the activity of PKA and the level of phospho-CREB in vivo in the CNS. These results highlight a novel neutrophic property of cinnamon and its metabolite NaB via PKA - CREB pathway, which may be of benefit for various neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it causes a severe decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Over time, motor skills are affected, ... Schmahmann JD. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations. Brain Pathol. 2009 Jan; ...

  12. Intrathecal antibody production against Epstein-Barr and other neurotropic viruses in pediatric and adult onset multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Jacobi, Christian; Lange, Peter; Nau, Roland; Krone, Bernd; Hanefeld, Folker

    2010-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent reports proposed an increased EBV-targeted humoral immune response in MS, which appears to be more pronounced in pediatric patients. However, little is known about the CNS-derived antibody production against EBV in patients with MS. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency and intensity of intrathecal antibody production against EBV as compared to other neurotropic viruses in pediatric and adult onset MS. In cohorts of 43 childhood, 50 adult onset MS patients, 20 children and 12 adults with other CNS disorders, paired CSF and serum samples were studied. Frequency and intensity of intrathecal antibody production against EBV as compared to measles, rubella, varicella zoster (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) were analyzed by determination of virus-specific CSF-to-serum Antibody Indices (AI). Intrathecally synthesized EBV antibodies were detectable in 26% pediatric and 10% adult onset MS patients, compared to frequencies ranging in both groups from 10 to 60% for the other viruses. Median AIs for EBV were lower than those for all other viruses, with more than twofold higher median AI for measles, rubella and VZV. The EBV-targeted humoral immune response in the CNS is only part of the intrathecal polyspecific antibody production in MS, directed against various neurotropic viruses. Our results do not rule out the possibility that EBV is involved in the pathogenesis of MS by triggering diverse cellular immune mechanisms, but they argue against a direct pathogenic role of EBV-targeted humoral immune response within the CNS.

  13. Adult Onset Vitiligo: Multivariate Analysis Suggests the Need for a Thyroid Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, L.; Cammi, A.; Dragoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of age at onset on disease features in vitiligo. Objectives. To identify factors associated with adult onset vitiligo in comparison with childhood onset vitiligo. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively collected medical records of 191 patients. Such records included clinical examination, personal and familial medical history, laboratory evaluations, concomitant vitiligo treatment and drug assumption. Results. 123 patients with a disease onset after the age of 40 (adult onset vitiligo) were compared with 68 patients who developed vitiligo before the age of 12 (childhood onset vitiligo). Multivariate analysis revealed that personal history of thyroid diseases (P = 0.04; OR 0.4), stress at onset (P = 0.002; OR = 0.34), personal history of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) (P = 0.003; OR = 0.23), and thyroid nodules (P = 0.001; OR 0.90) were independently associated with adult onset vitiligo, whereas family history of dermatological diseases (P = 0.003; OR = 2.87) and Koebner phenomenon (P < 0.001; OR = 4.73) with childhood onset vitiligo. Moreover, in the adult onset group, concomitant thyroid disease preceded vitiligo in a statistically significant number of patients (P = 0.014). Conclusions. Childhood onset and adult onset vitiligo have different clinical features. In particular, ATD and thyroid nodules were significantly associated with adult onset vitiligo, suggesting that a thyroid screening should be recommended in this group of patients. PMID:27747240

  14. Adult Onset Vitiligo: Multivariate Analysis Suggests the Need for a Thyroid Screening.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, L; Colucci, R; Cammi, A; Dragoni, F; Moretti, S

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of age at onset on disease features in vitiligo. Objectives. To identify factors associated with adult onset vitiligo in comparison with childhood onset vitiligo. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively collected medical records of 191 patients. Such records included clinical examination, personal and familial medical history, laboratory evaluations, concomitant vitiligo treatment and drug assumption. Results. 123 patients with a disease onset after the age of 40 (adult onset vitiligo) were compared with 68 patients who developed vitiligo before the age of 12 (childhood onset vitiligo). Multivariate analysis revealed that personal history of thyroid diseases (P = 0.04; OR 0.4), stress at onset (P = 0.002; OR = 0.34), personal history of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) (P = 0.003; OR = 0.23), and thyroid nodules (P = 0.001; OR 0.90) were independently associated with adult onset vitiligo, whereas family history of dermatological diseases (P = 0.003; OR = 2.87) and Koebner phenomenon (P < 0.001; OR = 4.73) with childhood onset vitiligo. Moreover, in the adult onset group, concomitant thyroid disease preceded vitiligo in a statistically significant number of patients (P = 0.014). Conclusions. Childhood onset and adult onset vitiligo have different clinical features. In particular, ATD and thyroid nodules were significantly associated with adult onset vitiligo, suggesting that a thyroid screening should be recommended in this group of patients.

  15. Updates in adult-onset Still disease: Atypical cutaneous manifestations and associations with delayed malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Natalie Z; Brezinski, Elizabeth A; Berliner, Jacqueline; Haemel, Anna; Connolly, M Kari; Gensler, Lianne; McCalmont, Timothy H; Shinkai, Kanade

    2015-08-01

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder that is clinically characterized by a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms and signs. Though an evanescent eruption is the classic cutaneous finding, recent literature has highlighted atypical rashes associated with Still disease. A second emerging concept in presentations of AOSD is its association with malignancy. This review focuses on these concepts: the clinical spectrum of atypical skin manifestations and AOSD as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. PubMed-MEDLINE was screened for peer-reviewed articles describing atypical presentations of AOSD and cases associated with malignancy. Erythematous, brown or violaceous, persistent papules and plaques were the most common cutaneous finding (28/30 [93%]). Linear configurations were also rarely described. Of these patients, 81% concurrently had the typical evanescent skin eruption. There were 31 patients with associated malignancies, most commonly breast cancer and lymphoma. The diagnosis of malignancy did not precede or immediately follow a clinical presentation otherwise consistent with AOSD in a considerable subset of patients (42%). Understanding the cutaneous spectrum of AOSD and heightened awareness for its delayed association with malignancy may lead to improved recognition of cutaneous variants and reinforce the need for diagnostic evaluation and long-term follow-up for malignancy in patients with this clinical presentation.

  16. Unique histopathologic findings in a patient with adult-onset Still disease.

    PubMed

    Wolgamot, Greg; Yoo, Jane; Hurst, Stan; Gardner, Greg; Olerud, John; Argenyi, Zsolt

    2007-04-01

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is an uncommon disorder characterized by fever, polyarthralgia, elevated white blood cell count, and a maculopapular rash, the histologic features of which have not been well-known. A 55-year-old Asian woman presented initially with a "burning" and severely pruritic eruption on her face, hands, and arms, thought clinically to be urticaria. Within 1 month, she began spiking high fevers, developed diffuse joint pain, and had marked elevations of ferritin, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, characteristic of AOSD. The cutaneous eruption became more widespread, involving the trunk, scalp, and remainder of the extremities, with diffuse thickening of the skin with papular and linear hyperpigmentation and accentuation. Biopsies from several locations showed focal hyperkeratosis associated with dyskeratotic keratinocytes with a peculiar, distinctive distribution in the upper epidermis and cornified layers. In addition, increased dermal mucin was present, with minimal fibroblast proliferation and inflammation. This unusual combination of diffuse dermal mucinosis and a unique pattern of dyskeratosis can present a challenge in generating an accurate differential diagnosis, and may represent an unusual response to chronic scratching or be a distinctive histologic manifestation of AOSD.

  17. Adult-onset NREM parasomnia with hypnopompic hallucinatory pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mantoan, Laura; Eriksson, Sofia H; Nisbet, Angus P; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-02-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old woman presenting with nocturnal episodes of pain and screaming during sleep starting at age 30. There was no childhood or family history of parasomnia. The events had gradually become more frequent over the years, occurring in the first half of the night within 2 h of sleep onset. There were no triggers, and she had partial amnesia for the events. A diagnosis of adult-onset sleep terrors was made on clinical grounds and supported polysomnographically. Seizures and periodic limb movements were excluded as triggering factors. There was some mild sleep disordered breathing (predominantly non-desaturating hypopnea with a propensity for REM sleep of debatable significance). Imaging of the brain and spine and neurophysiological investigations ruled out lesions, entrapments, or neuropathies as possible causes of pain. Treatment (clonazepam, paroxetine, or gabapentin) was poorly tolerated and made no difference to the nocturnal episodes, while trazodone worsened them. This is the first report of hypnopompic psychic pain in association with a NREM parasomnia. We hypothesize that the pain may represent a sensory hallucination analogous to the more commonly recognized visual NREM parasomnia-associated hypnopompic visual hallucinations and that, as such, it may arise during arousal of the sensory neocortex as confabulatory response.

  18. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A.; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10–15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  19. Invited Review: Decoding the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie RNA dysregulation in neurodegenerative disorders: a review of the current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, M J; Cooper-Knock, J; Dodd, J E; Stopford, M J; Mihaylov, S R; Kirby, J; Shaw, P J; Hautbergue, G M

    2015-01-01

    Altered RNA metabolism is a key pathophysiological component causing several neurodegenerative diseases. Genetic mutations causing neurodegeneration occur in coding and noncoding regions of seemingly unrelated genes whose products do not always contribute to the gene expression process. Several pathogenic mechanisms may coexist within a single neuronal cell, including RNA/protein toxic gain-of-function and/or protein loss-of-function. Genetic mutations that cause neurodegenerative disorders disrupt healthy gene expression at diverse levels, from chromatin remodelling, transcription, splicing, through to axonal transport and repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation. We address neurodegeneration in repeat expansion disorders [Huntington's disease, spinocerebellar ataxias, C9ORF72-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)] and in diseases caused by deletions or point mutations (spinal muscular atrophy, most subtypes of familial ALS). Some neurodegenerative disorders exhibit broad dysregulation of gene expression with the synthesis of hundreds to thousands of abnormal messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules. However, the number and identity of aberrant mRNAs that are translated into proteins – and how these lead to neurodegeneration – remain unknown. The field of RNA biology research faces the challenge of identifying pathophysiological events of dysregulated gene expression. In conclusion, we discuss current research limitations and future directions to improve our characterization of pathological mechanisms that trigger disease onset and progression. PMID:25319671

  20. Inadvertent Skipping of Steroids in Septic Shock Leads to a Diagnosis of Adult Onset Still’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Vinoth K; Balasubramanian, Kavitha; Aghoram, Rajeswari

    2017-01-01

    Adult onset Still’s disease is uncommon in middle-aged and elderly individuals and can rarely present with shock; shock is usually associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiorgan dysfunction syndrome or acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report a post-menopausal woman with arthritis, fever, pneumonitis and hypotension which was managed as septic shock. Steroids were inadvertently missed during the second day of hospitalization in the intensive care unit. Persistence of hypotension on inotropes, with normal renal, hepatic and neurological function and recurrence of fever when steroids were skipped, led to suspicion of an inflammatory disorder. A diagnosis of Still’s disease may be entertained in postmenopausal women with polyarthritis, rash, and fever with leukocytosis. Sepsis is mimicked, and multiple antibiotics use is common before the diagnosis of such an entity is made. Shock is rare in adult onset Still’s disease and is not necessarily associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, or multiorgan dysfunction. PMID:28191382

  1. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. The proposed use of cervical spinal cord stimulation for the treatment and prevention of cognitive decline in dementias and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Tomycz, Nestor D

    2016-11-01

    Cervical spinal cord stimulation is a well-established treatment for intractable neuropathic upper extremity pain. More than 20years ago it was demonstrated that cervical spinal cord stimulation could engender an increase in cerebral blood flow. Cerebral blood flow has been shown to be decreased in many patients with dementia and in various neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, there is evidence that reduced cerebral blood flow worsens neurodegenerative disease and may also predict which patients progress from mild cognitive impairment to full blown Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of decreased cerebral blood flow in patients with early cognitive problems may offer clinicians a window of opportunity to intervene and prevent further brain damage. Further evidence that supports augmenting cerebral blood flow as an effective strategy for preventing and treating cognitive brain dysfunction comes from experimental studies with omental transposition. The author proposes cervical spinal cord stimulation as a titratable, programmable extracranial neuromodulation technique to increase cerebral blood flow for the purposes of improving cognitive function and preventing cognitive deterioration in patients with dementias and neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Neurodegenerative disease phenotypes in carriers of MAPT p.A152T, a risk factor for frontotemporal dementia spectrum disorders and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suzee E; Tartaglia, Maria C; Yener, Görsev; Genç, Sermin; Seeley, William W; Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Moreno, Fermin; Mendez, Mario F; Klein, Eric; Rademakers, Rosa; López de Munain, Adolfo; Combarros, Onofre; Kramer, Joel H; Kenet, Robert O; Boxer, Adam L; Geschwind, Michael D; Gorno-Tempini, Maria-Luisa; Karydas, Anna M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Miller, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Coppola and colleagues demonstrated that a rare microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) sequence variant, c.454G>A (p.A152T) significantly increases the risk of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) spectrum disorders and Alzheimer disease (AD) in a screen of 15,369 subjects. We describe clinical features of 9 patients with neurodegenerative disease (4 women) harboring p.A152T, aged 51 to 79 years at symptom onset. Seven developed FTD spectrum clinical syndromes, including progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (n=2), behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD, n=1), nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA, n=2), and corticobasal syndrome (n=2); 2 patients were diagnosed with clinical AD. Thus, MAPT p.A152T is associated with a variety of FTD spectrum clinical presentations, although patients with clinical AD are also identified. These data warrant larger studies with clinicopathologic correlation to elucidate the influence of this genetic variant on neurodegenerative disease.

  4. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, M K; Samples, J R; Kramer, P L; Rust, K; Topinka, J R; Yount, J; Koler, R D; Acott, T S

    1997-01-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. PMID:9012402

  5. Scientific basis for the use of Indian ayurvedic medicinal plants in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders: ashwagandha.

    PubMed

    Ven Murthy, M R; Ranjekar, Prabhakar K; Ramassamy, Charles; Deshpande, Manasi

    2010-09-01

    nontoxic medication that normalizes physiological functions, disturbed by chronic stress, through correction of imbalances in the neuroendocrine and immune systems [9, 10]. The scientific research that has been carried out on Ashwagandha and other ayurvedic herbal medicines may be classified into three major categories, taking into consideration the endogenous or exogenous phenomena that are known to cause physiological disequilibrium leading to the pathological state; (A) pharmacological and therapeutic effects of extracts, purified compounds or multi-herbal mixtures on specific non-neurological diseases; (B) pharmacological and therapeutic effects of extracts, purified compounds or multi-herbal mixtures on neurodegenerative disorders; and (C) biochemical, physiological and genetic studies on the herbal plants themselves, in order to distinguish between those originating from different habitats, or to improve the known medicinal quality of the indigenous plant. Some of the major points on its use in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are described below.

  6. Sandhoff disease mimicking adult-onset bulbospinal neuronopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P K; Young, E; King, R H

    1989-01-01

    A 32 year old male is described with an onset of upper limb postural tremor in adolescence followed by muscle cramps. Progressive proximal amyotrophy and weakness in the limbs developed late in the third decade. Examination disclosed, in addition, bilateral facial weakness and mild dysarthria. Enzyme studies revealed hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, indicating a diagnosis of Sandhoff disease. Intra-axonal membranocytoplasmic bodies were present in a rectal biopsy. The presentation, which resembled that of X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy, widens the clinical spectrum for disorders related to G(M2) gangliosidosis. Images PMID:2795083

  7. B-cell populations discriminate between pediatric- and adult-onset multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Alexander; Balint, Bettina; Korporal-Kuhnke, Mirjam; Jarius, Sven; von Engelhardt, Kathrin; Fürwentsches, Alexandra; Bussmann, Cornelia; Ebinger, Friedrich; Haas, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively assess the B-cell composition in blood and CSF of patients with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (pedMS) and adult-onset multiple sclerosis (adMS). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we obtained blood and CSF samples from 25 patients with pedMS (8–18 years) and 40 patients with adMS (23–65 years) and blood specimens from 66 controls (1–55 years). By using multicolor flow cytometry, we identified naive, transitional, isotype class-switched memory, nonswitched memory, and double-negative memory B-cell subsets as well as plasmablasts (PB) and terminally differentiated plasma cells (PC). Flow cytometric data were compared to concentrations of B-cell-specific cytokines in serum and CSF as determined by ELISA. Results: Frequencies of circulating naive B-cells decreased with higher age in controls but not in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). B-cell patterns in CSF differed between pedMS and adMS with an acute relapse: in pedMS-derived CSF samples, high frequencies of nonswitched memory B cells and PB were present, whereas class-switched memory B cells and PC dominated in the CSF of patients with adMS. In pedMS, PB were also elevated in the periphery. Accumulation of PB in the CSF correlated with high intrathecal CXCL-13 levels and augmented intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M. Conclusions: We demonstrate distinct changes in intrathecal B-cell homeostasis in patients with pedMS during active disease, which differ from those in adults by an expansion of plasmablasts in blood and CSF and similarly occur in prototypic autoantibody-driven autoimmune disorders. This emphasizes the particular importance of activated B-lymphocyte subsets for disease progression in the earliest clinical stages of MS. PMID:28053999

  8. Adult onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease with psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    del Valle-López, Pilar; Pérez-García, Rosa; Sanguino-Andrés, Rosa; González-Pablos, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare neurological disorder characterized by pyramidal and extrapyramidal manifestations, dysarthria and dementia. Its onset is usually in childhood and most patients have a fatal outcome in few years. A high percentage of cases are hereditary with a recessive autosomal pattern. In the majority of the patients reported, a mutation of the gene that encodes the pantothenate kinase (PANK2) located in the 20p13-p12.3 chromosome that causes iron storage in the basal ganglia of the brain has been found. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms as well as specific MRI imaging findings. The most common psychiatric features are cognitive impairment as well as depressive symptoms. There are few documented cases with psychotic disorders. We present the case of a patient with late onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease and psychotic symptoms that preceded the development of neurological manifestations. The pathophysiology and the treatment of psychotic symptomatology are presented and discussed. Key words: Psicosis, Hallervorden-Spatz, late onset, Basal ganglia.

  9. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Perea, Anna E; Pastula, Daniel M; Mead, Paul S

    2015-11-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions.

  10. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  11. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  12. Adult-Onset Antisocial Behavior Trajectories: Associations with Adolescent Family Processes and Emerging Adulthood Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Guided by conceptual and empirical work on emerging adulthood, this study investigated the role of closeness to mother and father and behavioral autonomy during adolescence on the development of adult-onset antisocial behavior. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we identified four aggressive…

  13. Childhood adversities and adult-onset asthma: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Korkeila, Jyrki; Lietzen, Raija; Sillanmäki, Lauri H; Rautava, Päivi; Korkeila, Katariina; Kivimäki, Mika; Koskenvuo, Markku; Vahtera, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Childhood adversities may be important determinants of later illnesses and poor health behaviour. However, large-scale prospective studies on the associations between childhood adversities and the onset of asthma in adulthood are lacking. Design Prospective cohort study with 7-year follow-up. Setting Nationally representative study. Data were collected from the Health and Social Support (HeSSup) survey and national registers. Participants The participants represent the Finnish population from the following age groups: 20–24, 30–34, 40–44, and 50–54 years at baseline in 1998 (24 057 survey participants formed the final cohort of this study). The occurrence of childhood adversities was assessed at baseline with a six-item survey scale. The analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, behavioural health risks and common mental disorders. Primary and secondary outcomes The survey data were linked to data from national health registers on incident asthma during a 7-year follow-up to define new-onset asthma cases with verified diagnoses. Results A total of 12 126 (59%) participants reported that they encountered a childhood adversity. Of them 3677 (18% of all) endured three to six adversities. During a follow-up of 7 years, 593 (2.9%) participants were diagnosed with incident asthma. Those who reported three or more childhood adversities had a 1.6-fold (95% CI 1.31 to 2.01) greater risk of asthma compared to those without childhood adversities. This hazard attenuated but remained statistically significant after adjustment for conventional risk factors (HR 1.33; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.67). Conclusions Adults who report having encountered adversities in childhood may have an increased risk of developing asthma. PMID:23069774

  14. Glycoproteomics in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyejin; Zhang, Jianpeng; Chung, Kathryn A.; Leverenz, James B.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Jankovic, Joseph; Su, Zhen; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Pan, Catherine; Montine, Thomas J.; Pan, Sheng; Nutt, John; Albin, Roger; Gearing, Marla; Beyer, Richard P.; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Protein glycosylation regulates protein function and cellular distribution. Additionally, aberrant protein glycosylations have been recognized to play major roles in human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Glycoproteomics, a branch of proteomics that catalogs and quantifies glycoproteins, provides a powerful means to systematically profile the glycopeptides or glycoproteins of a complex mixture that are highly enriched in body fluids, and therefore, carry great potential to be diagnostic and/or prognostic markers. Application of this mass spectrometry-based technology to the study of neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) is relatively new, and is expected to provide insight into the biochemical pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, as well as biomarker discovery. In this review, we have summarized the current understanding of glycoproteins in biology and neurodegenerative disease, and have discussed existing proteomic technologies that are utilized to characterize glycoproteins. Some of the ongoing studies, where glycoproteins isolated from cerebrospinal fluid and human brain are being characterized in Parkinson's disease at different stages versus controls, are presented, along with future applications of targeted validation of brain specific glycoproteins in body fluids. PMID:19358229

  15. Adult-onset Alexander disease: a series of eleven unrelated cases with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Fancellu, Roberto; Mariotti, Caterina; Romano, Silvia; Salmaggi, Andrea; Carella, Francesco; Girotti, Floriano; Gattellaro, Grazietta; Carriero, Maria Rita; Farina, Laura; Ceccherini, Isabella; Savoiardo, Mario

    2008-09-01

    Alexander disease (AD) in its typical form is an infantile lethal leucodystrophy, characterized pathologically by Rosenthal fibre accumulation. Following the identification of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene as the causative gene, cases of adult-onset AD (AOAD) are being described with increasing frequency. AOAD has a different clinical and neuroradiological presentation with respect to early-onset AD, as abnormalities are mainly concentrated in the brainstem-spinal cord junction. We report detailed clinical and genetic data of 11 cases of AOAD, observed over a 4-year period, and a review of the previously reported 25 cases of genetically confirmed AOAD. In our series, onset occurred as late as age 62, and up to 71 in an affected deceased relative. Most cases appeared sporadic, but family history may be misleading. The most frequent symptoms were related to bulbar dysfunction-with dysarthria, dysphagia, dysphonia (seven patients)-, pyramidal involvement (seven patients) and cerebellar ataxia (seven patients). Four patients had palatal myoclonus. Sleep disorders were also observed (four cases). Bulbar symptoms, however, were infrequent at onset and two symptomatic patients had an almost pure pyramidal involvement. Two subjects were asymptomatic. Misdiagnosis at presentation was frequent and MRI was instrumental in suggesting the correct diagnosis by showing, in all cases, mild to severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata extending caudally to the cervical spinal cord. In ten patients, molecular studies revealed six novel missense mutations and three previously reported changes in GFAP. The last typical patient carried no definitely pathogenic mutation, but a missense variant (p.D157N), supposedly a rare polymorphism. Revision of the literature and the present series indicate that the clinical picture is not specific, but AOAD must be considered in patients of any age with lower brainstem signs. When present, palatal myoclonus is strongly suggestive

  16. Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids and pigmented glia: report of five cases and a new mutation.

    PubMed

    Kleinfeld, Kirk; Mobley, Bret; Hedera, Peter; Wegner, Adam; Sriram, Subramaniam; Pawate, Siddharama

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this work is to report on a series of five patients with adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP). ALSP is a rare adult-onset leukodystrophy, which encompasses hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy. This was a retrospective chart review and literature review. Five previously healthy women presented with a rapidly progressive neurological disorder at ages 39, 37, 40, 30, and 47, respectively. All five individuals were initially diagnosed as suffering from multiple sclerosis. The clinical courses of the five patients were dominated by progressive spastic quadriparesis (patient 5, newly diagnosed, has paraparesis at this time) and dementia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse cerebral atrophy, corpus callosal atrophy, and diffuse T2 hyperintensities in the subcortical and periventricular white matter with no gadolinium enhancing lesions. Three patients showed involvement of pyramidal tracts from motor cortex to the brainstem. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal in all cases. Diagnosis of ALSP was established by biopsy (two cases) and autopsy (two cases). Histopathology showed the presence of neuroaxonal spheroids in all four cases and pigmented glia in three. In the fifth case, diagnosis was established by genetic analysis alone that showed a disease-causing mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Genetic analysis was done in three patients with available DNA, and identified the disease-causing mutation in all three, including a novel mutation F828S. ALSP may be suspected in adults with rapid to subacute progression of neurological disease when (1) MRI shows corpus callosal atrophy on a background of generalized brain atrophy and diffuse white matter disease without postcontrast enhancement, (2) CSF studies are normal, and (3) studies for systemic inflammatory diseases and specific leukodystrophies are

  17. Role of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) in the pathogenesis of alzheimer disease and other selected age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Tramutola, Antonella; Butterfield, D Allan

    2016-10-24

    Oxidative stress is involved in various and numerous pathological states including several age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Peroxidation of the membrane lipid bilayer is one of the major sources of free radical-mediated injury that directly damages neurons causing increased membrane rigidity, decreased activity of membrane-bound enzymes, impairment of membrane receptors and altered membrane permeability and eventual cell death. Moreover, the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids leads to the formation of aldehydes, which can act as toxic by-products. One of the most abundant and cytotoxic lipid -derived aldehydes is 4-hydroxy 2-nonenal (HNE). HNE toxicity is mainly due to the alterations of cell functions by the formation of covalent adducts of HNE with proteins. A key marker of lipid peroxidation, HNE-protein adducts, were found to be elevated in brain tissues and body fluids of Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, Huntington disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis subjects and/or models of the respective age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Although only a few proteins were identified as common targets of HNE modification across all these listed disorders, a high overlap of these proteins occurs concerning the alteration of common pathways, such as glucose metabolism or mitochondrial function that are known to contribute to cognitive decline. Within this context, despite the different etiological and pathological mechanisms that lead to the onset of different neurodegenerative diseases, the formation of HNE-protein adducts might represent the shared leit-motif, which aggravates brain damage contributing to disease specific clinical presentation and decline in cognitive performance observed in each case.

  18. When uncommon and common coalesce: adult onset Still's disease associated with breast augmentation as part of autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Dagan, A; Kogan, M; Shoenfeld, Y; Segal, G

    2016-06-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon, multisystemic, auto-inflammatory disorder, while breast augmentation is a very common cosmetic procedure. We describe a case in which these two coalesce, AOSD, manifested with pleuritis and pericarditis, developed after breast mammoplasty. The pathogenetic, missing link, behind the development of AOSD following mammoplasty, is thought to be the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). We reviewed other cases of AOSD associated with breast mammoplasty published to date and the literature regarding AOSD and ASIA syndrome. The review is followed by a short debate of whether silicone implants should be explanted in similar, future cases.

  19. Oxidative Stress and Protein Quality Control Systems in the Aged Canine Brain as a Model for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aged dogs are considered the most suitable spontaneous animal model for studying normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Elderly canines naturally develop cognitive dysfunction and neuropathological hallmarks similar to those seen in humans, especially Alzheimer's disease-like pathology. Pet dogs also share similar living conditions and diets to humans. Oxidative damage accumulates in the canine brain during aging, making dogs a valid model for translational antioxidant treatment/prevention studies. Evidence suggests the presence of detective protein quality control systems, involving ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs), in the aged canine brain. Further studies on the canine model are needed to clarify the role of age-related changes in UPS activity and HSP expression in neurodegeneration in order to design novel treatment strategies, such as HSP-based therapies, aimed at improving chaperone defences against proteotoxic stress affecting brain during aging. PMID:26078824

  20. The X-Linked Hypothesis of Brain Disorders: Can Gender Ratios Tell Us Anything About Cellular Etiology of Neurodegenerative and Psychiatric Diseases?

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Bodini, Benedetta; Politis, Marios; Pariante, Carmine M; Ciccarelli, Olga; Yeo, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we propose an X-linked hypothesis of brain disorders that postulates a neuronal origin of those neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders with a greater male prevalence. The hypothesis is based on the accumulated genetics and genomic evidence linking X chromosome genes and transcripts to neuronal cells. The behavioral genetics literature has long pointed to the link between postsynaptic protein complexes coded on chromosome X and mental retardation. More recently, novel genomic evidence has emerged of X-linked mRNA overexpression of neuronal source in the human brain. We review the evidence for this hypothesis and its consistency with the distribution across genders of brain disorders of known aetiology. We then provide examples of the utilization of this hypothesis in the investigation of the pathophysiology of complex brain disorders in both the stratification of disease cohorts and the development of realistic preclinical models. We conclude by providing a general framework for testing its validity, which will be exploited in future studies, and provide future directions for research.

  1. Etiologic Framework for the Study of Neurodegenerative Disorders as Well as Vascular and Metabolic Comorbidities on the Grounds of Shared Epidemiologic and Biologic Features

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Rábano, Alberto; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Calero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background: During the last two decades, protein aggregation at all organismal levels, from viruses to humans, has emerged from a neglected area of protein science to become a central issue in biology and biomedicine. This article constitutes a risk-based review aimed at supporting an etiologic scenario of selected, sporadic, protein-associated, i.e., conformational, neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs), and their vascular- and metabolic-associated ailments. Methods: A rationale is adopted, to incorporate selected clinical data and results from animal-model research, complementing epidemiologic evidences reported in two prior articles. Findings: Theory is formulated assuming an underlying conformational transmission mechanism, mediated either by horizontal transfer of mammalian genes coding for specific aggregation-prone proteins, or by xeno-templating between bacterial and host proteins. We build a few population-based and experimentally-testable hypotheses focusing on: (1) non-disposable surgical instruments for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) and other rapid progressive neurodegenerative dementia (sRPNDd), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and motor neuron disease (MND); and (2) specific bacterial infections such as B. pertussis and E. coli for all forms, but particularly for late-life sporadic conformational, NDDs, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and atherosclerosis where natural protein fibrils present in such organisms as a result of adaptation to the human host induce prion-like mechanisms. Conclusion: Implications for cohort alignment and experimental animal research are discussed and research lines proposed. PMID:27378910

  2. Effects of diabetes mellitus on bone mass in juvenile and adult-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levin, M E; Boisseau, V C; Avioli, L V

    1976-01-29

    To assess the influence of diabetes mellitus on bone metabolism, we measured skeletal mass in the forearms of 35 patients with juvenile diabetes on insulin and 101 stable patients with adult-onset diabetes, on diet alone, insulin, or oral hypoglycemic agents. There was a significant loss of bone mass in both juvenile and adult-onset diabetes (P less than 0.01) as compared to controls matched for age and sex. The decrease was already present in patients with diabetes of less than five years' duration. Bone loss and duration of the diabetes did not correlate; the greatest decrease in bone mass was observed in the patients receiving oral agents. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the loss of skeletal tissue in diabetes reflects the underlying disease since it occurs early and is not related to severity as evidenced by the need for insulin, to duration, or to treatment with insulin or diet alone.

  3. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of vinclozolin induced mouse adult onset disease and associated sperm epigenome biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Covert, Trevor R; Haque, Md M; Settles, Matthew; Nilsson, Eric E; Anway, Matthew D; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-12-01

    The endocrine disruptor vinclozolin has previously been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in the rat. The current study was designed to investigate the transgenerational actions of vinclozolin on the mouse. Transient exposure of the F0 generation gestating female during gonadal sex determination promoted transgenerational adult onset disease in F3 generation male and female mice, including spermatogenic cell defects, testicular abnormalities, prostate abnormalities, kidney abnormalities and polycystic ovarian disease. Pathology analysis demonstrated 75% of the vinclozolin lineage animals developed disease with 34% having two or more different disease states. Interestingly, the vinclozolin induced transgenerational disease was observed in the outbred CD-1 strain, but not the inbred 129 mouse strain. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified differential DNA methylation regions that can potentially be utilized as epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational exposure and disease.

  4. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Update on differences between childhood-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease and occurs worldwide in both children and adults. The estimated annual incidence among children is 2.22/100,000 and among adults is 23.2/100,000 in the United States. There is increasing understanding about differences in disease manifestations, medication use, and disease severity between those with childhood-onset SLE as compared with adult-onset SLE. Children have a more fulminant disease onset and course than adults with SLE, resulting in two to three times higher mortality. In future years, we anticipate more insight into the genetics between childhood-onset SLE and adult-onset SLE to help delineate the best therapies for both subsets of patients. PMID:23998441

  6. The hippocampus in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Moodley, K K; Chan, D

    2014-01-01

    AD is the commonest neurodegenerative disorder resulting ultimately in dementia, a stage during which there is a loss of previously acquired intellectual skill and independent occupational and social function. Neurodegenerative changes within the hippocampus and an extended neuronal network involving the medial temporal and medial parietal lobe result in the archetypal memory impairment seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). As attention focuses increasingly on early diagnosis and treatment of dementia, this understanding of the hippocampal involvement in AD has helped to develop diagnostic tools for use in early disease. However, hippocampal damage is also a common feature among non-AD neurodegenerative dementias. Neuroimaging techniques, in conjunction with behavioral and pathological techniques, can be used to determine the involvement of the hippocampus in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1 year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  8. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database.

  9. Guinea worm cause of adult onset asthmatic attack, a radiological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Marchie, T T

    1999-01-01

    A case report of a fifty years old Hausa male from Sokoto town, Nigeria an endemic region of guinea worm infestation, who presented with sudden adult onset of asthmatic attack and was evaluated radiologically and the diagnosis of acute obstructive airway disease was confirmed. It was noted, that there were associated calcified chain of guinea worms in the lung parenchyma. A rare association of acute asthmatic attack. Patient responded there-after to an anti-asthmatic regime of management.

  10. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis.

  11. Dioxin (TCDD) induces epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    Environmental compounds can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study examined the ability of dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo[p]dioxin, TCDD) to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to dioxin during fetal day 8 to 14 and adult-onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. The incidences of total disease and multiple disease increased in F1 and F3 generations. Prostate disease, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F1 generation dioxin lineage. Kidney disease in males, pubertal abnormalities in females, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F3 generation dioxin lineage animals. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 50 differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) in gene promoters. These DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. Observations demonstrate dioxin exposure of a gestating female promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

  12. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  13. Opening Pandora’s jar: a primer on the putative roles of CRMP2 in a panoply of neurodegenerative, sensory and motor neuron, and central disorders

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Rajesh; Wilson, Sarah M; Brittain, Joel M; Weimer, Jill; Sultana, Rukhsana; Butterfield, Allan; Hensley, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    CRMP2, also known as DPYSL2/DRP2, Unc-33, Ulip or TUC2, is a cytosolic phosphoprotein that mediates axon/dendrite specification and axonal growth. Mapping the CRMP2 interactome has revealed previously unappreciated functions subserved by this protein. Together with its canonical roles in neurite growth and retraction and kinesin-dependent axonal transport, it is now known that CRMP2 interacts with numerous binding partners to affect microtubule dynamics; protein endocytosis and vesicular cycling, synaptic assembly, calcium channel regulation and neurotransmitter release. CRMP2 signaling is regulated by post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, oxidation, proteolysis and phosphorylation; the latter being a fulcrum of CRMP2 functions. Here, the putative roles of CRMP2 in a panoply of neurodegenerative, sensory and motor neuron, and central disorders are discussed and evidence is presented for therapeutic strategies targeting CRMP2 functions. PMID:23308041

  14. Protective effect of naringin against the LPS-induced apoptosis of PC12 cells: Implications for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Xu, You Song; Wang, Miao Lin; Cheng, Chao; Bian, Rui; Yuan, Hao; Wang, Yi; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Lin Lin; Zhou, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that increased apoptosis plays an essential role in neurodegenerative disorders. It has been demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces apoptosis largely through the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory mediators. In this study, we investigated the potential protective mechanisms of naringin (Nar), a pummelo peel extract, on LPS-induced PC12 cell apoptosis. Nar pre-conditioning prior to stimulation with LPS for 18 h was a prerequisite for evaluating PC12 cell viability and the protective mechanisms of Nar. Nar significantly improved cell survival in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. On the one hand, Nar downregulated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), inhibited the release of ROS, mitigated the stimulation of oxidative stress, and rectified the antioxidant protein contents of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), superoxide dismutase (SOD)2 and glutathione synthetase (GSS). On the other hand, Nar down-regulated inflammatory gene and protein expression, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, HMGB1, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) path way and downstream mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, activator protein transcription factor-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Moroever, Nar markedly attenuated the cytochrome c shift from the mitochondria to the cytosol and regulated caspase-3-related protein expression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of Nar in neuronal-like PC12 cells. These results suggest that Nar can be utilized as a potential drug for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28260042

  15. Neurobiological effects of the green tea constituent theanine and its potential role in the treatment of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Lardner, Anne L

    2014-07-01

    Theanine (n-ethylglutamic acid), a non-proteinaceous amino acid component of green and black teas, has received growing attention in recent years due to its reported effects on the central nervous system. It readily crosses the blood-brain barrier where it exerts a variety of neurophysiological and pharmacological effects. Its most well-documented effect has been its apparent anxiolytic and calming effect due to its up-regulation of inhibitory neurotransmitters and possible modulation of serotonin and dopamine in selected areas. It has also recently been shown to increase levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. An increasing number of studies demonstrate a neuroprotective effects following cerebral infarct and injury, although the exact molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Theanine also elicits improvements in cognitive function including learning and memory, in human and animal studies, possibly via a decrease in NMDA-dependent CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) and increase in NMDA-independent CA1-LTP. Furthermore, theanine administration elicits selective changes in alpha brain wave activity with concomitant increases in selective attention during the execution of mental tasks. Emerging studies also demonstrate a promising role for theanine in augmentation therapy for schizophrenia, while animal models of depression report positive improvements following theanine administration. A handful of studies are beginning to examine a putative role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and theoretical extrapolations to a therapeutic role for theanine in other psychiatric disorders such as anxiety disorders, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and bipolar disorder are discussed.

  16. Altered Redox Mitochondrial Biology in the Neurodegenerative Disorder Fragile X-Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome: Use of Antioxidants in Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyu; Napoli, Eleonora; Wong, Sarah; Hagerman, Randi; Liu, Siming; Tassone, Flora; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    A 55–200 expansion of the CGG nucleotide repeat in the 5’-UTR of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) is the hallmark of the triplet nucleotide disease known as the “premutation” as opposed to those with >200 repeats, known as the full mutation or fragile X syndrome. Originally, premutation carriers were thought to be free of phenotypic traits; however, some are diagnosed with emotional and neurocognitive issues and, later in life, with the neurodegenerative disease fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Considering that mitochondrial dysfunction has been observed in fibroblasts and post-mortem brain samples from carriers of the premutation, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) may result in cumulative oxidative-nitrative damage. Fibroblasts from premutation carriers (n = 31, all FXTAS-free except 8), compared with age- and sex-matched controls (n = 25), showed increased mitochondrial ROS production, impaired Complex I activity, lower expression of MIA40 (rate-limiting step of the redox-regulated mitochondrial-disulfide-relay-system), increased mtDNA deletions and increased biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidative-nitrative damage. Most of the outcomes were more pronounced in FXTAS-affected individuals. Significant recovery of mitochondrial mass and/or function was obtained with superoxide or hydroxyl radicals’ scavengers, a glutathione peroxidase analog, or by overexpressing MIA40. The effects of ethanol (a hydroxyl radical scavenger) were deleterious, while others (by N-acetyl-cysteine, quercetin and epigallocatechin-3-gallate) were outcome- and/or carrier- specific. The use of antioxidants in the context of precision medicine is discussed with the goal of improving mitochondrial function in carriers with the potential of decreasing the morbidity and/or delaying FXTAS onset. PMID:27385396

  17. Targeting intrinsically disordered proteins in neurodegenerative and protein dysfunction diseases: another illustration of the D(2) concept.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2010-08-01

    Many biologically active proteins, which are usually called intrinsically disordered or natively unfolded proteins, lack stable tertiary and/or secondary structure under physiological conditions in vitro. Their functions complement the functional repertoire of ordered proteins, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) often being involved in regulation, signaling and control. Their amino acid sequences and compositions are very different from those of ordered proteins, making reliable identification of IDPs possible at the proteome level. IDPs are highly abundant in various human diseases, including neurodegeneration and other protein dysfunction maladies and, therefore, represent attractive novel drug targets. Some of the aspects of IDPs, as well as their roles in neurodegeneration and protein dysfunction diseases, are discussed in this article, together with the peculiarities of IDPs as potential drug targets.

  18. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  19. Pesticide methoxychlor promotes the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease through the female germline.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures.

  20. Adult-onset presentation of a hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria patient without prior history of neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Kamer; Louie, Kristal T; Qu, Yong; Velasquez, Jorge; Zaldivar, Frank; Rioseco-Camacho, Natalia; Camacho, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway caused by mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, ORNT1 (SLC25A15). In general, the majority of patients with HHH syndrome come to medical attention during infancy or early school years with symptoms such as learning disabilities, changes in cognitive development, spasticity, or liver dysfunction. In this report, we describe a 35-year-old male of Indian descent who was diagnosed with HHH syndrome after he presented to the emergency room with gastroenteritis, disorientation, and slurred speech. Molecular analysis revealed that this patient was heterozygous for two ORNT1 mutations, p.[Gly220Arg(+)Arg275X] (c.[658G>A(+)823C>T]) that had been previously reported in homozygous probands who presented during the first year of life. Cellular studies revealed that the ORNT1 p.Gly220Arg mutation was nonfunctional but targeted to the mitochondria. Given that this patient was a successful college graduate on a vegetarian diet without a prior history of learning or neurological impairment, additional factors such as gene redundancy, environmental, and epigenetic factors may have contributed to the delay in onset of presentation and lack of any previous symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an adult-onset HHH syndrome presentation without a prior history of neurological or cognitive deficiency.

  1. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  2. Piriform sinus carcinoma with a paraneoplastic syndrome misdiagnosed as adult onset Still's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Du, Jintao

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PS) occur less commonly in association with otolaryngologic neoplasms than other carcinomas such as those of lung or breast. Piriform sinus carcinoma with PS is extremely rare. We here report a case of piriform sinus carcinoma accompanied by PS that was initially misdiagnosed as adult onset Still's disease and describe our diagnosis and treatment. One lesson we have drawn from the experience of this misdiagnosis is that PS symptoms may manifest before the primary tumor is evident and complicate the diagnostic process.

  3. Familial Adult-onset Alexander Disease: Clinical and Neuroradiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    ELMALI, Ayşe Deniz; ÇETİNÇELİK, Ümran; IŞLAK, Civan; UZUN ADATEPE, Nurten; KARAALİ SAVRUN, Feray; YALÇINKAYA, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) dramatically differs from the early onset AD with respect to clinical and neuroradiological findings. Herein we report the detailed clinical and neuroradiological findings of a Turkish family with AOAD. In all three cases, magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked atrophy of the mesencephalon, bulbus, and cervical spinal cord accompanied with signal abnormalities in the same regions along with supratentorial white matter. Basal ganglia were affected in two cases. Molecular genetic analysis revealed heterozygous mutation in the 8th exon of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene M451I (c.1245G>A), leading to the diagnosis of AOAD in all cases. PMID:28360791

  4. [Adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure requiring liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Terán, Alvaro; Casafont, Fernando; Fábrega, Emilio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Pons-Romero, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    We present the case of a 23-year-old man with fever of unknown origin, who developed acute liver failure 2 months after symptom onset, requiring an urgent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease was established after the reappearance of symptoms after transplantation, and high doses of corticosteroids were used to control disease activity. Subsequently, given the impossibility of tapering the steroid dose, interleukin-1 receptor blocking treatment was started with satisfactory outcome. We also review the published literature.

  5. Adult onset primary focal dystonia of the foot: an orthopaedic intervention.

    PubMed

    Logan, Loretta; Resseque, Barbara; Dontamsetti, Monica Sakshi

    2016-03-30

    A 54-year-old woman presented to a foot centre with a chief symptom of cramping in her toes, which, she believed, was of a secondary cause originating from a bunion. She was treated conservatively; however, she returned a month later as the symptoms had progressed to painful cramping of toes, toe-curling and instability while walking, due to involuntary movement of her toes. It was believed that the patient presented with a rare case of primary adult onset focal foot dystonia. This case report explains dystonia further in detail and delves into the different treatment and management options available today, including the unique orthopaedic intervention provided for this patient.

  6. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome due to West Nile Virus treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Julien; Armstrong, David; Daneman, Nick; Jain, Jennifer Deborah; Perry, James

    2017-02-01

    A 63-year-old female with no significant past medical history was presented with a 5-day history of progressive opsoclonus-myoclonus, headaches, and fevers. Her workup was significant only for positive West-Nile Virus serum serologies. She received a 2-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIG). At an 8-week follow up, she had a complete neurological remission. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is a rare condition for which paraneoplastic and infectious causes have been attributed. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported of opsoclonus-myoclonus secondary to West-Nile Virus treated with intravenous immunoglobulin monotherapy.

  7. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  8. Inferior olivary nucleus involvement in pediatric neurodegenerative disorders: does it play a role in neuroimaging pattern-recognition approach?

    PubMed

    Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Morana, Giovanni; Bruno, Claudio; Di Rocco, Maja; Striano, Pasaquale; De Grandis, Eusa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    The diagnostic work up of neurometabolic/degenerative disorders is complex. In such context, identification of neuroradiological features suggestive of specific diagnoses is useful to prompt further diagnostic tests. Involvement of the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has been reported in several pathologic conditions, either as a primary manifestation of disease or secondary to hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD). In this study, we analyzed a cohort of 95 children with different neurometabolic/degenerative diseases involving the brainstem and cerebellum, with the aim to evaluate whether ION involvement plays a role in a neuroimaging-based pattern-recognition approach. A total of 13 patients (13.7%) showed bilateral high-signal intensity and enlargement of the ION on T2-weighted images, while 16 (16.8%) had ION T2-hyperintensity without olivary nucleus enlargement. Our study demonstrates that ION involvement is not rare in children with neurometabolic/degenerative disorders. Two main neuroradiological patterns, that is, "T2-hyperintense signal" and "T2-hyperintense signal with enlargement" are found. These patterns can be related to different etiologies, and do not suggest specific diagnoses. Primary ION lesion can be characterized by olivary swelling, and the differentiation from typical secondary HOD may be difficult.

  9. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids and demyelinating plaque-like lesions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Saez, Elena; Shah, Sachit; Costa, Carme; Fleminger, Simon; Connor, Stephen; Bodi, Istvan

    2012-06-01

    Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids is an uncommon cause of dementia. Both hereditary (autosomal dominant) and sporadic cases have been described. A 41-year-old African woman presented with inappropriate behavior and personality change consistent with frontal lobe dysfunction. MRI demonstrated diffuse frontoparietal white matter signal abnormality and volume loss, as well as focal enhancing white matter lesions, while CT scan showed white matter calcifications. She had been gradually deteriorating over the last 5 years, diagnosed as having progressive demyelinating illness. She died of recurrent chest infections. There was no familial history. The brain showed prominent symmetrical white matter changes with greyish discolorization mainly affecting the frontal and parietal lobes, with less involvement of the temporal lobe and only mildly affecting the occipital white matter. Histology revealed deep white matter atrophy with many neuroaxonal spheroids labelled by neurofilament and β-amyloid precursor protein. In addition, scattered inactive demyelinating plaque-like lesions were found in the periventricular areas, brainstem and the cervical spinal cord. This case had typical features of an adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids. However, we also demonstrated demyelinating plaque-like lesions, which has not been previously described. The possibility of a demyelinating origin contributing to the changes may be considered in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  10. Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 in a family with adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Lynch, David R.; Lukas, Thomas; Ahmeti, Kreshnik; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Ryan, Eanna; Schadt, Kimberly A.; Newman, Jordan H.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic defect for adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) in a family with 5 patients. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the shared genetic variants in 3 affected members in a PLS family with 5 affected individuals. Sanger sequencing was used for validation of the variants and for cosegregation analysis. Mitochondrial activity for both patients and unaffected siblings was measured using a SeaHorse metabolic analyzer. Results: Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent cosegregation analysis demonstrated that compound heterozygous missense variants L695P and I743T in SPG7 were the only mutations cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal recessive fashion in this family. The parents and siblings are genetically heterozygous and clinically unaffected. Functional studies suggested that the PLS-associated SPG7 mutants affect mitochondrial function when glucose is reduced. Conclusions: Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 are associated with adult-onset PLS, extending the spectrum of SPG7-linked neurologic diseases. Patients with the PLS phenotype should have genetic testing for paraplegin, especially when the condition is familial. PMID:27123479

  11. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions.

  12. Neurodegenerative disorders, bullous pemphigoid and psoriasis: a comparative study in ethnic Poles indicates that Parkinson’s disease is more relevant to bullous pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Pietkiewicz, Paweł P.; Świrkowicz, Anna; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika; Dmochowski, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering dermatosis of the elderly with autoimmunity to hemidesmosomal proteins, BP180 and BP230, which are expressed also in neuronal tissue. Aim The aim here was to retrospectively compare the prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders (ND), particularly Parkinson’s disease (PD), unspecified conditions manifesting as dementia and stroke, in two groups of ethnic Poles, with BP and with psoriasis (Ps), in order to obtain data whether BP is more prone to coexist with ND than Ps in the elderly. Psoriasis was chosen in this comparative study as it was considered to be a paradigm of cutaneous disease with systemic manifestations. Material and methods The available medical records of 96 BP patients and 149 Ps patients over 70 years of age were analyzed for the presence of ND. Results There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence of ND without specifying the type and ND types analyzed between BP and Ps groups, except for a higher prevalence of PD in the BP group. Conclusions Thus, regarding population aging and increasing incidence and prevalence of BP corresponding with that phenomenon in various ethnicities, it appears justified to expand studies of a possible immunopathogenic relationship, appearing to be PD-related, between BP and ND. PMID:28261030

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) γ and PPARα Agonists Modulate Mitochondrial Fusion-Fission Dynamics: Relevance to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Related Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Zolezzi, Juan M.; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Ordenes, Daniela; Godoy, Juan A.; Carvajal, Francisco J.; Santos, Manuel J.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies showed that the activation of the retinoid X receptor, which dimerizes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), leads to an enhanced clearance of Aβ from the brain of transgenic mice model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), because an increased expression of apolipoprotein E and it main transporters. However, the effects observed must involve additional underlying mechanisms that have not been yet explored. Several studies conducted in our laboratory suggest that part of the effects observed for the PPARs agonist might involves mitochondrial function and, particularly, mitochondrial dynamics. In the present study we assessed the effects of oxidative stress challenge on mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial dynamics-related proteins in hippocampal neurons. Using immunofluorescence, we evaluated the PPARγ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1), mitochondrial fission protein 1 (FIS1), and mitochondrial length, in order to determine if PPARs agonist pre-treatment is able to protect mitochondrial population from hippocampal neurons through modulation of the mitochondrial fusion-fission events. Our results suggest that both a PPARγ agonist (ciglitazone) and a PPARα agonist (WY 14.643) are able to protect neurons by modulating mitochondrial fusion and fission, leading to a better response of neurons to oxidative stress, suggesting that a PPAR based therapy could acts simultaneously in different cellular components. Additionally, our results suggest that PGC-1α and mitochondrial dynamics should be further studied in future therapy research oriented to ameliorate neurodegenerative disorders, such as AD. PMID:23675519

  14. Meditation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Newberg, Andrew B; Serruya, Mijail; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé Sattar; Reibel, Diane; Monti, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases pose a significant problem for the healthcare system, doctors, and patients. With an aging population, more and more individuals are developing neurodegenerative diseases and there are few treatment options at the present time. Meditation techniques present an interesting potential adjuvant treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases and have the advantage of being inexpensive, and easy to teach and perform. There is increasing research evidence to support the application of meditation techniques to help improve cognition and memory in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the current data on meditation, memory, and attention, and the potential applications of meditation techniques in patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Distinguishing adult-onset asthma from COPD: a review and a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Michael J; Perret, Jennifer L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; McDonald, Vanessa M; McDonald, Christine F

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. This review presents a comprehensive synopsis of their epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentations; describes how they can be distinguished; and considers both established and proposed new approaches to their management. Both adult-onset asthma and COPD are complex diseases arising from gene–environment interactions. Early life exposures such as childhood infections, smoke, obesity, and allergy influence adult-onset asthma. While the established environmental risk factors for COPD are adult tobacco and biomass smoke, there is emerging evidence that some childhood exposures such as maternal smoking and infections may cause COPD. Asthma has been characterized predominantly by Type 2 helper T cell (Th2) cytokine-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. In established COPD, the inflammatory cell infiltrate in small airways comprises predominantly neutrophils and cytotoxic T cells (CD8 positive lymphocytes). Parenchymal destruction (emphysema) in COPD is associated with loss of lung tissue elasticity, and small airways collapse during exhalation. The precise definition of chronic airflow limitation is affected by age; a fixed cut-off of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity leads to overdiagnosis of COPD in the elderly. Traditional approaches to distinguishing between asthma and COPD have highlighted age of onset, variability of symptoms, reversibility of airflow limitation, and atopy. Each of these is associated with error due to overlap and convergence of clinical characteristics. The management of chronic stable asthma and COPD is similarly convergent. New approaches to the management of obstructive airway diseases in adults have been proposed based on inflammometry and also multidimensional assessment, which focuses on the four domains of the airways, comorbidity, self-management, and

  16. The ocular motor features of adult-onset alexander disease: a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Abegg, Mathias; Vertinsky, A Talia; Ceccherini, Isabella; Caroli, Francesco; Barton, Jason J S

    2011-06-01

    A 51-year-old Chinese man presented with gaze-evoked nystagmus, impaired smooth pursuit and vestibular ocular reflex cancellation, and saccadic dysmetria, along with a family history suggestive of late-onset autosomal dominant parkinsonism. MRI revealed abnormalities of the medulla and cervical spinal cord typical of adult-onset Alexander disease, and genetic testing showed homozygosity for the p.D295N polymorphic allele in the gene encoding the glial fibrillary acidic protein. A review of the literature shows that ocular signs are frequent in adult-onset Alexander disease, most commonly gaze-evoked nystagmus, pendular nystagmus, and/or oculopalatal myoclonus, and less commonly ptosis, miosis, and saccadic dysmetria. These signs are consistent with the propensity of adult-onset Alexander disease to cause medullary abnormalities on neuroimaging.

  17. Limited diagnostic value of procalcitonin in early diagnosis of adult onset Still’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient was referred to the Infectious Diseases Ward because of fever lasting for 14 days. On admission to the hospital the patient was in a generally good state, without any abnormalities on physical examination. Laboratory investigation revealed elevated inflammatory markers. Diagnostic imaging comprising chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasonography, and echocardiography showed no abnormalities. During the hospitalization, there occurred episodes of fever with skin rash and musculoskeletal pain of the lower limbs. Procalcitonin concentrations continued to increase. C-reactive protein concentrations decreased during therapy, starting from 191 mg/l. On the 23rd day of the disease, edema of the feet, ankles, and knees appeared. On the basis of the clinical picture and after excluding other possible causes of fever, the patient was diagnosed with adult onset Still’s disease. The procalcitonin concentration was normalized after 5 days of steroid therapy. The patient was discharged under ambulatory rheumatologic supervision. PMID:27826176

  18. Limited diagnostic value of procalcitonin in early diagnosis of adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient was referred to the Infectious Diseases Ward because of fever lasting for 14 days. On admission to the hospital the patient was in a generally good state, without any abnormalities on physical examination. Laboratory investigation revealed elevated inflammatory markers. Diagnostic imaging comprising chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasonography, and echocardiography showed no abnormalities. During the hospitalization, there occurred episodes of fever with skin rash and musculoskeletal pain of the lower limbs. Procalcitonin concentrations continued to increase. C-reactive protein concentrations decreased during therapy, starting from 191 mg/l. On the 23(rd) day of the disease, edema of the feet, ankles, and knees appeared. On the basis of the clinical picture and after excluding other possible causes of fever, the patient was diagnosed with adult onset Still's disease. The procalcitonin concentration was normalized after 5 days of steroid therapy. The patient was discharged under ambulatory rheumatologic supervision.

  19. [A case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia in an elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Mayuko; Sakaeda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Mika; Miki, Toshifumi; Saito, Junko; Chikamori, Masayasu; Tomita, Hideharu; Ichikawa, Hiromoto; Yoshimoto, Kaori; Takamatsu, Masahiro; Okada, Mitsuo; Aono, Rei; Enzan, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Takako

    2013-03-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with consciousness disturbance. The results of brain magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid examination were normal, but triphasic waves were noted on electroencephalography. His plasma ammonia level was elevated due to which encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemia was suspected. However, his liver function was normal, and no evidence of cirrhosis or portal-systemic shunt was noted. The patient's medical history revealed that he had a tendency to excessively consume pulse products since childhood, and an amino acid analysis showed elevation of citrulline and arginine levels. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with an extremely rare case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia, which was triggered by cessation of the intake of pulse foods (soybeans and peanuts) due to dental problems.

  20. Adult-onset nemaline myopathy in a dog presenting with persistent atrial standstill and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R K; Russell, N J; Shelton, G D

    2012-06-01

    A nine-year-old neutered female mixed breed dog presented for evaluation following a five-day history of lethargy, inappetence, weakness, abdominal distension and generalised muscle atrophy. Persistent vatrial standstill with a junctional rhythm was identified on electrocardiogram. Echocardiogram identified moderate dilation of all cardiac chambers and mild thickening of the mitral and tricuspid valves. Serology was negative for Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii. Permanent pacemaker implantation was performed in addition to endomyocardial and skeletal muscle biopsies. Cryosections from the biceps femoris muscle showed numerous nemaline rod bodies while endomyocardial biopsies were possibly consistent with end-stage myocarditis. Rod bodies have rarely been reported in the veterinary literature. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of adult-onset nemaline rod myopathy and hypothyroidism with concurrent cardiac disease in a dog.

  1. Adult-onset Still’s disease: current challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mariam; Putman, Michael S; Dua, Anisha B

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) – a multi-systemic inflammatory condition characterized by high fevers, polyarthritis, an evanescent rash, and pharyngitis – has been a challenging condition to diagnose expediently and treat effectively. Questions remain regarding the underlying pathophysiology and etiology of AOSD. Pathognomonic diagnostic tests and reliable biomarkers remain undiscovered. Over the past decade, important progress has been made. Diagnostic criteria employing glycosylated ferritin have improved specificity. More important, novel biologic therapies have offered important clues to AOSD’s underlying pathophysiology. Cytokine-specific biologic therapies have been instrumental in providing more effective treatment for disease refractory to conventional treatment. While IL-1 therapy has demonstrated efficacy in refractory disease, novel therapies targeting IL-6 and IL-18 show great promise and are currently under investigation. PMID:27843366

  2. Adult-onset intradural spinal teratoma in the lumbar spine: A case report.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Masaki; Takeda, Koutarou; Shitoto, Katsuo

    2000-12-01

    Intradural spinal teratoma is a very rare tumour that can be associated with dysraphic defects. We report a case of adult-onset intradural spinal teratoma in the lumbar spine. The patient was a 54-year-old female who had chief complaints of a gait disturbance. X-rays showed an enlargement of the interpedicular distance at L3/L4 and spina bifida distal to L4. MRI showed a spindle-shaped tumour between L2 and L5. We performed laminotomy using an ultrasonic surgical knife. Pathological diagnosis of the resected tumour was matured teratoma. The diagnosis of matured teratoma was made because the tumour had no epithelium and a layered structure including prostate tissue, matured fat, cartilage and sweat gland.

  3. Hidden in plain sight: macrophage activation syndrome complicating Adult Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Lourdes; Vila, Salvador; Mellado, Robert Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Hemophagocytic Lymphystiocytosis is a rare and fatal complication of rheumatic diseases, particularly Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD). It may be precipitated with immunosuppressive drugs and with viral and bacterial infections. A diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion associated to certain clinical manifestations (fever, rash, Splemomegaly, any cytology blood dyscrasia, hipertrigliceridemia, hiperfibrinogenemia, and others), as well as pathologic evidence of hemophagocitosis from bone marrow biopsy or tissue samples of affected organs. Therapy consists of high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a 42 year old woman with AOSD in remission who developed HLH in spite of receiving therapy with high dose steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. She had 2 negative bone marrow aspirates. Evidence of Hemophagocytosis was detected in both bone marrow biopsies. Timely evaluation and recognition of the signs and symptoms of HLH is crucial for the prompt management and a decrease in the mortality associated with this disease.

  4. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  5. Occupational exposures and uncontrolled adult-onset asthma in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II.

    PubMed

    Le Moual, Nicole; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Siroux, Valérie; Radon, Katja; Norback, Dan; Torén, Kjell; Olivieri, Mario; Urrutia, Isabel; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Benke, Geza; Kromhout, Hans; Mirabelli, Maria C; Mehta, Amar J; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sigsgaard, Torben; Blanc, Paul D; Kogevinas, Manolis; Antó, Josep M; Zock, Jan-Paul

    2014-02-01

    Occupational exposure is a well-recognised modifiable risk factor for asthma, but the relationship between occupational exposure and asthma control has not been studied. We aimed to study this association among working-age adults from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Data were available for 7077 participants (mean age 43 years, 45% never-smokers, 5867 without asthma and 1210 with current asthma). Associations between occupational exposure to specific asthmagens and asthma control status (33% with uncontrolled asthma, based on the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines) were evaluated using logistic and multinomial regressions, adjusted for age, sex and smoking status, with study areas included as a random effect. Statistically significant positive associations were observed between uncontrolled adult-onset asthma and both past 12-month and 10-year exposure to any occupational asthmagens (OR (95% CI) 1.6 (1.0-2.40) and 1.7 (1.2-2.5), respectively); high (1.7 (1.0-2.8) and 1.9 (1.3-2.9), respectively) and low (1.6 (1.0-2.7) and 1.8 (1.2-2.7), respectively) molecular weight agents; and cleaning agents (2.0 (1.1-3.6) and 2.3 (1.4-3.6), respectively), with stronger associations for long-term exposures. These associations were mainly explained by the exacerbation domain of asthma control and no associations were observed between asthmagens and partly controlled asthma. These findings suggest that occupational exposure to asthmagens is associated with uncontrolled adult-onset asthma. Occupational risk factors should be quickly identified to prevent uncontrolled asthma.

  6. Adult-Onset Leukoencephalopathy with Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia Caused by a Novel R782G Mutation in CSF1R

    PubMed Central

    Foulds, Nicola; Pengelly, Reuben J.; Hammans, Simon R.; Nicoll, James A. R.; Ellison, David W.; Ditchfield, Adam; Beck, Sarah; Ennis, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant inheritance of a late onset rapidly progressive leukodystrophy in which exome sequencing has revealed a novel mutation p.R782G in the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor gene (CSF1R). Neuropathology of two affected family members showed cerebral white matter degeneration with axonal swellings and pigmented macrophages. The few recently reported families with CSF1R mutations had been previously labelled “hereditary diffuse leukencephalopathy with axonal spheroids” (HDLS) and “pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy” (POLD), disorders which now appear to form a disease continuum. The term “adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia” (ALSP) has been proposed to encompass this spectrum. As CSF1R regulates microglia this mutation implies that dysregulation of microglia is the primary cause of the disease. PMID:25975230

  7. Adult-Onset Leukoencephalopathy with Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia Caused by a Novel R782G Mutation in CSF1R.

    PubMed

    Foulds, Nicola; Pengelly, Reuben J; Hammans, Simon R; Nicoll, James A R; Ellison, David W; Ditchfield, Adam; Beck, Sarah; Ennis, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant inheritance of a late onset rapidly progressive leukodystrophy in which exome sequencing has revealed a novel mutation p.R782G in the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor gene (CSF1R). Neuropathology of two affected family members showed cerebral white matter degeneration with axonal swellings and pigmented macrophages. The few recently reported families with CSF1R mutations had been previously labelled "hereditary diffuse leukencephalopathy with axonal spheroids" (HDLS) and "pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy" (POLD), disorders which now appear to form a disease continuum. The term "adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia" (ALSP) has been proposed to encompass this spectrum. As CSF1R regulates microglia this mutation implies that dysregulation of microglia is the primary cause of the disease.

  8. Assignment of the gene coding for the human high-affinity glutamate transporter EAAC1 to 9p24: Potential role in dicarboxylic aminoaciduria and neurodegenerative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.P.; Kanai, Y.; Stelzner, M.; Hediger, M.A.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-03-15

    Functional defects of high-affinity glutamate transporters have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In small intestine and kidney, in which the high-affinity glutamate transporter mediates net absorption of glutamate and aspartate across epithelial cells, an inborn error of glutamate transport is thought to cause dicarboxylic aminoaciduria. This disorder is characterized by increased urinary excretion of glutamate and aspartate and is, in general, associated with neurologic and developmental abnormalities. Recently, the authors isolated a cDNA encoding a high-affinity glutamate transporter (EAAC1) that also transports aspartate but not other amino acids. EAAC1 is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, particularly in brain (neurons), intestine, and kidney. Here, the authors present mapping of the chromosome location of EAAC1 using Southern analysis of a panel of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Southern analysis of EcoRI-digested DNA gave bands at 6.5, 5.6, 5.1, and 1.2 kb for human genomic DNA; 7.5 kb for mouse genomic DNA; and 7.3, 3.2, and 1 kb for hamster genomic DNA. All four human EAAC1-specific bands were observed in the lane corresponding to the human/Chinese hamster hybrid containing chromosome 9 but not in lanes corresponding to any other hybrid. Because the human/Chinese hamster hybrid is the only one retaining chromosome 9, this result unambiguously assigns human EAAC1 to chromosome 9. For precise chromosome assignment of the human EAAC1 gene, they employed FISH. Map position of the EAAC1 probe was assigned by visual inspection of the fluorescent signal on the DAPI-stained metaphase chromosomes. The human EAAC1 gene was assigned to 9p24.

  9. Fractality of sensations and the brain health: the theory linking neurodegenerative disorder with distortion of spatial and temporal scale-invariance and fractal complexity of the visible world

    PubMed Central

    Zueva, Marina V.

    2015-01-01

    The theory that ties normal functioning and pathology of the brain and visual system with the spatial–temporal structure of the visual and other sensory stimuli is described for the first time in the present study. The deficit of fractal complexity of environmental influences can lead to the distortion of fractal complexity in the visual pathways of the brain and abnormalities of development or aging. The use of fractal light stimuli and fractal stimuli of other modalities can help to restore the functions of the brain, particularly in the elderly and in patients with neurodegenerative disorders or amblyopia. Non-linear dynamics of these physiological processes have a strong base of evidence, which is seen in the impaired fractal regulation of rhythmic activity in aged and diseased brains. From birth to old age, we live in a non-linear world, in which objects and processes with the properties of fractality and non-linearity surround us. Against this background, the evolution of man took place and all periods of life unfolded. Works of art created by man may also have fractal properties. The positive influence of music on cognitive functions is well-known. Insufficiency of sensory experience is believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of amblyopia and age-dependent diseases. The brain is very plastic in its early development, and the plasticity decreases throughout life. However, several studies showed the possibility to reactivate the adult’s neuroplasticity in a variety of ways. We propose that a non-linear structure of sensory information on many spatial and temporal scales is crucial to the brain health and fractal regulation of physiological rhythms. Theoretical substantiation of the author’s theory is presented. Possible applications and the future research that can experimentally confirm or refute the theoretical concept are considered. PMID:26236232

  10. Cln1 gene disruption in mice reveals a common pathogenic link between two of the most lethal childhood neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Goutam; Bagh, Maria B.; Peng, Shiyong; Saha, Arjun; Sarkar, Chinmoy; Moralle, Matthew; Zhang, Zhongjian; Mukherjee, Anil B.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is a devastating manifestation in the majority of >50 lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are the most common childhood neurodegenerative LSDs. Mutations in 13 different genes (called CLNs) underlie various types of NCLs, of which the infantile NCL (INCL) and congenital NCL (CNCL) are the most lethal. Although inactivating mutations in the CLN1 gene encoding palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) cause INCL, those in the CLN10 gene encoding cathepsin D (CD) underlie CNCL. PPT1 is a lysosomal thioesterase that cleaves the thioester linkage in S-acylated proteins required for their degradation by lysosomal hydrolases like CD. Thus, PPT1 deficiency causes lysosomal accumulation of these lipidated proteins (major constituents of ceroid) leading to INCL. We sought to determine whether there is a common pathogenic link between INCL and CNCL. Using biochemical, histological and confocal microscopic analyses of brain tissues and cells from Cln1−/− mice that mimic INCL, we uncovered that Cln10/CD is overexpressed. Although synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum, the CD-precursor protein (pro-CD) is transported through endosome to the lysosome where it is proteolytically processed to enzymatically active-CD. We found that despite Cln10 overexpression, the maturation of pro-CD to enzymatically active-CD in lysosome was disrupted. This defect impaired lysosomal degradative function causing accumulation of undegraded cargo in lysosome leading to INCL. Notably, treatment of intact Cln1−/− mice as well as cultured brain cells derived from these animals with a thioesterase-mimetic small molecule, N-tert-butyl-hydroxylamine, ameliorated the CD-processing defect. Our findings are significant in that they define a pathway in which Cln1 mutations disrupt the maturation of a major degradative enzyme in lysosome contributing to neuropathology in INCL and suggest that lysosomal CD deficiency is a common pathogenic link

  11. Adult-onset Still's disease presenting as fever of unknown origin in a patient with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Sally; Skidmore, Peter

    2008-02-15

    A 43-year-old African American man with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was found to have adult-onset Still's disease manifesting as fever of unknown origin. In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients are preserving their immune status and, thus, must be evaluated in a manner similar to that for the general population.

  12. Omental transplantation for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rafael, Hernando

    2014-01-01

    Up to date, almost all researchers consider that there is still no effective therapy for neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) and therefore, these diseases are incurable. However, since May 1998, we know that a progressive ischemia in the medial temporal lobes and subcommissural regions can cause Alzheimer’s disease; because, in contrast to this, its revascularization by means of omental tissue can cure or improve this disease. Likewise we observed that the aging process, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; all of them are of ischemic origin caused by cerebral atherosclerosis, associated with vascular anomalies and/or environmental chemicals. On the contrary, an omental transplantation on the affected zone can stop and improve these diseases. For these reasons, I believe that NDDs, are wrongly classified as neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25232510

  13. Banisteriopsis caapi, a unique combination of MAO inhibitory and antioxidative constituents for the activities relevant to neurodegenerative disorders and Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Tekwani, Babu L.; Tripathi, Lalit M.; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Shabana I.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Miller, Loren S.; Joshi, Vaishali C.; Muhammad, Ilias

    2009-01-01

    (MAO) -A and -B enzymes (IC50 2.5 and 2.0 nM, and 25 and 20 µM, respectively), and (−)-epicatechin (8) and (−)-procyanidin B2 (9) showed potent antioxidant and moderate MAO-B inhibitory activities (IC50 <0.13 and 0.57 µg/mL, and 65 and 35 µM). HPLC analysis revealed that most of the dominant chemical and bioactive markers (1, 2, 5, 7–9) were present in high concentrations in dried bark of large branch. Analysis of regular/commercial B. caapi dried stems showed a similar qualitative HPLC pattern, but relatively low content of dominant markers 1, 2, 7, and 9, which led to decreased MAO inhibitory and antioxidant potency. Conclusion Collectively, these results give additional basis to the existing claim of B. caapi stem extract for the treatment of Parkinsonism, including other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19879939

  14. Adult-onset deficiency of acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 protects mice from diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance[S

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Taylor; Nelson, David W.; Gao, Yu; Huang, Ting-Ni; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang E.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 catalyzes triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, required in intestinal fat absorption. We previously demonstrated that mice without a functional MGAT2-coding gene (Mogat2−/−) exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to obesity induced by excess calories. One critical question raised is whether lacking MGAT2 during early development is required for the metabolic phenotypes in adult mice. In this study, we found that Mogat2−/− pups grew slower than wild-type littermates during the suckling period. To determine whether inactivating MGAT2 in adult mice is sufficient to confer resistance to diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with an inducible Mogat2-inactivating mutation. Mice with adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency (Mogat2AKO) exhibited a transient decrease in food intake like Mogat2−/− mice when fed a high-fat diet and a moderate increase in energy expenditure after acclimatization. They gained less weight than littermate controls, but the difference was smaller than that between wild-type and Mogat2−/− mice. The moderate reduction in weight gain was associated with reduced hepatic TAG and improved glucose tolerance. Similar protective effects were also observed in mice that had gained weight on a high-fat diet before inactivating MGAT2. These findings suggest that adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency mitigates metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding and that MGAT2 modulates early postnatal nutrition and may program metabolism later in life. PMID:25535286

  15. Occasional detection of thymic epithelial tumor 4 years after diagnosis of adult onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Caruso, Andrea; Valli, Riccardo; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thymoma is a T cell neoplasm arising from the thymic epithelium that due to its immunological role, frequently undercover derangements of immunity such a tumors and autoimmune diseases. Methods: Herein, we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first description of an association between thymoma and adult onset Still disease (AOSD) in a 47-year-old man. The first one was occasionally detected 4 years later the diagnosis of AOSD, and surgically removed via right lateral thoracotomy. Histology confirmed an encapsulated thymic tumor (type AB sec. WHO-classification). Results: The AOSD was particularly resistant to the therapy, requiring a combination of immunosuppressant followed by anti-IL1R, that was the only steroids-sparing treatment capable to induce and maintain the remission. The differential diagnosis was particularly challenging because of the severe myasthenic-like symptoms that, with normal laboratory tests, were initially misinterpreted as fibromyalgia. The pathogenic link of this association could be a thymus escape of autoreactive T lymphocytes causing autoimmunity. Conclusion: Clinicians should be always include the possibility of a thymoma in the differential diagnosis of an unusual new onset of weakness and normal laboratories data, in particular once autoimmune disease is present in the medical history. PMID:27603335

  16. A nonsense mutation of human XRCC4 is associated with adult-onset progressive encephalocardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Leonardo; Nasca, Alessia; Zanolini, Alice; Cendron, Filippo; d'Adamo, Pio; Costa, Rodolfo; Lamperti, Costanza; Celotti, Lucia; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We studied two monozygotic twins, born to first cousins, affected by a multisystem disease. At birth, they both presented with bilateral cryptorchidism and malformations. Since early adulthood, they developed a slowly progressive neurological syndrome, with cerebellar and pyramidal signs, cognitive impairment, and depression. Dilating cardiomyopathy is also present in both. By whole-exome sequencing, we found a homozygous nucleotide change in XRCC4 (c.673C>T), predicted to introduce a premature stop codon (p.R225*). XRCC4 transcript levels were profoundly reduced, and the protein was undetectable in patients' skin fibroblasts. XRCC4 plays an important role in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), a system that is involved in repairing DNA damage from, for example, ionizing radiations. Gamma-irradiated mutant cells demonstrated reduction, but not abolition, of DSB repair. In contrast with embryonic lethality of the Xrcc4 KO mouse, nonsense mutations in human XRCC4 have recently been associated with primordial dwarfism and, in our cases, with adult-onset neurological impairment, suggesting an important role for DNA repair in the brain. Surprisingly, neither immunodeficiency nor predisposition to malignancy was reported in these patients. PMID:25872942

  17. Adult-onset hypogonadism: evaluation and role of testosterone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Davidiuk, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency (TD) has become a growing concern in the field of men’s sexual health, with an increasing number of men presenting for evaluation of this condition. Given the increasing demand for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), a panel of experts met in August of 2015 to discuss the treatment of men who present for evaluation in the setting of low or normal gonadotropin levels and the associated signs and symptoms of hypogonadism. This constellation of factors can be associated with elements of both primary and secondary hypogonadism. Because this syndrome commonly occurs in men who are middle-aged and older, it was termed adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH). AOH can be defined by the following elements: low levels of testosterone, associated signs and symptoms of hypogonadism, and low or normal gonadotropin levels. Although there are significant benefits of TRT for patients with AOH, candidates also need to understand the potential risks. Patients undergoing TRT will need to be monitored regularly because there are potential complications that can develop with long-term use. This review is aimed at providing a deeper understanding of AOH, discussing the benefits and risks of TRT, and outlining each modality of TRT in use for AOH. PMID:28078213

  18. A new structural approach to genomic discovery of disease: example of adult-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of disease discovery from genomic data, by methods which depart substantially from customary practices found in the investigation of genome-wide association studies. Such data in general are composed of the genomic content from two contrasting phenotypes, e.g., disease versus control populations, and the analysis proceeds under the hypothesis that populational dissimilarities might reveal disease risk alleles. The proposed suite of new methods is in part based on information theory (Shannon in Bell Syst Tech J 27:379-423, 1948a; Bell Syst Tech J 27:623-656, 1948b; Jaynes in Phys Rev 106:620-630, 1957), and strong evidence will be given of the effectiveness of this new approach. The methodology extends naturally and successfully to predicting genomic disposition to disease arising from large collections of weakly contributing genomic loci. Evidence will be advanced that the example of adult-onset diabetes ("type 2 diabetes") is such a candidate disease, and in this case, probably for the first time, it can be demonstrated that disease prediction is possible. Another novel element of this study is the search and identification of potential beneficial genomic loci that may counter a disease. The generality of the methodology suggests that it might extend to other diseases.

  19. Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease Successfully Treated with Anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of Adult-Onset Still's disease (Still's disease). Whereas an increasing body of evidence supports interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade as a promising treatment for Still's disease, whether it is therapeutic for MAS associated with Still's disease remains unclear. We report a 34-year-old Caucasian man with one-decade history of TNF-blockade-responsive seronegative arthritis who presented with abrupt onset of fever, serositis, bicytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Striking hyperferritinemia was noted without evidence of infection, malignancy, or hemophagocytosis on bone marrow biopsy. NK cells were undetectable in the peripheral blood, whereas soluble IL-2 receptor was elevated. His multiorgan disease resolved in association with methylprednisolone pulse therapy, Anakinra, and a tapering course of prednisone. This case reinforces the notion that Still's disease is inherently poised to manifest MAS as one of the clinical phenotypes by shedding light on the role of IL-1 underlying both Still's disease and related MAS. PMID:27818826

  20. Nephrin mutations cause childhood- and adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santín, Sheila; García-Maset, Rafael; Ruíz, Patricia; Giménez, Isabel; Zamora, Isabel; Peña, Antonia; Madrid, Alvaro; Camacho, Juan A; Fraga, Gloria; Sánchez-Moreno, Ana; Cobo, Maria Angeles; Bernis, Carmen; Ortiz, Alberto; de Pablos, Augusto Luque; Pintos, Guillem; Justa, Maria Luisa; Hidalgo-Barquero, Emilia; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Ballarín, José; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the NPHS1 gene cause congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type presenting before the first 3 months of life. Recently, NPHS1 mutations have also been identified in childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and milder courses of disease, but their role in adults with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis remains unknown. Here we developed an in silico scoring matrix to evaluate the pathogenicity of amino-acid substitutions using the biophysical and biochemical difference between wild-type and mutant amino acid, the evolutionary conservation of the amino-acid residue in orthologs, and defined domains, with the addition of contextual information. Mutation analysis was performed in 97 patients from 89 unrelated families, of which 52 presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome after 18 years of age. Compound heterozygous or homozygous NPHS1 mutations were identified in five familial and seven sporadic cases, including one patient 27 years old at onset of the disease. Substitutions were classified as 'severe' or 'mild' using this in silico approach. Our results suggest an earlier onset of the disease in patients with two 'severe' mutations compared to patients with at least one 'mild' mutation. The finding of mutations in a patient with adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis indicates that NPHS1 analysis could be considered in patients with later onset of the disease.

  1. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  2. Clinical and histopathological features of cutaneous manifestations of adult-onset Still disease.

    PubMed

    Santa, Erin; McFalls, Jeanne M; Sahu, Joya; Lee, Jason B

    2017-03-25

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a rare autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by recurring fevers, arthralgia, and consistent laboratory abnormalities that include leukocytosis and hyperferritinemia. Skin findings accompany the disease in nearly 90% of the cases. Early reports described evanescent, pruritic, salmon-pink or urticarial lesions, referred to as the typical eruption of AOSD. Histopathologic findings consist of superficial perivascular dermatitis with varying number of interstitial neutrophils. Later reports described a more persistent rash that tended to be photodistributed, hyperpigmented, often in a linear configuration, sometimes in a rippled pattern, referred to as the atypical eruption of AOSD. The presence of individual necrotic keratinocytes in the upper spinous layer has been the consistent histopathologic finding. The persistent rash may not represent an atypical presentation of AOSD as recent reports indicate a high prevalence of the rash. Emerging data also suggest that patients with persistent eruption have a worse prognosis. The recognition of the clinical and histopathological findings of skin eruptions of AOSD may facilitate an earlier diagnosis, potentially improving disease outcome. Herein, clinical and histopathological features of cutaneous manifestation of AOSD in two Asian women are highlighted accompanied by relevant review of the disease.

  3. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. PMID:27242405

  4. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Juvenile versus adult-onset ankylosing spondylitis -- clinical, radiographic, and social outcomes. a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Deepak R; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Sengupta, Raj

    2013-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has 2 main modes of onset: juvenile-onset AS (JoAS) and adult-onset AS (AoAS). It is not known whether JoAS is a subtype of AS, or AS modulated by early age of onset and longer disease duration. We performed a systematic review of the literature, identifying 12 articles and 1 abstract directly comparing JoAS and AoAS cohorts, with observational study design. Patients with JoAS appear to have more peripheral joint involvement both clinically and radiographically (especially knees and ankles) and more root joint involvement (hips and shoulders); they are more likely to proceed to hip arthroplasty and often initially present with peripheral rather than axial symptoms. Patients with AoAS appear to have more axial symptoms and radiographic disease, particularly in the lumbar spine, and worse axial metrology. In terms of other characteristics, more evidence is needed to confidently state whether JoAS and AoAS are different.

  6. Autophagy, inflammation and neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Alirezaei, Mehrdad; Kemball, Christopher C.; Whitton, J. Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is emerging as a central regulator of cellular health and disease and, in the central nervous system (CNS), this homeostatic process appears to influence synaptic growth and plasticity. Herein, we review the evidence that dysregulation of autophagy may contribute to several neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS. Up-regulation of autophagy may prevent, delay or ameliorate at least some of these disorders, and – based on recent findings from our laboratory – we speculate that this goal may be achieved using a safe, simple, and inexpensive approach. PMID:21138487

  7. [Adult-onset ataxia-telangiectasia. A clinical and therapeutic observation].

    PubMed

    Gazulla, J; Benavente, I; Sarasa Barrio, M

    2006-10-01

    A case of adult-onset ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is presented, with debut at the age of 18 years and survival into the fourth decade. The clinical picture included cerebellar ataxia, distal weakness and hypopalesthesia in the lower limbs, oculomotor apraxia, dysarthria, and conjunctival telangiectasiae. Carcinoembrionic antigen was raised in plasma. MR imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and thinning of the spinal cord. Deficiencies of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate have been found in the cerebellar cortex in a case of AT. These were attributed to the loss of Purkinje cells and granule cells. In spite of some ataxias having improved with the gabaergic drugs gabapentin and tiagabine, the administration of gabapentin, acetazolamide and a placebo, did not benefit this patient. Pregabalin, 225 mg/day, ameliorated the ataxia unexpectedly, with further improvement after the addition of tiagabine. The authors suggest that the beneficial effect observed might have been due, either to the higher affinity of pregabalin towards alpha2-delta, a subtype of the alpha2-delta subunit which forms part of the voltage-gated calcium channel; either to the profusion of this subtype in the Purkinje cell layer, or to its larger capacity to let calcium into the neuron; or to the combination of these. These differences with gabapentin could explain the higher power of pregabalin in the stimulation of the cerebellar structures, thus justifying the improvement of ataxia in this case of AT. A synergistic effect with pregabalin is proposed as the cause of the improvement obtained with the addition of tiagabine.

  8. Novel case of Trevor’s disease: Adult onset and later recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Amrit S; Kumar, Neil S; Chin, Matthew A; Lackman, Richard D

    2017-01-01

    Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor’s disease, is an osteocartilaginous epiphyseal overgrowth typically occurring in children. The literature reports 6 adult cases and none describe recurrence requiring additional procedures. We present a new-onset proximal tibial DEH in an adult recurring approximately 3 years after open excision. A 39-year-old female presented with a history of right knee pain, swelling, and instability. Physical examination revealed a firm proximal tibial mass. Computed tomography (CT) imaging showed an exophytic, lobulated, sclerotic mass involving the anterolateral margin of the lateral tibial plateau. Magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of an osteochondroma. The patient underwent curettage of the lesion due to its periarticular location. Histology revealed benign and reactive bone and cartilage consistent with periosteal chondroma. Two and a half years later, the patient presented with a firm, palpable mass larger than the initial lesion. CT revealed a lateral tibial plateau sclerotic mass consistent with recurrent intra-articular DEH. A complete excision was performed and histology showed sclerotic bone with overlying cartilage consistent with exostosis. DEH is a rare epiphyseal osteocartilaginous outgrowth frequently occurring in the long bones of children less than 8 years old. DEH resembles an osteochondroma due to its pediatric presentation and similar histologic appearance. Adult-onset cases comprise less than 1% of reported cases. Recurrence rate after surgical intervention is unknown. Only 1 such case, occurring in a child, has been described. Clinicians contemplating operative treatment for DEH should note the potential for recurrence and consider complete excision. A follow-up period of several years may be warranted to identify recurrent lesions. PMID:28144583

  9. Parental smoking in pregnancy and the risks of adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Layla L; Harris, Holly R; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Willett, Walter C; Forman, Michele R; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Michels, Karin B

    2013-02-01

    Fetal exposure to parental smoking may lead to developmental adaptations and promote various diseases in later life. This study evaluated the associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the daughter in adulthood, and assessed whether these associations are explained by birth weight or body weight throughout life. We used data on 33086 participants of the Nurses' Health Study II and the Nurses' Mothers' Cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with the nurse daughter, with self-reported physician-diagnosed hypertension from 1989 until 2007. Overall, 8575 (25.9%) mothers and 18874 (57.0%) fathers smoked during pregnancy. During follow-up, 7825 incident cases of adult-onset hypertension were reported. Both maternal and paternal smoking of ≥ 15 cigarettes/d during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of hypertension (rate ratio, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.09-1.29; and rate ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12-1.25, respectively) in the age-adjusted models. Further adjustment for birth weight did not affect the effect estimates appreciably, whereas additional adjustment for body shape and weight until age 18, or current body mass index, attenuated the associations with both maternal and paternal smoking (rate ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.98-1.16; and rate ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12, respectively). The associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the offspring were largely explained by body weight throughout life, suggesting that these associations may not reflect direct intrauterine mechanisms.

  10. Mutated CTSF in adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and FTD

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, Julie; Mariën, Peter; Crols, Roeland; Van Mossevelde, Sara; Dillen, Lubina; Perrone, Federica; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Verhoeven, Jo; D'aes, Tine; Ceuterick-De Groote, Chantal; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular basis of a Belgian family with autosomal recessive adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL or Kufs disease [KD]) with pronounced frontal lobe involvement and to expand the findings to a cohort of unrelated Belgian patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: Genetic screening in the ANCL family and FTD cohort (n = 461) was performed using exome sequencing and targeted massive parallel resequencing. Results: We identified a homozygous mutation (p.Ile404Thr) in the Cathepsin F (CTSF) gene cosegregating in the ANCL family. No other mutations were found that could explain the disease in this family. All 4 affected sibs developed motor symptoms and early-onset dementia with prominent frontal features. Two of them evolved to akinetic mutism. Disease presentation showed marked phenotypic variation with the onset ranging from 26 to 50 years. Myoclonic epilepsy in one of the sibs was suggestive for KD type A, while epilepsy was not present in the other sibs who presented with clinical features of KD type B. In a Belgian cohort of unrelated patients with FTD, the same heterozygous p.Arg245His mutation was identified in 2 patients who shared a common haplotype. Conclusions: A homozygous CTSF mutation was identified in a recessive ANCL pedigree. In contrast to the previous associations of CTSF with KD type B, our findings suggest that CTSF genetic testing should also be considered in patients with KD type A as well as in early-onset dementia with prominent frontal lobe and motor symptoms. PMID:27668283

  11. Adult onset asthma and interaction between genes and active tobacco smoking: The GABRIEL consortium

    PubMed Central

    Postma, D. S.; Moffatt, M. F.; Jarvis, D.; Ramasamy, A.; Wjst, M.; Omenaas, E. R.; Bouzigon, E.; Demenais, F.; Nadif, R.; Siroux, V.; Polonikov, A. V.; Solodilova, M.; Ivanov, V. P.; Curjuric, I.; Imboden, M.; Kumar, A.; Probst-Hensch, N.; Ogorodova, L. M.; Puzyrev, V. P.; Bragina, E. Yu; Freidin, M. B.; Nolte, I. M.; Farrall, A. M.; Cookson, W. O. C. M.; Strachan, D. P.; Koppelman, G. H.; Boezen, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified novel genetic associations for asthma, but without taking into account the role of active tobacco smoking. This study aimed to identify novel genes that interact with ever active tobacco smoking in adult onset asthma. Methods We performed a genome-wide interaction analysis in six studies participating in the GABRIEL consortium following two meta-analyses approaches based on 1) the overall interaction effect and 2) the genetic effect in subjects with and without smoking exposure. We performed a discovery meta-analysis including 4,057 subjects of European descent and replicated our findings in an independent cohort (LifeLines Cohort Study), including 12,475 subjects. Results First approach: 50 SNPs were selected based on an overall interaction effect at p<10−4. The most pronounced interaction effect was observed for rs9969775 on chromosome 9 (discovery meta-analysis: ORint = 0.50, p = 7.63*10−5, replication: ORint = 0.65, p = 0.02). Second approach: 35 SNPs were selected based on the overall genetic effect in exposed subjects (p <10−4). The most pronounced genetic effect was observed for rs5011804 on chromosome 12 (discovery meta-analysis ORint = 1.50, p = 1.21*10−4; replication: ORint = 1.40, p = 0.03). Conclusions Using two genome-wide interaction approaches, we identified novel polymorphisms in non-annotated intergenic regions on chromosomes 9 and 12, that showed suggestive evidence for interaction with active tobacco smoking in the onset of adult asthma. PMID:28253294

  12. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  13. Cerebral Blood Flow and Aβ-Amyloid Estimates by WARM Analysis of [(11)C]PiB Uptake Distinguish among and between Neurodegenerative Disorders and Aging.

    PubMed

    Rodell, Anders B; O'Keefe, Graeme; Rowe, Christopher C; Villemagne, Victor L; Gjedde, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background: We report results of the novel Washout Allometric Reference Method (WARM) that uses estimates of cerebral blood flow and amyloid load from the same [(11)C]Pittsburgh Compound B ([(11)C]PiB) retention maps in brain to distinguish between patients with different forms dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and healthy volunteers. The method introduces two approaches to the identification of brain pathology related to amyloid accumulation, (1) a novel analysis of amyloid binding based on the late washout of the tracer from brain tissue, and (2) the simultaneous estimation of absolute cerebral blood flow indices (sCBF) from the early accumulation of the tracer in brain tissue. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that a change of cerebral blood flow is correlated with the degree of tracer [(11)C]PiB retention, reflecting dendritic spine pathology and consequent inhibition of brain energy metabolism and reduction of blood flow by neurovascular coupling in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Methods: Previously reported images of [(11)C]PiB retention in brain of 29 subjects with cognitive impairment or dementia [16 Alzheimer's Disease (AD), eight subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), five patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), five patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 29 age-matched healthy control subjects (HC)], underwent analysis of PiB delivery and retention by means of WARM for quantitation of [(11)C]PiB's binding potentials (BPND) and correlated surrogate cerebral blood flow (sCBF) estimates, based on the [(11)C]PiB images, compared to estimates by conventional Standard Uptake Value Ratio (SUVR) of [(11)C]PiB retention with cerebellum gray matter as reference. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) revealed the power of discrimination among estimates. Results: For AD, the discriminatory power of [(11)C]PiB binding potential (BPND) by WARM exceeded the power of SUVR that in turn exceeded the

  14. Cerebral Blood Flow and Aβ-Amyloid Estimates by WARM Analysis of [11C]PiB Uptake Distinguish among and between Neurodegenerative Disorders and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rodell, Anders B.; O’Keefe, Graeme; Rowe, Christopher C.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Background: We report results of the novel Washout Allometric Reference Method (WARM) that uses estimates of cerebral blood flow and amyloid load from the same [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B ([11C]PiB) retention maps in brain to distinguish between patients with different forms dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, and healthy volunteers. The method introduces two approaches to the identification of brain pathology related to amyloid accumulation, (1) a novel analysis of amyloid binding based on the late washout of the tracer from brain tissue, and (2) the simultaneous estimation of absolute cerebral blood flow indices (sCBF) from the early accumulation of the tracer in brain tissue. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that a change of cerebral blood flow is correlated with the degree of tracer [11C]PiB retention, reflecting dendritic spine pathology and consequent inhibition of brain energy metabolism and reduction of blood flow by neurovascular coupling in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: Previously reported images of [11C]PiB retention in brain of 29 subjects with cognitive impairment or dementia [16 Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), eight subjects with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), five patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), five patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 29 age-matched healthy control subjects (HC)], underwent analysis of PiB delivery and retention by means of WARM for quantitation of [11C]PiB’s binding potentials (BPND) and correlated surrogate cerebral blood flow (sCBF) estimates, based on the [11C]PiB images, compared to estimates by conventional Standard Uptake Value Ratio (SUVR) of [11C]PiB retention with cerebellum gray matter as reference. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) revealed the power of discrimination among estimates. Results: For AD, the discriminatory power of [11C]PiB binding potential (BPND) by WARM exceeded the power of SUVR that in turn exceeded the power of s

  15. Clinical Value of NPHS2 Analysis in Early- and Adult-Onset Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santín, Sheila; Tazón-Vega, Bárbara; Silva, Irene; Cobo, María Ángeles; Giménez, Isabel; Ruíz, Patricia; García-Maset, Rafael; Ballarín, José

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives To date, very few cases with adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) carrying NPHS2 variants have been described, all of them being compound heterozygous for the p.R229Q variant and one pathogenic mutation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Mutation analysis was performed in 148 unrelated Spanish patients, of whom 50 presented with FSGS after 18 years of age. Pathogenicity of amino acid substitutions was evaluated through an in silico scoring system. Haplotype analysis was carried out using NPHS2 single nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite markers. Results Compound heterozygous or homozygous NPHS2 pathogenic mutations were identified in seven childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) cases. Six additional cases with late childhood- and adult-onset SRNS were compound heterozygotes for p.R229Q and one pathogenic mutation, mostly p.A284V. p.R229Q was more frequent among SRNS cases relative to controls (odds ratio = 2.65; P = 0.02). Significantly higher age at onset of the disease and slower progression to ESRD were found in patients with one pathogenic mutation plus the p.R229Q variant in respect to patients with two NPHS2 pathogenic mutations. Conclusions NPHS2 analysis has a clinical value in both childhood- and adult-onset SRNS patients. For adult-onset patients, the first step should be screening for p.R229Q and, if positive, for p.A284V. These alleles are present in conserved haplotypes, suggesting a common origin for these substitutions. Patients carrying this specific NPHS2 allele combination did not respond to corticoids or immunosuppressors and showed FSGS, average 8-year progression to ESRD, and low risk for recurrence of FSGS after kidney transplant. PMID:20947785

  16. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  17. Metal attenuating therapies in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Mot, Alexandra I; Wedd, Anthony G; Sinclair, Layla; Brown, David R; Collins, Steven J; Brazier, Marcus W

    2011-12-01

    The clinical and pathological spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases is diverse, although common to many of these disorders is the accumulation of misfolded proteins, with oxidative stress thought to be an important contributing mechanism to neuronal damage. As a corollary, transition metal ion dyshomeostasis appears to play a key pathogenic role in a number of these maladies, including the most common of neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, studies spanning a wide variety of neurodegenerative disorders are presented with their involvement of transition metals compared and contrasted, including more detailed treatise in relation to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases. For each of these diseases, a discussion of the evolving scientific rationale for the development of therapies aimed at ameliorating the detrimental effects of transition metal dysregulation, including results from various human trials, is then provided.

  18. Serum calprotectin--a promising diagnostic marker for adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qian; Zha, Xicao; Li, Chun; Jia, Yuan; Zhu, Lei; Guo, Jianping; Su, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin is a calcium-binding cytosolic protein, mainly expressed in immune cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. Our study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of calprotectin for adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), by comparing serum calprotectin concentrations in patients with AOSD (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 34), primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS, n = 40), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 39), osteoarthritis (OA, n = 20), and healthy controls (HCs, n = 49). Calprotectin concentrations were significantly higher in patients with AOSD (55.26 ± 18.00 ng/ml), compared to patients with RA (39.17 ± 18.90 ng/ml), pSS (35.31 ± 19.47 ng/ml), SLE (32.21 ± 25.01 ng/ml), OA (19.24 ± 10.67 ng/ml), and HCs (8.46 ± 5.17 ng/ml). All the differences were highly significant (p < 0.001). Using receiver-operating characteristic curve, the cut-off value of calprotectin was defined as 45.488 ng/ml, and its sensitivity and specificity for AOSD diagnosis were 63.0 and 80.1%, respectively. The positive rate of calprotectin was significantly higher in AOSD cases compared to patients with other diseases and healthy controls (p < 0.001). Serum calprotectin was positively correlated with ferritin (r = 0.294, p < 0.05), and concentration of hemoglobin was significantly lower in calprotectin-positive patients compared to negative patients in AOSD (103.49 ± 20.21 g/l vs 115.71 ± 15.59 g/l, t = -2.142, p = 0.038). These findings suggest that serum calprotectin may serve as a promising marker for the diagnosis of AOSD and monitor disease activity to a certain extent.

  19. Stroke prevention by direct revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tackeun; Oh, Chang Wan; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyojun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Cho, Won-Sang; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-06-01

    . CONCLUSIONS Direct or combined revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia can prevent further stroke.

  20. Microbial Immuno-Communication in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bevan S.; Minter, Myles R.

    2017-01-01

    Neuro-inflammation is a critical process by which the brain coordinates chemokine-regulated cellular recruitment, cytokine release, and cell-mediated removal of pathogenic material to protect against infection or brain injury. Dysregulation of this immune response is involved in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, however the precise contribution of neuro-inflammation to the exacerbation and progression of these diseases remains unclear. Evidence now suggests that commensal micro-organisms populating the host and their metabolites, collectively termed the microbiome, regulate innate immunity by influencing peripheral immune cell populations, and modulating microglial phenotype. Recent preclinical studies now demonstrate that perturbations in the host microbiome can induce alterations in pathological phenotypes associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases. How perturbations in the host microbiome and subsequently altered peripheral immune status are communicated to the brain to influence neuro-inflammatory processes in these neurodegenerative disease settings is far from understood. This review provides insight into the regulation of neuro-inflammatory processes by the host microbiome in the context of neurodegenerative disease and highlights the potential importance of the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier, functioning as “immune barriers,” to communicate host immune status to the brain. Understanding the mechanisms by which the commensal microbiome communicates with the brain to influence neuro-inflammatory processes will be critical in the development of microbially-targeted therapeutics in the potential treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28386215

  1. Ischemic optic neuropathy as a model of neurodegenerative disorder: A review of pathogenic mechanism of axonal degeneration and the role of neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Khalilpour, Saba; Latifi, Shahrzad; Behnammanesh, Ghazaleh; Majid, Amin Malik Shah Abdul; Majid, Aman Shah Abdul; Tamayol, Ali

    2017-04-15

    Optic neuropathy is a neurodegenerative disease which involves optic nerve injury. It is caused by acute or intermittent insults leading to visual dysfunction. There are number of factors, responsible for optic neuropathy, and the optic nerve axon is affected in all type which causes the loss of retinal ganglion cells. In this review we will highlight various mechanisms involved in the cell loss cascades during axonal degeneration as well as ischemic optic neuropathy. These mechanisms include oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, angiogenesis, neuroinflammation and apoptosis following retinal ischemia. We will also discuss the effect of neuroprotective agents in attenuation of the negative effect of factors involve in the disease occurrence and progression.

  2. Molecular basis of adult-onset and chronic G sub M2 gangliosidoses in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin: Substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the. alpha. -subunit of. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Paw, B.H.; Kaback, M.M.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Chronic and adult-onset G{sub M2} gangliosidoses are neurological disorders caused by marked deficiency of the A isoenzyme of {beta}-hexosaminidase; they occur in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, though less frequently than classic (infantile) Tay-Sachs disease. Earlier biosynthetic studies had identified a defective {alpha}-subunit that failed to associate with the {beta}-subunit. The authors have now found a guanosine to adenosine transition at the 3{prime} end of exon 7, which causes substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the {alpha}-subunit. An RNase protection assay was used to localize the mutation to a segment of mRNA from fibroblasts of a patient with the adult-onset disorder. That segment of mRNA (after reverse transcription) and a corresponding segment of genomic DNA were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The sequence analysis, together with an assay based on the loss of a ScrFI restriction site, showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote who had inherited the 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation from his father and an allelic null mutation from his mother. The 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation, in compound heterozygosity with a presumed null allele, was also found in fetal fibroblasts with an association-defective phenotype and in cells from five patients with chronic G{sub M2} gangliosidosis.

  3. Human DNA methylomes of neurodegenerative diseases show common epigenomic patterns.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mut, J V; Heyn, H; Vidal, E; Moran, S; Sayols, S; Delgado-Morales, R; Schultz, M D; Ansoleaga, B; Garcia-Esparcia, P; Pons-Espinal, M; de Lagran, M M; Dopazo, J; Rabano, A; Avila, J; Dierssen, M; Lott, I; Ferrer, I; Ecker, J R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-19

    Different neurodegenerative disorders often show similar lesions, such as the presence of amyloid plaques, TAU-neurotangles and synuclein inclusions. The genetically inherited forms are rare, so we wondered whether shared epigenetic aberrations, such as those affecting DNA methylation, might also exist. The studied samples were gray matter samples from the prefrontal cortex of control and neurodegenerative disease-associated cases. We performed the DNA methylation analyses of Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer-like neurodegenerative profile associated with Down's syndrome samples. The DNA methylation landscapes obtained show that neurodegenerative diseases share similar aberrant CpG methylation shifts targeting a defined gene set. Our findings suggest that neurodegenerative disorders might have similar pathogenetic mechanisms that subsequently evolve into different clinical entities. The identified aberrant DNA methylation changes can be used as biomarkers of the disorders and as potential new targets for the development of new therapies.

  4. Human DNA methylomes of neurodegenerative diseases show common epigenomic patterns

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mut, J V; Heyn, H; Vidal, E; Moran, S; Sayols, S; Delgado-Morales, R; Schultz, M D; Ansoleaga, B; Garcia-Esparcia, P; Pons-Espinal, M; de Lagran, M M; Dopazo, J; Rabano, A; Avila, J; Dierssen, M; Lott, I; Ferrer, I; Ecker, J R; Esteller, M

    2016-01-01

    Different neurodegenerative disorders often show similar lesions, such as the presence of amyloid plaques, TAU-neurotangles and synuclein inclusions. The genetically inherited forms are rare, so we wondered whether shared epigenetic aberrations, such as those affecting DNA methylation, might also exist. The studied samples were gray matter samples from the prefrontal cortex of control and neurodegenerative disease-associated cases. We performed the DNA methylation analyses of Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer-like neurodegenerative profile associated with Down's syndrome samples. The DNA methylation landscapes obtained show that neurodegenerative diseases share similar aberrant CpG methylation shifts targeting a defined gene set. Our findings suggest that neurodegenerative disorders might have similar pathogenetic mechanisms that subsequently evolve into different clinical entities. The identified aberrant DNA methylation changes can be used as biomarkers of the disorders and as potential new targets for the development of new therapies. PMID:26784972

  5. Obesity-related abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K Hoa; Ande, Sudharsana R; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-29

    The incidence of adult-onset T1D in low-risk non-HLA type has increased several folds, whereas the contemporaneous incidence in high-risk HLA-type remains stable. Various factors behind this selective increase in T1D in young adults remain unclear. Obesity and its associated abnormalities appear to be an important determinant; however, the underlying mechanism involved is not understood. Recently, we have developed two novel transgenic obese mice models, Mito-Ob and m-Mito-Ob, by expressing a pleiotropic protein prohibitin (PHB) and a phospho mutant form of PHB (Y114F-PHB or m-PHB) from the aP2 gene promoter, respectively. Both mice models develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, independent of diet; but obesity associated chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance in a male sex-specific manner. Interestingly, on a high fat diet (HFD) only male m-Mito-Ob mice displayed marked mononuclear cell infiltration in pancreas and developed insulitis that mimic adult-onset T1D. Male Mito-Ob mice that share the metabolic phenotype of male m-Mito-Ob mice, and female m-Mito-Ob that harbor m-PHB similar to male m-Mito-Ob mice, did not develop insulitis. Thus, insulitis development in male m-Mito-Ob in response to HFD requires both, obesity-related abnormalities and m-PHB. Collectively, this data provides a proof-of-concept that obesity-associated abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D and reveals PHB as a potential susceptibility gene for T1D.

  6. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    DOE PAGES

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; ...

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in amore » postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.« less

  7. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. This second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes. PMID:25701871

  8. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; Gasparini, L.; Ferrera, D.; Canale, C.; Guipponi, M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Brussino, A.; Brusco, A.

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  9. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD).

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. This second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  10. An autopsied case of adult-onset bulbospinalform Alexander disease with a novel S393R mutation in the GFAP gene.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Aiba, Ikuko; Saito, Kozo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese man with no apparent family history noticed diplopia. He gradually showed gait disturbance and dysuria. Abducens disorder of eye movement with nystagmus, tongue atrophy with fasciculation, spastic tetraparesis, and sensory disturbance were also observed. MRI showed severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord ("tadpole appearance"). Tracheotomy and gastrostomy were performed 7 years after onset due to the development of bulbar palsy. Death occurred following respiratory failure after 11 years total disease duration. The brain weighed 1,380 g. The cerebrum, cerebellum, midbrain, and upper pons were preserved from atrophy, but the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. A few Rosenthal fibers were observed in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, whereas numerous Rosenthal fibers were observed in the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord. Myelin loss with relatively preserved axons was extensively observed from the middle of the pons to the spinal cord. The clinicopathological diagnosis was adult-onset bulbospinal-form Alexander disease. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene analysis revealed a novel mutation of S393R. Expression patterns of S393R mutant GFAP using adrenal carcinoma-derived cells (SW13 cells) showed a decreased number of filamentous structures and abnormal aggregates.

  11. Adult-onset nemaline rods in a patient treated for suspected dermatomyositis: study with two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Danon, M.J.; Giometti, C.S.; Manaligod, J.R.; Perurena, O.H.; Skosey, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    A 65-year-old woman with progressive muscle weakness and a diffuse rash of three years' duration was examined. Muscle tissue was studied with histochemical techniques, phase-contrast microscopy, electron microscopy, and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Histochemical studies showed numerous nemaline rods, with a normal ratio of types I and II fibers. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed abnormalities in the myosin light chain and tropomyosin protein patterns when compared with normal and diseased muscle biopsy samples, including those from two patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis.

  12. Solitary, adult-onset, intraosseous myofibroma of the finger: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yihong; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2015-09-01

    Myofibroma is a rare benign neoplasm of myofibroblastic origin. It typically occurs in the skin and subcutaneous tissues of the head and neck in infants and young children as multicentric lesions known as infantile myofibromatosis. Intraosseous myofibromas are very rare and are typically destructive lesions that predominantly affect craniofacial bones in the setting of myofibromatosis. Solitary, intraosseous myofibromas in adults are exceedingly rare. Herein, we report a myofibroma involving the middle phalanx of the right index finger in a 58-year-old man who presented with a pathologic fracture. Twelve other cases of adult-onset, intraosseous myofibroma were compiled from the English language literature and integrated with this report.

  13. Mutant ubiquitin (UBB+1) associated with neurodegenerative disorders is hydrolyzed by ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCH-L3).

    PubMed

    Dennissen, Frank J A; Kholod, Natalia; Hermes, Denise J H P; Kemmerling, Nadja; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Dantuma, Nico P; van Leeuwen, Fred W

    2011-08-19

    Mutant ubiquitin (UBB(+1)) accumulates in the hallmarks of tauopathies and polyglutamine diseases. We show that the deubiquitinating enzyme YUH1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its mouse and human ortholog UCH-L3 are able to hydrolyze the C-terminal extension of UBB(+1). This yields another dysfunctional ubiquitin molecule (UB(G76Y)) with biochemical properties similar to full length UBB(+1). UBB(+1) may be detected in post-mortem tissue due to impaired C-terminal truncation of UBB(+1). Although the level of UCH-L3 protein in several neurodegenerative diseases is unchanged, we show that in vitro oxidation of recombinant UCH-L3 impairs its deubiquitinating activity. We postulate that impaired UCH-L3 function may contribute to the accumulation of full length UBB(+1) in various pathologies.

  14. GC-MS metabolomic analysis reveals significant alterations in cerebellar metabolic physiology in a mouse model of adult onset hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis K; Margarity, Marigoula; Klapa, Maria I

    2011-02-04

    Although adult-onset hypothyroidism (AOH) has been connected to neural activity alterations, including movement, behavioral, and mental dysfunctions, the underlying changes in brain metabolic physiology have not been investigated in a systemic and systematic way. The current knowledge remains fragmented, referring to different experimental setups and recovered from various brain regions. In this study, we developed and applied a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics protocol to obtain a holistic view of the cerebellar metabolic physiology in a Balb/cJ mouse model of prolonged adult-onset hypothyroidism induced by a 64-day treatment with 1% potassium perchlorate in the drinking water of the animals. The high-throughput analysis enabled the correlation between multiple parallel-occurring metabolic phenomena; some have been previously related to AOH, while others implicated new pathways, designating new directions for further research. Specifically, an overall decline in the metabolic activity of the hypothyroid compared to the euthyroid cerebellum was observed, characteristically manifested in energy metabolism, glutamate/glutamine metabolism, osmolytic/antioxidant capacity, and protein/lipid synthesis. These alterations provide strong evidence that the mammalian cerebellum is metabolically responsive to AOH. In light of the cerebellum core functions and its increasingly recognized role in neurocognition, these findings further support the known phenotypic manifestations of AOH into movement and cognitive dysfunctions.

  15. Adult-Onset Still’s Disease: Still a Serious Health Problem (a Case Report and Literature Review)

    PubMed Central

    Agha-Abbaslou, Mojgan; Bensaci, Ana Maria; Dike, Oluchi; Poznansky, Mark C.; Hyat, Arooj

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 53 Final Diagnosis: Adult-onset Still’s Disease Symptoms: Abdominal pain • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Adult-onset Still’s Disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease accompanied by a triad of spiking fever, maculopapular exanthema, and arthralgia. To date, there is no definite laboratory or imaging test available for diagnosing AOSD, and the diagnosis is one of exclusion, which can be very challenging. Case Report: We report on the case of a 53-year-old female who presented with fever, arthralgia, and abdominal pain. Her initial laboratory tests showed elevated AST and ALT, and normal leukocytes with bandemia. During her hospitalization, we evaluated the patient for other potential differential diagnoses. After an extensive workup, the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on Yamaguchi criteria. Her serum ferritin levels were measured and found to be markedly elevated, which is a non-specific finding in AOSD patients. Conclusions: This case highlights the important role of a detailed history and physical examination for timely diagnosis of AOSD to prevent complications and improve patient’s prognosis. PMID:28154368

  16. A Single-Use, In Vitro Biosensor for the Detection of T-Tau Protein, A Biomarker of Neuro-Degenerative Disorders, in PBS and Human Serum Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    PubMed

    Dai, Yifan; Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-02-19

    A single-use, in vitro biosensor for the detection of T-Tau protein in phosphate-buffer saline (PBS) and undiluted human serum was designed, manufactured, and tested. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) served as the transduction mechanism. This biosensor consisted of three electrodes: working, counter, and reference electrodes fabricated on a PET sheet. Both working and counter electrodes were thin gold film, 10 nm in thickness. Laser ablation technique was used to define the size and structure of the biosensor. The biosensor was produced using cost-effective roll-to-roll process. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize the anti-T-Tau (T-Tau antibody) on the gold working electrode. A carbodiimide conjugation approach using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked anti-T-Tau to the carboxylic groups on one end of the MPA. A T-Tau protein ladder with six isoforms was used in this study. The anti-T-Tau concentration used was 500,000 pg/mL. The T-Tau protein concentration ranged from 1000 pg/mL to 100,000 pg/mL. DPV measurements showed excellent responses, with a good calibration curve. Thus, a practical tool for simple detection of T-Tau protein, a biomarker of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been successfully developed. This tool could also be extended to detect other biomarkers for neuro-degenerative disorders, such as P-Tau protein and β-amyloid 42.

  17. A Single-Use, In Vitro Biosensor for the Detection of T-Tau Protein, A Biomarker of Neuro-Degenerative Disorders, in PBS and Human Serum Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV)

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yifan; Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-01-01

    A single-use, in vitro biosensor for the detection of T-Tau protein in phosphate-buffer saline (PBS) and undiluted human serum was designed, manufactured, and tested. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) served as the transduction mechanism. This biosensor consisted of three electrodes: working, counter, and reference electrodes fabricated on a PET sheet. Both working and counter electrodes were thin gold film, 10 nm in thickness. Laser ablation technique was used to define the size and structure of the biosensor. The biosensor was produced using cost-effective roll-to-roll process. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize the anti-T-Tau (T-Tau antibody) on the gold working electrode. A carbodiimide conjugation approach using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N’-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N–hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked anti-T-Tau to the carboxylic groups on one end of the MPA. A T-Tau protein ladder with six isoforms was used in this study. The anti-T-Tau concentration used was 500,000 pg/mL. The T-Tau protein concentration ranged from 1000 pg/mL to 100,000 pg/mL. DPV measurements showed excellent responses, with a good calibration curve. Thus, a practical tool for simple detection of T-Tau protein, a biomarker of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been successfully developed. This tool could also be extended to detect other biomarkers for neuro-degenerative disorders, such as P-Tau protein and β-amyloid 42. PMID:28218731

  18. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lee J.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy. PMID:21258649

  19. Sleep disturbance in mental health problems and neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Bradley, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Sleep has been described as being of the brain, by the brain, and for the brain. This fundamental neurobiological behavior is controlled by homeostatic and circadian (24-hour) processes and is vital for normal brain function. This review will outline the normal sleep–wake cycle, the changes that occur during aging, and the specific patterns of sleep disturbance that occur in association with both mental health disorders and neurodegenerative disorders. The role of primary sleep disorders such as insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder as potential causes or risk factors for particular mental health or neurodegenerative problems will also be discussed. PMID:23761983

  20. Synthetic prions and other human neurodegenerative proteinopathies.

    PubMed

    Le, Nhat Tran Thanh; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Aulić, Suzana; Salzano, Giulia; Tran, Hoa Thanh; Scaini, Denis; Moda, Fabio; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-09-02

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. The common feature of these diseases is the pathological conversion of the normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a β-structure-rich conformer-termed PrP(Sc). The latter can induce a self-perpetuating process leading to amplification and spreading of pathological protein assemblies. Much evidence suggests that PrP(Sc) itself is able to recruit and misfold PrP(C) into the pathological conformation. Recent data have shown that recombinant PrP(C) can be misfolded in vitro and the resulting synthetic conformers are able to induce the conversion of PrP(C) into PrP(Sc)in vivo. In this review we describe the state-of-the-art of the body of literature in this field. In addition, we describe a cell-based assay to test synthetic prions in cells, providing further evidence that synthetic amyloids are able to template conversion of PrP into prion inclusions. Studying prions might help to understand the pathological mechanisms governing other neurodegenerative diseases. Aggregation and deposition of misfolded proteins is a common feature of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders. Although the proteins implicated in each of these diseases differ, they share a common prion mechanism. Recombinant proteins are able to aggregate in vitro into β-rich amyloid fibrils, sharing some features of the aggregates found in the brain. Several studies have reported that intracerebral inoculation of synthetic aggregates lead to unique pathology, which spread progressively to distal brain regions and reduced survival time in animals. Here, we review the prion-like features of different proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as α-synuclein, superoxide dismutase-1, amyloid-β and tau.

  1. Ageing and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chia-Wei; Chen, Yu-Chih; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2010-11-01

    Ageing, which all creatures must encounter, is a challenge to every living organism. In the human body, it is estimated that cell division and metabolism occurs exuberantly until about 25 years of age. Beyond this age, subsidiary products of metabolism and cell damage accumulate, and the phenotypes of ageing appear, causing disease formation. Among these age-related diseases, neurodegenerative diseases have drawn a lot of attention due to their irreversibility, lack of effective treatment, and accompanied social and economical burdens. In seeking to ameliorate ageing and age-related diseases, the search for anti-ageing drugs has been of much interest. Numerous studies have shown that the plant polyphenol, resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene), extends the lifespan of several species, prevents age-related diseases, and possesses anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. The beneficial effects of resveratrol are believed to be associated with the activation of a longevity gene, SirT1. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cerebrovascular disease. The therapeutic potential of resveratrol, diet and the roles of stem cell therapy are discussed to provide a better understanding of the ageing mystery.

  2. Prevalence of Mental Health Illness Among Patients with Adult-onset Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Basil; Hodge, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children diagnosed with some forms of strabismus were recently found to have an increased risk of developing mental illness by early adulthood. The purpose of this case-controlled study was to determine if adults with non-paralytic forms of strabismus are similarly at an elevated risk for developing mental illness. Methods The medical records of all patients diagnosed as adults (≥ 19 years of age) with convergence insufficiency (CI, n=118), divergence insufficiency (DI, n=80), and small angle hypertropia (HT, n=99) from January 1, 1985, through December 31, 2004, were retrospectively reviewed. Each case was compared with a sex- and birthdate-matched non-strabismic control. The medical records were reviewed for mental health diagnoses, including inpatient and outpatient encounters, psychiatric ER visits, and medication use. Results Mental health disorders were diagnosed in 65 (55.1%) patients with CI compared to 54 (45.8%) controls (p=0.15), in 51 (63.8%) patients with DI compared to 42 (52.5%) controls (p=0.15), and in 63 (63.6%) patients with HT compared to 57 (57.6%) controls (p=0.38). CI patients were not more likely to have mental health disorders than their controls (p=0.15). Mental health hospitalizations (p=0.02), psychiatric medication use (p=0.04), and unspecified anxiety disorders (p=0.03) were higher in DI patients compared to controls. HT patients were found to have more generalized anxiety disorders (p=0.003) than controls. Conclusions Adults with some forms of strabismus (DI and HT) appear to have an increased risk of mental illness and its comorbidities, compared to age- and gender-matched non-strabismic controls. PMID:26559866

  3. Is Chronic Stress During Childhood Associated with Adult-Onset Vulvodynia?

    PubMed Central

    Khandker, Maheruh; Brady, Sonya S.; Stewart, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Vulvodynia is an unexplained chronic vulvar pain condition. Case-control studies provide opportunities to examine potential mechanisms by which vulvodynia may develop. Findings inform etiological models that can be tested in subsequent prospective studies. Methods: A survey of interpersonal relationships and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders was administered to 215 case-control pairs of women with and without vulvodynia. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine associations between affect-based chronic stressors (i.e., living in fear of abuse, perceived abuse, and antecedent mood disorders) with vulvodynia. These associations were then examined among women with and without a history of childhood abuse. Results: Among women with a history of severe childhood abuse, those with vulvodynia had three times the odds of living in fear of any abuse compared to women without vulvodynia (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 11.0), after adjustment for childhood poverty. Among women with no history of childhood abuse, those with vulvodynia had over six times the odds of antecedent mood disorder compared to women without vulvodynia (95% confidence interval: 1.9,19.6). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that affect-based chronic stressors may be important to the psychobiological mechanisms of vulvodynia. Prospective studies are recommended to test biopsychosocial models of the etiology of vulvodynia. PMID:25046165

  4. A Case of Adult-Onset Acute Rheumatic Fever With Long-Lasting Atrioventricular Block Requiring Permanent Pacemaker Implantation.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yusuke; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Yoshioki; Ueno, Shuichi; Nagashima, Takao; Imai, Yasushi; Shimpo, Masahisa; Kario, Kazuomi

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old hypertensive Japanese woman presented with epigastric pain on inspiration, fever, complete atrioventricular block and polyarthritis. Her antistreptolysin O levels were markedly elevated. A diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made according to the modified Jones criteria. She was prescribed loxoprofen sodium, which was partially effective for her extracardiac clinical symptoms. However, she had syncope due to complete atrioventricular block with asystole longer than 10 seconds. Consequently, we implanted a permanent pacemaker. Although we prescribed prednisolone, the efficacy of which was limited for the patient's conduction disturbance, the complete atrioventricular block persisted. In our systematic review of 12 similar cases, the duration of complete heart block was always transient and there was no case requiring a permanent pacemaker. We thus encountered a very rare case of adult-onset acute rheumatic fever with persistent complete atrioventricular block necessitating permanent pacemaker implantation.

  5. Acute pneumonitis in a patient with adult-onset disease after toclizumab treatment with good response to anakinra.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Jara Chinarro, Beatriz; Espinosa Malpartida, María; Barbadillo Mateos, Carmen

    Pulmonary involvement in the form of acute pneumonitis in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon manifestation, with few cases reported in the literature. We report the case of a 61-year-old male with 3 years of AOSD evolution, treated with methotrexate (MTX) and half-dose corticosteroids, which debuted with symptoms of fever, dyspnea and dry cough after 3 weeks of receiving the first dose of tocilizumab (TCZ). In the follow-up study showed leukocytosis with left shift, elevated serum ferritin and C-reactive protein standard. The chest CT scan showed ground-glass pattern predominantly in central and upper lobes and the BAL shows an increase in the percentage of lymphocyte with normal subpopulations and negative cultures. MTX and TCM were suspended, prednisone was increased to 30mg/day and within a week Anakinra 100mg/day SC was iniciated, noting in a few days a progressive clinical, analytical and radiological improvement.

  6. Adult-onset focal expression of mutated human tau in the hippocampus impairs spatial working memory of rats.

    PubMed

    Mustroph, Martina L; King, Michael A; Klein, Ronald L; Ramirez, Julio J

    2012-07-15

    Tauopathy in the hippocampus is one of the earliest cardinal features of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition characterized by progressive memory impairments. In fact, density of tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampus strongly correlates with severity of cognitive impairments in AD. In the present study, we employed a somatic cell gene transfer technique to create a rodent model of tauopathy by injecting a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with a mutated human tau gene (P301L) into the hippocampus of adult rats. The P301L mutation is causal for frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17), but it has been used for studying memory effects characteristic of AD in transgenic mice. To ascertain if P301L-induced mnemonic deficits are persistent, animals were tested for 6 months. It was hypothesized that adult-onset, spatially restricted tau expression in the hippocampus would produce progressive spatial working memory deficits on a learned alternation task. Rats injected with the tau vector exhibited persistent impairments on the hippocampal-dependent task beginning at about 6 weeks post-transduction compared to rats injected with a green fluorescent protein vector. Histological analysis of brains for expression of human tau revealed hyperphosphorylated human tau and NFTs in the hippocampus in experimental animals only. Thus, adult-onset, vector-induced tauopathy spatially restricted to the hippocampus progressively impaired spatial working memory in rats. We conclude that the model faithfully reproduces histological and behavioral findings characteristic of dementing tauopathies. The rapid onset of sustained memory impairment establishes a preclinical model particularly suited to the development of potential tauopathy therapeutics.

  7. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Cultured cells of the nervous system, including human neurones, in the study of the neuro-degenerative disorder, Alzheimer's disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    De Boni, U

    1985-01-01

    Human nervous-system cells in culture are a suitable model for the study of the degenerative changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer-diseased brain contains a factor which induces the formation of paired helical filaments (PHF) in cultured cells, similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease. The excitotoxic amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, induce similar PHE formation in cultured cells. The neurotoxic element aluminium is present in high concentrations in the brain in several human neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. In cultured-cell systems, aluminium interacts with acidic nuclear proteins, decreases steroid binding, produces a form of neurofibrillary degeneration and alters nucleoside metabolism.

  9. Dysregulation of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiuyang; Huang, Timothy; Zhang, Lishan; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Hong; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is one of the major protein degradation pathways, where abnormal UPS function has been observed in cancer and neurological diseases. Many neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathological feature, namely intracellular ubiquitin-positive inclusions formed by aggregate-prone neurotoxic proteins. This suggests that dysfunction of the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases contributes to the accumulation of neurotoxic proteins and to instigate neurodegeneration. Here, we review recent findings describing various aspects of UPS dysregulation in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. PMID:28018215

  10. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old white man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison’s disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities, and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss, and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be

  11. Fatal adult-onset antibody deficiency syndrome in a patient with cartilage hair hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Horn, Julia; Schlesier, Michael; Warnatz, Klaus; Prasse, Antje; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Salzer, Ulrich

    2010-09-01

    Cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA-processing (RMRP) gene. Although its most constant feature is metaphyseal dysplasia with short stature, CHH is associated with extraskeletal defects such as thin hair, anemia, immunodeficiency, and increased incidence of lymphomas. The spectrum of immunologic phenotypes in CHH translates into clinical severity. Whereas T-cell deficiency may remain subclinical or may result in severe combined immunodeficiency or Omenn syndrome, humoral immunodeficiency has only rarely been noted in these patients. Here we report the diagnosis of CHH in a woman who presented with severe short stature and a full-blown antibody deficiency, clinically resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Sequencing of the RMRP gene revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel mutations (g.68_69delinsTT and g.76C>T). Despite the late onset of immunodeficiency in the patient, its clinical course was severe, and the patient died 3 years after the first diagnosis.

  12. Uncommon neurodegenerative causes of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Alexander F

    2005-01-01

    A group of neurodegenerative diseases is outlined that affect cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. These diseases give rise to atypical forms of dementia and, unlike Alzheimer's disease (AD), are often associated with neurological symptoms. Clinical symptoms reflect the localization of the degenerative process rather than the nature of the underlying histopathology. Degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobe presents initially with behavioral alterations, but later in the course, impairment of cognition and activities of daily living develops. Posterior cortical atrophy affects the parietal and occipital association cortices and causes complex visual disturbances. In corticobasal degeneration (CBD) the focus of pathology includes the frontoparietal cortex and several subcortical nuclei, causing symmetrical rigidity, bradykinesia, myoclonus and dystonia. Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) involves the frontal, temporal and parietal cortex as well as parts of the brain stem. Clinical features include a hypokinetic rigid syndrome with nuchal dystonia and vertical gaze palsy. Huntington's disease is a prototypical autosomal dominant disorder that affects the extrapyramidal system and causes choreatic movements in combination with personality changes and cognitive deterioration. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with dementia is a neurodegeneration of the frontotemporal cortex and of the anterior horn of the spinal cord. Behavioral change similar to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is paralleled or followed by the classic features of motor neuron disease.

  13. Effects of Panax ginseng in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ik-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Ginseng, the root of the Panax ginseng, has been a popular and widely-used traditional herbal medicine in Korea, China, and Japan for thousands of years. Now it has become popular as a functional health food and is used globally as a natural medicine. Evidence is accumulating in the literature on the physiological and pharmacological effects of P. ginseng on neurodegenerative diseases. Possible ginseng- or ginsenosides-mediated neuroprotective mechanisms mainly involve maintaining homeostasis, and anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, and immune-stimulatory activities. This review considers publications dealing with the various actions of P. ginseng that are indicative of possible neurotherapeutic efficacies in neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:23717136

  14. Resveratrol: A Focus on Several Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tellone, Ester; Galtieri, Antonio; Russo, Annamaria; Giardina, Bruno; Ficarra, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Molecules of the plant world are proving their effectiveness in countering, slowing down, and regressing many diseases. The resveratrol for its intrinsic properties related to its stilbene structure has been proven to be a universal panacea, especially for a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. This paper evaluates (in vivo and in vitro) the various molecular targets of this peculiar polyphenol and its ability to effectively counter several neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. What emerges is that, in the deep heterogeneity of the pathologies evaluated, resveratrol through a convergence on the protein targets is able to give therapeutic responses in neuronal cells deeply diversified not only in morphological structure but especially in their function performed in the anatomical district to which they belong. PMID:26180587

  15. RNASEH1 Mutations Impair mtDNA Replication and Cause Adult-Onset Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Aurelio; Melchionda, Laura; Nasca, Alessia; Carrara, Franco; Lamantea, Eleonora; Zanolini, Alice; Lamperti, Costanza; Fang, Mingyan; Zhang, Jianguo; Ronchi, Dario; Bonato, Sara; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Moggio, Maurizio; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is common in mitochondrial disorders and is frequently associated with multiple mtDNA deletions. The onset is typically in adulthood, and affected subjects can also present with general muscle weakness. The underlying genetic defects comprise autosomal-dominant or recessive mutations in several nuclear genes, most of which play a role in mtDNA replication. Next-generation sequencing led to the identification of compound-heterozygous RNASEH1 mutations in two singleton subjects and a homozygous mutation in four siblings. RNASEH1, encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1), is an endonuclease that is present in both the nucleus and mitochondria and digests the RNA component of RNA-DNA hybrids. Unlike mitochondria, the nucleus harbors a second ribonuclease (RNase H2). All affected individuals first presented with CPEO and exercise intolerance in their twenties, and these were followed by muscle weakness, dysphagia, and spino-cerebellar signs with impaired gait coordination, dysmetria, and dysarthria. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers, together with impaired activity of various mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, were observed in muscle biopsies of affected subjects. Western blot analysis showed the virtual absence of RNase H1 in total lysate from mutant fibroblasts. By an in vitro assay, we demonstrated that altered RNase H1 has a reduced capability to remove the RNA from RNA-DNA hybrids, confirming their pathogenic role. Given that an increasing amount of evidence indicates the presence of RNA primers during mtDNA replication, this result might also explain the accumulation of mtDNA deletions and underscores the importance of RNase H1 for mtDNA maintenance. PMID:26094573

  16. Inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases--an update.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sandra; Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Breur, Marjolein; van der Valk, Paul; Baker, David; van Noort, Johannes M

    2014-06-01

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive dysfunction and loss of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), is the major cause of cognitive and motor dysfunction. While neuronal degeneration is well-known in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, it is also observed in neurotrophic infections, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, neoplastic disorders, prion diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as neuropsychiatric disorders and genetic disorders. A common link between these diseases is chronic activation of innate immune responses including those mediated by microglia, the resident CNS macrophages. Such activation can trigger neurotoxic pathways leading to progressive degeneration. Yet, microglia are also crucial for controlling inflammatory processes, and repair and regeneration. The adaptive immune response is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases contributing to tissue damage, but also plays important roles in resolving inflammation and mediating neuroprotection and repair. The growing awareness that the immune system is inextricably involved in mediating damage as well as regeneration and repair in neurodegenerative disorders, has prompted novel approaches to modulate the immune system, although it remains whether these approaches can be used in humans. Additional factors in humans include ageing and exposure to environmental factors such as systemic infections that provide additional clues that may be human specific and therefore difficult to translate from animal models. Nevertheless, a better understanding of how immune responses are involved in neuronal damage and regeneration, as reviewed here, will be essential to develop effective therapies to improve quality of life, and mitigate the personal, economic and social impact of these diseases.

  17. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington’s disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions. PMID:26863614

  18. Composition, Standardization and Chemical Profiling of Banisteriopsis caapi, a Plant for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders Relevant to Parkinson’s Disease†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Tekwani, Babu L.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Miller, Loren S.; Chaurasiya, Narayan D.; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Tripathi, Lalit M.; Khan, Shabana I.; Joshi, Vaishali C.; Wigger, Frank T.; Muhammad, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Banisteriopsis caapi, a woody vine from the Amazonian basin, is popularly known as an ingredient of a sacred drink ayahuasca, widely used throughout the Amazon as a medicinal tea for healing and spiritual exploration. The usefulness of B. caapi has been established for alleviating symptoms of neurological disorders including Parkinson’s disease. Aim of the study Primary objective of this study was to develop the process for preparing standardized extracts of B. caapi to achieve high potency for inhibition of human monoamine oxidases (MAO) and antioxidant properties. The aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of the plant collected from different geographical locations and seasons were analyzed by HPLC for principal bioactive markers. The extracts were simultaneously tested in vitro for inhibition of human MAOs and antioxidant activity for analysis of correlation between phytochemical composition of the extracts and bioactivities. Materials and methods Reversed-phase HPLC with photodiode array detection was employed to profile the alkaloidal and non-alkaloidal components of the aqueous extract of B. caapi. The B. caapi extracts and standardized compositions were tested in vitro for inhibition of recombinant preparations of human MAO-A and MAO-B. In vitro cell-based assays were employed for evaluation of antioxidant property and mammalian cell cytotoxicity of these preparations. Results Among the different aerial parts, leaves, stems/large branches and stem bark of B. caapi, HPLC analysis revealed that most of the dominant chemical and bioactive markers (1, 2, 5, 7-9) were present in high concentrations in dried bark of large branch. A library of HPLC chromatograms has also been generated as a tool for fingerprinting and authentication of the studied B. caapi species. The correlation between potency of MAO inhibition and antioxidant activity with the content of the main active constituents of the aqueous B. caapi extracts and

  19. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D.

  20. The Phospholipase D2 Knock Out Mouse Has Ectopic Purkinje Cells and Suffers from Early Adult-Onset Anosmia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Schrewe, Heinrich; Wakelam, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is an enzyme that produces phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid messenger molecule involved in a number of cellular events including, through its membrane curvature properties, endocytosis. The PLD2 knock out (PLD2KO) mouse has been previously reported to be protected from insult in a model of Alzheimer's disease. We have further analysed a PLD2KO mouse using mass spectrophotometry of its lipids and found significant differences in PA species throughout its brain. We have examined the expression pattern of PLD2 which allowed us to define which region of the brain to analyse for defect, notably PLD2 was not detected in glial-rich regions. The expression pattern lead us to specifically examine the mitral cells of olfactory bulbs, the Cornus Amonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We find that the change to longer PA species correlates with subtle architectural defect in the cerebellum, exemplified by ectopic Purkinje cells and an adult-onset deficit of olfaction. These observations draw parallels to defects in the reelin heterozygote as well as the effect of high fat diet on olfaction. PMID:27658289

  1. Combination Immunosuppressive Therapy Including Rituximab for Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Eva Johanna; Jung, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphopcytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening condition. It can occur either as primary form with genetic defects or secondary to other conditions, such as hematological or autoimmune diseases. Certain triggering factors can predispose individuals to the development of HLH. We report the case of a 25-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with HLH in the context of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) during a primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). During therapy with anakinra and dexamethasone, he was still symptomatic with high-spiking fevers, arthralgia, and sore throat. His laboratory values showed high levels of ferritin and C-reactive protein. His condition improved after the addition of rituximab and cyclosporine to his immunosuppressive regimen with prednisolone and anakinra. This combination therapy led to a sustained clinical and serological remission of his condition. While rituximab has been used successfully for HLH in the context of EBV-associated lymphoma, its use in autoimmune diseases is uncommon. We hypothesize that the development of HLH was triggered by a primary EBV infection and that rituximab led to elimination of EBV-infected B-cells, while cyclosporine ameliorated the cytokine excess. We therefore propose that this combination immunosuppressive therapy might be successfully used in HLH occurring in the context of autoimmune diseases. PMID:28018698

  2. Rituximab Treatment for PR3-ANCA-Positive Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Associated with Adult-Onset Periodic Fever Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hamano, Yoshitomo; Yoshizawa, Hiromichi; Sugase, Taro; Miki, Takuya; Ohtani, Naoko; Hanawa, Shiho; Takeshima, Eri; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Osamu; Takemoto, Fumi; Muto, Shigeaki; Yumura, Wako; Kusano, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old Japanese woman with nephrotic syndrome due to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) Type I diagnosed after a 5-year history of periodic fever syndrome (PFS). Hypocomplementemia and elevation of anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (PR3-ANCA) were observed. HIV, and hepatitis B and C serology were negative. Nephrotic syndrome and periodic fever did not respond to oral steroid and intravenous steroid pulse therapies combined with cyclosporine, dipyridamole, warfarin and losartan. We tried immunotherapy using rituximab, a human-mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen on mature B cells. This therapeutic approach led to improvement of renal function and remission of nephrotic syndrome and hypocomplementemia. However, it did not have a beneficial effect on periodic fever. Suspecting adult-onset hereditary PFS, we analyzed her genetic alteration of MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes. A rare genotype in intron 6 of TNFRSF1A was revealed. The etiological relationship between periodic fever and MPGN is discussed. Rituximab is a hopeful choice of induction therapy for refractory MPGN. PMID:23197963

  3. Clinical characteristics and follow-up analysis of adult-onset Still's disease complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Yang, Yingyun; Bai, Yujia; Yang, Dan; Xiong, Yangyang; Zeng, Xuejun

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated clinical characteristics and prognosis for adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We retrospectively identified cases of AOSD with (n = 10) and without (n = 305) HLH complications. We reviewed their medical records, completed follow-up through outpatient clinic and telephone interviews, and analyzed their clinical symptoms, signs, laboratory test results, treatments, and prognosis. More AOSD patients with HLH developed hepatomegaly, bleeding, serositis, and neurologic symptoms than those without HLH, and they more commonly presented with leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, severe anemia, severe liver function abnormalities, decreased fibrinogen, elevated immunoglobulin, and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. The ten patients with AOSD complicated by HLH were treated with high-dose steroids or pulse steroid therapy, and eight of them also received cytotoxic drugs, while biological agents showed poor response. Follow-up results indicated that AOSD patients overall had good prognosis, while those with HLH showed worse prognosis, including higher relapse and readmission rates and increased mortality. In patients with AOSD, unexplained decreased blood cells, severe liver dysfunction, and/or hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow should be considered as signs of HLH complication. Patients with AOSD complicated by HLH have worse prognosis and higher relapse rates compared to AOSD patients without HLH complications. Thus, these patients should undergo frequent and careful follow-up.

  4. Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia linked CSF1R mutation: Report of four Korean cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joo; Shin, Jin-Hong; Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Jong Hun; Na, Duk L; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Hwang, Sun Jae; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Young Min; Shin, Myung-Jun; Lee, Myung Jun; Kim, Seong-Jang; Yoon, Uicheul; Park, Do Youn; Jung, Dae Soo; Ahn, Jae Woo; Sung, Suk; Huh, Gi Yeong

    2015-02-15

    We describe detailed clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and neuropathological features in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP), encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD), linked to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) mutations in four Korean cases. Clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and neuropathological findings were obtained by direct evaluation and from previous medical records. The genetic analysis of the CSF1R gene was done in two autopsy-confirmed ALSP cases and two cases where ALSP was suspected based on the clinical and neuroimaging characteristics. We identified two known mutations: c.2342C>T (p.A781V) in one autopsy-proven HDLS and clinically ALSP-suspected case and c.2345G>A (p.R782H) in another autopsy-proven POLD case. We also found a novel mutation (c.2296A>G; p.M766V) in a patient presenting with hand tremor, stuttering and hesitant speech, and abnormal behavior whose father died from a possible diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented ALSP-linked CSF1R mutation in Korea and supports the suggestion that HDLS and POLD, with pathological characteristics that are somewhat different but which are caused by CSF1R mutations, are the same spectrum of disease, ALSP.

  5. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids and pigmented glia: report of a family, historical perspective, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marotti, Jonathan D; Tobias, Sharon; Fratkin, Jonathan D; Powers, James M; Rhodes, C Harker

    2004-06-01

    We present a two-generation family consisting of a father and two daughters, who had an adult-onset leukodystrophy characterized by widespread destruction of cerebral white matter with neuroaxonal spheroids. The mode of inheritance appears to be autosomal dominant. All three patients presented with a variety of motor and cognitive symptoms, including frontal lobe signs, 4-7 years before death. Each followed a chronic course until death at ages 39, 46, and 51. At autopsy, the white matter loss was widespread but most prominent in the cerebrum with descending corticospinal tract degeneration and relative sparing of subcortical U-fibers. Pigmented glial cells were present, most of which appear to be macrophages, but inconstantly Prussian blue-positive. This disease is consistent with published reports of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS). However, a review of the literature and a personal review of the neuropathology of the original case of the pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) reveal overlapping clinical and neuropathologic features between these two previously distinct entities, suggesting a common pathogenetic and perhaps etiological relationship between the two.

  6. Retrospective study of 61 patients with adult-onset Still's disease admitted with fever of unknown origin in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Dong; Yu, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Shu; Weng, Xin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), as a category of connective tissue diseases, has about 5∼9% of fever of unknown origin (FUO) cases. Diagnosis of AOSD was challenging because of its nonspecific characteristics. The present study analyzed clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in a series of patients with AOSD from eastern China. Medical records of 61 patients admitted with FUO and with a discharge diagnosis of AOSD were retrospectively evaluated and analyzed with special focus on clinical manifestations and laboratory findings. Compared with previous reports, most features of our patients had a similar incidence rate. Rash (79%), arthralgia (80%), and sore throat (84%) were the most frequent clinical manifestations in our series. Leukocytosis (80%), elevated ESR (98%) and CRP (100%), negative ANA (90%) and RF (93%), and high ferritin level (94%) were the most sensitive laboratory findings in our patients. AOSD was not a rare reason of FUO in eastern China. Fever, arthralgia, rash, sore throat, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated ESR and CRP, negative ANA and RF, and high ferritin level were the most common clinical features in our series. The lack of highly specific characteristic makes the diagnosis of AOSD difficult compared with other diseases in FUO.

  7. A series of 22 patients with adult-onset Still's disease presenting with fever of unknown origin. A difficult diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Baxevanos, Gerasimos; Tzimas, Thomas; Pappas, Georgios; Akritidis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) remains a perplexing, difficult to diagnose clinical entity, with clinical characteristics that are often broad and encountered in numerous other clinical entities. This vague clinical presentation is depicted in the commonly used diagnostic criteria, as the ones by Yamaguchi and Fautrel. The authors sought to investigate how diagnostic criteria apply in a series of 22 new cases of AOSD patients presenting with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and diagnosed at the Internal Medicine Department of Hatzikosta General Hospital of Ioannina, Greece. The aims of the study were: (1) to study the incidence of AOSD and (2) to retrospectively apply different classifications to the data of these patients in search of a more efficient way of diagnosing these patients in the future. The annual incidence of AOSD was estimated at two new cases per 10(5). The clinical manifestations of the patients are discussed, with an emphasis on specific manifestations being considered as criteria by Yamaguchi and Fautrel classifications. Four patients exhibited markedly increased serum D: -dimers, a finding of which the potential pathophysiologic implications are discussed. Serum ferritin levels have additive values, both for diagnostic and cost-reduction purposes in cases presenting as FUO; serum ferritin values are not included in any diagnostic set of criteria at present. The finding of high levels of D-dimers in AOSD needs further studies.

  8. Aptamer and its applications in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jing; Yu, Shuqing; Zheng, Yuan; Zheng, Yan; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Jianliang

    2017-02-01

    Aptamers are small single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotide fragments or small peptides, which can bind to targets by high affinity and specificity. Because aptamers are specific, non-immunogenic and non-toxic, they are ideal materials for clinical applications. Neurodegenerative disorders are ravaging the lives of patients. Even though the mechanism of these diseases is still elusive, they are mainly characterized by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the central nervous system. So it is essential to develop potential measures to slow down or prevent the onset of these diseases. With the advancements of the technologies, aptamers have opened up new areas in this research field. Aptamers could bind with these related target proteins to interrupt their accumulation, subsequently blocking or preventing the process of neurodegenerative diseases. This review presents recent advances in the aptamer generation and its merits and limitations, with emphasis on its applications in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, Huntington's disease and multiple sclerosis.

  9. Polyphenols: Multipotent Therapeutic Agents in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Khushwant S.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Aging leads to numerous transitions in brain physiology including synaptic dysfunction and disturbances in cognition and memory. With a few clinically relevant drugs, a substantial portion of aging population at risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders require nutritional intervention. Dietary intake of polyphenols is known to attenuate oxidative stress and reduce the risk for related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Polyphenols exhibit strong potential to address the etiology of neurological disorders as they attenuate their complex physiology by modulating several therapeutic targets at once. Firstly, we review the advances in the therapeutic role of polyphenols in cell and animal models of AD, PD, MS, and HD and activation of drug targets for controlling pathological manifestations. Secondly, we present principle pathways in which polyphenol intake translates into therapeutic outcomes. In particular, signaling pathways like PPAR, Nrf2, STAT, HIF, and MAPK along with modulation of immune response by polyphenols are discussed. Although current polyphenol researches have limited impact on clinical practice, they have strong evidence and testable hypothesis to contribute clinical advances and drug discovery towards age-related neurological disorders. PMID:23840922

  10. Neuron–astrocyte interactions in neurodegenerative diseases: Role of neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Selective neuron loss in discrete brain regions is a hallmark of various neurodegenerative disorders, although the mechanisms responsible for this regional vulnerability of neurons remain largely unknown. Earlier studies attributed neuron dysfunction and eventual loss during neurodegenerative diseases as exclusively cell autonomous. Although cell-intrinsic factors are one critical aspect in dictating neuron death, recent evidence also supports the involvement of other central nervous system cell types in propagating non-cell autonomous neuronal injury during neurodegenerative diseases. One such example is astrocytes, which support neuronal and synaptic function, but can also contribute to neuroinflammatory processes through robust chemokine secretion. Indeed, aberrations in astrocyte function have been shown to negatively impact neuronal integrity in several neurological diseases. The present review focuses on neuroinflammatory paradigms influenced by neuron–astrocyte cross-talk in the context of select neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26543505

  11. Proteomics of Human Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Keene, C. Dirk; Pan, Catherine; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The technology, experimental approaches, and bioinformatics that support proteomic research are evolving rapidly. The application of these new capabilities to the study of neurodegenerative diseases is providing insight into the biochemical pathogenesis of neurodegeneration as well as fueling major efforts in biomarker discovery. Here, we review the fundamentals of commonly used proteomic approaches and the outcomes of these investigations with autopsy and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18800015

  12. Parkinsonism, movement disorders and genetics in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders that are a common cause of adult-onset behavioural and cognitive impairment. FTD often presents in combination with various hyperkinetic or hypokinetic movement disorders, and evidence suggests that various genetic mutations underlie these different presentations. Here, we review the known syndromatic-genetic correlations in FTD. Although no direct genotype-phenotype correlations have been identified, mutations in multiple genes have been associated with various presentations. Mutations in the genes that encode microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) and progranulin (PGRN) can manifest as symmetrical parkinsonism, including the phenotypes of Richardson syndrome and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). Expansions in the C9orf72 gene are most frequently associated with familial FTD, typically combined with motor neuron disease, but other manifestations, such as symmetrical parkinsonism, CBS and multiple system atrophy-like presentations, have been described in patients with these mutations. Less common gene mutations, such as those in TARDBP, CHMP2B, VCP, FUS and TREM2, can also present as atypical parkinsonism. The most common hyperkinetic movement disorders in FTD are motor and vocal stereotypies, which have been observed in up to 78% of patients with autopsy-proven FTD. Other hyperkinetic movements, such as chorea, orofacial dyskinesias, myoclonus and dystonia, are also observed in some patients with FTD.

  13. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide releasing hybrid, attenuates neuroinflammation induced by microglial and astrocytic activation: a new candidate for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Edith; Kodela, Ravinder; Kashfi, Khosrow; McGeer, Patrick L

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) and nitric oxide (NO) have been described as gasotransmitters. Anti-inflammatory activity in the central and peripheral nervous systems may be one of their functions. Previously we demonstrated that several SH(-) donors including H2 S-releasing aspirin (S-ASA) exhibited anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activity in vitro against toxins released by activated microglia and astrocytes. Here we report that NOSH-ASA, an NO- and H2 S-releasing hybrid of aspirin, has a significantly greater anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effect than S-ASA or NO-ASA. When activated by LPS/IFNγ, human microglia and THP-1 cells release materials that are toxic to differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. These phenomena also occur with IFNγ-stimulated human astroglia and U373 cells. When the cells were treated with the S-ASA or NO-ASA, there was a significant enhancement of neuroprotection. However, NOSH-ASA had significantly more potent protection properties than NO-ASA or S-ASA. The effect was concentration-dependent, as well as incubation time-dependent. Such treatment not only reduced the release of the TNFα and IL-6, but also attenuated activation of P38 MAPK and NFκB proteins. All the compounds tested were not harmful when applied directly to SH-SY5Y cells. These data suggest that NOSH-ASA has significant anti-inflammatory properties and may be a new candidate for treating neurodegenerative disorders that have a prominent neuroinflammatory component such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

  14. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease: Multicenter Study of 41 Patients and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María L; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A; Hernández, María V; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; de los Riscos, Marina; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J; González-Vela, M Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2-6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3-47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0-10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5-50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations.

  15. Inhibition of GSK-3 Ameliorates Aβ Pathology in an Adult-Onset Drosophila Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killick, Richard; Augustin, Hrvoje; Gandy, Carina; Allen, Marcus J.; Hardy, John; Lovestone, Simon; Partridge, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Aβ peptide accumulation is thought to be the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), with downstream neurotoxic effects including the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is increasingly implicated as playing a pivotal role in this amyloid cascade. We have developed an adult-onset Drosophila model of AD, using an inducible gene expression system to express Arctic mutant Aβ42 specifically in adult neurons, to avoid developmental effects. Aβ42 accumulated with age in these flies and they displayed increased mortality together with progressive neuronal dysfunction, but in the apparent absence of neuronal loss. This fly model can thus be used to examine the role of events during adulthood and early AD aetiology. Expression of Aβ42 in adult neurons increased GSK-3 activity, and inhibition of GSK-3 (either genetically or pharmacologically by lithium treatment) rescued Aβ42 toxicity. Aβ42 pathogenesis was also reduced by removal of endogenous fly tau; but, within the limits of detection of available methods, tau phosphorylation did not appear to be altered in flies expressing Aβ42. The GSK-3–mediated effects on Aβ42 toxicity appear to be at least in part mediated by tau-independent mechanisms, because the protective effect of lithium alone was greater than that of the removal of tau alone. Finally, Aβ42 levels were reduced upon GSK-3 inhibition, pointing to a direct role of GSK-3 in the regulation of Aβ42 peptide level, in the absence of APP processing. Our study points to the need both to identify the mechanisms by which GSK-3 modulates Aβ42 levels in the fly and to determine if similar mechanisms are present in mammals, and it supports the potential therapeutic use of GSK-3 inhibitors in AD. PMID:20824130

  16. Metabolic programming effects initiated in the suckling period predisposing for adult-onset obesity cannot be reversed by calorie restriction

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Mahmood, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal rats reared on high-carbohydrate (HC) milk formula developed chronic hyperinsulinemia and adult-onset obesity due to programming of islets and the hypothalamic energy circuitry. In this study, calorie restriction by pair-feeding was imposed on HC male rats (HC/PF) to normalize food intake similar to that of mother-fed (MF) rats from weaning until postnatal day 140. A group of HC/PF rats was switched over to ad libitum feeding (HC/PF/AL) from days 90 to 140. Pair-feeding reduced body weight gains and serum insulin and leptin levels in HC/PF rats compared with HC rats, but these parameters were restored to HC levels in the HC/PF/AL rats after ad libitum feeding. Interestingly, the heightened insulin secretory response of isolated islets from adult HC/PF and HC/PF/ AL rats to glucose, acetylcholine, and oxymetazoline were not significantly different from the responses of islets from HC rats. Similarly, the expression of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin in the hypothalamus was not significantly different among HC, HC/PF, and HC/PF/AL rats. Expression of the leptin receptor in the hypothalami from the HC, HC/PF, and HC/PF/AL rats mirrored that of serum leptin, whereas suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3) expression remained high in these three groups. The results indicate that, although calorie restriction resulted in reduction in body weight gain and normalized the serum hormonal pattern, the programed predisposition for the hypersecretory capacity of islets and the hypothalamic hyperphagic response in the HC rats could not be permanently overcome by the pair-feeding imposed on HC rats. PMID:23249696

  17. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Apraxias in Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Abbas, Mirza Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer's disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating. PMID:25722511

  19. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    rearrangements, being observed in 6 of 10 PTC cases with ALK rearrangements versus 2 of 15 cases with no ALK rearrangements. The six radiation-exposed cases of PTC harboring both ALK rearrangements and solid/trabecular-like architecture were associated with higher radiation doses and younger ages at the time of the A-bombing and at diagnosis compared to the other 19 PTC with no detectable gene alterations. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ALK rearrangements are involved in the development of radiation-induced adult-onset PTC. PMID:23050789

  20. Adult onset asymmetric upper limb tremor misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease: A clinical and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Schwingenschuh, Petra; Ruge, Diane; Edwards, Mark J; Terranova, Carmen; Katschnig, Petra; Carrillo, Fatima; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Dickson, John; Lees, Andrew J; Quinn, Niall; Mir, Pablo; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-01-01

    different from controls. Taken together, these results may help differentiate these SWEDDs patients from PD and support our hypothesis that adult-onset dystonia is the underlying diagnosis in this sub-group of patients with SWEDDs. PMID:20131394

  1. Epigenetic Changes in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Jee; Kim, Sunhong; Han, Myeong Hoon; Lee, Sung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Afflicted neurons in various neurodegenerative diseases generally display diverse and complex pathological features before catastrophic occurrence of massive neuronal loss at the late stages of the diseases. This complex nature of neuronal pathophysiology inevitably implicates systemwide changes in basic cellular activities such as transcriptional controls and signal cascades, and so on, as a cause. Recently, as one of these systemwide cellular changes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, epigenetic changes caused by protein toxicity have begun to be highlighted. Notably, recent advances in related techniques including next-generation sequencing (NGS) and mass spectrometry enable us to monitor changes in the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins and to link these changes in histone PTMs to the specific transcriptional changes. Indeed, epigenetic alterations and consequent changes in neuronal transcriptome are now begun to be extensively studied in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this review, we will discuss details of our current understandings on epigenetic changes associated with two representative neurodegenerative diseases [AD and polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases] and further discuss possible future development of pharmaceutical treatment of the diseases through modulating these epigenetic changes. PMID:27871175

  2. Engineering enhanced protein disaggregases for neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackrel, Meredith E; Shorter, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Protein misfolding and aggregation underpin several fatal neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). There are no treatments that directly antagonize the protein-misfolding events that cause these disorders. Agents that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native form and function could simultaneously eliminate any deleterious loss-of-function or toxic gain-of-function caused by misfolded conformers. Moreover, a disruptive technology of this nature would eliminate self-templating conformers that spread pathology and catalyze formation of toxic, soluble oligomers. Here, we highlight our efforts to engineer Hsp104, a protein disaggregase from yeast, to more effectively disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with PD, ALS, and FTD. Remarkably subtle modifications of Hsp104 primary sequence yielded large gains in protective activity against deleterious α-synuclein, TDP-43, FUS, and TAF15 misfolding. Unusually, in many cases loss of amino acid identity at select positions in Hsp104 rather than specific mutation conferred a robust therapeutic gain-of-function. Nevertheless, the misfolding and toxicity of EWSR1, an RNA-binding protein with a prion-like domain linked to ALS and FTD, could not be buffered by potentiated Hsp104 variants, indicating that further amelioration of disaggregase activity or sharpening of substrate specificity is warranted. We suggest that neuroprotection is achievable for diverse neurodegenerative conditions via surprisingly subtle structural modifications of existing chaperones. PMID:25738979

  3. The role of copper in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, D J; Bartnikas, T B; Gitlin, J D

    1999-08-01

    Copper is an essential trace metal which plays a fundamental role in the biochemistry of the human nervous system. Menkes disease and Wilson disease are inherited disorders of copper metabolism and the dramatic neurodegenerative phenotypes of these two diseases underscore the essential nature of copper in nervous system development as well as the toxicity of this metal when neuronal copper homeostasis is perturbed. Ceruloplasmin contains 95% of the copper found in human plasma and inherited loss of this essential ferroxidase is associated with progressive neurodegeneration of the retina and basal ganglia. Gain-of-function mutations in the cytosolic copper enzyme superoxide dismutase result in the motor neuron degeneration of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and current evidence suggests a direct pathogenic role for copper in this process. Recent studies have also implicated copper in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease and the prion-mediated encephalopathies, suggesting that further elucidation of the mechanisms of copper trafficking and metabolism within the nervous system will be of direct relevance to our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

  4. The transition metals copper and iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Ríos, Camilo; Tristán-López, Luis; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montes, Sergio

    2010-07-30

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a worldwide health problem. Metals like iron and copper are essential for life, but they are also involved in several neurodegenerative mechanisms such as protein aggregation, free radical generation and oxidative stress. The role of Fe and Cu, their pathogenic mechanisms and possible therapeutic relevance are discussed regarding four of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Metal-mediated oxidation by Fenton chemistry is a common feature for all those disorders and takes part of a self-amplifying damaging mechanism, leading to neurodegeneration. The interaction between metals and proteins in the nervous system seems to be a crucial factor for the development or absence of neurodegeneration. The present review also deals with the therapeutic strategies tested, mainly using metal chelating drugs. Metal accumulation within the nervous system observed in those diseases could be the result of compensatory mechanisms to improve metal availability for physiological processes.

  5. Clinico-Pathological Correlations of the Most Common Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Taipa, Ricardo; Pinho, João; Melo-Pires, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative dementias are a group of neurological disorders characterized by deterioration in several cognitive domains in which there is selective and progressive loss of specific populations of neurons. The precise neurobiological basis for the different neurodegenerative dementias remains unknown. It is expected that different pathologies reflect different mechanisms, at least early in the neurodegeneration process. The next decades promise treatments directed to causes and mechanisms, bringing an outstanding challenge to clinicians due to heterogeneous clinical presentations with the same molecular pathology. The purpose of this brief review is to describe the key neuropathological features of the most common neurodegenerative dementias (Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration) and the relationship with the clinical syndromes described in clinico-pathological studies. We expect this overview contributes for the understanding of this broad topic integrating the two ends of the spectrum: clinical and pathological. PMID:22557993

  6. Copper handling by astrocytes: insights into neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn; Hong, Sandra; Qian, Yongchang

    2011-12-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element in the brain that can be toxic at elevated levels. Cu accumulation is a suspected etiology in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and prion-induced disorders. Astrocytes are a proposed depot in the brain for Cu and other metals, including lead (Pb). This article describes the physiological roles of Cu in the central nervous system and in selected neurodegenerative diseases, and reviews evidence that astrocytes accumulate Cu and protect neurons from Cu toxicity. Findings from murine genetic models of Menkes disease and from cell culture models concerning the molecular mechanisms by which astrocytes take up, store, and buffer Cu intracellularly are discussed, as well as potential mechanistic linkages between astrocyte functions in Cu handling and neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Biomarker Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Caudle, W. Michael; Zhang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Biomarkers for neurodegenerative disorders are essential to facilitate disease diagnosis, ideally at early stages, monitor disease progression, and assess response to existing and future treatments. Application of proteomics to the human brain, cerebrospinal fluid and plasma has greatly hastened the unbiased and high-throughput searches for novel biomarkers. There are many steps critical to biomarker discovery, whether for neurodegenerative or other diseases, including sample preparation, protein/peptide separation and identification, as well as independent confirmation and validation. In this review we have summarized current proteomics technologies involved in discovery of biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases, practical considerations and limitations of several major aspects, as well as the current status of candidate biomarkers revealed by proteomics for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. PMID:18938247

  8. Redox Imbalance and Viral Infections in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential molecules for many physiological functions and act as second messengers in a large variety of tissues. An imbalance in the production and elimination of ROS is associated with human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders. In the last years the notion that neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by chronic viral infections, which may result in an increase of neurodegenerative diseases progression, emerged. It is known in literature that enhanced viral infection risk, observed during neurodegeneration, is partly due to the increase of ROS accumulation in brain cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of viral infection, occurring during the progression of neurodegeneration, remain unclear. In this review, we discuss the recent knowledge regarding the role of influenza, herpes simplex virus type-1, and retroviruses infection in ROS/RNS-mediated Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). PMID:27110325

  9. Increased Expression of the Large Conductance, Calcium-Activated K+ (BK) Channel in Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Samuel T.; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Velinov, Milen; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic J protein co-chaperone that opposes neurodegeneration. Mutations in CSPα (i.e., Leu115 to Arg substitution or deletion (Δ) of Leu116) cause adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease. We have previously demonstrated that CSPα limits the expression of large conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels in neurons, which may impact synaptic excitability and neurotransmission. Here we show by western blot analysis that expression of the pore-forming BKα subunit is elevated ~2.5 fold in the post-mortem cortex of a 36-year-old patient with the Leu116∆ CSPα mutation. Moreover, we find that the increase in BKα subunit level is selective for ANCL and not a general feature of neurodegenerative conditions. While reduced levels of CSPα are found in some postmortem cortex specimens from Alzheimer’s disease patients, we find no concomitant increase in BKα subunit expression in Alzheimer’s specimens. Both CSPα monomer and oligomer expression are reduced in synaptosomes prepared from ANCL cortex compared with control. In a cultured neuronal cell model, CSPα oligomers are short lived. The results of this study indicate that the Leu116∆ mutation leads to elevated BKα subunit levels in human cortex and extend our initial work in rodent models demonstrating the modulation of BKα subunit levels by the same CSPα mutation. While the precise sequence of pathogenic events still remains to be elucidated, our findings suggest that dysregulation of BK channels may contribute to neurodegeneration in ANCL. PMID:25905915

  10. Genes Interacting with Occupational Exposures to Low Molecular Weight Agents and Irritants on Adult-Onset Asthma in Three European Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rava, Marta; Ahmed, Ismail; Kogevinas, Manolis; Le Moual, Nicole; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Curjuric, Ivan; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Dumas, Orianne; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Imboden, Medea; Mehta, Amar J.; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Zock, Jan-Paul; Jarvis, Deborah; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Demenais, Florence; Nadif, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The biological mechanisms by which cleaning products and disinfectants—an emerging risk factor—affect respiratory health remain incompletely evaluated. Studying genes by environment interactions (G × E) may help identify new genes related to adult-onset asthma. Objectives: We identified interactions between genetic polymorphisms of a large set of genes involved in the response to oxidative stress and occupational exposures to low molecular weight (LMW) agents or irritants on adult-onset asthma. Methods: Our data came from three large European cohorts: Epidemiological Family-based Study of the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Disease in Adults (SAPALDIA), and European Community Respiratory Health Survey in Adults (ECRHS). A candidate pathway–based strategy identified 163 genes involved in the response to oxidative stress and potentially related to exposures to LMW agents/irritants. Occupational exposures were evaluated using an asthma job-exposure matrix and job-specific questionnaires for cleaners and healthcare workers. Logistic regression models were used to detect G × E interactions, adjusted for age, sex, and population ancestry, in 2,599 adults (mean age, 47 years; 60% women, 36% exposed, 18% asthmatics). p-Values were corrected for multiple comparisons. Results: Ever exposure to LMW agents/irritants was associated with current adult-onset asthma [OR = 1.28 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.58)]. Eight single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) by exposure interactions at five loci were found at p < 0.005: PLA2G4A (rs932476, chromosome 1), near PLA2R1 (rs2667026, chromosome 2), near RELA (rs931127, rs7949980, chromosome 11), PRKD1 (rs1958980, rs11847351, rs1958987, chromosome 14), and PRKCA (rs6504453, chromosome 17). Results were consistent across the three studies and after accounting for smoking. Conclusions: Using a pathway-based selection process, we identified novel genes potentially involved

  11. Ketogenic Diet in Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Ernesto; Bosco, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of data demonstrate the utility of ketogenic diets in a variety of metabolic diseases as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. In regard to neurological disorders, ketogenic diet is recognized as an effective treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy but emerging data suggests that ketogenic diet could be also useful in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Parkinson's disease, and some mitochondriopathies. Although these diseases have different pathogenesis and features, there are some common mechanisms that could explain the effects of ketogenic diets. These mechanisms are to provide an efficient source of energy for the treatment of certain types of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by focal brain hypometabolism; to decrease the oxidative damage associated with various kinds of metabolic stress; to increase the mitochondrial biogenesis pathways; and to take advantage of the capacity of ketones to bypass the defect in complex I activity implicated in some neurological diseases. These mechanisms will be discussed in this review. PMID:25101284

  12. DNA Double Strand Breaks: A Common Theme in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Daniela; Mollinari, Cristiana; Racaniello, Mauro; Garaci, Enrico; Cardinale, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of DNA damage and impairment of DNA repair systems are involved in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative diseases. Whenever DNA damage is too extensive, the DNA damage response pathway provides for triggering cellular senescence and/or apoptosis. However, whether the increased level of DNA damage in neurodegenerative disorders is a cause rather than the consequence of neurodegenerative events remains to be established. Among possible DNA lesions, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are rare events, nevertheless they are the most lethal form of DNA damage. In neurons, DSBs are particularly deleterious because of their reduced DNA repair capability as compared to proliferating cells. Here, we provide a description of DSB repair systems and describe human studies showing the presence of several types of DNA lesions in three major neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Then, we analyze the role of DSB accumulation and deficiency of DSB repair systems in neurodegeneration by examining studies on animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Metal imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bourassa, Megan W.

    2014-01-01

    Metal ions are known to play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and prion diseases. In these diseases, aberrant metal binding or improper regulation of redox active metal ions can induce oxidative stress by producing cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Altered metal homeostasis is also frequently seen in the diseased state. As a result, the imaging of metals in intact biological cells and tissues has been very important for understanding the role of metals in neurodegenerative diseases. A wide range of imaging techniques have been utilized, including X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), all of which allow for the imaging of metals in biological specimens with high spatial resolution and detection sensitivity. These techniques represent unique tools for advancing the understanding of the disease mechanisms and for identifying possible targets for developing treatments. In this review, we will highlight the advances in neurodegenerative disease research facilitated by metal imaging techniques. PMID:22797194

  14. Adult-onset deficiency in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I alters oligodendrocyte turnover in the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kun; Forbes, M Elizabeth; Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Sonntag, William E; Riddle, David R

    2009-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) provide trophic support during development and also appear to influence cell structure, function and replacement in the adult brain. Recent studies demonstrated effects of the GH/IGF-I axis on adult neurogenesis, but it is unclear whether the GH/IGF-I axis influences glial turnover in the normal adult brain. In the current study, we used a selective model of adult-onset GH and IGF-I deficiency to evaluate the role of GH and IGF-I in regulating glial proliferation and survival in the adult corpus callosum. GH/IGF-I-deficient dwarf rats of the Lewis strain were made GH/IGF-I replete via twice daily injections of GH starting at postnatal day 28 (P28), approximately the age at which GH pulse amplitude increases in developing rodents. GH/IGF-I deficiency was initiated in adulthood by removing animals from GH treatment. Quantitative analyses revealed that adult-onset GH/IGF-I deficiency decreased cell proliferation in the white matter and decreased the survival of newborn oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that aging-related changes in the GH/IGF-I axis produce deficits in ongoing turnover of oligodendrocytes, which may contribute to aging-related cognitive changes and deficits in remyelination after injury.

  15. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  16. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A case of adult-onset reducing body myopathy presenting a novel clinical feature, asymmetrical involvement of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shintaro; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Higuchi, Masa-Aki; Tsugawa, Jun; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2014-08-15

    We herein report a 32-year-old woman with adult-onset reducing body myopathy (RBM) who had a mutation in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 gene (FHL1) and showed a marked asymmetrical involvement of sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. At 30 years of age she noticed bilateral foot drop, and over the next two years developed difficulty raising her right arm. At 32 years of age she was admitted to our hospital for a diagnostic evaluation. Neurological examination showed moderate weakness and atrophy of her right sternocleidomastoid muscle, right trapezius muscle, and bilateral upper proximal muscles. There were severe weakness and atrophy of her bilateral tibialis anterior muscles. Her deep tendon reflexes were hypoactive in her upper extremities. Her serum creatine kinase level was mildly increased. Muscle biopsy specimens from the left tibialis anterior muscle revealed marked variation in fiber size, some necrotic or regenerating fibers, and reducing bodies. Gene analysis of FHL1 demonstrated a mutation: a heterozygous missense mutation of c.377G>A (p. C126T) in FHL1. Compared with previous adult-onset RBM cases harboring mutations in FHL1, our case was characterized by asymmetrical atrophy of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles.

  18. Vapor, Dust and Smoke Exposure in relation to adult-onset asthma and chronic respiratory symptoms: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    LeVan, Tricia D.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lee, Hin-Peng; Koh, David; Yu, Mimi C.; London, Stephanie J.

    2006-01-01

    Occupational factors contribute to a significant fraction of respiratory disease and symptoms. We evaluated the role of occupational exposures on asthma, chronic bronchitis, and respiratory symptoms in a population-based cohort, the Singapore Chinese Health Study. History of occupations, occupational exposures, and respiratory conditions were collected by interviews with 52,325 Singaporeans born 1918–1953. Exposure to dusts, from cotton, wood, metal, mineral and/or asbestos, was associated with non-chronic cough and/or phlegm (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.30), chronic bronchitis (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.57) and adult-onset asthma (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.30). Cotton dust was the major component contributing to respiratory symptoms. Vapor exposure, from chemical solvents, dyes, cooling oils, paints, wood preservatives and/or pesticides, was associated with non-chronic cough or phlegm (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.27), chronic dry cough (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19, 2.01) and adult-onset asthma (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.56). Chemical solvents, cooling oils and pesticides were the major sources contributing to respiratory symptoms. These data support the role of occupational exposures in the etiology of respiratory illness in a population-based cohort in Singapore with a low prevalence of atopic illness. PMID:16707657

  19. Role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Rao, A V; Balachandran, B

    2002-10-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDD) are a group of illness with diverse clinical importance and etiologies. NDD include motor neuron disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cerebellar disorders, Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), cortical destructive Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Schizophrenia. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies provide many risk factors such as advanced age, genetic defects, abnormalities of antioxidant enzymes, excitotoxicity, cytoskeletal abnormalities, autoimmunity, mineral deficiencies, oxidative stress, metabolic toxicity, hypertension and other vascular disorders. Growing body of evidence implicates free radical toxicity, radical induced mutations and oxidative enzyme impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction due to congenital genetic defects in clinical manifestations of NDD. Accumulation of oxidative damage in neurons either primarily or secondarily may account for the increased incidence of NDD such as AD, ALS and stroke in aged populations. The molecular mechanisms of neuronal degeneration remain largely unknown and effective therapies are not currently available. Recent interest has focused on antioxidants such as carotenoids and in particular lycopene, a potent antioxidant in tomatoes and tomato products, flavonoids and vitamins as potentially useful agents in the management of human NDD. The pathobiology of neurodegenerative disorders with emphasis on genetic origin and its correlation with oxidative stress of neurodegenerative disorders will be reviewed and the reasons as to why brain constitutes a vulnerable site of oxidative damage will be discussed. The article will also discuss the potential free radical scavenger, mechanism of antioxidant action of lycopene and the need for the use of antioxidants in the prevention of NDD.

  20. Evidence for Prion-Like Mechanisms in Several Neurodegenerative Diseases: Potential Implications for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal, untreatable neurodegenerative diseases. While the impact of TSEs on human health is relatively minor, these diseases are having a major influence on how we view, and potentially treat, other more common neurodegenerative disorders. Until recently, TSEs encapsulated a distinct category of neurodegenerative disorder, exclusive in their defining characteristic of infectivity. It now appears that similar mechanisms of self-propagation may underlie other proteinopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. This link is of scientific interest and potential therapeutic importance as this route of self-propagation offers conceptual support and guidance for vaccine development efforts. Specifically, the existence of a pathological, self-promoting isoform offers a rational vaccine target. Here, we review the evidence of prion-like mechanisms within a number of common neurodegenerative disorders and speculate on potential implications and opportunities for vaccine development. PMID:24228054

  1. Ubiquitin pathways in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Atkin, Graham; Paulson, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Control of proper protein synthesis, function, and turnover is essential for the health of all cells. In neurons these demands take on the additional importance of supporting and regulating the highly dynamic connections between neurons that are necessary for cognitive function, learning, and memory. Regulating multiple unique synaptic protein environments within a single neuron while maintaining cell health requires the highly regulated processes of ubiquitination and degradation of ubiquitinated proteins through the proteasome. In this review, we examine the effects of dysregulated ubiquitination and protein clearance on the handling of disease-associated proteins and neuronal health in the most common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25071440

  2. [Cellular bases of neurodegenerative processes].

    PubMed

    Nieoullon, A

    1998-01-01

    Neurodegenerative processes are generally characterized by the long-lasting course of neuronal death and the selectivity of the neuronal population or brain structure involved in the lesion. This is the case for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or Huntington's diseases, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The reasons for such a specificity are largely unknown as are generally the mechanisms of the diseases. One common feature of these diseases, however, is that the neuronal death is thought to involve apoptosis, at least partly. Interestingly, apoptosis in the brain would involve specific gene products similar to that identified in the nematode c. elegans, partly corresponding in mammals to ICE-related compounds and Bcl2 protein. The involvement of calcium as well as of oxydative stress mechanisms in such neuronal death is to be fully proved but putative modulation by external signals (such as those provided through trophic factors or even neurotransmitters) represents an interesting way to validate the current hypothesis of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases in humans.

  3. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Salari, Ali

    2016-03-25

    Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to "helix to strand (HE)", "helix to coil (HC)" and "strand to coil (CE)" alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Cerebral correlates of psychotic syndromes in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Psychosis has been recognized as a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases and a core feature of dementia that worsens most clinical courses. It includes hallucinations, delusions including paranoia, aggressive behaviour, apathy and other psychotic phenomena that occur in a wide range of degenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, synucleinopathies (Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies), Huntington’s disease, frontotemporal degenerations, motoneuron and prion diseases. Many of these psychiatric manifestations may be early expressions of cognitive impairment, but often there is a dissociation between psychotic/behavioural symptoms and the rather linear decline in cognitive function, suggesting independent pathophysiological mechanisms. Strictly neuropathological explanations are likely to be insufficient to explain them, and a large group of heterogeneous factors (environmental, neurochemical changes, genetic factors, etc.) may influence their pathogenesis. Clinico-pathological evaluation of behavioural and psychotic symptoms (PS) in the setting of neurodegenerative and dementing disorders presents a significant challenge for modern neurosciences. Recognition and understanding of these manifestations may lead to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic options that can serve to delay long-term progression of these devastating disorders and improve the patients’ quality of life. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and distinctive pathological features underlying the development of PS in neurodegenerative diseases may provide important insights into psychotic processes in general. PMID:21418522

  6. Protein-Remodeling Factors As Potential Therapeutics for Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackrel, Meredith E.; Shorter, James

    2017-01-01

    Protein misfolding is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. A unifying feature of patients with these disorders is the accumulation of deposits comprised of misfolded protein. Aberrant protein folding can cause toxicity through a loss or gain of protein function, or both. An intriguing therapeutic approach to counter these disorders is the application of protein-remodeling factors to resolve these misfolded conformers and return the proteins to their native fold and function. Here, we describe the application of protein-remodeling factors to alleviate protein misfolding in neurodegenerative disease. We focus on Hsp104, Hsp110/Hsp70/Hsp40, NMNAT, and HtrA1, which can prevent and reverse protein aggregation. While many of these protein-remodeling systems are highly promising, their activity can be limited. Thus, engineering protein-remodeling factors to enhance their activity could be therapeutically valuable. Indeed, engineered Hsp104 variants suppress neurodegeneration in animal models, which opens the way to novel therapeutics and mechanistic probes to help understand neurodegenerative disease. PMID:28293166

  7. Pain in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Tommaso, Marina; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Defrin, Ruth; Kunz, Miriam; Pickering, Gisele; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are going to increase as the life expectancy is getting longer. The management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias, Parkinson's disease (PD) and PD related disorders, motor neuron diseases (MND), Huntington's disease (HD), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), is mainly addressed to motor and cognitive impairment, with special care to vital functions as breathing and feeding. Many of these patients complain of painful symptoms though their origin is variable, and their presence is frequently not considered in the treatment guidelines, leaving their management to the decision of the clinicians alone. However, studies focusing on pain frequency in such disorders suggest a high prevalence of pain in selected populations from 38 to 75% in AD, 40% to 86% in PD, and 19 to 85% in MND. The methods of pain assessment vary between studies so the type of pain has been rarely reported. However, a prevalent nonneuropathic origin of pain emerged for MND and PD. In AD, no data on pain features are available. No controlled therapeutic trials and guidelines are currently available. Given the relevance of pain in neurodegenerative disorders, the comprehensive understanding of mechanisms and predisposing factors, the application and validation of specific scales, and new specific therapeutic trials are needed. PMID:27313396

  8. Epigenetic programming of neurodegenerative diseases by an adverse environment.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Olena; Kovalchuk, Igor; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2012-03-20

    Experience and environment can critically influence the risk and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as miRNA expression, DNA methylation, and histone modifications, readily respond to experience and environmental factors. Here we propose that epigenetic regulation of gene expression and environmental modulation thereof may play a key role in the onset and course of common neurological conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis. For example, epigenetic mechanisms may mediate long-term responses to adverse experience, such as stress, to affect disease susceptibility and the course of neurodegenerative events. This review introduces the epigenetic components and their possible role in mediating neuropathological processes in response to stress. We argue that epigenetic modifications will affect neurodegenerative events through altered gene function. The study of epigenetic states in neurodegenerative diseases presents an opportunity to gain new insights into risk factors and pathogenic mechanisms. Moreover, research into epigenetic regulation of disease may revolutionize health care by opening new avenues of personalized, preventive and curative medicine.

  9. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chi, Ching-Shiang; Cheng, Shin-Nan; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Harn, Horng-Jyh

    2015-12-25

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS) disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM), and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  10. Estradiol and neurodegenerative oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon

    2008-10-01

    Estradiol is a potent preventative against neurodegenerative disease, in part, by activating antioxidant defense systems scavenging reactive oxygen species, limiting mitochondrial protein damage, improving electron transport chain activity and reducing mitochondrial DNA damage. Estradiol also increases the activity of complex IV of the electron transport chain, improving mitochondrial respiration and ATP production under normal and stressful conditions. However, the high oxidative cellular environment present during neurodegeneration makes estradiol a poor agent for treatment of existing disease. Oxidative stress stimulates the production of the hydroperoxide-dependent hydroxylation of estradiol to the catecholestrogen metabolites, which can undergo reactive oxygen species producing redox cycling, setting up a self-generating toxic cascade offsetting any antioxidant/antiapoptotic effects generated by the parent estradiol. Additional disease-induced factors can further perpetuate this cycle. For example dysregulation of the catecholamine system could alter catechol-O-methyltransferase-catalyzed methylation, preventing removal of redox cycling catecholestrogens from the system enhancing pro-oxidant effects of estradiol.

  11. Neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Emerit, J; Edeas, M; Bricaire, F

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress is now recognized as accountable for redox regulation involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Its role is pivotal for the modulation of critical cellular functions, notably for neurons astrocytes and microglia, such as apoptosis program activation, and ion transport, calcium mobilization, involved in excitotoxicity. Excitotoxicity and apoptosis are the two main causes of neuronal death. The role of mitochondria in apoptosis is crucial. Multiple apoptotic pathways emanate from the mitochondria. The respiratory chain of mitochondria that by oxidative phosphorylation, is the fount of cellular energy, i.e. ATP synthesis, is responsible for most of ROS and notably the first produced, superoxide anion (O(2)(;-)). Mitochondrial dysfunction, i.e. cell energy impairment, apoptosis and overproduction of ROS, is a final common pathogenic mechanism in aging and in neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Nitric oxide (NO(;)), an RNS, which can be produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase in brain, plays a prominent role. The research on the genetics of inherited forms notably ALS, AD, PD, has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of the sporadic forms of neurodegenerative diseases or of aging of the brain. ROS and RNS, i.e. oxidative stress, are not the origin of neuronal death. The cascade of events that leads to neurons, death is complex. In addition to mitochondrial dysfunction (apoptosis), excitotoxicity, oxidative stress (inflammation), the mechanisms from gene to disease involve also protein misfolding leading to aggregates and proteasome dysfunction on ubiquinited material.

  12. Cell-to-cell transmission of pathogenic proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing L; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2014-01-01

    A common feature of many neurodegenerative diseases is the deposition of β-sheet-rich amyloid aggregates formed by proteins specific to these diseases. These protein aggregates are thought to cause neuronal dysfunction, directly or indirectly. Recent studies have strongly implicated cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins as a common mechanism for the onset and progression of various neurodegenerative disorders. Emerging evidence also suggests the presence of conformationally diverse ‘strains’ of each type of disease protein, which may be another shared feature of amyloid aggregates, accounting for the tremendous heterogeneity within each type of neurodegenerative disease. Although there are many more questions to be answered, these studies have opened up new avenues for therapeutic interventions in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24504409

  13. Aging, neurodegenerative disease, and traumatic brain injury: the role of neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Esopenko, Carrie; Levine, Brian

    2015-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition with significant effects on cognition and behavior. While the acute and sub-acute effects of TBI recover over time, relatively little is known about the long-term effects of TBI in relation to neurodegenerative disease. This issue has recently garnered a great deal of attention due to publicity surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional athletes, although CTE is but one of several neurodegenerative disorders associated with a history of TBI. Here, we review the literative on neurodegenerative disorders linked to remote TBI. We also review the evidence for neuroimaging changes associated with unhealthy brain aging in the context of remote TBI. We conclude that neuroimaging biomarkers have significant potential to increase understanding of the mechanisms of unhealthy brain aging and neurodegeneration following TBI, with potential for identifying those at risk for unhealthy brain aging prior to the clinical manifestation of neurodegenerative disease.

  14. Human-induced pluripotent stem cells: potential for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christopher A; Akimov, Sergey S

    2014-09-15

    The cell biology of human neurodegenerative diseases has been difficult to study till recently. The development of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models has greatly enhanced our ability to model disease in human cells. Methods have recently been improved, including increasing reprogramming efficiency, introducing non-viral and non-integrating methods of cell reprogramming, and using novel gene editing techniques for generating genetically corrected lines from patient-derived iPSCs, or for generating mutations in control cell lines. In this review, we highlight accomplishments made using iPSC models to study neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Fronto-Temporal Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Spinomuscular Atrophy and other polyglutamine diseases. We review disease-related phenotypes shown in patient-derived iPSCs differentiated to relevant neural subtypes, often with stressors or cell "aging", to enhance disease-specific phenotypes. We also discuss prospects for the future of using of iPSC models of neurodegenerative disorders, including screening and testing of therapeutic compounds, and possibly of cell transplantation in regenerative medicine. The new iPSC models have the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics.

  15. [Review on the neuroprotective effects of green tea polyphenols for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Li, Yong

    2010-01-01

    Considering the multi-etiological characters of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, the current pharmacological approaches using drugs oriented towards a single molecular target possess limited ability to modify the course of the diseases. Green tea polyphenols have been reported to possess more than two active neuroprotective-neurorescue moieties that simultaneously manipulate multiple targets involved in neurodegeneration. This review aims to shed light on the multipharmacological neuroprotective activities and the mechanisms of green tea polyphenols on neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Mapping Neurodegenerative Disease Onset and Progression.

    PubMed

    Seeley, William W

    2017-03-13

    Brain networks have been of long-standing interest to neurodegeneration researchers, including but not limited to investigators focusing on conventional prion diseases, which are known to propagate along neural pathways. Tools for human network mapping, however, remained inadequate, limiting our understanding of human brain network architecture and preventing clinical research applications. Until recently, neuropathological studies were the only viable approach to mapping disease onset and progression in humans but required large autopsy cohorts and laborious methods for whole-brain sectioning and staining. Despite important advantages, postmortem studies cannot address in vivo, physiological, or longitudinal questions and have limited potential to explore early-stage disease except for the most common disorders. Emerging in vivo network-based neuroimaging strategies have begun to address these issues, providing data that complement the neuropathological tradition. Overall, findings to date highlight several fundamental principles of neurodegenerative disease anatomy and pathogenesis, as well as some enduring mysteries. These principles and mysteries provide a road map for future research.

  17. Exosomes, an Unmasked Culprit in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Federico N.; Pampliega, Olatz; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular nanovesicles (30–100 nm) generated from endosomal membranes and known to be released by all cell lineages of the Central Nervous System (CNS). They constitute important vesicles for the secretion and transport of multilevel information, including signaling, toxic, and regulatory molecules. Initially thought to have a function merely in waste disposal, the involvement of exosomes in neuronal development, maintenance, and regeneration through its paracrine and endocrine signaling functions has drawn particular attention in recent years. These vesicles, being involved in the clearance and cell-to-cell spreading of toxic molecules, have been naturally implicated in aging, and in several neurodegenerative diseases associated with pathological conversion of proteins, as well as in the transport of other disease-associated molecules, such as nucleic acids or pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our understanding of such unique form of communication may provide not only answers about (patho)physiological processes in the brain, but can also offer means to exploit these vesicles as vehicles for the delivery of biologically relevant molecules or as tools to monitor brain diseases in a non-invasive way. A promising field in expansion, the study of exosomes and related extracellular vesicles has just commenced to unveil their potential as therapeutic tools for brain disorders as well as biomarkers of disease state. PMID:28197068

  18. Exosomes, an Unmasked Culprit in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Soria, Federico N; Pampliega, Olatz; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Meissner, Wassilios G; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular nanovesicles (30-100 nm) generated from endosomal membranes and known to be released by all cell lineages of the Central Nervous System (CNS). They constitute important vesicles for the secretion and transport of multilevel information, including signaling, toxic, and regulatory molecules. Initially thought to have a function merely in waste disposal, the involvement of exosomes in neuronal development, maintenance, and regeneration through its paracrine and endocrine signaling functions has drawn particular attention in recent years. These vesicles, being involved in the clearance and cell-to-cell spreading of toxic molecules, have been naturally implicated in aging, and in several neurodegenerative diseases associated with pathological conversion of proteins, as well as in the transport of other disease-associated molecules, such as nucleic acids or pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our understanding of such unique form of communication may provide not only answers about (patho)physiological processes in the brain, but can also offer means to exploit these vesicles as vehicles for the delivery of biologically relevant molecules or as tools to monitor brain diseases in a non-invasive way. A promising field in expansion, the study of exosomes and related extracellular vesicles has just commenced to unveil their potential as therapeutic tools for brain disorders as well as biomarkers of disease state.

  19. Advances in epigenetics and epigenomics for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors-literally those that are "over" or "above" genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes-have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  20. Neuronal network disintegration: common pathways linking neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Devenney, Emma M; Irish, Muireann; Ittner, Arne; Naismith, Sharon; Ittner, Lars M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Halliday, Glenda M; Eisen, Andrew; Hodges, John R; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegeneration refers to a heterogeneous group of brain disorders that progressively evolve. It has been increasingly appreciated that many neurodegenerative conditions overlap at multiple levels and therefore traditional clinicopathological correlation approaches to better classify a disease have met with limited success. Neuronal network disintegration is fundamental to neurodegeneration, and concepts based around such a concept may better explain the overlap between their clinical and pathological phenotypes. In this Review, promoters of overlap in neurodegeneration incorporating behavioural, cognitive, metabolic, motor, and extrapyramidal presentations will be critically appraised. In addition, evidence that may support the existence of large-scale networks that might be contributing to phenotypic differentiation will be considered across a neurodegenerative spectrum. Disintegration of neuronal networks through different pathological processes, such as prion-like spread, may provide a better paradigm of disease and thereby facilitate the identification of novel therapies for neurodegeneration. PMID:27172939

  1. Stem cell technology for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunn, J Simon; Sakowski, Stacey A; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to investigate and treat neurodegenerative diseases. In the current review, we discuss the process of extending basic stem cell research into translational therapies for patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. We begin with a discussion of the burden of these diseases on society, emphasizing the need for increased attention toward advancing stem cell therapies. We then explain the various types of stem cells utilized in neurodegenerative disease research, and outline important issues to consider in the transition of stem cell therapy from bench to bedside. Finally, we detail the current progress regarding the applications of stem cell therapies to specific neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. With a greater understanding of the capacity of stem cell technologies, there is growing public hope that stem cell therapies will continue to progress into realistic and efficacious treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Amyloidosis in Retinal Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masuzzo, Ambra; Dinet, Virginie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Mascarelli, Frederic; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the central nervous system, the retina may reflect both physiological processes and abnormalities related to pathologies that affect the brain. Amyloidosis due to the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) was initially regarded as a specific and exclusive characteristic of neurodegenerative alterations seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. More recently, it was discovered that amyloidosis-related alterations, similar to those seen in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, also occur in the retina. Remarkably, these alterations were identified not only in primary retinal pathologies, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma, but also in the retinas of Alzheimer’s patients. In this review, we first briefly discuss the biogenesis of Aβ, a peptide involved in amyloidosis. We then discuss some pathological aspects (synaptic dysfunction, mitochondrial failure, glial activation, and vascular abnormalities) related to the neurotoxic effects of Aβ. We finally highlight common features shared by AD, AMD, and glaucoma in the context of Aβ amyloidosis and further discuss why the retina, due to the transparency of the eye, can be considered as a “window” to the brain. PMID:27551275

  3. Nanobiomaterials' applications in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Silva Adaya, Daniela; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Guevara, Jorge; Ortiz-Islas, Emma

    2017-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier is the interface between the blood and brain, impeding the passage of most circulating cells and molecules, protecting the latter from foreign substances, and maintaining central nervous system homeostasis. However, its restrictive nature constitutes an obstacle, preventing therapeutic drugs from entering the brain. Usually, a large systemic dose is required to achieve pharmacological therapeutic levels in the brain, leading to adverse effects in the body. As a consequence, various strategies are being developed to enhance the amount and concentration of therapeutic compounds in the brain. One such tool is nanotechnology, in which nanostructures that are 1-100 nm are designed to deliver drugs to the brain. In this review, we examine many nanotechnology-based approaches to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The review begins with a brief history of nanotechnology, followed by a discussion of its definition, the properties of most reported nanomaterials, their biocompatibility, the mechanisms of cell-material interactions, and the current status of nanotechnology in treating Alzheimer's, Parkinson's diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Of all strategies to deliver drug to the brain that are used in nanotechnology, drug release systems are the most frequently reported.

  4. Neuronal Mitophagy in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vicente, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal homeostasis depends on the proper functioning of different quality control systems. All intracellular components are subjected to continuous turnover through the coordinated synthesis, degradation and recycling of their constituent elements. Autophagy is the catabolic mechanism by which intracellular cytosolic components, including proteins, organelles, aggregates and any other intracellular materials, are delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Among the different types of selective autophagy described to date, the process of mitophagy involves the selective autophagic degradation of mitochondria. In this way, mitophagy is responsible for basal mitochondrial turnover, but can also be induced under certain physiological or pathogenic conditions to eliminate unwanted or damaged mitochondria. Dysfunctional cellular proteolytic systems have been linked extensively to neurodegenerative diseases (ND) like Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), or Huntington’s disease (HD), with autophagic failure being one of the main factors contributing to neuronal cell death in these diseases. Neurons are particularly vulnerable to autophagic impairment as well as to mitochondrial dysfunction, due mostly to their particular high energy dependence and to their post-mitotic nature. The accurate and proper degradation of dysfunctional mitochondria by mitophagy is essential for maintaining control over mitochondrial quality and quantity in neurons. In this report, I will review the role of mitophagy in neuronal homeostasis and the consequences of its dysfunction in ND. PMID:28337125

  5. Annual Research Review: The Promise of Stem Cell Research for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccarino, Flora M.; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Stevens, Hanna E.; Szekely, Anna; Abyzov, Alexej; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman

    2011-01-01

    The study of the developing brain has begun to shed light on the underpinnings of both early and adult onset neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging of the human brain across developmental time points and the use of model animal systems have combined to reveal brain systems and gene products that may play a role in autism spectrum disorders,…

  6. Mesencephalic complex I deficiency does not correlate with parkinsonism in mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders.

    PubMed

    Palin, Eino J H; Paetau, Anders; Suomalainen, Anu

    2013-08-01

    Genetic evidence from recessively inherited Parkinson's disease has indicated a clear causative role for mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. This role has long been discussed based on findings that toxic inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I caused parkinsonism and that tissues of patients with Parkinson's disease show complex I deficiency. Disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance are a common cause of inherited neurodegenerative disorders, and lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions or depletion and respiratory chain defect, including complex I deficiency. However, parkinsonism associates typically with defects of catalytic domain of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Surprisingly, however, not all mutations affecting DNA polymerase gamma manifest as parkinsonism, but, for example, spacer region mutations lead to spinocerebellar ataxia and/or severe epilepsy. Furthermore, defective Twinkle helicase, a close functional companion of DNA polymerase gamma in mitochondrial DNA replication, results in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, epilepsy or adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy, but not typically parkinsonism. Here we sought for clues for this specificity in the neurological manifestations of mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders by studying mesencephalic neuropathology of patients with DNA polymerase gamma or Twinkle defects, with or without parkinsonism. We show here that all patients with mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders had neuronopathy in substantia nigra, most severe in DNA polymerase gamma-associated parkinsonism. The oculomotor nucleus was also affected, but less severely. In substantia nigra, all patients had a considerable decrease of respiratory chain complex I, but other respiratory chain enzymes were not affected. Complex I deficiency did not correlate with parkinsonism, age, affected gene or inheritance. We conclude that the cell number in substantia nigra correlated well with parkinsonism in DNA polymerase gamma

  7. Sound naming in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chow, Maggie L; Brambati, Simona M; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Johnson, Julene K

    2010-04-01

    Modern cognitive neuroscientific theories and empirical evidence suggest that brain structures involved in movement may be related to action-related semantic knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we examined the naming of environmental sounds in patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), two neurodegenerative diseases associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Subjects were presented with 56 environmental sounds: 28 sounds were of objects that required manipulation when producing the sound, and 28 sounds were of objects that required no manipulation. Subjects were asked to provide the name of the object that produced the sound and also complete a sound-picture matching condition. Subjects included 33 individuals from four groups: CBD/PSP, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, and normal controls. We hypothesized that CBD/PSP patients would exhibit impaired naming performance compared with controls, but the impairment would be most apparent when naming sounds associated with actions. We also explored neural correlates of naming environmental sounds using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain MRI. As expected, CBD/PSP patients scored lower on environmental sounds naming (p<0.007) compared with the controls. In particular, the CBD/PSP patients scored the lowest when naming sounds of manipulable objects (p<0.05), but did not show deficits in naming sounds of non-manipulable objects. VBM analysis across all groups showed that performance in naming sounds of manipulable objects correlated with atrophy in the left pre-motor region, extending from area six to the middle and superior frontal gyrus. These results indicate an association between impairment in the retrieval of action-related names and the motor system, and suggest that difficulty in naming manipulable sounds may be related to atrophy in the pre-motor cortex. Our results support the hypothesis that retrieval of action-related semantic knowledge involves motor

  8. Deciphering complex mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases: the advent of systems biology.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Overall, Christopher M; Power, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Classical biological methods involving analyses of one or several genes have been the mainstay for studying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. However, it has become clear that these diseases exhibit complex molecular interactions involving both host genomes and environmental determinants. Systems biology represents an integrated and deeper investigation of interacting biomolecules within cells or organisms. This approach has only recently become feasible as high-throughput technologies including cDNA microarrays, mass spectrometric analyses of proteins and lipids together with rigorous bioinformatics have evolved. Herein, we review recent developments from studies of systems biology applied to multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and HIV-associated dementia as three prototypic neurodegenerative disorders. Existing high-content data derived from clinically and experimentally derived neural tissues point to convergent pathways among these neurodegenerative disorders, which transcend descriptive studies to reach a more integrated understanding of disease pathogenesis and, in some instances, highlighting 'druggable' network nodes.

  9. Reorganizing metals: the use of chelating compounds as potential therapies for metal-related neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Badrick, Alison C; Jones, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    Metal ions, particularly copper, zinc and iron, are implicated in several amyloidogenic neurodegenerative disorders. In the brain, as elsewhere in the body, metal ion excess or deficiency can potentially inhibit protein function, interfere with correct protein folding or, in the case of iron or copper, promote oxidative stress. The involvement of metal ions in neurodegenerative disorders has made them an emerging target for therapeutic interventions. One approach has been to chelate and sequester the ions and thus limit their potential to interfere with protein folding or render them unable to undergo redox processes. Newer approaches suggest that redistributing metal ions has therapeutic benefits, and recent studies indicate that alleviating cellular copper deficiency may be a plausible way to limit neurodegeneration. In this review we discuss the role of metals in amyloidogenic, neurodegenerative disorders and highlight some mechanisms and compounds used in various therapeutic approaches.

  10. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adult Onset Still's Disease with a Serum Ferritin of 26,387 μg/L.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheetal; Monemian, Seyed; Khalid, Ayesha; Dosik, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Serum ferritin rises in the anemia of chronic inflammation reflecting increased iron storage and other changes mediated by inflammation. When iron deficiency coexists, the ferritin may not always decline into the subnormal range. We describe the rare interaction of iron deficiency with the extreme hyperferritinemia characteristic of adult onset Still's disease. The combination has clinical relevance and allows deductions about the presence of serum ferritin at 26,387 μg/L despite obvious iron depletion. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was delayed and became fully obvious when her Still's disease remitted and serum ferritin decreased to 6.5 μg/L. The coexistence of iron deficiency should be considered when evaluating a patient with anemia of chronic inflammation even when the ferritin level is elevated several hundredfold. Further insights on ferritin metabolism in Still's disease are suggested by the likelihood that the patient's massive hyperferritinemia in the acute phase of Still's disease was almost entirely of the iron-free apoferritin form.

  11. Mutations in zebrafish lrp2 result in adult-onset ocular pathogenesis that models myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Veth, Kerry N; Willer, Jason R; Collery, Ross F; Gray, Matthew P; Willer, Gregory B; Wagner, Daniel S; Mullins, Mary C; Udvadia, Ava J; Smith, Richard S; John, Simon W M; Gregg, Ronald G; Link, Brian A

    2011-02-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals--but not all--develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease.

  12. Mutations in Zebrafish lrp2 Result in Adult-Onset Ocular Pathogenesis That Models Myopia and Other Risk Factors for Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Veth, Kerry N.; Willer, Jason R.; Collery, Ross F.; Gray, Matthew P.; Willer, Gregory B.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Mullins, Mary C.; Udvadia, Ava J.; Smith, Richard S.; John, Simon W. M.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Link, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, Bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals—but not all—develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease. PMID:21379331

  13. Adult Onset Asthma and Periocular Xanthogranuloma (AAPOX), a Rare Entity With a Strong Link to IgG4-Related Disease: An Observational Case Report Study.

    PubMed

    London, Jonathan; Martin, Antoine; Soussan, Michael; Badelon, Isabelle; Gille, Thomas; Uzunhan, Yurdagul; Giroux-Leprieur, Bénédicte; Warzocha, Ursula; Régent, Alexis; Galatoire, Olivier; Dhote, Robin; Abad, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Adult onset asthma and periocular xanthogranuloma (AAPOX) is a rare non-Langerhans histiocytosis characterized histopathologically by a periocular infiltration of foamy histiocytes and Touton giant cells. Benign hyperplasia with plasma cell infiltration is classically described in eyelids or lymph nodes of AAPOX patients. It is also a characteristic feature of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), a new entity defined by an IgG4-bearing plasma cell infiltration of organs.To determine if AAPOX syndrome shares clinical, biological, and histopathological characteristics with IgG4-RD, we used the comprehensive clinical diagnostic criteria for IgG4-RD in a retrospective case series of three consecutive patients with histologically-proven AAPOX. Patients who were diagnosed with AAPOX at a French academic referral center for orbital inflammation between November 1996 and March 2013 were enrolled. Biopsies from ocular adnexa or other organs were systematically reexamined. For each patient, clinical and serological data, radiologic findings, and treatment were retrospectively analyzed.Two AAPOX patients fulfilled all of the diagnostic criteria for a definite IgG4-RD. One patient who lacked the serological criteria fulfilled the criteria of a probable IgG4-RD.These 3 cases of AAPOX patients fulfilled the IgG4-RD comprehensive clinical diagnostic criteria. To our knowledge, this is the first observational case report study to clearly show a strong relationship between IgG4-RD and AAPOX syndrome.

  14. Highly Expression of CD11b and CD32 on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Adult-Onset Still’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Choi, Bunsoon; Suh, Chang-Hee; Han, Mi Hwa; Jung, Ju-Yang; Sayeed, Hasan M.; Kim, Ye Won; Sohn, Seonghyang

    2017-01-01

    Background: We investigated the potential role of several pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs; CD11b, CD11c, CD32, CD206, CD209, and dectin-1) in adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). Methods: The study included 13 untreated AOSD patients, 19 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (as a disease control), and 19 healthy controls (HCs). The PRRs were quantified in peripheral blood using flow cytometry. The serum levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-18, and IL-23 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Significantly higher mean frequencies of cells presenting CD11b and CD32 from whole blood were observed in patients with AOSD than in patients with RA or HC. The levels of IL-17, IL-18, and IL-23 were elevated in AOSD patients compared to HCs. CD11b frequencies from whole cells correlated with systemic scores, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, aspartate transaminase levels, interleukin-23 (IL-23) levels, and IL-18. Frequencies of CD209 from granulocytes were significantly correlated with systemic scores, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and levels of C-reactive protein, ferritin, LDH, IL-23, and interleukin-18 (IL-18). Conclusions: Elevated frequencies of circulating CD11b-positive cells and positive correlations with disease activity markers suggest that circulating CD11b-positive cells contribute to the pathogenesis of AOSD. PMID:28106835

  15. Co-existing spinal intradural ependymal cyst and sacral Tarlov cyst in adult-onset tethered cord syndrome with syringomyelia: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Hamid H.; Khan, Muhammad F.; Enam, Syed Ather; Hashmi, Imtiaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Synchronous spinal intradural ependymal cysts and sacral Tarlov cysts in adult onset tethered cord syndrome are extremely rare. Case Description: A 23-year-old male presented with back pain radiating into both lower extremities, accompanied by acute onset of gait difficulty and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging identified a low lying conus medullaris, syringomyelia with septations extending from T12 to S1, a tethered cord, and a thickened filum terminale with a sacral Tarlov cyst. The patient underwent a L3-4 laminectomy for decompression of syringomyelia and excision/biopsy of a space occupying lesion along with S1-2 laminectomy for cord untethering and Tarlov cyst fenestration. Postoperative histopathology confirmed that the lesion was an ependymal cyst. Clinically, patient showed marked improvement in the neurological status. Conclusion: Simultaneous decompressive laminectomy of L3-4 and S1-2 effectively decompressed the syringomyelia while allowing for excision/biopsy of a space occupying lesion at the former and untethering and Tarlov cyst fenestration at the latter levels. PMID:27843691

  16. Maturity of judgement in decision making for predictive testing for nontreatable adult-onset neurogenetic conditions: a case against predictive testing of minors.

    PubMed

    Richards, F H

    2006-11-01

    International guidelines developed to minimize harm from predictive testing for adult-onset, nontreatable neurogenetic conditions such as Huntington disease (HD) state that such testing should not be available to minors. Some authors have proposed that predictive testing for these conditions should be available to minors at the request of parents and/or of younger adolescents themselves. They highlight the lack of empirical evidence that predictive testing of minors causes harm and suggest that refusing to test minors may be detrimental. The current study focuses on the context of predictive test requests by adolescents younger than 18 years, and presents arguments and evidence that the risk of potential harm from testing such young people is sufficiently high to justify continued caution in this area. A study based on a model of psychosocial maturity found that the 3 factors involved in maturity of judgement in decision making - responsibility, temperance and perspective - continue to develop into late adolescence. There is also evidence that the prefrontal areas of the brain, which are involved in executive functions such as decision making, are not fully developed until early adulthood. Combined with evidence of adverse long-term effects, from research with adults who have undergone predictive testing, these findings constitute grounds for retaining a minimum age of 18 years for predictive testing for nontreatable conditions. Further research on assessment of maturity will assist with reaching a consensus on this issue.

  17. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage.

  18. Implications of glial nitric oxide in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Jose Enrique; Tarragon, Ernesto; Campuzano, Carmen María; Ros-Bernal, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic janus-faced molecule synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) which plays a critical role in a number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. The physiological roles of NO depend on its local concentrations, as well as its availability and the nature of downstream target molecules. Its double-edged sword action has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. Excessive NO production, as the evoked by inflammatory signals, has been identified as one of the major causative reasons for the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, excessive NO synthesis under neuroinflammation leads to the formation of reactive nitrogen species and neuronal cell death. There is an intimate relation between microglial activation, NO and neuroinflammation in the human brain. The role of NO in neuroinflammation has been defined in animal models where this neurotransmitter can modulate the inflammatory process acting on key regulatory pathways, such as those associated with excitotoxicity processes induced by glutamate accumulation and microglial activation. Activated glia express inducible NOS and produce NO that triggers calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum, activating the release of vesicular glutamate from astroglial cells resulting in neuronal death. This change in microglia potentially contributes to the increased age-associated susceptibility and neurodegeneration. In the current review, information is provided about the role of NO, glial activation and age-related processes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may be helpful in the isolation of new therapeutic targets for aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26347610

  19. Protein aggregate spreading in neurodegenerative diseases: Problems and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lim, Hee-Sun; Masliah, Eliezer; Lee, He-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Progressive accumulation of specific protein aggregates is a defining feature of many major neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, fronto-temporal dementia, Huntington’s disease, and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD). Findings from several recent studies have suggested that aggregation-prone proteins, such as tau, α-synuclein, polyglutamine-containing proteins, and amyloid-β, can spread to other cells and brain regions, a phenomenon considered unique to prion disorders, such as CJD and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Cell-to-cell propagation of protein aggregates may be the general underlying principle for progressive deterioration of neurodegenerative diseases. This may also have significant implications in cell replacement therapies, as evidenced by the propagation of α-synuclein aggregates from host to grafted cells in long-term transplants in Parkinson’s patients. Here, we review recent progress in protein aggregate propagation in experimental model systems and discuss outstanding questions and future perspectives. Understanding the mechanisms of this pathological spreading may open the way to unique opportunities for development of diagnostic techniques and novel therapies for protein misfolding-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21624403

  20. Potential application of lithium in Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lazzara, Carol A.; Kim, Yong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Lithium, the long-standing hallmark treatment for bipolar disorder, has recently been identified as a potential neuroprotective agent in neurodegeneration. Here we focus on introducing numerous in vitro and in vivo studies that have shown lithium treatment to be efficacious in reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, increasing autophagy, inhibiting apoptosis, and decreasing the accumulation of α-synulcein, with an emphasis on Parkinson's disease. A number of biological pathways have been shown to be involved in causing these neuroprotective effects. The inhibition of GSK-3β has been the mechanism most studied; however, other modes of action include the regulation of apoptotic proteins and glutamate excitotoxicity as well as down-regulation of calpain. This review provides a framework of the neuroprotective effects of lithium in neurodegenerative diseases and the putative mechanisms by which lithium provides the protection. Lithium-only treatment may not be a suitable therapeutic option for neurodegenerative diseases due to inconsistent efficacy and potential side-effects, however, the use of low dose lithium in combination with other potential or existing therapeutic compounds may be a promising approach to reduce symptoms and disease progression in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26578864

  1. Role of Redox Signaling in Neuroinflammation and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), a redox signal, are produced by various enzymatic reactions and chemical processes, which are essential for many physiological functions and act as second messengers. However, accumulating evidence has implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders related to increased oxidative stress. Under pathological conditions, increasing ROS production can regulate the expression of diverse inflammatory mediators during brain injury. Elevated levels of several proinflammatory factors including cytokines, peptides, pathogenic structures, and peroxidants in the central nervous system (CNS) have been detected in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). These proinflammatory factors act as potent stimuli in brain inflammation through upregulation of diverse inflammatory genes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and adhesion molecules. To date, the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying the expression of target proteins regulated by these factors are elusive. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the intracellular signaling pathways, especially ROS, involved in the expression of several inflammatory proteins induced by proinflammatory factors in brain resident cells. Understanding redox signaling transduction mechanisms involved in the expression of target proteins and genes may provide useful therapeutic strategies for brain injury, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24455696

  2. Exercise-induced neuroprotective effects on neurodegenerative diseases: the key role of trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Nardi, António E; Machado, Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    Age-related neurodegenerative disorders, like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, are becoming a major issue to public health care. Currently, there is no effective pharmacological treatment to address cognitive impairment in these patients. Here, we aim to explore the role of exercise-induced trophic factor enhancement in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. There is a significant amount of evidence from animal and human studies that links neurodegenerative related cognitive deficits with changes on brain and peripheral trophic factor levels. Several trials with elderly individuals and patients with neurodegenerative diseases report exercise induced cognitive improvements and changes on trophic factor levels including BDNF, IGF-I, among others. Further studies with healthy aging and clinical populations are needed to understand how diverse exercise interventions produce different variations in trophic factor signaling. Genetic profiles and potential confounders regarding trophic factors should also be addressed in future trials.

  3. Mitochondrial Quality Control: Decommissioning Power Plants in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Oishee

    2013-01-01

    The cell has an intricate quality control system to protect its mitochondria from oxidative stress. This surveillance system is multi-tiered and comprises molecules that are present inside the mitochondria, in the cytosol, and in other organelles like the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. These molecules cross talk with each other and protect the mitochondria from oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a fundamental part of early disease pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. These disorders also damage the cellular quality control machinery that protects the cell against oxidative stress. This exacerbates the oxidative damage and causes extensive neuronal cell death that is characteristic of neurodegeneration. PMID:24288463

  4. Advances in the treatment of visual hallucinations in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Collerton, Daniel; Taylor, John-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of visual hallucinations in neurodegenerative disorders is not well advanced. The complexity of underlying mechanisms presents a number of potential avenues for developing treatments, but also suggests that any single one may be of limited efficacy. Reducing medication, with the careful introduction of antidementia medication if needed, is the mainstay of current management. Antipsychotic medication leads to excessive morbidity and mortality and should only be used in cases of high distress that do not otherwise respond. Education, reduction of risk factors and psychological treatments have limited evidence of efficacy, but are unlikely to cause harm. PMID:23882162

  5. Neuroimmune regulation of microglial activity involved in neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    González, Hugo; Elgueta, Daniela; Montoya, Andro; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2014-09-15

    Neuroinflammation constitutes a fundamental process involved in the progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. Microglial cells play a central role in neuroinflammation, promoting neuroprotective or neurotoxic microenvironments, thus controlling neuronal fate. Acquisition of different microglial functions is regulated by intercellular interactions with neurons, astrocytes, the blood-brain barrier, and T-cells infiltrating the central nervous system. In this study, an overview of the regulation of microglial function mediated by different intercellular communications is summarised and discussed. Afterward, we focus in T-cell-mediated regulation of neuroinflammation involved in neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Stem cell challenges in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhongling; Gao, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases result from the gradual and progressive loss of neural cells and lead to nervous system dysfunction. The rapidly advancing stem cell field is providing attractive alternative options for fighting these diseases. Results have provided proof of principle that cell replacement can work in humans with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, three clinical studies of cell transplantation were published that found no net benefit, while patients in two of the studies developed dyskinesias that persisted despite reductions in treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have major potential advantages because patient-specific neuroblasts are suitable for transplantation, avoid immune reactions, and can be produced without the use of human ES cells (hESC). Although iPSCs have not been successfully used in clinical trials for PD, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were treated with autologous stem cells and, though they had some degree of decline one year after treatment, they were still improved compared with the preoperative period or without any drug therapy. In addition, neural stem cells (NSCs), via brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), have been shown to ameliorate complex behavioral deficits associated with widespread Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in a transgenic mouse model of AD. So far, the FDA lists 18 clinical trials treating multiple sclerosis (MS), but most are in preliminary stages. This article serves as an overview of recent studies in stem cell and regenerative approaches to the above chronic neurodegenerative disorders. There are still many obstacles to the use of stem cells as a cure for neurodegenerative disease, especially because we still don't fully understand the true mechanisms of these diseases. However, there is hope in the potential of stem cells to help us learn and understand a great deal more about the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Cdk5 at crossroads of protein oligomerization in neurodegenerative diseases: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Wilkaniec, Anna; Czapski, Grzegorz A; Adamczyk, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is involved in proper neurodevelopment and brain function and serves as a switch between neuronal survival and death. Overactivation of Cdk5 is associated with many neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases. It is believed that in those diseases Cdk5 may be an important link between disease-initiating factors and cell death effectors. A common hallmark of neurodegenerative disorders is incorrect folding of specific proteins, thus leading to their intra- and extracellular accumulation in the nervous system. Abnormal Cdk5 signaling contributes to dysfunction of individual proteins and has a substantial role in either direct or indirect interactions of proteins common to, and critical in, different neurodegenerative diseases. While the roles of Cdk5 in α-synuclein (ASN) - tau or β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) - tau interactions are well documented, its contribution to many other pertinent interactions, such as that of ASN with Aβ, or interactions of the Aβ - ASN - tau triad with prion proteins, did not get beyond plausible hypotheses and remains to be proven. Understanding of the exact position of Cdk5 in the deleterious feed-forward loop critical for development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases may help designing successful therapeutic strategies of several fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is associated with many neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's diseases. It is believed that in those diseases Cdk5 may be an important factor involved in protein misfolding, toxicity and interaction. We suggest that Cdk5 may contribute to the vicious circle of neurotoxic events involved in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  9. Sex-specific associations of low birth weight with adult-onset diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Mueller, Noel T; Duncan, Bruce B; Chor, Dóra; Bensenor, Isabela M; Griep, Rosane H; Appel, Lawrence J; Barreto, Sandhi M; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests sex differences in the early origins of adult metabolic disease, but this has been little investigated in developing countries. We investigated sex-specific associations between low birth weight (LBW; <2.5 kg) and adult-onset diabetes in 12,525 participants from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Diabetes was defined by self-reported information and laboratory measurements. In confounder-adjusted analyses, LBW (vs. 2.5–4 kg) was associated with higher prevalence of diabetes in women (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 1.54, 95% CI: 1.32–1.79), not in men (PR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.91–1.25; Pheterogeneity = 0.003). The association was stronger among participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.35–1.91), than those without (PR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.99–1.32; Pheterogeneity = 0.03). When jointly stratified by sex and maternal diabetes, the association was observed for women with (PR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.37–2.29) and without (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.20–1.75) maternal diabetes. In contrast, in men, LBW was associated with diabetes in participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.83), but not in those without (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.74–1.14). These sex-specific findings extended to continuous measures of glucose homeostasis. LBW was associated with higher diabetes prevalence in Brazilian women, and in men with maternal diabetes, suggesting sex-specific intrauterine effects on adult metabolic health. PMID:27845438

  10. Metabolic Disturbances in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease Evaluated Using Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Hsieh, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Hung, Wei-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based comprehensive analysis of metabolic profiles with metabolomics approach has potential diagnostic and predictive implications. However, no metabolomics data have been reported in adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). This study investigated the metabolomic profiles in AOSD patients and examined their association with clinical characteristics and disease outcome. Methods Serum metabolite profiles were determined on 32 AOSD patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS analysis, and the differentially expressed metabolites were quantified using multiple reactions monitoring (MRM)/MS analysis in 44 patients and 42 HC. Pure standards were utilized to confirm the presence of the differentially expressed metabolites. Results Eighteen differentially expressed metabolites were identified in AOSD patents using LC/MS-based analysis, of which 13 metabolites were validated by MRM/MS analysis. Among them, serum levels of lysoPC(18:2), urocanic acid and indole were significantly lower, and L-phenylalanine levels were significantly higher in AOSD patients compared with HC. Moreover, serum levels of lysoPC(18:2), PhePhe, uridine, taurine, L-threonine, and (R)-3-Hydroxy-hexadecanoic acid were significantly correlated with disease activity scores (all p<0.05) in AOSD patients. A different clustering of metabolites was associated with a different disease outcome, with significantly lower levels of isovalerylsarcosine observed in patients with chronic articular pattern (median, 77.0AU/ml) compared with monocyclic (341.5AU/ml, p<0.01) or polycyclic systemic pattern (168.0AU/ml, p<0.05). Conclusion Thirteen differentially expressed metabolites identified and validated in AOSD patients were shown to be involved in five metabolic pathways. Significant associations of metabolic profiles with disease activity and outcome of AOSD suggest their involvement in AOSD pathogenesis. PMID

  11. Adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) and Nasu-Hakola disease: lesion staging and dynamic changes of axons and microglial subsets.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Suzuki-Kouyama, Emi; Inoue, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Asa; Tokiwai, Mika; Arai, Nobutaka; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Aoki, Naoya; Jinnai, Kenji; Yazawa, Ikuru; Arai, Kimihito; Ishihara, Kenji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Yagisita, Saburo; Amano, Naoji; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Terada, Seishi; Yoshida, Mari; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mitsuyama, Yoshio; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2016-09-08

    The brains of 10 Japanese patients with adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and eight Japanese patients with Nasu-Hakola disease (N-HD) and five age-matched Japanese controls were examined neuropathologically with special reference to lesion staging and dynamic changes of microglial subsets. In both diseases, the pathognomonic neuropathological features included spherically swollen axons (spheroids and globules), axon loss and changes of microglia in the white matter. In ALSP, four lesion stages based on the degree of axon loss were discernible: Stage I, patchy axon loss in the cerebral white matter without atrophy; Stage II, large patchy areas of axon loss with slight atrophy of the cerebral white matter and slight dilatation of the lateral ventricles; Stage III, extensive axon loss in the cerebral white matter and dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles without remarkable axon loss in the brainstem and cerebellum; Stage IV, devastated cerebral white matter with marked dilatation of the ventricles and axon loss in the brainstem and/or cerebellum. Internal capsule and pontine base were relatively well preserved in the N-HD, even at Stage IV, and the swollen axons were larger with a higher density in the ALSP. Microglial cells immunopositive for CD68, CD163 or CD204 were far more obvious in ALSP, than in N-HD, and the shape and density of the cells changed in each stage. With progression of the stage, clinical symptoms became worse to apathetic state, and epilepsy was frequently observed in patients at Stages III and IV in both diseases. From these findings, it is concluded that (i) shape, density and subsets of microglia change dynamically along the passage of stages and (ii) increase of IBA-1-, CD68-, CD163- and CD204-immunopositive cells precedes loss of axons in ALSP.

  12. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Eveline S.; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B.; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A.; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M.; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E.; Yeo, Gene W.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43Q331K and TDP-43M337V), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43–dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43Q331K, but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43Q331K enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  13. TLR4 Endogenous Ligand S100A8/A9 Levels in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease and Their Association with Disease Activity and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Han, Jae Ho; Kim, Woo-Jung; Noh, Hyun Jin; An, Jeong-Mi; Yim, Hyunee; Jung, Ju-Yang; Kim, You-Sun; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    S100A8/A9 has been suggested as a marker of disease activity in patients with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We evaluated the clinical significance of S100A8/A9 as a biomarker and its pathogenic role in AOSD. Blood samples were collected prospectively from 20 AOSD patients and 20 healthy controls (HCs). Furthermore, skin and lymph node biopsy specimens of AOSD patients were investigated for S100A8/A9 expression levels via immunohistochemistry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of active AOSD patients and HCs were investigated for S100A8/A9 cell signals. S100A8/A9, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in active AOSD patients were higher than those of HCs. S100A8/A9 levels correlated positively with IL-1β, TNF-α and C-reactive protein. The inflammatory cells expressing S100A8/A9 were graded from one to three in skin and lymph node biopsies of AOSD patients. The grading for S100A8/A9 was more intense in the skin lesions with karyorrhexis, mucin deposition, and neutrophil infiltration. Like lipopolysaccharide (LPS), S100A8/A9 induced phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) in PBMCs, suggesting that S100A8/A9 activates Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways. These findings suggest that S100A8/A9 may be involved in the inflammatory response with induction of proinflammatory cytokines and may serve as a clinicopathological marker for disease activity in AOSD. PMID:27537874

  14. RNAi applications in therapy development for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M M

    2009-01-01

    RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for experimental manipulation of gene expression and is widely used to investigate gene function both in vitro and in vivo. RNAi refers to an evolutionarily conserved cellular mechanism for sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene silencing, in which double-stranded RNAs promote selective degradation of homologous cellular mRNAs. Because RNAi-based techniques can be employed to reduce expression of specific genes, this approach holds great promise as a therapy for diverse diseases, including devastating neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Importantly, in recent years RNAi has also emerged as a key tool in target identification and validation studies designed to complement traditional (i.e., small molecule-based) drug development strategies. These studies harness the power of RNAi-mediated reverse genetics to probe disease-associated pathways in both cell-based and animal models, and thus may provide critical data needed to focus drug development efforts around disease-relevant targets. This review highlights recent progress in the preclinical development of RNAi-based therapeutics for neurodegenerative disease and discusses the particular challenges that disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) pose for this approach. It further describes current applications of RNAi techniques for target identification and validation studies and underscores the importance of this methodology to developing treatments for neurological diseases.

  15. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Richelin V.; Miller, Karen J.; Singer, Elyse J.; Levine, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a significant amount of research investigating the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with regards to neurodegenerative disease. Here, we review basic science studies, randomized clinical trials, and epidemiological studies, and discuss the putative neuroprotective effects of HRT in the context of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Findings to date suggest a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease and improved cognitive functioning of postmenopausal women who use 17β-estradiol. With regards to Parkinson's disease, there is consistent evidence from basic science studies for a neuroprotective effect of 17β-estradiol; however, results of clinical and epidemiological studies are inconclusive at this time, and there is a paucity of research examining the association between HRT and Parkinson's-related neurocognitive impairment. Even less understood are the effects of HRT on risk for frontotemporal dementia and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. Limits to the existing research are discussed, along with proposed future directions for the investigation of HRT and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22548198

  16. Mitochondrial Medicine for Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are key cytoplasmic organelles, responsible for generating cellular energy, regulating intracellular calcium levels, altering the reduction-oxidation potential of cells, and regulating cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondria play a central role in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Freidriech ataxia. Further, several lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is an early event in most late-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Biochemical and animal model studies of inherited neurodegenerative diseases have revealed that mutant proteins of these diseases are associated with mitochondria. Mutant proteins are reported to block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins and disrupt the electron transport chain, induce free radicals, cause mitochondrial dysfunction, and, ultimately, damage neurons. This article discusses critical issues of mitochondria causing dysfunction in aging and neurodegenerative diseases, and discusses the potential of developing mitochondrial medicine, particularly mitochondrially targeted antioxidants, to treat aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18566920

  17. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chi, Ching-Shiang; Cheng, Shin-Nan; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Harn, Horng-Jyh

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS) disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Huntington’s disease (HD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM), and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases. PMID:26712747

  18. Emotional and behavioral symptoms in neurodegenerative disease: A model for studying the neural bases of psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Robert W.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Haase, Claudia M.

    2014-01-01

    Disruptions in emotional, cognitive, and social behavior are common in neurodegenerative disease and many forms of psychopathology. Because neurodegenerative diseases have much clearer patterns of brain atrophy, they may provide a window into the neural bases of these common symptoms. We discuss five common symptoms that occur in both neurodegenerative disease and psychopathology (i.e., anxiety, dysphoric mood, apathy, disinhibition, and euphoric mood) and their associated neural circuitry. We focus on two neurodegenerative diseases (i.e., Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia) that are common and well-characterized in terms of emotion, cognition, and social behavior and in patterns of associated neuropathology. Neurodegenerative diseases provide a powerful model system for studying the neural correlates of psychopathological symptoms; this is supported by evidence indicating convergence with psychiatric syndromes (e.g., symptoms of disinhibition associated with dysfunction in orbitofrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus in both frontotemporal dementia and bipolar disorder). We conclude that neurodegenerative diseases can play an important role in future approaches to the assessment, prevention, and treatment of mental illness. PMID:24437433

  19. Current Perspective of Stem Cell Therapy in Neurodegenerative and Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Chaudhary, Ravi Kumar; Mishra, Sachin; Kumar, Sundramurthy; Vinoth, Kumar Jayaseelan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Gulyás, Balázs

    2016-11-04

    Neurodegenerative diseases have been an unsolved riddle for quite a while; to date, there are no proper and effective curative treatments and only palliative and symptomatic treatments are available to treat these illnesses. The absence of therapeutic treatments for neurodegenerative ailments has huge economic hit and strain on the society. Pharmacotherapies and various surgical procedures like deep brain stimulation are being given to the patient, but they are only effective for the symptoms and not for the diseases. This paper reviews the recent studies and development of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. Stem cell-based treatment is a promising new way to deal with neurodegenerative diseases. Stem cell transplantation can advance useful recuperation by delivering trophic elements that impel survival and recovery of host neurons in animal models and patients with neurodegenerative maladies. Several mechanisms, for example, substitution of lost cells, cell combination, release of neurotrophic factor, proliferation of endogenous stem cell, and transdifferentiation, may clarify positive remedial results. With the current advancements in the stem cell therapies, a new hope for the cure has come out since they have potential to be a cure for the same. This review compiles stem cell therapy recent conceptions in neurodegenerative and neurometabolic diseases and updates in this field. Graphical Absract ᅟ.

  20. Decision-making cognition in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Ibáñez, Agustín; Roca, María; Torralva, Teresa; Manes, Facundo

    2010-11-01

    A large proportion of human social neuroscience research has focused on the issue of decision-making. Impaired decision-making is a symptomatic feature of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, but the nature of these decision-making deficits depends on the particular disease. Thus, examining the qualitative differences in decision-making impairments associated with different neurodegenerative diseases could provide valuable information regarding the underlying neural basis of decision-making. Nevertheless, few comparative reports of decision-making across patient groups exist. In this Review, we examine the neuroanatomical substrates of decision-making in relation to the neuropathological changes that occur in Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease. We then examine the main findings from studies of decision-making in these neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we suggest a number of recommendations that future studies could adopt to aid our understanding of decision-making cognition.

  1. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Federica; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, delineating the structural and functional alterations determined by these conditions. Advanced MRI techniques are of special interest for their potential to characterize the signature of each neurodegenerative condition and aid both the diagnostic process and the monitoring of disease progression. This aspect will become crucial when disease-modifying (personalized) therapies will be established. MRI techniques are very diverse and go from the visual inspection of MRI scans to more complex approaches, such as manual and automatic volume measurements, diffusion tensor MRI, and functional MRI. All these techniques allow us to investigate the different features of neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances concerning the use of MRI in some of the most important neurodegenerative conditions, putting an emphasis on the advanced techniques.

  2. Role of iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    Currently, we still lack effective measures to modify disease progression in neurodegenerative diseases. Iron-containing proteins play an essential role in many fundamental biological processes in the central nervous system. In addition, iron is a redox-active ion and can induce oxidative stress in the cell. Although the causes and pathology hallmarks of different neurodegenerative diseases vary, iron dyshomeostasis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial injury constitute a common pathway to cell death in several neurodegenerative diseases. MRI is capable of depicting iron content in the brain, and serves as a potential biomarker for early and differential diagnosis, tracking disease progression and evaluating the effectiveness of neuroprotective therapy. Iron chelators have shown their efficacy against neurodegeneration in a series of animal models, and been applied in several clinical trials. In this review, we summarize recent developments on iron dyshomeostasis in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Friedreich ataxia, and Huntington's disease.

  3. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury. Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias. A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antineuronal antibodies. We similarly identified immune-mediated and inflammatory markers

  4. HDAC6 as a target for neurodegenerative diseases: what makes it different from the other HDACs?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been demonstrated to be beneficial in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. Such results were mainly associated with the epigenetic modulation caused by HDACs, especially those from class I, via chromatin deacetylation. However, other mechanisms may contribute to the neuroprotective effect of HDAC inhibitors, since each HDAC may present distinct specific functions within the neurodegenerative cascades. Such an example is HDAC6 for which the role in neurodegeneration has been partially elucidated so far. The strategy to be adopted in promising therapeutics targeting HDAC6 is still controversial. Specific inhibitors exert neuroprotection by increasing the acetylation levels of α-tubulin with subsequent improvement of the axonal transport, which is usually impaired in neurodegenerative disorders. On the other hand, an induction of HDAC6 would theoretically contribute to the degradation of protein aggregates which characterize various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Hutington’s diseases. This review describes the specific role of HDAC6 compared to the other HDACs in the context of neurodegeneration, by collecting in silico, in vitro and in vivo results regarding the inhibition and/or knockdown of HDAC6 and other HDACs. Moreover, structure, function, subcellular localization, as well as the level of HDAC6 expression within brain regions are reviewed and compared to the other HDAC isoforms. In various neurodegenerative diseases, the mechanisms underlying HDAC6 interaction with other proteins seem to be a promising approach in understanding the modulation of HDAC6 activity. PMID:23356410

  5. Oligonucleotide-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Magen, Iddo; Hornstein, Eran

    2014-10-10

    Molecular genetics insight into the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer׳s disease, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, encourages direct interference with the activity of neurotoxic genes or the molecular activation of neuroprotective pathways. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are recently emerging as an efficient strategy for drug development and these can be employed as new treatments of neurodegenerative states. Here we review advances in this field in recent years which suggest an encouraging assessment that oligonucleotide technologies for targeting of RNAs will enable the development of new therapies and will contribute to preservation of brain integrity.

  6. Seeking environmental causes of neurodegenerative disease and envisioning primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Peter S; Palmer, Valerie S; Kisby, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Pathological changes of the aging brain are expressed in a range of neurodegenerative disorders that will impact increasing numbers of people across the globe. Research on the causes of these disorders has focused heavily on genetics, and strategies for prevention envision drug-induced slowing or arresting disease advance before its clinical appearance. We discuss a strategic shift that seeks to identify the environmental causes or contributions to neurodegeneration, and the vision of primary disease prevention by removing or controlling exposure to culpable agents. The plausibility of this approach is illustrated by the prototypical neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC). This often-familial long-latency disease, once thought to be an inherited genetic disorder but now known to have a predominant or exclusive environmental origin, is in the process of disappearing from the three heavily affected populations, namely Chamorros of Guam and Rota, Japanese residents of Kii Peninsula, Honshu, and Auyu and Jaqai linguistic groups on the island of New Guinea in West Papua, Indonesia. Exposure via traditional food and/or medicine (the only common exposure in all three geographic isolates) to one or more neurotoxins in seed of cycad plants is the most plausible if yet unproven etiology. Neurotoxin dosage and/or subject age at exposure might explain the stratified epidemic of neurodegenerative disease on Guam in which high-incidence ALS peaked and declined before that of PD, only to be replaced today by a dementing disorder comparable to Alzheimer's disease. Exposure to the Guam environment is also linked to the delayed development of ALS among a subset of Chamorro and non-Chamorro Gulf War/Era veterans, a summary of which is reported here for the first time. Lessons learned from this study and from 65 years of research on ALS-PDC include the exceptional value of initial, field-based informal investigation of

  7. Advances in Stem Cell Research- A Ray of Hope in Better Diagnosis and Prognosis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shripriya; Srivastava, Akriti; Srivastava, Pranay; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Pandey, Ankita; Kumar, Dipak; Rajpurohit, Chetan S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegeneration and neurodegenerative disorders have been a global health issue affecting the aging population worldwide. Recent advances in stem cell biology have changed the current face of neurodegenerative disease modeling, diagnosis, and transplantation therapeutics. Stem cells also serve the purpose of a simple in-vitro tool for screening therapeutic drugs and chemicals. We present the application of stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in the field of neurodegeneration and address the issues of diagnosis, modeling, and therapeutic transplantation strategies for the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders. We have discussed the progress made in the last decade and have largely focused on the various applications of stem cells in the neurodegenerative research arena. PMID:27878120

  8. A pilot study revealing impaired P50 gating in antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Lijffijt, Marijn; Moeller, F Gerard; Boutros, Nash N; Burroughs, S; Steinberg, Joel L; Lane, Scott D; Swann, Alan C

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated preattentive filtering assessed by P50 gating in nine participants with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and seven with adult-onset antisocial behavior (AAB). Relative to 15 comparison subjects, gating was impaired in ASPD, suggesting abnormal pre-attentive filtering in pathological impulsivity.

  9. Adult onset-hypothyroidism: alterations in hippocampal field potentials in the dentate gyrus are largely associated with anaesthesia-induced hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Huerta, K; Pacheco-Rosado, J; Gilbert, M E

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for a number of physiological processes and is particularly critical during nervous system development. The hippocampus is strongly implicated in cognition and is sensitive to developmental hypothyroidism. The impact of TH insufficiency in the foetus and neonate on hippocampal synaptic function has been fairly well characterised. Although adult onset hypothyroidism has also been associated with impairments in cognitive function, studies of hippocampal synaptic function with late onset hypothyroidism have yielded inconsistent results. In the present study, we report hypothyroidism induced by the synthesis inhibitor propylthiouracil (10 p.p.m., 0.001%, minimum of 4 weeks), resulted in marginal alterations in excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) and population spike (PS) amplitude in the dentate gyrus measured in vivo. No effects were seen in tests of short-term plasticity, and a minor enhancement of long-term potentiation of the EPSP slope was observed. The most robust synaptic alteration evident in hypothyroid animals was an increase in synaptic response latency, which was paralleled by a failure to maintain normal body temperature under anaesthesia, despite warming on a heating pad. Latency shifts could be reversed in hypothyroid animals by increasing the external heat source and, conversely, synaptic delays could be induced in control animals by removing the heat source, with a consequent drop in body and brain temperature. Thermoregulation is TH- dependent, and anaesthesia necessary for surgical procedures posed a thermoregulatory challenge that was differentially met in control and hypothyroid animals. Minor increases in field potential EPSP slope, decreases in PS amplitudes and increased latencies are consistent with previous reports of hypothermia in naive control rats. We conclude that failures in thyroid-dependent temperature regulation rather than direct action of TH in synaptic physiology are responsible for the

  10. Sex-comparative study of mouse cerebellum physiology under adult-onset hypothyroidism: The significance of GC-MS metabolomic data normalization in meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Maga-Nteve, Christoniki; Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Margarity, Marigoula; Klapa, Maria I

    2017-01-15

    A systematic data quality validation and normalization strategy is an important component of the omic profile meta-analysis, ensuring comparability of the profiles and exclusion of experimental biases from the derived biological conclusions. In this study, we present the normalization methodology applied on the sets of cerebellum gas chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolic profiles of 124days old male and female animals in an adult-onset-hypothyroidism (AOH) mouse model before combining them into a sex-comparative analysis. The employed AOH model concerns the monitoring of the brain physiology of Balb/cJ mice after eight-week administration of 1%w/v KClO4 in the drinking water, initiated on the 60th day of their life. While originating from the same animal study, the tissues of the two sexes were processed and their profiles acquired and analyzed at different time periods. Hence, the previously published profile set of male mice was first re-annotated based on the presently available resources. Then, after being validated as acquired under the same analytical conditions, both profiles sets were corrected for derivatization biases and filtered for low-confidence measurements based on the same criteria. The final normalized 73-metabolite profiles contribute to the currently few available omic datasets of the AOH effect on brain molecular physiology, especially with respect to sex differentiation. Multivariate statistical analysis indicated one (unknown) and three (succinate, benzoate, myristate) metabolites with significantly higher and lower, respectively, cerebellum concentration in the hypothyroid compared to the euthyroid female mice. The respective numbers for the males were two and 24. Comparison of the euthyroid cerebellum metabolic profiles between the two sexes indicated 36 metabolites, including glucose, myo- and scyllo-inositol, with significantly lower concentration in the females versus the males. This implies that the female mouse cerebellum has been