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Sample records for adult-onset neuronal ceroid

  1. Cathepsin F mutations cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine R.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Canafoglia, Laura; Andermann, Eva; Damiano, John; Morbin, Michela; Bruni, Amalia C.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Cossette, Patrick; Saftig, Paul; Grötzinger, Joachim; Schwake, Michael; Andermann, Frederick; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Mole, Sara E.; Franceschetti, Silvana; Alexander, Noreen A.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Chapman, Harold A.; Carpenter, Stirling; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is challenging to diagnose and genetically heterogeneous. Mutations in CLN6 were recently identified in recessive Kufs disease presenting as progressive myoclonus epilepsy (Type A), whereas the molecular basis of cases presenting with dementia and motor features (Type B) is unknown. We performed genome-wide linkage mapping of two families with recessive Type B Kufs disease and identified a single region on chromosome 11 to which both families showed linkage. Exome sequencing of five samples from the two families identified homozygous and compound heterozygous missense mutations in CTSF within this linkage region. We subsequently sequenced CTSF in 22 unrelated individuals with suspected recessive Kufs disease, and identified an additional patient with compound heterozygous mutations. CTSF encodes cathepsin F, a lysosomal cysteine protease, dysfunction of which is a highly plausible candidate mechanism for a storage disorder like ceroid lipofuscinosis. In silico modeling suggested the missense mutations would alter protein structure and function. Moreover, re-examination of a previously published mouse knockout of Ctsf shows that it recapitulates the light and electron-microscopic pathological features of Kufs disease. Although CTSF mutations account for a minority of cases of type B Kufs, CTSF screening should be considered in cases with early-onset dementia and may avoid the need for invasive biopsies. PMID:23297359

  2. Mutations in DNAJC5, Encoding Cysteine-String Protein Alpha, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosková, Lenka; Stránecký, Viktor; Hartmannová, Hana; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Ivánek, Robert; Hůlková, Helena; Jahnová, Helena; van der Zee, Julie; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Tyynelä, Jaana; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Nijssen, Peter C.G.; Mole, Sara E.; Elleder, Milan; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent storage material in neural tissues and neurodegeneration and has an age of onset in the third decade of life or later. The genetic and molecular basis of the disease has remained unknown for many years. We carried out linkage mapping, gene-expression analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate-gene sequencing in affected individuals from 20 families and/or individuals with simplex cases; we identified in five individuals one of two disease-causing mutations, c.346_348delCTC and c.344T>G, in DNAJC5 encoding cysteine-string protein alpha (CSPα). These mutations—causing a deletion, p.Leu116del, and an amino acid exchange, p.Leu115Arg, respectively—are located within the cysteine-string domain of the protein and affect both palmitoylation-dependent sorting and the amount of CSPα in neuronal cells. The resulting depletion of functional CSPα might cause in parallel the presynaptic dysfunction and the progressive neurodegeneration observed in affected individuals and lysosomal accumulation of misfolded and proteolysis-resistant proteins in the form of characteristic ceroid deposits in neurons. Our work represents an important step in the genetic dissection of a genetically heterogeneous group of ANCLs. It also confirms a neuroprotective role for CSPα in humans and demonstrates the need for detailed investigation of CSPα in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses and other neurodegenerative diseases presenting with neuronal protein aggregation. PMID:21820099

  3. Adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with palmitoyl-protein thioesterase deficiency: first adult-onset patients of a childhood disease.

    PubMed

    van Diggelen, O P; Thobois, S; Tilikete, C; Zabot, M T; Keulemans, J L; van Bunderen, P A; Taschner, P E; Losekoot, M; Voznyi, Y V

    2001-08-01

    The fluorogenic enzyme assay for palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) has greatly facilitated the diagnosis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Santavuori-Haltia disease) and the search for possible new variants with atypical clinical presentation. Here, we present the first cases of adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with onset in the fourth decade of life due to a profound deficiency of PPT. The causative mutations in the CLN1 gene were the known, deleterious mutation R151X and the novel missense mutation G108R. Patients presented at onset (31 and 38 years), with psychiatric symptoms only. At present (ages 56 and 54 years), visual, verbal, and cognitive losses have progressed and both patients have cerebellar ataxia and cannot walk without support. PMID:11506414

  4. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans dnj-14, the orthologue of the DNAJC5 gene mutated in adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, provides a new platform for neuroprotective drug screening and identifies a SIR-2.1-independent action of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sudhanva S; Johnson, James R; McCue, Hannah V; Chen, Xi; Edmonds, Matthew J; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Graham, Margaret E; Jenn, Robert C; Barclay, Jeff W; Burgoyne, Robert D; Morgan, Alan

    2014-11-15

    Adult onset neuronal lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is a human neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction and premature death. Recently, the mutations that cause ANCL were mapped to the DNAJC5 gene, which encodes cysteine string protein alpha. We show here that mutating dnj-14, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of DNAJC5, results in shortened lifespan and a small impairment of locomotion and neurotransmission. Mutant dnj-14 worms also exhibited age-dependent neurodegeneration of sensory neurons, which was preceded by severe progressive chemosensory defects. A focussed chemical screen revealed that resveratrol could ameliorate dnj-14 mutant phenotypes, an effect mimicked by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram. In contrast to other worm neurodegeneration models, activation of the Sirtuin, SIR-2.1, was not required, as sir-2.1; dnj-14 double mutants showed full lifespan rescue by resveratrol. The Sirtuin-independent neuroprotective action of resveratrol revealed here suggests potential therapeutic applications for ANCL and possibly other human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24947438

  6. Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Batten's Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, N. S.; Marsden, H. B.; Noronha, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Four patients are described, who on clinical, histological, and biochemical criteria are considered to be suffering from neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. It is suggested that this may be the commonest condition included under the term amaurotic family idiocy. A number of gangliosidoses can be classified on a biochemical basis and considerable advances have been made in identifying the enzyme deficiencies. The aetiology of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is unknown, and it is possible that there is more than one cause. Visual symptoms and signs are not always present. Though generalized convulsions occur at the start of the illness, myoclonus tends increasingly to dominate the clinical picture. An abnormal sensitivity to photic stimulation at a very slow frequency is a suggestive finding. Evidence of cerebral atrophy on air-encephalography favours this diagnosis, as the brain tends to be enlarged in the gangliosidoses. A definite diagnosis can only be made in life by examination of a cortical biopsy. Biochemical analysis will show a normal ganglioside pattern, and histological examination by light and electron microscopy will reveal characteristic changes. An age dependent classification of amaurotic family idiocy is no longer justifiable, and if full investigations are carried out, an increasing number of these patients can be diagnosed as suffering from a specific type of disorder. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:5023478

  7. Genetics Home Reference: infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Batten Disease Foundation CLIMB: Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases ... Sources for This Page Getty AL, Pearce DA. Interactions of the proteins of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: clues to function. Cell ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AE, Tyynelä J. Cathepsin D deficiency underlies congenital human neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Brain. 2006 Jun;129(Pt 6):1438-45. Epub 2006 May 2. Citation on PubMed Steinfeld ... deficiency is associated with a human neurodegenerative disorder. Am J Hum Genet. 2006 Jun; ...

  9. Experimental therapies in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses.

    PubMed

    Neverman, Nicole J; Best, Hannah L; Hofmann, Sandra L; Hughes, Stephanie M

    2015-10-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses represent a group of severe childhood lysosomal storage diseases. With at least 13 identified variants they are the most common cause of inherited neurodegeneration in children. These diseases share common pathological characteristics including motor problems, vision loss, seizures, and cognitive decline, culminating in premature death. Currently, no form of the disease can be treated or cured, with only palliative care to minimise discomfort. This review focuses on current and potentially ground-breaking clinical trials, including small molecule, enzyme replacement, stem cell, and gene therapies, in the development of effective treatments for the various disease subtypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)". PMID:25957554

  10. The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses: Opportunities from model systems.

    PubMed

    Faller, Kiterie M E; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Mohammed, Alamin; Rahim, Ahad A; Tuxworth, Richard I; Wager, Kim; Bond, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses are a group of severe and progressive neurodegenerative disorders, generally with childhood onset. Despite the fact that these diseases remain fatal, significant breakthroughs have been made in our understanding of the genetics that underpin these conditions. This understanding has allowed the development of a broad range of models to study disease processes, and to develop new therapeutic approaches. Such models have contributed significantly to our knowledge of these conditions. In this review we will focus on the advantages of each individual model, describe some of the contributions the models have made to our understanding of the broader disease biology and highlight new techniques and approaches relevant to the study and potential treatment of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)". PMID:25937302

  11. [The canine neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis: a review].

    PubMed

    Karli, P; Karol, A; Oevermann, A; Drögemüller, C; Gorgas, D; Henke, D

    2014-09-01

    The present article gives a survey over the current scientific knowledge of the canine neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (NCL). NCL is a heterogenous group of lysosomal storage diseases in humans and animals. In consequence of a gene mutation, there is an accumulation of ceroid-lipofuscin in neurons, cells of the retina and the skin and other cells. The stored ceroid-lipofuscin in neurons leads to an impaired cell function and subsequently to cell death. Recently, the underlying genetic defect was discovered in several dog breeds. Genetic testing permits an ante mortem diagnosis of the disease, which up to now was only possible with a positive biopsy result. Another advantage is the identification of carrier animals to eliminate the deleterious alleles. PMID:25183673

  12. Perspective of biochemical research in the neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Rider, J A; Dawson, G; Siakotos, A N

    1992-02-15

    The search for biochemical abnormalities in the neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL) or Batten disease was initiated with the discovery of normal levels of gangliosides in juvenile amaurotic idiocy. The primary goal of most biochemical studies has been to discover the unique biochemical marker for carriers and at-risk individual. Ceroid, the singular pathomorphologic trait of NCL, was isolated and shown to differ from a similar but normal product of aged cells, lipofuscin. In spite of the availability of stored product, the chemical analysis of ceroid has not elucidated the unique biochemical defect in the NCL, as has been the case for other lysosomal storage disorders. The NCL were thought to be a result of lipid peroxidation because ceroid is also found in disorders of impaired vitamin E metabolism or results from a diet deficient in the antioxidant, vitamin E. In addition, tissue analysis indicated losses of polyunsaturated fatty acids in affecteds and carriers, as well as the presence of a secondary product of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal, in affected and carrier NCL dogs. With the exception of a fluorescent compound isolated from retinal ceroid, studies aimed at discovering the disease-specific fluorophores of ceroid have been largely inconclusive. The discovery of elevated dolichols in urine and brain tissue of NCL patients led to another hypothesis, that the basic biochemical defect in NCL involved the metabolism of dolichols and retinoids. However, the more recent view is that dolichol metabolism is secondary to the unknown NCL lesion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1609832

  13. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease) in Newfoundland

    SciTech Connect

    Frecker, M.F.; Jacob, J.C.; Ives, E.J.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorders. The most common type found in Newfoundland is late infantile NCL; 1 in 63 of the population is estimated to be a carrier. The incidence has decreased over the years with fewer affected siblings born in families and migration away from smaller communities. For the 30 late infantile cases (24 families), most presented with generalized convulsive seizures; all had curvilinear inclusion bodies in several cell types. The mean age at onset was 2.8 {plus_minus} 0.6 yr and they lived a mean of 7.5 {plus_minus} 2.1 yr. Three of these families have been used to exclude linkage to markers on chromosome 1 and 16. There is one typical juvenile NCL family; it has been used to further define the localization of the gene on chromosome 16p. Genetic counseling for carrier status has been offered in this family. A single case of adult NCL (Kufs) has been identified. Reevaluation of the cases indicated that there are many who have clinical and neuropathological features of both late infantile and juvenile NCL. Unusual findings in these 13 cases (11 families) included the coexistence of both types of inclusion bodies. In patients with juvenile fingerprint inclusion bodies, atypical presentations were delayed milestones at age 8 mo, visual loss before 4 yr, psychomotor retardation before loss of vision and an enhanced response to photic stimulation on EEG. Molecular studies will determine the basis for this heterogeneity. Extensive family histories showed only 53% (19/36) of families were consanguinous or interelated indicating that the frequency of the gene is probably quite high.

  14. OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN JUVENILE NEURONAL CEROID LIPOFUSCINOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Hove, Marianne N.; Jensen, Hanne; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report optical coherence tomography findings obtained in two patients with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Methods: Two case reports. Results: Two 7-year-old girls presented with decreased visual acuity, clumsiness, night blindness, and behavioral problems. Optical coherence tomography showed an overall reduction in thickness of the central retina, as well as the outer and the inner retinal layers. The degenerative retinal changes were the same, despite different mutations in the CLN3 gene. Conclusion: In these rare cases of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, optical coherence tomography enabled unambiguous detection of prominent morphologic abnormalities of the retina at the patient's first presentation. The advanced stage of photoreceptor degeneration seen in our patients shows that a diagnosis can potentially be made much earlier. PMID:26308342

  15. Vision loss in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN3 disease).

    PubMed

    Ouseph, Madhu M; Kleinman, Mark E; Wang, Qing Jun

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL; also known as CLN3 disease) is a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder and the most common form of Batten disease. Progressive visual and neurological symptoms lead to mortality in patients by the third decade. Although ceroid-lipofuscinosis, neuronal 3 (CLN3) has been identified as the sole disease gene, the biochemical and cellular bases of JNCL and the functions of CLN3 are yet to be fully understood. As severe ocular pathologies manifest early in disease progression, the retina is an ideal tissue to study in the efforts to unravel disease etiology and design therapeutics. There are significant discrepancies in the ocular phenotypes between human JNCL and existing murine models, impeding investigations on the sequence of events occurring during the progression of vision impairment. This review focuses on current understanding of vision loss in JNCL and discusses future research directions toward molecular dissection of the pathogenesis of the disease and associated vision problems in order to ultimately improve the quality of patient life and cure the disease. PMID:26748992

  16. Moving towards effective therapeutic strategies for Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Ryan D; Koh, Seung yon; Hastings, Michelle L; Kielian, Tammy; Pearce, David A; Weimer, Jill M

    2016-01-01

    The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a family of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorders that annually affect 1:100,000 live births worldwide. This family of diseases results from mutations in one of 14 different genes that share common clinical and pathological etiologies. Clinically, the diseases are subcategorized into infantile, late-infantile, juvenile and adult forms based on their age of onset. Though the disease phenotypes may vary in their age and order of presentation, all typically include progressive visual deterioration and blindness, cognitive impairment, motor deficits and seizures. Pathological hallmarks of NCLs include the accumulation of storage material or ceroid in the lysosome, progressive neuronal degeneration and massive glial activation. Advances have been made in genetic diagnosis and counseling for families. However, comprehensive treatment programs that delay or halt disease progression have been elusive. Current disease management is primarily targeted at controlling the symptoms rather than "curing" the disease. Recognizing the growing need for transparency and synergistic efforts to move the field forward, this review will provide an overview of the therapeutic approaches currently being pursued in preclinical and clinical trials to treat different forms of NCL as well as provide insight to novel therapeutic approaches in development for the NCLs. PMID:27083890

  17. Genetics of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (Batten disease).

    PubMed

    Mole, Sara E; Cotman, Susan L

    2015-10-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders that affect children and adults and are grouped together by similar clinical features and the accumulation of autofluorescent storage material. More than a dozen genes containing over 430 mutations underlying human NCLs have been identified. These genes encode lysosomal enzymes (CLN1, CLN2, CLN10, CLN13), a soluble lysosomal protein (CLN5), a protein in the secretory pathway (CLN11), two cytoplasmic proteins that also peripherally associate with membranes (CLN4, CLN14), and many transmembrane proteins with different subcellular locations (CLN3, CLN6, CLN7, CLN8, CLN12). For most NCLs, the function of the causative gene has not been fully defined. Most of the mutations in these genes are associated with a typical disease phenotype, but some result in variable disease onset, severity, and progression, including distinct clinical phenotypes. There remain disease subgroups with unknown molecular genetic backgrounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)." PMID:26026925

  18. Considerations for the Treatment of Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Infantile Batten Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The infantile form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ie, infantile Batten disease) is the most rapidly progressing type and is caused by an inherited deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1. The absence of enzyme activity leads to progressive accumulation of autofluorescent material in many cell types, particularly neurons of the central nervous system. Clinical signs of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis appear between 6 months and 1 year of age and include vision loss, cognitive decline, motor deficits, seizures, and premature death, typically by 3 to 5 years of age. There is currently no effective treatment. However, preclinical experiments in the murine model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis have shown that gene therapy, enzyme replacement, stem cell transplantation, and small molecule drugs, alone or in combination, can significantly slow disease progression. A more thorough understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis will identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:24014510

  19. Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (JNCL) and the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Bozorg, Sara; Ramirez-Montealegre, Denia; Chung, Mina; Pearce, David A

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (JNCL) or Batten disease is the most common type of NCL in the United States and Europe. This devastating disorder presents with vision failure and progresses to include seizures, motor dysfunction, and dementia. Death usually occurs in the third decade, but some patients die before age twenty. Though the mechanism of visual failure remains poorly understood, recent advances in molecular genetics have improved diagnostic testing and suggested possible therapeutic strategies. The ophthalmologist plays a crucial role in both early diagnosis and documentation of progression of JNCL. We update Batten disease research, particularly as it relates to the eye, and present various theories on the pathophysiology of retinal degeneration. PMID:19539834

  20. Clinical and neuroradiological diagnostic aspects of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses disorders.

    PubMed

    Santavuori, P; Vanhanen, S L; Autti, T

    2001-01-01

    Early diagnosis is mandatory for avoiding further cases in families with hereditary metabolic brain disorders. This review lists the most important clinical symptoms and neuroradiological findings at the early stage of the seven most common childhood neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) types. In the infantile type the typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can be seen even before the clinical signs. In the classic late infantile type (CLN2), MRI is less informative but in this and in the variant late infantile type CLN6 the characteristic neurophysiological findings are present at an early stage, although not in the Finnish variant CLN5. In the latter, the clinical diagnosis depends on ophthalmological and MRI findings. The combination of ophthalmological deficits and vacuolated lymphocytes is highly characteristic of the juvenile type (CLN3). A new NCL type, Northern epilepsy (CLN8), is also briefly reviewed. PMID:11588989

  1. Characterization of neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis in 3 cats.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, M D; Armien, A G; Gilliam, D H; Johnson, G S; Zeng, R; Wünschmann, A; Kovi, R C; Katz, M L

    2014-07-01

    Three young domestic shorthair cats were presented for necropsy with similar histories of slowly progressive visual dysfunction and neurologic deficits. Macroscopic examination of each cat revealed cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, dilated lateral ventricles, and slight brown discoloration of the gray matter. Histologically, there was bilateral loss of neurons within the limbic, motor, somatosensory, visual, and, to a lesser extent, vestibular systems with extensive astrogliosis in the affected regions of all 3 cases. Many remaining neurons and glial cells throughout the entire central nervous system were distended by pale yellow to eosinophilic, autofluorescent cytoplasmic inclusions with ultrastructural appearances typical of neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCLs). Differences in clinical presentation and neurological lesions suggest that the 3 cats may have had different variants of NCL. Molecular genetic characterization in the 1 cat from which DNA was available did not reveal any plausible disease-causing mutations of the CLN1 (PPT1), CLN3, CLN5, CLN8, and CLN10 (CTSD) genes. Further investigations will be required to identify the mutations responsible for NCLs in cats. PMID:24026940

  2. Electroclinical spectrum of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses associated with CLN6 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gilioli, Isabella; Invernizzi, Federica; Sofia, Vito; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Morbin, Michela; Chiapparini, Luisa; Granata, Tiziana; Binelli, Simona; Scaioli, Vidmer; Garavaglia, Barbara; Nardocci, Nardo; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Franceschetti, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical and neurophysiologic patterns of patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses associated with CLN6 mutations. Methods: We reviewed the features of 11 patients with different ages at onset. Results: Clinical disease onset occurred within the first decade of life in 8 patients and in the second and third decades in 3. All children presented with progressive cognitive regression associated with ataxia and pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs. Recurrent seizures, visual loss, and myoclonus were mostly reported after a delay from onset; 7 children were chairbound and had severe dementia less than 4 years from onset. One child, with onset at 8 years, had a milder course. Three patients with a teenage/adult onset presented with a classic progressive myoclonic epilepsy phenotype that was preceded by learning disability in one. The EEG background was slow close to disease onset in 7 children, and later showed severe attenuation; a photoparoxysmal response (PPR) was present in all. The 3 teenage/adult patients had normal EEG background and an intense PPR. Early attenuation of the electroretinogram was seen only in children with onset younger than 5.5 years. Somatosensory evoked potentials were extremely enlarged in all patients. Conclusions: In all patients, multifocal myoclonic jerks and seizures were a key feature, but myoclonic seizures were an early and prominent sign in the teenage/adult form only. Conversely, the childhood-onset form was characterized by initial and severe cognitive impairment coupled with electroretinogram and EEG attenuation. Cortical hyperexcitability, shown by the PPR and enlarged somatosensory evoked potentials, was a universal feature. PMID:26115733

  3. Astrocytosis in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Shyng, Charles; Sands, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL; infantile Batten disease) is an inherited paediatric neurodegenerative disease. INCL is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and is thus classified as a lysosomal storage disease. Pathological examination of both human and murine INCL brains reveals progressive, widespread neuroinflammation. In fact, astrocyte activation appears to be the first histological sign of disease. However, the role of astrocytosis in INCL was poorly understood. The hallmark of astrocyte activation is the up-regulation of intermediate filaments, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. The role of astrocytosis in INCL was studied in a murine model lacking PPT1 and the intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin (triple-knockout). This murine model of INCL with attenuated astrocytosis had an exacerbated pathological and clinical phenotype. The triple-knockout mouse had a significantly shortened lifespan, and accelerated cellular and humoural neuroinflammatory response compared with the parental PPT1(-/-) mouse. The data obtained from the triple-knockout mouse strongly suggest that astrocyte activation plays a beneficial role in early INCL disease progression. A more thorough understanding of the glial responses to lysosomal enzyme deficiencies and the accumulation of undergraded substrates will be crucial to developing effective therapeutics. PMID:25233404

  4. Perioperative care of a patient with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses

    PubMed Central

    Kako, Hiromi; Martin, David P.; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of inherited, autosomal recessive, and progressive neurodegenerative diseases, which result from an enzymatic defect or the deficiency of a transmembrane protein, leading to the accumulation of lipopigments (lipofuscin) in various tissues. NCL results in the impairment of function in several end-organs including the central nervous system with loss of cognitive and motor function, myoclonus, and intractable seizures. Additional involvement includes the cardiovascular system with arrhythmias and bradycardia as well as impairment of thermoregulation leading to perioperative hypothermia. Given the complexity of the end-organ involvement and the progressive nature of the disorder, the anesthetic care of such patients can be challenging. Till date, there are a limited number of reports regarding the anesthetic management of patients with NCL. We present an 18-year-old patient with NCL who required anesthetic care during replacement of a vagal nerve stimulator. Previous reports of anesthetic care for these patients are reviewed, the end-organ involvement of NCL discussed, and options for anesthetic care presented. PMID:24015141

  5. Perioperative care of a patient with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses.

    PubMed

    Kako, Hiromi; Martin, David P; Tobias, Joseph D

    2013-07-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of inherited, autosomal recessive, and progressive neurodegenerative diseases, which result from an enzymatic defect or the deficiency of a transmembrane protein, leading to the accumulation of lipopigments (lipofuscin) in various tissues. NCL results in the impairment of function in several end-organs including the central nervous system with loss of cognitive and motor function, myoclonus, and intractable seizures. Additional involvement includes the cardiovascular system with arrhythmias and bradycardia as well as impairment of thermoregulation leading to perioperative hypothermia. Given the complexity of the end-organ involvement and the progressive nature of the disorder, the anesthetic care of such patients can be challenging. Till date, there are a limited number of reports regarding the anesthetic management of patients with NCL. We present an 18-year-old patient with NCL who required anesthetic care during replacement of a vagal nerve stimulator. Previous reports of anesthetic care for these patients are reviewed, the end-organ involvement of NCL discussed, and options for anesthetic care presented. PMID:24015141

  6. Molecular epidemiology of childhood neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To review the descriptive epidemiological data on neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) in Italy, identify the spectrum of mutations in the causative genes, and analyze possible genotype-phenotype relations. Methods A cohort of NCL patients was recruited through CLNet, a nationwide network of child neurology units. Diagnosis was based on clinical and pathological criteria following ultrastructural investigation of peripheral tissues. Molecular confirmation was obtained during the diagnostic procedure or, when possible, retrospectively. Results One hundred eighty-three NCL patients from 156 families were recruited between 1966 and 2010; 124 of these patients (from 88 families) were tested for known NCL genes, with 9.7% of the patients in this sample having not a genetic diagnosis. Late infantile onset NCL (LINCL) accounted for 75.8% of molecularly confirmed cases, the most frequent form being secondary to mutations in CLN2 (23.5%). Juvenile onset NCL patients accounted for 17.7% of this cohort, a smaller proportion than found in other European countries. Gene mutations predicted severe protein alterations in 65.5% of the CLN2 and 78.6% of the CLN7 cases. An incidence rate of 0.98/100,000 live births was found in 69 NCL patients born between 1992 and 2004, predicting 5 new cases a year. Prevalence was 1.2/1,000,000. Conclusions Descriptive epidemiology data indicate a lower incidence of NCLs in Italy as compared to other European countries. A relatively high number of private mutations affecting all NCL genes might explain the genetic heterogeneity. Specific gene mutations were associated with severe clinical courses in selected NCL forms only. PMID:23374165

  7. Memory Loss and Frontal Cognitive Dysfunction in a Patient with Adult-onset Neuronal Intranuclear Inclusion Disease.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Sone, Jun; Fujioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Michihito; Ohdake, Reiko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is an uncommon progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Adult-onset NIID can result in prominent dementia. We herein describe the case of a 74-year-old man who presented with dementia, cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed hyperintensity of the corticomedullary junction. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed frontal-dominant white matter hyperintensity. NIID was diagnosed from the presence of intranuclear inclusions in a skin biopsy sample. Neuropsychological testing revealed memory loss and frontal cognitive dysfunction, especially in relation to language and executive functions. We were therefore able to confirm the association of NIID with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27523009

  8. Use of model organisms for the study of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Bond, Michael; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Tammen, Imke; Tear, Guy; Russell, Claire

    2013-11-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses are a group of fatal progressive neurodegenerative diseases predominantly affecting children. Identification of mutations that cause neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, and subsequent functional and pathological studies of the affected genes, underpins efforts to investigate disease mechanisms and identify and test potential therapeutic strategies. These functional studies and pre-clinical trials necessitate the use of model organisms in addition to cell and tissue culture models as they enable the study of protein function within a complex organ such as the brain and the testing of therapies on a whole organism. To this end, a large number of disease models and genetic tools have been identified or created in a variety of model organisms. In this review, we will discuss the ethical issues associated with experiments using model organisms, the factors underlying the choice of model organism, the disease models and genetic tools available, and the contributions of those disease models and tools to neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses or Batten Disease. PMID:23338040

  9. Pathogenesis and therapies for infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (infantile CLN1 disease).

    PubMed

    Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A; Cooper, Jonathan D; Sands, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL, Batten disease) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, infantile Batten disease, or infantile CLN1 disease) is caused by a deficiency in the soluble lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and has the earliest onset and fastest progression of all the NCLs. Several therapeutic strategies including enzyme replacement, gene therapy, stem cell-mediated therapy, and small molecule drugs have resulted in minimal to modest improvements in the murine model of PPT1-deficiency. However, more recent studies using various combinations of these approaches have shown more promising results; in some instances more than doubling the lifespan of PPT1-deficient mice. These combination therapies that target different pathogenic mechanisms may offer the hope of treating this profoundly neurodegenerative disorder. Similar approaches may be useful when treating other forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in soluble lysosomal proteins. Different therapeutic targets will need to be identified and novel strategies developed in order to effectively treat forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in integral membrane proteins such as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Finally, the challenge with all of the NCLs will lie in early diagnosis, improving the efficacy of the treatments, and effectively translating them into the clinic. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses or Batten Disease. PMID:23747979

  10. Psychiatric Symptoms of Children and Adolescents with Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backman, M. L.; Santavuori, P. R.; Aberg, L. E.; Aronen, E. T.

    2005-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders in childhood and adolescence. The clinical picture includes diverse and complex psychiatric symptoms that are difficult to treat. Only symptomatic treatment is available. To improve symptomatic therapy, it is important to recognize the symptoms.…

  11. CLN2 Disease (Classic Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis).

    PubMed

    Kohlschütter, Alfried; Schulz, Angela

    2016-06-01

    CLN2 disease is an inherited metabolic storage disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1). The disease affects mainly the brain and the retina and is characterized by progressive dysfunction of the central nervous system, leading to dementia, epilepsy, loss of motor function and blindness. The classical late infantile type begins at around three years of age with epilepsy and/or a standstill of psychomotor development, followed by a rapid loss of all abilities and death in childhood. A late onset form in a small proportion of patients starts at the age of 4 to 10 years, but also leads to severe neurological deterioration. The deficiency of TPP1 causes the lysosomal accumulation of a material called ceroid lipofuscin. The natural substrate of TPP1 is not known, nor is the connection between storage process and neurodegeneration, which is characterized by loss of neurons. Among various experimental approaches to treatment, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and gene therapy have developed remarkably. Enzyme delivery through the cerebrospinal fluid led to wide distribution of enzyme activity in the brain and to attenuated neuropathology and disease progression in a TPP1-deficient mouse model as well as in a natural TPP1-deficient dog model. Safety of the intrathecal delivery, pharmacokinetics, and tissue distribution of the administered enzyme studied in non-human primates were encouraging, and a phase I/II clinical trial for intraventricular ERT in CLN2 patients is ongoing. A second approach uses intracerebral injection of viral vectors containing normal coding segments of the CLN2 gene. In a CLN2 mouse model, this procedure resulted in cerebral enzyme expression, reduced brain pathology and increased survival. A small number of patients have been treated the same way using an AAV2-vector for gene transfer to the brain. Although there were no serious adverse events unequivocally attributable to the vector used, there were

  12. Late onset juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis with granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD)

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, I.L.; Taschner, P.E.M.

    1995-06-05

    The juvenile-onset subtype of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (JNCL) is well known and ultra-structurally characterized by fingerprints and/or curvilinear bodies in many cell types. Linkage studies indicated a most likely location for CLN3, the gene involved in JNCL, in the interval between loci D16S297 and D16S57, within close proximity of the loci D16S298 and D16S299. We present two sibs with a late onset progressive disease of mental deterioration, progressive macular degeneration, motor disturbances, and epilepsy. Histological symptoms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and ultrastructural granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD) in lymphocytes and neurons are found. Individual haplotypes at polymorphic marker loci on chromosome 16 were constructed to determine whether JNCL with GROD is linked to the CLN3 locus. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Recent studies of ovine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses from BARN, the Batten Animal Research Network.

    PubMed

    Palmer, David N; Neverman, Nicole J; Chen, Jarol Z; Chang, Chia-Tien; Houweling, Peter J; Barry, Lucy A; Tammen, Imke; Hughes, Stephanie M; Mitchell, Nadia L

    2015-10-01

    Studies on naturally occurring New Zealand and Australian ovine models of the neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (Batten disease, NCLs) have greatly aided our understanding of these diseases. Close collaborations between the New Zealand groups at Lincoln University and the University of Otago, Dunedin, and a group at the University of Sydney, Australia, led to the formation of BARN, the Batten Animal Research Network. This review focusses on presentations at the 14th International Conference on Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease), recent relevant background work, and previews of work in preparation for publication. Themes include CLN5 and CLN6 neuronal cell culture studies, studies on tissues from affected and control animals and whole animal in vivo studies. Topics include the effect of a CLN6 mutation on endoplasmic reticulum proteins, lysosomal function and the interactions of CLN6 with other lysosomal activities and trafficking, scoping gene-based therapies, a molecular dissection of neuroinflammation, identification of differentially expressed genes in brain tissue, an attempted therapy with an anti-inflammatory drug in vivo and work towards gene therapy in ovine models of the NCLs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease)". PMID:26073432

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in a border collie.

    PubMed

    Koie, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Hisashi; Sato, Tsuneo; Sato, Akane; Nawa, Koji; Nawa, Yuko; Kitagawa, Masato; Sakai, Manabu; Takahashi, Tomoko; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Yamato, Osamu; Watari, Toshihiro; Tokuriki, Mikihiko

    2004-11-01

    A castrated male border collie 23 months of age weighing 19.4 kg was referred to the Animal Medical Center of Nihon University with complaints of visual disturbance and behavioral abnormality, hyperacusis and morbid fear. The MRI examination revealed the slight dilated cerebral sulci and cerebellar fissures and left ventricular enlargement. This is the first report of MRI findings of canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:15585966

  15. Pathogenesis and Therapies for Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (infantile CLN1 disease)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins-Salsbury, Jacqueline A.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Sands, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCL, Batten Disease) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases. Infantile Neuronal Ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, Infantile Batten Disease, or infantile CLN1 disease) is caused by a deficiency in the soluble lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and has the earliest onset and fastest progression of all the NCLs. Several therapeutic strategies including enzyme replacement, gene therapy, stem cell-mediated therapy, and small molecule drugs have resulted in minimal to modest improvements in the murine model of PPT1-deficiency. However, more recent studies using various combinations of these approaches have shown more promising results; in some instances more than doubling the life span of PPT1-deficient mice. These combination therapies that target different pathogenic mechanisms may offer the hope of treating this profoundly neurodegenerative disorder. Similar approaches may be useful when treating other forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in soluble lysosomal proteins. Different therapeutic targets will need to be identified and novel strategies developed in order to effectively treat forms of NCL caused by deficiencies in integral membrane proteins such as Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis. Finally, the challenge with all of the NCLs will lie in early diagnosis, improving the efficacy of the treatments, and effectively translating them into the clinic. PMID:23747979

  16. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  17. Adult onset motor neuron disease: worldwide mortality, incidence and distribution since 1950.

    PubMed Central

    Chancellor, A M; Warlow, C P

    1992-01-01

    This review examines the commonly held premise that, apart from the Western Pacific forms, motor neuron disease (MND), has a uniform worldwide distribution in space and time; the methodological problems in studies of MND incidence; and directions for future epidemiological research. MND is more common in men at all ages. Age-specific incidence rises steeply into the seventh decade but the incidence in the very elderly is uncertain. A rise in mortality from MND over recent decades has been demonstrated wherever this has been examined and may be real rather than due to improved case ascertainment. Comparison of incidence studies in different places is complicated by non-standardised methods of case ascertainment and diagnosis but there appear to be differences between well studied populations. In developed countries in the northern hemisphere there is a weak positive correlation between standardised, age-specific incidence and distance from the equator. There is now strong evidence for an environmental factor as the cause of the Western Pacific forms of MND. A number of clusters of sporadic MND have been reported from developed countries, but no single agent identified as responsible. Images PMID:1479386

  18. Immunosuppressive Treatment for Retinal Degeneration in Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Juvenile Batten Disease).

    PubMed

    Drack, Arlene V; Mullins, Robert F; Pfeifer, Wanda L; Augustine, Erika F; Stasheff, Steven F; Hong, Sandy D

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (JNCL) presents with progressive vision loss at 4-7 years of age. Blindness results within 2 years, followed by inexorable neurologic decline and death. There is no treatment or cure. Neuroinflammation is postulated to play a role in the neurodegeneration. The JNCL mouse model demonstrated decreased neuroinflammation and improved motor skills with immunosuppression. Based on this work, a short-term human clinical trial of mycophenolate mofetil has begun, however longer term effects, and whether immunosuppression modulates vision loss, have not been studied. We report a JNCL patient treated with immunosuppressive therapy in whom visual function was comprehensively characterized over 2 years. PMID:24547931

  19. Disruption of PPT1 or PPT2 causes neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Praveena; Soyombo, Abigail A.; Atashband, Armita; Wisniewski, Krystyna E.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Hammer, Robert E.; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2001-01-01

    PPT1 and PPT2 encode two lysosomal thioesterases that catalyze the hydrolysis of long chain fatty acyl CoAs. In addition to this function, PPT1 (palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1) hydrolyzes fatty acids from modified cysteine residues in proteins that are undergoing degradation in the lysosome. PPT1 deficiency in humans causes a neurodegenerative disorder, infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (also known as infantile Batten disease). In the current work, we engineered disruptions in the PPT1 and PPT2 genes to create “knockout” mice that were deficient in either enzyme. Both lines of mice were viable and fertile. However, both lines developed spasticity (a “clasping” phenotype) at a median age of 21 wk and 29 wk, respectively. Motor abnormalities progressed in the PPT1 knockout mice, leading to death by 10 mo of age. In contrast, the majority of PPT2 mice were alive at 12 mo. Myoclonic jerking and seizures were prominent in the PPT1 mice. Autofluorescent storage material was striking throughout the brains of both strains of mice. Neuronal loss and apoptosis were particularly prominent in PPT1-deficient brains. These studies provide a mouse model for infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and further suggest that PPT2 serves a role in the brain that is not carried out by PPT1. PMID:11717424

  20. Portuguese family with the co-occurrence of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotypes due to progranulin gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria R; Macário, Maria C; Ramos, Lina; Baldeiras, Inês; Ribeiro, Maria H; Santana, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    We and others have reported heterozygous progranulin mutations as an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It has been identified a complete progranulin deficiency because of a homozygous mutation in a sibling pair with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Here, we describe the first case of NCL caused by a homozygous progranulin mutation segregating in a family with neuropathological confirmed FTLD. In this FTLD-NCL family, we detail the clinical phenotype, neuropsychological evaluation and imaging data of our proband harboring a homozygous mutation, c.900_901dupGT, with serum progranulin level (<6 ng/mL). Symptoms included rapidly progressive visual deficit, slightly dysarthria, and cerebellar ataxia. The electroretinogram confirmed a severe attenuation of rod and cone responses compatible with retinal dystrophy diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging showed severe global cerebellar atrophy. In contrast, heterozygous relatives presented behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and some also developed extrapyramidal features compatible with corticobasal syndrome. Our findings suggest the importance of assessing serum progranulin levels in suspected recessive adult-onset NCL cases. Overall, a more holistic neurologic intervention is needed to guarantee a proper genetic counseling in cases like the present family where two distinct phenotypes are generated according to the individuals' mutation state. PMID:27021778

  1. A mutation in canine CLN5 causes neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border collie dogs.

    PubMed

    Melville, Scott A; Wilson, Carmen L; Chiang, Chiu S; Studdert, Virginia P; Lingaas, Frode; Wilton, Alan N

    2005-09-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is a neurodegenerative disease found in Border collie dogs, humans, and other animals. Disease gene studies in humans and animals provided candidates for the NCL gene in Border collies. A combination of linkage analysis and comparative genomics localized the gene to CFA22 in an area syntenic to HSA13q that contains the CLN5 gene responsible for the Finnish variant of human late infantile NCL. Sequencing of CLN5 revealed a nonsense mutation (Q206X) within exon 4 that correlated with NCL in Border collies. This truncation mutation should result in a protein product of a size similar to that of some mutations identified in human CLN5 and therefore the Border collie may make a good model for human NCL. A simple test was developed to enable screening of the Border collie population for carriers so the disease can be eliminated as a problem in the breed. PMID:16033706

  2. A new simple enzyme assay for pre- and postnatal diagnosis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) and its variants

    PubMed Central

    Voznyi, Y; Keulemans, J; Mancini, G; Catsman-Berrevoet..., C; Young, E; Winchester, B; Kleijer, W; van Diggelen, O P

    1999-01-01

    Palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) deficiency was recently shown to be the primary defect in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL). The available enzyme assay is complicated and impractical for diagnostic use and is, in practice, unavailable. We have developed a new fluorimetric assay for PPT based on the sensitive fluorochrome 4-methylumbelliferone. This PPT assay is simple, sensitive, and robust and will facilitate the definition of the full clinical spectrum associated with a deficiency of PPT. PPT activity was readily detectable in fibroblasts, leucocytes, lymphoblasts, amniotic fluid cells, and chorionic villi, but was profoundly deficient in these tissues from INCL patients. Similarly, a deficiency of PPT was shown in patients with the variant juvenile NCL with GROD. These results show that rapid pre- and postnatal diagnosis can be performed with this new enzyme assay for PPT.


Keywords: infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis; CLN1; palmitoyl-protein thioesterase; enzyme analysis PMID:10874636

  3. Native and Complexed IGF-1: Biodistribution and Pharmacokinetics in Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Huhtala, Tuulia; Rytkönen, Jussi; Jalanko, Anu; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Riikonen, Raili; Närvänen, Ale

    2012-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by selective death of cortical neurons. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is important in embryonic development and is considered as a potential therapeutic agent for several disorders of peripheral and central nervous systems. In circulation IGF-1 is mainly bound to its carrier protein IGFBP-3. As a therapeutic agent IGF-1 has shown to be more active as free than complexed form. However, this may cause side effects during the prolonged treatment. In addition to IGFBP-3 the bioavailability of IGF-1 can be modulated by using mesoporous silicon nanoparticles (NPs) which are optimal carriers for sustained release of unstable peptide hormones like IGF-1. In this study we compared biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and bioavailability of radiolabeled free IGF-1, IGF-1/IGFBP-3, and IGF-1/NP complexes in a Cln1-/- knockout mouse model. IGF-1/NP was mainly accumulated in liver and spleen in all studied time points, whereas minor and more constant amounts were measured in other organs compared to free IGF-1 or IGF-1/IGFBP-3. Also concentration of IGF-1/NP in blood was relatively high and stable during studied time points suggesting continuous release of IGF-1 from the particles. PMID:22778966

  4. The Chihuahua dog: A new animal model for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis CLN7 disease?

    PubMed

    Faller, Kiterie M E; Bras, Jose; Sharpe, Samuel J; Anderson, Glenn W; Darwent, Lee; Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Alroy, Joseph; Penderis, Jacques; Mole, Sara E; Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Guerreiro, Rita J

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of incurable lysosomal storage disorders characterized by neurodegeneration and accumulation of lipopigments mainly within the neurons. We studied two littermate Chihuahua dogs presenting with progressive signs of blindness, ataxia, pacing, and cognitive impairment from 1 year of age. Because of worsening of clinical signs, both dogs were euthanized at about 2 years of age. Postmortem examination revealed marked accumulation of autofluorescent intracellular inclusions within the brain, characteristic of NCL. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on one of the affected dogs. After sequence alignment and variant calling against the canine reference genome, variants were identified in the coding region or splicing regions of four previously known NCL genes (CLN6, ARSG, CLN2 [=TPP1], and CLN7 [=MFSD8]). Subsequent segregation analysis within the family (two affected dogs, both parents, and three relatives) identified MFSD8:p.Phe282Leufs13*, which had previously been identified in one Chinese crested dog with no available ancestries, as the causal mutation. Because of the similarities of the clinical signs and histopathological changes with the human form of the disease, we propose that the Chihuahua dog could be a good animal model of CLN7 disease. PMID:26762174

  5. Native and Complexed IGF-1: Biodistribution and Pharmacokinetics in Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Huhtala, Tuulia; Rytkönen, Jussi; Jalanko, Anu; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Riikonen, Raili; Närvänen, Ale

    2012-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by selective death of cortical neurons. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is important in embryonic development and is considered as a potential therapeutic agent for several disorders of peripheral and central nervous systems. In circulation IGF-1 is mainly bound to its carrier protein IGFBP-3. As a therapeutic agent IGF-1 has shown to be more active as free than complexed form. However, this may cause side effects during the prolonged treatment. In addition to IGFBP-3 the bioavailability of IGF-1 can be modulated by using mesoporous silicon nanoparticles (NPs) which are optimal carriers for sustained release of unstable peptide hormones like IGF-1. In this study we compared biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and bioavailability of radiolabeled free IGF-1, IGF-1/IGFBP-3, and IGF-1/NP complexes in a Cln1-/- knockout mouse model. IGF-1/NP was mainly accumulated in liver and spleen in all studied time points, whereas minor and more constant amounts were measured in other organs compared to free IGF-1 or IGF-1/IGFBP-3. Also concentration of IGF-1/NP in blood was relatively high and stable during studied time points suggesting continuous release of IGF-1 from the particles. PMID:22778966

  6. Localization of juvenile, but not late-infantile, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis on chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Wenliang Yan; Ozelius, L.; Breakefield, X.O.; Gusella, J.F. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Boustany, R.M.N. ); Konradi, C.; Lerner, T.; Trofatter, J.A.; Haines, J.L. ); Julier, C. )

    1993-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the deposition of autofluorescent proteinaceous fingerprint or curvilinear bodies. The authors have found that CLN3, the gene underlying the juvenile form of NCL, is very tightly linked to the dinucleotide repeat marker D16S285 on chromosome 16. Integration of D16S285 into the genetic map of chromosome 16 by using the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain panel of reference pedigrees yielded a favored marker order in the CLN3 region of qtel-D16S150-.08-D16S285-.04-D16S148-.02-D16S67-ptel. The most likely location of the disease gene, near D16S285 in the D16S150-D16S148 interval, was favored by odds of greater than 10[sup 4]:1 over the adjacent D16S148-D16S67 interval, which was recently reported as the minimum candidate region. Analysis of D16S285 in pedigrees with late-infantile NCL virtually excluded the CLN3 region, suggesting that these two forms of NCL are genetically distinct. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A novel mutation in the MFSD8 gene in late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Stogmann, E; El Tawil, S; Wagenstaller, J; Gaber, A; Edris, S; Abdelhady, A; Assem-Hilger, E; Leutmezer, F; Bonelli, S; Baumgartner, C; Zimprich, F; Strom, T M; Zimprich, A

    2009-02-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are lysosomal storage disorders and constitute the most common group of progressive neurodegenerative diseases in childhood. Most NCLs are inherited in a recessive manner and are clinically characterised by a variable age at onset, epileptic seizures, psychomotor decline, visual impairment and premature death. To date, eight causative genes have been identified to underlie various clinical forms of NCL. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis followed by sequencing the recently described NCL gene MFSD8 in three affected and three unaffected members of a consanguineous Egyptian family with an autosomal recessively inherited progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The clinical picture of the patients was compatible with a late infantile NCL (LINCL); however, impairment of the visual system was not a cardinal symptom in the respective family. By linkage analysis, we identified two putative loci on chromosome 1p36.11-p35.1 and 4q28.1-q28.2. The latter locus (4q28.1-q28.2) contained the MFSD8 gene, comprising a novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 5 (c.362a>g /p.Tyr121Cys), which segregated with the disease in the three affected sibs. We describe a novel mutation in the previously identified MFSD8 gene in a family with a common phenotype of LINCL, but no clinical report of vision loss. Our results enlarge the mutational and perhaps the nosological spectrum of one of the recently identified subtypes of NCL, called CLN7. PMID:18850119

  8. Chromosome 16 microdeletion in a patient with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Taschner, P.E.M.; Vos, N. de; Thompson, A.D.; Callen, D.F.; Doggett, N.; Mole, S.E.; Dooley, T.P.; Barth, P.G.; Breuning, M.H. |

    1995-03-01

    The gene that is involved in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), or Batten disease - CLN3 - has been localized to 16p12, and the mutation shows a strong association with alleles of microsatellite markers D16S298, D16S299, and D16S288. Recently, haplotype analysis of a Batten patient from a consanguineous relationship indicated homozygosity for a D16S298 null allele. PCR analysis with different primers on DNA from the patient and his family suggests the presence of a cytogenetically undetectable deletion, which was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. The microdeletion is embedded in a region containing chromosome 16-specific repeated sequences. However, putative candidates for CLN3, members of the highly homologous sulfotransferase gene family, which are also present in this region in several copies, were not deleted in the patient. If the microdeletion in this patient is responsible for Batten disease, then we conclude that the sulfotransferase genes are probably not involved in JNCL. By use of markers and probes flanking D15S298, the maximum size of the microdeletion was determined to be {approximately}29 kb. The microdeletion may affect the CLN3 gene, which is expected to be in close proximity to D16S298. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Vitamin E deficiency and metabolic deficits in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis described by bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L; Muller, D; Woograsingh, R; Jowatt, V; Hindmarsh, A; Nicholson, J K; Martin, J E

    2002-12-01

    The mnd mouse, a model of neuronal ceroid lipofusinosis (NCL), has a profound vitamin E deficiency in sera and brain, associated with cerebral deterioration characteristic of NCL. In this study, the vitamin E deficiency is corrected using dietary supplementation. However, the histopathological features associated with NCL remained. With use of a bioinformatics approach based on high-resolution solid and solution state 1H-NMR spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA), the deficits associated with NCL are defined in terms of a metabolic phenotype. Although vitamin E supplementation reversed some of the metabolic abnormalities, in particular the concentration of phenylalanine in extracts of cerebral tissue, PCA demonstrated that metabolic deficits associated with NCL were greater than any effects produced from vitamin E supplementation. These deficits included increased glutamate and N-acetyl-L-aspartate and decreased creatine and glutamine concentrations in aqueous extracts of the cortex, as well as profound accumulation of lipid in intact cerebral tissue. This is discussed in terms of faulty production of mitochondrial-associated membranes, thought to be central to the deficits in mnd mice. PMID:12388797

  10. Proteolytic processing of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis related lysosomal protein CLN5.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Bhagya; Adams, Jessie; Lee, Stella Y

    2015-10-15

    CLN5 is a soluble lysosomal glycoprotein. Deficiency in CLN5 protein causes neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, an inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. The function of CLN5 and how it affects lysosome activity are unclear. We identified two forms of the CLN5 protein present in most of the cell lines studied. The molecular mass difference between these two forms is about 4kDa. The fibroblast cells derived from two CLN5 patients lack both forms. Using transient transfection, we showed one of these two forms is a proprotein and the other is a C-terminal cleaved mature form. Using cycloheximide chase analysis, we were able to demonstrate that the C-terminal processing occurs post-translationally. By treating cells with several pharmaceutical drugs to inhibit proteases, we showed that the C-terminal processing takes place in an acidic compartment and the protease involved is most likely a cysteine protease. This is further supported by overexpression of a CLN5 patient mutant D279N and a glycosylation mutant N401Q, showing that the C-terminal processing takes place beyond the endoplasmic reticulum, and can occur as early as from the trans Golgi network. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CLN5 is expressed in a variety of murine tissues. PMID:26342652

  11. Antigen presenting cell abnormalities in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Hersrud, Samantha L; Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2016-07-01

    Mutations of the CLN3 gene lead to juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that causes progressive neurodegeneration in children and adolescents. There is evidence of immune system involvement in pathology that has been only minimally investigated. We characterized bone marrow stem cell-derived antigen presenting cells (APCs), peritoneal macrophages, and leukocytes from spleen and blood, harvested from the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of JNCL. We detected dramatically elevated CD11c surface levels and increased total CD11c protein in Cln3(-/-) cell samples compared to wild type. This phenotype was specific to APCs and also to a loss of CLN3, as surface levels did not differ from wild type in other leukocyte subtypes nor in cells from two other NCL mouse models. Subcellularly, CD11c was localized to lipid rafts, indicating that perturbation of surface levels is attributable to derangement of raft dynamics, which has previously been shown in Cln3 mutant cells. Interrogation of APC function revealed that Cln3(-/-) cells have increased adhesiveness to CD11c ligands as well as an abnormal secretory pattern that closely mimics what has been previously reported for Cln3 mutant microglia. Our results show that CLN3 deficiency alters APCs, which can be a major contributor to the autoimmune response in JNCL. PMID:27101989

  12. Exacerbated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotype in Cln1/5 double-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Tea; Schmiedt, Mia-Lisa; Wong, Andrew M.; Kyttälä, Aija; Soronen, Jarkko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Tyynelä, Jaana; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Jalanko, Anu

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Both CLN1 and CLN5 deficiencies lead to severe neurodegenerative diseases of childhood, known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The broadly similar phenotypes of NCL mouse models, and the potential for interactions between NCL proteins, raise the possibility of shared or convergent disease mechanisms. To begin addressing these issues, we have developed a new mouse model lacking both Cln1 and Cln5 genes. These double-knockout (Cln1/5 dko) mice were fertile, showing a slight decrease in expected Mendelian breeding ratios, as well as impaired embryoid body formation by induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Cln1/5 dko fibroblasts. Typical disease manifestations of the NCLs, i.e. seizures and motor dysfunction, were detected at the age of 3 months, earlier than in either single knockout mouse. Pathological analyses revealed a similar exacerbation and earlier onset of disease in Cln1/5 dko mice, which exhibited a pronounced accumulation of autofluorescent storage material. Cortical demyelination and more pronounced glial activation in cortical and thalamic regions was followed by cortical neuron loss. Alterations in lipid metabolism in Cln1/5 dko showed a specific increase in plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity. Finally, gene expression profiling of Cln1/5 dko cortex revealed defects in myelination and immune response pathways, with a prominent downregulation of α-synuclein in Cln1/5 dko mouse brains. The simultaneous loss of both Cln1 and Cln5 genes might enhance the typical pathological phenotypes of these mice by disrupting or downregulating shared or convergent pathogenic pathways, which could potentially include interactions of CLN1 and CLN5. PMID:23065637

  13. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  14. Exome-Sequencing Confirms DNAJC5 Mutations as Cause of Adult Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Bruno A.; Alvarado, David; Cai, Yefei; Mayo, Kevin; Chakraverty, Sumitra; Norton, Joanne; Morris, John C.; Sands, Mark S.; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    We performed whole-exome sequencing in two autopsy-confirmed cases and an elderly unaffected control from a multigenerational family with autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL). A novel single-nucleotide variation (c.344T>G) in the DNAJC5 gene was identified. Mutational screening in an independent family with autosomal dominant ANCL found an in-frame single codon deletion (c.346_348 delCTC) resulting in a deletion of p.Leu116del. These variants fulfill all genetic criteria for disease-causing mutations: they are found in unrelated families with the same disease, exhibit complete segregation between the mutation and the disease, and are absent in healthy controls. In addition, the associated amino acid substitutions are located in evolutionarily highly conserved residues and are predicted to functionally affect the encoded protein (CSPα). The mutations are located in a cysteine-string domain, which is required for membrane targeting/binding, palmitoylation, and oligomerization of CSPα. We performed a comprehensive in silico analysis of the functional and structural impact of both mutations on CSPα. We found that these mutations dramatically decrease the affinity of CSPα for the membrane. We did not identify any significant effect on palmitoylation status of CSPα. However, a reduction of CSPα membrane affinity may change its palmitoylation and affect proper intracellular sorting. We confirm that CSPα has a strong intrinsic aggregation propensity; however, it is not modified by the mutations. A complementary disease-network analysis suggests a potential interaction with other NCLs genes/pathways. This is the first replication study of the identification of DNAJC5 as the disease-causing gene for autosomal dominant ANCL. The identification of the novel gene in ANCL will allow us to gain a better understanding of the pathological mechanism of ANCLs and constitutes a great advance toward the development of new molecular diagnostic tests and may

  15. Exome sequencing is an efficient tool for variant late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Liliana Catherine; Battu, Rajani; Ortega-Recalde, Oscar; Nallathambi, Jeyabalan; Anandula, Venkata Ramana; Renukaradhya, Umashankar; Laissue, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL) is a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by epilepsy, visual failure, progressive mental and motor deterioration, myoclonus, dementia and reduced life expectancy. Classically, NCL-affected individuals have been classified into six categories, which have been mainly defined regarding the clinical onset of symptoms. However, some patients cannot be easily included in a specific group because of significant variation in the age of onset and disease progression. Molecular genetics has emerged in recent years as a useful tool for enhancing NCL subtype classification. Fourteen NCL genetic forms (CLN1 to CLN14) have been described to date. The variant late-infantile form of the disease has been linked to CLN5, CLN6, CLN7 (MFSD8) and CLN8 mutations. Despite advances in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders mutations in these genes may cause similar phenotypes, which rends difficult accurate candidate gene selection for direct sequencing. Three siblings who were affected by variant late-infantile NCL are reported in the present study. We used whole-exome sequencing, direct sequencing and in silico approaches to identify the molecular basis of the disease. We identified the novel c.1219T>C (p.Trp407Arg) and c.1361T>C (p.Met454Thr) MFSD8 pathogenic mutations. Our results highlighted next generation sequencing as a novel and powerful methodological approach for the rapid determination of the molecular diagnosis of NCL. They also provide information regarding the phenotypic and molecular spectrum of CLN7 disease. PMID:25333361

  16. Common pathobiochemical hallmarks of progranulin-associated frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Götzl, Julia K; Mori, Kohji; Damme, Markus; Fellerer, Katrin; Tahirovic, Sabina; Kleinberger, Gernot; Janssens, Jonathan; van der Zee, Julie; Lang, Christina M; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Arzberger, Thomas; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Haass, Christian; Capell, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the progranulin (GRN) gene and the resulting reduction of GRN levels is a common genetic cause for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP)-43. Recently, it has been shown that a complete GRN deficiency due to a homozygous GRN loss-of-function mutation causes neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), a lysosomal storage disorder. These findings suggest that lysosomal dysfunction may also contribute to some extent to FTLD. Indeed, Grn(-/-) mice recapitulate not only pathobiochemical features of GRN-associated FTLD-TDP (FTLD-TDP/GRN), but also those which are characteristic for NCL and lysosomal impairment. In Grn(-/-) mice the lysosomal proteins cathepsin D (CTSD), LAMP (lysosomal-associated membrane protein) 1 and the NCL storage components saposin D and subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase (SCMAS) were all found to be elevated. Moreover, these mice display increased levels of transmembrane protein (TMEM) 106B, a lysosomal protein known as a risk factor for FTLD-TDP pathology. In line with a potential pathological overlap of FTLD and NCL, Ctsd(-/-) mice, a model for NCL, show elevated levels of the FTLD-associated proteins GRN and TMEM106B. In addition, pathologically phosphorylated TDP-43 occurs in Ctsd(-/-) mice to a similar extent as in Grn(-/-) mice. Consistent with these findings, some NCL patients accumulate pathologically phosphorylated TDP-43 within their brains. Based on these observations, we searched for pathological marker proteins, which are characteristic for NCL or lysosomal impairment in brains of FTLD-TDP/GRN patients. Strikingly, saposin D, SCMAS as well as the lysosomal proteins CTSD and LAMP1/2 are all elevated in patients with FTLD-TDP/GRN. Thus, our findings suggest that lysosomal storage disorders and GRN-associated FTLD may share common features. PMID:24619111

  17. Pre- and postnatal enzyme analysis for infantile, late infantile and adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN1 and CLN2).

    PubMed

    Van Diggelen, O P; Keulemans, J L; Kleijer, W J; Thobois, S; Tilikete, C; Voznyi, Y V

    2001-01-01

    The recent development of simple, fluorogenic enzyme assays for infantile and late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL and LINCL; CLN1 and CLN2) has greatly facilitated the diagnostic process for these diseases. In leucocytes and fibroblasts from INCL (n = 38) patients we found profound deficiencies of palmitoyl-protein thioesterase I (PPT1), the residual activity was < 5% of mean control activity. In fibroblasts from LINCL patients we found a similar deficiency of tripeptidyl-peptidase I activity (TPP-I), with < 2% activity in 16 patients. The residual TPP-I activity in leucocytes from LINCL patients seemed substantially higher. We also showed the feasibility of reliable prenatal enzyme analysis. In five first-trimester and two second-trimester prenatal analyses for INCL, four affected foetuses were detected (PPT activity 3-6%). Two first trimester pregnancies at risk for LINCL were analysed and a clear TPP-I deficiency was detected in both cases (TPP-I activity 3-4%). The first patient with adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) due to a deficiency of PPT is presented; her present age is 53 years and the onset of the disease was at 38 years with psychiatric symptoms. PMID:11588995

  18. Adult onset retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-07-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  19. Pupillary light reflex deficits in a canine model of late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Rebecca E H; Narfström, Kristina; Yao, Gang; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Coates, Joan R; Castaner, Leilani J; Katz, Martin L

    2013-11-01

    Late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2) is a hereditary neurological disorder characterized by progressive retinal degeneration and vision loss, cognitive and motor decline, seizures, and pronounced brain atrophy. The progressive loss of neurological functions eventually leads to death, usually by the early teenage years. Utilizing a canine model of CLN2, therapeutic studies to inhibit the brain and retinal degenerations are currently under way. Using this dog model, studies were undertaken to compare quantitative assessments of the pupillary light reflex (PLR) and electroretinography (ERG) as tools for evaluating the effects of the disease on retinal function. The PLR and ERG were recorded in normal and CLN2-affected Dachshunds at 2 month intervals between the ages of 4 and 10 months. Using custom instrumentation for quantitative PLR assessments, a series of white light stimuli of varying intensity was used to elicit pupil constriction, and pupil images were recorded using continuous infrared illumination and an infrared-sensitive camera. Electroretinography was used to evaluate retinal function in the same dogs. As the disease progressed, affected dogs exhibited progressive and profound declines in ERG amplitudes under both scotopic and photopic conditions. With low intensity light stimuli, CLN2 was also accompanied by progressive deficits in the PLR. Changes in the PLR to dim light stimuli included significant deficits in latency, constriction velocity, constriction amplitude, and redilation velocity. However, despite the almost complete loss of detectable ERG responses by disease end stage, the PLR to bright stimuli was well preserved throughout the disease progression. These findings demonstrate that the PLR is much more sensitive than the ERG in detecting residual retinal function in animal models of retinal degenerative disease. The preservation of the PLR in dogs with profoundly depressed ERGs correlates with a preservation of visually

  20. Translocation 10;18 in a patient with juvenile neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck-Muller, C.M.; Li, S.; Chen, H.

    1995-06-05

    We report the first observation of a chromosome abnormality in a patient with typical juvenile ceroid-lipfuscinosis (NCL), who was found to have an apparently balanced translocation between chromosomes 10 and 18 (t(10;18)(q22;q21.1)). Since juvenile NCL was previously mapped to 16p12, this report raises the possibility of heterogeneity in this form of NCL. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  1. First-trimester diagnosis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) using PPT enzyme assay and CLN1 mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    de Vries, B B; Kleijer, W J; Keulemans, J L; Voznyi, Y V; Franken, P F; Eurlings, M C; Galjaard, R J; Losekoot, M; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; Breuning, M H; Taschner, P E; van Diggelen, O P

    1999-06-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in childhood which is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) encoded by the CLN1 gene. In a pregnancy at risk for INCL, chorionic villi (CV) were studied using a novel fluorometric PPT enzyme assay in combination with mutation-analysis of the CLN1 gene. The PPT activity in chorionic villi was found to be deficient and homozygosity for the C451T mutation in CLN1 was found. The pregnancy was terminated and the PPT deficiency was confirmed in cultured CV cells as well as in the cultured fetal skin fibroblasts. This report shows the first early prenatal diagnosis of INCL performed by fluorometric enzyme analysis and mutation analysis of the CLN1 gene. PMID:10416973

  2. A new simple enzyme assay for pre- and postnatal diagnosis of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) and its variants.

    PubMed

    Voznyi, Y V; Keulemans, J L; Mancini, G M; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E; Young, E; Winchester, B; Kleijer, W J; van Diggelen, O P

    1999-06-01

    Palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) deficiency was recently shown to be the primary defect in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL). The available enzyme assay is complicated and impractical for diagnostic use and is, in practice, unavailable. We have developed a new fluorimetric assay for PPT based on the sensitive fluorochrome 4-methylumbelliferone. This PPT assay is simple, sensitive, and robust and will facilitate the definition of the full clinical spectrum associated with a deficiency of PPT. PPT activity was readily detectable in fibroblasts, leucocytes, lymphoblasts, amniotic fluid cells, and chorionic villi, but was profoundly deficient in these tissues from INCL patients. Similarly, a deficiency of PPT was shown in patients with the variant juvenile NCL with GROD. These results show that rapid pre- and postnatal diagnosis can be performed with this new enzyme assay for PPT. PMID:10874636

  3. The novel Cln1(R151X) mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) for testing nonsense suppression therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jake N; Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), also known as Batten disease, are a group of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorders in children characterized by the progressive onset of seizures, blindness, motor and cognitive decline and premature death. Patients with mutations in CLN1 primarily manifest with infantile NCL (INCL or Haltia-Santavuori disease), which is second only to congenital NCL for its age of onset and devastating progression. CLN1 encodes a lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1). Nonsense mutations in CLN1 account for 52.3% of all disease causing alleles in infantile NCL, the most common of which worldwide is the p.R151X mutation. Previously, we have shown how nonsense-mediated decay is involved in the degradation of CLN1 mRNA transcripts containing the p.R151X mutation in human lymphoblast cell lines. We have also shown how the read-through drugs gentamicin and ataluren (PTC124) increase CLN1 (PPT1) enzyme activity. Here, we provide the initial characterization of the novel Cln1(R151X) mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis that we have generated. This nonsense mutation model recapitulates the molecular, histological and behavioral phenotypes of the human disease. Cln1(R151X) mice showed a significant decrease in Cln1 mRNA level and PPT1 enzyme activity, accumulation of autofluorescent storage material, astrocytosis and microglial activation in the brain. Behavioral characterization of Cln1(R151X) mice at 3 and 5 months of age revealed significant motor deficits as measured by the vertical pole and rotarod tests. We also show how the read-through compound ataluren (PTC124) increases PPT1 enzyme activity and protein level in Cln1(R151X) mice in a proof-of-principle study. PMID:25205113

  4. Adult-Onset Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit; Broderick, Gregory A; Carson, Culley C; Dobs, Adrian S; Faraday, Martha M; Goldstein, Irwin; Hakim, Lawrence S; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Kacker, Ravi; Köhler, Tobias S; Mills, Jesse N; Miner, Martin; Sadeghi-Nejad, Hossein; Seftel, Allen D; Sharlip, Ira D; Winters, Stephen J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-07-01

    In August 2015, an expert colloquium commissioned by the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA) convened in Washington, DC, to discuss the common clinical scenario of men who present with low testosterone (T) and associated signs and symptoms accompanied by low or normal gonadotropin levels. This syndrome is not classical primary (testicular failure) or secondary (pituitary or hypothalamic failure) hypogonadism because it may have elements of both presentations. The panel designated this syndrome adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH) because it occurs commonly in middle-age and older men. The SMSNA is a not-for-profit society established in 1994 to promote, encourage, and support the highest standards of practice, research, education, and ethics in the study of human sexual function and dysfunction. The panel consisted of 17 experts in men's health, sexual medicine, urology, endocrinology, and methodology. Participants declared potential conflicts of interest and were SMSNA members and nonmembers. The panel deliberated regarding a diagnostic process to document signs and symptoms of AOH, the rationale for T therapy, and a monitoring protocol for T-treated patients. The evaluation and management of hypogonadal syndromes have been addressed in recent publications (ie, the Endocrine Society, the American Urological Association, and the International Society for Sexual Medicine). The primary purpose of this document was to support health care professionals in the development of a deeper understanding of AOH, particularly in how it differs from classical primary and secondary hypogonadism, and to provide a conceptual framework to guide its diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. PMID:27343020

  5. Morphologic and functional correlates of synaptic pathology in the cathepsin D knockout mouse model of congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sabine; Molchanova, Svetlana M; Wright, Ann K; Edwards, Andrew; Cooper, Jonathan D; Taira, Tomi; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Tyynelä, Jaana

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the cathepsin D (CTSD) gene cause an aggressive neurodegenerative disease (congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) that leads to early death. Recent evidence suggests that presynaptic abnormalities play a major role in the pathogenesis of CTSD deficiencies. To identify the early events that lead to synaptic alterations, we investigated synaptic ultrastructure and function in presymptomatic CTSD knockout (Ctsd) mice. Electron microscopy revealed that there were significantly greater numbers of readily releasable synaptic vesicles present in Ctsd mice than in wild-type control mice as early as postnatal day 16. The size of this synaptic vesicle pool continued to increase with disease progression in the hippocampus and thalamus of the Ctsd mice. Electrophysiology revealed a markedly decreased frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) with no effect on paired-pulse modulation of the evoked excitatory post synaptic potentials in the hippocampus of Ctsd mice. The reduced mEPSCs frequency was observed before the appearance of epilepsy or any morphologic sign of synaptic degeneration. Taken together, these data indicate that CTSD is required for normal synaptic function and that a failure in synaptic trafficking or recycling may bean early and important pathologic mechanism in Ctsd mice; these presynaptic abnormalities may initiate synaptic degeneration in advance of subsequent neuronal loss. PMID:22082660

  6. A canine Arylsulfatase G (ARSG) mutation leading to a sulfatase deficiency is associated with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Marie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Olby, Natasha J.; Hitte, Christophe; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Maurer, Marie; Pilot-Storck, Fanny; Hédan, Benoit; Dréano, Stéphane; Brahimi, Sandra; Delattre, Delphine; André, Catherine; Gray, Françoise; Delisle, Françoise; Caillaud, Catherine; Bernex, Florence; Panthier, Jean-Jacques; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Tiret, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) represent the most common group of inherited progressive encephalopathies in children. They are characterized by progressive loss of vision, mental and motor deterioration, epileptic seizures, and premature death. Rare adult forms of NCL with late onset are known as Kufs’ disease. Loci underlying these adult forms remain unknown due to the small number of patients and genetic heterogeneity. Here we confirm that a late-onset form of NCL recessively segregates in US and French pedigrees of American Staffordshire Terrier (AST) dogs. Through combined association, linkage, and haplotype analyses, we mapped the disease locus to a single region of canine chromosome 9. We eventually identified a worldwide breed-specific variant in exon 2 of the Arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene, which causes a p.R99H substitution in the vicinity of the catalytic domain of the enzyme. In transfected cells or leukocytes from affected dogs, the missense change leads to a 75% decrease in sulfatase activity, providing a functional confirmation that the variant might be the NCL-causing mutation. Our results uncover a protein involved in neuronal homeostasis, identify a family of candidate genes to be screened in patients with Kufs' disease, and suggest that a deficiency in sulfatase is part of the NCL pathogenesis. PMID:20679209

  7. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with DNAJC5/CSPα mutation has PPT1 pathology and exhibit aberrant protein palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Michael X; Wirak, Gregory S; Zhang, Yong-Quan; Dai, Feng; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Staropoli, John F; Nijssen, Peter C G; Lam, TuKiet T; Roth, Amy F; Davis, Nicholas G; Dawson, Glyn; Velinov, Milen; Chandra, Sreeganga S

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders with lysosomal pathology (CLN1-14). Recently, mutations in the DNAJC5/CLN4 gene, which encodes the presynaptic co-chaperone CSPα were shown to cause autosomal-dominant NCL. Although 14 NCL genes have been identified, it is unknown if they act in common disease pathways. Here we show that two disease-associated proteins, CSPα and the depalmitoylating enzyme palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1/CLN1) are biochemically linked. We find that in DNAJC5/CLN4 patient brains, PPT1 is massively increased and mis-localized. Surprisingly, the specific enzymatic activity of PPT1 is dramatically reduced. Notably, we demonstrate that CSPα is depalmitoylated by PPT1 and hence its substrate. To determine the consequences of PPT1 accumulation, we compared the palmitomes from control and DNAJC5/CLN4 patient brains by quantitative proteomics. We discovered global changes in protein palmitoylation, mainly involving lysosomal and synaptic proteins. Our findings establish a functional link between two forms of NCL and serve as a springboard for investigations of NCL disease pathways. PMID:26659577

  8. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs in Japan: clinical and molecular epidemiological study (2000-2011).

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Kawamichi, Takuji; Koie, Hiroshi; Tamura, Shinji; Matsunaga, Satoru; Imamoto, Shigeki; Saito, Miyoko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Matsuki, Naoaki; Tamahara, Satoshi; Sato, Shigenobu; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is an inherited, neurodegenerative lysosomal disease that causes premature death. The present study describes the clinical and molecular epidemiologic findings of NCL in Border Collies in Japan for 12 years, between 2000 and 2011. The number of affected dogs was surveyed, and their clinical characteristics were analyzed. In 4 kennels with affected dogs, the dogs were genotyped. The genetic relationships of all affected dogs and carriers identified were analyzed. The survey revealed 27 affected dogs, but there was a decreasing trend at the end of the study period. The clinical characteristics of these affected dogs were updated in detail. The genotyping survey demonstrated a high mutant allele frequency in examined kennels (34.8%). The pedigree analysis demonstrated that all affected dogs and carriers in Japan are related to some presumptive carriers imported from Oceania and having a common ancestor. The current high prevalence in Japan might be due to an overuse of these carriers by breeders without any knowledge of the disease. For NCL control and prevention, it is necessary to examine all breeding dogs, especially in kennels with a high prevalence. Such endeavors will reduce NCL prevalence and may already be contributing to the recent decreasing trend in Japan. PMID:22919312

  9. Guidelines for incorporating scientific knowledge and practice on rare diseases into higher education: neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses as a model disorder.

    PubMed

    Cismondi, Inés Adriana; Kohan, Romina; Adams, Heather; Bond, Mike; Brown, Rachel; Cooper, Jonathan D; de Hidalgo, Perla K; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Mole, Sara E; Mugnaini, Julia; de Ramirez, Ana María Oller; Pesaola, Favio; Rautenberg, Gisela; Platt, Frances M; Noher de Halac, Inés

    2015-10-01

    This article addresses the educational issues associated with rare diseases (RD) and in particular the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (NCLs, or CLN diseases) in the curricula of Health Sciences and Professional's Training Programs. Our aim is to develop guidelines for improving scientific knowledge and practice in higher education and continuous learning programs. Rare diseases (RD) are collectively common in the general population with 1 in 17 people affected by a RD in their lifetime. Inherited defects in genes involved in metabolism are the commonest group of RD with over 8000 known inborn errors of metabolism. The majority of these diseases are neurodegenerative including the NCLs. Any professional training program on NCL must take into account the medical, social and economic burdens related to RDs. To address these challenges and find solutions to them it is necessary that individuals in the government and administrative authorities, academia, teaching hospitals and medical schools, the pharmaceutical industry, investment community and patient advocacy groups all work together to achieve these goals. The logistical issues of including RD lectures in university curricula and in continuing medical education should reflect its complex nature. To evaluate the state of education in the RD field, a summary should be periodically up dated in order to assess the progress achieved in each country that signed up to the international conventions addressing RD issues in society. It is anticipated that auditing current practice will lead to higher standards and provide a framework for those educators involved in establishing RD teaching programs world-wide. PMID:26117801

  10. Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis in Border Collie Dogs in Japan: Clinical and Molecular Epidemiological Study (2000–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Kawamichi, Takuji; Koie, Hiroshi; Tamura, Shinji; Matsunaga, Satoru; Imamoto, Shigeki; Saito, Miyoko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Matsuki, Naoaki; Tamahara, Satoshi; Sato, Shigenobu; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is an inherited, neurodegenerative lysosomal disease that causes premature death. The present study describes the clinical and molecular epidemiologic findings of NCL in Border Collies in Japan for 12 years, between 2000 and 2011. The number of affected dogs was surveyed, and their clinical characteristics were analyzed. In 4 kennels with affected dogs, the dogs were genotyped. The genetic relationships of all affected dogs and carriers identified were analyzed. The survey revealed 27 affected dogs, but there was a decreasing trend at the end of the study period. The clinical characteristics of these affected dogs were updated in detail. The genotyping survey demonstrated a high mutant allele frequency in examined kennels (34.8%). The pedigree analysis demonstrated that all affected dogs and carriers in Japan are related to some presumptive carriers imported from Oceania and having a common ancestor. The current high prevalence in Japan might be due to an overuse of these carriers by breeders without any knowledge of the disease. For NCL control and prevention, it is necessary to examine all breeding dogs, especially in kennels with a high prevalence. Such endeavors will reduce NCL prevalence and may already be contributing to the recent decreasing trend in Japan. PMID:22919312

  11. Enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a canine model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease).

    PubMed

    Katz, Martin L; Coates, Joan R; Sibigtroth, Christine M; Taylor, Jacob D; Carpentier, Melissa; Young, Whitney M; Wininger, Fred A; Kennedy, Derek; Vuillemenot, Brian R; O'Neill, Charles A

    2014-11-01

    Using a canine model of classical late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease), a study was conducted to evaluate the potential pharmacological activity of recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (rhTPP1) enzyme replacement therapy administered directly to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CLN2 disease is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutations in CLN2, which encodes the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Infants with mutations in both CLN2 alleles develop normally but in the late-infantile/early-childhood period undergo progressive neurological decline accompanied by pronounced brain atrophy. The disorder, a form of Batten disease, is uniformly fatal, with clinical signs starting between 2 and 4 years of age and death usually occurring by the early teenage years. Dachshunds homozygous for a null mutation in the canine ortholog of CLN2 (TPP1) exhibit a similar disorder that progresses to end stage at 10.5-11 months of age. Administration of rhTPP1 via infusion into the CSF every other week, starting at approximately 2.5 months of age, resulted in dose-dependent significant delays in disease progression, as measured by delayed onset of neurologic deficits, improved performance on a cognitive function test, reduced brain atrophy, and increased life span. Based on these findings, a clinical study evaluating the potential therapeutic value of rhTPP1 administration into the CSF of children with CLN2 disease has been initiated. PMID:24938720

  12. Enzyme replacement therapy delays pupillary light reflex deficits in a canine model of late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Rebecca E H; Narfström, Kristina; Yao, Gang; Pearce, Jacqueline W; Coates, Joan R; Castaner, Leilani J; Jensen, Cheryl A; Dougherty, Brittanie N; Vuillemenot, Brian R; Kennedy, Derek; O'Neill, Charles A; Katz, Martin L

    2014-08-01

    Late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease) is a hereditary neurological disorder characterized by progressive retinal degeneration and vision loss, cognitive and motor decline, seizures, and pronounced brain atrophy. This fatal pediatric disease is caused by mutations in the CLN2 gene which encodes the lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Utilizing a TPP1-/- Dachshund model of CLN2 disease, studies were conducted to assess the effects of TPP1 enzyme replacement administered directly to the CNS on disease progression. Recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid vehicle was administered to CLN2-affected dogs via infusion into the CSF. Untreated and vehicle treated affected dogs exhibited progressive declines in pupillary light reflexes (PLRs) and electroretinographic (ERG) responses to light stimuli. Studies were undertaken to determine whether CSF administration of rhTPP1 alters progression of the PLR and ERG deficits in the canine model. rhTPP1 administration did not inhibit the decline in ERG responses, as rhTPP1 treated, vehicle treated, and untreated dogs all exhibited similar progressive and profound declines in ERG amplitudes. However, in some of the dogs treated with rhTPP1 there were substantial delays in the appearance and progression of PLR deficits compared with untreated or vehicle treated affected dogs. These findings indicate that CSF administration of TPP1 can attenuate functional impairment of neural pathways involved in mediating the PLR but does not prevent loss of retinal responses detectable with ERG. PMID:24954537

  13. In the rat brain acetyl-L-carnitine treatment modulates the expression of genes involved in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Cataldo, Enrico; Macchi, Monica; Durante, Mauro; Brunelli, Marcello

    2008-10-01

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance that, when administered at supraphysiological concentration, is neuroprotective. It is a molecule of considerable interest for its clinical application in various neural disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and painful neuropathies. Suppression subtractive hybridization methodology was used for the generation of subtracted cDNA libraries and the subsequent identification of differentially expressed transcripts in the rat brain after ALC treatment. The method generates an equalized representation of differentially expressed genes irrespective of their relative abundance and it is based on the construction of forward and reverse cDNA libraries that allow the identification of the genes which are regulated by ALC. We report that ALC treatment: (1) upregulates lysosomal H(+)/ATPase gene expression and (2) downregulates myelin basic protein gene expression. The expression of these genes is altered in some forms of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) pathologies. In this case, ALC might rebalance the disorders underlying NCL disease represented by a disturbance in pH homeostasis affecting the acidification of vesicles transported to lysosomal compartment for degradation. This study provides evidence that ALC controls genes involved in these serious neurological pathologies and provides insights into the ways in which ALC might exert its therapeutic benefits. PMID:18726077

  14. Oral Cysteamine bitartrate and N-acetylcysteine combination for patients with infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis:a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Sondra W.; Baker, Eva H.; Zein, Wadih M.; Zhang, Zhongjian; Quezado, Zenaide M.N.; Miao, Ning; Gropman, Andrea; Griffin, Kurt J.; Bianconi, Simona; Chandra, Goutam; Khan, Omar I.; Caruso, Rafael C.; Liu, Aiyi; Mukherjee, Anil B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene encoding palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1). PPT1-deficiency causes lysosomal ceroid accumulation leading to INCL pathogenesis. Previously, we reported that phosphocysteamine and N-acetylcysteine mediated ceroid depletion in cultured cells from INCL patients. We conducted a pilot study to determine whether a combination of cysteamine bitartrate and N-acetylcysteine is beneficial for these patients. Methods Patients (6-month to 3-years old) with any combination of 2 of the 7 most lethal PPT1 mutations were admitted. All patients were recruited from physician referrals and the PPT1 mutations were analyzed prior to admission. Patients were evaluated by electroretinography(ERG), brain MRI and MRS, electroencephalography (EEG), and electron microscopic analyses of leukocytes for granular osmiophilic deposits (GRODs). Patients received oral cysteamine bitartrate (60mg/kg/day) and N-acetylcysteine (60mg/kg/day) and were evaluated every 6 to 12 months until they showed isoelectric EEG attesting to a vegetative state or were too sick to travel. Outcomes were compared with the reported INCL natural history. In two cases, the disease progression was compared with that of a sibling who was above the age limit for inclusion into the protocol. Findings Between March, 2001, and June, 2011, we recruited 10 children with INCL but one was lost to follow-up after the first visit. Thus, a total of 9 patients (5 females and 4 males) were studied. At the first follow-up visit, peripheral leukocytes in all 9 patients showed virtually complete depletion of GRODs and 7 of 9 patients manifested less irritability and/or improved alertness based upon parental and physician observations. Evaluation by Denver scale showed acquisition of no new developmental skills and retinal function assessed by ERG progressively declined

  15. Nonclinical evaluation of CNS-administered TPP1 enzyme replacement in canine CLN2 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Vuillemenot, Brian R; Kennedy, Derek; Cooper, Jonathan D; Wong, Andrew M S; Sri, Sarmi; Doeleman, Thom; Katz, Martin L; Coates, Joan R; Johnson, Gayle C; Reed, Randall P; Adams, Eric L; Butt, Mark T; Musson, Donald G; Henshaw, Joshua; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S; O'Neill, Charles A

    2015-02-01

    The CLN2 form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a type of Batten disease, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Patients exhibit progressive neurodegeneration and loss of motor, cognitive, and visual functions, leading to death by the early teenage years. TPP1-null Dachshunds recapitulate human CLN2 disease. To characterize the safety and pharmacology of recombinant human (rh) TPP1 administration to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a potential enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for CLN2 disease, TPP1-null and wild-type (WT) Dachshunds were given repeated intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusions and the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile, central nervous system (CNS) distribution, and safety were evaluated. TPP1-null animals and WT controls received 4 or 16mg of rhTPP1 or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle every other week. Elevated CSF TPP1 concentrations were observed for 2-3 days after the first ICV infusion and were approximately 1000-fold higher than plasma levels at the same time points. Anti-rhTPP1 antibodies were detected in CSF and plasma after repeat rhTPP1 administration, with titers generally higher in TPP1-null than in WT animals. Widespread brain distribution of rhTPP1 was observed after chronic administration. Expected histological changes were present due to the CNS delivery catheters and were similar in rhTPP1 and vehicle-treated animals, regardless of genotype. Neuropathological evaluation demonstrated the clearance of lysosomal storage, preservation of neuronal morphology, and reduction in brain inflammation with treatment. This study demonstrates the favorable safety and pharmacology profile of rhTPP1 ERT administered directly to the CNS and supports clinical evaluation in patients with CLN2 disease. PMID:25257657

  16. Treatment of the Ppt1−/− Mouse Model of Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis with the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Memantine

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Rozzy; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, a family of neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders, represent the most common cause of pediatric-onset neurodegeneration. The infantile form has a devastatingly early onset and one of the fastest progressing disease courses. Despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms driving neuronal loss in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis remain unknown. We have previously shown that NMDA-type glutamate receptors in the Ppt1−/− mouse model of this disease exhibit a hyperfunctional phenotype and postulate that aberrant glutamatergic activity may contribute to neural pathology in both the mouse model and human patients. To test this hypothesis, we treated Ppt1−/− mice with the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine and assessed their response to the drug using an accelerating rotarod. At 20 mg/kg, memantine treatment induced a delayed but notable improvement in Ppt1−/− mice. Much remains to be assessed before moving to patient trials, but these results suggest memantine has potential as a treatment. PMID:24014511

  17. Refined assignment of the infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, CLN1) locus at 1p32: Incorporation of linkage disequilibrium in multipoint analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, E.; Vesa, J.; Peltonen, L.; Jaervela, I. ); Speer, M.C.; Ott, J. New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York ); Maekelae, T.P.; Alitalo, K. )

    1993-06-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, INCL, CLN1, is an autosomally inherited progressive neuro-generative disorder. The disease results in the massive death of cortical neurons, suggesting an essential role for the CLN1 gene product in the normal neuronal maturation during the first years of life. Identification of new multiallelic markers has now made possible the construction of a refined genetic map encompassing the CLN1 locus at 1p32. Strong allelic association was detected with a new, highly polymorphic HY-TM1 marker. The authors incorporated this observed linkage disequilibrium into multipoint linkage analysis, which significantly increased the informativeness of the limited family material and facilitated refined assignment of the CLN1 locus. 23 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis reveals upregulation of immediate early genes and mediators of the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xingwen; Lu, Jui-Yun; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2007-01-01

    Background The infantile form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (also known as infantile Batten disease) is caused by hereditary deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1), and is characterized by severe cortical degeneration with blindness and cognitive and motor dysfunction. The PPT1-deficient knockout mouse recapitulates the key features of the disorder, including seizures and death by 7–9 months of age. In the current study, we compared gene expression profiles of whole brain from PPT1 knockout and normal mice at 3, 5 and 8 months of age to identify temporal changes in molecular pathways implicated in disease pathogenesis. Results A total of 267 genes were significantly (approximately 2-fold) up- or downregulated over the course of the disease. Immediate early genes (Arc, Cyr61, c-fos, jun-b, btg2, NR4A1) were among the first genes upregulated during the presymptomatic period whereas immune response genes dominated at later time points. Chemokine ligands and protease inhibitors were among the most transcriptionally responsive genes. Neuronal survival factors (IGF-1 and CNTF) and a negative regulator of neuronal apoptosis (DAP kinase-1) were upregulated late in the course of the disease. Few genes were downregulated; these included the α2 subunit of the GABA-A receptor, a component of cortical and hippocampal neurons, and Hes5, a transcription factor important in neuronal differentiation. Conclusion A molecular description of gene expression changes occurring in the brain throughout the course of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis suggests distinct phases of disease progression, provides clues to potential markers of disease activity, and points to new targets for therapy. PMID:18021406

  19. Intrathecal enzyme replacement therapy improves motor function and survival in a preclinical mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jui-Yun; Nelvagal, Hemanth R; Wang, Lingling; Birnbaum, Shari G; Cooper, Jonathan D; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of related hereditary lysosomal storage disorders characterized by progressive loss of neurons in the central nervous system resulting in dementia, loss of motor skills, seizures and blindness. A characteristic intralysosomal accumulation of autofluorescent storage material occurs in the brain and other tissues. Three major forms and nearly a dozen minor forms of NCL are recognized. Infantile-onset NCL (CLN1 disease) is caused by severe deficiency in a soluble lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1) and no therapy beyond supportive care is available. Homozygous Ppt1 knockout mice reproduce the known features of the disease, developing signs of motor dysfunction at 5 months of age and death around 8 months. Direct delivery of lysosomal enzymes to the cerebrospinal fluid is an approach that has gained traction in small and large animal models of several other neuropathic lysosomal storage diseases, and has advanced to clinical trials. In the current study, Ppt1 knockout mice were treated with purified recombinant human PPT1 enzyme delivered to the lumbar intrathecal space on each of three consecutive days at 6 weeks of age. Untreated PPT1 knockout mice and wild-type mice served as additional controls. Four enzyme concentration levels (0, 2.6, 5.3 and 10.6 mg/ml of specific activity 20 U/mg) were administered in a volume of 80 μl infused over 8 min. Each group consisted of 16-20 mice. The treatment was well tolerated. Disease-specific survival was 233, 267, 272, and 284days for each of the four treatment groups, respectively, and the effect of treatment was highly significant (p<0.0001). The timing of motor deterioration was also delayed. Neuropathology was improved as evidenced by decreased autofluorescent storage material in the spinal cord and a decrease in CD68 staining in the cortex and spinal cord. The improvements in motor function and survival are similar to results reported for

  20. Linkage disequilibrium between the juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis gene and marker loci on chromosome 16p12. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; MacCormack, K.; Gleitsman, J.; Schlumpf, K.; Breakefield, X.O.; Gusella, J.F.; Haines, J.L. )

    1994-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; Batten disease) are a collection of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by the accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigments in the neurons and other cell types. Clinically, these disorders are characterized by progressive encephalopathy, loss of vision, and seizures. CLN3, the gene responsible for juvenile NCL, has been mapped to a 15-cM region flanked by the marker loci D16S148 and D16S150 on human chromosome 16. CLN2, the gene causing the late-infantile form of NCL (LNCL), is not yet mapped. The authors have used highly informative dinucleoide repeat markers mapping between D16S148 and D16S150 to refine the localization of CLN3 and to test for linkage to CLN2. The authors find significant linkage disequilibrium between CLN3 and the dinucleotide repeat marker loci D16S288 (X[sup 2](7) = 46.5, P < .005), D16S298 (X[sup 2](6) = 36.6, P < .005), and D16S299 (X[sup 2](7) = 73.8, P < .005), and also a novel RFLP marker at the D16S272 locus (X[sup 2](1) = 5.7, P = .02). These markers all map to 16p12.1. The D16S298/D16S299 haplotype [open quotes]5/4[close quotes] is highly overrepresented, accounting for 54% of CLN3 chromosomes as compared with 8% of control chromosomes (X[sup 2] = 117, df = 1, P < .001). Examination of the haplotypes suggests that the CLN3 locus can be narrowed to the region immediately surrounding these markers in 16p12.1. Analysis of D16S299 in LNCL pedigrees supports the previous finding that CLN3 and CLN2 are different genetic loci. This study also indicates that dinucleotide repeat markers play a valuable role in disequilibrium studies. 23 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. A nursing challenge: adult-onset Tay-Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D

    1991-12-01

    Adult-onset GM2 gangliosidosis (AOG), also labelled Adult-Onset Tay-Sachs disease, is a slowly progressing disease caused by a gradual accumulation of the GM2 ganglioside in neurons due to defective hexosaminidase A. Recent research findings and clinical experiences suggest that AOG may be more widespread than previously believed. Moreover, the diagnosis of AOG is often delayed because patients present with psychotic symptoms that mimic dementia, schizophrenia, mania, and depression. Because AOG patients typically respond poorly to psychiatric drug therapy and the symptomatology is so diverse, nurses must design and implement nursing care that ensures safety, structure, and comfort. PMID:1759864

  2. Novel rapid genotyping assays for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs and high frequency of the mutant allele in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Kawahara, Natsuko; Hayashi, Daisuke; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) constitutes a group of recessively inherited lysosomal storage diseases that primarily affect neuronal cells. Such diseases share certain clinical and pathologic features in human beings and animals. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs was first detected in Australia in the 1980s, and the pathogenic mutation was shown to be a nonsense mutation (c.619C>T) in exon 4 in canine CLN5 gene. In the present study, novel rapid genotyping assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR primer-induced restriction analysis, mutagenically separated PCR, and real-time PCR with TaqMan minor groove binder probes, were developed. The utility of microchip electrophoresis was also evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies in Japan using these assays to determine the current allele frequency in Japan, providing information to control and prevent this disease in the next stage. All assays developed in the current study are available to discriminate these genotypes, and microchip electrophoresis showed a timesaving advantage over agarose gel electrophoresis. Of all assays, real-time PCR was the most suitable for large-scale examination because of its high throughput. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier frequency was 8.1%. This finding suggested that the mutant allele frequency of NCL in Border Collies is high enough in Japan that measures to control and prevent the disease would be warranted. The genotyping assays developed in the present study could contribute to the prevention of NCL in Border Collies. PMID:22362793

  3. Sustained Neural Stem Cell-Based Intraocular Delivery of CNTF Attenuates Photoreceptor Loss in the nclf Mouse Model of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Jankowiak, Wanda; Kruszewski, Katharina; Flachsbarth, Kai; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Rüther, Klaus; Braulke, Thomas; Bartsch, Udo

    2015-01-01

    A sustained intraocular administration of neurotrophic factors is among the strategies aimed at establishing treatments for currently untreatable degenerative retinal disorders. In the present study we have analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a continuous neural stem (NS) cell-based intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on photoreceptor cells in the nclf mouse, an animal model of the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder variant late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (vLINCL). To this aim, we genetically modified adherently cultivated NS cells with a polycistronic lentiviral vector encoding a secretable variant of CNTF together with a Venus reporter gene (CNTF-NS cells). NS cells for control experiments (control-NS cells) were modified with a vector encoding the reporter gene tdTomato. Clonal CNTF-NS and control-NS cell lines were established using fluorescent activated cell sorting and intravitreally grafted into 14 days old nclf mice at the onset of retinal degeneration. The grafted cells preferentially differentiated into astrocytes that were attached to the posterior side of the lenses and the vitreal side of the retinas and stably expressed the transgenes for at least six weeks, the latest post-transplantation time point analyzed. Integration of donor cells into host retinas, ongoing proliferation of grafted cells or adverse effects of the donor cells on the morphology of the host eyes were not observed. Quantitative analyses of host retinas two, four and six weeks after cell transplantation revealed the presence of significantly more photoreceptor cells in eyes with grafted CNTF-NS cells than in eyes with grafted control-NS cells. This is the first demonstration that a continuous intraocular administration of a neurotrophic factor attenuates retinal degeneration in an animal model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:25992714

  4. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCL include: Abnormally increased muscle tone or spasm Blindness or vision problems Dementia Lack of muscle coordination ... early can have vision problems that progress to blindness and problems with mental function that get worse. ...

  5. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... your family has a known history of NCL. Prenatal tests, or a test called preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), may be available, depending on the specific type of disease. In PGD, an embryo is tested for abnormalities ...

  6. Morphological and Functional Correlates of Synaptic Pathology in the Cathepsin D Knock-Out Mouse Model of Congenital Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sabine; Molchanova, Svetlana M.; Wright, Ann K; Edwards, Andrew; Cooper, Jon D.; Taira, Tomi; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Tyynelä, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cathepsin D (CTSD) gene cause an aggressive neurodegenerative disease (congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) that leads to early death. Recent evidence suggests that presynaptic abnormalities play a major role in the pathogenesis of CTSD deficiencies. To identify the early events that lead to synaptic alterations, we investigated synaptic ultrastructure and function in pre-symptomatic CTSD knock-out (Ctsd−/−) mice. Electron microscopy revealed that there were significantly greater numbers of readily releasable synaptic vesicles present in Ctsd−/− mice than in wild-type control mice as early as postnatal day 16. The size of this synaptic vesicle pool continued to increase with disease progression in the hippocampus and thalamus of the Ctsd−/− mice. Electrophysiology revealed a markedly decreased frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with no effect on pair-pulse modulation of the evoked EPSPs in the hippocampus of Ctsd−/− mice. The reduced miniature EPSC frequency was observed before the appearance of epilepsy or any morphological sign of synaptic degeneration. Taken together, the data indicate that CTSD is required for normal synaptic function, and that a failure in synaptic trafficking or recycling may be an early and important pathological mechanism in Ctsd−/− mice; these presynaptic abnormalities may initiate synaptic degeneration in advance of subsequent neuronal loss. PMID:22082660

  7. An anti-neuroinflammatory that targets dysregulated glia enhances the efficacy of CNS-directed gene therapy in murine infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Macauley, Shannon L; Wong, Andrew M S; Shyng, Charles; Augner, David P; Dearborn, Joshua T; Pearse, Yewande; Roberts, Marie S; Fowler, Stephen C; Cooper, Jonathan D; Watterson, D Martin; Sands, Mark S

    2014-09-24

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is an inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by a deficiency in palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1). Studies in Ppt1(-/-) mice demonstrate that glial activation is central to the pathogenesis of INCL. Astrocyte activation precedes neuronal loss, while cytokine upregulation associated with microglial reactivity occurs before and concurrent with neurodegeneration. Therefore, we hypothesized that cytokine cascades associated with neuroinflammation are important therapeutic targets for the treatment of INCL. MW01-2-151SRM (MW151) is a blood-brain barrier penetrant, small-molecule anti-neuroinflammatory that attenuates glial cytokine upregulation in models of neuroinflammation such as traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, and kainic acid toxicity. Thus, we used MW151, alone and in combination with CNS-directed, AAV-mediated gene therapy, as a possible treatment for INCL. MW151 alone decreased seizure susceptibility. When combined with AAV-mediated gene therapy, treated INCL mice had increased life spans, improved motor performance, and eradication of seizures. Combination-treated INCL mice also had decreased brain atrophy, astrocytosis, and microglial activation, as well as intermediary effects on cytokine upregulation. These data suggest that MW151 can attenuate seizure susceptibility but is most effective when used in conjunction with a therapy that targets the primary genetic defect. PMID:25253854

  8. Analysis of phospholipid molecular species in brains from patients with infantile and juvenile neuronal-ceroid lipofuscinosis using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Käkelä, Reijo; Somerharju, Pentti; Tyynelä, Jaana

    2003-03-01

    Phospholipids (PL) in cerebral cortex from patients with infantile (INCL or CLN1) and juvenile (JNCL or CLN3) forms of neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (NCL) and controls were analysed by normal phase HPLC and on-line electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometric detection (LC-ESI-MS). The method provided quantitative data on numerous molecular species of different PL classes, which are not achieved by using the conventional chromatographic methods. Compared with the controls, the INCL brains contained proportionally more phosphatidylcholine (PC), and less phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS). Different molecular species of PC, PE, PS, phosphatidylinositol and sphingomyelin were quantified using multiple internal PL standards that differed in fatty acyl chain length and thus allowed correction for chain length dependency of instrument response. In INCL cortex, which had lost 65% of the normal PL content, the proportions of polyunsaturated molecular species, especially the PS and PE that contained docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), were dramatically decreased. The membranes may have adapted to this alteration by increasing the proportions of PL molecules substituted with monounsaturated and short-chain fatty acids. Lysobisphosphatidic acid was highly elevated in the INCL brain and consisted mostly of polyunsaturated species. It is possible that changes in the composition of PL membranes accelerate progression of INCL by altering signalling and membrane trafficking in neurons. PMID:12603829

  9. Atp13a2-deficient mice exhibit neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, limited α-synuclein accumulation and age-dependent sensorimotor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Patrick J.; Fleming, Sheila M.; Clippinger, Amy K.; Lewis, Jada; Tsunemi, Taiji; Giasson, Benoit; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mazzulli, Joseph R.; Bardgett, Mark E.; Haik, Kristi L.; Ekhator, Osunde; Chava, Anil Kumar; Howard, John; Gannon, Matt; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Chen, Yinhuai; Prasad, Vikram; Linn, Stephen C.; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Westbroek, Wendy; Sidransky, Ellen; Krainc, Dimitri; Shull, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ATP13A2 (PARK9), encoding a lysosomal P-type ATPase, are associated with both Kufor–Rakeb syndrome (KRS) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). KRS has recently been classified as a rare genetic form of Parkinson's disease (PD), whereas NCL is a lysosomal storage disorder. Although the transport activity of ATP13A2 has not been defined, in vitro studies show that its loss compromises lysosomal function, which in turn is thought to cause neuronal degeneration. To understand the role of ATP13A2 dysfunction in disease, we disrupted its gene in mice. Atp13a2−/− and Atp13a2+/+ mice were tested behaviorally to assess sensorimotor and cognitive function at multiple ages. In the brain, lipofuscin accumulation, α-synuclein aggregation and dopaminergic pathology were measured. Behaviorally, Atp13a2−/− mice displayed late-onset sensorimotor deficits. Accelerated deposition of autofluorescent storage material (lipofuscin) was observed in the cerebellum and in neurons of the hippocampus and the cortex of Atp13a2−/− mice. Immunoblot analysis showed increased insoluble α-synuclein in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex or cerebellum. There was no change in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra or in striatal dopamine levels in aged Atp13a2−/− mice. These results show that the loss of Atp13a2 causes sensorimotor impairments, α-synuclein accumulation as occurs in PD and related synucleinopathies, and accumulation of lipofuscin deposits characteristic of NCL, thus providing the first direct demonstration that null mutations in Atp13a2 can cause pathological features of both diseases in the same organism. PMID:23393156

  10. Altered glutamate receptor function in the cerebellum of the Ppt1−/− mouse, a murine model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Rozzy; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a family of devastating pediatric neurodegenerative disorders and currently represent the most common form of pediatric-onset neurodegeneration. Infantile NCL (INCL), the most aggressive of these disorders, is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene that encodes the enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1). Previous studies have suggested that glutamatergic neurotransmission may be disrupted in INCL, and therefore, the present study investigates glutamate receptor function in the Ppt1−/− mouse model of INCL by comparing the sensitivity of cultured WT and Ppt1−/− cerebellar granule cells to glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity. Ppt1−/− neurons were significantly less sensitive to AMPA receptor-mediated toxicity but markedly more vulnerable to NMDA receptor-mediated cell death. Since glutamate receptor function is primarily regulated by the surface expression level of the receptor, the surface level of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in the cerebella of WT and Ppt1−/− mice was also examined. Western blotting of surface cross-linked cerebellar samples showed a significantly lower surface level of the GluR4 AMPA receptor subunit in Ppt1−/− mice, providing a plausible explanation for the decreased vulnerability of Ppt1−/− cerebellar neurons to AMPA receptor-mediated cell death. The surface expression of the NR1, NR2A and NR2B NMDA receptor subunits was similar in the cerebella of WT and Ppt1−/− mice, indicating that there is another mechanism behind the increased sensitivity of Ppt1−/− cerebellar granule cells to NMDA toxicity. Our results indicate an AMPA receptor hypo- and NMDA receptor hyperfunction phenotype in Ppt1−/− neurons and provide new therapeutic targets for INCL. PMID:21971706

  11. Large alterations in ganglioside and neutral glycosphingolipid patterns in brains from cases with infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis/polyunsaturated fatty acid lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Svennerholm, L; Fredman, P; Jungbjer, B; Månsson, J E; Rynmark, B M; Boström, K; Hagberg, B; Norén, L; Santavuori, P

    1987-12-01

    Lipid composition was studied on cerebral tissue from nine children who had died of a progressive encephalopathy called the infantile form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) or polyunsaturated fatty acid lipidosis (PFAL). In the terminal stage of the disease, the concentrations of all lipid classes were found to be significantly reduced in the cerebral and cerebellar cortex and white matter. The concentration of gangliosides of the cerebral cortex was 15% and that of cerebrosides (galactosylceramide) in white matter 0.2-5% of the normal values for the children's ages. The reduction of gangliosides mainly affected those of the gangliotetraose series, particularly GD1a. The fatty acids of the linolenic acid series were strongly reduced in ethanolamine and serine phosphoglycerides. A very large increase up to 100-fold of oligoglycosphingolipids of the globo series and two fucose-containing lipids of the neolacto series was found in the forebrain of the three advanced cases examined. The brain tissue also contained very high concentrations of mono-, di-, and trisialogangliosides of the lacto and neolacto series, gangliosides with type 1 chain dominating. The structures of the gangliosides were tentatively identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and monoclonal antibodies with carefully determined epitope specificity. The gangliosides and neutral glycosphingolipids had very similar fatty acid composition, consisting of about 40% stearic acid and 40% C24-acids. PMID:3681296

  12. Parent-reported benefits of flupirtine in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease; CLN3) are not supported by quantitative data.

    PubMed

    Cialone, Jennifer; Augustine, Erika F; Newhouse, Nicole; Adams, Heather; Vierhile, Amy; Marshall, Frederick J; de Blieck, Elisabeth A; Kwon, Jennifer; Rothberg, Paul G; Mink, Jonathan W

    2011-10-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL; CLN3 disease; Batten disease) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease of childhood that typically presents at school age with vision loss followed by progressive cognitive decline, motor dysfunction, seizures, and behavior problems. No therapy has been shown to slow the progression of disease in JNCL patients, and all current treatments are symptomatic. Flupirtine has been shown in vitro to reduce apoptosis in CLN3 lymphocytes. Based on that preclinical study, several children with JNCL were given flupirtine by their parents. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was evidence of attenuated disease progression in any JNCL symptom domain. We administered a survey to parents of JNCL children to qualitatively assess flupirtine efficacy. We used the Unified Batten Disease Rating Scale (UBDRS) to determine specific aspects of disease progression and investigated three age-related factors: loss of independent ambulation, loss of intelligible speech, and loss of ability to perform independent activities of daily living. The median scores for the UBDRS physical, behavior, and capability subscales were determined in flupirtine-exposed subjects and compared to age-, sex-, and genotype-matched subjects who had never taken flupirtine. Twenty-one percent of survey responders reported administering flupirtine to their JNCL child, and 56% of these families perceived beneficial changes that they attributed to flupirtine. However, our quantitative, prospectively obtained data did not show any change in JNCL disease progression that could be attributed to flupirtine. This study highlights the need for prospective experimental therapeutic research. PMID:21556831

  13. Partial genetic suppression of a loss-of-function mutant of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-associated protease TPP1 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jonathan E.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is the most common childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease. NCL is inevitably fatal, and there is currently no treatment available. Children with NCL show a progressive decline in movement, vision and mental abilities, and an accumulation of autofluorescent deposits in neurons and other cell types. Late-infantile NCL is caused by mutations in the lysosomal protease tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1). TPP1 cleaves tripeptides from the N-terminus of proteins in vitro, but little is known about the physiological function of TPP1. TPP1 shows wide conservation in vertebrates but it is not found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we characterize ddTpp1, a TPP1 ortholog present in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Lysates from cells lacking ddTpp1 show a reduced but not abolished ability to cleave a TPP1 substrate, suggesting that other Dictyostelium enzymes can perform this cleavage. ddTpp1 and human TPP1 localize to the lysosome in Dictyostelium, indicating conserved function and trafficking. Cells that lack ddTpp1 show precocious multicellular development and a reduced ability to form spores during development. When cultured in autophagy-stimulating conditions, cells lacking ddTpp1 rapidly decrease in size and are less viable than wild-type cells, suggesting that one function of ddTpp1 could be to limit autophagy. Cells that lack ddTpp1 exhibit strongly impaired development in the presence of the lysosome-perturbing drug chloroquine, and this phenotype can be suppressed through a secondary mutation in the gene that we name suppressor of tpp1− A (stpA), which encodes a protein with some similarity to mammalian oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs). Taken together, these results suggest that targeting specific proteins could be a viable way to suppress the effects of loss of TPP1 function. PMID:25540127

  14. Partial genetic suppression of a loss-of-function mutant of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-associated protease TPP1 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jonathan E; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is the most common childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease. NCL is inevitably fatal, and there is currently no treatment available. Children with NCL show a progressive decline in movement, vision and mental abilities, and an accumulation of autofluorescent deposits in neurons and other cell types. Late-infantile NCL is caused by mutations in the lysosomal protease tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1). TPP1 cleaves tripeptides from the N-terminus of proteins in vitro, but little is known about the physiological function of TPP1. TPP1 shows wide conservation in vertebrates but it is not found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we characterize ddTpp1, a TPP1 ortholog present in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Lysates from cells lacking ddTpp1 show a reduced but not abolished ability to cleave a TPP1 substrate, suggesting that other Dictyostelium enzymes can perform this cleavage. ddTpp1 and human TPP1 localize to the lysosome in Dictyostelium, indicating conserved function and trafficking. Cells that lack ddTpp1 show precocious multicellular development and a reduced ability to form spores during development. When cultured in autophagy-stimulating conditions, cells lacking ddTpp1 rapidly decrease in size and are less viable than wild-type cells, suggesting that one function of ddTpp1 could be to limit autophagy. Cells that lack ddTpp1 exhibit strongly impaired development in the presence of the lysosome-perturbing drug chloroquine, and this phenotype can be suppressed through a secondary mutation in the gene that we name suppressor of tpp1(-) A (stpA), which encodes a protein with some similarity to mammalian oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs). Taken together, these results suggest that targeting specific proteins could be a viable way to suppress the effects of loss of TPP1 function. PMID:25540127

  15. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease).

    PubMed

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T; Calvi, Alessandra A; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C; Cutler, Daniel F; Futter, Clare E; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2015-12-15

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3(Δex1-6) null mice, revealing classic 'fingerprint' lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3(Δex1) (-6) RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6)-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3(Δex1) (-) (6) RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  16. Photoreceptor phagosome processing defects and disturbed autophagy in retinal pigment epithelium of Cln3Δex1-6 mice modelling juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease)

    PubMed Central

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T.; Calvi, Alessandra A.; Turmaine, Mark; Seabra, Miguel C.; Cutler, Daniel F.; Futter, Clare E.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degeneration and visual impairment are the first signs of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by CLN3 mutations, followed by inevitable progression to blindness. We investigated retinal degeneration in Cln3Δex1-6 null mice, revealing classic ‘fingerprint’ lysosomal storage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), replicating the human disease. The lysosomes contain mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase subunit c along with undigested membranes, indicating a reduced degradative capacity. Mature autophagosomes and basal phagolysosomes, the terminal degradative compartments of autophagy and phagocytosis, are also increased in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE, reflecting disruption to these key pathways that underpin the daily phagocytic turnover of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) required for maintenance of vision. The accumulated autophagosomes have post-lysosome fusion morphology, with undigested internal contents visible, while accumulated phagosomes are frequently docked to cathepsin D-positive lysosomes, without mixing of phagosomal and lysosomal contents. This suggests lysosome-processing defects affect both autophagy and phagocytosis, supported by evidence that phagosomes induced in Cln3Δex1-6-derived mouse embryonic fibroblasts have visibly disorganized membranes, unprocessed internal vesicles and membrane contents, in addition to reduced LAMP1 membrane recruitment. We propose that defective lysosomes in Cln3Δex1-6 RPE have a reduced degradative capacity that impairs the final steps of the intimately connected autophagic and phagocytic pathways that are responsible for degradation of POS. A build-up of degradative organellar by-products and decreased recycling of cellular materials is likely to disrupt processes vital to maintenance of vision by the RPE. PMID:26450516

  17. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type CLN2: A new rationale for the construction of phenotypic subgroups based on a survey of 25 cases in South America

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Romina; Noelia Carabelos, María; Xin, Winnie; Sims, Katherine; Guelbert, Norberto; Adriana Cismondi, Inés; Pons, Patricia; Alonso, Graciela Irene; Troncoso, Mónica; Witting, Scarlet; Pearce, David A.; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Oller-Ramírez, Ana María; de Halac, Inés Noher

    2013-01-01

    Tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 (TPP1) null or residual activity occurs in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) with underlying TPP1/CLN2 mutations. A survey of 25 South American CLN2 affected individuals enabled the differentiation of two phenotypes: classical late-infantile and variant juvenile, each in approximately 50% of patients, with residual TPP1 activity occurring in approximately 32%. Each individual was assigned to one of three subgroups: (I) n=11, null TPP1 activity in leukocytes; (II) n=8, residual TPP1 activity of 0.60–15.85 nmol/h/mg (nr 110–476); (III) n=6, activity not measured in leukocytes. Curvilinear bodies (CB) appeared in almost all studied CLN2 subjects; the only exceptions occurred in cases of subgroup II: two individuals had combined CBs/fingerprints (FPs), and one case had pure FPs. There were 15 mutations (4 first published in this paper, 3 previously observed in South America by our group, and 8 previously observed by others). In subgroup I, mutations were either missense or nonsense; in subgroups II and III, mutations prevailed at the non-conserved intronic site, c.887-10A>G (intron 7), and to a lesser extent at c.89+5G>C (intron 2), in heterozygous combinations. Grouping phenotypically and genetically known individuals on the basis of TPP1 activity supported the concept that residual enzyme activity underlies a protracted disease course. The prevalence of intronic mutations at nonconserved sites in subgroup II individuals indicates that some alternative splicing might allow some residual TPP1 activity. PMID:23266810

  18. Adult onset xanthogranuloma presenting as laryngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Li, Shawn; Weidenbecher, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic disorders can be classified according to the distribution pattern of the lesions and the organs involved. Non-Langerhans-cell histiocytosis is a rare group of diseases that have varied clinical presentations ranging from isolated masses to diffuse systemic eruptions. We discuss a patient who initially presented with a vocal cord lesion and was ultimately diagnosed with adult onset xanthogranuloma. PMID:26954863

  19. Chronic oral administration of minocycline to sheep with ovine CLN6 neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis maintains pharmacological concentrations in the brain but does not suppress neuroinflammation or disease progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs; or Batten disease) are fatal inherited human neurodegenerative diseases affecting an estimated 1:12,500 live births worldwide. They are caused by mutations in at least 11 different genes. Currently, there are no effective treatments. Progress into understanding pathogenesis and possible therapies depends on studying animal models. The most studied animals are the CLN6 South Hampshire sheep, in which the course of neuropathology closely follows that in affected children. Neurodegeneration, a hallmark of the disease, has been linked to neuroinflammation and is consequent to it. Activation of astrocytes and microglia begins prenatally, starting from specific foci associated with the later development of progressive cortical atrophy and the development of clinical symptoms, including the occipital cortex and blindness. Both neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation generalize and become more severe with increasing age and increasing clinical severity. The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic administration of an anti-inflammatory drug, minocycline, from an early age would halt or reverse the development of disease. Method Minocycline, a tetracycline family antibiotic with activity against neuroinflammation, was tested by chronic oral administration of 25 mg minocycline/kg/day to presymptomatic lambs affected with CLN6 NCL at 3 months of age to 14 months of age, when clinical symptoms are obvious, to determine if this would suppress neuroinflammation or disease progression. Results Minocycline was absorbed without significant rumen biotransformation to maintain pharmacological concentrations of 1 μM in plasma and 400 nM in cerebrospinal fluid, but these did not result in inhibition of microglial activation or astrocytosis and did not change the neuronal loss or clinical course of the disease. Conclusion Oral administration is an effective route for drug delivery to the central nervous system in large

  20. Canine ceroid lipofuscinosis, a model for ageing of the human isocortex.

    PubMed

    Braak, H; Braak, E; Strenge, H; Koppang, N

    1984-01-01

    In canine ceroid lipofuscinosis (one case studied), isocortical layer IIIab pyramidal cells develop spindle-shaped enlargements of their proximal axon filled with lipopigment, a feature that can be observed in juvenile and adult type of human neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and in normal ageing of the human isocortex as well. PMID:6479601

  1. A CLN8 nonsense mutation in the whole genome sequence of a mixed breed dog with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and Australian Shepherd ancestry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juyuan; Johnson, Gary S; Brown, Holly A; Provencher, Michele L; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Mhlanga-Mutangadura, Tendai; Taylor, Jeremy F; Schnabel, Robert D; O'Brien, Dennis P; Katz, Martin L

    2014-08-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are hereditary neurodegenerative diseases characterized by seizures and progressive cognitive decline, motor impairment, and vision loss accompanied by accumulation of autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies in the central nervous system and elsewhere in the body. Mutations in at least 14 genes underlie the various forms of NCL. One of these genes, CLN8, encodes an intrinsic membrane protein of unknown function that appears to be localized primarily to the endoplasmic reticulum. Most CLN8 mutations in people result in a form of NCL with a late infantile onset and relatively rapid progression. A mixed breed dog with Australian Shepherd and Blue Heeler ancestry developed neurological signs characteristic of NCL starting at about 8months of age. The signs became progressively worse and the dog was euthanized at 21months of age due to seizures of increasing frequency and severity. Postmortem examination of the brain and retinas identified massive accumulations of intracellular autofluorescent inclusions characteristic of the NCLs. Whole genome sequencing of DNA from this dog identified a CLN8:c.585G>A transition that predicts a CLN8:p.Trp195* nonsense mutation. This mutation appears to be rare in both ancestral breeds. All of our 133 archived DNA samples from Blue Heelers, and 1481 of our 1488 archived Australian Shepherd DNA samples tested homozygous for the reference CLN8:c.585G allele. Four of the Australian Shepherd samples tested heterozygous and 3 tested homozygous for the mutant CLN8:c.585A allele. All 3 dogs homozygous for the A allele exhibited clinical signs of NCL and in 2 of them NCL was confirmed by postmortem evaluation of brain tissue. The occurrence of confirmed NCL in 3 of 4 CLN8:c.585A homozygous dogs, plus the occurrence of clinical signs consistent with NCL in the fourth homozygote strongly suggests that this rare truncating mutation causes NCL. Identification of this NCL-causing mutation provides the

  2. A variant form of late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN5) is not an allelic form of batten (Spielmeyer-Vogt-Sjoegren, CLN3) disease: Exclusion of linkage to the CLN3 region of chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.; Gardiner, R.M.; Jaervela, I. ); Santavuori, P. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-03-15

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The biochemical basis of these diseases is unknown. Three main childhood forms are recognized: infantile (Santavuori-Haltia disease, CLN1), late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky disease, CLN2), and juvenile (Spielmeyer-Vogt-Sjoegren, Batten disease, CLN3). The CLN1 gene has been mapped to chromosome 1p and CLN3 to chromosome 16p by linkage analysis. The gene locus causing the classical late infantile form (CLN2) has not yet been mapped but has been excluded from both CLN1 and CLN3 loci. About 10% of NCL cases have a typical clinical features with most of these resembling the late infantile form. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Genetic heterogeneity in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL): Evidence that the late-infantile subtype (Jansky-Bielschowsky disease; CLN2) is not an allelic form of the juvenile or infantile subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.; McKay, T.; Mitchison, H.; Gardiner, M. ); Vesa, J.; Jaervelae, I.; Hellsten, E.; Peltonen, L.; Thompson, A.; Callen, D.; Sutherland, G.; Luna-Battadano, D.; Stallings, R.

    1993-10-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of inherited neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. Inheritance is autosomal recessive. Three main childhood subtypes are recognized: Infantile (Haltia-Santavuori disease; MIM 256743), late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky disease; MIM 204500), and juvenile (Spielmeyer-Sjoegren-Vogt, or Batten disease; MIM 204200). The gene loci for the juvenile (CLN3) and infantile (CLN1) types have been mapped to human chromosomes 16p and 1p, respectively, by linkage analysis. Linkage analysis of 25 families segregating for late-infantile NCL has excluded these regions as the site of this disease locus (CLN2). The three childhood subtypes of NCL therefore arise from mutations at distinct loci. 17 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Association between CLN3 (Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, CLN3 Type) Gene Expression and Clinical Characteristics of Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Makoukji, Joelle; Raad, Mohamad; Genadry, Katia; El-Sitt, Sally; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Saad Aldin, Ehab; Nohra, Eden; Jabbour, Mark; Sangaralingam, Ajanthah; Chelala, Claude; Habib, Robert H.; Boulos, Fouad; Tfayli, Arafat; Boustany, Rose-Mary

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Elucidation of underlying biology and molecular pathways is necessary for improving therapeutic options and clinical outcomes. CLN3 protein (CLN3p), deficient in neurodegenerative CLN3 disease is anti-apoptotic, and defects in the CLN3 gene cause accelerated apoptosis of neurons in CLN3 disease and up-regulation of ceramide. Dysregulated apoptotic pathways are often implicated in the development of the oncogenic phenotype. Predictably, CLN3 mRNA expression and CLN3 protein were up-regulated in a number of human and murine breast cancer-cell lines. Here, we determine CLN3 expression in non-tumor vs. tumor samples from fresh and formalin-fixed/paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast tissue and analyze the association between CLN3 overexpression and different clinicopathological characteristics of breast cancer patients. Additionally, gene expression of 28 enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism was determined. CLN3 mRNA is overexpressed in tumor vs. non-tumor breast tissue from FFPE and fresh samples, as well as in mouse MCF7 breast cancer compared to MCF10A normal cells. Of the clinicopathological characteristics of tumor grade, age, menopause status, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), only absence of HER2 expression correlated with CLN3 overexpression. Sphingolipid genes for ceramide synthases 2 and 6 (CerS2; CerS6), delta(4)-desaturase sphingolipid 2 (DEGS2), and acidic sphingomyelinase (SMPD1) displayed higher expression levels in breast cancer vs. control tissue, whereas ceramide galactosyltransferase (UGT8) was underexpressed in breast cancer samples. CLN3 may be a novel molecular target for cancer drug discovery with the goal of modulation of ceramide pathways. PMID:26528430

  5. Adult onset retinoblastoma: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Raj, Amit; Arya, Sudesh Kumar; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Kohli, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor of childhood. About 95% of retinoblastoma cases are diagnosed before the age of 5 years. Not more than 30 cases of Adult-onset retinoblastoma have been reported in literature. A 32 year old male presented with a painful blind eye. There was sudden loss of vision accompanied by severe pain and redness in right eye about 1 year ago, for which some surgery was done with neither a gain in vision nor any relief from pain. Then he was put on maximum tolerable medical therapy, later cyclocryotherapy was done. Now he presented to us with complains of extreme pain and bleeding from right eye since 2 days. There is no history of any ocular trauma. Right eye had no perception of light & showed anterior staphyloma with perforation. Right eye evisceration was done & material sent for histopathological examination, which revealed an adult-onset retinoblastoma. CECT scan revealed thickening of optic nerve throughout its entire length with contrast enhancement. He was further taken up for enucleation of residual sclera with maximum optic nerve stump removal to reconfirm the diagnosis. Histopathological examination revealed tumor deposits present in orbital soft tissue, resection margins and optic nerve cut end.Retinoblastoma presenting in adult age creates a diagnostic dilemma because of its low frequency and atypical features. We want to highlight the importance of high clinical suspicion and imaging modalities before taking any patient for evisceration with unexplained vision loss. One should send the eviscerated material for histopathological examination. PMID:26709674

  6. Phenotypes, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Genetic factors, atopy, and early respiratory tract infections are well-recognized factors predisposing to childhood-onset asthma. Adult-onset asthma is more often associated with obesity, smoking, depression, or other life-style or environmental factors, even though genetic factors and respiratory tract infections may also play a role in adult-onset disease. Adult-onset asthma is characterized by absence of atopy and is often severe requiring treatment with high dose of inhaled and/or oral steroids. Variety of risk factors and nonatopic nature of adult-onset disease suggest that variety of mechanisms is involved in the disease pathogenesis and that these mechanisms differ from the pathobiology of childhood-onset asthma with prevailing Th2 airway inflammation. Recognition of the mechanisms and mediators that drive the adult-onset disease helps to develop novel strategies for the treatment. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of adult-onset asthma and to concentrate on the mechanisms and mediators involved in establishing adult-onset asthma in response to specific risk factors. We also discuss the involvement of these mechanisms in the currently recognized phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. PMID:26538828

  7. Late-adult onset Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    McKelvie, Penelope; Infeld, Bernard; Marotta, Rosetta; Chin, Judy; Thorburn, David; Collins, Steven

    2012-02-01

    We report an illustrative case of a 74-year-old man who, in the absence of intercurrent illness, presented with rapid cognitive decline. MRI showed bilateral, symmetrical, high T2-weighted signal in the anterior basal ganglia and medial thalami, extending to the periaqueductal grey matter, basal ganglia and basal frontal lobes. A (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan showed widespread reduction of metabolism in the cortex of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus and caudate nuclei, with sparing of the sensorimotor cortex, thalami and lentiform nuclei. A mild vitamin B12 deficiency was found and despite normal thiamine levels, intravenous (IV) thiamine and vitamin B therapy was commenced, with a short course of IV methylprednisolone and tetracycline. Repeat neuropsychological assessment four weeks following treatment revealed increased alertness and interactiveness but significant cognitive decline persisted. Unexpectedly, the patient suffered a transmural anterior myocardial infarction six weeks after presentation and died within 24hours. An a autopsy showed: global reduction in cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity in all skeletal muscles examined; bilateral, symmetrical, hypervascular, focally necrotizing lesions in the substantia nigra, periaqueductal grey matter, superior colliculi, medial thalami anteriorly and posteriorly, as well as in the putamena but the mammillary bodies were not affected. Biochemical analysis of fresh muscle confirmed selective deficiency of complex IV of the oxidative phosphorylation chain. A diagnosis of late-adult onset Leigh syndrome was made. Multiple genetic studies failed to identify the specific underlying mutation. The relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:22273117

  8. Ceroid in fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1956-01-01

    Since the original description of ceroid in rats, many papers have appeared on the etiology and characteristics of this pigment. It was first seen as a yellow, granular pigment in hematoxylin and eosin sections of the cirrhotic livers of choline deficient rats. The pigment was more fully characterized by Endicott and Lillie, and additional stainging reactions were summarized recently by Lillie. The pigment is sudanophilic in paraffin sections, acid-fast, basophilic, isotropic, iron negative, and highly resistant to solution in water, alcohol, fat solvents, and dilute aqueous acids and alkalis. It is stained by Mallory's hemofuscin stain and Weigert's myelin stain. It reduces osmium tetraoxide and diamine silver carbonate but not ferric ferricyanide. The Gmelin reactions for bile pigments is negative. It has a greenish yellow fluorescence at 3650-3660 Å. It is Schiff positive with or without antecedent diastase digestion after performic or periodic acid oxidation.

  9. Data on characterizing the gene expression patterns of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis genes: CLN1, CLN2, CLN3, CLN5 and their association to interneuron and neurotransmission markers: Parvalbumin and Somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Minye, Helena M; Fabritius, Anna-Liisa; Vesa, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-09-01

    The article contains raw and analyzed data related to the research article "Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis genes, CLN2, CLN3, CLN5 are spatially and temporally co-expressed in a developing mouse brain" (Fabritius et al., 2014) [1]. The processed data gives an understanding of the development of the cell types that are mostly affected by defective function of CLN proteins, timing of expression of CLN1, CLN2, CLN3 and CLN5 genes in a murine model. The data shows relationship between the expression pattern of these genes during neural development. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify known interneuronal markers for neurotransmission and cell proliferation: parvalbumin, somatostatin subpopulations of interneurons. Non-radioactive in-situ hybridization detected CLN5 mRNA in the hippocampus. Throughout the development strong expression of CLN genes were identified in the germinal epithelium and in ventricle regions, cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. This provides supportive evidence that CLN1, CLN2, CLN3 and CLN5 genes may be involved in synaptic pruning. PMID:27508227

  10. Adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome and response to plasmapheresis

    PubMed Central

    Aghoram, Rajeshwari; Srijithesh, P. R.; Kannoth, Sudheeran

    2016-01-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a rare disease characterized by alopecia, recurrent muscle spasms, diarrhea, and skeletal abnormalities Adult-onset disease is reported only in five patients. Most of the reports have not characterized the nature of muscle spasm in the disease. In this paper, we report the first case of adult-onset Satoyoshi syndrome from India and the clinical and electrophysiological response to plasmapheresis. PMID:27011647

  11. Long-term expression and safety of administration of AAVrh.10hCLN2 to the brain of rats and nonhuman primates for the treatment of late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Sondhi, Dolan; Johnson, Linda; Purpura, Keith; Monette, Sebastien; Souweidane, Mark M; Kaplitt, Michael G; Kosofsky, Barry; Yohay, Kaleb; Ballon, Douglas; Dyke, Jonathan; Kaminksy, Stephen M; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2012-10-01

    Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL), a fatal, lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CLN2 gene, results in a deficiency of tripeptidyl-peptidase I (TPP-I) activity in neurons. Our prior studies showed that delivery of the human CLN2 cDNA directly to the CNS, using an adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector, is safe in children with LINCL. As a second-generation strategy, we have demonstrated that AAVrh.10hCLN2, a rhesus-derived AAV vector, mediates wide distribution of TPP-I through the CNS in a murine model. This study tests the hypothesis that direct administration of AAVrh.10hCLN2 to the CNS of rats and nonhuman primates at doses scalable to humans has an acceptable safety profile and mediates significant CLN2 expression in the CNS. A dose of 10(11) genome copies (GC) was administered bilaterally to the striatum of Sprague Dawley rats with sacrifice at 7 and 90 days with no significant impact except for mild vector-related histopathological changes at the site of vector administration. A dose of 1.8×10(12) GC of AAVrh.10hCLN2 was administered to the CNS of 8 African green monkeys. The vector-treated monkeys did not differ from controls in any safety parameter except for mild to moderate white matter edema and inflammation localized to the administration sites of the vector. There were no clinical sequelae to these localized findings. TPP-I activity was >2 SD over background in 31.7±8.1% of brain at 90 days. These findings establish the dose and safety profile for human clinical studies for the treatment of LINCL with AAVrh.10hCLN2. PMID:23131032

  12. Adult-onset laryngomalacia: case reports and review of management.

    PubMed

    Hey, Shi Ying; Oozeer, Nashreen Banon; Robertson, Stuart; MacKenzie, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Laryngomalacia is a dynamic airway condition characterised by inward collapse of flaccid supraglottic structures during inspiration. Although the most common cause of stridor in the paediatric population, adult-onset laryngomalacia remains a rare entity and its management, challenging. Two cases of adult-onset laryngomalacia are reported. A review of the English literature is performed and additional publications identified by hand-searching relevant papers; 13 case reports/series comprising 28 cases of adult-onset laryngomalacia were identified, divided into two main groups: idiopathic (6/28) and acquired (22/28). The aetiology of the acquired form includes neurological, traumatic and iatrogenic. Reported therapeutic measures used are laser supraglottoplasty, epiglottopexy, partial epiglottidectomy, defunctioning tracheostomy and intubation whilst correcting the underlying cause. The majority of patients only required one therapeutic procedure (follow-up of 2-24 months). A strong index of suspicion is required to diagnose adult-onset laryngomalacia aided by in-office laryngoscopy. The rarity of this condition prevents management-based randomised controlled trials. PMID:24615649

  13. Alcohol-Induced Developmental Origins of Adult-Onset Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Emilie R; Washburn, Shannon E; Golding, Michael C; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C; Ramadoss, Jayanth

    2016-07-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure may impair growth, development, and function of multiple organ systems and is encompassed by the term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Research has so far focused on the mechanisms, prevention, and diagnosis of FASD, while the risk for adult-onset chronic diseases in individuals exposed to alcohol in utero is not well explored. David Barker's hypothesis on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) suggests that insults to the milieu of the developing fetus program it for adult development of chronic diseases. In the 25 years since the introduction of this hypothesis, epidemiological and animal model studies have made significant advancements in identifying in utero developmental origins of chronic adult-onset diseases affecting cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and psychobehavioral systems. Teratogen exposure is an established programming agent for adult diseases, and recent studies suggest that prenatal alcohol exposure correlates with adult onset of neurobehavioral deficits, cardiovascular disease, endocrine dysfunction, and nutrient homeostasis instability, warranting additional investigation of alcohol-induced DOHaD, as well as patient follow-up well into adulthood for affected individuals. In utero epigenetic alterations during critical periods of methylation are a key potential mechanism for programming and susceptibility of adult-onset chronic diseases, with imprinted genes affecting metabolism being critical targets. Additional studies in epidemiology, phenotypic characterization in response to timing, dose, and duration of exposure, as well as elucidation of mechanisms underlying FASD-DOHaD inter relation, are thus needed to clinically define chronic disease associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. These studies are critical to establish interventional strategies that decrease incidence of these adult-onset diseases and promote healthier aging among individuals affected with FASD. PMID:27254466

  14. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  15. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14-17 years in females and 16-19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  16. Office Work Exposures and Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Maritta S.; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Office exposures have been linked to symptoms of sick building syndrome, but their relation to the development of asthma has not been studied previously. These exposures have increasing importance because an increasing proportion of the workforce is working in office environments. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the relations of exposure to carbonless copy paper (CCP), paper dust, and fumes from photocopiers and printers to adult-onset asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based incident case–control study of adults 21–63 years of age living in the Pirkanmaa District in South Finland. All new clinically diagnosed cases (n = 521) of asthma were recruited during a 3-year study period. A random sample of the source population formed the controls (n = 1,016). This part focused on 133 cases and 316 controls who were office workers according to their current occupation classified by the 1988 International Standard Classification of Occupations. All participants answered a questionnaire on health, smoking, occupation, and exposures at work and home. Subjects with previous asthma were excluded. Results Exposures to paper dust [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25–3.10] and CCP (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.03–2.66) were related to significantly increased risk of adult-onset asthma. An exposure–response relation was observed between exposure to paper dust and risk of asthma. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that exposures to paper dust and CCP in office work are related to increased risk of adult-onset asthma. Reduction of these exposures could prevent asthma in office workers. Clinicians seeing asthma patients should be aware of this link to office exposures. PMID:17637914

  17. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  18. [Macrophage activation syndrome associated with adult-onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2007-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially lethal disease, resulting from uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease. AOSD resemble reactive MAS in its symptoms and laboratory data. Moreover, AOSD per se induces MAS. It is, therefore, quite difficult to differentiate these syndrome and disease. The immunodeficiency state induced by treatment in AOSD could reactivate latent viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus, which could potentially lead to MAS. The therapeutic agents for AOSD, such as sulfasalazine, also could provoke reactive MAS. Because multiple factors are involved in inducing MAS to a different degree, the main cause should be searched for and targeted for the therapy. PMID:18174671

  19. Diagnosis of congenital and adult-onset hypothyroidism in cats.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2006-02-01

    Whereas hyperthyroidism is the most common endocrine disorder in the cat, hypothyroidism is the least common feline endocrine disorder. This is a the result of several factors including low index of suspicion, rarity of the naturally occurring hypothyroidism in cats, and a lack of species specific tests for endogenous TSH and antithyroglobulin antibodies. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism does occur in cats, especially in kittens and after radioactive treatment for hyperthyroidism. The clinician should become familiar with the common presentations of congenital and adult-onset hypothyroidism in cats. In addition, some of the tests specific to dogs (such as endogenous canine TSH) may be utilized to diagnose subclinical hypothyroidism in cats. Fortunately, the treatment of feline hypothyroidism with synthetic levothyroxine is both straightforward and effective. PMID:16584030

  20. Refractory Genital HPV Infection and Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Zheng, Heyi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic autoimmune disease (AIID) that can develop after exposure to infectious agents. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been reported to induce or exacerbate AIIDs, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No guidelines are available for the management of genital warts in AOSD. Case report and literature review. We report a patient who was diagnosed AOSD in the setting of refractory and recurrent genital HPV infection, demonstrating a possible link between HPV infection and AOSD. In addition, we also discuss the management of genital warts in patients with AOSD. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of AOSD with genital HPV infection have been reported in literature. We then conclude that the patient AOSD may be triggered by primary HPV infection. Larger number of patient samples is needed to confirm whether HPV could trigger AOSD. PMID:27082556

  1. Comparing illness presentation, treatment and functioning between patients with adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Christy Lai-Ming; Li, Adrienne Wing-Yee; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit-Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho-Ming; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai

    2014-12-30

    Studies have shown that early- and adult-onset schizophrenia patients differ in pre-morbid traits, illness presentation, psychopathology, and prognosis. We aimed to compare adult-onset patients (age range 26-55 years) with an adolescent-onset cohort (15-25 years) in demographics, illness presentation and functioning at baseline. Participants were from two territory-wide early intervention services for adolescent-onset (n=671) and adult-onset psychosis patients (n=360) in Hong Kong. The adolescent-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode from 2001-2003; retrospective data collection was done through systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was recruited for a larger interventional study from 2009-2011; information was collected via face-to-face interviews. Adult-onset psychosis was significantly associated with more females, more smokers, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning, poorer medication adherence, more psychiatric hospitalization and fewer with schizophrenia than adolescent-onset psychosis (mean age: 20.4). The effect sizes were small, except for medication adherence where a robust effect was found. No group difference in DUP was found. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that adolescent- and adult-onset psychoses share a similar prognostic trajectory. Implications for adapting intervention processes for adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis are discussed. PMID:25238985

  2. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  3. Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy: A fresh perspective.

    PubMed

    Chowers, Itay; Tiosano, Liran; Audo, Isabelle; Grunin, Michelle; Boon, Camiel J F

    2015-07-01

    Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AFVD) was first described by Gass four decades ago. AFVD is characterized by subretinal vitelliform macular lesions and is usually diagnosed after the age of 40. The lesions gradually increase and then decrease in size over the years, leaving an area of atrophic outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium. This process is accompanied by a loss of visual acuity. Vitelliform lesions are hyperautofluorescent and initially have a dome-shaped appearance on optical coherence tomography. The electro-oculogram and full-field electroretinogram are typically normal, indicating localized retinal pathology. Phenocopies are also associated with other ocular disorders, such as vitreomacular traction, age-related macular degeneration, pseudodrusen, and central serous chorioretinopathy. A minority of AFVD patients have a mutation in the PRPH2, BEST1, IMPG1, or IMPG2 genes. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the HTRA1 gene has also been associated with this phenotype. Accordingly, the phenotype can arise from alterations in the photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and/or interphotoreceptor matrix depending on the underlying gene defect. Excess photoreceptor outer segment production and/or impaired outer segment uptake due to impaired phagocytosis are likely underlying mechanisms. At present, no cure is available for AFVD. Thus, the current challenges in the field include identifying the underlying cause in the majority of AFVD cases and the development of effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:25681578

  4. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  5. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it causes a severe decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Over time, motor skills are affected, ... Schmahmann JD. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations. Brain Pathol. 2009 Jan; ...

  6. An autopsied case of sporadic adult-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with FUS-positive basophilic inclusions.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Fujii, Naoki; Kondo, Akira; Iwaki, Akiko; Hokonohara, Toshihiro; Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru

    2011-02-01

    Basophilic inclusions (BIs), which are characterized by their staining properties of being weakly argyrophilic, reactive with Nissl staining, and immunohistochemically negative for tau and transactive response (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), have been identified in patients with juvenile-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and adult-onset atypical ALS with ophthalmoplegia, autonomic dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, or a frontal lobe syndrome. Mutations in the fused in sarcoma gene (FUS) have been reported in cases of familial and sporadic ALS, and FUS immunoreactivity has been demonstrated in basophilic inclusion body disease (BIBD), neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID), and atypical frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive and tau-negative inclusions (aFTLD-U). In the present study, we immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally studied an autopsy case of sporadic adult-onset ALS with numerous BIs. The patient presented with the classical clinical course of ALS since 75 years of age and died at age 79. Postmortem examination revealed that both Betz cells in the motor cortex and motor neurons in the spinal cord were affected. The substantia nigra was spared. Notably, BIs were frequently observed in the motor neurons of the anterior horns, the inferior olivary nuclei, and the basal nuclei of Meynert. BIs were immunopositive for p62, LC3, and FUS, but immunonegative for tau, TDP-43, and neurofilament. Ultrastructurally, BIs consisted of filamentous or granular structures associated with degenerated organelles with no limiting membrane. There were no Bunina bodies, skein-like inclusions, or Lewy-like inclusions. All exons and exon/intron boundaries of the FUS gene were sequenced but no mutations were identified. PMID:20573033

  7. [Adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingfei

    2015-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by spiking fevers, arthritis/ arthralgias, typical salmon-colored bumpy rash, pharyngalgia, myalgia and possible involvement of visceral organs. The diagnosis is exclusively based on clinical symptoms, according to the criteria, after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or other autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. This report includes one case of adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia. PMID:26647549

  8. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  9. Adult-onset hypothyroidism and the cerebral metabolism of (1,2-13C2) acetate as detected by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Chapa, F; Künnecke, B; Calvo, R; Escobar del Rey, F; Morreale de Escobar, G; Cerdán, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the metabolic compartmentation of the cerebral tricarboxylic acid cycle and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt have been investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rats thyroidectomized as adults and age-matched controls were infused in the right jugular vein with unlabeled or (1,2-13C2) acetate solutions for 60 min. At the end of the infusion, the brains were frozen in situ and perchloric acid extracts were prepared and analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and reverse-phase HPLC. Thyroidectomized animals showed a decrease in the incorporation of 13C from (1,2-13C2) acetate in cerebral metabolites and an increase in the concentrations of unlabeled glutamate and GABA. Computer-assisted interpretation of the 13C multiplets observed for the carbons of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA indicated that adult-onset hypothyroidism produced 1) a decrease in the contribution of infused (1,2-13C2) acetate to the glial tricarboxylic acid cycle; 2) an increase in the contribution of unlabeled acetyl-CoA to the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle; and 3) impairments in the exchange of glutamate, glutamine, and GABA between the neuronal and glial compartments. Despite the fact that the adult brain has often been considered metabolically unresponsive to thyroid hormone status, present results show metabolic alterations in the neuronal and glial compartments that are reversible with substitution therapy. PMID:7828544

  10. Colocalization of iron and ceroid in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, F Y; Lee, T S; Pan, C C; Huang, A L; Chau, L Y

    1998-06-01

    The presence of ceroid, a complex of protein associated with oxidized lipids, is commonly observed in human atherosclerotic lesions. When the human aortic walls were examined by Perls' staining, it was found that the iron deposits were evident in aortas with atherosclerosis. The extent of iron deposition was associated with the severity of the lesion. Furthermore, the iron deposits appeared to be colocalized with ceroids either extracellularly or intracellularly in foam cell-like macrophages or smooth muscle cells. Electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis revealed that some of the extracellular iron aggregates were present within the ceroids. Likewise, some of the subcellular iron aggregates were found to be located near the lipid droplets or within the ceroids of foam cells. Collectively, these observations support the theory that the lipid oxidation occurring in lipid-laden cells of aortic lesions is facilitated by iron-overload in these cells. PMID:9690911

  11. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  12. Adult-Onset Antisocial Behavior Trajectories: Associations with Adolescent Family Processes and Emerging Adulthood Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Guided by conceptual and empirical work on emerging adulthood, this study investigated the role of closeness to mother and father and behavioral autonomy during adolescence on the development of adult-onset antisocial behavior. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we identified four aggressive…

  13. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied.

  14. The juvenile-onset, adolescent-onset and adult-onset obese.

    PubMed

    Garn, S M; Sullivan, T V; Hawthorne, V M

    1991-02-01

    As shown in more than 8000 proband-parent pairs derived from a total-community sample and followed in longitudinal fashion, the 5-year incidence of obesity (new cases per 5-year period) approximates 8 percent for the juvenile-onset, adolescent-onset and adult-onset obese alike. Parents of juvenile-onset (ages 5-9), adolescent-onset (10-19) and adult-onset obese (20-39) tend to be of above-average fatness level, +0.25Z scores, overall, regardless of the age at onset of obesity in their progeny. Except for the parents of the juvenile-onset obese, educational level of the parents tends to be below average for the sample as a whole. These new data acquired in longitudinal context and explored in retrospective-prospective fashion do not substantiate the notion that different onset ages of obesity indicate separate etiologies and different family constellations. PMID:2040547

  15. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Urticaria and dermographism in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Ayabe, Liliane Akemi; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Romiti, Ricardo; Maruta, Celina W

    2012-08-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients typically present with arthralgia, fever, lymphadenopathy and a transient salmon maculopapular rash. Only approximately 25 cases of AOSD with urticaria were described in the literature. In this article, the authors report three additional cases of AOSD with urticarial and dermographic lesions who had a good clinical response to glucocorticoid and antihistamines. A review of the literature concerning this issue is also herein written. PMID:21785958

  17. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database. PMID:27581317

  18. Adult onset unilateral systematized porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bandoyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti

    2014-06-01

    Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) is an uncommon, benign dermatosis that is characterized by asymptomatic grouped keratotic papules and plaques with a linear pattern on the extremities with distinct porokeratotic histopathological features. The lesions usually appear at birth or in childhood, although rare cases of late-onset adult PEODDN have been described. Herein we report a case of adult onset PEODDN with unilateral and segmental involvement. PMID:24945650

  19. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment. PMID:26998855

  20. Intra-arterial Chemotherapy for Adult Onset Retinoblastoma in a 32-Year-Old Man.

    PubMed

    Magan, Tejal; Khoo, Chloe T L; Jabbour, Pascal M; Fuller, Dwain G; Shields, Carol L

    2016-01-01

    A 32-year-old man with active unilateral group D retinoblastoma that was recurrent following external beam radiotherapy was treated with intra-arterial chemotherapy, leading to tumor regression. Additional plaque radiotherapy and intravitreal chemotherapy were required for complete control. Final visual acuity was 20/40. In selected cases, adult-onset retinoblastoma can be managed with intra-arterial chemotherapy. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e43-e46.]. PMID:27486894

  1. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1 year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis. PMID:27021143

  3. Dioxin (TCDD) Induces Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult Onset Disease and Sperm Epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental compounds can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study examined the ability of dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo[p]dioxin, TCDD) to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to dioxin during fetal day 8 to 14 and adult-onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. The incidences of total disease and multiple disease increased in F1 and F3 generations. Prostate disease, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F1 generation dioxin lineage. Kidney disease in males, pubertal abnormalities in females, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F3 generation dioxin lineage animals. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 50 differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) in gene promoters. These DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. Observations demonstrate dioxin exposure of a gestating female promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations. PMID:23049995

  4. Globus pallidus deep brain stimulation for adult-onset axial dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; Jinnah, H.A.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley; Freeman, Alan; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Generalized dystonia, both primary and secondary forms, and axial dystonias such as tardive dystonia, and idiopathic cervical dystonia are responsive to globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS. There is a paucity of investigations probing the impact of DBS on adult-onset axial dystonia. We assessed the efficacy of GPi DBS in four patients with rare adult-onset axial dystonia. Methods Primary outcome measure was improvement in the motor component of the Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) rating scale. Secondary outcome measures were quality of life as determined by the SF-36 questionnaire, time to achieve best possible benefit and DBS parameters that accounted for the best response. In patients with prominent concomitant cervical dystonia we also used the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS). Results GPi DBS improved BFM scores by 87.63 ± 11.46%. Improvement in total severity scale of TWSTRS was 71.5 ± 12.7%. Quality of life also remarkably improved as evidenced by 109.38 ± 82.97 and 7.05 ± 21.48% percent change in psychometrically-based physical component summary (PCS), and a mental component summary (MCS) score respectively. Conclusions GPi DBS is a very effective treatment for adult-onset axial dystonia. Considering its refractoriness to medical therapy and significant impact on quality of life DBS should be considered for this disorder. PMID:25260969

  5. Relationship between neuropsychological impairment and grey and white matter changes in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Baldanzi, Sigrid; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Simoncini, Costanza; Angelini, Corrado; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Cosottini, Mirco; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) has a wide phenotypic spectrum and potentially may affect central nervous system with mild to severe involvement. Our aim was to investigate grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) structural alterations in a sample of adult-onset DM1 patients and to evaluate relationship with clinical and cognitive variables. Thirty DM1 patients underwent neuropsychological investigation and 3T-MRI protocol. GM and WM changes were evaluated calculating brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter lesion load (LL% and Fazekas scale) and tract based spatial statistical (TBSS). Patients showed main impairment in tests exploring executive and mnesic domains with visuo-spatial involvement, significantly related to BPF. VBM revealed clusters of widespread GM reduction and TBSS revealed areas of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and axial diffusivity (AD) in patients compared to a group of matched healthy controls. Multiple regression analyses showed areas of significant negative relationship between left temporal atrophy and verbal memory, between RD and mnesic and visuo-spatial cognitive domains, and between AD and verbal memory. TBSS results indicate that the involvement of normal appearance WM, beyond the signal changes detected with conventional MR imaging (Fazekas scale and LL%), was associated with neuropsychological deficit. These data suggest that disrupted complex neuronal networks can underlie cognitive-behavioural dysfunctions in DM1. PMID:27437180

  6. Pathways of acetylcholine synthesis, transport and release as targets for treatment of adult-onset cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Amenta, F; Tayebati, S K

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a neurotransmitter widely diffused in central, peripheral, autonomic and enteric nervous system. This paper has reviewed the main mechanisms of ACh synthesis, storage, and release. Presynaptic choline transport supports ACh production and release, and cholinergic terminals express a unique transporter critical for neurotransmitter release. Neurons cannot synthesize choline, which is ultimately derived from the diet and is delivered through the blood stream. ACh released from cholinergic synapses is hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase into choline and acetyl coenzyme A and almost 50% of choline derived from ACh hydrolysis is recovered by a high-affinity choline transporter. Parallel with the development of cholinergic hypothesis of geriatric memory dysfunction, cholinergic precursor loading strategy was tried for treating cognitive impairment occurring in Alzheimer's disease. Controlled clinical studies denied clinical usefulness of choline and lecithin (phosphatidylcholine), whereas for other phospholipids involved in choline biosynthetic pathways such as cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) or alpha-glyceryl-phosphorylcholine (choline alphoscerate) a modest improvement of cognitive dysfunction in adult-onset dementia disorders is documented. These inconsistencies have probably a metabolic explanation. Free choline administration increases brain choline availability but it does not increase ACh synthesis/or release. Cholinergic precursors to serve for ACh biosynthesis should be incorporate and stored into phospholipids in brain. It is probable that appropriate ACh precursors and other correlated molecules (natural or synthesized) could represent a tool for developing therapeutic strategies by revisiting and updating treatments/supplementations coming out from this therapeutic stalemate. PMID:18289004

  7. Longitudinal changes in cerebellar and subcortical volumes in adult-onset Niemann-Pick disease type C patients treated with miglustat.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Elizabeth A; Walterfang, Mark; Abel, Larry; Desmond, Patricia; Fahey, Michael; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a rare neurovisceral disorder resulting in impaired intracellular lipid trafficking. The only disease-modifying treatment available to date is miglustat, an iminosugar inhibiting the accumulation of lipid by-products in neurons. This study explored how changes in cerebellar grey and white matter volumes, and in subcortical volumes, related to patient treatment status and disability and ataxia ratings. Nine adult-onset NPC patients and 17 matched controls underwent T1-weighted MRI. One patient was not receiving miglustat, and pre-treatment data were available for a further patient. Semi-automated cerebellar and subcortical segmentation was undertaken, and the rates of change in putamen, hippocampal, thalamic and caudal volumes, and grey and white matter cerebellar volumes, were compared to rates of change in Iturriaga disability score, Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and horizontal saccadic gain. Untreated NPC patients appeared to lose cerebellar grey and white matter, bilateral thalamic volume, and right caudate volume faster than treated patients. Cerebellar grey matter volume loss and volume loss in the left thalamus were significantly correlated with Iturriaga disability scale changes. Change in both cerebellar grey and white matter was correlated with decrease in horizontal saccadic gain, but not with change in BARS. This is the first study to examine longitudinal treatment effects of miglustat on cerebellar and subcortical volumes in patients with adult-onset NPC, and is evidence that miglustat may have a protective effect on cerebellar and subcortical structure and function. PMID:26092521

  8. Pesticide Methoxychlor Promotes the Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult-Onset Disease through the Female Germline

    PubMed Central

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M. Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. PMID:25057798

  9. The Incidence and Clinical Characteristics of Adult-Onset Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghadban, Rafif; Martinez, Jennifer M.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Mohney, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and natural history of convergence insufficiency (CI) in a population-based cohort of adults. Design Retrospectively reviewed population-based cohort. Participants Adult (≥19 years of age) residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota. Methods The medical records of all adults diagnosed with CI over a 20-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Main outcome measures Clinical characteristics and outcomes for adult-onset convergence insufficiency. Results A total of 118 adults (annual incidence of 8.44 per 100 000 patients older than 19 years) were diagnosed with CI during the 20-year period, comprising 15.7% of all forms of adult-onset strabismus observed in this population. The median age at diagnosis was 68.5 years (range 21.7 to 97.1 years) and 68 (57.6%) were female. The mean initial exodeviation at near was 14.1 PD (range 1 to 30 PD) and 1.7 PD (range 0 to 10 PD) at distance. The Kaplan-Meier rate of exotropia increasing by 7 prism diopters or more at near over time was 4.2% at 5 years, 13.5% at 10 years, and 24.4% at 20 years. Approximately 88% were managed with prisms while less than 5% underwent surgical correction. Conclusions Adult-onset convergence insufficiency comprised approximately 1 in 6 adults who were newly diagnosed with strabismus in this 20-year cohort. There was a significant increase in incidence with increasing age. Nearly one-fourth had an increase of their near exodeviation of at least 7 PD by 20 years after their diagnosis and most patients were managed conservatively. PMID:25626756

  10. Bartonella henselae infection presenting with a picture of adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Durey, Areum; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sun Myoung; Baek, JiHyeon; Han, Seung Baik; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture of suggestive for adult-onset Still's Disease (ASOD) due to Bartonella infection. A 42-year-old immunocompetent man was admitted with fever, rash, arthralgia and sore throat. As his clinical picture suggested ASOD except unusual skin manifestation, we treated him on steroid and ibuprofen. His fever and constitutional symptoms responded immediately within 24hrs of commencing therapy, yet rash and leukocytosis remained. Meanwhile, Bartonella infection was proved by culture of bone marrow. Minocyclin treatment started combined with hydroxychloroquine sulfate and the patient discharged with overall improvement. PMID:27000538

  11. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  12. Cord Blood Transplantation Following Reduced-intensity Conditioning for Adult-onset Inherited Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Takuro; Kato, Koji; Sakamoto, Keiji; Hayashi, Masayasu; Takashima, Shuichiro; Mori, Yasuo; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Teshima, Takanori; Harada, Naoki; Nagafuji, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Inherited hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a genetic anomaly disorder in which abnormally activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes cannot induce the apoptosis of target cells and antigen-presenting cells, leading to hemophagocytosis, pancytopenia, and a variety of symptoms such as a high fever. The present patient with adult-onset HLH developed refractory disease despite receiving immunosuppressive treatments. He underwent a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen that comprised antithymocyte globulin (ATG) followed by cord blood transplantation (RIC-CBT). He achieved and maintained a complete donor type. The incorporation of ATG into RIC-CBT may prevent graft failure and control hemophagocytosis, however, further efforts are necessary to reduce infectious complications. PMID:26984088

  13. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  14. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  15. Genetics Home Reference: late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... endoplasmic reticulum . The endoplasmic reticulum is involved in protein production, processing, and transport. Within these cell structures, the ... CLN8 , MFSD8 , or PPT1 gene usually reduce the production or activity of the particular protein or enzyme made from the gene. In many ...

  16. MPV17 Mutations Causing Adult-Onset Multisystemic Disorder With Multiple Mitochondrial DNA Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Garone, Caterina; Rubio, Juan Carlos; Calvo, Sarah E.; Naini, Ali; Tanji, Kurenai; DiMauro, Salvatore; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the cause of an adult-onset multisystemic disease with multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Design Case report. Setting University hospitals. Patient A 65-year-old man with axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, ophthalmoparesis, diabetes mellitus, exercise intolerance, steatohepatopathy, depression, parkinsonism, and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Results Skeletal muscle biopsy revealed ragged-red and cytochrome-c oxidase–deficient fibers, and Southern blot analysis showed multiple mtDNA deletions. No deletions were detected in fibroblasts, and the results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that the amount of mtDNA was normal in both muscle and fibroblasts. Exome sequencing using a mitochondrial library revealed compound heterozygous MPV17 mutations (p.LysMet88-89MetLeu and p.Leu143*), a novel cause of mtDNA multiple deletions. Conclusions In addition to causing juvenile-onset disorders with mtDNA depletion, MPV17 mutations can cause adult-onset multisystemic disease with multiple mtDNA deletions. PMID:22964873

  17. A Unique Case of Pica of Adult Onset with Interesting Psychosexual Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Suddhendu; Sanyal, D.; Bhattacharyya, R.

    2011-01-01

    Pica has been considered as the ingestion of inedible substances or atypical food combinations. Pica has been reported widely in pediatric age group and often found to be co existing with obsessive compulsive or major depressive disorder. Reports of pica in elderly age group are relatively uncommon and rarely does it have an adult onset. In this article we present a case of adult onset pica. A young lady with unusual sensation in her abdomen was found to consume iron nails over years and there was history of dyspareunia since her marriage three months back. On query it was known that the lady is having same sex relationship over years. There unique conglomeration of cultural, psychodynamic and physiological determinants which together is responsible for this unusual habit of this lady. Moreover the onset of the disease at a late age and different psychodynamic issues make the case all the more interesting. Whether the pica is an eating disorder or obsessive compulsive disorder is still controversial. Pica has been mentioned in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV TR. The present case report warrants the need to look into this entity more closely with regards to its occurrence and etiology. PMID:22021963

  18. Electrophysiological characterization of adult-onset Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Rosa; Dubbioso, Raffaele; Topa, Antonietta; Ruggiero, Lucia; Pisciotta, Chiara; Esposito, Marcello; Tozza, Stefano; Santoro, Lucio; Manganelli, Fiore

    2015-01-15

    In infantile and juvenile Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease electrophysiological studies have shown central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous system abnormalities. However, an extensive electrophysiological evaluation of CNS and PNS in adult form of NPC is still lacking. The aim of the study is to assess in adult-onset NPC disease the involvement of CNS and PNS by a multimodal electrophysiological approach. Three patients affected by adult form of NPC disease underwent electrophysiological evaluation including nerve conduction study (NCS), magnetic motor (MEPs), visual (VEPs), somatosensory (SSEPs) and brainstem auditory (BAEPs) evoked potentials. NCS, MEPs, VEPs and upper limb SSEPs were normal. Lower limb SSEPs were abnormal in all patients and abnormalities were consistent with a length-dependent process affecting the central somatosensory pathway. BAEPs were abnormal in all patients with both peripheral and central impairment of auditory pathway. Our electrophysiological findings suggest that auditory and lower limb somatosensory pathways are constantly affected in adult-onset form of NPC disease. The involvement of PNS, pyramidal, visual and upper limb somatosensory pathways might occur later during the course of disease. PMID:25537619

  19. Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 in a family with adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Lynch, David R.; Lukas, Thomas; Ahmeti, Kreshnik; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Ryan, Eanna; Schadt, Kimberly A.; Newman, Jordan H.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic defect for adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) in a family with 5 patients. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the shared genetic variants in 3 affected members in a PLS family with 5 affected individuals. Sanger sequencing was used for validation of the variants and for cosegregation analysis. Mitochondrial activity for both patients and unaffected siblings was measured using a SeaHorse metabolic analyzer. Results: Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent cosegregation analysis demonstrated that compound heterozygous missense variants L695P and I743T in SPG7 were the only mutations cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal recessive fashion in this family. The parents and siblings are genetically heterozygous and clinically unaffected. Functional studies suggested that the PLS-associated SPG7 mutants affect mitochondrial function when glucose is reduced. Conclusions: Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 are associated with adult-onset PLS, extending the spectrum of SPG7-linked neurologic diseases. Patients with the PLS phenotype should have genetic testing for paraplegin, especially when the condition is familial. PMID:27123479

  20. Adult-Onset Presentations of Genetic Immunodeficiencies: Genes Can Throw Slow Curves

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Katharine S.; Lewis, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review The molecular and genetic mechanisms behind adult presentations of primary immunodeficiency diseases are examined, with particular emphasis on cases where this was heralded by severe, recurrent or opportunistic infection. Recent Findings A detailed analysis over the last two decades of the relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype for a number of genetic immunodeficiencies has revealed multiple mechanisms that can account for the delayed presentation of genetic disorders that typically present in childhood, including hypomorphic gene mutations and X-linked gene mutations with age-related skewing in random X-chromosome inactivation. Adult-onset presentations of chronic granulomatous disease, X-linked agammaglobulinemia, interleukin-12/T helper 1/interferon-gamma and interleukin-23/T helper 17/interleukin-17 pathway defects, and X-linked lymphoproliferative disorder are used to illustrate these mechanisms. Finally, certain genetic types of common variable immunodeficiency are used to illustrate that inherited null mutations can take decades to manifest immunologically. Summary Both genetic mechanisms and environmental factors can account for adult-onset infectious and non-infectious complications as manifestations of disorders that typically present in childhood. This emphasizes the potential complexity in the relationship between genotype and phenotype with natural human mutations. PMID:20581672

  1. Prevalence of adult-onset multifactorial disease among offspring of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, S; Suyama, A; Cologne, J B; Akahoshi, M; Yamada, M; Suzuki, G; Koyama, K; Takahashi, N; Kasagi, E; Grant, E J; Lagarde, E; Hsu, W L; Furukawa, K; Ohishi, W; Tatsukawa, Y; Neriishi, K; Takahashi, I; Ashizawa, K; Hida, A; Imaizumi, M; Nagano, J; Cullings, H M; Katayama, H; Ross, N P; Kodama, K; Shore, R E

    2008-10-01

    The first study to examine whether parental radiation exposure leads to increased heritable risk of common adult-onset multifactorial diseases (i.e., hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, ischemic heart disease, and stroke) was conducted among 11,951 participants in the clinical examination program out of a potential of 24,673 mail survey subjects who were offspring of survivors born from May 1946 through December 1984. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated no evidence of an association between the prevalence of multifactorial diseases in the offspring and parental radiation exposure, after adjusting for age, city, gender and various risk factors. The odds ratio (OR) for a paternal dose of 1 Gy was 0.91 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-1.01, P = 0.08], and that for a maternal dose of 1 Gy was 0.98 (95% CI 0.86-1.10, P = 0.71). There was no apparent effect of parental age at exposure or of elapsed time between parental exposure and birth, but male offspring had a low odds ratio (OR = 0.76 at 1 Gy) for paternal exposure, but cautious interpretation is needed for this finding. The clinical assessment of nearly 12,000 offspring of A-bomb survivors who have reached a median age of about 50 years provided no evidence for an increased prevalence of adult-onset multifactorial diseases in relation to parental radiation exposure. PMID:19024652

  2. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions. PMID:24842077

  3. Distinguishing adult-onset asthma from COPD: a review and a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Michael J; Perret, Jennifer L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; McDonald, Vanessa M; McDonald, Christine F

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. This review presents a comprehensive synopsis of their epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentations; describes how they can be distinguished; and considers both established and proposed new approaches to their management. Both adult-onset asthma and COPD are complex diseases arising from gene–environment interactions. Early life exposures such as childhood infections, smoke, obesity, and allergy influence adult-onset asthma. While the established environmental risk factors for COPD are adult tobacco and biomass smoke, there is emerging evidence that some childhood exposures such as maternal smoking and infections may cause COPD. Asthma has been characterized predominantly by Type 2 helper T cell (Th2) cytokine-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. In established COPD, the inflammatory cell infiltrate in small airways comprises predominantly neutrophils and cytotoxic T cells (CD8 positive lymphocytes). Parenchymal destruction (emphysema) in COPD is associated with loss of lung tissue elasticity, and small airways collapse during exhalation. The precise definition of chronic airflow limitation is affected by age; a fixed cut-off of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity leads to overdiagnosis of COPD in the elderly. Traditional approaches to distinguishing between asthma and COPD have highlighted age of onset, variability of symptoms, reversibility of airflow limitation, and atopy. Each of these is associated with error due to overlap and convergence of clinical characteristics. The management of chronic stable asthma and COPD is similarly convergent. New approaches to the management of obstructive airway diseases in adults have been proposed based on inflammometry and also multidimensional assessment, which focuses on the four domains of the airways, comorbidity, self-management, and

  4. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  5. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  6. Hidden in plain sight: macrophage activation syndrome complicating Adult Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Lourdes; Vila, Salvador; Mellado, Robert Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Hemophagocytic Lymphystiocytosis is a rare and fatal complication of rheumatic diseases, particularly Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD). It may be precipitated with immunosuppressive drugs and with viral and bacterial infections. A diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion associated to certain clinical manifestations (fever, rash, Splemomegaly, any cytology blood dyscrasia, hipertrigliceridemia, hiperfibrinogenemia, and others), as well as pathologic evidence of hemophagocitosis from bone marrow biopsy or tissue samples of affected organs. Therapy consists of high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a 42 year old woman with AOSD in remission who developed HLH in spite of receiving therapy with high dose steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. She had 2 negative bone marrow aspirates. Evidence of Hemophagocytosis was detected in both bone marrow biopsies. Timely evaluation and recognition of the signs and symptoms of HLH is crucial for the prompt management and a decrease in the mortality associated with this disease. PMID:23875527

  7. A mouse model of adult-onset anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shun; Souma, Tomokazu; Hirano, Ikuo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Minegishi, Naoko; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin regulates erythropoiesis in a hypoxia-inducible manner. Here we generate inherited super-anaemic mice (ISAM) as a mouse model of adult-onset anaemia caused by erythropoietin deficiency. ISAM express erythropoietin in the liver but lack erythropoietin production in the kidney. Around weaning age, when the major erythropoietin-producing organ switches from the liver to the kidney, ISAM develop anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency, which is curable by administration of recombinant erythropoietin. In ISAM severe chronic anaemia enhances transgenic green fluorescent protein and Cre expression driven by the complete erythropoietin-gene regulatory regions, which facilitates efficient labelling of renal erythropoietin-producing cells. We show that the majority of cortical and outer medullary fibroblasts have the innate potential to produce erythropoietin, and also reveal a new set of erythropoietin target genes. ISAM are a useful tool for the evaluation of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and to trace the dynamics of erythropoietin-producing cells. PMID:23727690

  8. Predictive Medicine: Recombinant DNA Technology and Adult-Onset Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Genetic factors are of great importance in common adult-onset disorders such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and neuro-degenerative diseases. Advances in DNA technology now allow identification of persons at high-risk of developing some of these diseases. This advance is leading to predictive medicine. In some genetic disorders, such as those leading to atherosclerosis and cancer, identification of high-risk individuals allows intervention which alters the natural history of the disorder. In other diseases, for which there is no treatment, such as Huntington's disease, the application of this technology provides information that relieves uncertainty and may affect quality of life, but does not alter the course of the illness. General implementation of predictive testing programs awaits the results of pilot projects, which will demonstrate the needs, appropriate levels of support, and guidelines for delivery of such testing. PMID:21253100

  9. Blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome (Brueghel's syndrome). A variant of adult-onset torsion dystonia?

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with the idiopathic blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome are described. All presented in adult life, usually in the sixth decade; women were more commonly affected than men. Thirteen had blepharospasm alone, nine had oromandibular dystonia alone, and 17 had both. Torticollis or dystonic writer's camp preceded the syndrome in two patients. Eight other patients developed toritocollis, dystonic posturing of the arms, or involvement of respiratory muscles. No cause or hereditary basis for the illness were discovered. The evidence to indicate that this syndrome is due to an abnormality of extrapyramidal function, and that it is another example of adult-onset focal dystonia akin to spasmodic torticollis and dystonic writer's cramp, is discussed. Images PMID:1011031

  10. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability. PMID:26251896

  11. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  12. Adult onset sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma - a rare case report with cytohistological features.

    PubMed

    Sood, N; Sehrawat, N

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a fast growing, malignant tumour arising from immature mesenchymal cells, committed to skeletal muscle differentiation. It is more often seen in the paediatric population and constitutes less than 1% of all malignancies and less than 3% of all soft tissue tumours. RMS of the paranasal sinuses constitutes 10-15% of adult head and neck RMS, ethmoidal and maxillary sinuses being the most common. We report a 56-year-oldman presenting with left nasal obstruction, epistaxis on and off and left cheek swelling. Nasal endoscopy revealed a reddish friable mass, bleeding on touch, in the left nasal cavity. CECT scan showed a heterogeneous growth in the left maxillary sinus eroding the medial orbital wall and lateral nasal wall. FNAC of the left cheek swelling yielded highly cellular smears showing predominantly singly scattered round to ovoid neoplastic cells with scanty cytoplasm and indistinct nucleoli. Few of the cells had eccentric nuclei with moderate amount of eosinophilic cytoplasm. Attempted pseudorossette formation was seen. An impression of round cell tumour was given. A diagnosis of an adult onset sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma was made on histopathological examination of the nasal biopsy, supported by immunohistochemistry (IHC) showing strong myogenin positivity, focal positivity for PAX8 and negativity for CK, LCA, S-100 and CD99. Parameningeal RMS is rare in adults especially the elderly. However, it needs to be considered whenever a poorly-differentiated neoplasm is seen in this age and IHC is a useful aid. PMID:27568676

  13. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. PMID:27242405

  14. A nonsense mutation of human XRCC4 is associated with adult-onset progressive encephalocardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Leonardo; Nasca, Alessia; Zanolini, Alice; Cendron, Filippo; d'Adamo, Pio; Costa, Rodolfo; Lamperti, Costanza; Celotti, Lucia; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We studied two monozygotic twins, born to first cousins, affected by a multisystem disease. At birth, they both presented with bilateral cryptorchidism and malformations. Since early adulthood, they developed a slowly progressive neurological syndrome, with cerebellar and pyramidal signs, cognitive impairment, and depression. Dilating cardiomyopathy is also present in both. By whole-exome sequencing, we found a homozygous nucleotide change in XRCC4 (c.673C>T), predicted to introduce a premature stop codon (p.R225*). XRCC4 transcript levels were profoundly reduced, and the protein was undetectable in patients' skin fibroblasts. XRCC4 plays an important role in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), a system that is involved in repairing DNA damage from, for example, ionizing radiations. Gamma-irradiated mutant cells demonstrated reduction, but not abolition, of DSB repair. In contrast with embryonic lethality of the Xrcc4 KO mouse, nonsense mutations in human XRCC4 have recently been associated with primordial dwarfism and, in our cases, with adult-onset neurological impairment, suggesting an important role for DNA repair in the brain. Surprisingly, neither immunodeficiency nor predisposition to malignancy was reported in these patients. PMID:25872942

  15. Multimodal Image Analysis in Acquired Vitelliform Lesions and Adult-Onset Foveomacular Vitelliform Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha Bastos, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Brandão, Elisete; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Carneiro, Ângela M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize vitelliform lesions (VLs) in adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AOFVD) and acquired vitelliform (AVL) patients using multimodal image analysis. Methods. Retrospective study of twenty-eight eyes from nineteen patients diagnosed with AVL or AOFVD. They were evaluated by color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results. Bilateral VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.013). Regular and centered VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.004 and p = 0.016), whereas irregular and noncentered lesions were more frequent in AVL patients. Visual acuity, greatest linear dimension (GLD), lesion height (LH), and pseudohypopyon were similar between groups. Whereas median LH and GLD in AVL group diminished significantly during follow-up (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001), AOFVD lesions tended to become larger and thicker. Conclusions. When consulting a patient presenting a VL with unknown age of onset, familial history, or previous retinal diseases, some aspects of multimodal imaging assessment may lead the ophthalmologist to a correct diagnosis. PMID:27190637

  16. Targeting Hsp90/Hsp70-based protein quality control for treatment of adult onset neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Pratt, William B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Currently available therapies for adult onset neurodegenerative diseases provide symptomatic relief but do not modify disease progression. Here we explore a new neuroprotective approach based on drugs targeting chaperone-directed protein quality control. Critical target proteins that unfold and aggregate in these diseases, such as the polyglutamine androgen receptor in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, huntingtin in Huntington's disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, and tau in Alzheimer's disease, are client proteins of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), and their turnover is regulated by the protein quality control function of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery. Hsp90 and Hsp70 have opposing effects on client protein stability in protein quality control; Hsp90 stabilizes the clients and inhibits their ubiquitination, whereas Hsp70 promotes ubiquitination dependent on CHIP (C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) and proteasomal degradation. We discuss how drugs that modulate proteostasis by inhibiting Hsp90 function or promoting Hsp70 function enhance the degradation of the critical aggregating proteins and ameliorate toxic symptoms in cell and animal disease models. PMID:25292434

  17. Adult-Onset Hypothyroidism Enhances Fear Memory and Upregulates Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Fernández-Lamo, Iván; Alieva, María; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Venero, César; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most common hormonal disease in adults, which is frequently accompanied by learning and memory impairments and emotional disorders. However, the deleterious effects of thyroid hormones deficiency on emotional memory are poorly understood and often underestimated. To evaluate the consequences of hypothyroidism on emotional learning and memory, we have performed a classical Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm in euthyroid and adult-thyroidectomized Wistar rats. In this experimental model, learning acquisition was not impaired, fear memory was enhanced, memory extinction was delayed and spontaneous recovery of fear memory was exacerbated in hypothyroid rats. The potentiation of emotional memory under hypothyroidism was associated with an increase of corticosterone release after fear conditioning and with higher expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala, nuclei that are critically involved in the circuitry of fear memory. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult-onset hypothyroidism potentiates fear memory and also increases vulnerability to develop emotional memories. Furthermore, our findings suggest that enhanced corticosterone signaling in the amygdala is involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of fear memory potentiation. Therefore, we recommend evaluating whether inappropriate regulation of fear in patients with post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders is associated with abnormal levels of thyroid hormones, especially those patients refractory to treatment. PMID:22039511

  18. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Multimodal Image Analysis in Acquired Vitelliform Lesions and Adult-Onset Foveomacular Vitelliform Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rocha Bastos, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Brandão, Elisete; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Carneiro, Ângela M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize vitelliform lesions (VLs) in adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AOFVD) and acquired vitelliform (AVL) patients using multimodal image analysis. Methods. Retrospective study of twenty-eight eyes from nineteen patients diagnosed with AVL or AOFVD. They were evaluated by color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results. Bilateral VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.013). Regular and centered VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.004 and p = 0.016), whereas irregular and noncentered lesions were more frequent in AVL patients. Visual acuity, greatest linear dimension (GLD), lesion height (LH), and pseudohypopyon were similar between groups. Whereas median LH and GLD in AVL group diminished significantly during follow-up (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001), AOFVD lesions tended to become larger and thicker. Conclusions. When consulting a patient presenting a VL with unknown age of onset, familial history, or previous retinal diseases, some aspects of multimodal imaging assessment may lead the ophthalmologist to a correct diagnosis. PMID:27190637

  20. Intermittent rhabdomyolysis with adult onset associated with a mutation in the ACADVL gene.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana Patrícia; Nogueira, Célia; Rocha, Hugo; Vilarinho, Laura; Evangelista, Teresinha

    2013-12-01

    Deficiency of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is an autosomal recessive disease. Most common phenotypes occur in the neonatal period or in childhood with cardiomyopathy, hepatomegaly, and hypoketogenic hypoglycemia. Juvenile/adult-onset is characterized by exercise intolerance and recurrent rhabdomyolysis triggered by prolonged exercise or fasting. This article reports a patient with the homozygous mutation c.1097G>A (p.R366H) in the ACADVL gene. In Portugal, VLCAD deficiency became part of the neonatal screening plan in 2004, and as of 2012, 8 early-onset cases have been diagnosed, giving an incidence rate of 1:97.238 per 737.902 newborns. This patient was diagnosed outside of the neonatal screening plan. Beta-oxidation defects pose a diagnostic challenge because of their transient clinical and laboratorial manifestations and the absence of morphological changes in muscle biopsy further complicate matters, especially in the late-onset forms of the disease. The adult phenotype of VLCAD deficiency is highlighted, emphasizing the need for a high suspicion index and the value of tandem mass spectrometry for the diagnosis. PMID:24263034

  1. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Shaheen, N; Kumashiro, R; Tanikawa, K; O'Brien, W E; Beaudet, A L; Saheki, T

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, we show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. We also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. PMID:8105687

  2. Pathologic staging of white matter lesions in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy/leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids.

    PubMed

    Alturkustani, Murad; Keith, Julia; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Rademakers, Rosa; Ang, Lee-Cyn

    2015-03-01

    The pathologic features of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy/leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids (ALAS) are variable, and this has led to different hypotheses as to whether primarily demyelination or axonopathy may underlie this disorder. Typical ALAS pathology is rarely accompanied by focal multiple sclerosis (MS)-like plaques. In ALAS pathology accompanied by focal multiple sclerosis (MS)-like plaques cases, the pathologic features cannot be distinguished from those of progressive MS with diffusely abnormal white matter. To clarify these issues, we examined neuropathologic features in 159 representative samples from 5 ALAS cases (3 men and 2 women aged 39-61 years) and in 95 representative samples from 3 chronic MS cases (1 man and 2 women aged 50-73 years). The white matter abnormalities in ALAS cases were characterized by 3 evolving stages: 1) white matter with numerous spheroids in a background of well-myelinated fibers; 2) moderate loss of myelinated fibers with sparse to moderate number of spheroids; and 3) leukodystrophy-like pattern of confluent axonal and myelin loss. The application of this staging system suggests that myelin loss in ALAS is preceded by axonopathy. In progressive MS cases, the diffusely abnormal white matter pathology could be attributed to both primary demyelination and axonopathy. Some cases with predominant axonopathy are difficult to distinguish from cases with ALAS. PMID:25668567

  3. Health-related quality of life in sporadic adult-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Abele, Michael; Klockgether, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Despite progressive disability in sporadic adult-onset ataxia (SAOA), little is known about patients' assessment of their ataxic disorder and its impact on health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL). This study investigated Hr-QoL by means of the following self-administered scales: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Medical Outcome Study Short Form (SF-36). Twenty-two unselected ataxia patients were included. Sleep-related complaints were found in 9 (41%) of 22 and symptoms of depression in 6 (38%) of 16 patients. Compared to a large german control group, SAOA patients had lower scores in all SF-36 dimensions except for bodily pain. The greatest impairment was found in the domain physical functioning, followed by the domains social functioning and role limitations (emotional problems). There was a significant negative correlation of all nonmotor SF-36 dimensions with the BDI score. Walking aid dependency was significantly correlated with poorer health status perception in several motor and nonmotor domains. In addition, impaired sleep quality was correlated with an impaired general health perception and with bodily pain. The study demonstrates a great impact of SAOA on Hr-QoL. Adequate treatment of depression, motor disability, and impaired sleep quality is essential to improve Hr-QoL in ataxic patients. PMID:17149704

  4. [A case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) triggered by an overseas travel].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masayoshi; Shimada, Takuya; Hamaoka, Shima; Shibata, Masunari; Naito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old male presented with abnormal behavior and consciousness disturbance on the day after traveling abroad and was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory tests showed hyperammonemia and hypercitrullinemia. The electro-encephalogram showed frontal dominant bilateral slow δ burst. He had a peculiar taste for nuts. But he didn't take nuts during the overseas travel for 3 days. The family history revealed that his younger brother died of a status epilepticus of unknown cause at the age of 29. These findings were compatible with hepatic encephalopathy due to adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). Gene analysis provided a definite diagnosis of CTLN2. Diet and drug therapy have improved his condition. He is due to have liver transplantation which is the only established radical treatment for CTLN2 if his condition becomes worse. The present case shows that cessation of the habitual intake of nuts only for 3 days could lead to onset of CTLN2. PMID:25283831

  5. Multiple sclerosis and risk of young-adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hajiebrahimi, Mohammadhossein; Burkill, Sarah; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and young-adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma (YAHL) as this will signal etiologic similarities relevant both to inherited characteristics and environmental exposures in childhood. Methods: Swedish general population registers identified a cohort of 29,617 with an MS diagnosis between 1968 and 2012, matched with a cohort of 296,164 without MS. Cox regression was used to assess the association of MS with subsequent YAHL (defined as onset between ages 15 and 39 years; n = 20), with adjustment, for age/period, sex, county of residence, and level of education. Results: The adjusted hazard ratio (and 95% confidence interval) for the association of MS with YAHL is 3.30 (1.01–10.73), resulting from 4 and 16 events in the MS and non-MS cohorts, respectively. All 4 of the YAHL diagnoses in MS occurred in women, and the association of MS with YAHL has a hazard ratio of 4.04 (1.17–13.94) among women. There was no notable association of MS with older-onset Hodgkin lymphoma. Conclusion: There may be common risks for YAHL and MS, consistent with an etiologic role in MS for early-life exposures, such as to infectious agents. PMID:27144218

  6. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα. PMID:25533124

  7. Prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen in newly presenting adult onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wilde, C; Lakshmanan, A; Patel, M; Morales, M U; Dhar-Munshi, S; Amoaku, W M K

    2016-06-01

    PurposeTo report the association and prevalence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) in eyes with newly presenting adult onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AFVD). To compare the strength of association with other pathologies resulting from dysfunction of the choroid-Bruch's membrane-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) complex, including eyes with geographic atrophy (GA) and angioid streaks.MethodsRetrospective single-centre review of all consecutive newly presenting AFVD. Multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus photographs, red-free/blue light images, and fundus fluorescein angiograms were graded for the presence of RPD. For comparison, all consecutive newly presenting cases of GA and eyes with angioid streaks were studied.ResultsFifteen (15) patients were identified with AFVD (mean age of 77.3 years; 73.3% female). Mean age of patients with AFVD and RPD was 80.5 years (SD 3.7), whereas that of patients with AFVD without RPD was 75.1 years (SD 7.0). This age difference did not reach statistical significance, P=0.1. Six (40%) had identifiable RPD; being a bilateral finding in 100% of patients. No males with AFVD and RPD were identified. A total of 92 eyes presented with GA. Twenty-three (23) of these (25.0%) had RPD. Twelve (12) patients presented with identifiable angioid streaks, with 4 (36.4%) having RPD.ConclusionRPD are a frequent finding in eyes with newly presenting AFVD; not being restricted to AMD, but a finding common among diseases where pathophysiological mechanisms involve damage to Bruch's membrane and the RPE, whether genetic or degenerative. Our study supports the concept that they occur with high but variable frequencies in eyes with various pathologies. PMID:27034200

  8. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  9. [Adult-onset Hartnup disease presenting with neuropsychiatric symptoms but without skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Mori, E; Yamadori, A; Tsutsumi, A; Kyotani, Y

    1989-06-01

    Hartnup disease is an inborn abnormality of renal and intestinal transport involving the neutral amino acids. Intermittent pellagra-like rash, attacks of cerebellar ataxia and psychiatric disturbance are characteristic symptoms of this disease. We described here a patient with adult-onset Hartnup disease who presented unique neuropsychiatric symptoms but no dermatologic symptoms, and reported features of amino acids transport in this patient and his family. The patient, a man aged 37 years, was referred to us because of lasting daytime bruxism. He is the second child of healthy parents who are first cousin; his elder brother who has been mentally retarded became bed-ridden and died at 32 years of age. His younger brother is completely healthy. Although the patient's development in infancy has been slightly retarded, he completed compulsory 9-year education. At 29 years of age, he experienced episodes of diplopia, ataxic gait and insomnia, and at 33 years of age, of transient stupor. There had been no history of photosensitivity or dermatitis. On neurological examination, there were trunkal ataxia, increased muscular tone and decreased mental activity besides bruxism. These symptoms remained unchanged despite of several medications including trihexyphenidyl, diazepam, halloperidol, tiapride and sulpiride. Two months later, the patient became stuporous; bruxism and hypertonicity became exaggerated. Myerson's sign, sucking reflex and grasp reflex in both hand appeared. There was no dermal lesion. A cranial computed tomography revealed a small calcification in the right frontal subcortical region and a single photon emission tomography indicated possible bifrontal hypoperfusion. Electroencephalograms demonstrated non-specific slowing. Somatosensory evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocities were normal. There were constant indicanuria and amino-aciduria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2582682

  10. Astrocyte Leptin Receptor (ObR) and Leptin Transport in Adult-Onset Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihong; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Sakharkar, Amul; Cain, Courtney; Yu, Chuanhui; Kastin, Abba J.

    2008-01-01

    The agouti viable yellow (Avy) spontaneous mutation generates an unusual mouse phenotype of agouti-colored coat and adult-onset obesity with metabolic syndrome. Persistent production of agouti signaling protein in Avy mice antagonizes melanocortin receptors in the hypothalamus. To determine how this disruption of neuroendocrine circuits affects leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we measured leptin influx in Avy and B6 control mice after the development of obesity, hyperleptinemia, and increased adiposity. After iv bolus injection, 125I-leptin crossed the BBB significantly faster in young (2 month old) B6 mice than in young Avy mice or in older (8 month old) mice of either strain. This difference was not observed by in situ brain perfusion studies, indicating the cause being circulating factors, such as elevated leptin levels or soluble receptors. Thus, Avy mice showed peripheral leptin resistance. ObRa, the main transporting receptor for leptin at the BBB, showed no change in mRNA expression in the cerebral microvessels between the age-matched (2 month old) Avy and B6 mice. Higher ObRb mRNA was seen in the Avy microvasculature with unknown significance. Immunofluorescent staining unexpectedly revealed that many of the ObR(+) cells were astrocytes and that the Avy mice showed significantly more ObR(+) astrocytes in the hypothalamus than the B6 mice. Although leptin permeation from the circulation was slower in the Avy mice, the increased ObR expression in astrocytes and increased ObRb mRNA in microvessels suggest the possibility of heightened central nervous system sensitivity to circulating leptin. PMID:18292187

  11. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  12. Exclusion of one pedigree affected by adult onset primary open angle glaucoma from linkage to the juvenile glaucoma locus on chromosome 1q21-q31.

    PubMed Central

    Avramopoulos, D; Kitsos, G; Economou-Petersen, E; Grigoriadou, M; Vassilopoulos, D; Papageorgiou, C; Psilas, K; Petersen, M B

    1996-01-01

    A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) was recently assigned to chromosome region 1q21-q31. In the present study, a large Greek family with autosomal dominant adult onset POAG was investigated using microsatellite markers. Exclusion of linkage of the adult onset POAG gene to the region D1S194-D1S191 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, the data provide evidence that juvenile and adult onset POAG are genetically distinct disease entities. PMID:9004141

  13. Stroke prevention by direct revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tackeun; Oh, Chang Wan; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyojun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Cho, Won-Sang; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-06-01

    . CONCLUSIONS Direct or combined revascularization for patients with adult-onset moyamoya disease presenting with ischemia can prevent further stroke. PMID:26636391

  14. An increased incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in patients with adult-onset sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sarcomas are rare, often fatal malignancies of connective tissues that can occur in genetic predisposition syndromes or result from carcinogen exposure. Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is not known to contribute to any recognised familial cancer syndrome comprising sarcomas, but is known to be associated with a variety of second cancers, including sarcomas. This study describes the prevalence of HL in families affected by sarcoma. Methods The International Sarcoma Kindred Study (ISKS) is a prospective cohort of 561 families ascertained via a proband with adult-onset sarcoma. Cancer-specific standardised incidence ratios (SIR) for multiple primary malignancies in probands were estimated. Clinical characteristics of individuals reporting both sarcoma and HL were described. Standardised incidence ratios for the occurrence of cancer in ISKS families were also estimated. Results Multiple primary cancers were reported in 16% of probands, significantly higher than in the general population. The risk of HL in probands was increased 15.8-fold (95%CI 7.9-31.6) and increased risks were also seen for breast cancer (SIR 2.9, 95%CI 1.9-4.4) and thyroid cancer (SIR 8.4, 95%CI 4.2-16.8). In 8 probands with both HL and sarcoma, the diagnosis of HL preceded that of sarcoma in 7 cases, and occurred synchronously in one case. Only 3 cases of sarcoma occurred in or close to prior radiotherapy fields. The overall incidence of HL in the ISKS cohort was not significantly increased by comparison with age- and gender-specific population estimates (SIR 1.63, 95%CI 1.05-2.43), suggesting that the association between HL and sarcomas did not extend to other family members. The age of onset of non-sarcoma, non-HL cancers in families affected by both HL and sarcoma was younger than the general population (56.2 y vs 65.6 y, P < 0.0001). Conclusions The basis for the association between HL and sarcomas may include the carcinogenic effects of therapy combined with excellent survival rates for HL

  15. Obesity-related abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K Hoa; Ande, Sudharsana R; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-29

    The incidence of adult-onset T1D in low-risk non-HLA type has increased several folds, whereas the contemporaneous incidence in high-risk HLA-type remains stable. Various factors behind this selective increase in T1D in young adults remain unclear. Obesity and its associated abnormalities appear to be an important determinant; however, the underlying mechanism involved is not understood. Recently, we have developed two novel transgenic obese mice models, Mito-Ob and m-Mito-Ob, by expressing a pleiotropic protein prohibitin (PHB) and a phospho mutant form of PHB (Y114F-PHB or m-PHB) from the aP2 gene promoter, respectively. Both mice models develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, independent of diet; but obesity associated chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance in a male sex-specific manner. Interestingly, on a high fat diet (HFD) only male m-Mito-Ob mice displayed marked mononuclear cell infiltration in pancreas and developed insulitis that mimic adult-onset T1D. Male Mito-Ob mice that share the metabolic phenotype of male m-Mito-Ob mice, and female m-Mito-Ob that harbor m-PHB similar to male m-Mito-Ob mice, did not develop insulitis. Thus, insulitis development in male m-Mito-Ob in response to HFD requires both, obesity-related abnormalities and m-PHB. Collectively, this data provides a proof-of-concept that obesity-associated abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D and reveals PHB as a potential susceptibility gene for T1D. PMID:26766792

  16. Piriform sinus carcinoma with a paraneoplastic syndrome misdiagnosed as adult onset Still’s disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Du, Jintao

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PS) occur less commonly in association with otolaryngologic neoplasms than other carcinomas such as those of lung or breast. Piriform sinus carcinoma with PS is extremely rare. We here report a case of piriform sinus carcinoma accompanied by PS that was initially misdiagnosed as adult onset Still’s disease and describe our diagnosis and treatment. One lesson we have drawn from the experience of this misdiagnosis is that PS symptoms may manifest before the primary tumor is evident and complicate the diagnostic process. PMID:26770614

  17. Preparation of artificial ceroid/lipofuscin by UV-oxidation of subcellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, E; Yin, D

    1997-12-01

    Recent studies have consistently shown that, during oxidative damage, glycation, and other oxygen stress-related reactions, various biomolecules are converted into ceroid- and lipofuscin-like fluorescent pigments. In this study, artificial ceroid/lipofuscin was produced by exposing rat liver fractions to UV-light overnight. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were formed in increasing amounts during the early stages of the process, but decreased as the material was later converted into a polymeric structure with few remaining peroxides. In the transmission electron microscope the artificial pigment showed lamellar structures and was osmiophilic. By energy-dispersive X-ray analysis the material was found to contain Ca and Fe in the same way as natural ceroid/lipofuscin. Moreover, it exhibited ceroid/lipofuscin-like, greenish-yellowish autofluorescence when assayed by microfluorometry, with a fluorescence maximum consistently found at 430 nm when excited at 350 nm. Identical fluorescence maxima were found for each fraction of rat liver that was used as the origin of the pigments, i.e. nuclei, mitochondria, lysosomes and microsomes. Extracts with either chloroform-methanol, or sodium dodecylsulphate, showed identical complex fluorescence. When the pigments were extracted by chloroform-methanol, five fluorescent bands were obtained after thin-layer chromatographic separation. Fibroblasts were found to endocytose the material, a process that converted them into lipofuscin-loaded cells of an aged phenotype as observed by light and electron microscopy. Similar fluorescence emission spectra were obtained from cells grown at 40% O2, in order to stimulate endogenous lipofuscin-formation, and from cells exposed to artificial ceroid/lipofuscin. The described technique for creating artificial ceroid/lipofuscin is relatively easy to perform and should provide a useful new tool to study the possible influences of ceroid/lipofuscin on lysosomal and cellular functions

  18. Genetic testing of children for adult-onset conditions: opinions of the British adult population and implications for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Shkedi-Rafid, Shiri; Fenwick, Angela; Dheensa, Sandi; Lucassen, Anneke M

    2015-10-01

    This study set out to explore the attitudes of a representative sample of the British public towards genetic testing in children to predict disease in the future. We sought opinions about genetic testing for adult-onset conditions for which no prevention/treatment is available during childhood, and about genetic 'carrier' status to assess future reproductive risks. The study also examined participants' level of agreement with the reasons professional organisations give in favour of deferring such testing. Participants (n=2998) completed a specially designed questionnaire, distributed by email. Nearly half of the sample (47%) agreed that parents should be able to test their child for adult-onset conditions, even if there is no treatment or prevention at time of testing. This runs contrary to professional guidance about genetic testing in children. Testing for carrier status was supported by a larger proportion (60%). A child's future ability to decide for her/himself if and when to be tested was the least supported argument in favour of deferring testing. PMID:25370041

  19. Reactive macrophage activation syndrome possibly triggered by canakinumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Banse, Christopher; Vittecoq, Olivier; Benhamou, Ygal; Gauthier-Prieur, Maud; Lequerré, Thierry; Lévesque, Hervé

    2013-12-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and serious complication of adult-onset Still's disease. We describe a case in a 49-year-old woman with Still's disease refractory to glucocorticoids, methotrexate, and infliximab. Anakinra provided satisfactory disease control for 1 year, after which escape phenomenon occurred. After four tocilizumab injections, cutaneous melanoma developed. The persistent systemic manifestations prompted treatment with two canakinumab injections. Ten days later, she had a spiking fever, dyspnea, low back pain, abdominal pain, odynophagia, and hepatomegaly. Laboratory tests showed liver cytolysis (180 IU/L; N: 10-35), acute renal failure (creatinine, 407 μmol/L; N:50-100), thrombocytopenia (60 G/L; N: 150-400), leukocytosis (12,200/mm(3); N: 4000-10,000), hypertriglyceridemia (5070 mmol/L; N: 0.4-1.6), lactate dehydrogenase elevation (4824 IU/L; N: 135-250), and hyperferritinemia (97 761 μg/L; N:15-150). Examination of a bone marrow biopsy showed phagocytosis. Tests were negative for viruses and other infectious agents. Glucocorticoid therapy (1.5 mg/Kg/d) and intravenous polyvalent immunoglobulins (0.5 g/Kg/d) were given. Her condition improved despite the many factors of adverse prognostic significance (thrombocytopenia, absence of lymphadenopathy, and glucocorticoid therapy at diagnosis). This is the first reported case of MAS after canakinumab therapy in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease. PMID:23751410

  20. Uteroplacental insufficiency alters nephrogenesis and downregulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression in a model of IUGR with adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    Baserga, Mariana; Hale, Merica A; Wang, Zheng Ming; Yu, Xing; Callaway, Christopher W; McKnight, Robert A; Lane, Robert H

    2007-05-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) following uteroplacental insufficiency (UPI) reduces nephron number and predisposes toward renal insufficiency early in life and increased risk of adult-onset hypertension. In this study, we hypothesized that the inducible enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a pivotal protein in nephrogenesis, constitutes a mechanism through which UPI and subsequent glucocorticoid overexposure can decrease nephron number. We further hypothesized that UPI downregulates the key enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11beta-HSD2), which converts corticosterone to inert 11-dehydrocorticosterone, thereby protecting both the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) from the actions of corticosterone. Following bilateral uterine ligation on the pregnant rat, UPI significantly decreased renal COX-2, 11beta-HSD2, and GR mRNA and protein levels, but upregulated expression of MR at birth. At day 21 of life, 11beta-HSD2, GR, and also MR mRNA and protein levels were downregulated. UPI did not affect blood pressures (BP) at day 21 of life but significantly increased systolic BP in both genders at day 140. We conclude that in our animal model, UPI decreases fetal COX-2 expression during a period of active nephrogenesis in the IUGR rat, which is also characterized by decreased nephron number and adult-onset hypertension. PMID:17272666

  1. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. PMID:27317840

  2. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP).

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F; Stanley, E Richard

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/- and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/- mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/- mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/- mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches. Furthermore

  3. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP)

    PubMed Central

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A.; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F.; Stanley, E. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/− and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/− mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/− mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/− mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches

  4. Possible macrophage activation syndrome following initiation of adalimumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Souabni, Leila; Dridi, Leila; Ben Abdelghani, Kawther; Kassab, Selma; Chekili, Selma; Laater, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) has been rarely reported in the course of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and in the majority of cases, it was triggered by an infection. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first case of MAS occurring after adalimumab treatment initiation and not triggered by an infection. A 26-yearold woman with classical features of AOSD developed persistent fever, severe bicytopenia associated with extreme hyperferritinemia, hyponatremia and abnormal liver function tow months after the initiation of adalimumab treatment. The diagnosis of MAS was made without histological proof. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and her condition improved. During the disease course, extensive studies could not identify any viral infection or other known underlying etiology for the reactive MAS. The adalimumab was incriminated in this complication. Currently, the patient is in remission on tocilizumab and low-dose prednisolone. PMID:25018831

  5. Wiki-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma: A New Paradigm in Sarcoma Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, S. J.; Thomas, D.; Desai, J.; Vuletich, C.; von Dincklage, J.; Olver, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Australia introduced Wiki-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma. These guidelines utilized a customized MediaWiki software application for guideline development and are the first evidence-based guidelines for clinical management of sarcoma. This paper presents our experience with developing and implementing web-based interactive guidelines and reviews some of the challenges and lessons from adopting an evidence-based (rather than consensus-based) approach to clinical sarcoma guidelines. Digital guidelines can be easily updated with new evidence, continuously reviewed and widely disseminated. They provide an accessible method of enabling clinicians and consumers to access evidence-based clinical practice recommendations and, as evidenced by over 2000 views in the first four months after release, with 49% of those visits being from countries outside of Australia. The lessons learned have relevance to other rare cancers in addition to the international sarcoma community. PMID:25784832

  6. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil.

    PubMed

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  7. HPV Type 6 and 18 Coinfection in a Case of Adult-Onset Laryngeal Papillomatosis: Immunization with Gardasil

    PubMed Central

    Fancello, Virginia; Melis, Andrea; Piana, Andrea Fausto; Castiglia, Paolo; Cossu, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Bozzo, Corrado; King, Emma Victoria; Meloni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) is a rare human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease that often requires multiple surgical interventions and residual impairment of voice is almost inevitable. We report the case of a patient with adult onset recurrent LP, showing moderate dysplasia and coinfection with HPV types 6 and 18. The tetravalent HPV vaccine Gardasil was prescribed off label, with the aim of triggering an immunogenic response and consequently reducing the probability of further recurrences. The patient was followed for 9 months with no sign of relapse of his LP. The postexposure use of the anti-HPV vaccine could represent a promising therapeutic agent in established LP. Unfortunately, the potential efficacy of this new therapeutic option in this situation has been suggested only by isolated case reports. Further controlled studies, with a longer follow-up and a larger sample size, are needed to assess efficacy of Gardasil in LP. PMID:26783482

  8. Adult Onset of BRAFV600E-Mutated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Cutaneous Involvement Successfully Diagnosed by Immunohistochemical Staining

    PubMed Central

    Tono, Hisayuki; Fujimura, Taku; Kakizaki, Aya; Furudate, Sadanori; Ishibashi, Masaya; Aiba, Setsuya

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by the clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells; it is categorized as a single-system disease with single or multifocal lesions, and as a multi-system disease with or without the risk of organ involvement. Although the skin is not categorized as a risk organ, the precise diagnosis of skin lesions is necessary to determine the protocol for the treatment of LCH. In this report, we describe a 28-year-old Japanese man with adult onset of BRAFV600E-mutated LCH with cutaneous involvement successfully diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Our report suggests that immunohistochemical staining for the BRAFV600E gene could be a diagnostic tool to determine the clinical type of LCH. PMID:26500535

  9. Adult-onset focal expression of mutated human tau in the hippocampus impairs spatial working memory of rats

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, M.L.; King, M.A.; Klein, R.L.; Ramirez, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Tauopathy in the hippocampus is one of the earliest cardinal features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a condition characterized by progressive memory impairments. In fact, density of tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampus strongly correlates with severity of cognitive impairments in AD. In the present study, we employed a somatic cell gene transfer technique to create a rodent model of tauopathy by injecting a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with a mutated human tau gene (P301L) into the hippocampus of adult rats. The P301L mutation is causal for frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17), but it has been used for studying memory effects characteristic of AD in transgenic mice. To ascertain if P301L-induced mnemonic deficits are persistent, animals were tested for 6 months. It was hypothesized that adult-onset, spatially restricted tau expression in the hippocampus would produce progressive spatial working memory deficits on a learned alternation task. Rats injected with the tau vector exhibited persistent impairments on the hippocampal-dependent task beginning at about 6 weeks post-transduction compared to rats injected with a green fluorescent protein vector. Histological analysis of brains for expression of human tau revealed hyperphosphorylated human tau and NFTs in the hippocampus in experimental animals only. Thus, adult-onset, vector-induced tauopathy spatially restricted to the hippocampus progressively impaired spatial working memory in rats. We conclude that the model faithfully reproduces histological and behavioral findings characteristic of dementing tauopathies. The rapid onset of sustained memory impairment establishes a preclinical model particularly suited to the development of potential tauopathy therapeutics. PMID:22561128

  10. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington’s disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions. PMID:26863614

  11. Adult-onset Kawasaki disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) and concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuki; Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Noda, Ayako; Yamamoto, Yu; Matsumura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kawasaki disease (KD) most commonly develops in infants, although its specific cause is still unclear. We report here a rare case of adult-onset KD which revealed to be concurrently infected by Coxsackievirus A4. Case presentation The patient was a 37-year-old Japanese man who presented with fever, exanthema, changes in the peripheral extremities, bilateral non-exudative conjunctival injection, and changes in the oropharynx, signs that meet the diagnostic criteria for KD defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this case, the patient had a significantly high antibody titer for Coxsackievirus A4, which led us to presume that the occurrence of KD was concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection. Conclusion We reported a very rare case of KD which suggests that the disease can be concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection. Although KD is an acute childhood disease, with fever as one of the principal features, KD should also be considered in the differential diagnosis when adult patients present with a fever of unknown cause associated with a rash. PMID:26491373

  12. Response to immunotherapy in a patient with adult onset Leigh syndrome and T9176C mtDNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chuquilin, Miguel; Govindarajan, Raghav; Peck, Dawn; Font-Montgomery, Esperanza

    2016-09-01

    Leigh syndrome is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in different genes, including ATP6A for which no known therapy is available. We report a case of adult-onset Leigh syndrome with response to immunotherapy. A twenty year-old woman with baseline learning difficulties was admitted with progressive behavioral changes, diplopia, headaches, bladder incontinence, and incoordination. Brain MRI and PET scan showed T2 hyperintensity and increased uptake in bilateral basal ganglia, respectively. Autoimmune encephalitis was suspected and she received plasmapheresis with clinical improvement. She was readmitted 4 weeks later with dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia. Plasmapheresis was repeated with resolution of her symptoms. Given the multisystem involvement and suggestive MRI changes, genetic testing was done, revealing a homoplasmic T9176C ATPase 6 gene mtDNA mutation. Monthly IVIG provided clinical improvement with worsening when infusions were delayed. Leigh syndrome secondary to mtDNA T9176C mutations could have an autoimmune mechanism that responds to immunotherapy. PMID:27408822

  13. Adult-onset multiple acyl CoA dehydrogenation deficiency associated with an abnormal isoenzyme pattern of serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Fuminobu; Baba, Kousuke; Toyooka, Keiko; Liang, Wen-Chen; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamadera, Misaki; Sumi, Hisae; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old male with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). The patient had suffered from exercise intolerance in his hip and thigh muscles for one year. Then, restriction of carbohydrates for a diet made his symptoms rapidly deteriorate. Blood test revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel missense mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase gene (ETFDH), and an abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern: LDH-1 (60.0%) and LDH-2 (26.0%) predominated with abnormally elevated LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (2.3), compared with muscle-derived LDH-5 (4.0%). Oral riboflavin treatment significantly improved his exercise intolerance and the LDH profile: LDH-1 (34.4%), LDH-2 (34.9%), LDH-5 (6.9%) and LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (1.0). The abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern may be one feature of adult-onset MADD selectively affecting type I muscle fibers with relatively high LDH-1 content. PMID:21907580

  14. Adult-onset Still's disease: an Italian multicentre retrospective observational study of manifestations and treatments in 245 patients.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, Paolo; Priori, Roberta; Valesini, Guido; Rossi, Silvia; Montecucco, Carlo Maurizio; D'Ascanio, Anna; Carli, Linda; Bombardieri, Stefano; LaSelva, Gaetana; Iannone, Florenzo; Lapadula, Giovanni; Alivernini, Stefano; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Colaci, Michele; Ferri, Clodoveo; Iacono, Daniela; Valentini, Gabriele; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele; LoMonaco, Andrea; Bagnari, Valentina; Govoni, Marcello; Piazza, Ilaria; Adami, Silvano; Ciccia, Francesco; Triolo, Giovanni; Alessandri, Elisa; Cutolo, Maurizio; Cantarini, Luca; Galeazzi, Mauro; Ruscitti, Piero; Giacomelli, Roberto; Caso, Francesco; Galozzi, Paola; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-07-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory condition of unknown aetiology characterized by typical episodes of spiking fever, evanescent rash, arthralgia, leukocytosis and hyperferritinemia. Given the lack of data in Italian series, we promote a multicentric data collection to characterize the clinical phenotype of Italian patients with AOSD. Data from 245 subjects diagnosed with AOSD were collected by 15 centres between March and May 2013. The diagnosis was made following Yamaguchi's criteria. Data regarding clinical manifestations, laboratory features, disease course and treatments were reported and compared with those presented in other published series of different ethnicity. The most frequent features were the following: arthritis (93 %), pyrexia (92.6 %), leukocytosis (89 %), negative ANA (90.4 %) and neutrophilia (82 %). As compared to other North American, North European, Middle Eastern and Far Eastern cohorts, Italian data show differences in clinical and laboratory findings. Regarding the treatments, in 21.9 % of cases, corticosteroids and traditional DMARDs have not been able to control the disease while biologics have been shown to be effective in 48 to 58 patients. This retrospective work summarizes the largest Italian multicentre series of AOSD patients and presents clinical and laboratory features that appear to be influenced by the ethnicity of the affected subjects. PMID:27207567

  15. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D. PMID:26341315

  16. The association of infantile osteopetrosis and neuronal storage disease in two brothers.

    PubMed

    Jagadha, V; Halliday, W C; Becker, L E; Hinton, D

    1988-01-01

    Neurological manifestations in infantile osteopetrosis are common and varied, and not always attributable to the skeletal pathology. An unusual association of osteopetrosis with neuronal storage of ceroid lipofuscin is reported in two infant brothers born of nonconsanguinous parents. The first child became symptomatic at age 5 days with weight loss and vomiting. He had poor head control, hypertonia, and persistent fisting, and died at age 2 months. In the second infant, the diagnosis of osteopetrosis was confirmed at age 2 days. His neurological symptoms included blindness, deafness, and recurrent seizures. The infant died at 7 months of age. In both cases, autopsy confirmed the diffuse bony sclerosis with hepatosplenomegaly and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Neuropathological examination revealed cerebral atrophy with ventricular dilation, neuronal loss, and astrogliosis. The most striking finding was widespread accumulation of neuronal ceroid lipofuscin associated with formation of axonal spheroids. The optic nerves were compressed at the optic foramina and showed loss of myelinated axons and gliosis. Rapid Golgi impregnations of neurons from the calcarine cortex in the second infant were analyzed quantitatively, showing a reduction in the total dendritic length and number of branches. The primary defect in osteopetrosis is thought to be a lysosomal dysfunction involving the monocyte cell line from which osteoclasts are derived. Thus, the association in two brothers of osteopetrosis with accumulation of neuronal ceroid lipofuscin may not be fortuitous. The neuronal storage disorder in this instance probably reflects lysosomal dysfunction. PMID:3348081

  17. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Experiences of Racism and the Incidence of Adult-Onset Asthma in the Black Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeffrey; O’Connor, George T.; Brown, Timothy A.; Cozier, Yvette C.; Palmer, Julie R.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic stress resulting from experiences of racism may increase the incidence of adult-onset asthma through effects on the immune system and the airways. We conducted prospective analyses of the relation of experiences of racism with asthma incidence in the Black Women’s Health Study, a prospective cohort of black women in the United States followed since 1995 with mailed biennial questionnaires. Methods: Among 38,142 participants followed from 1997 to 2011, 1,068 reported incident asthma. An everyday racism score was created based on five questions asked in 1997 and 2009 about the frequency in daily life of experiences of racism (eg, poor service in stores), and a lifetime racism score was based on questions about racism on the job, in housing, and by police. We used Cox regression models to derive multivariable incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for categories of each racism score in relation to incident asthma. Results: The IRRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.19-1.78) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of the 1997 everyday racism score (P for trend <.0001) and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.18-1.75) for the highest compared with the lowest category of 1997 lifetime racism. Among women who reported the same levels of racism in 1997 and 2009, the IRRs for the highest categories of everyday and lifetime racism were 2.12 (95% CI, 1.55-2.91) and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.20-2.30), respectively. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of experiences of racism and asthma in black women in the United States, a positive association between racism and asthma is of public health importance. PMID:23887828

  19. Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) in the era of biologic therapies: dichotomous view for cytokine and clinical expressions.

    PubMed

    Maria, Alexandre Thibault Jacques; Le Quellec, Alain; Jorgensen, Christian; Touitou, Isabelle; Rivière, Sophie; Guilpain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder characterized by hectic spiking fever, evanescent rash and joint involvement. Prognosis is highly variable upon disease course and specific involvements, ranging from benign and limited outcome to chronic destructive polyarthritis and/or life-threatening events in case of visceral complications or reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (RHL). AOSD remains a debatable entity at the frontiers of autoimmune diseases and autoinflammatory disorders. The pivotal role of macrophage cell activation leading to a typical Th1 cytokine storm is now well established in AOSD, and confirmed by the benefits using treatments targeting TNF-α, IL-1β or IL-6 in refractory patients. However, it remains difficult to determine predictive factors of outcome and to draw guidelines for patient management. Herein, reviewing literature and relying on our experience in a series of 8 refractory AOSD patients, we question nosology and postulate that different cytokine patterns could underlie contrasting clinical expressions, as well as responses to targeted therapies. We therefore propose to dichotomize AOSD according to its clinical presentation. On the one hand, 'systemic AOSD' patients, exhibiting the highest inflammation process driven by excessive IL-18, IL-1β and IL-6 production, would be at risk of life-threatening complications (such as multivisceral involvements and RHL), and would preferentially respond to IL-1β and IL-6 antagonists. On the other hand, 'rheumatic AOSD' patients, exhibiting pre-eminence of joint involvement driven by IL-8 and IFN-γ production, would be at risk of articular destructions, and would preferentially respond to TNF-α blockers. PMID:25183244

  20. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease: A STROBE-compliant case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971-2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases.Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non-PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort).AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD.PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  1. Comparison of Glomerular Transcriptome Profiles of Adult-Onset Steroid Sensitive Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and Minimal Change Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hong; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Weijia; Wei, Chengguo; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiao; Wang, Weiming; Lv, Danfeng; He, John Cijiang; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To search for biomarkers to differentiate primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and minimal change disease (MCD). Methods We isolated glomeruli from kidney biopsies of 6 patients with adult-onset steroid sensitiveFSGS and 5 patients with MCD, and compared the profiles of glomerular transcriptomes between the two groups of patients using microarray analysis. Results Analysis of differential expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that up-regulated DEGs in FSGS patients compared with MCD patients were primarily involved in spermatogenesis, gamete generation, regulation of muscle contraction, response to unfolded protein, cell proliferation and skeletal system development. The down-regulated DEGs were primarily related to metabolic process, intracellular transport, oxidation/reduction andestablishment of intracellular localization. We validated the expression of the top 6 up-regulated and top 6 down-regulated DEGs using real-time PCR. Membrane metallo-endopeptidase (MME) is a down-regulated gene that was previously identified as a key gene for kidney development. Immunostaining confirmed that the protein expression of MME decreased significantly in FSGS kidneys compared with MCD kidneys. Conclusions This report was the first study to examine transcriptomes in Chinese patients with various glomerular diseases. Expressions of MME both in RNA and protein level decreased significantly in glomeruli of FSGS kidneys compared with MCD kidneys. Our data suggested that MME might play a role in the normal physiological function of podocytes and a decrease in MME expression might be related to podocyte injury. We also identified genes and pathways specific for FSGS versus MCD, and our data could help identify potential new biomarkers for the differential diagnosis between these two diseases. PMID:26536600

  2. Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort VI: A cross-sectional comparison of outcomes between adults with pediatric-onset and adult-onset morphea

    PubMed Central

    Condie, Daniel; Grabell, Daniel; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies have looked at outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset morphea. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in adults with pediatric-onset morphea to those of patients with adult-onset morphea. Methods Participants in the study were drawn from the Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort and included 68 adults with pediatric-onset morphea and 234 patients with adult-onset morphea. Outcome measures included the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), physical exam findings, and quality of life questionnaires. Results Adults with pediatric-onset morphea were younger, had longer disease duration, and were more likely to have the linear subtype of morphea. Patients with pediatric-onset disease were less likely to have active disease. Among patients with active disease, those with pediatric-onset morphea had less disease activity as measured by the LoSCAT. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had higher disease damage as measured by the Physician Global Assessment of Damage, but similar disease damage as measured by the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had more favorable quality of life scores for all measures that reached statistical significance. Conclusion Adults with pediatric-onset morphea differ from patients with adult-onset disease with respect to subtype, disease activity, disease damage, and health-related quality of life. PMID:25156342

  3. Juvenile ceroid lipofuscinosis. Evidence for methylated lysine in neural storage body protein.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, M. L.; Rodrigues, M.

    1991-01-01

    Juvenile ceroid lipofuscinosis, or Batten disease, is a hereditary disorder characterized by progressive visual loss, seizures, cognitive and psychomotor deterioration, and early death, usually between 15 and 35 years of age. Individuals with this disease have massive deposits of autofluorescent inclusion bodies in cells of most tissues. The accumulation of these intracellular deposits suggests that juvenile ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a storage disease resulting from the inability of cells to metabolize some normal cellular constituent. It has been reported that the storage material is largely protein, much of which is a specific mitochondrial protein that apparently is not properly metabolized in subjects with Batten disease. The storage bodies were partially purified from the retinas of two siblings who died as a result of juvenile ceroid lipofuscinosis, as well as from the cerebral cortex of an unrelated individual with this disorder. Chromatographic analysis of storage body protein acid hydrolysates indicated that they contained a large amount of the modified amino acid epsilon-N-trimethyllysine. The abundance of this amino acid in the storage protein suggests that the disease may result from excessive methylation or from a failure to demethylate intermediate forms of the stored proteins. Acid hydrolysis also solubilized a fluorescent component from the retinal storage material, suggesting that the stored protein has a bound fluorescent adduct. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1899540

  4. Interleukin 1 inhibition with anakinra in adult-onset Still disease: a meta-analysis of its efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhihai; Han, Shuyin; Liang, Xingguang; Ma, Kuifen; Zhang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Background Anakinra is the first interleukin-1 inhibitor to be used in clinical practice, and recent evidence showed that interleukin-1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of adult-onset Still disease (AoSD). However, data concerning efficacy with anakinra use in different clinical trials has not been evaluated, and the overall remission of AoSD with anakinra treatment has not been well defined. Methods We conducted a search on Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the overall remission rates, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI), by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity. Results Of the 273 articles that were identified, 265 were excluded. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion. The overall remission rate and complete remission rate of anakinra in AoSD patients were 81.66% (95% CI: 69.51%–89.69%) and 66.75% (95% CI: 59.94%–75.3%), respectively. Compared with the controls, the use of anakinra was associated with a significant remission in AoSD, with an OR of 0.16 (95% CI: 0.06–0.44, P=0.0005). There were also significant reductions of the dosage of corticosteroid (mean difference =21.19) (95% CI: 13.2–29.18, P<0.0001) from anakinra onset to the latest follow up time. Clinical and laboratory parameters were all improved, and anakinra was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion Our study has shown that anakinra is effective in remitting the manifestations of AoSD, with reduction of the dose of corticosteroid in patients with AoSD. Further, anakinra therapy was not associated with increased risk of adverse events, and it was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. Further research is still recommended to investigate these findings. PMID:25473268

  5. Annual Research Review: Current limitations and future directions in MRI studies of child- and adult-onset developmental psychopathologies

    PubMed Central

    Horga, Guillermo; Kaur, Tejal; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the study of child- and adult-onset developmental psychopathologies has generated many investigations that have measured brain structure and function in vivo throughout development, often generating great excitement over our ability to visualize the living, developing brain using the attractive, even seductive images that these studies produce. Often lost in this excitement is the recognition that brain imaging generally, and MRI in particular, is simply a technology, one that does not fundamentally differ from any other technology, be it a blood test, a genotyping assay, a biochemical assay, or behavioral test. No technology alone can generate valid scientific findings. Rather, it is only technology coupled with a strong experimental design that can generate valid and reproducible findings that lead to new insights into the mechanisms of disease and therapeutic response. In this review we discuss selected studies to illustrate the most common and important limitations of MRI study designs as most commonly implemented thus far, as well as the misunderstanding that the interpretations of findings from those studies can create for our theories of developmental psychopathologies. Those limitations are in large part responsible thus far for the generally poor reproducibility of findings across studies, poor generalizability to the larger population, failure to identify developmental trajectories, inability to distinguish causes from effects of illness, and poor ability to infer causal mechanisms in most MRI studies of developmental psychopathologies. For each of these limitations in study design and the difficulties they entail for the interpretation of findings, we discuss various approaches that numerous laboratories are now taking to address those difficulties, which have in common the yoking of brain imaging technologies to studies with inherently stronger designs that permit more valid and more powerful

  6. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    rearrangements, being observed in 6 of 10 PTC cases with ALK rearrangements versus 2 of 15 cases with no ALK rearrangements. The six radiation-exposed cases of PTC harboring both ALK rearrangements and solid/trabecular-like architecture were associated with higher radiation doses and younger ages at the time of the A-bombing and at diagnosis compared to the other 19 PTC with no detectable gene alterations. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ALK rearrangements are involved in the development of radiation-induced adult-onset PTC. PMID:23050789

  7. When uncommon and common coalesce: adult onset Still's disease associated with breast augmentation as part of autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Dagan, A; Kogan, M; Shoenfeld, Y; Segal, G

    2016-06-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon, multisystemic, auto-inflammatory disorder, while breast augmentation is a very common cosmetic procedure. We describe a case in which these two coalesce, AOSD, manifested with pleuritis and pericarditis, developed after breast mammoplasty. The pathogenetic, missing link, behind the development of AOSD following mammoplasty, is thought to be the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). We reviewed other cases of AOSD associated with breast mammoplasty published to date and the literature regarding AOSD and ASIA syndrome. The review is followed by a short debate of whether silicone implants should be explanted in similar, future cases. PMID:25604318

  8. Adult-Onset Deficiency in Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Alters Oligodendrocyte Turnover in the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Kun; Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Lichtenwalner, Robin J.; Sonntag, William E.; Riddle, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) provide trophic support during development and also appear to influence cell structure, function and replacement in the adult brain. Recent studies demonstrated effects of the GH/IGF-I axis on adult neurogenesis, but it is unclear whether the GH/IGF-I axis influences glial turnover in the normal adult brain. In the current study we used a selective model of adult-onset GH and IGF-I deficiency to evaluate the role of GH and IGF-I in regulating glial proliferation and survival in the adult corpus callosum. GH/IGF-I-deficient dwarf rats of the Lewis strain were made GH/IGF-I replete via twice daily injections of GH starting at postnatal day 28 (P28), approximately the age at which GH pulse amplitude increases in developing rodents. GH/IGF-I deficiency was initiated in adulthood by removing animals from GH treatment. Quantitative analyses revealed that adult-onset GH/IGF-I deficiency decreased cell proliferation in the white matter and decreased the survival of newborn oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that aging-related changes in the GH/IGF-I axis produce deficits in ongoing turnover of oligodendrocytes, which may contribute to aging-related cognitive changes and deficits in remyelination after injury. PMID:19115393

  9. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, M G; Nelson, I; Sweeney, M G; Cooper, J M; Watkins, P J; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Harding, A E

    1995-01-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7726155

  10. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Differences in B7 and CD28 family gene expression in the peripheral blood between newly diagnosed young-onset and adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Pruul, K; Kisand, K; Alnek, K; Metsküla, K; Reimand, K; Heilman, K; Peet, A; Varik, K; Peetsalu, M; Einberg, Ü; Tillmann, V; Uibo, R

    2015-09-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, and there are pathogenetic differences between young- and adult-onset T1D patients. We hypothesized that the expressions of genes involved in costimulatory immune system pathways in peripheral blood are differently regulated in young- and adult-onset T1D. Study group I consisted of 80 children, adolescents, and young adults (age range 1.4-21.4 y; 31 controls and 49 T1D patients). Study group II consisted of 48 adults (age range 22.0-78.4 y; 30 controls and 18 T1D patients). The mRNA expression levels of CD86, CD28, CD25, CD226, CD40, BTLA, GITR, PDCD1, FoxP3, TGF-β, ICOS, sCTLA4, flCTLA4, and CD80 were measured in peripheral blood. Genetic polymorphisms (HLA haplotypes; rs231806, rs231775, and rs3087243 in CTLA4; rs763361 in CD226; and rs706778 in CD25) and T1D-associated autoantibodies were analyzed. In group I, there was significantly lower expression of CD226 in T1D patients than in the controls. In group II, there were significantly higher expression levels of CD86 and TGF-β in T1D patients than in the controls. In the T1D patients in group I, the upregulated CD80 expression correlated with the expression of both CTLA4 splice variants (sCTLA4 and flCTLA4). In contrast, in group II, upregulated CD86 correlated with TGF-β and CD25. In group I, the inhibitory CD80-CTLA4 pathway was activated, whereas, in group II, the activation CD86-CD28 pathway and TGF-β production were activated. These results emphasize the differences between young-onset and adult-onset T1D in the regulation of costimulatory pathways. These differences should be considered when developing novel treatments for T1D. PMID:25980680

  12. Mutations in UBQLN2 cause dominant X-linked juvenile and adult-onset ALS and ALS/dementia.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han-Xiang; Chen, Wenjie; Hong, Seong-Tshool; Boycott, Kym M; Gorrie, George H; Siddique, Nailah; Yang, Yi; Fecto, Faisal; Shi, Yong; Zhai, Hong; Jiang, Hujun; Hirano, Makito; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Jansen, Gerard H; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bigio, Eileen H; Brooks, Benjamin R; Ajroud, Kaouther; Sufit, Robert L; Haines, Jonathan L; Mugnaini, Enrico; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Siddique, Teepu

    2011-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a paralytic and usually fatal disorder caused by motor-neuron degeneration in the brain and spinal cord. Most cases of ALS are sporadic but about 5-10% are familial. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein (TARDBP, also known as TDP43) and fused in sarcoma (FUS, also known as translocated in liposarcoma (TLS)) account for approximately 30% of classic familial ALS. Mutations in several other genes have also been reported as rare causes of ALS or ALS-like syndromes. The causes of the remaining cases of familial ALS and of the vast majority of sporadic ALS are unknown. Despite extensive studies of previously identified ALS-causing genes, the pathogenic mechanism underlying motor-neuron degeneration in ALS remains largely obscure. Dementia, usually of the frontotemporal lobar type, may occur in some ALS cases. It is unclear whether ALS and dementia share common aetiology and pathogenesis in ALS/dementia. Here we show that mutations in UBQLN2, which encodes the ubiquitin-like protein ubiquilin 2, cause dominantly inherited, chromosome-X-linked ALS and ALS/dementia. We describe novel ubiquilin 2 pathology in the spinal cords of ALS cases and in the brains of ALS/dementia cases with or without UBQLN2 mutations. Ubiquilin 2 is a member of the ubiquilin family, which regulates the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins. Functional analysis showed that mutations in UBQLN2 lead to an impairment of protein degradation. Therefore, our findings link abnormalities in ubiquilin 2 to defects in the protein degradation pathway, abnormal protein aggregation and neurodegeneration, indicating a common pathogenic mechanism that can be exploited for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21857683

  13. Incidence of Adult-onset Asthma After Hypothetical Interventions on Body Mass Index and Physical Activity: An Application of the Parametric G-Formula

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Danaei, Goodarz; Camargo,, Carlos A.; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    High body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight (kg)/height (m)2) is associated with increased asthma risk, but uncertainty persists about the role of physical activity. We estimated the independent and joint associations of hypothetical interventions on BMI and physical activity with the risk of adult-onset asthma in 76,470 asthma-free women from the Nurses’ Health Study who were followed between 1988 and 1998. Information about asthma, BMI, physical activity, and other factors was updated every 2 years. We used the parametric g-formula to estimate the 10-year asthma risk in the following 4 scenarios: no intervention, 5% BMI reduction in a 2-year period for those who were overweight or obese, at least 2.5 hours/week of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and both of the previous 2 interventions. At baseline, women had a mean age of 55 (standard deviation, 7) years and a mean BMI of 25.4 (standard deviation, 4.8). Median time spent in physical activity was 0.7 hours/week. During follow-up, 1,146 women developed asthma. The 10-year asthma risk under no intervention was 1.5%. Compared with no intervention, the population risk ratios were 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.99) under the BMI intervention, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.81, 1.10) under the physical activity intervention, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.78, 1.06) under the joint intervention. Interventions on BMI and physical activity may have a modest impact on the risk of adult-onset asthma in this population of US women. PMID:24107616

  14. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age. PMID:23462803

  15. Natural history of adult-onset eIF2B-related disorders: a multi-centric survey of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Labauge, Pierre; Horzinski, Laetitia; Ayrignac, Xavier; Blanc, Pierre; Vukusic, Sandra; Rodriguez, Diana; Mauguiere, Francois; Peter, Laure; Goizet, Cyril; Bouhour, Francoise; Denier, Christian; Confavreux, Christian; Obadia, Michael; Blanc, Frederic; de Sèze, Jérome; Fogli, Anne; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2009-08-01

    Mutations in one of the five eukaryotic initiation factor 2B genes (EIF2B1-5) were first described in childhood ataxia with cerebral hypomyelination--vanishing white matter syndrome. The syndrome is characterized by (i) cerebellar and pyramidal signs in children aged 2-5 years; (ii) extensive cavitating leucoencephalopathy; and (iii) episodes of rapid deterioration following stress. Since then a broad clinical spectrum from congenital to adult-onset forms has been reported, leading to the concept of eIF2B-related disorders. Our aim was to describe clinical and brain magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, genetic findings and natural history of patients with adult-onset eIF2B-related disorders (after age 16). The inclusion criteria were based on the presence of eIF2B mutations and a disease onset after the age of 16 years. One patient with an asymptomatic diagnosis (age 16 years) was also included. Clinical and magnetic resonance findings were retrospectively recorded in all patients. All patients were examined to assess clinical evolution, using functional, pyramidal, cerebellar and cognitive scales. This multi-centric study included 16 patients from 14 families. A sex ratio imbalance was noted (male/female = 3/13). The mean age of onset was 31.1 years (range 16-62). Initial symptoms were neurologic (n = 11), psychiatric (n = 2) and ovarian failure (n = 2). Onset of the symptoms was linked to a precipitating factor in 13% of cases that included minor head trauma and delivery. During follow-up (mean: 11.2 years, range 2-22 years) 12.5% of the patients died. Of the 14 survivors, 62% showed a decline in their cognitive functions, and 79% were severely handicapped or bedridden. One case remained asymptomatic. Stress worsened clinical symptoms in 38% of the patients. Magnetic resonance imaging findings consist of constant cerebral atrophy, extensive cystic leucoencephalopathy (81%), corpus callosum (69%) and cerebellar (38%) T2-weighted hyperintensities. All

  16. [A case in which the subject was affected by Listeia meningoencephalitis during administration of infliximab for steroid-dependent adult onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Chie; Ohara, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Nonaka, Michio; Imai, Kohzoh

    2006-06-01

    The subject was a 22-year-old woman who developed high fever and arthralgias and eruptions in the extremities around June 2005. She sought medical advice at a nearby dermatology clinic, where hepatic dysfunction was noted on blood testing. The patient was thus hospitalized the next day. Although CRP levels were significantly high, no sign of infection was observed and bone marrow cell differentiation was normal. Adult onset Still's disease was diagnosed based on the observation of persistent high fever >39 degrees C, eruptions, increased leukocytes, pharyngeal pain, splenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, negative autoantibody results from blood testing, and high serum ferritin levels. Administration of prednisolone 30 mg/day was initiated, but proved ineffective. Steroid pulse therapy was conducted, and the subject was transferred to our medical facility for continued treatment. Attempts were made to control the disease using combined steroid and cyclosporine administration; but exacerbation of high serum ferritin levels and hepatic dysfunctions were observed, so a second course of steroid pulse therapy was conducted. Symptoms improved temporarily, but steroid levels were difficult to reduce. Cyclosporine was therefore replaced by methotrexate, and administration of infliximab was initiated. In the course of treatment, administration of a sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim combination was initiated, but was discontinued due to suspicion of drug-induced hepatic injury. A second administration of infliximab was conducted in late August, and rapid improvements in clinical symptoms and abnormal test values was observed. However, high fever and headache developed suddenly in early September. Based on the results of spinal fluid testing, blood and spinal fluid cultures and MRI of the head, Listeria meningoencephalitis was diagnosed. Diplopia and impaired consciousness occurred during the disease course, and formation of a brain abscess was observed on imaging. However, symptoms

  17. Regular inhaled corticosteroids in adult-onset asthma and the risk for future cancer: a population-based cohort study with proper person-time analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Victor C; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Huang, Hsu-Kai; Chao, Tsung-Ming; Hong, Ya-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) can exert anti-inflammatory effects for chronic airway diseases, and several observational studies suggest that they play a role as cancer chemopreventive agents, particularly against lung cancer. We aimed to examine whether regular ICS use was associated with a reduced risk for future malignancy in patients with newly diagnosed adult-onset asthma. Methods We used a population-based cohort study between 2001 and 2008 with appropriate person-time analysis. Participants were followed up until the first incident of cancer, death, or to the end of 2008. The Cox model was used to derive an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for cancer development. Kaplan–Meier cancer-free survival curves of two groups were compared. Results The exposed group of 2,117 regular ICS users and the nonexposed group of 17,732 non-ICS users were assembled. After 7,365 (mean, 3.5 years; standard deviation 2.1) and 73,789 (mean, 4.1 years; standard deviation 2.4) person-years of follow-up for the ICS users and the comparator group of non-ICS users, respectively, the aHR for overall cancer was nonsignificantly elevated at 1.33 with 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00–1.76, P=0.0501. The Kaplan–Meier curves for overall cancer-free proportions of both groups were not significant (log-rank, P=0.065). Synergistic interaction of concurrent presence of regular ICS use was conducted using “ICS-negative and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-negative” as the reference. The aHR for the group of “ICS-positive, COPD-negative” did not reach statistically significant levels with aHR at 1.38 (95% CI, 0.53–3.56). There was a statistically significant synergistic interaction of concurrent presence of regular ICS use and COPD with aHR at 3.78 (95% CI, 2.10–6.81). Conclusion The protective effect of regular ICS use in the studied East Asian patients with adult-onset asthma was not detectable, contrary to reports of previous

  18. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; Gasparini, L.; Ferrera, D.; Canale, C.; Guipponi, M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Brussino, A.; Brusco, A.

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  19. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; et al

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in amore » postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.« less

  20. An autopsied case of adult-onset bulbospinalform Alexander disease with a novel S393R mutation in the GFAP gene.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Aiba, Ikuko; Saito, Kozo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese man with no apparent family history noticed diplopia. He gradually showed gait disturbance and dysuria. Abducens disorder of eye movement with nystagmus, tongue atrophy with fasciculation, spastic tetraparesis, and sensory disturbance were also observed. MRI showed severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord ("tadpole appearance"). Tracheotomy and gastrostomy were performed 7 years after onset due to the development of bulbar palsy. Death occurred following respiratory failure after 11 years total disease duration. The brain weighed 1,380 g. The cerebrum, cerebellum, midbrain, and upper pons were preserved from atrophy, but the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. A few Rosenthal fibers were observed in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, whereas numerous Rosenthal fibers were observed in the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord. Myelin loss with relatively preserved axons was extensively observed from the middle of the pons to the spinal cord. The clinicopathological diagnosis was adult-onset bulbospinal-form Alexander disease. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene analysis revealed a novel mutation of S393R. Expression patterns of S393R mutant GFAP using adrenal carcinoma-derived cells (SW13 cells) showed a decreased number of filamentous structures and abnormal aggregates. PMID:25828773

  1. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-01

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.). PMID:24566697

  2. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara; Chakraborty, Subhadip; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  4. Echocardiographic assessment of subclinical left ventricular eccentric hypertrophy in adult-onset GHD patients by geometric remodeling: an observational case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Gregorio, Cesare; Curtò, Lorenzo; Recupero, Antonino; Grimaldi, Patrizia; Almoto, Barbara; Venturino, Marilena; Cento, Domenico; Narbone, Maria Carola; Trimarchi, Francesco; Coglitore, Sebastiano; Cannavò, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Background Most patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) show high body mass index. Overweight subjects, but GHD patients, were demonstrated to have high left ventricular mass index (LVMi) and abnormal LV geometric remodeling. We sought to study these characteristics in a group of GHD patients, in an attempt to establish the BMI-independent role of GHD. Methods Fifty-four patients, 28 F and 26 M, aged 45.9 ± 13.1, with adult-onset GHD (pituitary adenomas 48.2%, empty sella 27.8%, pituitary inflammation 5.5%, cranio-pharyngioma 3.7%, not identified pathogenesis 14.8%) were enrolled. To minimize any possible interferences of BMI on the aim of this study, the control group included 20 age- and weight-matched healthy subjects. The LV geometry was identified by the relationship between LVMi (cut-off 125 g/m2) and relative wall thickness (cut-off 0.45) at echocardiography. Results There was no significant between-group difference in resting cardiac morphology and function, nor when considering age-related discrepancy. The majority of patients had normal-low LVM/LVMi, but about one fourth of them showed higher values. These findings correlated to relatively high circulating IGF-1 and systolic blood pressure at rest. The main LV geometric pattern was eccentric hypertrophy in 22% of GHD population (26% of with severe GHD) and in 15% of controls (p = NS). Conclusion Though the lack of significant differences in resting LV morphology and function, about 25% of GHD patients showed high LVMi (consisting of eccentric hypertrophy), not dissimilarly to overweight controls. This finding, which prognostic role is well known in obese and hypertensive patients, is worthy to be investigated in GHD patients through wider controlled trials. PMID:16507109

  5. Identification of two novel mutations in the SLC25A13 gene and detection of seven mutations in 102 patients with adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kobayashi, K; Nishi, I; Horinouchi, H; Jalil, M A; Li, M X; Ushikai, M; Iijima, M; Kondo, I; Saheki, T

    2000-12-01

    Adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) is characterized by a liver-specific deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) protein. We have recently identified the gene responsible for CTLN2, viz., SLC25A13, which encodes a calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier protein, designated citrin, and found five mutations of the SLC25A13 gene in CTLN2 patients. In the present study, we have identified two novel mutations, 1800ins1 and R605X, in SLC25A13 mRNA and the SLC25A13 gene. Diagnostic analysis for the seven mutations in 103 CTLN2 patients diagnosed by biochemical and enzymatic studies has revealed that 102 patients had one or two of the seven mutations and 93 patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. These results indicate that CTLN2 is caused by an abnormality in the SLC25A13 gene, and that our criteria for CTLN2 before DNA diagnosis are correct. Five of 22 patients from consanguineous unions have been shown to be compound heterozygotes, suggesting a high frequency of the mutated genes. The frequency of homozygotes is calculated to be more than 1 in 20,000 from carrier detection (6 in 400 individuals tested) in the Japanese population. We have detected no cross-reactive immune materials in the liver of CTLN2 patients with any of the seven mutations by Western blot analysis with anti-human citrin antibody. From these findings, we hypothesize that CTLN2 is caused by a complete deletion of citrin, although the mechanism of ASS deficiency is still unknown. PMID:11153906

  6. TLR4 Endogenous Ligand S100A8/A9 Levels in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease and Their Association with Disease Activity and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Han, Jae Ho; Kim, Woo-Jung; Noh, Hyun Jin; An, Jeong-Mi; Yim, Hyunee; Jung, Ju-Yang; Kim, You-Sun; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    S100A8/A9 has been suggested as a marker of disease activity in patients with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We evaluated the clinical significance of S100A8/A9 as a biomarker and its pathogenic role in AOSD. Blood samples were collected prospectively from 20 AOSD patients and 20 healthy controls (HCs). Furthermore, skin and lymph node biopsy specimens of AOSD patients were investigated for S100A8/A9 expression levels via immunohistochemistry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of active AOSD patients and HCs were investigated for S100A8/A9 cell signals. S100A8/A9, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in active AOSD patients were higher than those of HCs. S100A8/A9 levels correlated positively with IL-1β, TNF-α and C-reactive protein. The inflammatory cells expressing S100A8/A9 were graded from one to three in skin and lymph node biopsies of AOSD patients. The grading for S100A8/A9 was more intense in the skin lesions with karyorrhexis, mucin deposition, and neutrophil infiltration. Like lipopolysaccharide (LPS), S100A8/A9 induced phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) in PBMCs, suggesting that S100A8/A9 activates Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways. These findings suggest that S100A8/A9 may be involved in the inflammatory response with induction of proinflammatory cytokines and may serve as a clinicopathological marker for disease activity in AOSD. PMID:27537874

  7. Adult-Onset Deletion of β-Catenin in (10kb)Dmp1-Expressing Cells Prevents Intermittent PTH-Induced Bone Gain.

    PubMed

    Kedlaya, Rajendra; Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Bettagere, Vidya; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Horan, Daniel; Divieti-Pajevic, Paola; Robling, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    β-Catenin (βcat) is a major downstream signaling node in canonical Wingless-related integration site (Wnt) signaling pathway, and its activity is crucial for canonical Wnt signal transduction. Wnt signaling has recently been implicated in the osteo-anabolic response to PTH, a potent calcium-regulating factor. We investigated whether βcat is essential for the anabolic action of intermittent PTH by generating male mice with adult-onset deletion of βcat in a subpopulation of bone cells (osteocytes and late-stage osteoblasts), treating them with an anabolic regimen of PTH, and measuring the skeletal responses. Male (10kb)Dmp1-CreERt2 transgenic mice that also harbored floxed loss-of-function βcat alleles (βcat(f/f)) were induced for Cre activity using tamoxifen, then injected daily with human PTH 1-34 (30 μg/kg) or vehicle for 5 weeks. Mice in which βcat was deleted showed either total lack of bone mineral density (BMD) gain, or BMD loss, and did not respond to PTH treatment. However, bone mass measurements in the trabecular compartment of the femur and spine revealed PTH-induced bone gain whether βcat was deleted or not. PTH-stimulated increases in periosteal and cancellous bone formation rates were not impaired by βcat deletion, but resorption markers and cortical porosity were significantly increased in induced mice, particularly induced mice treated with PTH. These results suggest that βcat is required for net-positive BMD effects of PTH therapy but that the anabolic effects per se of PTH treatment might not require osteocytic/osteoblastic βcat. PMID:27253995

  8. Elevated high-mobility group B1 levels in active adult-onset Still's disease associated with systemic score and skin rash.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Yang; Suh, Chang-Hee; Sohn, Seonghyang; Nam, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyoun-Ah

    2016-08-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein, and such prototypical damage-associated molecular patterns mediate the immune response in the noninfectious inflammatory response. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder involved in the dysregulation of innate immunity. We investigated the serum HMGB1 level in patients with AOSD and evaluated its clinical significance. Blood samples were collected from 40 patients with active AOSD and 40 healthy controls (HC). Of the patients with AOSD, follow-up samples were collected from 16 patients after a resolution of AOSD disease activity. Serum HMGB1 levels in patients with AOSD were higher than those of the HC (10.0 ± 5.85 vs. 5.15 ± 1.79 ng/mL, p < 0.001). Serum HMGB1 levels were found to be correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and the systemic score. The AOSD patient who had a sore throat showed a higher serum HMGB1 level than those patients who did not, and the patient with a skin rash had higher levels than the patients without. In addition, the serum HMGB1 levels were decreased after the resolution of disease activity in the AOSD patients who were followed up. The serum HMGB1 levels were elevated in AOSD patients compared to the HC and were correlated with both CRP and the systemic score. The HMGB1 levels were associated with skin rash and a sore throat in AOSD patients. After the resolution of disease activity, serum HMGB1 levels were found to have decreased. PMID:27225247

  9. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  10. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy-confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old White man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison's disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of MSA. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting the optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be considered in the

  11. Remote Assessment of Cognitive Function in Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Batten disease): A Pilot Study of Feasibility and Reliability.

    PubMed

    Ragbeer, Shayne N; Augustine, Erika F; Mink, Jonathan W; Thatcher, Alyssa R; Vierhile, Amy E; Adams, Heather R

    2016-03-01

    Remote technology provides an opportunity to extend the reach of clinical care and research for pediatric rare disease. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility and reliability of neuropsychological evaluation, using remote audiovisual technology, in the assessment of children with juvenile Batten disease. Three children with Batten disease and 1 healthy sibling completed a standardized cognitive assessment. Results indicated high agreement between an in-person and a remote evaluator when comparing the subjects' cognitive test scores. This initial test of remote cognitive assessment suggests it is feasible and reliable in children with pediatric neurodegenerative disease, for whom disease burden may limit travel and access to expert care and/or clinical trials. PMID:26336202

  12. Microdeletion in a Moroccan patient with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (Batten disease) may affect the CLN3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Taschner, P.E.M.; De Vos, N.; Briuning, M.H.

    1994-09-01

    CLN3 has been localized genetically to 16p12 and shows a strong association with microsatellite markers D16S298, D16S299, and D16S288. Recently, haplotype analysis of a Batten patient from a consanguineous, relationship with these markers indicated homozygosity for the D16S298 null allele. Null alleles for polymorphic microsatellite markers have been observed to arise from small deletions within one of the priming sequences. PCR analysis with different primers and Southern blot analysis using DNA from the patient and his family indicate a deletion of at least 160 bp. A cosmid contig containing D16S298 has been constructed. Cosmid NL 11A spans the deletion, which is located within a 25 kb EcoRI fragment. The isolation of cDNA clones from this region could lead to the identification of the CLN3 gene.

  13. Golden Retriever dogs with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis have a two-base-pair deletion and frameshift in CLN5.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, D; Kolicheski, A; Johnson, G S; Mhlanga-Mutangadura, T; Taylor, J F; Schnabel, R D; Katz, M L

    2015-01-01

    We studied a recessive, progressive neurodegenerative disease occurring in Golden Retriever siblings with an onset of signs at 15 months of age. As the disease progressed these signs included ataxia, anxiety, pacing and circling, tremors, aggression, visual impairment and localized and generalized seizures. A whole genome sequence, generated with DNA from one affected dog, contained a plausibly causal homozygous mutation: CLN5:c.934_935delAG. This mutation was predicted to produce a frameshift and premature termination codon and encode a protein variant, CLN5:p.E312Vfs*6, which would lack 39 C-terminal amino acids. Eighteen DNA samples from the Golden Retriever family members were genotyped at CLN5:c.934_935delAG. Three clinically affected dogs were homozygous for the deletion allele; whereas, the clinically normal family members were either heterozygotes (n = 11) or homozygous for the reference allele (n = 4). Among archived Golden Retrievers DNA samples with incomplete clinical records that were also genotyped at the CLN5:c.934_935delAG variant, 1053 of 1062 were homozygous for the reference allele, 8 were heterozygotes and one was a deletion-allele homozygote. When contacted, the owner of this homozygote indicated that their dog had been euthanized because of a neurologic disease that progressed similarly to that of the affected Golden Retriever siblings. We have collected and stored semen from a heterozygous Golden Retriever, thereby preserving an opportunity for us or others to establish a colony of CLN5-deficient dogs. PMID:25934231

  14. Progressive Retinal Degeneration and Accumulation of Autofluorescent Lipopigments in Progranulin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hafler, Brian P.; Klein, Zoe A.; Zhou, Z. Jimmy; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior investigations have shown that patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) develop neurodegeneration characterized by vision loss, motor dysfunction, seizures, and often early death. Neuropathological analysis of patients with NCL shows accumulation of intracellular autofluorescent storage material, lipopigment, throughout neurons in the central nervous system including in the retina. A recent study of a sibling pair with adult onset NCL and retinal degeneration showed linkage to the region of the progranulin (GRN) locus and a homozygous mutation was demonstrated in GRN. In particular, the sibling pair with a mutation in GRN developed retinal degeneration and optic atrophy. This locus for this form of adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis was designated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis-11 (CLN11). Based on these clinical observations, we wished to determine whether Grn-null mice develop accumulation of autofluorescent particles and retinal degeneration. Retinas of both wild-type and Progranulin deficient mice were examined by immunostaining and autofluorescence. Accumulation of autofluorescent material was present in Progranulin deficient mice at 12 months. Degeneration of multiple classes of neurons including photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells was noted in mice at 12 and 18 months. Our data shows that Grn−/− mice develop degenerative pathology similar to features of human CLN11. PMID:25234724

  15. Molecular basis of adult-onset and chronic G sub M2 gangliosidoses in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin: Substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the. alpha. -subunit of. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Paw, B.H.; Kaback, M.M.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Chronic and adult-onset G{sub M2} gangliosidoses are neurological disorders caused by marked deficiency of the A isoenzyme of {beta}-hexosaminidase; they occur in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, though less frequently than classic (infantile) Tay-Sachs disease. Earlier biosynthetic studies had identified a defective {alpha}-subunit that failed to associate with the {beta}-subunit. The authors have now found a guanosine to adenosine transition at the 3{prime} end of exon 7, which causes substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the {alpha}-subunit. An RNase protection assay was used to localize the mutation to a segment of mRNA from fibroblasts of a patient with the adult-onset disorder. That segment of mRNA (after reverse transcription) and a corresponding segment of genomic DNA were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The sequence analysis, together with an assay based on the loss of a ScrFI restriction site, showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote who had inherited the 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation from his father and an allelic null mutation from his mother. The 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation, in compound heterozygosity with a presumed null allele, was also found in fetal fibroblasts with an association-defective phenotype and in cells from five patients with chronic G{sub M2} gangliosidosis.

  16. Intra-neural ceroid-like pigment following the treatment of lepromatous leprosy with clofazimine (B663; Lamprene).

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, A C; Jones, R L

    1981-01-01

    A 33 year old male Nigerian presented with widespread involvement of peripheral nerves, several of which were tender and painful. Nerve biopsies confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium leprae in both endoneurial and perineurial areas, mainly in foamy macrophages (Virchow cells), but there were also large accumulations of an amorphous, acid-fast and alcohol-fast material which was not obviously of bacterial origin. Appropriate stains indicated that this had many characteristics of lipofuscin. Although not previously known, it was at this stage discovered that the patient had received treatment with anti-leprosy drugs nearly three years before presentation in this country. One of these was clofazimine, an aniline aposafranine derivative known to produce a ceroid-like pigment in the tissues of patients treated with this drug or lepromatous leprosy. Images PMID:6260900

  17. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  18. An atypical presentation of adult-onset Still’s disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and macrophage activation syndrome treated with immunosuppression: a case-based review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Daniel K.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Haythe, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known complication of rheumatologic diseases, but it is only rarely associated with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented in a pulmonary hypertension crisis and was found to have underlying AOSD with PAH and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with a course complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). She dramatically improved with steroids, cyclosporine A, and anakinra, with total resolution of the MAS and significant improvement of her pulmonary arterial pressures. While there are only select case reports of AOSD associated with PAH, this is the first reported case of (1) AOSD complicated by both PAH and MAS and (2) AOSD complicated by biopsy-proven NSIP. Clinically, this case highlights the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of PAH and MAS from underlying AOSD and supports their use in this setting. PMID:27162622

  19. X-ray microprobe analysis of the retina and RPE in sheep with ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, D.A.; Armstrong, D.; Jolly, R. )

    1990-11-01

    Ovine ceroid-lipofuscinosis (OCL) is one animal model for the human condition, and because autofluorescent lipopigments are prominent in the brain and eye, it may also prove useful as a model for aging. For example, a progressive decline in electrical recording from brain and retina are observed in both aging and OCL. Samples of retinal and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) tissues were obtained from a young control. 2 animals with OCL and a normal aged sheep. Specimens were cryo-fractured and examined by scanning electron microscopy/x-ray microanalysis. Measurements made of 6 individual cells in the ganglion layer of OCL specimens, the remainder of the retina, and RPE showed age-related changes in zinc, iron, and copper which were associated with lipopigment accumulation in the RPE. There was marked decrease in phosphate, sulfur, and manganese levels, as photoreceptor cells and their outer segments are lost in the disease process. This is the first report of metal analysis in the retina and RPE in a disease entity, and as a function of normal aging.

  20. A plural role for lipids in motor neuron diseases: energy, signaling and structure

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Florent; Hussain, Ghulam; Dupuis, Luc; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Henriques, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are characterized by selective death of motor neurons and include mainly adult-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Neurodegeneration is not the single pathogenic event occurring during disease progression. There are multiple lines of evidence for the existence of defects in lipid metabolism at peripheral level. For instance, hypermetabolism is well characterized in ALS, and dyslipidemia correlates with better prognosis in patients. Lipid metabolism plays also a role in other MNDs. In SMA, misuse of lipids as energetic nutrients is described in patients and in related animal models. The composition of structural lipids in the central nervous system is modified, with repercussion on membrane fluidity and on cell signaling mediated by bioactive lipids. Here, we review the main epidemiologic and mechanistic findings that link alterations of lipid metabolism and motor neuron degeneration, and we discuss the rationale of targeting these modifications for therapeutic management of MNDs. PMID:24600344

  1. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26081570

  2. Fetal programming, epigenetics, and adult onset disease.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    How early life events program adult disease is undergoing a transition from the broad field of maternal malnutrition to the current relevant issues of food deserts and prematurity. Although many adult diseases and morbidities associate with various early life events and programming, the morbidities of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and obesity seem to be common end points of many early life events despite potential confounders. PMID:25459776

  3. Unusual sequelae of adult-onset dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Mohammad Ebrahim; Bishara, Rema; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman diagnosed with dermatomyositis 5 years ago based on progressive proximal muscle weakness, elevated creatine kinase, typical findings on electromyography and muscle biopsy. Despite the treatment, in contrast to improvement in her muscle symptoms, the heliotrope rash of her eyelids persisted. After several years, the patient developed multiple limited skin retraction lesions with hyperpigmentation on both lower limbs. Palpation of these lesions revealed dry, cold and very firm skin on both thighs and calves, particularly in the distal areas. X-ray and ultrasound imaging of the calves showed multiple subcutaneous calcifications in the distal muscles. PMID:25085949

  4. Neuronal arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Silver, R. Angus

    2016-01-01

    The vast computational power of the brain has traditionally been viewed as arising from the complex connectivity of neural networks, in which an individual neuron acts as a simple linear summation and thresholding device. However, recent studies show that individual neurons utilize a wealth of nonlinear mechanisms to transform synaptic input into output firing. These mechanisms can arise from synaptic plasticity, synaptic noise, and somatic and dendritic conductances. This tool kit of nonlinear mechanisms confers considerable computational power on both morphologically simple and more complex neurons, enabling them to perform a range of arithmetic operations on signals encoded in a variety of different ways. PMID:20531421

  5. Muscle Mitochondrial Uncoupling Dismantles Neuromuscular Junction and Triggers Distal Degeneration of Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Luc; Gonzalez de Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Eschbach, Judith; Rene, Frédérique; Oudart, Hugues; Halter, Benoit; Huze, Caroline; Schaeffer, Laurent; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most frequent adult onset motor neuron disease, is associated with hypermetabolism linked to defects in muscle mitochondrial energy metabolism such as ATP depletion and increased oxygen consumption. It remains unknown whether muscle abnormalities in energy metabolism are causally involved in the destruction of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and subsequent motor neuron degeneration during ALS. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied transgenic mice with muscular overexpression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a potent mitochondrial uncoupler, as a model of muscle restricted hypermetabolism. These animals displayed age-dependent deterioration of the NMJ that correlated with progressive signs of denervation and a mild late-onset motor neuron pathology. NMJ regeneration and functional recovery were profoundly delayed following injury of the sciatic nerve and muscle mitochondrial uncoupling exacerbated the pathology of an ALS animal model. Conclusions/Significance These findings provide the proof of principle that a muscle restricted mitochondrial defect is sufficient to generate motor neuron degeneration and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeted at muscle metabolism might prove useful for motor neuron diseases. PMID:19404401

  6. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Condensed from Motor Neuron Diseases ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Motor Neuron Diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  7. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... called upper motor neurons ) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons ) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons ...

  8. Further delineation of eye manifestations in homozygous 15q13.3 microdeletions including TRPM1: a differential diagnosis of ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Drumare, Isabelle; Holder, Muriel; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Vallée, Louis; Defoort, Sabine; Bourgois, Béatrice; Pernes, Philippe; Cuvellier, Jean-Christophe; Huet, Frédéric; Chehadeh, Salima El; Thevenon, Julien; Callier, Patrick; Thauvin, Christel; Faivre, Laurence; Andrieux, Joris

    2014-06-01

    The 15q13.3 heterozygous microdeletion is a fairly common microdeletion syndrome with marked clinical variability and incomplete penetrance. The average size of the deletion, which comprises six genes including CHRNA7, is 1.5 Mb. CHRNA7 has been identified as the gene responsible for the neurological phenotype in this microdeletion syndrome. Only seven patients with a homozygous microdeletion that includes at least CHRNA7, and is inherited from both parents have been described in the literature. The aim of this study was to further describe the distinctive eye manifestations from the analysis in the three French patients diagnosed with the classical 1.5 Mb homozygous microdeletion. Patients' ages ranged from 30 months to 9 years, and included one sib pair. They all displayed a remarkably severe identifiable clinical phenotype that included congenital blindness and convulsive encephalopathy with inconstant abnormal movements. The ophthalmological examination revealed a lack of eye tracking, optic nerve pallor, an immature response with increased latencies with no response to the checkerboard stimulations at the visual evoked potential examination, and a distinctive retina dystrophy with a negative electroretinogram in which the "b" wave was smaller than the "a" wave after a dark adapted pupil and bright flash in all patients. Clear genotype-phenotype correlations emerged, showing that this eye phenotype was secondary to homozygous deletion of TRPM1, the gene responsible for autosomal recessive congenital stationary night blindness. The main differential diagnosis is ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:24668847

  9. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution. PMID:26510501

  10. Characterization of thoracic motor and sensory neurons and spinal nerve roots in canine degenerative myelopathy, a potential disease model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Brandie R; Coates, Joan R; Johnson, Gayle C; Shelton, G Diane; Katz, Martin L

    2014-04-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is a progressive, adult-onset, multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced-stage DM. To determine whether other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MNs) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected boxers and Pembroke Welsh corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced-stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, nor of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory neuron death suggest that sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  11. Magnetic resonance findings of the corpus callosum in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  12. Magnetic Resonance Findings of the Corpus Callosum in Canine and Feline Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  13. Exome sequencing in a consanguineous family clinically diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease identifies a homozygous CTSF mutation.

    PubMed

    Bras, Jose; Djaldetti, Ruth; Alves, Ana Margarida; Mead, Simon; Darwent, Lee; Lleo, Alberto; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Blesa, Rafael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Clarimon, Jordi; Guerreiro, Rita

    2016-10-01

    We have previously reported the whole genome genotyping analysis of 2 consanguineous siblings clinically diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this analysis, we identified several large regions of homozygosity shared between both affected siblings, which we suggested could be candidate loci for a recessive genetic lesion underlying the early onset AD in these cases. We have now performed exome sequencing in one of these siblings and identified the potential cause of disease: the CTSF c.1243G>A:p.Gly415Arg mutation in homozygosity. Biallelic mutations in this gene have been shown to cause Type B Kufs disease, an adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis with some cases resembling the impairment seen in AD. PMID:27524508

  14. Characterization of Thoracic Motor and Sensory Neurons and Spinal Nerve Roots in Canine Degenerative Myelopathy, a Potential Disease Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Brandie R.; Coates, Joan R.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Shelton, G. Diane; Katz, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Canine Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) is a progressive adult-onset multisystem degenerative disease with many features in common with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As with some forms of ALS, DM is associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Clinical signs include general proprioceptive ataxia and spastic upper motor neuron paresis in pelvic limbs, which progress to flaccid tetraplegia and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to characterize DM as a potential disease model for ALS. We previously reported that intercostal muscle atrophy develops in dogs with advanced stage DM. To determine if other components of the thoracic motor unit (MU) also demonstrated morphological changes consistent with dysfunction, histopathologic and morphometric analyses were conducted on thoracic spinal motor neurons (MN) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and in motor and sensory nerve root axons from DM-affected Boxers and Pembroke Welsh Corgis (PWCs). No alterations in MNs, or motor root axons were observed in either breed. However, advanced stage PWCs exhibited significant losses of sensory root axons, and numerous DRG sensory neurons displayed evidence of degeneration. These results indicate that intercostal muscle atrophy in DM is not preceded by physical loss of the motor neurons innervating these muscles, or of their axons. Axonal loss in thoracic sensory roots and sensory nerve death suggest sensory involvement may play an important role in DM disease progression. Further analysis of the mechanisms responsible for these morphological findings would aid in the development of therapeutic intervention for DM and some forms of ALS. PMID:24375814

  15. Enhancing mitochondrial calcium buffering capacity reduces aggregation of misfolded SOD1 and motor neuron cell death without extending survival in mouse models of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Han, Joo Seok; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Vetto, Anne P; Lee, Sandra K; Tseng, Eva; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-03-13

    Mitochondria have been proposed as targets for toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive, fatal adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of motor neurons. A decrease in the capacity of spinal cord mitochondria to buffer calcium (Ca(2+)) has been observed in mice expressing ALS-linked mutants of SOD1 that develop motor neuron disease with many of the key pathological hallmarks seen in ALS patients. In mice expressing three different ALS-causing SOD1 mutants, we now test the contribution of the loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+)-buffering capacity to disease mechanism(s) by eliminating ubiquitous expression of cyclophilin D, a critical regulator of Ca(2+)-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore that determines mitochondrial Ca(2+) content. A chronic increase in mitochondrial buffering of Ca(2+) in the absence of cyclophilin D was maintained throughout disease course and was associated with improved mitochondrial ATP synthesis, reduced mitochondrial swelling, and retention of normal morphology. This was accompanied by an attenuation of glial activation, reduction in levels of misfolded SOD1 aggregates in the spinal cord, and a significant suppression of motor neuron death throughout disease. Despite this, muscle denervation, motor axon degeneration, and disease progression and survival were unaffected, thereby eliminating mutant SOD1-mediated loss of mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering capacity, altered mitochondrial morphology, motor neuron death, and misfolded SOD1 aggregates, as primary contributors to disease mechanism for fatal paralysis in these models of familial ALS. PMID:23486940

  16. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. PMID:20167276

  17. Adult-Onset Asthma to Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asthma has been associated with atherosclerotic disease in several studies with some evidence that this association may be limited to women. However, most previous studies have failed to account for the heterogeneity of asthma subtypes. We previously reported increased carotid intima medial thickne...

  18. Childhood adversities and adult-onset asthma: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Korkeila, Jyrki; Lietzen, Raija; Sillanmäki, Lauri H; Rautava, Päivi; Korkeila, Katariina; Kivimäki, Mika; Koskenvuo, Markku; Vahtera, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Childhood adversities may be important determinants of later illnesses and poor health behaviour. However, large-scale prospective studies on the associations between childhood adversities and the onset of asthma in adulthood are lacking. Design Prospective cohort study with 7-year follow-up. Setting Nationally representative study. Data were collected from the Health and Social Support (HeSSup) survey and national registers. Participants The participants represent the Finnish population from the following age groups: 20–24, 30–34, 40–44, and 50–54 years at baseline in 1998 (24 057 survey participants formed the final cohort of this study). The occurrence of childhood adversities was assessed at baseline with a six-item survey scale. The analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, behavioural health risks and common mental disorders. Primary and secondary outcomes The survey data were linked to data from national health registers on incident asthma during a 7-year follow-up to define new-onset asthma cases with verified diagnoses. Results A total of 12 126 (59%) participants reported that they encountered a childhood adversity. Of them 3677 (18% of all) endured three to six adversities. During a follow-up of 7 years, 593 (2.9%) participants were diagnosed with incident asthma. Those who reported three or more childhood adversities had a 1.6-fold (95% CI 1.31 to 2.01) greater risk of asthma compared to those without childhood adversities. This hazard attenuated but remained statistically significant after adjustment for conventional risk factors (HR 1.33; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.67). Conclusions Adults who report having encountered adversities in childhood may have an increased risk of developing asthma. PMID:23069774

  19. Sandhoff disease mimicking adult-onset bulbospinal neuronopathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P K; Young, E; King, R H

    1989-09-01

    A 32 year old male is described with an onset of upper limb postural tremor in adolescence followed by muscle cramps. Progressive proximal amyotrophy and weakness in the limbs developed late in the third decade. Examination disclosed, in addition, bilateral facial weakness and mild dysarthria. Enzyme studies revealed hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, indicating a diagnosis of Sandhoff disease. Intra-axonal membranocytoplasmic bodies were present in a rectal biopsy. The presentation, which resembled that of X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy, widens the clinical spectrum for disorders related to G(M2) gangliosidosis. PMID:2795083

  20. Adult-onset phenylketonuria with rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tufekcioglu, Zeynep; Cakar, Arman; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Gurvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene, which converts phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although it is principally a childhood disorder, in rare cases, the first signs of PKU may develop in late adulthood resembling common neurological diseases. Here we report a 59-year-old, previously normal functioning man who was admitted with blurred vision, cognitive problems, and gait difficulty that began 8 months before. He had brisk reflexes and left side dominant parkinsonism. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 25/30, and neuropsychological evaluation revealed a dysexecutive syndrome with simultanagnosia and constructional apraxia. His Clinical Dementia Rating score (CDR) was 1. Cranial MRI revealed bilateral diffuse hyperintense lesions in parietal and occipital white matter in T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and diffusion weighted images. Diagnostic workup for rapidly progressive dementias was all normal except PHE level which was found to be highly elevated (1075 μmol/L, normal 39-240 μmol/L) with normal tyrosine level (61.20 μmol/L, normal 35-100 μmol/L). Three months after PHE-restricted diet, his cognitive impairment and signs of parkinsonism significantly improved, with MRI scan unchanged. This case demonstrates that late-onset PKU is a rare, treatable cause of rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism with certain constellations such as consanguinity and white matter abnormalities (WMAs) in imaging. PMID:26962957

  1. Adult onset folliculocentric langerhans cell histiocytosis confined to the scalp.

    PubMed

    Hancox, John G; James, Asha Pardasani; Madden, Christopher; Wallace, Christopher A; McMichael, Amy J

    2004-04-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a pleomorphic disease entity characterized by local or disseminated atypical Langerhans cells found most commonly in bone, lungs, mucocutaneous structures, and endocrine organs. Cutaneous disease occurs in approximately one quarter of all cases. Cutaneous findings include soft-tissue swelling, eczematous changes, a seborrheic dermatitis-like appearance, and ulceration. We report a rare case of LCH confined to the scalp with folliculocentric infiltrates. This 32-year-old male patient presented with follicularly based erythema, scale, and pustules unresponsive to topicals and oral antibiotics. The patient's lesions mimicked lichen planopilaris and folliculitis decalvans during the disease process. On hematoxylin and eosin stain, scalp biopsy showed a perivascular interstitial patchy lichenoid mononuclear cell infiltrate that focally abutted follicular infundibula. Prominent mononuclear cells having reniform nuclei were present, and immunoperoxidase stains for CD1a confirmed Langerhans cell differentiation. Serological and imaging workup failed to display systemic involvement. PMID:15024194

  2. Late adult onset of Langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Perren, F; Fankhauser, L; Thiévent, B; Pache, J-C; Delavelle, J; Rochat, T; Landis, T; Chizzolini, C

    2011-02-15

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) with multiple organ involvement is a rare disorder in adults. Extrapituitary involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is uncommon. We report the unusual case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with a left-sided hemiataxia-hemiparesis, left hemisensory loss and short-lasting episodes of an alien left hand due to lesions of the internal capsule and the right thalamus, extending into the mesencephalon associated with extensive surrounding edema, without pituitary involvement. The neuroradiological image suggested glioblastoma multiforme. Brain biopsy revealed inflammatory tissue and "pseudotumoral" multiple sclerosis was suspected. Biopsy of concomitant lung and bone lesions disclosed Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The treatment with pulsed steroids in association with mycophenolate mofetil led to a sustained, clinical neurological remission. PMID:21131007

  3. Clinical analysis of adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxias in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-ataxic symptoms of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) vary widely and often overlap with various types of SCAs. Duration and severity of the disease and genetic background may play a role in such phenotypic diversity. We conducted the study in order to study clinical characteristics of common SCAs in Thailand and the factors that may influence their phenotypes. Methods 131 (49.43%) out of 265 Thai ataxia families with cerebellar degeneration had positive tests for SCA1, SCA2, Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or SCA6. The study evaluated 83 available families including SCA1 (21 patients), SCA2 (15), MJD (39) and SCA6 (8). Comparisons of frequency of each non-ataxic sign among different SCA subtypes were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to analyze parameters in association with disease severity and size of CAG repeat. Results Mean ages at onset were not different among patients with different SCAs (40.31 ± 11.33 years, mean ± SD). Surprisingly, SCA6 patients often had age at onset and phenotypes indistinguishable from SCA1, SCA2 and MJD. Frequencies of ophthalmoparesis, nystagmus, hyperreflexia and areflexia were significantly different among the common SCAs, whilst frequency of slow saccade was not. In contrast to Caucasian patients, parkinsonism, dystonia, dementia, and facial fasciculation were uncommon in Thai patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ophthalmoparesis (p < 0.001) and sensory impairment (p = 0.025) were associated with the severity of the disease. Conclusions We described clinical characteristics of the 4 most common SCAs in Thailand accounting for almost 90% of familial spinocerebellar ataxias. There were some different observations compared to Caucasian patients including earlier age at onset of SCA6 and the paucity of extrapyramidal features, cognitive impairment and facial fasciculation. Severity of the disease, size of the pathological CAG repeat allele, genetic background and somatic heterogeneity of pathological alleles may influence clinical expressions of these common SCAs. PMID:24708620

  4. Adult-Onset Asthma Might Raise Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Risks But shared risk factors, such as air pollution, might explain the connection, researchers say To use ... is often caused by different factors -- such as air pollution -- and often results in a more rapid decline ...

  5. Adult Onset of Xanthelasmoid Mastocytosis: Report of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Nafiseh Sadat; Nejad, Masumeh Hosseini; Feli, Shahab; Bakhshoodeh, Behnoosh; Layegh, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Xanthelasmoid or pseudoxanthomatous mastocytosis is an extremely rare variant of diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis. Herein, we describe an adult male with cutaneous mastocytosis showing multiple widespread yellowish ovoid papules like eruptive xanthoma. A 60-year-old male visited our outpatient clinic with a 1-year history of generalized yellowish, ovoid, and skin color papular eruption located on the trunk, groin, extremities, with the modest pruritus. Vital signs were stable, and Darier's sign was negative. No other subjective and objective signs were detected during the examination. No abnormality was detected in his diagnostic laboratory tests. Skin biopsy was taken, and histopathologic examination revealed proliferation of mast cells with ovoid and spindle nuclei with distinct cytoplasm borders around the capillaries, which was compatible with mastocytosis. Antihistamine was prescribed for pruritus control which was successful, but eruptions were persistent, and even 1-year phototherapy was not useful. PMID:27512209

  6. Recurrent adult onset Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Neil; Guido, Bruce; Mago, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura is an immunoglobulin A (IgA)-immune complex mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis that classically manifests with palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria or proteinuria. The condition is much more predominant in children (90% of cases) and commonly follows an upper respiratory infection. We present a case of recurrent Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) complicated by nephritis in an adult female initially categorized as IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We review the pathophysiologic basis of HSP nephritis as the variant of HSP accompanied by renal involvement and its pathogenetic commonality with IgA nephropathy. PMID:27617937

  7. Downregulation of genes with a function in axon outgrowth and synapse formation in motor neurones of the VEGFδ/δ mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell mitogen that stimulates vasculogenesis. It has also been shown to act as a neurotrophic factor in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of the hypoxia response element of the promoter region of the gene encoding VEGF in mice causes a reduction in neural VEGF expression, and results in adult-onset motor neurone degeneration that resembles amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Investigating the molecular pathways to neurodegeneration in the VEGFδ/δ mouse model of ALS may improve understanding of the mechanisms of motor neurone death in the human disease. Results Microarray analysis was used to determine the transcriptional profile of laser captured spinal motor neurones of transgenic and wild-type littermates at 3 time points of disease. 324 genes were significantly differentially expressed in motor neurones of presymptomatic VEGFδ/δ mice, 382 at disease onset, and 689 at late stage disease. Massive transcriptional downregulation occurred with disease progression, associated with downregulation of genes involved in RNA processing at late stage disease. VEGFδ/δ mice showed reduction in expression, from symptom onset, of the cholesterol synthesis pathway, and genes involved in nervous system development, including axonogenesis, synapse formation, growth factor signalling pathways, cell adhesion and microtubule-based processes. These changes may reflect a reduced capacity of VEGFδ/δ mice for maintenance and remodelling of neuronal processes in the face of demands of neural plasticity. The findings are supported by the demonstration that in primary motor neurone cultures from VEGFδ/δ mice, axon outgrowth is significantly reduced compared to wild-type littermates. Conclusions Downregulation of these genes involved in axon outgrowth and synapse formation in adult mice suggests a hitherto unrecognized role of VEGF in the maintenance of neuronal circuitry. Dysregulation of VEGF may lead to

  8. Unbiased Cell-based Screening in a Neuronal Cell Model of Batten Disease Highlights an Interaction between Ca2+ Homeostasis, Autophagy, and CLN3 Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Chandrachud, Uma; Walker, Mathew W; Simas, Alexandra M; Heetveld, Sasja; Petcherski, Anton; Klein, Madeleine; Oh, Hyejin; Wolf, Pavlina; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Norton, Stephanie; Haggarty, Stephen J; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Cotman, Susan L

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal accumulation of undigested macromolecules, often disease-specific, is a major feature of lysosomal and neurodegenerative disease and is frequently attributed to defective autophagy. The mechanistic underpinnings of the autophagy defects are the subject of intense research, which is aided by genetic disease models. To gain an improved understanding of the pathways regulating defective autophagy specifically in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), a neurodegenerative disease of childhood, we developed and piloted a GFP-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) screening assay to identify, in an unbiased fashion, genotype-sensitive small molecule autophagy modifiers, employing a JNCL neuronal cell model bearing the most common disease mutation in CLN3. Thapsigargin, a sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) Ca(2+) pump inhibitor, reproducibly displayed significantly more activity in the mouse JNCL cells, an effect that was also observed in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived JNCL neural progenitor cells. The mechanism of thapsigargin sensitivity was Ca(2+)-mediated, and autophagosome accumulation in JNCL cells could be reversed by Ca(2+) chelation. Interrogation of intracellular Ca(2+) handling highlighted alterations in endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial, and lysosomal Ca(2+) pools and in store-operated Ca(2+) uptake in JNCL cells. These results further support an important role for the CLN3 protein in intracellular Ca(2+) handling and in autophagic pathway flux and establish a powerful new platform for therapeutic screening. PMID:25878248

  9. Unbiased Cell-based Screening in a Neuronal Cell Model of Batten Disease Highlights an Interaction between Ca2+ Homeostasis, Autophagy, and CLN3 Protein Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chandrachud, Uma; Walker, Mathew W.; Simas, Alexandra M.; Heetveld, Sasja; Petcherski, Anton; Klein, Madeleine; Oh, Hyejin; Wolf, Pavlina; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Norton, Stephanie; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Cotman, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of undigested macromolecules, often disease-specific, is a major feature of lysosomal and neurodegenerative disease and is frequently attributed to defective autophagy. The mechanistic underpinnings of the autophagy defects are the subject of intense research, which is aided by genetic disease models. To gain an improved understanding of the pathways regulating defective autophagy specifically in juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten disease), a neurodegenerative disease of childhood, we developed and piloted a GFP-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) screening assay to identify, in an unbiased fashion, genotype-sensitive small molecule autophagy modifiers, employing a JNCL neuronal cell model bearing the most common disease mutation in CLN3. Thapsigargin, a sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) Ca2+ pump inhibitor, reproducibly displayed significantly more activity in the mouse JNCL cells, an effect that was also observed in human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived JNCL neural progenitor cells. The mechanism of thapsigargin sensitivity was Ca2+-mediated, and autophagosome accumulation in JNCL cells could be reversed by Ca2+ chelation. Interrogation of intracellular Ca2+ handling highlighted alterations in endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial, and lysosomal Ca2+ pools and in store-operated Ca2+ uptake in JNCL cells. These results further support an important role for the CLN3 protein in intracellular Ca2+ handling and in autophagic pathway flux and establish a powerful new platform for therapeutic screening. PMID:25878248

  10. Quantum neuron design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2014-03-01

    In previous work, we have developed quantum systems that can learn and do information processing much like artificial neural networks. These learning methods have some advantages over other implementations of quantum computing in that they construct their own algorithms and could be robust to noise and decoherence. Here we take the next step, by designing quantum neurons that have some of the important behaviors of biological neurons, yet have the advantage of being complex valued and having quantum computing power. Our neuron model consists of a two-level system coupled to a Gaussian bath representing the environment. Simulations of a interconnected network of these neurons show that the model can both learn standard AI tasks, as similar networks of classical neurons have been shown to do, and, in addition, perform quantum mechanical calculations.

  11. Human GnRH Deficiency: A Unique Disease Model to Unravel the Ontogeny of GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Pitteloud, Nelly; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Crowley, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary survival of a species is largely a function of its reproductive fitness. In mammals, a sparsely populated and widely dispersed network of hypothalamic neurons, the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, serve as the pilot light of reproduction via coordinated secretion of GnRH. Since it first description, human GnRH deficiency has been recognized both clinically and genetically as a heterogeneous disease. A spectrum of different reproductive phenotypes comprised of congenital GnRH deficiency with anosmia (Kallmann syndrome), congenital GnRH deficiency with normal olfaction (normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism), and adult-onset hypogonadotropic hypogonadism has been described. In the last two decades, several genes and pathways which govern GnRH ontogeny have been discovered by studying humans with GnRH deficiency. More importantly, detailed study of these patients has highlighted the emerging theme of oligogenicity and genotypic synergism, and also expanded the phenotypic diversity with the documentation of reversal of GnRH deficiency later in adulthood in some patients. The underlying genetic defect has also helped understand the associated nonreproductive phenotypes seen in some of these patients. These insights now provide practicing clinicians with targeted genetic diagnostic strategies and also impact on clinical management. PMID:20606386

  12. Transporting mitochondria in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Course, Meredith M.; Wang, Xinnan

    2016-01-01

    Neurons demand vast and vacillating supplies of energy. As the key contributors of this energy, as well as primary pools of calcium and signaling molecules, mitochondria must be where the neuron needs them, when the neuron needs them. The unique architecture and length of neurons, however, make them a complex system for mitochondria to navigate. To add to this difficulty, mitochondria are synthesized mainly in the soma, but must be transported as far as the distant terminals of the neuron. Similarly, damaged mitochondria—which can cause oxidative stress to the neuron—must fuse with healthy mitochondria to repair the damage, return all the way back to the soma for disposal, or be eliminated at the terminals. Increasing evidence suggests that the improper distribution of mitochondria in neurons can lead to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we will discuss the machinery and regulatory systems used to properly distribute mitochondria in neurons, and how this knowledge has been leveraged to better understand neurological dysfunction. PMID:27508065

  13. How microglia kill neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26341532

  14. Neuronal Functions of ESCRTs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) regulate protein trafficking from endosomes to lysosomes. Recent studies have shown that ESCRTs are involved in various cellular processes, including membrane scission, microRNA function, viral budding, and the autophagy pathway in many tissues, including the nervous system. Indeed, dysfunctional ESCRTs are associated with neurodegeneration. However, it remains largely elusive how ESCRTs act in post-mitotic neurons, a highly specialized cell type that requires dynamic changes in neuronal structures and signaling for proper function. This review focuses on our current understandings of the functions of ESCRTs in neuronal morphology, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22438674

  15. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits.

    PubMed

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  16. Neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hallengren, Jada; Chen, Ping-Chung; Wilson, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons have highly specialized intracellular compartments that facilitate the development and activity of the nervous system. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that controls many aspects of neuronal function by regulating protein abundance. Disruption of this signaling pathway has been demonstrated in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Angleman Syndrome. Since many neurological disorders exhibit ubiquitinated protein aggregates, the loss of neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis may be an important contributor of disease. This review discusses the mechanisms utilized by neurons to control the free pool of ubiquitin necessary for normal nervous system development and function as well as new roles of protein ubiquitination in regulating synaptic activity. PMID:23686613

  17. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  18. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  19. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  20. Increased lysosomal biogenesis in activated microglia and exacerbated neuronal damage after traumatic brain injury in progranulin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Matsuwaki, T; Yamanouchi, K; Nishihara, M

    2013-10-10

    Progranulin (PGRN) is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, it has been demonstrated that patients with the homozygous mutation in the GRN gene present with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, and there is growing evidence that PGRN is related to lysosomal function. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of PGRN in the lysosomes of activated microglia in the cerebral cortex after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We showed that the mouse GRN gene has two possible coordinated lysosomal expression and regulation (CLEAR) sequences that bind to transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal genes. PGRN was colocalized with Lamp1, a lysosomal marker, and Lamp1-positive areas in GRN-deficient (KO) mice were significantly expanded compared with wild-type (WT) mice after TBI. Expression of all the lysosome-related genes examined in KO mice was significantly higher than that in WT mice. The number of activated microglia with TFEB localized to the nucleus was also significantly increased in KO as compared with WT mice. Since the TFEB translocation is regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in the lysosome, we compared ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation that reflects mTORC1 activity. S6K1 phosphorylation in KO mice was significantly lower than that in WT mice. In addition, the number of nissl-positive and fluoro-jade B-positive cells around the injury was significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in KO as compared with WT mice. These results suggest that PGRN localized in the lysosome is involved in the activation of mTORC1, and its deficiency leads to increased TFEB nuclear translocation with a resultant increase in lysosomal biogenesis in activated microglia and exacerbated neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex after TBI. PMID:23830905

  1. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system. PMID:24509431

  2. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  3. Imaging voltage in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Takahashi, Hiroto; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, imaging membrane potential has become a fruitful approach to study neural circuits, especially in invertebrate preparations with large, resilient neurons. At the same time, particularly in mammalian preparations, voltage imaging methods suffer from poor signal to noise and secondary side effects, and they fall short of providing single-cell resolution when imaging of the activity of neuronal populations. As an introduction to these techniques, we briefly review different voltage imaging methods (including organic fluorophores, SHG chromophores, genetic indicators, hybrid, nanoparticles and intrinsic approaches), and illustrate some of their applications to neuronal biophysics and mammalian circuit analysis. We discuss their mechanisms of voltage sensitivity, from reorientation, electrochromic or electro-optical phenomena, to interaction among chromophores or membrane scattering, and highlight their advantages and shortcomings, commenting on the outlook for development of novel voltage imaging methods. PMID:21220095

  4. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Dan; Segall, Ken

    2010-07-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These “Josephson junction neurons” reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, large interconnected networks of Josephson junction neurons would operate fully in parallel. They would be orders of magnitude faster than both traditional computer simulations and biological neural networks. Josephson junction neurons provide a new tool for exploring long-term large-scale dynamics for networks of neurons.

  5. High-resolution magic angle spinning and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveal significantly altered neuronal metabolite profiles in CLN1 but not in CLN3.

    PubMed

    Sitter, Beathe; Autti, Taina; Tyynelä, Jaana; Sonnewald, Ursula; Bathen, Tone F; Puranen, Johanna; Santavuori, Pirkko; Haltia, Matti J; Paetau, Anders; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Häkkinen, Anna-Maija

    2004-09-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are among the most severe inherited progressive neurodegenerative disorders of children. The purpose of this study was to compare the in vivo 1.5-T 1H magnetic resonance (MR) and ex vivo 14.3-T high-resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H MR brain spectra of patients with infantile (CLN1) and juvenile (CLN3) types of NCL, to obtain detailed information about the alterations in the neuronal metabolite profiles in these diseases and to test the suitability of the ex vivo HR MAS (1)H MRS technique in analysis of autopsy brain tissue. Ex vivo spectra from CLN1 autopsy brain tissue (n = 9) significantly differed from those of the control (n = 9) and CLN3 (n = 5) groups, although no differences were found between the CLN3 and the control groups. Principal component analysis of ex vivo data showed that decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamine, and glutamate as well as increased levels of inositols characterized the CLN1 spectra. Also, the intensity ratio of lipid methylene/methyl protons was decreased in spectra of CLN1 brain tissue compared with CLN3 and control brain tissue. In concordance with the ex vivo data, the in vivo spectra of late-stage patients with CLN1 (n = 3) revealed a dramatic decrease of NAA and a proportional increase of myo-inositol and lipids compared with control subjects. Again, the spectra of patients with CLN3 (n = 13) did not differ from those of controls (n = 15). In conclusion, the ex vivo and in vivo spectroscopic findings were in good agreement within all analyzed groups and revealed significant alterations in metabolite profiles in CLN1 brain tissue but not in CLN3 compared with controls. Furthermore, HR MAS 1H MR spectra facilitated refined detection of neuronal metabolites, including GABA, and composition of lipids in the autopsy brain tissue of NCL patients. PMID:15352223

  6. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.R.; Chen, S.T.; Chu, Y.S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C.C.; Chen, H.H.; Lin, C.H.; Tung, H.T.; Chen, Y.S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J.H.; Hwu, Y.

    2013-04-08

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics - including record spatial resolution - and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  7. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-05-29

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  8. Neuronal porosome lipidome

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kenneth T; Maddipati, Krishna R; Taatjes, Douglas J; Jena, Bhanu P

    2014-01-01

    Cup-shaped lipoprotein structures called porosomes are the universal secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane, where secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release intravesicular contents. In neurons, porosomes measure ∼15 nm and are comprised of nearly 40 proteins, among them SNAREs, ion channels, the Gαo G-protein and several structural proteins. Earlier studies report the interaction of specific lipids and their influence on SNAREs, ion channels and G-protein function. Our own studies demonstrate the requirement of cholesterol for the maintenance of neuronal porosome integrity, and the influence of lipids on SNARE complex assembly. In this study, to further understand the role of lipids on porosome structure-function, the lipid composition of isolated neuronal porosome was determined using mass spectrometry. Using lipid-binding assays, the affinity of porosome-associated syntaxin-1A to various lipids was determined. Our mass spectrometry results demonstrate the presence of phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIP's) and phosphatidic acid (PA) among other lipids, and the enriched presence of ceramide (Cer), lysophosphatidylinositol phosphates (LPIP) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Lipid binding assays demonstrate the binding of neuronal porosome to cardiolipin, and confirm its association with PIP's and PA. The ability of exogenous PA to alter protein–protein interaction and neurotransmitter release is further demonstrated from the study. PMID:25224862

  9. Interleukin-6 Deficiency Does Not Affect Motor Neuron Disease Caused by Superoxide Dismutase 1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yongmei; Ripley, Barry; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Fujimoto, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset, progressive, motor neuron degenerative disease. Recent evidence indicates that inflammation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases including ALS. Previously, abnormal levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were described in ALS patients and/or in mouse ALS models. In addition, one study showed that blocking IL-1β could slow down progression of ALS-like symptoms in mice. In this study, we examined a role for IL-6 in ALS, using an animal model for familial ALS. Methods Mice with mutant SOD1 (G93A) transgene, a model for familial ALS, were used in this study. The expression of the major inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α, in spinal cords of these SOD1 transgenic (TG) mice were assessed by real time PCR. Mice were then crossed with IL-6(-/-) mice to generate SOD1TG/IL-6(-/-) mice. SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/-) mice (n = 17) were compared with SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/-) mice (n = 18), SOD1 TG/IL-6(+/+) mice (n = 11), WT mice (n = 15), IL-6(+/-) mice (n = 5) and IL-6(-/-) mice (n = 8), with respect to neurological disease severity score, body weight and the survival. We also histologically compared the motor neuron loss in lumber spinal cords and the atrophy of hamstring muscles between these mouse groups. Results Levels of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in spinal cords of SOD1 TG mice was increased compared to WT mice. However, SOD1 TG/IL-6(-/-) mice exhibited weight loss, deterioration in motor function and shortened lifespan (167.55 ± 11.52 days), similarly to SOD1 TG /IL-6(+/+) mice (164.31±12.16 days). Motor neuron numbers and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in spinal cords were not significantly different in SOD1 TG /IL-6(-/-) mice and SOD1 TG /IL-6 (+/+) mice. Conclusion These results provide compelling preclinical evidence indicating that IL-6 does not directly contribute to motor neuron disease caused by SOD1 mutations. PMID:27070121

  10. Epigenomic Landscapes Reflect Neuronal Diversity.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, Steven

    2015-06-17

    Epigenomic profiling of complex tissues obscures regulatory elements that distinguish one cell type from another. In this issue of Neuron, Mo et al. (2015) apply cell-type-specific profiling to mouse neuronal subtypes and discover an unprecedented level of neuronal diversity. PMID:26087157

  11. Neuronal cell cycle: the neuron itself and its circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Frade, José M; Ovejero-Benito, María C

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are usually regarded as postmitotic cells that undergo apoptosis in response to cell cycle reactivation. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates the existence of a defined developmental program that induces DNA replication in specific populations of neurons, which remain in a tetraploid state for the rest of their adult life. Similarly, de novo neuronal tetraploidization has also been described in the adult brain as an early hallmark of neurodegeneration. The aim of this review is to integrate these recent developments in the context of cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in neurons. We conclude that a variety of mechanisms exists in neuronal cells for G1/S and G2/M checkpoint regulation. These mechanisms, which are connected with the apoptotic machinery, can be modulated by environmental signals and the neuronal phenotype itself, thus resulting in a variety of outcomes ranging from cell death at the G1/S checkpoint to full proliferation of differentiated neurons. PMID:25590687

  12. Phosphoinositide signaling in somatosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-05-01

    Somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG) are responsible for detecting thermal and tactile stimuli. They are also the primary neurons mediating pain and itch. A large number of cell surface receptors in these neurons couple to phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes leading to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and the generation of downstream signaling molecules. These neurons also express many different ion channels, several of which are regulated by phosphoinositides. This review will summarize the knowledge on phosphoinositide signaling in DRG neurons, with special focus on effects on sensory and other ion channels. PMID:26724974

  13. Neuronal synchrony: peculiarity and generality.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Thomas; Huerta, Ramon; Rabinovich, Mikhail I

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization in neuronal systems is a new and intriguing application of dynamical systems theory. Why are neuronal systems different as a subject for synchronization? (1) Neurons in themselves are multidimensional nonlinear systems that are able to exhibit a wide variety of different activity patterns. Their "dynamical repertoire" includes regular or chaotic spiking, regular or chaotic bursting, multistability, and complex transient regimes. (2) Usually, neuronal oscillations are the result of the cooperative activity of many synaptically connected neurons (a neuronal circuit). Thus, it is necessary to consider synchronization between different neuronal circuits as well. (3) The synapses that implement the coupling between neurons are also dynamical elements and their intrinsic dynamics influences the process of synchronization or entrainment significantly. In this review we will focus on four new problems: (i) the synchronization in minimal neuronal networks with plastic synapses (synchronization with activity dependent coupling), (ii) synchronization of bursts that are generated by a group of nonsymmetrically coupled inhibitory neurons (heteroclinic synchronization), (iii) the coordination of activities of two coupled neuronal networks (partial synchronization of small composite structures), and (iv) coarse grained synchronization in larger systems (synchronization on a mesoscopic scale). PMID:19045493

  14. RNA Protein Interaction in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons have their own systems for regulating RNA. Several multigene families encode RNA binding proteins (RNABPs) that are uniquely expressed in neurons, including the well-known neuron-specific markers ELAV and NeuN, and the disease antigen NOVA. New technologies have emerged in recent years to assess the function of these proteins in vivo, and the answers are yielding insights into how and why neurons may regulate RNA in special ways—to increase cellular complexity, to spatially localize mRNA, and to regulate their expression in response to synaptic stimuli. The functions of such restricted neuronal proteins is likely to be complimented by more widely expressed RNABPs that may themselves have developed specialized functions in neurons, including Argonaute/miRNAs. Here we review what is known about such RNABPs, and explore the potential biologic and neurologic significance of neuronal RNA regulatory systems. PMID:23701460

  15. Add neurons, subtract anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Hen, René

    2014-01-01

    IN BRIEF To keep memories from becoming jumbled, the brain must encode the distinct features of events and situations in a way that allows them to be distinguished from one another—a process called pattern separation. Pattern separation enables us to distinguish dangerous situations from similar ones that pose no risk. People with defects in this ability may be prone to anxiety disorders. The process occurs in one of the two regions of the brain that generate neurons throughout life. These fledgling cells seem to be critical to pattern separation. Interventions that specifically boost the ranks of rookie neurons could provide new ways to regulate mood and possibly treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:24974712

  16. Single neuron modeling and data assimilation in BNST neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsian, Reza

    Neurons, although tiny in size, are vastly complicated systems, which are responsible for the most basic yet essential functions of any nervous system. Even the most simple models of single neurons are usually high dimensional, nonlinear, and contain many parameters and states which are unobservable in a typical neurophysiological experiment. One of the most fundamental problems in experimental neurophysiology is the estimation of these parameters and states, since knowing their values is essential in identification, model construction, and forward prediction of biological neurons. Common methods of parameter and state estimation do not perform well for neural models due to their high dimensionality and nonlinearity. In this dissertation, two alternative approaches for parameters and state estimation of biological neurons have been demonstrated: dynamical parameter estimation (DPE) and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The first method uses elements of chaos control and synchronization theory for parameter and state estimation. MCMC is a statistical approach which uses a path integral formulation to evaluate a mean and an error bound for these unobserved parameters and states. These methods have been applied to biological system of neurons in Bed Nucleus of Stria Termialis neurons (BNST) of rats. State and parameters of neurons in both systems were estimated, and their value were used for recreating a realistic model and predicting the behavior of the neurons successfully. The knowledge of biological parameters can ultimately provide a better understanding of the internal dynamics of a neuron in order to build robust models of neuron networks.

  17. Simple neuron models of ITD sensitive neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasika, Vasant; White, John A.; Colburn, H. Steven

    2002-05-01

    Neurons which show sensitivity to interaural time delay (ITD) exist in both mammalian medial superior olive (MSO), and bird nucleus laminaris (NL). In this study, we examine simple mathematical models of single MSO and NL cells which respond probabilistically to a pair of isolated inputs with a response probability that depends on the input interpulse interval. Inputs are either isolated pulse pairs or pairs of periodic trains, with or without random jitter added to their event times. Refractoriness is incorporated in the input description and/or in the cell model in specified simulations. We find that periodic rate-ITD shapes are shaped by three interacting factors: the cell's temporal response (described by the paired-pulse response), input frequency, and the degree of input synchrony. Paired-pulse responses are able to predict the widths of rate-ITD curves obtained from deterministic periodic input simulations. Reduced input synchrony predictably smears rate-ITD curves. Larger numbers of weaker inputs yield stronger rate-ITD modulation than a few strong inputs. Model response is compared with in vivo and in vitro MSO and NL physiological data. Comparisons with published analytical models as well as more complex and realistic physiological cell models are examined.

  18. Micropatterning neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Hardelauf, Heike; Waide, Sarah; Sisnaiske, Julia; Jacob, Peter; Hausherr, Vanessa; Schöbel, Nicole; Janasek, Dirk; van Thriel, Christoph; West, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    Spatially organised neuronal networks have wide reaching applications, including fundamental research, toxicology testing, pharmaceutical screening and the realisation of neuronal implant interfaces. Despite the large number of methods catalogued in the literature there remains the need to identify a method that delivers high pattern compliance, long-term stability and is widely accessible to neuroscientists. In this comparative study, aminated (polylysine/polyornithine and aminosilanes) and cytophobic (poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and methylated) material contrasts were evaluated. Backfilling plasma stencilled PEGylated substrates with polylysine does not produce good material contrasts, whereas polylysine patterned on methylated substrates becomes mobilised by agents in the cell culture media which results in rapid pattern decay. Aminosilanes, polylysine substitutes, are prone to hydrolysis and the chemistries prove challenging to master. Instead, the stable coupling between polylysine and PLL-g-PEG can be exploited: Microcontact printing polylysine onto a PLL-g-PEG coated glass substrate provides a simple means to produce microstructured networks of primary neurons that have superior pattern compliance during long term (>1 month) culture. PMID:24855658

  19. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons: a journey from birth to neuronal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Tricoire, Ludovic; Vitalis, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule crucial for many physiological processes such as synaptic plasticity, vasomotricity, and inflammation. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of NO by neurons. In the juvenile and mature hippocampus and neocortex nNOS is primarily expressed by subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons. Over the past two decades, many advances have been achieved in the characterization of neocortical and hippocampal nNOS expressing neurons. In this review, we summarize past and present studies that have characterized the electrophysiological, morphological, molecular, and synaptic properties of these neurons. We also discuss recent studies that have shed light on the developmental origins and specification of GABAergic neurons with specific attention to neocortical and hippocampal nNOS expressing GABAergic neurons. Finally, we summarize the roles of NO and nNOS-expressing inhibitory neurons. PMID:23227003

  20. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks. PMID:27515518

  1. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  2. Metabolic reprogramming during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Agostini, M; Romeo, F; Inoue, S; Niklison-Chirou, M V; Elia, A J; Dinsdale, D; Morone, N; Knight, R A; Mak, T W; Melino, G

    2016-09-01

    Newly generated neurons pass through a series of well-defined developmental stages, which allow them to integrate into existing neuronal circuits. After exit from the cell cycle, postmitotic neurons undergo neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis and synaptic maturation and plasticity. Lack of a global metabolic analysis during early cortical neuronal development led us to explore the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial biology during ex vivo differentiation of primary cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we observed a huge increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. Changes in mitochondrial mass, morphology and function were correlated with the upregulation of the master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, TFAM and PGC-1α. Concomitant with mitochondrial biogenesis, we observed an increase in glucose metabolism during neuronal differentiation, which was linked to an increase in glucose uptake and enhanced GLUT3 mRNA expression and platelet isoform of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFKp) protein expression. In addition, glutamate-glutamine metabolism was also increased during the differentiation of cortical neurons. We identified PI3K-Akt-mTOR signalling as a critical regulator role of energy metabolism in neurons. Selective pharmacological inhibition of these metabolic pathways indicate existence of metabolic checkpoint that need to be satisfied in order to allow neuronal differentiation. PMID:27058317

  3. Encephalization, neuronal excess, and neuronal index in rodents.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2007-10-01

    Encephalization, or brain size larger than expected from body size, has long been considered to correlate with improved cognitive abilities across species and even intelligence. However, it is still unknown what characteristics of relatively large brains underlie their improved functions. Here, it is shown that more encephalized rodent species have the number of neurons expected for their brain size, but a larger number of neurons than expected for their body size. The number of neurons in excess relative to body size might be available for improved associative functions and, thus, be responsible for the cognitive advantage observed in more encephalized animals. It is further proposed that, if such neuronal excess does provide for improved cognitive abilities, then the total number of excess neurons in each species-here dubbed the neuronal index-should be a better indicator of cognitive abilities than the encephalization quotient (EQ). Because the neuronal index is a function of both the number of neurons expected from the size of the body and the absolute number of neurons in the brain, differences in this parameter across species that share similar EQs might explain why these often have different cognitive capabilities, particularly when comparing across mammalian orders. PMID:17847061

  4. Pin1 in Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Esther B.E.; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    While the role of the prolyl isomerase Pin1 in dividing cells has long been recognized, Pin1’s function in postmitotic neurons is poorly understood. We have identified a novel mechanism by which Pin1 mediates activation of the mitochondrial cell death machinery specifically in neurons. This perspective presents a sophisticated signaling pathway that triggers neuronal apoptosis upon JNK-mediated phosphorylation of the BH3-only protein BIMEL at serine 65. Pin1 is enriched at the mitochondria in neurons together with BIMEL and components of a neuron-specific JNK signaling complex and functions as a molecular switch that couples the phosphorylation of BIMEL by JNK to apoptosis specifically in neurons. We discuss how these findings relate to our understanding of the development of the nervous system and the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. PMID:17568190

  5. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  6. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons. PMID:26112081

  7. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  8. [Motor neuron disease: metabolic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Godoy, J M; Skacel, M; Balassiano, S L; Neves, J R

    1992-03-01

    The authors studied serum and urinary calcium and phosphorus levels, as well as abnormalities on the spine of 30 patients with motor neuron disease. The authors believe in multifactorial aspects in the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease, calling special attention to toxic and metabolic factors. PMID:1307483

  9. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  10. Ethanol and neuronal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mandel, P; Ledig, M; M'Paria, J R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on membrane enzymes (Na+, K+ and Mg2+ ATPases, 5'-nucleotidase, adenylate cyclase) alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase were studied in nerve cells (established cell lines, primary cultures of chick and rat brain) cultured in the presence of 100 mM ethanol, and in total rat brain, following various ethanol treatments of the rats (20% ethanol as the sole liquid source, intraperitoneal injection). The results show a difference between neuronal and glial cells. Most of the observed changes in enzymatic activities returned rapidly to control values when ethanol was withdrawn from the culture medium or from the diet. Alcohol dehydrogenase was more stimulated by ethanol than aldehyde dehydrogenase; therefore acetaldehyde may be accumulated. The inhibition of superoxide dismutase activity may allow an accumulation of cytotoxic O2- radicals in nervous tissue and may explain the polymorphism of lesions brought about by alcohol intoxication. PMID:6264495

  11. Neuron's function revealed

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    There's a new way to explore biologys secrets. With a flash of light, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley zeroed in on the type of neural cell that controls swimming in larval zebrafish. Using innovative light-activated proteins and gene expression techniques, the scientists zapped several zebrafish with a pulse of light, and initiated a swimming action in a subset of fish that was traced back to the type of neuron that drives the side-to-side motion of their tail fins. The technique behind this needle-in-haystack search for the neural roots of a specific behavior could become a powerful way to learn how any biological system works. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/09/16/light-activated-protein/

  12. Multiplying with Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbiani, F.; Krapp, H.; Koch, C.; Laurent, G.

    1998-03-01

    LGMD and DCMD are a pair of identified neurons in the locust brain thought to be involved in visually triggered escape behavior. LGMD integrates visual inputs in its dendritic arbor, converts them into spikes transmitted in a 1:1 manner to DCMD which relays this information to motor centers. We measured the spike activity of DCMD during simulated object approach and observed that its peak occured prior to the expected collision. The time difference between peak activity and collision depended linearly on the ratio of object size to approach velocity, as expected if LGMD/DCMD were detecting the moment in time when the approaching object reaches a fixed angular threshold θ_thresh on the locust's retina. The response of LGMD/DCMD could be fitted by multiplying the angular velocity at which an approaching object is increasing in size over the retina, dot θ, with an exponential function of the object's angular size, θ: f(t) = g(dot θ(t-δ) e^-α θ(t-δ)) where g is a static non-linearity, α a constant related to the angular threshold detected by LGMD/DCMD (θ_thresh = arctan (2/α)) and δ denotes the lag of the neuronal response with respect to the stimulus. This suggests that LGMD/DCMD derives its angular threshold sensitivity by multiplying dot θ with an exponential of θ. A biophysical implementation would be through linear summation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs proportional to log(dot θ) and -α θ, followed by a conversion to spike rate according to the static non-linearity (g circ exp). We have performed several experiments to test this hypothesis.

  13. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  14. Stochastic models of neuronal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, L.M; David, O; Friston, K.J

    2005-01-01

    Cortical activity is the product of interactions among neuronal populations. Macroscopic electrophysiological phenomena are generated by these interactions. In principle, the mechanisms of these interactions afford constraints on biologically plausible models of electrophysiological responses. In other words, the macroscopic features of cortical activity can be modelled in terms of the microscopic behaviour of neurons. An evoked response potential (ERP) is the mean electrical potential measured from an electrode on the scalp, in response to some event. The purpose of this paper is to outline a population density approach to modelling ERPs. We propose a biologically plausible model of neuronal activity that enables the estimation of physiologically meaningful parameters from electrophysiological data. The model encompasses four basic characteristics of neuronal activity and organization: (i) neurons are dynamic units, (ii) driven by stochastic forces, (iii) organized into populations with similar biophysical properties and response characteristics and (iv) multiple populations interact to form functional networks. This leads to a formulation of population dynamics in terms of the Fokker–Planck equation. The solution of this equation is the temporal evolution of a probability density over state-space, representing the distribution of an ensemble of trajectories. Each trajectory corresponds to the changing state of a neuron. Measurements can be modelled by taking expectations over this density, e.g. mean membrane potential, firing rate or energy consumption per neuron. The key motivation behind our approach is that ERPs represent an average response over many neurons. This means it is sufficient to model the probability density over neurons, because this implicitly models their average state. Although the dynamics of each neuron can be highly stochastic, the dynamics of the density is not. This means we can use Bayesian inference and estimation tools that have

  15. Simulating synchronization in neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Christian G.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss several techniques used in simulating neuronal networks by exploring how a network's connectivity structure affects its propensity for synchronous spiking. Network connectivity is generated using the Watts-Strogatz small-world algorithm, and two key measures of network structure are described. These measures quantify structural characteristics that influence collective neuronal spiking, which is simulated using the leaky integrate-and-fire model. Simulations show that adding a small number of random connections to an otherwise lattice-like connectivity structure leads to a dramatic increase in neuronal synchronization.

  16. Towards Automatic Classification of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    The classification of neurons into types has been much debated since the inception of modern neuroscience. Recent experimental advances are accelerating the pace of data collection. The resulting information growth of morphological, physiological, and molecular properties encourages efforts to automate neuronal classification by powerful machine learning techniques. We review state-of-the-art analysis approaches and availability of suitable data and resources, highlighting prominent challenges and opportunities. The effective solution of the neuronal classification problem will require continuous development of computational methods, high-throughput data production, and systematic metadata organization to enable cross-lab integration. PMID:25765323

  17. Single neuron dynamics and computation.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Nicolas; Hakim, Vincent; Richardson, Magnus J E

    2014-04-01

    At the single neuron level, information processing involves the transformation of input spike trains into an appropriate output spike train. Building upon the classical view of a neuron as a threshold device, models have been developed in recent years that take into account the diverse electrophysiological make-up of neurons and accurately describe their input-output relations. Here, we review these recent advances and survey the computational roles that they have uncovered for various electrophysiological properties, for dendritic arbor anatomy as well as for short-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24492069

  18. Differential motor neuron involvement in progressive muscular atrophy: a comparative study with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Yuichi; Atsuta, Naoki; Yoshida, Mari; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Mimuro, Maya; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Koike, Haruki; Sobue, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Objective Progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) is a clinical diagnosis characterised by progressive lower motor neuron (LMN) symptoms/signs with sporadic adult onset. It is unclear whether PMA is simply a clinical phenotype of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in which upper motor neuron (UMN) signs are undetectable. To elucidate the clinicopathological features of patients with clinically diagnosed PMA, we studied consecutive autopsied cases. Design Retrospective, observational. Setting Autopsied patients. Participants We compared clinicopathological profiles of clinically diagnosed PMA and ALS using 107 consecutive autopsied patients. For clinical analysis, 14 and 103 patients were included in clinical PMA and ALS groups, respectively. For neuropathological evaluation, 13 patients with clinical PMA and 29 patients with clinical ALS were included. Primary outcome measures Clinical features, UMN and LMN degeneration, axonal density in the corticospinal tract (CST) and immunohistochemical profiles. Results Clinically, no significant difference between the prognosis of clinical PMA and ALS groups was shown. Neuropathologically, 84.6% of patients with clinical PMA displayed UMN and LMN degeneration. In the remaining 15.4% of patients with clinical PMA, neuropathological parameters that we defined as UMN degeneration were all negative or in the normal range. In contrast, all patients with clinical ALS displayed a combination of UMN and LMN system degeneration. CST axon densities were diverse in the clinical PMA group, ranging from low values to the normal range, but consistently lower in the clinical ALS group. Immunohistochemically, 85% of patients with clinical PMA displayed 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) pathology, while 15% displayed fused-in-sarcoma (FUS)-positive basophilic inclusion bodies. All of the patients with clinical ALS displayed TDP-43 pathology. Conclusions PMA has three neuropathological background patterns. A combination of UMN and LMN

  19. A fish on the hunt, observed neuron by neuron

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This three-dimensional microscopy image reveals an output neuron of the optic tectum lighting up in response to visual information from the retina. The scientists used this state-of-the-art imaging technology to learn how neurons in the optic tectum take visual information and convert it into an output that drives action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/10/29/zebrafish-vision/

  20. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26784007

  1. Tinbergen on mirror neurons

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology—the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that the latter provides the defeasible ‘best explanation’ for current data on the causation and ontogeny of MNs; and to argue that functional analysis, of the kind that Tinbergen identified somewhat misleadingly with studies of ‘survival value’, should be a high priority for future research. In this kind of functional analysis, system-level theories would assign MNs a small, but potentially important, role in the achievement of action understanding—or another social cognitive function—by a production line of interacting component processes. These theories would be tested by experimental intervention in human and non-human animal samples with carefully documented and controlled developmental histories. PMID:24778376

  2. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  3. Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ataie, Amin; Shadifar, Mohammad; Ataee, Ramin

    2016-04-01

    Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations' sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could reduce toxic neuronal damages and many studies confirmed the efficacy of polyphenol antioxidants in fruits and vegetables to reduce neuronal death and to diminish oxidative stress. This systematic review showed the antioxidant activities of phytochemicals which play as natural neuroprotectives with low adverse effects against some neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases. PMID:27303602

  4. [Direct neuronal effects of statins].

    PubMed

    Bösel, J; Endres, M

    2006-03-01

    Statins, i.e. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, reduce the risk of stroke and may have therapeutic potential for other neurologic diseases, including multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to lowering cholesterol levels, statins exert a number of cholesterol-independent (pleiotropic) effects. While endothelial, anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory, i.e. peripheral, effects of statins are well known, little is known about the direct effects on neurons. This may be of clinical relevance because some statins are able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Recent experimental studies demonstrate that statins reduce the activity of neuronal glutamate receptors and protect neurons from excitotoxic insults. At higher doses, however, statins may also inhibit neurite sprouting and even induce neuronal apoptosis. PMID:16028081

  5. Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ataie, Amin; Shadifar, Mohammad; Ataee, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations’ sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could reduce toxic neuronal damages and many studies confirmed the efficacy of polyphenol antioxidants in fruits and vegetables to reduce neuronal death and to diminish oxidative stress. This systematic review showed the antioxidant activities of phytochemicals which play as natural neuroprotectives with low adverse effects against some neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases. PMID:27303602

  6. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  7. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics.

    PubMed

    de Vladar, Harold P; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-12-01

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild. PMID:26640653

  8. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    de Vladar, Harold P.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-01-01

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild. PMID:26640653

  9. Experiments on clustered neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, S.; Soriano, J.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal cultures show a rich repertoire of spontaneous activity. However, the mechanisms that relate a particular network architecture with a specific dynamic behavior are still not well understood. In order to investigate the dependence of neuronal network dynamics on architecture we study spontaneous activity in networks formed by interconnected aggregates of neurons (clustered neuronal networks). In the experiments we monitor the spontaneous activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. Network's firing is characterized by bursts of activity, in which the clusters fire sequentially in a short time window, remaining silent until the next bursting episode. We also investigate perturbations on the connectivity of the network. We mainly focus in physical damage. In some cases we observe important changes in the collective activity of the network, while in other cases some dynamic motifs are preserved, hinting at the existence of dynamic robustness.

  10. [Ambient modulation of neuronal excitability].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Zhang

    2016-08-25

    Although the modulation of synaptic activity plays an important role in the modulation of neuronal excitability, the significance of the ambient modulation (AM) of neuronal excitability should be emphasized. The AM refers to the alterations of membrane potential of neuron resulted from distinct neural activities, such as the tonic inhibition and excitation through activation of extra-synaptic receptors, the paracrine actions of nearby neural and non-neural cells, endocrinal actions of blood borne hormones and other active chemical substances. The AM of neuronal excitability may have important bearings on distinct brain functions, such as the regulation and switching of cortical states, the appearance of chaotic and vague feelings, which are usually the characteristic features in many mental and neural disorders. PMID:27546499

  11. More sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons than glutamatergic neurons in response to acidosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Li, Fang; Wang, Chunyan; Su, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-25

    Acidosis impairs brain functions. Neuron-specific mechanisms underlying acidosis-induced brain dysfunction remain elusive. We studied the sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons and glutamatergic neurons to acidosis by whole-cell recording in brain slices. The acidification to the neurons was induced by perfusing artificial cerebral spinal fluid with lower pH. This acidification impairs excitability and synaptic transmission in the glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Acidosis impairs spiking capacity in the GABAergic neurons more than in the glutamatergic neurons. Acidosis also strengthens glutamatergic synaptic transmission and attenuates GABAergic synaptic transmission on the GABAergic neurons more than the glutamatergic neurons, which results in the functional impairment of these GABAergic neurons. This acidosis-induced dysfunction predominantly in the cortical GABAergic neurons drives the homeostasis of neuronal networks toward overexcitation and exacerbates neuronal impairment. PMID:27116702

  12. Cooperative effects of neuronal ensembles.

    PubMed

    Rose, G; Siebler, M

    1995-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of neurons as the basic cellular elements of the central nervous system and their synaptic connections are well characterized down to a molecular level. However, the behavior of complex noisy networks formed by these constituents usually cannot simply be derived from the knowledge of its microscopic parameters. As a consequence, cooperative phenomena based on the interaction of neurons were postulated. This is a report on a study of global network spike activity as a function of synaptic interaction. We performed experiments in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons and, for comparison, simulations of a mathematical model closely related to electrophysiology. Numeric analyses revealed that at a critical level of synaptic connectivity the firing behavior undergoes a phase transition. This cooperative effect depends crucially on the interaction of numerous cells and cannot be attributed to the spike threshold of individual neurons. In the experiment a drastic increase in the firing level was observed upon increase of synaptic efficacy by lowering of the extracellular magnesium concentration, which is compatible with our theoretical predictions. This "on-off" phenomenon demonstrates that even in small neuronal ensembles collective behavior can emerge which is not explained by the characteristics of single neurons. PMID:8542966

  13. Neuronal polarity: an evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Melissa M.; Jegla, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Polarized distribution of signaling molecules to axons and dendrites facilitates directional information flow in complex vertebrate nervous systems. The topic we address here is when the key aspects of neuronal polarity evolved. All neurons have a central cell body with thin processes that extend from it to cover long distances, and they also all rely on voltage-gated ion channels to propagate signals along their length. The most familiar neurons, those in vertebrates, have additional cellular features that allow them to send directional signals efficiently. In these neurons, dendrites typically receive signals and axons send signals. It has been suggested that many of the distinct features of axons and dendrites, including the axon initial segment, are found only in vertebrates. However, it is now becoming clear that two key cytoskeletal features that underlie polarized sorting, a specialized region at the base of the axon and polarized microtubules, are found in invertebrate neurons as well. It thus seems likely that all bilaterians generate axons and dendrites in the same way. As a next step, it will be extremely interesting to determine whether the nerve nets of cnidarians and ctenophores also contain polarized neurons with true axons and dendrites, or whether polarity evolved in concert with the more centralized nervous systems found in bilaterians. PMID:25696820

  14. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  15. Communication among neurons.

    PubMed

    Marner, Lisbeth

    2012-04-01

    The communication among neurons is the prerequisite for the working brain. To understand the cellular, neurochemical, and structural basis of this communication, and the impacts of aging and disease on brain function, quantitative measures are necessary. This thesis evaluates several quantitative neurobiological methods with respect to possible bias and methodological issues. Stereological methods are suited for the unbiased estimation of number, length, and volumes of components of the nervous system. Stereological estimates of the total length of myelinated nerve fibers were made in white matter of post mortem brains, and the impact of aging and diseases as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease were evaluated. Although stereological methods are in principle unbiased, shrinkage artifacts are difficult to account for. Positron emission tomography (PET) recordings, in conjunction with kinetic modeling, permit the quantitation of radioligand binding in brain. The novel serotonin 5-HT4 antagonist [11C]SB207145 was used as an example of the validation process for quantitative PET receptor imaging. Methods based on reference tissue as well as methods based on an arterial plasma input function were evaluated with respect to precision and accuracy. It was shown that [11C]SB207145 binding had high sensitivity to occupancy by unlabeled ligand, necessitating high specific activity in the radiosynthesis to avoid bias. The established serotonin 5-HT2A ligand [18F]altanersin was evaluated in a two-year follow-up study in elderly subjects. Application of partial volume correction of the PET data diminished the reliability of the measures, but allowed for the correct distinction between changes due to brain atrophy and receptor availability. Furthermore, a PET study of patients with Alzheimer's disease with the serotonin transporter ligand [11C]DASB showed relatively preserved serotonergic projections, despite a marked decrease in 5-HT2A receptor binding. Possible confounders are

  16. Spinal Cord Neuronal Precursors Generate Multiple Neuronal Phenotypes in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Anjali J.; Piper, David; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Lucero, Mary T.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal restricted precursors (NRPs) (Mayer-Proschel et al., 1997) can generate multiple neurotransmitter phenotypes during maturation in culture. Undifferentiated E-NCAM+ (embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule) immunoreactive NRPs are mitotically active and electrically immature, and they express only a subset of neuronal markers. Fully mature cells are postmitotic, process-bearing cells that are neurofilament-M and synaptophysin immunoreactive, and they synthesize and respond to different subsets of neurotransmitter molecules. Mature neurons that synthesize and respond to glycine, glutamate, GABA, dopamine, and acetylcholine can be identified by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and calcium imaging in mass cultures. Individual NRPs also generate heterogeneous progeny as assessed by neurotransmitter response and synthesis, demonstrating the multipotent nature of the precursor cells. Differentiation can be modulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 molecules. Shh acts as a mitogen and inhibits differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). BMP-2 and BMP-4, in contrast, inhibit cell division and promote differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). Thus, a single neuronal precursor cell can differentiate into multiple classes of neurons, and this differentiation can be modulated by environmental signals. PMID:9742154

  17. Interfacing neurons with carbon nanotubes: (re)engineering neuronal signaling.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Cellot, Giada; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylindrically shaped nanostructures made by sheets of graphene rolled up to form hollow tubes. Owing to their unique range of thermal, electronic, and structural properties, CNTs have been rapidly developing as a technology platform for biological and medical applications, including those designed to develop novel neuro-implantable devices. Depending on their structure, CNTs combine an incredible strength with an extreme flexibility. Further, these materials exhibit physical and chemical properties which allow them to efficiently conduit electrical current in electrochemical interfaces. CNTs can be organized in scaffolds made up of small fibers or tubes with diameters similar to those of neural processes such as axons and dendrites. Recently, CNT scaffolds have been found to promote growth, differentiation, and survival of neurons and to modify their electrophysiological properties. These features make CNTs an attractive material for the design of nano-bio hybrid systems able to govern cell-specific behaviors in cultured neuronal networks. The leading scope of this short review is to highlight how nanotube scaffolds can impact on neuronal signaling ability. In particular, we will focus on the direct and specific interactions between this synthetic nanomaterial and biological cell membranes, and on the ability of CNTs to improve interfaces developed to record or to stimulate neuronal activity. CNTs hold the potential for the development of innovative nanomaterial-based neurological implants. Therefore, it is particularly relevant to improve our knowledge on the impact on neuronal performance of interfacing nerve cells with CNTs. PMID:21867808

  18. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  19. Chondroitin sulfate and neuronal disorders.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shinji; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The brain extracellular matrix (ECM) is involved in several aspects of neuronal development, plasticity, and pathophysiology. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), consisting of core proteins with covalently attached chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains, are essential components of the brain ECM. During late postnatal development, CSPGs condense around parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neurons (PV-cells) and form lattice-like ECM structures called perineuronal nets (PNNs). Enzymatic or genetic manipulation of PNNs reactivates neuronal plasticity in the adult brain, probably by resetting the excitatory/inhibitory balance in neural networks. Recent studies have indicated that PNNs control PV-cell function by enhancing the accumulation of specific proteins at the cell surface and/or acting as neuroprotective shields against oxidative stress. Since dysfunction of PV-cells and remodeling of CSPGs are commonly observed in several disorders, including schizophrenia, Costello syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy, modulation of PV-cell function by CSPGs may provide a novel strategy for these neuronal disorders. Here we review the potential roles of CSPGs as therapeutic targets for neuronal disorders, with particular focus on structural changes of CS chains under pathological conditions. PMID:27100510

  20. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence.

    PubMed

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity--factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner. PMID:26598734

  1. Stochastic phase-change neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  2. Stochastic phase-change neurons.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals. PMID:27183057

  3. Cysteine string protein (CSP) and its role in preventing neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Robert D; Morgan, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a member of the DnaJ/Hsp40 family of co-chaperones that localises to neuronal synaptic vesicles. Its name derives from the possession of a string of 12-15 cysteine residues, palmitoylation of which is required for targeting to post-Golgi membranes. The DnaJ domain of CSP enables it to bind client proteins and recruit Hsc70 chaperones, thereby contributing to the maintenance of protein folding in the presynaptic compartment. Mutation of CSP in flies, worms and mice reduces lifespan and causes synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the neurodegenerative disease, adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is caused by mutations in the human CSPα-encoding DNAJC5 gene. Accumulating evidence suggests that the major mechanism by which CSP prevents neurodegeneration is by maintaining the conformation of SNAP-25, thereby facilitating its entry into the membrane-fusing SNARE complex. In this review, we focus on the role of CSP in preventing neurodegeneration and discuss how recent studies of this universal neuroprotective chaperone are being translated into potential novel therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25800794

  4. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  5. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K; Douglas, Pamela K; Friston, Karl J

    2016-03-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics--based on approximate Bayesian inference--has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  6. The neuronal code for number.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Humans and non-human primates share an elemental quantification system that resides in a dedicated neural network in the parietal and frontal lobes. In this cortical network, 'number neurons' encode the number of elements in a set, its cardinality or numerosity, irrespective of stimulus appearance across sensory motor systems, and from both spatial and temporal presentation arrays. After numbers have been extracted from sensory input, they need to be processed to support goal-directed behaviour. Studying number neurons provides insights into how information is maintained in working memory and transformed in tasks that require rule-based decisions. Beyond an understanding of how cardinal numbers are encoded, number processing provides a window into the neuronal mechanisms of high-level brain functions. PMID:27150407

  7. Microtubule dynamics in neuronal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Akira; Ando, Ryota; Sapir, Tamar; Tanaka, Teruyuki

    2013-07-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are essential for neuronal morphogenesis in the developing brain. The MT cytoskeleton provides physical support to shape the fine structure of neuronal processes. MT-based motors play important roles in nucleokinesis, process formation and retraction. Regulation of MT stability downstream of extracellular cues is proposed to be critical for axonogenesis. Axons and dendrites exhibit different patterns of MT organization, underlying the divergent functions of these processes. Centrosomal positioning has drawn the attention of researchers because it is a major clue to understanding neuronal MT organization. In this review, we focus on how recent advances in live imaging have revealed the dynamics of MT organization and centrosome positioning during neural development. PMID:23864552

  8. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K.; Douglas, Pamela K.; Friston, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics—based on approximate Bayesian inference—has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  9. Correlations and Neuronal Population Information.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Adam; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pouget, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Brain function involves the activity of neuronal populations. Much recent effort has been devoted to measuring the activity of neuronal populations in different parts of the brain under various experimental conditions. Population activity patterns contain rich structure, yet many studies have focused on measuring pairwise relationships between members of a larger population-termed noise correlations. Here we review recent progress in understanding how these correlations affect population information, how information should be quantified, and what mechanisms may give rise to correlations. As population coding theory has improved, it has made clear that some forms of correlation are more important for information than others. We argue that this is a critical lesson for those interested in neuronal population responses more generally: Descriptions of population responses should be motivated by and linked to well-specified function. Within this context, we offer suggestions of where current theoretical frameworks fall short. PMID:27145916

  10. Microtubule dynamics in neuronal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Akira; Ando, Ryota; Sapir, Tamar; Tanaka, Teruyuki

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are essential for neuronal morphogenesis in the developing brain. The MT cytoskeleton provides physical support to shape the fine structure of neuronal processes. MT-based motors play important roles in nucleokinesis, process formation and retraction. Regulation of MT stability downstream of extracellular cues is proposed to be critical for axonogenesis. Axons and dendrites exhibit different patterns of MT organization, underlying the divergent functions of these processes. Centrosomal positioning has drawn the attention of researchers because it is a major clue to understanding neuronal MT organization. In this review, we focus on how recent advances in live imaging have revealed the dynamics of MT organization and centrosome positioning during neural development. PMID:23864552

  11. Copying and Evolution of Neuronal Topology

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Chrisantha; Karishma, K. K.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2008-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for copying of neuronal networks that is of considerable interest for neuroscience for it suggests a neuronal basis for causal inference, function copying, and natural selection within the human brain. To date, no model of neuronal topology copying exists. We present three increasingly sophisticated mechanisms to demonstrate how topographic map formation coupled with Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) can copy neuronal topology motifs. Fidelity is improved by error correction and activity-reverberation limitation. The high-fidelity topology-copying operator is used to evolve neuronal topologies. Possible roles for neuronal natural selection are discussed. PMID:19020662

  12. Rescuing neurons in prion disease.

    PubMed

    Verity, Nicholas C; Mallucci, Giovanna R

    2011-01-01

    One of the major current challenges to both medicine and neuroscience is the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, which pose an ever-increasing medical, social and economic burden in the developed world. These disorders, which include Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases, and the rarer prion diseases, are separate entities clinically but have common features, including aggregates of misfolded proteins and varying patterns of neurodegeneration. A key barrier to effective treatment is that patients present clinically with advanced, irreversible, neuronal loss. Critically, mechanisms of neurotoxicity are poorly understood. Prevention of neuronal loss, ideally by targeting underlying pathogenic mechanisms, must be the aim of therapy. The present review describes the rationale and experimental approaches that have allowed such prevention, rescuing neurons in mice with prion disease. This rescue cured animals of a rapidly fatal neurodegenerative condition, resulting in symptom-free survival for their natural lifespan. Early pathological changes were reversed; behavioural, cognitive and neurophysiological deficits were recovered; and there was no neuronal loss. This was achieved by targeting the central pathogenic process in prion disease rather than the presumed toxic species, first by proof-of-principle experiments in transgenic mice and then by treatment using RNA interference for gene knockdown. The results have been a new therapeutic target for prion disease, further insight into mechanisms of prion neurotoxicity and the discovery of a window of reversibility in neuronal damage. Furthermore, the work gives rise to new concepts for treatment strategies for other neurodegenerative disorders, and highlights the need for clinical detection of early neuronal dysfunction, so that similar early rescue can also be achieved for these disorders. PMID:21158739

  13. Nitric oxide in neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    1996-01-01

    NO has clearly revolutionized our thinking about aspects of neurotransmission and neuronal signaling. NO is emerging as an important regulator of a variety of physiologic processes; however, under conditions of excessive or inappropriate formation, NO is also emerging as an important mediator of pathologic nervous tissue damage. Uncovering and understanding the targets of NO that contribute to the neuropathologic process will hopefully lead to the development of selective therapeutic agents and to a better understanding of basic processes underlying normal and pathological neuronal functions. PMID:8594616

  14. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. Conclusion This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties

  15. Which Neurons Will Be the Engram - Activated Neurons and/or More Excitable Neurons?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-il; Cho, Hye-Yeon; Han, Jin-Hee

    2016-01-01

    During past decades, the formation and storage principle of memory have received much attention in the neuroscience field. Although some studies have attempted to demonstrate the nature of the engram, elucidating the memory engram allocation mechanism was not possible because of the limitations of existing methods, which cannot specifically modulate the candidate neuronal population. Recently, the development of new techniques, which offer ways to mark and control specific populations of neurons, may accelerate solving this issue. Here, we review the recent advances, which have provided substantial evidence showing that both candidates (neuronal population that is activated by learning, and that has increased CREB level/excitability at learning) satisfy the criteria of the engram, which are necessary and sufficient for memory expression. PMID:27122991

  16. Outputs of radula mechanoafferent neurons in Aplysia are modulated by motor neurons, interneurons, and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rosen, S C; Miller, M W; Cropper, E C; Kupfermann, I

    2000-03-01

    The gain of sensory inputs into the nervous system can be modulated so that the nature and intensity of afferent input is variable. Sometimes the variability is a function of other sensory inputs or of the state of motor systems that generate behavior. A form of sensory modulation was investigated in the Aplysia feeding system at the level of a radula mechanoafferent neuron (B21) that provides chemical synaptic input to a group of motor neurons (B8a/b, B15) that control closure and retraction movements of the radula, a food grasping structure. B21 has been shown to receive both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs from a variety of neuron types. The current study investigated the morphological basis of these heterosynaptic inputs, whether the inputs could serve to modulate the chemical synaptic outputs of B21, and whether the neurons producing the heterosynaptic inputs were periodically active during feeding motor programs that might modulate B21 outputs in a phase-specific manner. Four cell types making monosynaptic connections to B21 were found capable of heterosynaptically modulating the chemical synaptic output of B21 to motor neurons B8a and B15. These included the following: 1) other sensory neurons, e.g. , B22; 2) interneurons, e.g., B19; 3) motor neurons, e.g., B82; and 4) multifunction neurons that have sensory, motor, and interneuronal functions, e.g., B4/5. Each cell type was phasically active in one or more feeding motor programs driven by command-like interneurons, including an egestive motor program driven by CBI-1 and an ingestive motor program driven by CBI-2. Moreover, the phase of activity differed for each of the modulator cells. During the motor programs, shifts in B21 membrane potential were related to the activity patterns of some of the modulator cells. Inhibitory chemical synapses mediated the modulation produced by B4/5, whereas excitatory and/or electrical synapses were involved in the other instances. The data indicate that

  17. Turning Heads: Development of Vertebrate Branchiomotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2007-01-01

    The cranial motor neurons innervate muscles that control eye, jaw, and facial movements of the vertebrate head and parasympathetic neurons that innervate certain glands and organs. These efferent neurons develop at characteristic locations in the brainstem, and their axons exit the neural tube in well-defined trajectories to innervate target tissues. This review is focused on a subset of cranial motor neurons called the branchiomotor neurons, which innervate muscles derived from the branchial (pharyngeal) arches. First, the organization of the branchiomotor pathways in zebrafish, chick, and mouse embryos will be compared, and the underlying axon guidance mechanisms will be addressed. Next, the molecular mechanisms that generate branchiomotor neurons and specify their identities will be discussed. Finally, the caudally directed or tangential migration of facial branchiomotor neurons will be examined. Given the advances in the characterization and analysis of vertebrate genomes, we can expect rapid progress in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of these vital neuronal networks. PMID:14699587

  18. Network of hypothalamic neurons that control appetite

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) controls food intake and energy expenditure via tight coordinations between multiple neuronal populations. Specifically, two distinct neuronal populations exist in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus (ARH): the anorexigenic (appetite-suppressing) pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons and the orexigenic (appetite-increasing) neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. The coordinated regulation of neuronal circuit involving these neurons is essential in properly maintaining energy balance, and any disturbance therein may result in hyperphagia/obesity or hypophagia/starvation. Thus, adequate knowledge of the POMC and NPY/AgRP neuron physiology is mandatory to understand the pathophysiology of obesity and related metabolic diseases. This review will discuss the history and recent updates on the POMC and NPY/AgRP neuronal circuits, as well as the general anorexigenic and orexigenic circuits in the CNS. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(4): 229-233] PMID:25560696

  19. Neuronal activity controls transsynaptic geometry.

    PubMed

    Glebov, Oleg O; Cox, Susan; Humphreys, Lawrence; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal synapse is comprised of several distinct zones, including presynaptic vesicle zone (SVZ), active zone (AZ) and postsynaptic density (PSD). While correct relative positioning of these zones is believed to be essential for synaptic function, the mechanisms controlling their mutual localization remain unexplored. Here, we employ high-throughput quantitative confocal imaging, super-resolution and electron microscopy to visualize organization of synaptic subdomains in hippocampal neurons. Silencing of neuronal activity leads to reversible reorganization of the synaptic geometry, resulting in a increased overlap between immunostained AZ and PSD markers; in contrast, the SVZ-AZ spatial coupling is decreased. Bayesian blinking and bleaching (3B) reconstruction reveals that the distance between the AZ-PSD distance is decreased by 30 nm, while electron microscopy shows that the width of the synaptic cleft is decreased by 1.1 nm. Our findings show that multiple aspects of synaptic geometry are dynamically controlled by neuronal activity and suggest mutual repositioning of synaptic components as a potential novel mechanism contributing to the homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26951792

  20. Hypothalamic neuronal responses to cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fever has been extensively studied in the past few decades. The hypothesis that hypothalamic thermosensitive neurons play a major role in both normal thermoregulation and in fever production and lysis has particularly helped to advance our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the response to pyrogens. Furthermore, new data in the study of host defense responses induced by pyrogenic cytokines such as interleukin 1, interferon alpha 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 have demonstrated that those factors have multiple, yet coordinated, regulatory activities in the central nervous system, so that our understanding of the role of the brain in the activity of these agents requires a new perspective and dimension. Thus, recent evidence from our laboratory indicates that blood-borne cytokines may be detected in the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis and transduced there into neuronal signals. Such signals may then affect distinct, but partially overlapping, sets of neuronal systems in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, mediating directly and/or indirectly the array of various host defense responses characteristic of infection that are thought to be induced by blood-borne cytokines. PMID:2205055

  1. Regeneration: New Neurons Wire Up.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Pamela A

    2016-09-12

    Functional repair of damage in the nervous system requires re-establishment of precise patterns of synaptic connectivity. A new study shows that after selective ablation, zebrafish retinal neurons regenerate and reconstruct some, although not all, of their stereotypic wiring. PMID:27623258

  2. Glia Get Neurons in Shape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu O; Barres, Ben A

    2016-05-01

    Glial cells are essential components of the nervous system. In this issue, Singhvi et al. uncover cellular and molecular mechanisms through which C. elegans glia shape sensory neuron terminals and thus control animal thermosensing behaviors. PMID:27153490

  3. Modeling neuronal vulnerability in ALS.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Francesco; Caroni, Pico

    2014-08-20

    Using computational models of motor neuron ion fluxes, firing properties, and energy requirements, Le Masson et al. (2014) reveal how local imbalances in energy homeostasis may self-amplify and contribute to neurodegeneration in ALS. PMID:25144872

  4. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  5. Neuronal activity controls transsynaptic geometry

    PubMed Central

    Glebov, Oleg O.; Cox, Susan; Humphreys, Lawrence; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal synapse is comprised of several distinct zones, including presynaptic vesicle zone (SVZ), active zone (AZ) and postsynaptic density (PSD). While correct relative positioning of these zones is believed to be essential for synaptic function, the mechanisms controlling their mutual localization remain unexplored. Here, we employ high-throughput quantitative confocal imaging, super-resolution and electron microscopy to visualize organization of synaptic subdomains in hippocampal neurons. Silencing of neuronal activity leads to reversible reorganization of the synaptic geometry, resulting in a increased overlap between immunostained AZ and PSD markers; in contrast, the SVZ-AZ spatial coupling is decreased. Bayesian blinking and bleaching (3B) reconstruction reveals that the distance between the AZ-PSD distance is decreased by 30 nm, while electron microscopy shows that the width of the synaptic cleft is decreased by 1.1 nm. Our findings show that multiple aspects of synaptic geometry are dynamically controlled by neuronal activity and suggest mutual repositioning of synaptic components as a potential novel mechanism contributing to the homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26951792

  6. The Neuronal Infrastructure of Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menenti, Laura; Segaert, Katrien; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Models of speaking distinguish producing meaning, words and syntax as three different linguistic components of speaking. Nevertheless, little is known about the brain's integrated neuronal infrastructure for speech production. We investigated semantic, lexical and syntactic aspects of speaking using fMRI. In a picture description task, we…

  7. Electrophysiology of raccoon cuneocerebellar neurons.

    PubMed

    Haring, J H; Rowinski, M J; Pubols, B H

    1984-01-01

    Electrophysiological experiments were undertaken in order to locate and functionally characterize cells of the raccoon main cuneate nucleus (MCN) that can be activated by electrical stimulation of the cerebellum. A total of 98 such units were studied in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized, methoxyflurane-anesthetized, or decerebrate preparations. Aside from a greater likelihood of resting discharge in the decerebrate preparations, no appreciable variability in physiological properties of the neurons could be attributed to differences in the type of preparation. Using constant latency of response and ability to be blocked by collision as principal criteria, both antidromically (n = 31) and synaptically (n = 67) activated neurons of the main cuneate nucleus could be identified. A small number of MCN neurons could be activated by both cerebellar and thalamic stimulation, but no unit was antidromically activated from both locations. MCN neurons projecting to the cerebellum are located primarily in the ventral polymorphic cell region of the nucleus at and rostral to the obex, corresponding to the "medial tongue" region of Johnson et al. (1968). In contrast, neurons synaptically activated from the cerebellum are found throughout the dorsoventral extent of the rostral MCN, including the "clusters" region. The majority of antidromically activated units responded to mechanical stimulation of deeper tissues, and most of these were activated by muscle stretch. Only a small portion (13-15%) of either antidromically or synaptically activated units were classed as light touch units with peripheral receptive fields (RFs) restricted to glabrous surfaces of the forepaw. Glabrous skin RFs located on the digital surfaces are smaller than those located on the palm pads. In both cases, RFs are larger than those associated with primary afferent fibers, but toward the low end of the distribution for MCN neurons not activated by cerebellar stimulation. All MCN units activated by cerebellar

  8. Neuronal migration on laminin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liang, S; Crutcher, K A

    1992-03-20

    Chick sympathetic (E-9) or telencephalic (E-7) neurons were cultured at low density on poly-DL-ornithine (PORN), poly-L-lysine (POLS), laminin or laminin-covered PORN or POLS and monitored with time-lapse videomicroscopy. Neurons migrated on laminin, or laminin-covered PORN or POLS, but not on PORN or POLS alone. Neuronal migration did not involve interactions with other cells indicating that neurons are capable of independent migration when exposed to a laminin substrate. PMID:1600626

  9. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Johanni; Gaál, Alexisz Tamás; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron’s firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ). PMID:27341100

  10. NEURONAL PHOSPHOPROTEINS: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of a great variety of neuron-specific phosproteins in nervous tissue supports the view that protein phosphorylation plays many roles in neuronal function. The physiological significance of several of these phosphoproteins has already been established. Some neuronal p...

  11. Primary Culture of Mouse Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gaven, Florence; Marin, Philippe; Claeysen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons represent less than 1% of the total number of neurons in the brain. This low amount of neurons regulates important brain functions such as motor control, motivation, and working memory. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). This progressive neuronal loss is unequivocally associated with the motors symptoms of the pathology (bradykinesia, resting tremor, and muscular rigidity). The main agent responsible of dopaminergic neuron degeneration is still unknown. However, these neurons appear to be extremely vulnerable in diverse conditions. Primary cultures constitute one of the most relevant models to investigate properties and characteristics of dopaminergic neurons. These cultures can be submitted to various stress agents that mimic PD pathology and to neuroprotective compounds in order to stop or slow down neuronal degeneration. The numerous transgenic mouse models of PD that have been generated during the last decade further increased the interest of researchers for dopaminergic neuron cultures. Here, the video protocol focuses on the delicate dissection of embryonic mouse brains. Precise excision of ventral mesencephalon is crucial to obtain neuronal cultures sufficiently rich in dopaminergic cells to allow subsequent studies. This protocol can be realized with embryonic transgenic mice and is suitable for immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, second messenger quantification, or neuronal death/survival assessment. PMID:25226064

  12. Spontaneous Calcium Changes in Micro Neuronal Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Aki; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Iwabuchi, Shin; Goto, Miho; Takayama, Yuzo; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    We have developed a practical experimental method to mass-produce and maintain a variation of minimal neuronal networks (“micro neuronal networks”) consisted of a single to several neurons in culture using spray-patterning technique. In this paper, we could maintain the micro-cultures for one month or more by adding conditioned medium and carried out optical recording of spontaneous activity in micro neuronal networks and considered the interactions between them. To determine the interactions between micro neuronal networks, fluorescence changes in several small networks were simultaneously measured using calcium indicator dye fluo-4 AM, and time-series analysis was carried out using surrogate arrangements. By using the spray-patterning method, a large number of cell-adhesive micro regions were formed. Neurons extended neurites along the edge of the cell-adhesive micro regions and form micro neuronal networks. In part of micro regions, some neurite was protruded from the region, and thus micro neuronal networks were connected with synapses. In these networks, a single neuron-induced network activity was observed. On the other hand, even in morphologically non-connected micro neuronal networks, synchronous oscillations between micro neuronal networks were observed. Our micro-patterning methods and results provide the possibility that synchronous activity is occurred between morphologically non-connected neuronal networks. This suggest that the humoral factor is also a important component for network-wide dynamics.

  13. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, David R.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  14. Morphological homogeneity of neurons: searching for outlier neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Krissia; Feenders, Christoph; Viana, Matheus P; Kaiser, Marcus; Costa, Luciano da F

    2012-10-01

    We report a morphology-based approach for the automatic identification of outlier neurons, as well as its application to the NeuroMorpho.org database, with more than 5,000 neurons. Each neuron in a given analysis is represented by a feature vector composed of 20 measurements, which are then projected into a two-dimensional space by applying principal component analysis. Bivariate kernel density estimation is then used to obtain the probability distribution for the group of cells, so that the cells with highest probabilities are understood as archetypes while those with the smallest probabilities are classified as outliers. The potential of the methodology is illustrated in several cases involving uniform cell types as well as cell types for specific animal species. The results provide insights regarding the distribution of cells, yielding single and multi-variate clusters, and they suggest that outlier cells tend to be more planar and tortuous. The proposed methodology can be used in several situations involving one or more categories of cells, as well as for detection of new categories and possible artifacts. PMID:22615032

  15. Sensory neurons and circuits mediating itch

    PubMed Central

    LaMotte, Robert H.; Dong, Xinzhong; Ringkamp, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Chemicals used experimentally to evoke itch elicit activity in diverse subpopulations of cutaneous pruriceptive neurons, all of which also respond to painful stimuli. However, itch is distinct from pain: it evokes different behaviors, such as scratching, and originates from the skin or certain mucosae but not from muscle, joints or viscera. New insights regarding the neurons that mediate the sensation of itch have been gained from experiments in which gene expression has been manipulated in different types of pruriceptive neurons as well as from comparisons between psychophysical measurements of itch and the neuronal discharges and other properties of peripheral and central pruriceptive neurons. PMID:24356071

  16. Neuronal gap junctions play a role in the secondary neuronal death following controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Andrei B; Wang, Yongfu; Song, Ji-Hoon; Denisova, Janna V; Berman, Nancy E; Fontes, Joseph D

    2012-08-22

    In the mammalian CNS, excessive release of glutamate and overactivation of glutamate receptors are responsible for the secondary (delayed) neuronal death following neuronal injury, including ischemia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and epilepsy. Recent studies in mice showed a critical role for neuronal gap junctions in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia-mediated neuronal death. Here, using controlled cortical impact (CCI) in adult mice, as a model of TBI, and Fluoro-Jade B staining for analysis of neuronal death, we set to determine whether neuronal gap junctions play a role in the CCI-mediated secondary neuronal death. We report that 24h post-CCI, substantial neuronal death is detected in a number of brain regions outside the injury core, including the striatum. The striatal neuronal death is reduced both in wild-type mice by systemic administration of mefloquine (a relatively selective blocker of neuronal gap junctions) and in knockout mice lacking connexin 36 (neuronal gap junction protein). It is also reduced by inactivation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (with LY341495) which, as reported previously, control the rapid increase in neuronal gap junction coupling following different types of neuronal injury. The results suggest that neuronal gap junctions play a critical role in the CCI-induced secondary neuronal death. PMID:22781494

  17. Direct innervation and modulation of orexin neurons by lateral hypothalamic LepRb neurons

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Gwendolyn W.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Myers, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    Leptin, the adipose-derived hormonal signal of body energy stores, acts via the leptin receptor (LepRb) on neurons in multiple brain regions. We previously identified LepRb neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), which are distinct from neighboring leptin-regulated melanin concentrating hormone (MCH)- or orexin (OX)-expressing cells. Neither the direct synaptic targets of LHA LepRb neurons nor their potential role in the regulation of other LHA neurons have been determined, however. We thus generated several adenoviral and transgenic systems in which cre recombinase promotes the expression of the tracer, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and utilized these in combination with LepRbcre mice to determine the neuronal targets of LHA LepRb neurons. This analysis revealed that, while some LHA LepRb neurons project to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), LHA LepRb neurons also densely innervate the LHA where they directly synapse with OX, but not MCH, neurons. Indeed, few other LepRb neurons in the brain project to the OX-containing region of the mouse LHA, and direct leptin action via LHA LepRb neurons regulates gene expression in OX neurons. These findings thus reveal a major role for LHA leptin action in the modulation of OX neurons, suggesting the importance of LHA LepRb neurons in the regulation of OX signaling that is crucial to leptin action and metabolic control. PMID:20739548

  18. Forward engineering neuronal diversity using direct reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Eade, Kevin T; Blanchard, Joel W; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2015-06-01

    The nervous system is comprised of a vast diversity of distinct neural cell types. Differences between neuronal subtypes drive the assembly of neuronal circuits and underlie the subtype specificity of many neurological diseases. Yet, because neurons are irreversibly post-mitotic and not readily available from patients, it has not been feasible to study specific subtypes of human neurons in larger numbers. A powerful means to study neuronal diversity and neurological disease is to establish methods to produce desired neuronal subtypes in vitro. Traditionally this has been accomplished by treating pluripotent or neural stem cells with growth factors and morphogens that recapitulate exogenous developmental signals. These approaches often require extended periods of culture, which can limit their utility. However, more recently, it has become possible to produce neurons directly from fibroblasts using transcription factors and/or microRNAs. This technique referred to as direct reprogramming or transdifferentiation has proven to be a rapid, robust, and reproducible method to generate mature neurons of many different subtypes from multiple cell sources. Here, we highlight recent advances in generating neurons of specific subtypes using direct reprogramming and outline various scenarios in which induced neurons may be applied to studies of neuronal function and neurological disease. PMID:25908841

  19. Spatially selective photoconductive stimulation of live neurons

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jacob; Singh, Dipika; Hollett, Geoffrey; Dravid, Shashank M.; Sailor, Michael J.; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic activity is intimately linked to neuronal structure and function. Stimulation of live cultured primary neurons, coupled with fluorescent indicator imaging, is a powerful technique to assess the impact of synaptic activity on neuronal protein trafficking and function. Current technology for neuronal stimulation in culture include chemical techniques or microelectrode or optogenetic based techniques. While technically powerful, chemical stimulation has limited spatial resolution and microelectrode and optogenetic techniques require specialized equipment and expertise. We report an optimized and improved technique for laser based photoconductive stimulation of live neurons using an inverted confocal microscope that overcomes these limitations. The advantages of this approach include its non-invasive nature and adaptability to temporal and spatial manipulation. We demonstrate that the technique can be manipulated to achieve spatially selective stimulation of live neurons. Coupled with live imaging of fluorescent indicators, this simple and efficient technique should allow for significant advances in neuronal cell biology. PMID:24904287

  20. Using light to probe neuronal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daria, Vincent R.; Bachor, Hans-A.

    2015-08-01

    In the last few years a multi-disciplinary approach has been launched to investigate the brain using new techniques, which are capable of probing neuronal function across the entire length scales of the brain. Here, we discuss optical tools and spatial light patterning techniques to investigate brain function from the perspective of individual neurons and neuronal circuits. We discuss both biochemical and genetic tools to stimulate neurons, as well as techniques to record neuronal activity. We discuss optical projection and imaging tricks that can be dynamically customized to a particular neuron morphology and neuronal circuit layout facilitating a systematic study of their input/output transfer functions. These optical techniques will play a major role towards understanding the operation of a brain.

  1. Neuronal avalanches and brain plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.; Perrone-Capano, C.

    2007-12-01

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Moreover, experimental studies of morphology indicate that neurons develop a network of small-world-like connections, with the possibility of a very high connectivity degree. Here we discuss a recent model based on self-organized criticality, which consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The model is implemented on regular and small world lattices and on a scale-free network, the Apollonian network. The system exhibits an avalanche activity with a power law distribution of sizes and durations. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power law behaviour with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra. The exponents are found to be quite stable with respect to initial configurations and strength of plastic remodelling, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of neural network models.

  2. Local optimization of neuron arbors.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, C

    1992-01-01

    How parsimoniously is brain wiring laid out, that is, how well does a neuron minimize costs of connections among its synapses? Neural optimization of dendritic and axonic arbors can be evaluated using a generalization of the Steiner tree concept from combinatorial network optimization theory. Local branch-junction geometry of neuronal connecting structures fits a volume minimization model well. In addition, volume of the arborizations at this neighborhood level is significantly more strongly minimized than their length, signal propagation speed, or surface area. The mechanism of this local volume optimization resembles those involved in formation of nonliving tree structures such as river junctions and electric-discharge patterns, and appears to govern initial nerve growth-cone behavior through vector-mechanical energy minimization. PMID:1586674

  3. Neuronal responses to physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  4. Neuronal Responses to Physiological Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  5. NBLAST: Rapid, Sensitive Comparison of Neuronal Structure and Construction of Neuron Family Databases.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marta; Manton, James D; Ostrovsky, Aaron D; Prohaska, Steffen; Jefferis, Gregory S X E

    2016-07-20

    Neural circuit mapping is generating datasets of tens of thousands of labeled neurons. New computational tools are needed to search and organize these data. We present NBLAST, a sensitive and rapid algorithm, for measuring pairwise neuronal similarity. NBLAST considers both position and local geometry, decomposing neurons into short segments; matched segments are scored using a probabilistic scoring matrix defined by statistics of matches and non-matches. We validated NBLAST on a published dataset of 16,129 single Drosophila neurons. NBLAST can distinguish neuronal types down to the finest level (single identified neurons) without a priori information. Cluster analysis of extensively studied neuronal classes identified new types and unreported topographical features. Fully automated clustering organized the validation dataset into 1,052 clusters, many of which map onto previously described neuronal types. NBLAST supports additional query types, including searching neurons against transgene expression patterns. Finally, we show that NBLAST is effective with data from other invertebrates and zebrafish. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27373836

  6. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans.

    PubMed

    Root, David H; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27477243

  7. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J.; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27477243

  8. Control of Neuronal Network in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a soil dwelling nematode, is evolutionarily rudimentary and contains only ∼ 300 neurons which are connected to each other via chemical synapses and gap junctions. This structural connectivity can be perceived as nodes and edges of a graph. Controlling complex networked systems (such as nervous system) has been an area of excitement for mankind. Various methods have been developed to identify specific brain regions, which when controlled by external input can lead to achievement of control over the state of the system. But in case of neuronal connectivity network the properties of neurons identified as driver nodes is of much importance because nervous system can produce a variety of states (behaviour of the animal). Hence to gain insight on the type of control achieved in nervous system we implemented the notion of structural control from graph theory to C. elegans neuronal network. We identified ‘driver neurons’ which can provide full control over the network. We studied phenotypic properties of these neurons which are referred to as ‘phenoframe’ as well as the ‘genoframe’ which represents their genetic correlates. We find that the driver neurons are primarily motor neurons located in the ventral nerve cord and contribute to biological reproduction of the animal. Identification of driver neurons and its characterization adds a new dimension in controllability of C. elegans neuronal network. This study suggests the importance of driver neurons and their utility to control the behaviour of the organism. PMID:26413834

  9. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  10. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  11. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an "all or none" phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera).

  12. Npas4: Linking Neuronal Activity to Memory.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaochen; Lin, Yingxi

    2016-04-01

    Immediate-early genes (IEGs) are rapidly activated after sensory and behavioral experience and are believed to be crucial for converting experience into long-term memory. Neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (Npas4), a recently discovered IEG, has several characteristics that make it likely to be a particularly important molecular link between neuronal activity and memory: it is among the most rapidly induced IEGs, is expressed only in neurons, and is selectively induced by neuronal activity. By orchestrating distinct activity-dependent gene programs in different neuronal populations, Npas4 affects synaptic connections in excitatory and inhibitory neurons, neural circuit plasticity, and memory formation. It may also be involved in circuit homeostasis through negative feedback and psychiatric disorders. We summarize these findings and discuss their implications. PMID:26987258

  13. Neuronal synaptobrevin promotes longevity in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Jonathan; Haberman, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Neurons have unique challenges relative to other cell types. Unlike most other cells, neurons must remain healthy and functional throughout the lifespan of an animal. Premature neuronal loss underlies many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases. Despite previous research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, little is known about the mechanisms that allow neurons to remain functional for the lifetime of a healthy animal. Understanding these cellular and biochemical processes is essential to promote healthful aging and reduce the severity of neurodegenerative disease. Here we discuss our recent identification of neuron-specific proteins that regulate endosome fusion events and the role of endosomes in maintaining healthy neurons. PMID:23740166

  14. Neuronal synaptobrevin promotes longevity in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Jonathan; Haberman, Adam

    2012-11-01

    Neurons have unique challenges relative to other cell types. Unlike most other cells, neurons must remain healthy and functional throughout the lifespan of an animal. Premature neuronal loss underlies many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases. Despite previous research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, little is known about the mechanisms that allow neurons to remain functional for the lifetime of a healthy animal. Understanding these cellular and biochemical processes is essential to promote healthful aging and reduce the severity of neurodegenerative disease. Here we discuss our recent identification of neuron-specific proteins that regulate endosome fusion events and the role of endosomes in maintaining healthy neurons. PMID:23740166

  15. A new work mechanism on neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rubin; Tsuda, Ichiro; Zhang, Zhikang

    2015-05-01

    By re-examining the neuronal activity energy model, we show the inadequacies in the current understanding of the energy consumption associated with neuron activity. Specifically, we show computationally that a neuron first absorbs and then consumes energy during firing action potential, and this result cannot be produced from any current neuron models or biological neural networks. Based on this finding, we provide an explanation for the observation that when neurons are excited in the brain, blood flow increases significantly while the incremental oxygen consumption is very small. We can also explain why external stimulation and perception emergence are synchronized. We also show that negative energy presence in neurons at the sub-threshold state is an essential reason that leads to blood flow incremental response time in the brain rather than neural excitation to delay. PMID:25640576

  16. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks. PMID:26398224

  17. The genealogy of genealogy of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2014-01-01

    Two scenarios of neuronal evolution (monophyly and polyphyly) are discussed in the historical timeline starting from the 19th century. The recent genomic studies on Ctenophores re-initiated a broad interest in the hypotheses of independent origins of neurons. However, even earlier work on ctenophores suggested that their nervous systems are unique in many aspects of their organization and a possibility of the independent origin of neurons and synapses was introduced well before modern advances in genomic biology. PMID:26478767

  18. The genealogy of genealogy of neurons.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2014-12-01

    Two scenarios of neuronal evolution (monophyly and polyphyly) are discussed in the historical timeline starting from the 19th century. The recent genomic studies on Ctenophores re-initiated a broad interest in the hypotheses of independent origins of neurons. However, even earlier work on ctenophores suggested that their nervous systems are unique in many aspects of their organization and a possibility of the independent origin of neurons and synapses was introduced well before modern advances in genomic biology. PMID:26478767

  19. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    PubMed

    Timme, Nicholas M; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hottowy, Pawel; Litke, Alan M; Beggs, John M

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  20. Neuron Model with Simplified Memristive Ionic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegab, Almoatazbellah M.; Salem, Noha M.; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Chua, Leon

    2015-06-01

    A simplified neuron model is introduced to mimic the action potential generated by the famous Hodgkin-Huxley equations by using the genetic optimization algorithm. Comparison with different neuron models is investigated, and it is confirmed that the sodium and potassium channels in our simplified neuron model are made out of memristors. In addition, the channel equations in the simplified model may be adjusted to introduce a simplified memristor model that is in accordance with the theoretical conditions of the memristive systems.

  1. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas M.; Ito, Shinya; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Litke, Alan M.; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  2. Performance limitations of relay neurons.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rahul; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-01-01

    Relay cells are prevalent throughout sensory systems and receive two types of inputs: driving and modulating. The driving input contains receptive field properties that must be transmitted while the modulating input alters the specifics of transmission. For example, the visual thalamus contains relay neurons that receive driving inputs from the retina that encode a visual image, and modulating inputs from reticular activating system and layer 6 of visual cortex that control what aspects of the image will be relayed back to visual cortex for perception. What gets relayed depends on several factors such as attentional demands and a subject's goals. In this paper, we analyze a biophysical based model of a relay cell and use systems theoretic tools to construct analytic bounds on how well the cell transmits a driving input as a function of the neuron's electrophysiological properties, the modulating input, and the driving signal parameters. We assume that the modulating input belongs to a class of sinusoidal signals and that the driving input is an irregular train of pulses with inter-pulse intervals obeying an exponential distribution. Our analysis applies to any [Formula: see text] order model as long as the neuron does not spike without a driving input pulse and exhibits a refractory period. Our bounds on relay reliability contain performance obtained through simulation of a second and third order model, and suggest, for instance, that if the frequency of the modulating input increases or the DC offset decreases, then relay increases. Our analysis also shows, for the first time, how the biophysical properties of the neuron (e.g. ion channel dynamics) define the oscillatory patterns needed in the modulating input for appropriately timed relay of sensory information. In our discussion, we describe how our bounds predict experimentally observed neural activity in the basal ganglia in (i) health, (ii) in Parkinson's disease (PD), and (iii) in PD during therapeutic deep

  3. Acute lower motor neuron tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Añor, Sònia

    2014-11-01

    Flaccid nonambulatory tetraparesis or tetraplegia is an infrequent neurologic presentation; it is characteristic of neuromuscular disease (lower motor neuron [LMN] disease) rather than spinal cord disease. Paresis beginning in the pelvic limbs and progressing to the thoracic limbs resulting in flaccid tetraparesis or tetraplegia within 24 to 72 hours is a common presentation of peripheral nerve or neuromuscular junction disease. Complete body flaccidity develops with severe decrease or complete loss of spinal reflexes in pelvic and thoracic limbs. Animals with acute generalized LMN tetraparesis commonly show severe motor dysfunction in all limbs and severe generalized weakness in all muscles. PMID:25441630

  4. Dopamine neurons control striatal cholinergic neurons via regionally heterogeneous dopamine and glutamate signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chuhma, Nao; Mingote, Susana; Moore, Holly; Rayport, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Midbrain dopamine neurons fire in bursts conveying salient information. Bursts are associated with pauses in tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons. While the reciprocal balance of dopamine and acetylcholine in the striatum is well known, how dopamine neurons control cholinergic neurons has not been elucidated. Here we show that dopamine neurons make direct fast dopaminergic and glutamatergic connections with cholinergic interneurons, with regional heterogeneity. Dopamine neurons drive a burst-pause firing sequence in cholinergic interneurons in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, mixed actions in the accumbens core, and a pause in the dorsal striatum. This heterogeneity is due mainly to regional variation in dopamine-neuron glutamate cotransmission. A single dose of amphetamine attenuates dopamine neuron connections to cholinergic interneurons with dose-dependent regional specificity. Overall, the present data indicate that dopamine neurons control striatal circuit function via discrete, plastic connections with cholinergic interneurons. PMID:24559678

  5. Effective Stimuli for Constructing Reliable Neuron Models

    PubMed Central

    Druckmann, Shaul; Berger, Thomas K.; Schürmann, Felix; Hill, Sean; Markram, Henry; Segev, Idan

    2011-01-01

    The rich dynamical nature of neurons poses major conceptual and technical challenges for unraveling their nonlinear membrane properties. Traditionally, various current waveforms have been injected at the soma to probe neuron dynamics, but the rationale for selecting specific stimuli has never been rigorously justified. The present experimental and theoretical study proposes a novel framework, inspired by learning theory, for objectively selecting the stimuli that best unravel the neuron's dynamics. The efficacy of stimuli is assessed in terms of their ability to constrain the parameter space of biophysically detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the neuron's dynamics as attested by their ability to generalize well to the neuron's response to novel experimental stimuli. We used this framework to evaluate a variety of stimuli in different types of cortical neurons, ages and animals. Despite their simplicity, a set of stimuli consisting of step and ramp current pulses outperforms synaptic-like noisy stimuli in revealing the dynamics of these neurons. The general framework that we propose paves a new way for defining, evaluating and standardizing effective electrical probing of neurons and will thus lay the foundation for a much deeper understanding of the electrical nature of these highly sophisticated and non-linear devices and of the neuronal networks that they compose. PMID:21876663

  6. Macroscopic Description for Networks of Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montbrió, Ernest; Pazó, Diego; Roxin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of neuroscience, statistical physics, and nonlinear dynamics is to understand how brain function arises from the collective dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. This challenge has been chiefly addressed through large-scale numerical simulations. Alternatively, researchers have formulated mean-field theories to gain insight into macroscopic states of large neuronal networks in terms of the collective firing activity of the neurons, or the firing rate. However, these theories have not succeeded in establishing an exact correspondence between the firing rate of the network and the underlying microscopic state of the spiking neurons. This has largely constrained the range of applicability of such macroscopic descriptions, particularly when trying to describe neuronal synchronization. Here, we provide the derivation of a set of exact macroscopic equations for a network of spiking neurons. Our results reveal that the spike generation mechanism of individual neurons introduces an effective coupling between two biophysically relevant macroscopic quantities, the firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which together govern the evolution of the neuronal network. The resulting equations exactly describe all possible macroscopic dynamical states of the network, including states of synchronous spiking activity. Finally, we show that the firing-rate description is related, via a conformal map, to a low-dimensional description in terms of the Kuramoto order parameter, called Ott-Antonsen theory. We anticipate that our results will be an important tool in investigating how large networks of spiking neurons self-organize in time to process and encode information in the brain.

  7. Functional connectivity in in vitro neuronal assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Daniele; Pastore, Vito P.; Massobrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Complex network topologies represent the necessary substrate to support complex brain functions. In this work, we reviewed in vitro neuronal networks coupled to Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) as biological substrate. Networks of dissociated neurons developing in vitro and coupled to MEAs, represent a valid experimental model for studying the mechanisms governing the formation, organization and conservation of neuronal cell assemblies. In this review, we present some examples of the use of statistical Cluster Coefficients and Small World indices to infer topological rules underlying the dynamics exhibited by homogeneous and engineered neuronal networks. PMID:26500505

  8. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  9. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  10. Novel Method for Neuronal Nanosurgical Connection

    PubMed Central

    Katchinskiy, Nir; Goez, Helly R.; Dutta, Indrani; Godbout, Roseline; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal injury may cause an irreversible damage to cellular, organ and organism function. While preventing neural injury is ideal, it is not always possible. There are multiple etiologies for neuronal injury including trauma, infection, inflammation, immune mediated disorders, toxins and hereditary conditions. We describe a novel laser application, utilizing femtosecond laser pulses, in order to connect neuronal axon to neuronal soma. We were able to maintain cellular viability, and demonstrate that this technique is universal as it is applicable to multiple cell types and media. PMID:26846892

  11. Neuronal polarity and the kinesin superfamily proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Takao; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2007-02-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, typically with a long axon and relatively short dendrites. A wealth of recent data has identified a number of signaling molecules that are involved in neuronal polarization. Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) contribute to the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarity by selectively transporting various proteins and vesicles to either the axon or dendrites. Now evidence is emerging that KIFs also play an important role in axonal formation, the initial event of neuronal polarization. In particular, KIF13B transports phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate, which, based on current hypotheses, is one of the most upstream molecules in the intracellular signaling cascades involved in axonal formation. PMID:17284724

  12. Spiking Neurons for Analysis of Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks comprising spiking neurons of a novel type have been conceived as improved pattern-analysis and pattern-recognition computational systems. These neurons are represented by a mathematical model denoted the state-variable model (SVM), which among other things, exploits a computational parallelism inherent in spiking-neuron geometry. Networks of SVM neurons offer advantages of speed and computational efficiency, relative to traditional artificial neural networks. The SVM also overcomes some of the limitations of prior spiking-neuron models. There are numerous potential pattern-recognition, tracking, and data-reduction (data preprocessing) applications for these SVM neural networks on Earth and in exploration of remote planets. Spiking neurons imitate biological neurons more closely than do the neurons of traditional artificial neural networks. A spiking neuron includes a central cell body (soma) surrounded by a tree-like interconnection network (dendrites). Spiking neurons are so named because they generate trains of output pulses (spikes) in response to inputs received from sensors or from other neurons. They gain their speed advantage over traditional neural networks by using the timing of individual spikes for computation, whereas traditional artificial neurons use averages of activity levels over time. Moreover, spiking neurons use the delays inherent in dendritic processing in order to efficiently encode the information content of incoming signals. Because traditional artificial neurons fail to capture this encoding, they have less processing capability, and so it is necessary to use more gates when implementing traditional artificial neurons in electronic circuitry. Such higher-order functions as dynamic tasking are effected by use of pools (collections) of spiking neurons interconnected by spike-transmitting fibers. The SVM includes adaptive thresholds and submodels of transport of ions (in imitation of such transport in biological

  13. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Yun; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Seong Hwan; Jeong, Young Jin; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung; Cheon, Sang-Myung; Kim, Jae Woo

    2016-07-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  14. Childhood dyspraxia predicts adult-onset nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Jason; Mittal, Vijay; Kline, Emily; Mortensen, Erik L; Michelsen, Niels; Ekstrøm, Morten; Millman, Zachary B; Mednick, Sarnoff A; Sørensen, Holger J

    2015-11-01

    Several neurological variables have been investigated as premorbid biomarkers of vulnerability for schizophrenia and other related disorders. The current study examined whether childhood dyspraxia predicted later adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders. From a standardized neurological examination performed with children (aged 10-13) at genetic high risk of schizophrenia and controls, several measures of dyspraxia were used to create a scale composed of face/head dyspraxia, oral articulation, ideomotor dyspraxia (clumsiness), and dressing dyspraxia (n = 244). Multinomial logistic regression showed higher scores on the dyspraxia scale predict nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders relative to other psychiatric disorders and no mental illness outcomes, even after controlling for genetic risk, χ2 (4, 244) = 18.61, p < .001. Findings that symptoms of dyspraxia in childhood (reflecting abnormalities spanning functionally distinct brain networks) specifically predict adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders are consistent with a theory of abnormal connectivity, and they highlight a marked early-stage vulnerability in the pathophysiology of nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders. PMID:26439077

  15. Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Anchlia, Sonal; Vyas, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation. PMID:27134456

  16. Delineation of Early and Later Adult Onset Depression by Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongjun; Nie, Binbin; Li, Na; Luo, Chunrong; Li, Haijun; Liu, Fang; Bai, Yan; Shan, Baoci; Xu, Lin; Xu, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to a lack of evidence, there is no consistent age of onset to define early onset (EO) versus later onset (LO) major depressive disorder (MDD). Fractional anisotropy (FA), derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), has been widely used to study neuropsychiatric disorders by providing information about the brain circuitry, abnormalities of which might facilitate the delineation of EO versus LO MDD. Method In this study, 61 pairs of untreated, non-elderly, first-episode MDD patients and healthy controls (HCs) aged 18–45 years old received DTI scans. The voxel-based analysis method (VBM), classification analysis, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), and regression analyses were used to determine abnormal FA clusters and their correlations with age of onset and clinical symptoms. Results Classification analysis suggested in the best model that there were two subgroups of MDD patients, delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, by which MDD patients could be divided into EO (18–29 years old) and LO (30–45 years old) groups. LO MDD was characterized by decreased FA, especially in the white matter (WM) of the fronto-occipital fasciculus and posterior limb of internal capsule, with a negative correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms; in marked contrast, EO MDD showed increased FA, especially in the WM of the corpus callosum, corticospinal midbrain and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, while FA of the WM near the midbrain had a positive correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms. Conclusion Specific abnormalities of the brain circuitry in EO vs. LO MDD were delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, as demonstrated by distinct abnormal FA clusters with opposite correlations with clinical symptoms. This DTI study supported the evidence of an exact age for the delineation of MDD, which could have broad multidisciplinary importance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703742 PMID:25393297

  17. Adult-onset painful axonal polyneuropathy caused by a dominant NAGLU mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Martine; Gonzalez, Michael; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Allard, Pierre; Gehring, Kalle; Leblanc, Diane; Leclerc, Nadine; Schondorf, Ronald; Mathieu, Jean; Zuchner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset painful sensory neuropathies are usually acquired conditions associated with common diseases. Adult presentations of known hereditary forms are often accompanied by other organ involvement. We recruited a large French-Canadian family with a dominantly inherited late-onset painful sensory neuropathy. The main clinical feature is recurrent leg pain that progresses to constant painful paraesthesias in the feet and later the hands. As it evolves, some patients develop a mild sensory ataxia. We selected four affected individuals for whole exome sequencing. Analysis of rare variants shared by all cases led to a list of four candidate variants. Segregation analysis in all 45 recruited individuals has shown that only the p.Ile403Thr variant in the α-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) gene segregates with the disease. Recessive NAGLU mutations cause the severe childhood lysosomal disease mucopolysacharidosis IIIB. Family members carrying the mutation showed a significant decrease of the enzymatic function (average 45%). The late-onset and variable severity of the symptoms may have precluded the description of such symptoms in parents of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB cases. The identification of a dominant phenotype associated with a NAGLU mutation supports that some carriers of lysosomal enzyme mutations may develop later in life much milder phenotypes. PMID:25818867

  18. Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Anchlia, Sonal; Vyas, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation. PMID:27134456

  19. Adult onset-hypothyroidism increases response latency and long-term potentiation (LTP) in rat hippocampus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during both development and in adulthood. The hippocampus is critical for some types of learning and memory and is particularly sensitive to thyroid hormone deficiency. Hypothyroidism in adulthood has been ass...

  20. Epigenetics as the mediator of fetal programming of adult onset disease: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Saffery, Richard; Novakovic, Boris

    2014-11-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis describes how early life environmental factors influence development in a way that impacts later health and disease risk. The hypothesis is supported by a large number of animal studies and a smaller number of observational studies in humans. Epigenetic variation induced in early life has emerged as a prime candidate to be the mediator of such effects, but little direct evidence of this relation exists in humans, primarily due to the inherent problems associated with unraveling the relative contributions of genetic and environmental variables to phenotypic diversity. There are several prerequisites for establishing a causal link that include demonstrating interindividual epigenetic variability in early life in response to specific environmental exposures. Further, compelling evidence linking epigenetic change to disease, prior to onset is required. Finally, the functional relevance of specific epigenetic change must be demonstrated. Evidence is emerging in all of these areas but, ultimately, only large longitudinal life-course studies, commencing prior to birth, can provide direct evidence in support of a role of epigenetic processes as a driver of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease in humans. PMID:24835110

  1. Adult Onset Global Loss of the Fto Gene Alters Body Composition and Metabolism in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sara; Teboul, Lydia; Tung, Y. C. Loraine; Rimmington, Debra; Bosch, Fatima; Jimenez, Veronica; Yeo, Giles S. H.; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Coll, Anthony P.; Cox, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    The strongest BMI–associated GWAS locus in humans is the FTO gene. Rodent studies demonstrate a role for FTO in energy homeostasis and body composition. The phenotypes observed in loss of expression studies are complex with perinatal lethality, stunted growth from weaning, and significant alterations in body composition. Thus understanding how and where Fto regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and body composition is a challenge. To address this we generated a series of mice with distinct temporal and spatial loss of Fto expression. Global germline loss of Fto resulted in high perinatal lethality and a reduction in body length, fat mass, and lean mass. When ratio corrected for lean mass, mice had a significant increase in energy expenditure, but more appropriate multiple linear regression normalisation showed no difference in energy expenditure. Global deletion of Fto after the in utero and perinatal period, at 6 weeks of age, removed the high lethality of germline loss. However, there was a reduction in weight by 9 weeks, primarily as loss of lean mass. Over the subsequent 10 weeks, weight converged, driven by an increase in fat mass. There was a switch to a lower RER with no overall change in food intake or energy expenditure. To test if the phenotype can be explained by loss of Fto in the mediobasal hypothalamus, we sterotactically injected adeno-associated viral vectors encoding Cre recombinase to cause regional deletion. We observed a small reduction in food intake and weight gain with no effect on energy expenditure or body composition. Thus, although hypothalamic Fto can impact feeding, the effect of loss of Fto on body composition is brought about by its actions at sites elsewhere. Our data suggest that Fto may have a critical role in the control of lean mass, independent of its effect on food intake. PMID:23300482

  2. The clinical implications of adult-onset henoch-schonelin purpura

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis mediated by IgA-immune complex deposition. It is characterized by the clinical tetrad of non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and renal involvement. Pathologically, it can be considered a form of immune complex-mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) involving the skin and other organs. Though it primarily affects children (over 90% of cases), the occurrence in adults has been rarely reported. Management often involves the use of immunomodulatory or immune-suppressive regimens. PMID:21619657

  3. An adult onset case of alpha-methyl-acyl-CoA racemase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily Helen; Gavrilov, Dimitar K; Oglesbee, Devin; Freeman, William D; Vavra, Michael W; Matern, Dietrich; Tortorelli, Silvia

    2010-12-01

    α-Methyl-acyl-CoA-racemase (AMACR) deficiency (OMIM 604489) is a rare peroxisomal disorder with a variable age of onset from infancy to late adulthood. We describe a 45-year-old male with a history of seizures who presented with relapsing encephalopathy. Laboratory studies revealed an elevated serum pristanic acid concentration, an elevated pristanic/phytanic acid ratio, as well as the previously described homozygous mutation in the AMACR gene, c.154T>C, consistent with AMACR deficiency. This homozygous mutation is associated with a variable phenotype ranging from neonatal cholestasis to late-onset sensorimotor neuropathy. Dietary pristanic acid restriction was attempted to improve clinical status and the patient has remained in remission for more than 16 months. PMID:20821052

  4. Adult-Onset Fatal Neurohepatopathy in a Woman Caused by MPV17 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Mehta, Neil; Hameed, Bilal; Pekmezci, Melike; Packman, Seymour; Ralph, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are classically considered diseases of early childhood, typically affecting the liver, peripheral, and central nervous systems with a rapidly progressive course. Evidence is emerging that initial symptom onset can extend into adulthood, though few such cases have been reported. We describe a 25-year-old woman who presented initially with secondary amenorrhea, followed by a megaloblastic anemia, lactic acidosis, leukoencephalopathy, progressive peripheral neuropathy, and liver cirrhosis. An apparently homozygous P98L mutation was identified in MPV17, a gene associated with a lethal infantile neurohepatopathy. Homozygosity for the same allele was recently reported in a man with a similar hepatic and neurologic phenotype. This is the first clinical report of an adult female with this disorder, and the first to describe amenorrhea and megaloblastic anemia as likely associated symptoms. PMID:24190800

  5. Adult onset asynchronous multifocal eosinophilic granuloma of bone: an 11-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dallaudière, Benjamin; Kerger, Joseph; Malghem, Jacques; Galant, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a rare observation within the spectrum of histiocytosis X, generally described in children. We report the case of a 33-year-old man with multifocal EG showing an asynchronous evolution of bone lesions during a follow-up of 11 years. We also present the therapeutic approach chosen for this patient and the repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations used to monitor the disease with a final favorable outcome. PMID:25793108

  6. Work Place Success for Persons with Adult-Onset Hearing Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Laurel E.; Elliott, Holly

    1993-01-01

    Data from 1,309 persons who were working and became hard of hearing or deafened between the ages of 18 and 65 are analyzed to determine work outcomes in terms of occupation, perception of work achievement, earning power, support of supervisors and colleagues, and work adaptations. Data show that work success is possible and usual after…

  7. Adult-onset Invasive Haemophilus influenzae Type f Caused by Acute Lower Leg Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Yuko; Kakuta, Risako; Araki, Makoto; Sato, Taigo; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Taniuchi, Norihide

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, routine Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccination began in 2013. Thus, similar to other countries, a strain shift is expected in the near future. We experienced a case of H. influenzae type f (Hif) bacteremia in a 66-year-old man. The primary focus of the infection was the soft tissue of the left lower leg, which is an extremely rare origin in adults. Subsequently, we conducted multilocus sequence typing and identified the strain as sequence type 124, which is the most common invasive strain of Hif worldwide. This case may mark the beginning of an Hif strain shift in Japan. PMID:27374690

  8. Noncirrhotic Extrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Causing Adult-Onset Encephalopathy Treated with Endovascular Closure

    PubMed Central

    Elnekave, Eldad; Belenky, Eugenia; Van der Veer, Lindsley

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of episodic confusion and progressive ataxia. A comprehensive metabolic panel was notable for elevated values of alkaline phosphatase (161 U/L), total bilirubin (1.5 mg/dL), and serum ammonia of 300 umol/L (normal range 9–47). Hepatitis panel, relevant serological tests, tumor markers (CA-19-9, CEA), and urea cycle enzyme studies were unrevealing. Lactulose and rifaximin therapy failed to normalize serum ammonia levels. Imaging revealed a structural vascular abnormality communicating between an enlarged inferior mesenteric vein and the left renal vein, measuring 16 mm in greatest diameter. The diagnosis of congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt was made and endovascular shunt closure was performed using a 22 mm Amplatzer II vascular plug. Within a day, serum ammonia levels normalized. Lactulose and rifaximin were discontinued, and confusion and ataxia resolved. PMID:26199783

  9. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  10. Stages of neuronal network formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiterski, Lydia; Claudepierre, Thomas; Luxenhofer, Robert; Jordan, Rainer; Käs, Josef A.

    2013-02-01

    Graph theoretical approaches have become a powerful tool for investigating the architecture and dynamics of complex networks. The topology of network graphs revealed small-world properties for very different real systems among these neuronal networks. In this study, we observed the early development of mouse retinal ganglion cell (RGC) networks in vitro using time-lapse video microscopy. By means of a time-resolved graph theoretical analysis of the connectivity, shortest path length and the edge length, we were able to discover the different stages during the network formation. Starting from single cells, at the first stage neurons connected to each other ending up in a network with maximum complexity. In the further course, we observed a simplification of the network which manifested in a change of relevant network parameters such as the minimization of the path length. Moreover, we found that RGC networks self-organized as small-world networks at both stages; however, the optimization occurred only in the second stage.

  11. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it. PMID:26630202

  12. BigNeuron: Large-scale 3D Neuron Reconstruction from Optical Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael; Roskams, Jane; Hill, Sean; Spruston, Nelson; Meijering, Erik; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure of single neurons is critical for understanding how they function within neural circuits. BigNeuron is a new community effort that combines modern bioimaging informatics, recent leaps in labeling and microscopy, and the widely recognized need for openness and standardization to provide a community resource for automated reconstruction of dendritic and axonal morphology of single neurons. PMID:26182412

  13. Inhibitory neurons modulate spontaneous signaling in cultured cortical neurons: density-dependent regulation of excitatory neuronal signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Michael; Guaraldi, Mary; Shea, Thomas B.

    2010-06-01

    Cortical neuronal activity depends on a balance between excitatory and inhibitory influences. Culturing of neurons on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) has provided insight into the development and maintenance of neuronal networks. Herein, we seeded MEAs with murine embryonic cortical/hippocampal neurons at different densities (<150 or >1000 cells mm-2) and monitored resultant spontaneous signaling. Sparsely seeded cultures displayed a large number of bipolar, rapid, high-amplitude individual signals with no apparent temporal regularity. By contrast, densely seeded cultures instead displayed clusters of signals at regular intervals. These patterns were observed even within thinner and thicker areas of the same culture. GABAergic neurons (25% of total neurons in our cultures) mediated the differential signal patterns observed above, since addition of the inhibitory antagonist bicuculline to dense cultures and hippocampal slice cultures induced the signal pattern characteristic of sparse cultures. Sparsely seeded cultures likely lacked sufficient inhibitory neurons to modulate excitatory activity. Differential seeding of MEAs can provide a unique model for analyses of pertubation in the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory function during aging and neuropathological conditions where dysregulation of GABAergic neurons is a significant component.

  14. Motor neurons and the generation of spinal motor neuron diversity

    PubMed Central

    Stifani, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurons (MNs) are neuronal cells located in the central nervous system (CNS) controlling a variety of downstream targets. This function infers the existence of MN subtypes matching the identity of the targets they innervate. To illustrate the mechanism involved in the generation of cellular diversity and the acquisition of specific identity, this review will focus on spinal MNs (SpMNs) that have been the core of significant work and discoveries during the last decades. SpMNs are responsible for the contraction of effector muscles in the periphery. Humans possess more than 500 different skeletal muscles capable to work in a precise time and space coordination to generate complex movements such as walking or grasping. To ensure such refined coordination, SpMNs must retain the identity of the muscle they innervate. Within the last two decades, scientists around the world have produced considerable efforts to elucidate several critical steps of SpMNs differentiation. During development, SpMNs emerge from dividing progenitor cells located in the medial portion of the ventral neural tube. MN identities are established by patterning cues working in cooperation with intrinsic sets of transcription factors. As the embryo develop, MNs further differentiate in a stepwise manner to form compact anatomical groups termed pools connecting to a unique muscle target. MN pools are not homogeneous and comprise subtypes according to the muscle fibers they innervate. This article aims to provide a global view of MN classification as well as an up-to-date review of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of SpMN diversity. Remaining conundrums will be discussed since a complete understanding of those mechanisms constitutes the foundation required for the elaboration of prospective MN regeneration therapies. PMID:25346659

  15. Local and Commissural IC Neurons Make Axosomatic Inputs on Large GABAergic Tectothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Oliver, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Large GABAergic (LG) neurons are a distinct type of neuron in the inferior colliculus (IC) identified by their dense VGLUT2-containing axosomatic synaptic terminals. Yet, the sources of these terminals are unknown. Since IC glutamatergic neurons express VGLUT2, and IC neurons are known to have local collaterals, we tested the hypothesis that these excitatory, glutamatergic axosomatic inputs on LG neurons come from local axonal collaterals and commissural IC neurons. We injected a recombinant viral tracer into the IC which enabled Golgi-like GFP labeling in both dendrites and axons. In all cases, we found terminals positive for both GFP and VGLUT2 (GFP+/VGLUT2+) that made axosomatic contacts on LG neurons. One to six axosomatic contacts were made on a single LG cell body by a single axonal branch. The GFP-labeled neurons giving rise to the VGLUT2+ terminals on LG neurons were close by. The density of GFP+/VGLUT2+ terminals on the LG neurons was related to the number of nearby GFP-labeled cells. On the contralateral side, a smaller number of LG neurons received axosomatic contacts from GFP+/VGLUT2+ terminals. In cases with a single GFP-labeled glutamatergic neuron, the labeled axonal plexus was flat, oriented in parallel to the fibrodendritic laminae, and contacted 9–30 LG cell bodies within the plexus. Our data demonstrated that within the IC microcircuitry, there is a convergence of inputs from local IC excitatory neurons on LG cell bodies. This suggests that LG neurons are heavily influenced by the activity of the nearby laminar glutamatergic neurons in the IC. PMID:24796971

  16. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  17. Olfactory Receptor Neuron Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  18. Olfactory receptor neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  19. The Mirror Neuron System and Action Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buccino, Giovanni; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Riggio, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Mirror neurons, first described in the rostral part of monkey ventral premotor cortex (area F5), discharge both when the animal performs a goal-directed hand action and when it observes another individual performing the same or a similar action. More recently, in the same area mirror neurons responding to the observation of mouth actions have been…

  20. Maximum hyperchaos in chaotic nonmonotonic neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, J. W.; Chen, Z. X.; Liu, R. T.; Wu, B. X.

    1997-07-01

    Hyperchaos in chaotic nonmonotonic neuronal networks is discussed with computer simulations. Maximum chaos with all Lyapunov exponents positive is found not only in the present dissipative model with weak coupling connections between neurons, but also with some strong-coupling connections. Although the model presented is a noninvertible map, the information dimension of simple chaos still yields a good approximation to the Lyapunov dimension.

  1. Transmitter sensitivity of neurons assayed by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikami, D.

    1981-05-22

    Ionic conductance channels that are opened by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at synapses of sympathetic neurons are permeable to small organic amines. Uptake of a tritium-labeled amine through these channels can be measured by autoradiography. This provides a simple and direct way to assess the sensitivity of individual neurons to acetylcholine without using microelectrodes.

  2. Neighbor effects of neurons bearing protective transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angela L; Campbell, Laura B; Sapolsky, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Viral vectors bearing protective transgenes can decrease neurotoxicity after varied necrotic insults. A neuron that dies necrotically releases glutamate, calcium and reactive oxygen species, thereby potentially damaging neighboring neurons. This raises the possibility that preventing such neuron death via gene therapy can secondarily protect neighboring neurons that, themselves, do not express a protective transgene. We determined whether such “good neighbor” effects occur, by characterizing neurons that, while uninfected themselves, are in close proximity to a transgene-bearing neuron. We tested two genes whose overexpression protects against excitotoxicity: anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and a calcium-activated K+ channel, SK2. Using herpes simplex virus type 2-mediated transgene delivery to hippocampal cultures, we observed “good neighbor” effects on neuronal survival following an excitotoxic insult. However, in the absence of insult, “bad neighbor effects” could also occur (i.e., where being in proximity to a neuron constitutively expressing one of those transgenes is deleterious). We also characterized the necessity for cell-cell contact for these effects. These phenomena may have broad implications for the efficacy of gene overexpression strategies in the CNS. PMID:20417625

  3. Neurons from rat brain coupled to transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassanelli, S.; Fromherz, P.

    Field-effect transistors form spontaneously capacitive junctions with cultured nerve cells from rat brains. The transfer of ac signals from neurons to silicon is studied and used to parametrize an equivalent circuit. The coupling is distinctly weaker than in junctions assembled with leech nerve cells. The implications with respect to the recording and stimulation of neuronal activity by silicon devices are considered.

  4. Radiation-induced impairment of neuronal excitability

    SciTech Connect

    Pellmar, T.C.; Tolliver, J.M.; Neel, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation causes a decrease in the synaptically evoked activity of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells. This effect is dose and dose-rate dependent. Hydrogen peroxide, which produces hydroxyl free radicals when combined with FE + 2, produces similar damage. In contrast, the radioprotectant, dithiothreitol, increases the excitability of hippocampal neurons. These studies indicate that radiation can directly affect the function of central neurons.

  5. Dynamics of Hybrid Electronic-Neuronal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Barbara; Garcia, Paul; Furman, Michael D.; Lindner, John; Ditto, William

    2001-03-01

    Hybrid systems of neurons and nonlinear electrical components may make possible a new breed of computer optimized for such applications as pattern recognition and the combinatorially explosive problems that are the bane of traditional computers. Because the dynamics of arrays of neurons are high dimensional, and as they are difficult to measure and control, we have focused our initial efforts on more manageable hybrid silicon-neuron systems. Here we present results from our numerical simulations and biological experiments involving a neuron coupled to Chua’s famous chaotic circuit. The results of our simulations reinforce the possibility of using the dynamics of hybrid systems for encoding numbers and performing computation [1]. For example, bi-directionally coupling the FitzHugh-Nagumo model neuron to the Chua model circuit resulted in co-existing stable limit cycles, which can be used to store information. The coupling was also able to convert periodic neuronal spiking to chaotic bursting. We observed similar results with the more physiologically relevant Pinsky-Rinzel [2] model neuron, which facilitated our transition to a living neuron, the rodent hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell, which we coupled to an analog Chua circuit. [1] Sinha, S., Ditto, W.L., Phys. Rev. Lett., 81, 2156-2159 (1998); Sinha, S., Ditto, W.L., Phys. Rev. E, 60, 363-377 (1999) [2] Pinsky, P., Rinzel, J., Journ. Comp. Neuroscience, 1, 39-60 (1994)

  6. Coupled Activation of Primary Sensory Neurons Contributes to Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Shin; Anderson, Michael; Park, Kyoungsook; Zheng, Qin; Agarwal, Amit; Gong, Catherine; Saijilafu; Young, LeAnne; He, Shaoqiu; LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Zhou, Fengquan; Bergles, Dwight; Hanani, Menachem; Guan, Yun; Spray, David C; Dong, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    Primary sensory neurons in the DRG play an essential role in initiating pain by detecting painful stimuli in the periphery. Tissue injury can sensitize DRG neurons, causing heightened pain sensitivity, often leading to chronic pain. Despite the functional importance, how DRG neurons function at a population level is unclear due to the lack of suitable tools. Here we developed an imaging technique that allowed us to simultaneously monitor the activities of >1,600 neurons/DRG in live mice and discovered a striking neuronal coupling phenomenon that adjacent neurons tend to activate together following tissue injury. This coupled activation occurs among various neurons and is mediated by an injury-induced upregulation of gap junctions in glial cells surrounding DRG neurons. Blocking gap junctions attenuated neuronal coupling and mechanical hyperalgesia. Therefore, neuronal coupling represents a new form of neuronal plasticity in the DRG and contributes to pain hypersensitivity by "hijacking" neighboring neurons through gap junctions. PMID:27568517

  7. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  8. An overview of the neuron ring model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taber, Rod

    1991-01-01

    The Neuron Ring model employs an avalanche structure with two important distinctions at the neuron level. Each neuron has two memory latches; one traps maximum neuronal activation during pattern presentation, and the other records the time of latch content change. The latches filter short term memory. In the process, they preserve length 1 snapshots of activation theory history. The model finds utility in pattern classification. Its synaptic weights are first conditioned with sample spectra. The model then receives a test or unknown signal. The objective is to identify the sample closest to the test signal. Class decision follows complete presentation of the test data. The decision maker relies exclusively on the latch contents. Presented here is an overview of the Neuron Ring at the seminar level.

  9. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    PubMed

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood. PMID:27406773

  10. Programming embryonic stem cells to neuronal subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Mirza; Wichterle, Hynek

    2010-01-01

    Richness of neural circuits and specificity of neuronal connectivity depends on the diversification of nerve cells into functionally and molecularly distinct subtypes. While efficient methods for directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into multiple principal neuronal classes have been established, only a few studies systematically examined the subtype diversity of in vitro derived nerve cells. Here we review evidence based on molecular and in vivo transplantation studies that ESC-derived spinal motor neurons and cortical layer V pyramidal neurons acquire subtype specific functional properties. We discuss similarities and differences in the role of cell intrinsic transcriptional programs, extrinsic signals and cell-cell interactions during subtype diversification of the two classes of nerve cells. We conclude that the high degree of fidelity with which differentiating ESCs recapitulate normal embryonic development provides a unique opportunity to explore developmental processes underlying specification of mammalian neuronal diversity in a simplified and experimentally accessible system. PMID:20970319

  11. Interaction function of coupled bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shi; Jiadong, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    The interaction functions of electrically coupled Hindmarsh–Rose (HR) neurons for different firing patterns are investigated in this paper. By applying the phase reduction technique, the phase response curve (PRC) of the spiking neuron and burst phase response curve (BPRC) of the bursting neuron are derived. Then the interaction function of two coupled neurons can be calculated numerically according to the PRC (or BPRC) and the voltage time course of the neurons. Results show that the BPRC is more and more complicated with the increase of the spike number within a burst, and the curve of the interaction function oscillates more and more frequently with it. However, two certain things are unchanged: ϕ = 0, which corresponds to the in-phase synchronization state, is always the stable equilibrium, while the anti-phase synchronization state with ϕ = 0.5 is an unstable equilibrium. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos.  11272065 and 11472061).

  12. Multidisciplinary Interventions in Motor Neuron Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, U. E.; Philip-Ephraim, E. E.; Oparah, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Motor neuron disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of upper motor neuron in the motor cortex and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. Death occurs 2–4 years after the onset of the disease. A complex interplay of cellular processes such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and impaired axonal transport are proposed pathogenetic processes underlying neuronal cell loss. Currently evidence exists for the use of riluzole as a disease modifying drug; multidisciplinary team care approach to patient management; noninvasive ventilation for respiratory management; botulinum toxin B for sialorrhoea treatment; palliative care throughout the course of the disease; and Modafinil use for fatigue treatment. Further research is needed in management of dysphagia, bronchial secretion, pseudobulbar affect, spasticity, cramps, insomnia, cognitive impairment, and communication in motor neuron disease. PMID:26317009

  13. Animal models for motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Green, S L; Tolwani, R J

    1999-10-01

    Motor neuron disease is a general term applied to a broad class of neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by fatally progressive muscular weakness, atrophy, and paralysis attributable to loss of motor neurons. At present, there is no cure for most motor neuron diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common human motor neuron disease--the cause of which remains largely unknown. Animal models of motor neuron disease (MND) have significantly contributed to the remarkable recent progress in understanding the cause, genetic factors, and pathologic mechanisms proposed for this class of human neurodegenerative disorders. Largely driven by ALS research, animal models of MND have proven their usefulness in elucidating potential causes and specific pathogenic mechanisms, and have helped to advance promising new treatments from "benchside to bedside." This review summarizes important features of selected established animal models of MND: genetically engineered mice and inherited or spontaneously occurring MND in the murine, canine, and equine species. PMID:10551448

  14. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Tristan, I. Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M.

    2014-03-15

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  15. Neuron Biomechanics Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  16. Neuron biomechanics probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  17. A COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF MOTOR NEURON DEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Przedborski, Serge; Abbott, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To explore the link between bioenergetics and motor neuron degeneration, we used a computational model in which detailed morphology and ion conductance are paired with intracellular ATP production and consumption. We found that reduced ATP availability increases the metabolic cost of a single action potential and disrupts K+/Na+ homeostasis, resulting in a chronic depolarization. The magnitude of the ATP shortage at which this ionic instability occurs depends on the morphology and intrinsic conductance characteristic of the neuron. If ATP shortage is confined to the distal part of the axon, the ensuing local ionic instability eventually spreads to the whole neuron and involves fasciculation-like spiking events. A shortage of ATP also causes a rise in intracellular calcium. Our modeling work supports the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction can account for salient features of the paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including motor neuron hyperexcitability, fasciculation, and differential vulnerability of motor neuron subpopulations. PMID:25088365

  18. Effects of surface asymmetry on neuronal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staii, Cristian

    Understanding the brain is of tremendous fundamental importance, but it is immensely challenging because of the complexity of both its architecture and function. A growing body of evidence shows that physical stimuli (stiffness of the growth substrate, gradients of various molecular species, geometry of the surrounding environment, traction forces etc.) play a key role in the wiring up of the nervous system. I will present a systematic experimental and theoretical investigation of neuronal growth on substrates with asymmetric geometries and textures. The experimental results show unidirectional axonal growth on these substrates. We demonstrate that the unidirectional bias is imparted by the surface ratchet geometry and quantify the geometrical guidance cues that control neuronal growth. Our results provide new insight into the role played by physical cues in neuronal growth, and could lead to new methods for stimulating neuronal regeneration and the engineering of artificial neuronal tissue. We acknowledge support from NSF through CBET 1067093.

  19. Bistable behaviour in a neocortical neurone model.

    PubMed

    Delord, B; Klaassen, A J; Burnod, Y; Costalat, R; Guigon, E

    1997-03-01

    Intracellular recordings have shown that neocortical pyramidal neurones have an intrinsic capacity for regenerative firing. The cellular mechanism of this firing was investigated by computer simulations of a model neurone endowed with standard action potential and persistent sodium (gNaP) conductances. The firing mode of the neurone was determined as a function of leakage and NaP maximal conductances (gl and gNaP). The neurone had two stable states of activity (bistable) over wide range of gl and gNaP, one at the resting potential and the other in a regenerative firing mode, that could be triggered by a transient input. This model points to a cellular mechanism that may contribute to the generation and maintenance of long-lasting sustained neuronal discharges in the cerebral cortex. PMID:9141084

  20. Central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Andrei S; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2016-02-01

    High-level neurons processing complex, behaviorally relevant signals are sensitive to conjunctions of features. Characterizing the receptive fields of such neurons is difficult with standard statistical tools, however, and the principles governing their organization remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate multiple distinct receptive-field features in individual high-level auditory neurons in a songbird, European starling, in response to natural vocal signals (songs). We then show that receptive fields with similar characteristics can be reproduced by an unsupervised neural network trained to represent starling songs with a single learning rule that enforces sparseness and divisive normalization. We conclude that central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields that can arise through a combination of sparseness and normalization in neural circuits. Our results, along with descriptions of random, discontinuous receptive fields in the central olfactory neurons in mammals and insects, suggest general principles of neural computation across sensory systems and animal classes. PMID:26787894

  1. Characterization of mitochondrial transport in neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Lin, Mei-Yao; Sun, Tao; Knight, Adam L; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are cellular power plants that supply ATP to power various biological activities essential for neuronal growth, survival, and function. Due to extremely varied morphological features, neurons face exceptional challenges to maintain energy homeostasis. Neurons require specialized mechanisms distributing mitochondria to distal synapses where energy is in high demand. Axons and synapses undergo activity-dependent remodeling, thereby altering mitochondrial distribution. The uniform microtubule polarity has made axons particularly useful for exploring mechanisms regulating mitochondrial transport. Mitochondria alter their motility under stress conditions or when their integrity is impaired. Therefore, research into the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial motility in healthy and diseased neurons is an important emerging frontier in neurobiology. In this chapter, we discuss the current protocols in the characterization of axonal mitochondrial transport in primary neuron cultures isolated from embryonic rats and adult mice. We also briefly discuss new procedures developed in our lab in analyzing mitochondrial motility patterns at presynaptic terminals and evaluate their impact on synaptic vesicle release. PMID:25416353

  2. Mirror Neurons through the Lens of Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Pier F.; Tramacere, Antonella; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Iriki, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    The consensus view in mirror neuron research is that mirror neurons comprise a uniform, stable execution-observation matching system. In this article, we argue that, in light of recent evidence, this is, at best, an incomplete and oversimplified view of mirror neurons, whose activity is actually quite variable and more plastic than previously theorized. We propose an epigenetic account for understanding developmental changes in sensorimotor systems, including variations in mirror neuron activity. Although extant associative and genetic accounts fail to consider the complexity of genetic and non-genetic interactions, we propose a new Evo-Devo perspective, which predicts that environmental differences early in development, or through sensorimotor training, should produce variations in mirror neuron response patterns, tuning them to the social environment. PMID:23953747

  3. Attractor dynamics in local neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Thivierge, Jean-Philippe; Comas, Rosa; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    Patterns of synaptic connectivity in various regions of the brain are characterized by the presence of synaptic motifs, defined as unidirectional and bidirectional synaptic contacts that follow a particular configuration and link together small groups of neurons. Recent computational work proposes that a relay network (two populations communicating via a third, relay population of neurons) can generate precise patterns of neural synchronization. Here, we employ two distinct models of neuronal dynamics and show that simulated neural circuits designed in this way are caught in a global attractor of activity that prevents neurons from modulating their response on the basis of incoming stimuli. To circumvent the emergence of a fixed global attractor, we propose a mechanism of selective gain inhibition that promotes flexible responses to external stimuli. We suggest that local neuronal circuits may employ this mechanism to generate precise patterns of neural synchronization whose transient nature delimits the occurrence of a brief stimulus. PMID:24688457

  4. Central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Andrei S.; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2016-01-01

    High-level neurons processing complex, behaviorally relevant signals are sensitive to conjunctions of features. Characterizing the receptive fields of such neurons is difficult with standard statistical tools, however, and the principles governing their organization remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate multiple distinct receptive-field features in individual high-level auditory neurons in a songbird, European starling, in response to natural vocal signals (songs). We then show that receptive fields with similar characteristics can be reproduced by an unsupervised neural network trained to represent starling songs with a single learning rule that enforces sparseness and divisive normalization. We conclude that central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields that can arise through a combination of sparseness and normalization in neural circuits. Our results, along with descriptions of random, discontinuous receptive fields in the central olfactory neurons in mammals and insects, suggest general principles of neural computation across sensory systems and animal classes. PMID:26787894

  5. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristan, I.; Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M.

    2014-03-01

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  6. Pathological Changes of von Economo Neuron and Fork Neuron in Neuropsychiatric Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-ning; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhu, Ming-wei

    2016-02-01

    von Economo neuron (VEN) is a bipolar neuron characterized by a large spindle-shaped soma. VEN is generally distributed in the layer V of anterior insular lobe and anterior cingulate cortex. Fork neuron is another featured bipolar neuron. In recent years,many studies have illustrated that VEN and fork neurons are correlated with complicated cognition such as self-consciousness and social emotion. Studies in the development and morpholigies of these two neurons as well as their pathological changes in various neurological and psychiatric disorders have found that the abnormal number and functions of VEN can cause corresponding dysfunctions in social recognition and emotions both during the neuro-developmental stages of childhood and during the nerve degeneration in old age stage. Therefore, more attentions should be paid on the research of VEN and fork neurons in neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26996211

  7. The Sensory Neurons of Touch

    PubMed Central

    Abraira, Victoria E.; Ginty, David D.

    2013-01-01

    The somatosensory system decodes a wide range of tactile stimuli and thus endows us with a remarkable capacity for object recognition, texture discrimination, sensory-motor feedback and social exchange. The first step leading to perception of innocuous touch is activation of cutaneous sensory neurons called low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMRs). Here, we review the properties and functions of LTMRs, emphasizing the unique tuning properties of LTMR subtypes and the organizational logic of their peripheral and central axonal projections. We discuss the spinal cord neurophysiological representation of complex mechanical forces acting upon the skin and current views of how tactile information is processed and conveyed from the spinal cord to the brain. An integrative model in which ensembles of impulses arising from physiologically distinct LTMRs are integrated and processed in somatotopically aligned mechanosensory columns of the spinal cord dorsal horn underlies the nervous system’s enormous capacity for perceiving the richness of the tactile world. PMID:23972592

  8. Quo vadis motor neuron disease?

    PubMed

    Balendra, Rubika; Patani, Rickie

    2016-03-26

    Motor neuron disease (MND), also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative condition that is invariably fatal, usually within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis. The aetio-pathogenesis of MND remains unresolved and no effective treatments exist. The only Food and Drug Administration approved disease modifying therapy is riluzole, a glutamate antagonist, which prolongs survival by up to 3 mo. Current management is largely symptomatic/supportive. There is therefore a desperate and unmet clinical need for discovery of disease mechanisms to guide novel therapeutic strategy. In this review, we start by introducing the organizational anatomy of the motor system, before providing a clinical overview of its dysfunction specifically in MND. We then summarize insights gained from pathological, genetic and animal models and conclude by speculating on optimal strategies to drive the step change in discovery, which is so desperately needed in this arena. PMID:27019797

  9. Quo vadis motor neuron disease?

    PubMed Central

    Balendra, Rubika; Patani, Rickie

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND), also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative condition that is invariably fatal, usually within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis. The aetio-pathogenesis of MND remains unresolved and no effective treatments exist. The only Food and Drug Administration approved disease modifying therapy is riluzole, a glutamate antagonist, which prolongs survival by up to 3 mo. Current management is largely symptomatic/supportive. There is therefore a desperate and unmet clinical need for discovery of disease mechanisms to guide novel therapeutic strategy. In this review, we start by introducing the organizational anatomy of the motor system, before providing a clinical overview of its dysfunction specifically in MND. We then summarize insights gained from pathological, genetic and animal models and conclude by speculating on optimal strategies to drive the step change in discovery, which is so desperately needed in this arena. PMID:27019797

  10. Parallel Network Simulations with NEURON

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, M.; Cannia, C.; Lytton, W.W; Markram, Henry; Hines, M. L.

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation environment has been extended to support parallel network simulations. Each processor integrates the equations for its subnet over an interval equal to the minimum (interprocessor) presynaptic spike generation to postsynaptic spike delivery connection delay. The performance of three published network models with very different spike patterns exhibits superlinear speedup on Beowulf clusters and demonstrates that spike communication overhead is often less than the benefit of an increased fraction of the entire problem fitting into high speed cache. On the EPFL IBM Blue Gene, almost linear speedup was obtained up to 100 processors. Increasing one model from 500 to 40,000 realistic cells exhibited almost linear speedup on 2000 processors, with an integration time of 9.8 seconds and communication time of 1.3 seconds. The potential for speed-ups of several orders of magnitude makes practical the running of large network simulations that could otherwise not be explored. PMID:16732488

  11. Molecular chaperones and neuronal proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather L.; Li, Wenwen; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is essential for maintaining the functionality of the proteome. The disruption of proteostasis, due to genetic mutations or an age-related decline, leads to aberrantly folded proteins that typically lose their function. The accumulation of misfolded and aggregated protein is also cytotoxic and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Neurons have developed an intrinsic protein quality control network, of which molecular chaperones are an essential component. Molecular chaperones function to promote efficient folding and target misfolded proteins for refolding or degradation. Increasing molecular chaperone expression can suppress protein aggregation and toxicity in numerous models of neurodegenerative disease; therefore, molecular chaperones are considered exciting therapeutic targets. Furthermore, mutations in several chaperones cause inherited neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the importance of molecular chaperones in neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the advances in understanding their protective mechanisms. PMID:25770416

  12. Variable Neuronal Participation in Stereotypic Motor Programs

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Evan S.; Vasireddi, Sunil K.; Bruno, Angela M.; Wang, Jean; Frost, William N.

    2012-01-01

    To what extent are motor networks underlying rhythmic behaviors rigidly hard-wired versus fluid and dynamic entities? Do the members of motor networks change from moment-to-moment or from motor program episode-to-episode? These are questions that can only be addressed in systems where it is possible to monitor the spiking activity of networks of neurons during the production of motor programs. We used large-scale voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging followed by Independent Component Analysis spike-sorting to examine the extent to which the neuronal network underlying the escape swim behavior of Tritonia diomedea is hard-wired versus fluid from a moment-to-moment perspective. We found that while most neurons were dedicated to the swim network, a small but significant proportion of neurons participated in a surprisingly variable manner. These neurons joined the swim motor program late, left early, burst only on some cycles or skipped cycles of the motor program. We confirmed that this variable neuronal participation was not due to effects of the VSD by finding such neurons with intracellular recording in dye-free saline. Further, these neurons markedly varied their level of participation in the network from swim episode-to-episode. The generality of such unreliably bursting neurons was confirmed by their presence in the rhythmic escape networks of two other molluscan species, Tritonia festiva and Aplysia californica. Our observations support a view that neuronal networks, even those underlying rhythmic and stereotyped motor programs, may be more variable in structure than widely appreciated. PMID:22815768

  13. Neuronal Ensemble Synchrony during Human Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Harrison, Matthew T.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Madsen, Joseph R.; Blum, Andrew S.; Potter, N. Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are classically characterized as the expression of hypersynchronous neural activity, yet the true degree of synchrony in neuronal spiking (action potentials) during human seizures remains a fundamental question. We quantified the temporal precision of spike synchrony in ensembles of neocortical neurons during seizures in people with pharmacologically intractable epilepsy. Two seizure types were analyzed: those characterized by sustained gamma (∼40–60 Hz) local field potential (LFP) oscillations or by spike-wave complexes (SWCs; ∼3 Hz). Fine (<10 ms) temporal synchrony was rarely present during gamma-band seizures, where neuronal spiking remained highly irregular and asynchronous. In SWC seizures, phase locking of neuronal spiking to the SWC spike phase induced synchrony at a coarse 50–100 ms level. In addition, transient fine synchrony occurred primarily during the initial ∼20 ms period of the SWC spike phase and varied across subjects and seizures. Sporadic coherence events between neuronal population spike counts and LFPs were observed during SWC seizures in high (∼80 Hz) gamma-band and during high-frequency oscillations (∼130 Hz). Maximum entropy models of the joint neuronal spiking probability, constrained only on single neurons' nonstationary coarse spiking rates and local network activation, explained most of the fine synchrony in both seizure types. Our findings indicate that fine neuronal ensemble synchrony occurs mostly during SWC, not gamma-band, seizures, and primarily during the initial phase of SWC spikes. Furthermore, these fine synchrony events result mostly from transient increases in overall neuronal network spiking rates, rather than changes in precise spiking correlations between specific pairs of neurons. PMID:25057195

  14. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Joseph D; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V; Belousov, Andrei B

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed. PMID:26017008

  15. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V.; Belousov, Andrei B.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed. PMID:26017008

  16. Parabrachial CGRP Neurons Control Meal Termination.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos A; Bowen, Anna J; Schwartz, Michael W; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-05-10

    The lateral parabrachial nucleus is a conduit for visceral signals that cause anorexia. We previously identified a subset of neurons located in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBel) that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and inhibit feeding when activated by illness mimetics. We report here that in otherwise normal mice, functional inactivation of CGRP neurons markedly increases meal size, with meal frequency being reduced in a compensatory manner, and renders mice insensitive to the anorexic effects of meal-related satiety peptides. Furthermore, CGRP neurons are directly innervated by orexigenic hypothalamic AgRP neurons, and photostimulation of AgRP fibers supplying the PBel delays satiation by inhibiting CGRP neurons, thereby contributing to AgRP-driven hyperphagia. By establishing a role for CGRP neurons in the control of meal termination and as a downstream mediator of feeding elicited by AgRP neurons, these findings identify a node in which hunger and satiety circuits interact to control feeding behavior. PMID:27166945

  17. Carboxylation and anaplerosis in neurons and glia.

    PubMed

    Hassel, B

    2000-01-01

    Anaplerosis, or de novo formation of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, compensates for losses of TCA cycle intermediates, especially alpha-ketoglutarate, from brain cells. Loss of alpha-ketoglutarate occurs through release of glutamate and GABA from neurons and through export of glutamine from glia, because these amino acids are alpha-ketoglutarate derivatives. Anaplerosis in the brain may involve four different carboxylating enzymes: malic enzyme, phosphoenopyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and pyruvate carboxylase. Anaplerotic carboxylation was for many years thought to occur only in glia through pyruvate carboxylase; therefore, loss of transmitter glutamate and GABA from neurons was thought to be compensated by uptake of glutamine from glia. Recently, however, anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation was demonstrated in glutamatergic neurons, meaning that these neurons to some extent can maintain transmitter synthesis independently of glutamine. Malic enzyme, which may carboxylate pyruvate, was recently detected in neurons. The available data suggest that neuronal and glial pyruvate carboxylation could operate at as much as 30% and 40-60% of the TCA cycle rate, respectively. Cerebral carboxylation reactions are probably balanced by decarboxylation reactions,, because cerebral CO2 formation equals O2 consumption. The finding of pyruvate carboxylation in neurons entails a major revision of the concept of the glutamine cycle. PMID:11414279

  18. Neurophysiological characterization of mammalian osmosensitive neurones

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Charles W.; Ciura, Sorana; Trudel, Eric; Stachniak, Tevye J. E.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the osmolality of the extracellular fluid is maintained near a predetermined set-point through a negative feedback regulation of thirst, diuresis, salt appetite and natriuresis. This homeostatic control is believed to be mediated by osmosensory neurones which synaptically regulate the electrical activity of command neurones that mediate each of these osmoregulatory effector responses. Our present understanding of the molecular, cellular and network basis that underlies the central control of osmoregulation is largely derived from studies on primary osmosensory neurones in the organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT) and effector neurones in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), which release hormones that regulate diuresis and natriuresis. Primary osmosensory neurones in the OVLT exhibit changes in action potential firing rate that vary in proportion with ECF osmolality. This effect results from the intrinsic depolarizing receptor potential which these cells generate via a molecular transduction complex that may comprise various members of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family of cation channel proteins, notably TRPV1 and TRPV4. Osmotically evoked changes in the firing rate of OVLT neurones then regulate the electrical activity of downstream neurones in the SON through graded changes in glutamate release. PMID:17350993

  19. Rapid Mechanically Controlled Rewiring of Neuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Magdesian, Margaret H; Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Mori, Megumi; Boudreau, Dominic; Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Sanz, Ricardo; Miyahara, Yoichi; Barrett, Christopher J; Fournier, Alyson E; De Koninck, Yves; Grütter, Peter

    2016-01-20

    CNS injury may lead to permanent functional deficits because it is still not possible to regenerate axons over long distances and accurately reconnect them with an appropriate target. Using rat neurons, microtools, and nanotools, we show that new, functional neurites can be created and precisely positioned to directly (re)wire neuronal networks. We show that an adhesive contact made onto an axon or dendrite can be pulled to initiate a new neurite that can be mechanically guided to form new synapses at up to 0.8 mm distance in <1 h. Our findings challenge current understanding of the limits of neuronal growth and have direct implications for the development of new therapies and surgical techniques to achieve functional regeneration. Significance statement: Brain and spinal cord injury may lead to permanent disability and death because it is still not possible to regenerate neurons over long distances and accurately reconnect them with an appropriate target. Using microtools and nanotools we have developed a new method to rapidly initiate, elongate, and precisely connect new functional neuronal circuits over long distances. The extension rates achieved are ≥60 times faster than previously reported. Our findings have direct implications for the development of new therapies and surgical techniques to achieve functional regeneration after trauma and in neurodegenerative diseases. It also opens the door for the direct wiring of robust brain-machine interfaces as well as for investigations of fundamental aspects of neuronal signal processing and neuronal function. PMID:26791225

  20. Tuning supramolecular mechanics to guide neuron development

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Shantanu; Newcomb, Christina J.; Webber, Matthew J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to influence neuronal differentiation and maturation, though the mechanism by which neuronal cells respond to these biophysical cues is not completely understood. Here we design ECM mimics using self-assembled peptide nanofibers, in which fiber rigidity is tailored by supramolecular interactions, in order to investigate the relationship between matrix stiffness and morphological development of hippocampal neurons. We observe that development of neuronal polarity is accelerated on soft nanofiber substrates, and results from the dynamics of neuronal processes. While the total neurite outgrowth of non-polar neurons remains conserved, weaker adhesion of neurites to soft PA substrate facilitates easier retraction, thus enhancing the frequency of “extension-retraction” events. We hypothesize that higher neurite motility enhances the probability of one neurite to reach a critical length relative to others, thereby initiating the developmental sequence of axon differentiation. Our results suggest that substrate stiffness can influence neuronal development by regulating its dynamics, thus providing useful information on scaffold design for applications in neural regeneration. PMID:23562052