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Sample records for adult-onset slowly progressive

  1. Two sporadic cases of adult-onset progressive mucinous histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Young, A; Olivere, J; Yoo, S; Martins, C; Barrett, T

    2006-02-01

    Progressive mucinous histiocytosis is a rare, benign, non-Langerhans' cell histiocytosis limited to the skin. Ten cases--all women--in four families and one sporadic case have been described in the literature. The disorder usually begins in childhood and progresses slowly. We report two sporadic cases of adult-onset progressive mucinous histiocytosis in unrelated African-American women, aged 48 and 55 years, respectively, who developed red-brown and flesh-coloured, asymptomatic papules on the face, the arms and the legs without truncal, mucosal or visceral involvement. The lesions showed no spontaneous regression. Both patients lacked associated systemic symptoms, including polyuria, polydipsia or seizures. There was no underlying hyperlipidaemia, paraproteinaemia or lymphoproliferative disease. No family history of similar lesions could be identified. Light microscopy revealed dermal proliferation of spindle-shaped histiocytes with abundant mucin deposition. Electron microscopy demonstrated a high number of myelin figures or zebra bodies in the cytoplasm of histiocytes. On immunohistochemistry, positive staining with macrophage markers--CD68, HAM56 and lysozyme--and factor XIIIa, a transglutaminase present in dermal dendrocytes, and negative staining with Langerhans' cell markers--CD1a and S100--and CD34, a marker present in dermal dendritic cells derived from uncommitted mesenchymal cells, were observed. PMID:16420313

  2. Adult-onset phenylketonuria with rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tufekcioglu, Zeynep; Cakar, Arman; Bilgic, Basar; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Gurvit, Hakan; Emre, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene, which converts phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although it is principally a childhood disorder, in rare cases, the first signs of PKU may develop in late adulthood resembling common neurological diseases. Here we report a 59-year-old, previously normal functioning man who was admitted with blurred vision, cognitive problems, and gait difficulty that began 8 months before. He had brisk reflexes and left side dominant parkinsonism. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was 25/30, and neuropsychological evaluation revealed a dysexecutive syndrome with simultanagnosia and constructional apraxia. His Clinical Dementia Rating score (CDR) was 1. Cranial MRI revealed bilateral diffuse hyperintense lesions in parietal and occipital white matter in T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and diffusion weighted images. Diagnostic workup for rapidly progressive dementias was all normal except PHE level which was found to be highly elevated (1075 μmol/L, normal 39-240 μmol/L) with normal tyrosine level (61.20 μmol/L, normal 35-100 μmol/L). Three months after PHE-restricted diet, his cognitive impairment and signs of parkinsonism significantly improved, with MRI scan unchanged. This case demonstrates that late-onset PKU is a rare, treatable cause of rapidly progressive dementia and parkinsonism with certain constellations such as consanguinity and white matter abnormalities (WMAs) in imaging. PMID:26962957

  3. Axial mitochondrial myopathy in a patient with rapidly progressive adult-onset scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Hiniker, Annie; Wong, Lee-Jun; Berven, Sigurd; Truong, Cavatina K; Adesina, Adekunle M; Margeta, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Axial myopathy can be the underlying cause of rapidly progressive adult-onset scoliosis; however, the pathogenesis of this disorder remains poorly understood. Here we present a case of a 69-year old woman with a family history of scoliosis affecting both her mother and her son, who over 4 years developed rapidly progressive scoliosis. The patient had a history of stable scoliosis since adolescence that worsened significantly at age 65, leading to low back pain and radiculopathy. Paraspinal muscle biopsy showed morphologic evidence of a mitochondrial myopathy. Diagnostic deficiencies of electron transport chain enzymes were not detected using standard bioassays, but mitochondrial immunofluorescence demonstrated many muscle fibers totally or partially deficient for complexes I, III, IV-I, and IV-IV. Massively parallel sequencing of paraspinal muscle mtDNA detected multiple deletions as well as a 40.9% heteroplasmic novel m.12293G > A (MT-TL2) variant, which changes a G:C pairing to an A:C mispairing in the anticodon stem of tRNA Leu(CUN). Interestingly, these mitochondrial abnormalities were not detected in the blood of either the patient or her son, suggesting that the patient's rapidly progressive late onset scoliosis was due to the acquired paraspinal mitochondrial myopathy; the cause of non-progressive scoliosis in the other two family members currently remains unexplained. Notably, this case illustrates that isolated mitochondrial myopathy can underlie rapidly-progressive adult-onset scoliosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the primary axial myopathy.

  4. Adult onset retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-07-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  5. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  6. [A man with slowly progressive dyspnea on exertion].

    PubMed

    Lauren, S T; Simons, S O; Arens, A I J

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with a medical history of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension was admitted to the hospital because of slowly progressive shortness of breath and hypoxemia. The diagnosis hepatopulmonary syndrome was confirmed by a pulmonary perfusion scan with 99m Tc-albumin. The scan showed a right-left shunt, because the 99m Tc-albumin transited the lungs and appeared in the brain, the thyroid gland, the kidneys and the spleen. The patient received a liver transplantation, which is considered the only definitive treatment. PMID:27484427

  7. The neuropsychological and neuroradiological correlates of slowly progressive visual agnosia.

    PubMed

    Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Aresi, Anna; Reati, Fabiola; Riva, Alice; Gobbo, Clara; Bizzi, Alberto

    2009-04-01

    The case of a 64-year-old woman affected by slowly progressive visual agnosia is reported aiming to describe specific cognitive-brain relationships. Longitudinal clinical and neuropsychological assessment, combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography (PET) were used. Sequential neuropsychological evaluations performed during a period of 9 years since disease onset showed the appearance of apperceptive and associative visual agnosia, alexia without agraphia, agraphia, finger agnosia, and prosopoagnosia, but excluded dementia. MRI showed moderate diffuse cortical atrophy, with predominant atrophy in the left posterior cortical areas (temporal, parietal, and lateral occipital cortical gyri). 18FDG-PET showed marked bilateral posterior cortical hypometabolism; proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging disclosed severe focal N-acetyl-aspartate depletion in the left temporoparietal and lateral occipital cortical areas. In conclusion, selective metabolic alterations and neuronal loss in the left temporoparietooccipital cortex may determine progressive visual agnosia in the absence of dementia.

  8. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  9. Adult-Onset Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit; Broderick, Gregory A; Carson, Culley C; Dobs, Adrian S; Faraday, Martha M; Goldstein, Irwin; Hakim, Lawrence S; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Kacker, Ravi; Köhler, Tobias S; Mills, Jesse N; Miner, Martin; Sadeghi-Nejad, Hossein; Seftel, Allen D; Sharlip, Ira D; Winters, Stephen J; Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-07-01

    In August 2015, an expert colloquium commissioned by the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA) convened in Washington, DC, to discuss the common clinical scenario of men who present with low testosterone (T) and associated signs and symptoms accompanied by low or normal gonadotropin levels. This syndrome is not classical primary (testicular failure) or secondary (pituitary or hypothalamic failure) hypogonadism because it may have elements of both presentations. The panel designated this syndrome adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH) because it occurs commonly in middle-age and older men. The SMSNA is a not-for-profit society established in 1994 to promote, encourage, and support the highest standards of practice, research, education, and ethics in the study of human sexual function and dysfunction. The panel consisted of 17 experts in men's health, sexual medicine, urology, endocrinology, and methodology. Participants declared potential conflicts of interest and were SMSNA members and nonmembers. The panel deliberated regarding a diagnostic process to document signs and symptoms of AOH, the rationale for T therapy, and a monitoring protocol for T-treated patients. The evaluation and management of hypogonadal syndromes have been addressed in recent publications (ie, the Endocrine Society, the American Urological Association, and the International Society for Sexual Medicine). The primary purpose of this document was to support health care professionals in the development of a deeper understanding of AOH, particularly in how it differs from classical primary and secondary hypogonadism, and to provide a conceptual framework to guide its diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. PMID:27343020

  10. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment. PMID:26998855

  11. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment.

  12. Expanding the spectrum of PEX10-related peroxisomal biogenesis disorders: slowly progressive recessive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Mathilde; Guissart, Claire; Mallaret, Martial; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Cheillan, David; Drouot, Nathalie; Muller, Jean; Claustres, Mireille; Tranchant, Christine; Anheim, Mathieu; Koenig, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs) consist of a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive diseases, in which peroxisome assembly and proliferation are impaired leading to severe multisystem disease and early death. PBDs include Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) with a relatively mild clinical phenotype caused by PEX1, (MIM# 602136), PEX2 (MIM# 170993), PEX6 (MIM# 601498), PEX10 (MIM# 602859), PEX12 (MIM# 601758), and PEX16 (MIM# 603360) mutations. Three adult patients are reported belonging to a non-consanguineous French family affected with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, axonal neuropathy, and pyramidal signs. Mental retardation and diabetes mellitus were optional. The age at onset was in childhood or in adolescence (3-15 years). Brain MRI showed marked cerebellar atrophy. Biochemical blood analyses suggested a mild peroxisomal defect. With whole exome sequencing, two mutations in PEX10 were found in the three patients: c.827G>T (novel) causing the missense change p.Cys276Phe and c.932G>A causing the missense change p.Arg311Gln. The phenotypic spectrum related to PEX10 mutations includes slowly progressive, syndromic recessive ataxia.

  13. [Cerebro-oculo-hepato-renal syndrome (Arima's syndrome) with slowly progressive renal insufficiency and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Kubota, M; Shinozaki, M; Ishizaki, A; Kurata, K

    1991-11-01

    We reported an additional case of Arima's syndrome with slowly progressive renal insufficiency and epilepsy. The patient is a 20-year-old man whose parents are consanguineous. He had a history of mild asphyxia at birth, and unexplained tachypnea developed during the neonatal period. But it disappeared later, and he have had no respiratory problem since then. Physical examination on admission at the age of 19 years revealed bilateral blephaloptosis, narrow palate, searching nystagmoid movement, absence of light reflex, muscle hypotonia and wasting of extremities. Funduscopic study showed optic hypoplasia, choroid coloboma and narrowing of vessels. Head CT scan showed agenesis of cerebellar vermis and hypoplasia of brainstem. CT scan and echography of the kidney disclosed the bilateral multiple cysts. Liver was hyperechoic in echographic study; this finding is consistent with fatty change. EEG showed dysrhythmic slow wave activity with sporadic spike and wave complex. Compared with previously reported cases, the present case has the following features: (1) slowly progressive renal insufficiency, (2) generalized tonic clonic convulsion developing from the age of 11 months, (3) ABR abnormalities including the right-sided shortening of wave I-II interpeak latency and bilateral ill-defined wave V. Slow progress of renal failure in our case may reflect the mild pathological process of the kidney with sparing functional nephrons. It shows the diversity of the kidney pathology in Arima's syndrome. Epilepsy is a less common association in the syndrome, whereas EEG abnormalities were reported. ABR abnormalities may reflect the morphological alteration of the brainstem structure including auditory pathway. In our case it is uncertain whether the neonatal tachypnea was due to birth asphyxia or brainstem malformation responsible for abnormal respiration as suggested in Joubert's syndrome. PMID:1760207

  14. Biallelic Mutations in DNM1L are Associated with a Slowly Progressive Infantile Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nasca, Alessia; Legati, Andrea; Baruffini, Enrico; Nolli, Cecilia; Moroni, Isabella; Ardissone, Anna; Goffrini, Paola; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles, undergoing continuous fission and fusion, and mitochondrial dynamics is important for several cellular functions. DNM1L is the most important mediator of mitochondrial fission, with a role also in peroxisome division. Few reports of patients with genetic defects in DNM1L have been published, most of them describing de novo dominant mutations. We identified compound heterozygous DNM1L variants in two brothers presenting with an infantile slowly progressive neurological impairment. One variant was a frame-shift mutation, the other was a missense change, the pathogenicity of which was validated in a yeast model. Fluorescence microscopy revealed abnormally elongated mitochondria and aberrant peroxisomes in mutant fibroblasts, indicating impaired fission of these organelles. In conclusion, we described a recessive disease caused by DNM1L mutations, with a clinical phenotype resembling mitochondrial disorders but without any biochemical features typical of these syndromes (lactic acidosis, respiratory chain complex deficiency) or indicating a peroxisomal disorder. PMID:27328748

  15. Atypical, slowly progressive behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia associated with C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Baber K.; Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Takada, Leonel T.; Sha, Sharon J.; Rutherford, Nicola. J.; Fong, Jamie C.; Karydas, Anna; Wu, Teresa; Ketelle, Robin; Baker, Matt C.; Hernandez, Mariely-Dejesus; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Rademakers, Rosa; Lee, Suzee E.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Seeley, William; Rankin, Katherine P.; Boxer, Adam L.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some patients meeting behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) diagnostic criteria progress slowly and plateau at mild symptom severity. Such patients have mild neuropsychological and functional impairments, lack characteristic bvFTD brain atrophy, and have thus been referred to as bvFTD “phenocopies” or slowly progressive (bvFTD-SP). The few patients with bvFTD-SP that have been studied at autopsy have found no evidence of FTD pathology, suggesting that bvFTD-SP is neuropathologically distinct from other forms of FTD. Here, we describe two patients with bvFTD-SP with chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) hexanucleotide expansions. Methods Three hundred and eighty-four patients with FTD clinical spectrum and Alzheimer’s disease diagnoses were screened for C9ORF72 expansion. Two bvFTD-SP mutation carriers were identified. Neuropsychological and functional data, as well as brain atrophy patterns assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), were compared with 44 patients with sporadic bvFTD and 85 healthy controls. Results Both patients were age 48 at baseline and met possible bvFTD criteria. In the first patient, VBM revealed thalamic and posterior insula atrophy. Over seven years, his neuropsychological performance and brain atrophy remained stable. In the second patient, VBM revealed cortical atrophy with subtle frontal and insular volume loss. Over two years, her neuropsychological and functional scores as well as brain atrophy remained stable. Conclusions C9ORF72 mutations can present with a bvFTD-SP phenotype. Some bvFTD-SP patients may have neurodegenerative pathology, and C9ORF72 mutations should be considered in patients with bvFTD-SP and a family history of dementia or motor neuron disease. PMID:22399793

  16. Phenocopy or variant: a longitudinal study of very slowly progressive frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Brodtmann, Amy; Cowie, Tiffany; McLean, Catriona; Darby, David

    2013-01-01

    Frontal variant frontotemporal dementia (fvFTD) can present with a range of social and cognitive impairments. Complicating this clinical picture is a group of non-progressive or ‘phenocopy’ patients. We present a patient and his father with very slowly progressive fvFTD over decades. Stable MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging abnormalities were present in the presenting patient, with serial neuropsychological assessments that showed no significant change over 15 years. His father also had a 20-year history of functional decline, associated with neuropsychological evidence of change. Neuropathological confirmation of the condition of his father became available. This revealed gross bilateral frontal atrophy and spongiosis in the frontal cortical regions with mild neuronal loss and rounded ubiquitinated perinuclear inclusions, consistent with early stage frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin by current neuropathological criteria. The phenotype of frontal variant FTD is broad. Many patients present with frontal networks dysfunction. We present evidence that some patients with a very slow clinical progression do have FTD. PMID:23391955

  17. Adult onset retinoblastoma: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Raj, Amit; Arya, Sudesh Kumar; Punia, Rajpal Singh; Kohli, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor of childhood. About 95% of retinoblastoma cases are diagnosed before the age of 5 years. Not more than 30 cases of Adult-onset retinoblastoma have been reported in literature. A 32 year old male presented with a painful blind eye. There was sudden loss of vision accompanied by severe pain and redness in right eye about 1 year ago, for which some surgery was done with neither a gain in vision nor any relief from pain. Then he was put on maximum tolerable medical therapy, later cyclocryotherapy was done. Now he presented to us with complains of extreme pain and bleeding from right eye since 2 days. There is no history of any ocular trauma. Right eye had no perception of light & showed anterior staphyloma with perforation. Right eye evisceration was done & material sent for histopathological examination, which revealed an adult-onset retinoblastoma. CECT scan revealed thickening of optic nerve throughout its entire length with contrast enhancement. He was further taken up for enucleation of residual sclera with maximum optic nerve stump removal to reconfirm the diagnosis. Histopathological examination revealed tumor deposits present in orbital soft tissue, resection margins and optic nerve cut end.Retinoblastoma presenting in adult age creates a diagnostic dilemma because of its low frequency and atypical features. We want to highlight the importance of high clinical suspicion and imaging modalities before taking any patient for evisceration with unexplained vision loss. One should send the eviscerated material for histopathological examination. PMID:26709674

  18. Phenotypes, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Adult-Onset Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Genetic factors, atopy, and early respiratory tract infections are well-recognized factors predisposing to childhood-onset asthma. Adult-onset asthma is more often associated with obesity, smoking, depression, or other life-style or environmental factors, even though genetic factors and respiratory tract infections may also play a role in adult-onset disease. Adult-onset asthma is characterized by absence of atopy and is often severe requiring treatment with high dose of inhaled and/or oral steroids. Variety of risk factors and nonatopic nature of adult-onset disease suggest that variety of mechanisms is involved in the disease pathogenesis and that these mechanisms differ from the pathobiology of childhood-onset asthma with prevailing Th2 airway inflammation. Recognition of the mechanisms and mediators that drive the adult-onset disease helps to develop novel strategies for the treatment. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of adult-onset asthma and to concentrate on the mechanisms and mediators involved in establishing adult-onset asthma in response to specific risk factors. We also discuss the involvement of these mechanisms in the currently recognized phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. PMID:26538828

  19. Phenotypes, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Genetic factors, atopy, and early respiratory tract infections are well-recognized factors predisposing to childhood-onset asthma. Adult-onset asthma is more often associated with obesity, smoking, depression, or other life-style or environmental factors, even though genetic factors and respiratory tract infections may also play a role in adult-onset disease. Adult-onset asthma is characterized by absence of atopy and is often severe requiring treatment with high dose of inhaled and/or oral steroids. Variety of risk factors and nonatopic nature of adult-onset disease suggest that variety of mechanisms is involved in the disease pathogenesis and that these mechanisms differ from the pathobiology of childhood-onset asthma with prevailing Th2 airway inflammation. Recognition of the mechanisms and mediators that drive the adult-onset disease helps to develop novel strategies for the treatment. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of adult-onset asthma and to concentrate on the mechanisms and mediators involved in establishing adult-onset asthma in response to specific risk factors. We also discuss the involvement of these mechanisms in the currently recognized phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. PMID:26538828

  20. Slowly Progressive Encephalopathy with Hearing Loss Due to a Mutation in the mtDNA tRNALeu(CUN) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Çoku, Jorida; Shanske, Sara; Mehrazin, Mahsa; Tanji, Kurenai; Naini, Ali; Emmanuele, Valentina; Patterson, Marc; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in the tRNALeu(UCN) gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been invariably accompanied by skeletal myopathy with or without chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO). We report a young woman with a heteroplasmic m.12276G>A mutation in tRNALeu(UCN), who had childhood-onset and slowly progressive encephalopathy with ataxia, cognitive impairment, and hearing loss. Sequencing of the 22 tRNA mitochondrial genes is indicated in all unusual neurological syndromes, even in the absence of maternal inheritance. PMID:20022607

  1. A case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration successfully treated with antitumor and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsuboguchi, Shintaro; Yajima, Ryuji; Higuchi, You; Ishikawa, Masanori; Kawachi, Izumi; Koyama, Yu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2016-07-28

    We report a case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) with breast cancer in a 54-year-old woman. The symptoms of limb and truncal ataxia, and dysarthria gradually progressed during the course of 1 year, and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score was 2. A mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection was performed for the breast cancer. No malignant cells were found on histopathological examination of the lymph node. Combination chemotherapy with adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) prevented neurologic deterioration. However, subsequent treatment with trastuzumab and paclitaxel did not prevent progression of the symptoms (mRS score 3). Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres without brain stem atrophy. Anti-Yo antibody was detected in the serum, which led to a diagnosis of anti-Yo-associated PCD. We resected an enlarged axillary lymph node, which was found on computed tomography. The histopathological analysis of the lymph node revealed foreign body granuloma, which suggested an association with necrotic malignant tissue. Following additional tegafur-uracil therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), the cerebellar signs and symptoms gradually improved (mRS score 2). The clinical course shows that PCD can present as a slowly progressive cerebellar symptom. We propose an active treatment for anti-Yo-associated PCD consisting of tumor resection, combined chemotherapy, and IVIg.

  2. A case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration successfully treated with antitumor and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsuboguchi, Shintaro; Yajima, Ryuji; Higuchi, You; Ishikawa, Masanori; Kawachi, Izumi; Koyama, Yu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2016-07-28

    We report a case of slowly progressive anti-Yo-associated paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) with breast cancer in a 54-year-old woman. The symptoms of limb and truncal ataxia, and dysarthria gradually progressed during the course of 1 year, and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score was 2. A mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection was performed for the breast cancer. No malignant cells were found on histopathological examination of the lymph node. Combination chemotherapy with adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (AC) prevented neurologic deterioration. However, subsequent treatment with trastuzumab and paclitaxel did not prevent progression of the symptoms (mRS score 3). Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres without brain stem atrophy. Anti-Yo antibody was detected in the serum, which led to a diagnosis of anti-Yo-associated PCD. We resected an enlarged axillary lymph node, which was found on computed tomography. The histopathological analysis of the lymph node revealed foreign body granuloma, which suggested an association with necrotic malignant tissue. Following additional tegafur-uracil therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), the cerebellar signs and symptoms gradually improved (mRS score 2). The clinical course shows that PCD can present as a slowly progressive cerebellar symptom. We propose an active treatment for anti-Yo-associated PCD consisting of tumor resection, combined chemotherapy, and IVIg. PMID:27356731

  3. [A case of cryptococcal ventriculitis with slowly progressive gait disturbance and memory impairment as initial symptoms].

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Nobuo; Nagasaka, Takamura; Takaki, Ryusuke; Miwa, Michiaki; Shindo, Kazumasa; Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted due to progressive gait disturbance and cognitive impairment. On MRI, a hyperintense region was observed in the periventricular white matter on FLAIR imaging, with Gd-enhancement in the choroid plexus and periventricular wall. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed marked abnormalities including a high white blood cell count (WBC, 360 cells/mm(3). 83% lymphocytes), an elevated protein level (1,416 mg/dl), a low glucose level (12 mg/dl), and elevated cryptococcal antigen with positive Indian ink staining. Cryptococcal ventriculitis was diagnosed. The patient was initially treated with liposomal amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole, and flucytosine for 38 weeks, followed by administration of itraconazole and fluconazole with some improvement. The brain MRI after one month showed septum formation in the posterior horn, which was suggestive of ventriculitis. Although ventriculitis is rare, we should pay attention to the presence of ventriculitis due to cryptococcal infection in the central nervous system. PMID:25746069

  4. Predictors of Relapse in Adult-Onset Nephrotic Minimal Change Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hajeong; Yoo, Kyung Don; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Dong Ki; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Joo, Kwon Wook; Kim, Yon Su; Ahn, Curie; Han, Jin Suk; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Minimal change disease (MCD) is a well-known benign primary glomerulonephritis because of its distinct rare tendency to progress to end-stage renal disease. However, factors associated with relapse in adults are not well known. We aimed to identify predictors of relapse in adult-onset MCD patients. A retrospective cohort of 195 patients with adult-onset primary MCD with nephritic syndrome and disease onset between 1979 and 2013 was followed up for >12 months. The number of relapses was counted and predictors of relapse were analyzed. A total of 195 patients were included. Median age at diagnosis was 38 years (IQR, 23–53 years) and 113 (57.9%) were men. During 81 months (IQR, 44–153 months) of follow-up, 92% of patients achieved remission after initial treatment. However, only 60 (32.8%) did not experience a relapse and 11 patients failed to remit. Among the remaining 124 patients, 65 experienced a relapse once or twice and 59 experienced a relapse more than twice. Younger onset age, increased severity of nephrotic features such as lower serum albumin levels and higher cholesterol level were associated with relapse. Interestingly, the grade of mesangial proliferation was lower in patients who experienced a relapse. Initial combined treatment with corticosteroids (CS) and cyclophosphamide reduced the number of relapses. In addition, patients with shorter treatment duration tended to experience relapse more often. Multivariate analysis showed that younger onset age, combined mesangial proliferation, initial treatment regimen, and treatment duration were independent risk factors for relapse. Progression to end-stage renal disease was developed in only a patient. In conclusion, more than two-thirds of adult-onset nephrotic MCD patients experienced relapse, although their renal progression was rare. Younger onset age, CS without cyclophosphamide treatment, and shorter treatment duration were independent risk factors for relapse in adult-onset MCD patients

  5. Predictors of Relapse in Adult-Onset Nephrotic Minimal Change Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hajeong; Yoo, Kyung Don; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Dong Ki; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Joo, Kwon Wook; Kim, Yon Su; Ahn, Curie; Han, Jin Suk; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-03-01

    Minimal change disease (MCD) is a well-known benign primary glomerulonephritis because of its distinct rare tendency to progress to end-stage renal disease. However, factors associated with relapse in adults are not well known. We aimed to identify predictors of relapse in adult-onset MCD patients.A retrospective cohort of 195 patients with adult-onset primary MCD with nephritic syndrome and disease onset between 1979 and 2013 was followed up for >12 months. The number of relapses was counted and predictors of relapse were analyzed.A total of 195 patients were included. Median age at diagnosis was 38 years (IQR, 23-53 years) and 113 (57.9%) were men. During 81 months (IQR, 44-153 months) of follow-up, 92% of patients achieved remission after initial treatment. However, only 60 (32.8%) did not experience a relapse and 11 patients failed to remit. Among the remaining 124 patients, 65 experienced a relapse once or twice and 59 experienced a relapse more than twice. Younger onset age, increased severity of nephrotic features such as lower serum albumin levels and higher cholesterol level were associated with relapse. Interestingly, the grade of mesangial proliferation was lower in patients who experienced a relapse. Initial combined treatment with corticosteroids (CS) and cyclophosphamide reduced the number of relapses. In addition, patients with shorter treatment duration tended to experience relapse more often. Multivariate analysis showed that younger onset age, combined mesangial proliferation, initial treatment regimen, and treatment duration were independent risk factors for relapse. Progression to end-stage renal disease was developed in only a patient.In conclusion, more than two-thirds of adult-onset nephrotic MCD patients experienced relapse, although their renal progression was rare. Younger onset age, CS without cyclophosphamide treatment, and shorter treatment duration were independent risk factors for relapse in adult-onset MCD patients.

  6. Adult-onset Nemaline Myopathy Coexisting With Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingling; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanxia; Li, Nianchun; Qiu, Guoping; Luo, Yun; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder which is characterized by fluctuating muscle fatigue. However, the association of MG with nemaline myopathy is rarely reported. Here we report a case of MG coexisting with adult-onset nemaline myopathy. A 55-year-old man endured fluctuating muscle weakness with positive acetylcholine receptor and titin antibodies. After the patient was administrated cholinergic drugs and immunosuppression, the muscle weakness of the patient had mildly been alleviated. Electromyography showed a progressive decrement in the amplitude of muscle action potential at low frequency. Muscle biopsy showed numerous nemalines in the muscle fibers. This is the first reported case of nemalines present in the muscle fibers of adult patient with MG. The pathogenesis of nemaline may be related to titin antibody in adult-onset nemaline myopathy with MG. PMID:26825889

  7. Childhood- and adult-onset lupus: an update of similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Papadimitraki, Eva D; Isenberg, David A

    2009-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune rheumatic disease. Although its highest prevalence is among women of childbearing age, the disease is not confined within this population. A total of 15-20% of cases of SLE are diagnosed in children younger than 16 years (childhood-onset lupus). Although there have been few studies directly comparing childhood- to adult-onset lupus, there is substantial evidence to suggest that pediatric lupus patients display some differences in their disease profile compared with adult-onset populations. Overall, an increased male-to-female ratio, a higher prevalence of nephritis and CNS involvement necessitating a more sustained need for steroids and immnosuppressive drugs, and a higher prevalence of progression to end-stage renal disease are distinguishing features of childhood-onset lupus. In contrast, a higher prevalence of pulmonary involvement, arthritis and discoid lupus are reported in adult-onset SLE patients. Furthermore, childhood-onset lupus patients may experience a serious negative impact on their psychosocial and physical development, issues that pose extra challenges to healthcare providers. Growth delay, osteoporosis, the psychological effect of steroid-induced alterations of the physical image, and often poor treatment compliance are the issues that need to be addressed in pediatric lupus populations. In this review, we compare the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory features, and treatment options of childhood- and adult-onset lupus, and comment on the applicability of the instruments that measure activity, severity and cumulative disease damage in childhood-onset disease. In addition, we highlight special issues of concern for pediatric lupus patients, discussing the significance in the transition from pediatric to adult rheumatology care.

  8. Adult-onset laryngomalacia: case reports and review of management.

    PubMed

    Hey, Shi Ying; Oozeer, Nashreen Banon; Robertson, Stuart; MacKenzie, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Laryngomalacia is a dynamic airway condition characterised by inward collapse of flaccid supraglottic structures during inspiration. Although the most common cause of stridor in the paediatric population, adult-onset laryngomalacia remains a rare entity and its management, challenging. Two cases of adult-onset laryngomalacia are reported. A review of the English literature is performed and additional publications identified by hand-searching relevant papers; 13 case reports/series comprising 28 cases of adult-onset laryngomalacia were identified, divided into two main groups: idiopathic (6/28) and acquired (22/28). The aetiology of the acquired form includes neurological, traumatic and iatrogenic. Reported therapeutic measures used are laser supraglottoplasty, epiglottopexy, partial epiglottidectomy, defunctioning tracheostomy and intubation whilst correcting the underlying cause. The majority of patients only required one therapeutic procedure (follow-up of 2-24 months). A strong index of suspicion is required to diagnose adult-onset laryngomalacia aided by in-office laryngoscopy. The rarity of this condition prevents management-based randomised controlled trials. PMID:24615649

  9. Alcohol-Induced Developmental Origins of Adult-Onset Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Emilie R; Washburn, Shannon E; Golding, Michael C; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C; Ramadoss, Jayanth

    2016-07-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure may impair growth, development, and function of multiple organ systems and is encompassed by the term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Research has so far focused on the mechanisms, prevention, and diagnosis of FASD, while the risk for adult-onset chronic diseases in individuals exposed to alcohol in utero is not well explored. David Barker's hypothesis on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) suggests that insults to the milieu of the developing fetus program it for adult development of chronic diseases. In the 25 years since the introduction of this hypothesis, epidemiological and animal model studies have made significant advancements in identifying in utero developmental origins of chronic adult-onset diseases affecting cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and psychobehavioral systems. Teratogen exposure is an established programming agent for adult diseases, and recent studies suggest that prenatal alcohol exposure correlates with adult onset of neurobehavioral deficits, cardiovascular disease, endocrine dysfunction, and nutrient homeostasis instability, warranting additional investigation of alcohol-induced DOHaD, as well as patient follow-up well into adulthood for affected individuals. In utero epigenetic alterations during critical periods of methylation are a key potential mechanism for programming and susceptibility of adult-onset chronic diseases, with imprinted genes affecting metabolism being critical targets. Additional studies in epidemiology, phenotypic characterization in response to timing, dose, and duration of exposure, as well as elucidation of mechanisms underlying FASD-DOHaD inter relation, are thus needed to clinically define chronic disease associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. These studies are critical to establish interventional strategies that decrease incidence of these adult-onset diseases and promote healthier aging among individuals affected with FASD. PMID:27254466

  10. Alcohol-Induced Developmental Origins of Adult-Onset Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Emilie R; Washburn, Shannon E; Golding, Michael C; Bake, Shameena; Miranda, Rajesh C; Ramadoss, Jayanth

    2016-07-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure may impair growth, development, and function of multiple organ systems and is encompassed by the term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Research has so far focused on the mechanisms, prevention, and diagnosis of FASD, while the risk for adult-onset chronic diseases in individuals exposed to alcohol in utero is not well explored. David Barker's hypothesis on Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) suggests that insults to the milieu of the developing fetus program it for adult development of chronic diseases. In the 25 years since the introduction of this hypothesis, epidemiological and animal model studies have made significant advancements in identifying in utero developmental origins of chronic adult-onset diseases affecting cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and psychobehavioral systems. Teratogen exposure is an established programming agent for adult diseases, and recent studies suggest that prenatal alcohol exposure correlates with adult onset of neurobehavioral deficits, cardiovascular disease, endocrine dysfunction, and nutrient homeostasis instability, warranting additional investigation of alcohol-induced DOHaD, as well as patient follow-up well into adulthood for affected individuals. In utero epigenetic alterations during critical periods of methylation are a key potential mechanism for programming and susceptibility of adult-onset chronic diseases, with imprinted genes affecting metabolism being critical targets. Additional studies in epidemiology, phenotypic characterization in response to timing, dose, and duration of exposure, as well as elucidation of mechanisms underlying FASD-DOHaD inter relation, are thus needed to clinically define chronic disease associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. These studies are critical to establish interventional strategies that decrease incidence of these adult-onset diseases and promote healthier aging among individuals affected with FASD.

  11. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  12. [A case of very slowly progressive, high-cervical spondylotic myelopathy presenting with symmetric deep sensory deficits in the palms].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Yamamoto, T

    1995-09-01

    We report a case of very slowly progressive, high-cervical spondylotic myelopathy with symmetrical deep sensory deficits in the palms. A 76-year-old man began to feel tingling sensation in the second fingers of the bilateral hands 30 years prior to admission. The abnormal sensation spread from the first to the third fingers, and subsequently all over the palms. He noticed intermittent sharp pain in the dermatomes of C4 and 5 bilaterally from his late sixties, and later he developed clumsiness of fine finger movements. In recent years he experienced stiffness in the thighs while walking. On neurological examination, there was a mild sensory deficits in light touch over the bilateral palms, while perception of temperature and pain was normal. Vibration sense was severely and position sense mildly impaired. Discriminative sensation, including graphesthesia, stereognosis, two-point discrimination and texture recognition, was severely impaired over the bilateral palms. On the other hand, all modalities of sensation were normal in the lower limbs. Gross motor dysfunction, such as weakness of limbs, amyotrophy or gait disturbance, was not present. He did not show limb ataxia, but the dexterity of his fingers was severely impaired. Deep tendon reflexes were mildly increased except for the Achilles tendons that were hyporeactive. Plantar responses were flexor bilaterally. Nerve conduction study revealed giant F waves and H reflexes by stimulations of the median and ulnar nerves bilaterally.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Higher body mass index in adults at diagnosis of the slowly progressive form of type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with lower risk HLA genes.

    PubMed

    Fourlanos, S; Elkassaby, S; Varney, M D; Colman, P G; Harrison, L C

    2014-06-01

    We hypothesised that higher body weight, a proposed risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, would be associated with increased penetrance of lower risk genes. In adults at diagnosis of the slowly progressive form of type 1 diabetes mellitus we found that higher body mass index was associated with the absence of the highest risk HLA genes.

  14. Two new human {beta}-galactosidase gene mutations in American patients with slowly progressive G{sub M1} gangliosidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shalish, C.; Breakefield, X.O.; Kaye, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    Two cases with slowly progressive forms of G{sub M1} gangliosidosis were each found to have a novel mutation for the {beta}-galactosidase gene. AS (died at 4 yr) began with symptoms at 8 months ({beta}-galactosidase activity 10% normal) and HS (59 yr) developed dystronic hand movements at age 3 yr ({beta}-galactosidase activity < 2% of normal controls). The entire 2.4 coding region was sequenced in both directions for each patient using RT-PCR. First strand cDNA was synthesized from fibroblast RNA and double stranded PCR fragments spanning the coding region were made with oligonucleotide primers. Sequencing was performed using asymmetric PCR products made from each double stranded product. Case AS was found to have a nine base-pair insertion [CAGAATTTT] on one allele beginning at nucleotide position 730, which did not result in a frameshift and is predicted to cause the insertion of three amino acids (Glu-Phe-Ser) between amino acids 44-45. No other mutations in the coding region were identified on this or the other allele in this individual. Case HS had a unique point mutation identified in one allele. This mutation was an A{r_arrow}G transition at nucleotide 797 which results in a Asn{r_arrow}Ser amino acid substitution in codon 266 (mutation N266S) with no other mutations found in the expressed RNA sequences. SSCP was performed on a 200 bp region surrounding codon 266 using genomic DNA from over 50 controls to look for changes in nucleotide sequence. Only case HS demonstrated a shift indicating that the base pair change did not represent a normal polymorphism.

  15. Adult-onset bulbar ptosis in Joubert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Benjamin; Levine, Johanan; Le, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In this case report, we describe a case of adult-onset bulbar ptosis in a patient with Joubert syndrome. Joubert syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with malformations in cerebellum and brainstem. Many ocular abnormalities have been noted in Joubert syndrome, but the association of this syndrome with adult-onset ptosis has not been described to date. This 24-year-old Joubert patient developed a cerebrospinal fluid cyst in her midbrain. She had signs of bilateral third nerve palsy and abducens palsy in the left eye. The bilateral central third nerve palsy causing functional blindness secondary to severe bilateral levator palsy was treated successfully with silicone sling frontalis suspension, as the seventh nerve nucleus was not involved. PMID:22291457

  16. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  17. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14-17 years in females and 16-19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  18. Adult-Onset Acquired Partial Lipodystrophy Accompanied by Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Yusuke; Fujimura, Taku; Kakizaki, Aya; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Kusakari, Yoshiyuki; Aiba, Setsuya

    2015-01-01

    Lipodystrophy is a group of metabolic disorders, possibly caused by autoimmune disease. In this report, we describe a case of adult-onset acquired partial lipodystrophy accompanied by rheumatoid arthritis without a family history. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining revealed dense infiltration of IL-27-producing cells as well as MMP-7-and MMP-28-expressing cells, both of which have been reported to facilitate the development of autoimmune disease. Our present case might suggest possible mechanisms for acquired partial lipodystrophy. PMID:26034476

  19. Office Work Exposures and Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Maritta S.; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Office exposures have been linked to symptoms of sick building syndrome, but their relation to the development of asthma has not been studied previously. These exposures have increasing importance because an increasing proportion of the workforce is working in office environments. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the relations of exposure to carbonless copy paper (CCP), paper dust, and fumes from photocopiers and printers to adult-onset asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based incident case–control study of adults 21–63 years of age living in the Pirkanmaa District in South Finland. All new clinically diagnosed cases (n = 521) of asthma were recruited during a 3-year study period. A random sample of the source population formed the controls (n = 1,016). This part focused on 133 cases and 316 controls who were office workers according to their current occupation classified by the 1988 International Standard Classification of Occupations. All participants answered a questionnaire on health, smoking, occupation, and exposures at work and home. Subjects with previous asthma were excluded. Results Exposures to paper dust [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25–3.10] and CCP (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.03–2.66) were related to significantly increased risk of adult-onset asthma. An exposure–response relation was observed between exposure to paper dust and risk of asthma. Conclusions This study provides new evidence that exposures to paper dust and CCP in office work are related to increased risk of adult-onset asthma. Reduction of these exposures could prevent asthma in office workers. Clinicians seeing asthma patients should be aware of this link to office exposures. PMID:17637914

  20. Adult-Onset Still's Disease: From Pathophysiology to Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mavragani, Clio P.; Spyridakis, Evangelos G.; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting primarily young individuals. The diagnosis is primarily clinical and necessitates the exclusion of a wide range of mimicking disorders. Given the lack of solid data in regard to the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms, treatment of AOSD has been for years largely empirical. Recent advances have revealed a pivotal role of several proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-18 (IL-18) in disease pathogenesis, giving rise to the development of new targeted therapies aiming at optimal disease control. PMID:22792508

  1. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  2. Associated Markers for Adult-onset Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Ramses-Bedolla-Pulido, Tonatiuh; Fabiola-García-Padilla, Lourdes; Hernández-Colín, Dante

    2015-10-01

    The clinical behavior of asthma varies with age at onset. This study was undertaken to identify associated markers of adult-onset allergic asthma (age ≥20 years).This cross-sectional study compared two groups: 58 patients with asthma onset at ≥20 years and 66 with onset at ≥20 years. They were compared depending on results of clinical history, and body mass index (BMI), aeroallergen sensitization, total serum IgE, eosinophil count, asthma control test, and asthma severity level.Ages at first asthma episode were 10.0 ± 6.6 and 33.4 ± 10.5 (p<0.001) in the <20 and ≥20 group, respectively. BMI was higher in adult asthmatic subjects (29.8 versus 27.1, P=0.017), but BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) was not associated with asthma onset in ≥20 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.759 to 3.211; p= 0.227). After multivariate analysis, allergic rhinitis and IgE ≥150 IU/mL were negatively correlated with asthma onset in ≥20 years old (OR adjusted [ORa] = 0.255, 95% CI 0.078 to 0.837, P= 0.024, and ORa =0.385, 95% CI 0.175 to 0.849, p= 0.018, respectively).Adult-onset allergic asthma was not different from early-onset asthma. PMID:26742445

  3. Coats’ disease of adult-onset in 48 eyes

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Ekta; Rishi, Pukhraj; Appukuttan, Bindu; Uparkar, Mahesh; Sharma, Tarun; Gopal, Lingam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coats’ disease diagnosed in adulthood is an idiopathic, retinal exudative vascular disease without an inciting factor and has retinal features different from the childhood disease. Aim: To describe clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of eyes with Coats’ disease first diagnosed in patients 35 years or older. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients first diagnosed with Coats’ disease at the age of 35 years or more at a tertiary eye care center between January 1995 and 2012. Eyes with retinal exudation or Coats’-like response from secondary causes were excluded. Results: Forty-five of 646 patients (7%) diagnosed with Coats’ disease had adult-onset disease. Mean age at presentation was 47 years. Systemic hypertension was the most common (22%) systemic association and decreased vision the predominant presenting feature (83%). Localized (<6 clock h) presentation (74%) was unique to adults as against diffuse involvement (69%) in children (P < 0.001). Eyes were treated with laser photocoagulation 29 (60%), cryotherapy (4%), or both (2%) with surgical intervention in three (6%) eyes. Following treatment eight (35%) eyes improved, 11 (48%) eyes were stable while four (12%) eyes worsened due to complications. Conclusion: Adult-onset Coats’ disease has less extensive involvement, more benign natural course, and a more favorable treatment outcome as against the childhood-onset disease. The bilateral presentation emphasizes the need for regular follow-up to detect possible future involvement of the fellow eye. PMID:27609165

  4. Associated Markers for Adult-onset Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Ramses-Bedolla-Pulido, Tonatiuh; Fabiola-García-Padilla, Lourdes; Hernández-Colín, Dante

    2015-10-01

    The clinical behavior of asthma varies with age at onset. This study was undertaken to identify associated markers of adult-onset allergic asthma (age ≥20 years).This cross-sectional study compared two groups: 58 patients with asthma onset at ≥20 years and 66 with onset at ≥20 years. They were compared depending on results of clinical history, and body mass index (BMI), aeroallergen sensitization, total serum IgE, eosinophil count, asthma control test, and asthma severity level.Ages at first asthma episode were 10.0 ± 6.6 and 33.4 ± 10.5 (p<0.001) in the <20 and ≥20 group, respectively. BMI was higher in adult asthmatic subjects (29.8 versus 27.1, P=0.017), but BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) was not associated with asthma onset in ≥20 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.759 to 3.211; p= 0.227). After multivariate analysis, allergic rhinitis and IgE ≥150 IU/mL were negatively correlated with asthma onset in ≥20 years old (OR adjusted [ORa] = 0.255, 95% CI 0.078 to 0.837, P= 0.024, and ORa =0.385, 95% CI 0.175 to 0.849, p= 0.018, respectively).Adult-onset allergic asthma was not different from early-onset asthma.

  5. Adult-onset autosomal recessive ataxia associated with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 5 gene (CLN5) mutations.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Cecilia; Nassani, Stefano; Guo, Yiran; Chen, Yulan; Giorgio, Elisa; Brussino, Alessandro; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Cavalieri, Simona; Lo Buono, Nicola; Funaro, Ada; Pizio, Nicola Renato; Nmezi, Bruce; Kyttala, Aija; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Padiath, Quasar Salem; Hakonarson, Hakon; Zhang, Hao; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive inherited ataxias are a growing group of genetic disorders. We report two Italian siblings presenting in their mid-50s with difficulty in walking, dysarthria and progressive cognitive decline. Visual loss, ascribed to glaucoma, manifested a few years before the other symptoms. Brain MRI showed severe cerebellar atrophy, prevalent in the vermis, with marked cortical atrophy of both hemispheres. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous mutation (c.935G > A;p.Ser312Asn) in the ceroid neuronal lipofuscinosis type 5 gene (CLN5). Bioinformatics predictions and in vitro studies showed that the mutation was deleterious and likely affects ER-lysosome protein trafficking. Our findings support CLN5 hypomorphic mutations cause autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, confirming other reports showing CLN mutations are associated with adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. We suggest CLN genes should be considered in the molecular analyses of patients presenting with adult-onset autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia.

  6. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  7. Comparing illness presentation, treatment and functioning between patients with adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis.

    PubMed

    Hui, Christy Lai-Ming; Li, Adrienne Wing-Yee; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit-Wa; Lee, Edwin Ho-Ming; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai

    2014-12-30

    Studies have shown that early- and adult-onset schizophrenia patients differ in pre-morbid traits, illness presentation, psychopathology, and prognosis. We aimed to compare adult-onset patients (age range 26-55 years) with an adolescent-onset cohort (15-25 years) in demographics, illness presentation and functioning at baseline. Participants were from two territory-wide early intervention services for adolescent-onset (n=671) and adult-onset psychosis patients (n=360) in Hong Kong. The adolescent-onset cohort had their initial psychotic episode from 2001-2003; retrospective data collection was done through systematic case note review. The adult-onset cohort was recruited for a larger interventional study from 2009-2011; information was collected via face-to-face interviews. Adult-onset psychosis was significantly associated with more females, more smokers, more non-local birth, more full-time employment, better functioning, poorer medication adherence, more psychiatric hospitalization and fewer with schizophrenia than adolescent-onset psychosis (mean age: 20.4). The effect sizes were small, except for medication adherence where a robust effect was found. No group difference in DUP was found. The finding that adult-onset patients had better functioning challenges the view that adolescent- and adult-onset psychoses share a similar prognostic trajectory. Implications for adapting intervention processes for adolescent- and adult-onset psychosis are discussed.

  8. Adult-onset hypothyroidism in a lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Greer, Leah L; Troutman, Mitchell; McCracken, Malcolm D; Ramsay, Edward C

    2003-09-01

    A 19-yr-old female lynx (Lynx canadensis) presented for an acute onset of anorexia and reluctance to move. Physical examination, radiography, hematology, and serum biochemistry revealed evidence of renal failure, presumptive uremic gastritis, chronic intervertebral disk disease at T13-L1, and markedly low serum levels of total thyroxine (1.54 nmol/L) and total triixodothyronine (0.55 nmol/L). Twenty-five hours after its original presentation, the lynx exhibited horizontal nystagmus, which has been suggested as a clinical sign associated with hypothyroidism in domestic dogs. The lynx was euthanatized because of poor prognosis, and medical management concerns related to its chronic renal failure. Necropsy examination substantiated that the lynx had true hypothyroidism with 60-90% of the thyroid gland replaced with adipose tissue. Although feline adult-onset hypothyroidism may have low incidence, it should still be considered as a cause of nonspecific signs of disease in cats, as well as signs suggestive of hypothyroidism. Routine monitoring of baseline exotic felid thyroid levels throughout life would help to identify normal values and diagnose a potential disease that has obscure clinical signs.

  9. Type II (adult onset) citrullinaemia: clinical pictures and the therapeutic effect of liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, S; Yazaki, M; Takei, Y; Ikegami, T; Hashikura, Y; Kawasaki, S; Iwai, M; Kobayashi, K; Saheki, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Adult onset type II citrullinemia is an inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by a deficiency of liver specific argininosuccinate synthetase activity. Most of the patients with this disease were reported in Japan and therefore, this disease has not been well recognised outside this country. The detailed clinical pictures of the patients with type II citrullinaemia are reported and their outcomes after liver transplantation referred to.
METHODS—Ten patients with this disease were evaluated. Seven of them underwent liver transplants using a graft obtained from a healthy family member.
RESULTS—There were six men and four women; the age of onset of encephalopathy ranged from 17 to 51 years. The initial symptom in nine patients was sudden onset disturbance of consciousness, and one patient had long been regarded as having a chronic progressive psychotic illness. High concentrations of plasma citrulline and ammonia were commonly seen on admission. Although brain CT or MRI lacked any consistent findings, the EEG was abnormal in all patients, showing diffuse slow waves. Additionally, in five patients chronic pancreatitis preceded the onset of encephalopathy. After liver transplantation the metabolic abnormalities, including abnormal plasma concentrations of citrulline and ammonia, were immediately corrected and all neuropsychic symptoms soon disappeared, except for impaired cognitive function in one patient. Six out of these seven patients returned to their previous social lives, including work.
CONCLUSIONS—The clinical concept of adult onset type II citrullinaemia coincides well with the range of hepatic encephalopathy, and liver transplantation is a very promising therapeutic approach.

 PMID:11606680

  10. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  11. Memory Loss and Frontal Cognitive Dysfunction in a Patient with Adult-onset Neuronal Intranuclear Inclusion Disease.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Sone, Jun; Fujioka, Yusuke; Masuda, Michihito; Ohdake, Reiko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is an uncommon progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Adult-onset NIID can result in prominent dementia. We herein describe the case of a 74-year-old man who presented with dementia, cerebellar ataxia, neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed hyperintensity of the corticomedullary junction. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed frontal-dominant white matter hyperintensity. NIID was diagnosed from the presence of intranuclear inclusions in a skin biopsy sample. Neuropsychological testing revealed memory loss and frontal cognitive dysfunction, especially in relation to language and executive functions. We were therefore able to confirm the association of NIID with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27523009

  12. Adult-onset nemaline rods in a patient treated for suspected dermatomyositis: study with two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Danon, M.J.; Giometti, C.S.; Manaligod, J.R.; Perurena, O.H.; Skosey, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    A 65-year-old woman with progressive muscle weakness and a diffuse rash of three years' duration was examined. Muscle tissue was studied with histochemical techniques, phase-contrast microscopy, electron microscopy, and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Histochemical studies showed numerous nemaline rods, with a normal ratio of types I and II fibers. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed abnormalities in the myosin light chain and tropomyosin protein patterns when compared with normal and diseased muscle biopsy samples, including those from two patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis.

  13. Phonological recoding, visual short-term store and the effect of unattended speech: evidence from a case of slowly progressive anarthria.

    PubMed

    Papagno, Costanza; Lucchelli, Federica; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Phonological processing and short-term memory were investigated in a patient with slowly progressive anarthria. The patient, who had an auditory-verbal span in the lower unimpaired range, showed preserved phonological similarity and word length effects with auditory presentation. These phonological effects of immediate retention were absent with visual input. The patient was also unable to perform phonological judgments on written verbal material. Under unattended speech interference her visual span improved, with an increase of visual confusion errors. In the light of a model including a main auditory-verbal storage component (the phonological short-term input store, STS), and a rehearsal process, that, after phonological recoding, conveys visually presented verbal material to the phonological STS, the patient's pattern of impairment is interpreted as a selective deficit in the process of phonological recoding. This prevents visual-verbal material from accessing the phonological STS, that is, therefore, insulated from visual inputs. PMID:18387560

  14. Successful treatment of adult-onset erythromelalgia with steroid pulse and pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Aya; Fujimura, Taku; Kambayashi, Yumi; Watabe, Akiko; Aiba, Setsuya

    2012-09-01

    Adult-onset erythromelalgia (EM) is a rare disease characterized by episodic bouts of burning pain and erythema for which the optimal therapy is unclear. In this report, we describe a 68-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset EM. Intravenous administration of methylprednisolone sodium succinate 1,000 mg/day dramatically improved her pain as evaluated by the visual analog scale. Although the patient's pain gradually developed again, it could be controlled with pregabalin. Our present case might suggest a possible, optimal therapy for adult-onset EM. PMID:23275767

  15. Successful Treatment of Adult-Onset Erythromelalgia with Steroid Pulse and Pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Kakizaki, Aya; Fujimura, Taku; Kambayashi, Yumi; Watabe, Akiko; Aiba, Setsuya

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset erythromelalgia (EM) is a rare disease characterized by episodic bouts of burning pain and erythema for which the optimal therapy is unclear. In this report, we describe a 68-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset EM. Intravenous administration of methylprednisolone sodium succinate 1,000 mg/day dramatically improved her pain as evaluated by the visual analog scale. Although the patient's pain gradually developed again, it could be controlled with pregabalin. Our present case might suggest a possible, optimal therapy for adult-onset EM. PMID:23275767

  16. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it causes a severe decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Over time, motor skills are affected, ... Schmahmann JD. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations. Brain Pathol. 2009 Jan; ...

  17. [Kimura's disease: an unrecognized cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease].

    PubMed

    Shehwaro, N; Langlois, A-L; Gueutin, V; Debchi, L; Charlotte, F; Rouvier, P; Rottembourg, J; Izzedine, H

    2014-02-01

    Kimura's disease (KD) is an angiolymphoid proliferative disorder of soft tissue with eosinophilia, with a predilection for head and neck regions in young Oriental men. Kidney disease is thought to be rare in KD. About a case of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease, we comment Kimura's disease and its associated kidney damage. Kimura disease should be suspected and included in the diagnosis of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease.

  18. [Adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingfei

    2015-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by spiking fevers, arthritis/ arthralgias, typical salmon-colored bumpy rash, pharyngalgia, myalgia and possible involvement of visceral organs. The diagnosis is exclusively based on clinical symptoms, according to the criteria, after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or other autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. This report includes one case of adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia. PMID:26647549

  19. Adult Onset Vitiligo: Multivariate Analysis Suggests the Need for a Thyroid Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, L.; Cammi, A.; Dragoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of age at onset on disease features in vitiligo. Objectives. To identify factors associated with adult onset vitiligo in comparison with childhood onset vitiligo. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively collected medical records of 191 patients. Such records included clinical examination, personal and familial medical history, laboratory evaluations, concomitant vitiligo treatment and drug assumption. Results. 123 patients with a disease onset after the age of 40 (adult onset vitiligo) were compared with 68 patients who developed vitiligo before the age of 12 (childhood onset vitiligo). Multivariate analysis revealed that personal history of thyroid diseases (P = 0.04; OR 0.4), stress at onset (P = 0.002; OR = 0.34), personal history of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) (P = 0.003; OR = 0.23), and thyroid nodules (P = 0.001; OR 0.90) were independently associated with adult onset vitiligo, whereas family history of dermatological diseases (P = 0.003; OR = 2.87) and Koebner phenomenon (P < 0.001; OR = 4.73) with childhood onset vitiligo. Moreover, in the adult onset group, concomitant thyroid disease preceded vitiligo in a statistically significant number of patients (P = 0.014). Conclusions. Childhood onset and adult onset vitiligo have different clinical features. In particular, ATD and thyroid nodules were significantly associated with adult onset vitiligo, suggesting that a thyroid screening should be recommended in this group of patients. PMID:27747240

  20. Health-related quality of life in sporadic adult-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Abele, Michael; Klockgether, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Despite progressive disability in sporadic adult-onset ataxia (SAOA), little is known about patients' assessment of their ataxic disorder and its impact on health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL). This study investigated Hr-QoL by means of the following self-administered scales: Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Medical Outcome Study Short Form (SF-36). Twenty-two unselected ataxia patients were included. Sleep-related complaints were found in 9 (41%) of 22 and symptoms of depression in 6 (38%) of 16 patients. Compared to a large german control group, SAOA patients had lower scores in all SF-36 dimensions except for bodily pain. The greatest impairment was found in the domain physical functioning, followed by the domains social functioning and role limitations (emotional problems). There was a significant negative correlation of all nonmotor SF-36 dimensions with the BDI score. Walking aid dependency was significantly correlated with poorer health status perception in several motor and nonmotor domains. In addition, impaired sleep quality was correlated with an impaired general health perception and with bodily pain. The study demonstrates a great impact of SAOA on Hr-QoL. Adequate treatment of depression, motor disability, and impaired sleep quality is essential to improve Hr-QoL in ataxic patients. PMID:17149704

  1. Neural regulation of acid maltase in an unusual adult onset deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meola, G; Sansone, V; Rotondo, G; Radice, S; Sterlicchio, M; Mauri, M; Bresolin, N; Moggio, M

    1994-01-01

    In a 48-year-old female, the first symptoms apparently manifested themselves 18 years before, with occasional tripping and weakness in both legs. During the next 18 years, weakness progressed and the patient developed a waddling gait; she became unable to rise from a lying or seated position unassisted and the shoulder girdle also became affected. Neurological examination revealed limb and shoulder girdle predominantly involving the lower extremities. We established cell cultures from muscle biopsy specimens obtained from our patient and carried out morphological analysis which, although aspecific, demonstrated clear signs of neurogenic suffering. This was confirmed in EMG studies performed. Biochemical analysis revealed very low acid maltase residual activity. We describe an unusual case of adult-onset acid maltase deficiency (AMD) with neurogenic atrophy and low residual activity. Innervated myofibres prepared by co-culturing the patient's myoblasts, with spinal cord foetal mouse explants were not associated with an abnormal in vitro maturation of the innervated myofibres as expected by the very low residual enzymatic activity found both in the muscle biopsy specimens and in the muscle cultures. There is strong suggestion that factors other than the amount of residual activity must be involved to determine the clinical manifestation of this disease.

  2. Exponential increase of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody titer after initiating and stopping insulin in a patient with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akihiro; Nagasawa, Kaoru; Okubo, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Mori, Yasumichi

    2015-01-01

    Few articles have described fluctuations in glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADAb) levels after a diagnosis of slowly progressive type 1 diabetes (SPIDDM). Here, we present a case in which GADAb levels exponentially increased after initiating and stopping insulin. A 64-year-old female patient newly diagnosed with SPIDDM was admitted and started multiple daily insulin injections. The patient's GADAb titer was 6.9 U/mL (normal: <1.4 U/mL) and the patient had a type 1 diabetes susceptible HLA class II haplotype known in the Japanese population as: DRB1*04:05-DQB1*04:01. When the patient's "honeymoon period" set in, hypoglycemia was observed and the dose of insulin was reduced. Two months after the diagnosis, 1 unit of insulin glargine/day was being injected and the patient demonstrated good glycemic control. Subsequently, the patient's home doctor recommended that insulin injections be stopped. Three months after the diagnosis, the patient's GADAb titer suddenly increased to 1600 U/mL. The patient's GADAb titer decreased but was still positive (40 U/mL) 36 months after diagnosis. HbA1c levels were maintained below 7%, and oral glucose tolerance tests at 10, 26, and 36 months after diagnosis suggested that the patient had preserved insulin secretion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that describes exponential increases in GADAb after initiating and stopping insulin in a patient with SPIDDM.

  3. Mutations in CIZ1 cause adult-onset primary cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Uitti, Ryan J.; Zhao, Yu; Vemula, Satya R.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Auburger, Georg; Leube, Barbara; Lehnhoff, Katja; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Primary dystonia is usually of adult onset, can be familial, and frequently involves the cervical musculature. Our goal was to identify the causal mutation in a family with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia. Methods Linkage and haplotype analyses were combined with solution-based whole-exome capture and massively parallel sequencing in a large Caucasian pedigree with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia to identify a cosegregating mutation. High-throughput screening and Sanger sequencing were completed in 308 Caucasians with familial or sporadic adult-onset cervical dystonia and matching controls for sequence variants in this mutant gene. Results Exome sequencing led to the identification of an exonic splicing enhancer mutation in Exon 7 of CIZ1 (c.790A>G, p.S264G) which encodes CIZ1, Cip1-interacting zinc finger protein 1. CIZ1 is a p21Cip1/Waf1-interacting zinc finger protein expressed in brain and involved in DNA synthesis and cell-cycle control. Using a minigene assay, we showed that c.790A>G altered CIZ1 splicing patterns. The p.S264G mutation also altered the nuclear localization of CIZ1. Screening in subjects with adult-onset cervical dystonia identified two additional CIZ1 missense mutations (p.P47S and p.R672M). Interpretation Mutations in CIZ1 may cause adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia, possibly by precipitating neurodevelopmental abnormalities that manifest in adults and/or G1/S cell-cycle dysregulation in the mature central nervous system. PMID:22447717

  4. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  5. Sandhoff disease mimicking adult-onset bulbospinal neuronopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P K; Young, E; King, R H

    1989-01-01

    A 32 year old male is described with an onset of upper limb postural tremor in adolescence followed by muscle cramps. Progressive proximal amyotrophy and weakness in the limbs developed late in the third decade. Examination disclosed, in addition, bilateral facial weakness and mild dysarthria. Enzyme studies revealed hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, indicating a diagnosis of Sandhoff disease. Intra-axonal membranocytoplasmic bodies were present in a rectal biopsy. The presentation, which resembled that of X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy, widens the clinical spectrum for disorders related to G(M2) gangliosidosis. Images PMID:2795083

  6. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  7. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV.

    PubMed

    Akman, H Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K H; Finegold, Milton J; Dimauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J

    2011-11-15

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5-20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1(neo/neo)) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1(-/-)), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  8. Adult-Onset Antisocial Behavior Trajectories: Associations with Adolescent Family Processes and Emerging Adulthood Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Guided by conceptual and empirical work on emerging adulthood, this study investigated the role of closeness to mother and father and behavioral autonomy during adolescence on the development of adult-onset antisocial behavior. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we identified four aggressive…

  9. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  10. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  11. A multi-hit endocrine model of intrinsic adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard L

    2008-04-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that adult-onset asthma is initiated by stress (anxiety and depression), obesity and menopause. Ironically, despite our understanding of the various stressors that promote chronic adult-onset asthma, most of which are known to elevate cortisol production via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, inhaled and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay for the treatment of chronic asthma. This implicates other endocrine or cellular changes independent of cortisol synthesis in non-allergic adult-onset asthma. The mechanism by which corticosteroids are thought to modulate bronchial tone in relieving asthma is via corticosteroid-responsive genes that increase PGE(2) and cAMP production which promote muscle relaxation. Therefore, any physiological condition that suppresses intracellular PGE(2) and cAMP production would counter cortisol-induced muscle relaxation and potentially trigger non-allergic adult-onset asthma. Stress, obesity and menopause act on three interrelated endocrine pathways, the serotonergic, leptinergic and hypothalamic pathways, all of which operate through receptors to modulate cAMP and Ca(2+) metabolism in smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We propose that the level of SMC cAMP, as determined by overall signaling through corticosteroid receptors, leptin receptors and the GPCRs of the HPG and serotonergic pathways, will regulate bronchial tone (i.e. the 'Multi-Hit Endocrine Model of Adult-Onset Asthma'). Thus, decreases in HPG (menopause) and serotonergic (depression) signaling and increases in leptinergic (obesity) signaling relative to HPA signaling would decrease cellular SMC cAMP and promote muscle contraction. This model can explain the discrepant epidemiological data associating stress, obesity, depression and menopause with adult-onset asthma and is supported by basic and clinical data. Treatment of depressed or menopausal asthmatics with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or hormone replacement therapy

  12. Childhood Psychosocial Stressors and Adult Onset Arthritis: Broad Spectrum Risk Factors and Allostatic Load

    PubMed Central

    Von Korff, Michael; Alonso, Jordi; Ormel, Johan; Angermeyer, Matthais; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Fleiz, Clara; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Kessler, Ronald C.; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Posada-Villa, José; Scott, Kate M.; Uda, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Neural, endocrine and immune stress mediators are hypothesized to increase risks of diverse chronic diseases, including arthritis. Retrospective data from the World Mental Health Surveys (N=18,309) were employed to assess whether adult onset of arthritis was associated with childhood adversities and early onset psychological disorder. Cox proportional hazard models assessed the association of number of childhood adversities and the presence of early onset psychological disorder with arthritis age of onset. Controlling for age, sex and early onset mental disorder, relative to persons with no childhood adversities, persons with two adversities had increased risk of adult onset arthritis (Hazard ratio=1.27, 95% CI= 1.08, 1.50), while persons with three or more adversities had higher risk (HR=1.44, CI=1.24,1.67). Early onset depressive and/or anxiety disorder was associated with increased risk of adult-onset arthritis after controlling for childhood adversities (HR=1.43, CI=1.28, 1.61). Since psychosocial stressors may be broad spectrum risk factors that increase risks of diverse chronic conditions in later life (e.g., arthritis, heart disease, diabetes, asthma, chronic pain), prospective studies of childhood psychosocial stressors may be most productive if multiple disease outcomes are assessed in the same study. Results from this study provide methodological guidance for future prospective studies of the relationship between childhood psychosocial stressors and subsequent risk of adult onset arthritis. PERSPECTIVE Retrospective reports of early onset mood-anxiety disorder and multiple childhood adversities were independently associated with increased risk of adult onset arthritis. Carrying out prospective studies of these relationships entails significant challenges. Since childhood psychosocial stressors may be broad spectrum risk factors for diverse chronic conditions, multiple disease outcomes should be assessed in prospective studies assessing health consequences

  13. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. [Pathophysiology, subtypes, and treatments of adult-onset Still's disease: An update].

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Sève, P; Hot, A; Broussolle, C; Jamilloux, Y

    2015-05-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare and difficult to diagnose multisystemic disorder considered as a multigenic autoinflammatory syndrome. Its immunopathogenesis seems to be at the crossroads between inflammasomopathies and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, the most severe manifestation of the disease. According to recent insights in the pathophysiology and thanks to cohort studies and therapeutic trials, two phenotypes of adult-onset Still's disease may be distinguished: a systemic pattern, initially highly symptomatic and with a higher risk to exhibit life-threatening complications such as reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, where interleukin-1 blockade seems to be very effective, a chronic articular pattern, more indolent with arthritis in the foreground and less severe systemic manifestations, which would threat functional outcome and where interleukin-6 blockade seems to be more effective. This review focuses on these data.

  15. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database.

  16. Intra-arterial Chemotherapy for Adult Onset Retinoblastoma in a 32-Year-Old Man.

    PubMed

    Magan, Tejal; Khoo, Chloe T L; Jabbour, Pascal M; Fuller, Dwain G; Shields, Carol L

    2016-01-01

    A 32-year-old man with active unilateral group D retinoblastoma that was recurrent following external beam radiotherapy was treated with intra-arterial chemotherapy, leading to tumor regression. Additional plaque radiotherapy and intravitreal chemotherapy were required for complete control. Final visual acuity was 20/40. In selected cases, adult-onset retinoblastoma can be managed with intra-arterial chemotherapy. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e43-e46.]. PMID:27486894

  17. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database. PMID:27581317

  18. Urticaria and dermographism in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Ayabe, Liliane Akemi; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Romiti, Ricardo; Maruta, Celina W

    2012-08-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients typically present with arthralgia, fever, lymphadenopathy and a transient salmon maculopapular rash. Only approximately 25 cases of AOSD with urticaria were described in the literature. In this article, the authors report three additional cases of AOSD with urticarial and dermographic lesions who had a good clinical response to glucocorticoid and antihistamines. A review of the literature concerning this issue is also herein written.

  19. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset still's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes. PMID:26834930

  20. The need for improved detection and management of adult-onset hearing loss in australia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Catherine M; Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Reath, Jennifer; Hickson, Louise; Leeder, Stephen R; Mitchell, Paul; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset hearing loss is insidious and typically diagnosed and managed several years after onset. Often, this is after the loss having led to multiple negative consequences including effects on employment, depressive symptoms, and increased risk of mortality. In contrast, the use of hearing aids is associated with reduced depression, longer life expectancy, and retention in the workplace. Despite this, several studies indicate high levels of unmet need for hearing health services in older adults and poor use of prescribed hearing aids, often leading to their abandonment. In Australia, the largest component of financial cost of hearing loss (excluding the loss of well-being) is due to lost workplace productivity. Nonetheless, the Australian public health system does not have an effective and sustainable hearing screening strategy to tackle the problem of poor detection of adult-onset hearing loss. Given the increasing prevalence and disease burden of hearing impairment in adults, two key areas are not adequately met in the Australian healthcare system: (1) early identification of persons with chronic hearing impairment; (2) appropriate and targeted referral of these patients to hearing health service providers. This paper reviews the current literature, including population-based data from the Blue Mountains Hearing Study, and suggests different models for early detection of adult-onset hearing loss. PMID:23710184

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis.

  2. Pesticide methoxychlor promotes the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease through the female germline.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures.

  3. Pesticide Methoxychlor Promotes the Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult-Onset Disease through the Female Germline

    PubMed Central

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M. Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. PMID:25057798

  4. Bartonella henselae infection presenting with a picture of adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Durey, Areum; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sun Myoung; Baek, JiHyeon; Han, Seung Baik; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture of suggestive for adult-onset Still's Disease (ASOD) due to Bartonella infection. A 42-year-old immunocompetent man was admitted with fever, rash, arthralgia and sore throat. As his clinical picture suggested ASOD except unusual skin manifestation, we treated him on steroid and ibuprofen. His fever and constitutional symptoms responded immediately within 24hrs of commencing therapy, yet rash and leukocytosis remained. Meanwhile, Bartonella infection was proved by culture of bone marrow. Minocyclin treatment started combined with hydroxychloroquine sulfate and the patient discharged with overall improvement. PMID:27000538

  5. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  6. Psychological impact of genetic testing for adult-onset disorders. An update for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Meiser, B; Gleeson, M A; Tucker, K M

    2000-02-01

    Testing for gene mutations that confer susceptibility to adult-onset disorders has potential benefits, but these must be balanced against the psychological harms, if any. We review published findings on the psychological effects of such testing, focusing on Huntington's disease, which has the most available data, and the hereditary cancer syndromes. Most of the evidence suggests that non-carriers and carriers differ significantly in terms of short-term, but not long-term, psychological adjustment to test results. The psychological impact of genetic testing depends more on pretest psychological distress than the test result itself. PMID:10735024

  7. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  8. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  9. Cord Blood Transplantation Following Reduced-intensity Conditioning for Adult-onset Inherited Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Takuro; Kato, Koji; Sakamoto, Keiji; Hayashi, Masayasu; Takashima, Shuichiro; Mori, Yasuo; Takenaka, Katsuto; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Teshima, Takanori; Harada, Naoki; Nagafuji, Koji; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Inherited hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a genetic anomaly disorder in which abnormally activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes cannot induce the apoptosis of target cells and antigen-presenting cells, leading to hemophagocytosis, pancytopenia, and a variety of symptoms such as a high fever. The present patient with adult-onset HLH developed refractory disease despite receiving immunosuppressive treatments. He underwent a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen that comprised antithymocyte globulin (ATG) followed by cord blood transplantation (RIC-CBT). He achieved and maintained a complete donor type. The incorporation of ATG into RIC-CBT may prevent graft failure and control hemophagocytosis, however, further efforts are necessary to reduce infectious complications. PMID:26984088

  10. The Evidence-Based Approach to Adult-Onset Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canetta, Pietro A. A.; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset nephrotic syndrome (NS) differs from its pediatric counterpart in several important ways. Most importantly, NS in adults is more etiologically heterogeneous compared to children, and thus treatment approaches rely heavily on the histological diagnosis provided by renal biopsy. The evidence-based approach to treatment of adult NS has been critically examined by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines in glomerulonephritis, published in 2012. Here, we examine the strengths and limits of those guidelines and review recent work that expands the evidence-based approach. PMID:26442238

  11. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  12. Mutations in DNAJC5, Encoding Cysteine-String Protein Alpha, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosková, Lenka; Stránecký, Viktor; Hartmannová, Hana; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Ivánek, Robert; Hůlková, Helena; Jahnová, Helena; van der Zee, Julie; Staropoli, John F.; Sims, Katherine B.; Tyynelä, Jaana; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Nijssen, Peter C.G.; Mole, Sara E.; Elleder, Milan; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent storage material in neural tissues and neurodegeneration and has an age of onset in the third decade of life or later. The genetic and molecular basis of the disease has remained unknown for many years. We carried out linkage mapping, gene-expression analysis, exome sequencing, and candidate-gene sequencing in affected individuals from 20 families and/or individuals with simplex cases; we identified in five individuals one of two disease-causing mutations, c.346_348delCTC and c.344T>G, in DNAJC5 encoding cysteine-string protein alpha (CSPα). These mutations—causing a deletion, p.Leu116del, and an amino acid exchange, p.Leu115Arg, respectively—are located within the cysteine-string domain of the protein and affect both palmitoylation-dependent sorting and the amount of CSPα in neuronal cells. The resulting depletion of functional CSPα might cause in parallel the presynaptic dysfunction and the progressive neurodegeneration observed in affected individuals and lysosomal accumulation of misfolded and proteolysis-resistant proteins in the form of characteristic ceroid deposits in neurons. Our work represents an important step in the genetic dissection of a genetically heterogeneous group of ANCLs. It also confirms a neuroprotective role for CSPα in humans and demonstrates the need for detailed investigation of CSPα in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses and other neurodegenerative diseases presenting with neuronal protein aggregation. PMID:21820099

  13. Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 in a family with adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Lynch, David R.; Lukas, Thomas; Ahmeti, Kreshnik; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Ryan, Eanna; Schadt, Kimberly A.; Newman, Jordan H.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic defect for adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) in a family with 5 patients. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the shared genetic variants in 3 affected members in a PLS family with 5 affected individuals. Sanger sequencing was used for validation of the variants and for cosegregation analysis. Mitochondrial activity for both patients and unaffected siblings was measured using a SeaHorse metabolic analyzer. Results: Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent cosegregation analysis demonstrated that compound heterozygous missense variants L695P and I743T in SPG7 were the only mutations cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal recessive fashion in this family. The parents and siblings are genetically heterozygous and clinically unaffected. Functional studies suggested that the PLS-associated SPG7 mutants affect mitochondrial function when glucose is reduced. Conclusions: Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 are associated with adult-onset PLS, extending the spectrum of SPG7-linked neurologic diseases. Patients with the PLS phenotype should have genetic testing for paraplegin, especially when the condition is familial. PMID:27123479

  14. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions.

  15. The social behavior of male rats administered an adult-onset calorie restriction regimen.

    PubMed

    Govic, Antonina; Levay, Elizabeth A; Kent, Stephen; Paolini, Antonio G

    2009-03-23

    The behavioral outcomes of a calorie restricted diet are often neglected in favour of a more physiological examination of the consequences of calorie restriction (CR). This is especially the case with social behavior. A few findings within the maternal CR literature suggest that adult male social behavior is altered by this regimen. Despite the paucity of findings within the maternal CR literature, a systematic investigation of the behavioral phenotype of males administered an adult-onset CR is completely lacking and was the focus of the current study. Adult male hooded Wistar rats were administered a three week CR, with one group receiving a 25% CR and another group receiving a 50% CR before male-to-male social behavior was examined and compared with ad libitium fed males. Various behavioral elements were modulated by CR, both the CR25% and 50% group initiated contact sooner and engaged in greater social activity compared to the ad libitum fed controls. The CR25% group also demonstrated less non-social (self-grooming) behavior and a greater frequency of walkovers compared to all groups, indicating a propensity towards dominance. The CR50% group demonstrated greater environmental assessment/exploration, as measured by the frequency of rearing. As with the maternal CR literature, an adult-onset chronic CR induces a more socially active behavioral phenotype and reduces interest in non-social behavior in the moderately CR group. Taken together, the social behavioral phenotype can be modulated by a CR initiated and maintained during adulthood.

  16. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions. PMID:24842077

  17. Similarities in speech and white matter characteristics in idiopathic developmental stuttering and adult-onset stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Soo-Eun; Synnestvedt, Anna; Ostuni, John

    2009-01-01

    Adult-onset stuttering (AS) typically occurs following neurological and/or psychological trauma, considered different from developmental stuttering (DS), which starts during early childhood with few if any new cases reported after adolescence. Here we report four cases of AS, two with apparent psychological trigger and two without, none with evidence of neurological injury, and none conforming to previously reported characteristics of psychogenic stuttering. We asked whether this group of AS would have similar speech and neuroanatomical characteristics to those with DS. We conducted blinded analyses of speech samples in both AS cases and 14 cases of DS on type, frequency, and loci of disfluencies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to compare white matter tracts using fractional anisotropy (FA). We found that AS did not differ significantly from DS in any of the speech characteristics measured. On DTI, DS had significantly increased FA relative to controls in the right superior longitudinal tract. AS cases showed a similar trend for increases in these regions when compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that symptoms of idiopathic stuttering can begin during adulthood, and that similar neuroanatomical differences from controls may be associated with both developmental and adult onset idiopathic stuttering. PMID:20640049

  18. An autopsy case of adult-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia type 2 with a novel mutation in exon 7 of the proteolipid protein 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Arakawa, Kenji; Furuya, Hirokazu; Fujii, Naoki; Iwaki, Akiko

    2011-12-01

    We report an autopsy case of rare adult-onset spastic paraplegia type 2 (SPG2) with a novel missense mutation in exon 7 of the proteolipid protein 1 gene (PLP1). The patient was a 67-year-old man whose elder brother had died of a similar disease with onset in his 40s. Thirty-three years before death at the age of 35, he noticed difficulty in walking. He gradually became abasic over a period of 6 years. He also developed progressive dementia and eventually became bed-ridden by 28 years after onset. At autopsy, gross inspection revealed diffuse, moderate atrophy of the cerebrum with a dilated ventricular system and softening of the white matter throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Histopathologically, the CNS showed widespread myelin pallor in the white matter. By contrast, the gray matter and peripheral nerves were well preserved. Some white matter tracts, including the corticospinal tracts, were preferentially affected, and severe axonal degeneration was observed in these tracts. Genetic analysis revealed a novel mutation, p.Tyr263Cys, in exon 7 of PLP1. This case represents an adult-onset SPG2 patient with one of the oldest ages of onset reported to date. The late onset and long clinical course suggest that this novel mutation does not affect the maturation of oligodendrocytes, but is related to insufficient maintenance of myelin.

  19. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  20. Adult-onset Still's disease with myocarditis and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Rare manifestation with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devika; Jagani, Rajat; Mendonca, Satish; Rathi, Khushi Ram

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by fever, evanescent pink salmon rash, arthritis, and multiorgan involvement. Here, we report an unusual manifestation of AOSD in a 40-year-old male who presented to our hospital with pyrexia of unknown origin and rash of 3 weeks duration. All his serological investigations and imaging studies were unremarkable. He was fulfilling clinical and laboratory criteria as per Yamaguchi for AOSD and was managed for the same. Our patient did not respond well to the treatment, had a downhill course, and succumbed to his illness. Autopsy confirmed myocarditis and florid bone marrow reactive hemophagocytosis as the cause of his death. PMID:26960645

  1. Predictive Medicine: Recombinant DNA Technology and Adult-Onset Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Genetic factors are of great importance in common adult-onset disorders such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and neuro-degenerative diseases. Advances in DNA technology now allow identification of persons at high-risk of developing some of these diseases. This advance is leading to predictive medicine. In some genetic disorders, such as those leading to atherosclerosis and cancer, identification of high-risk individuals allows intervention which alters the natural history of the disorder. In other diseases, for which there is no treatment, such as Huntington's disease, the application of this technology provides information that relieves uncertainty and may affect quality of life, but does not alter the course of the illness. General implementation of predictive testing programs awaits the results of pilot projects, which will demonstrate the needs, appropriate levels of support, and guidelines for delivery of such testing. PMID:21253100

  2. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  3. Adult-onset nemaline myopathy in a dog presenting with persistent atrial standstill and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R K; Russell, N J; Shelton, G D

    2012-06-01

    A nine-year-old neutered female mixed breed dog presented for evaluation following a five-day history of lethargy, inappetence, weakness, abdominal distension and generalised muscle atrophy. Persistent vatrial standstill with a junctional rhythm was identified on electrocardiogram. Echocardiogram identified moderate dilation of all cardiac chambers and mild thickening of the mitral and tricuspid valves. Serology was negative for Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii. Permanent pacemaker implantation was performed in addition to endomyocardial and skeletal muscle biopsies. Cryosections from the biceps femoris muscle showed numerous nemaline rod bodies while endomyocardial biopsies were possibly consistent with end-stage myocarditis. Rod bodies have rarely been reported in the veterinary literature. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of adult-onset nemaline rod myopathy and hypothyroidism with concurrent cardiac disease in a dog. PMID:22647214

  4. Myotonia and flaccid dysarthria in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    de Swart, B J M; van Engelen, B G M; van de Kerkhof, J P B M; Maassen, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To specify and quantify possible defects in speech execution in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Methods: Studies on speech production were done on 30 mildly affected patients with myotonic dystrophy. Special attention was paid to myotonia. Because muscle activity can result in a decrease of myotonia, speech characteristics were measured before and after warm up. The possibility that warming up causes increased weakness was also assessed. Results: As with other motor skills, a warm up effect was found in speech production, resulting in an increase in repetition rate and a decrease in variability of repetition rate. Signs of fatigue did not occur. Conclusions: Warming up is valuable for patients with myotonic dystrophy in reducing the influence of myotonia on speech production. PMID:15377703

  5. A mouse model of adult-onset anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shun; Souma, Tomokazu; Hirano, Ikuo; Pan, Xiaoqing; Minegishi, Naoko; Suzuki, Norio; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin regulates erythropoiesis in a hypoxia-inducible manner. Here we generate inherited super-anaemic mice (ISAM) as a mouse model of adult-onset anaemia caused by erythropoietin deficiency. ISAM express erythropoietin in the liver but lack erythropoietin production in the kidney. Around weaning age, when the major erythropoietin-producing organ switches from the liver to the kidney, ISAM develop anaemia due to erythropoietin deficiency, which is curable by administration of recombinant erythropoietin. In ISAM severe chronic anaemia enhances transgenic green fluorescent protein and Cre expression driven by the complete erythropoietin-gene regulatory regions, which facilitates efficient labelling of renal erythropoietin-producing cells. We show that the majority of cortical and outer medullary fibroblasts have the innate potential to produce erythropoietin, and also reveal a new set of erythropoietin target genes. ISAM are a useful tool for the evaluation of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and to trace the dynamics of erythropoietin-producing cells. PMID:23727690

  6. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  7. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Adult-Onset Leukoencephalopathy with Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia Caused by a Novel R782G Mutation in CSF1R.

    PubMed

    Foulds, Nicola; Pengelly, Reuben J; Hammans, Simon R; Nicoll, James A R; Ellison, David W; Ditchfield, Adam; Beck, Sarah; Ennis, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant inheritance of a late onset rapidly progressive leukodystrophy in which exome sequencing has revealed a novel mutation p.R782G in the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor gene (CSF1R). Neuropathology of two affected family members showed cerebral white matter degeneration with axonal swellings and pigmented macrophages. The few recently reported families with CSF1R mutations had been previously labelled "hereditary diffuse leukencephalopathy with axonal spheroids" (HDLS) and "pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy" (POLD), disorders which now appear to form a disease continuum. The term "adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia" (ALSP) has been proposed to encompass this spectrum. As CSF1R regulates microglia this mutation implies that dysregulation of microglia is the primary cause of the disease.

  9. Possible risk factors for primary adult onset dystonia: a case-control investigation by the Italian Movement Disorders Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Defazio, G.; Berardelli, A.; Abbruzzese, G.; Lepore, V.; Coviello, V.; Acquistapace, D.; Capus, L.; Carella, F.; De Berardinis, M. T.; Galardi, G.; Girlanda, P.; Maurri, S.; Albanese, A.; Bertolasi, L.; Liguori, R.; Rossi, A.; Santoro, L.; Tognoni, G.; Livrea, P.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Little is known about the aetiology of idiopathic adult onset dystonia. The Italian Movement Disorders Study Group promoted a case-control study on some hypothetical risk factors including past medical events, life events, life habits, occupational hazards, and family hystory of dystonia, parkinsonism, and tremor.
METHODS—Cases affected by idiopathic adult onset dystonia (age at symptom onset >20 years, duration of disease >one year and adult onset dystonia, whereas hypertension and cigarette smoking exerted a protective effect. The findings also suggested a positive association between local body injury—for example, previous ocular diseases and neck or trunk trauma—and dystonia of the same body part.
CONCLUSIONS—The results support the idea that environmental and genetic factors may both be important in the aetiology of adult onset dystonia, and suggest aetiological clues worthy of further analytical investigation.

 PMID:9436723

  10. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-08-15

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes.

  11. Adult onset sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma - a rare case report with cytohistological features.

    PubMed

    Sood, N; Sehrawat, N

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a fast growing, malignant tumour arising from immature mesenchymal cells, committed to skeletal muscle differentiation. It is more often seen in the paediatric population and constitutes less than 1% of all malignancies and less than 3% of all soft tissue tumours. RMS of the paranasal sinuses constitutes 10-15% of adult head and neck RMS, ethmoidal and maxillary sinuses being the most common. We report a 56-year-oldman presenting with left nasal obstruction, epistaxis on and off and left cheek swelling. Nasal endoscopy revealed a reddish friable mass, bleeding on touch, in the left nasal cavity. CECT scan showed a heterogeneous growth in the left maxillary sinus eroding the medial orbital wall and lateral nasal wall. FNAC of the left cheek swelling yielded highly cellular smears showing predominantly singly scattered round to ovoid neoplastic cells with scanty cytoplasm and indistinct nucleoli. Few of the cells had eccentric nuclei with moderate amount of eosinophilic cytoplasm. Attempted pseudorossette formation was seen. An impression of round cell tumour was given. A diagnosis of an adult onset sinonasal rhabdomyosarcoma was made on histopathological examination of the nasal biopsy, supported by immunohistochemistry (IHC) showing strong myogenin positivity, focal positivity for PAX8 and negativity for CK, LCA, S-100 and CD99. Parameningeal RMS is rare in adults especially the elderly. However, it needs to be considered whenever a poorly-differentiated neoplasm is seen in this age and IHC is a useful aid. PMID:27568676

  12. Nephrin mutations cause childhood- and adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santín, Sheila; García-Maset, Rafael; Ruíz, Patricia; Giménez, Isabel; Zamora, Isabel; Peña, Antonia; Madrid, Alvaro; Camacho, Juan A; Fraga, Gloria; Sánchez-Moreno, Ana; Cobo, Maria Angeles; Bernis, Carmen; Ortiz, Alberto; de Pablos, Augusto Luque; Pintos, Guillem; Justa, Maria Luisa; Hidalgo-Barquero, Emilia; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Ballarín, José; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the NPHS1 gene cause congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type presenting before the first 3 months of life. Recently, NPHS1 mutations have also been identified in childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and milder courses of disease, but their role in adults with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis remains unknown. Here we developed an in silico scoring matrix to evaluate the pathogenicity of amino-acid substitutions using the biophysical and biochemical difference between wild-type and mutant amino acid, the evolutionary conservation of the amino-acid residue in orthologs, and defined domains, with the addition of contextual information. Mutation analysis was performed in 97 patients from 89 unrelated families, of which 52 presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome after 18 years of age. Compound heterozygous or homozygous NPHS1 mutations were identified in five familial and seven sporadic cases, including one patient 27 years old at onset of the disease. Substitutions were classified as 'severe' or 'mild' using this in silico approach. Our results suggest an earlier onset of the disease in patients with two 'severe' mutations compared to patients with at least one 'mild' mutation. The finding of mutations in a patient with adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis indicates that NPHS1 analysis could be considered in patients with later onset of the disease.

  13. Patterns and correlates of multiple risk factors for adult-onset cancer among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    MAYS, DARREN; PESHKIN, BETH N.; WALKER, LESLIE R.; ABRAHAM, ANISHA A.; HAWKINS, KIRSTEN B.; TERCYAK, KENNETH P.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated patterns and correlates of multiple, adult-onset cancer risk factors (MCRFs) among adolescents. Baseline data from an intervention efficacy trial were analyzed to examine patterns of co-occurring MCRFs and sociodemographic and theoretical (e.g., prevention self-efficacy) correlates of MCRFs among adolescents (N = 50) age 13 – 21. The mean total MCRFs was 4.6 (SD = 1.6; range 0–9). The most common risk factors were intentions to use alcohol (n = 40, 80%), < 5 daily servings of fruits/vegetables (n = 40, 80%), and lifetime alcohol use (n = 38, 76%). MCRFs commonly co-occurred, suggesting a clustered risk profile. Greater age (B = 0.19 95% CI 0.01, 0.38) and lower prevention self-efficacy (B = −0.16, 95% CI −0.02, −0.30) were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with MCRFs. Multiple health behavior change interventions are needed to prevent accumulation of risk factors as youth mature. Self-efficacy may be an important target for prevention interventions. PMID:22363044

  14. Adult-Onset Hypothyroidism Enhances Fear Memory and Upregulates Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Fernández-Lamo, Iván; Alieva, María; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Venero, César; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most common hormonal disease in adults, which is frequently accompanied by learning and memory impairments and emotional disorders. However, the deleterious effects of thyroid hormones deficiency on emotional memory are poorly understood and often underestimated. To evaluate the consequences of hypothyroidism on emotional learning and memory, we have performed a classical Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm in euthyroid and adult-thyroidectomized Wistar rats. In this experimental model, learning acquisition was not impaired, fear memory was enhanced, memory extinction was delayed and spontaneous recovery of fear memory was exacerbated in hypothyroid rats. The potentiation of emotional memory under hypothyroidism was associated with an increase of corticosterone release after fear conditioning and with higher expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala, nuclei that are critically involved in the circuitry of fear memory. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult-onset hypothyroidism potentiates fear memory and also increases vulnerability to develop emotional memories. Furthermore, our findings suggest that enhanced corticosterone signaling in the amygdala is involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of fear memory potentiation. Therefore, we recommend evaluating whether inappropriate regulation of fear in patients with post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders is associated with abnormal levels of thyroid hormones, especially those patients refractory to treatment. PMID:22039511

  15. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  16. Effect size of memory deficits in mice with adult-onset P301L tau expression.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Holly C; Rudy, Carolyn C; Weitzner, Daniel S; Zhang, Chong; Tosto, David E; Knowlan, Kevin; Xu, Ying; Reed, Miranda N

    2014-10-01

    Transgenic mice expressing mutations in tau have yielded essential discoveries for Alzheimer's disease. One of the most commonly used tau mouse models is the tet-off Tg(tauP301L)4510 model that expresses P301L human tau driven by the calcium-calmodulin kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) promoter system. Tau expression in this model is regulatable, allowing for suppression of mutant tau expression until adulthood and prevention of possible developmental alterations resulting from P301L tau expression during development. Here, we compared the effect and sample sizes needed for three learning and memory tasks in mice with adult-onset P301L tau expression. Our findings indicate that the Incremental Repeated Acquisition (IRA) and trace fear conditioning tasks, neither of which have previously been published with these mice, were highly sensitive to P301L tau expression, whereas the Morris water maze, the most commonly used task with this model, was the least sensitive. Memory deficits were observed at a time when tau pathology was subtle and prior to readily detectable neuronal loss. Thus, we provide essential information (effect and sample sizes needed) for establishing experimental designs at a time point when memory deficits are likely to go undetected if inadequate sample sizes are used. Our work also suggests the tet-off Tg4510 model provides a way to avoid mutant tau expression during the perinatal and early postnatal stages, thereby preventing possible developmental alterations unrelated to Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Occasional detection of thymic epithelial tumor 4 years after diagnosis of adult onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Caruso, Andrea; Valli, Riccardo; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thymoma is a T cell neoplasm arising from the thymic epithelium that due to its immunological role, frequently undercover derangements of immunity such a tumors and autoimmune diseases. Methods: Herein, we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first description of an association between thymoma and adult onset Still disease (AOSD) in a 47-year-old man. The first one was occasionally detected 4 years later the diagnosis of AOSD, and surgically removed via right lateral thoracotomy. Histology confirmed an encapsulated thymic tumor (type AB sec. WHO-classification). Results: The AOSD was particularly resistant to the therapy, requiring a combination of immunosuppressant followed by anti-IL1R, that was the only steroids-sparing treatment capable to induce and maintain the remission. The differential diagnosis was particularly challenging because of the severe myasthenic-like symptoms that, with normal laboratory tests, were initially misinterpreted as fibromyalgia. The pathogenic link of this association could be a thymus escape of autoreactive T lymphocytes causing autoimmunity. Conclusion: Clinicians should be always include the possibility of a thymoma in the differential diagnosis of an unusual new onset of weakness and normal laboratories data, in particular once autoimmune disease is present in the medical history. PMID:27603335

  18. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. PMID:27242405

  19. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Mutated CTSF in adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and FTD

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, Julie; Mariën, Peter; Crols, Roeland; Van Mossevelde, Sara; Dillen, Lubina; Perrone, Federica; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Verhoeven, Jo; D'aes, Tine; Ceuterick-De Groote, Chantal; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular basis of a Belgian family with autosomal recessive adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL or Kufs disease [KD]) with pronounced frontal lobe involvement and to expand the findings to a cohort of unrelated Belgian patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: Genetic screening in the ANCL family and FTD cohort (n = 461) was performed using exome sequencing and targeted massive parallel resequencing. Results: We identified a homozygous mutation (p.Ile404Thr) in the Cathepsin F (CTSF) gene cosegregating in the ANCL family. No other mutations were found that could explain the disease in this family. All 4 affected sibs developed motor symptoms and early-onset dementia with prominent frontal features. Two of them evolved to akinetic mutism. Disease presentation showed marked phenotypic variation with the onset ranging from 26 to 50 years. Myoclonic epilepsy in one of the sibs was suggestive for KD type A, while epilepsy was not present in the other sibs who presented with clinical features of KD type B. In a Belgian cohort of unrelated patients with FTD, the same heterozygous p.Arg245His mutation was identified in 2 patients who shared a common haplotype. Conclusions: A homozygous CTSF mutation was identified in a recessive ANCL pedigree. In contrast to the previous associations of CTSF with KD type B, our findings suggest that CTSF genetic testing should also be considered in patients with KD type A as well as in early-onset dementia with prominent frontal lobe and motor symptoms.

  1. Adult-Onset Familial Mediterranean Fever in Northwestern Iran; Clinical Feature and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, H; Zamani, F; Ajdarkosh, H; Mohamadzadeh, Z; Fereshtehnejad, SM; Nassaji, M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sporadic, paroxysmal attacks of fever and serosal inflammation. Although the disease usually begins before the age of 20 years, we aimed to evaluate the demography, clinical features and treatment outcome of familial Mediterranean fever in Iranian adult patients above 20 years old. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, adult patients (first attack at the age of >20 years) with a diagnosis of FMF who referred to the gastroenterology and rheumatology Clinics of Ardebil University of Medical Science (situated in north west of Iran) over the period of 2004-2009 were enrolled. FMF diagnosis was based on clinical criteria. RESULTS Forty four FMF patients (30 male and 14 female) with the mean [± Standard Deviation (SD)] age of first attack of 29 ± 7.8 years were enrolled. Abdominal pain (95.5%) and fever (91%) were the most common clinical findings. All of the patients had satisfactorily responded to therapy. Response was complete in 76.7% and partial in 23.3% of the patients. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence of amyloidosis at the time of diagnosis or during follow-up. CONCLUSION Our findings demonstrated that adult-onset FMF in Iran has different characteristics (more common in males, lesser prevalence of arthritis and erysipelas-like erythema, less delay in diagnosis) and treatment outcome (favorable response even to low-dose colchicine) in comparison with the previous data on early onset patients. PMID:25197532

  2. Adult-onset familial mediterranean Fever in northwestern iran; clinical feature and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, H; Zamani, F; Ajdarkosh, H; Mohamadzadeh, Z; Fereshtehnejad, Sm; Nassaji, M

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sporadic, paroxysmal attacks of fever and serosal inflammation. Although the disease usually begins before the age of 20 years, we aimed to evaluate the demography, clinical features and treatment outcome of familial Mediterranean fever in Iranian adult patients above 20 years old. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, adult patients (first attack at the age of >20 years) with a diagnosis of FMF who referred to the gastroenterology and rheumatology Clinics of Ardebil University of Medical Science (situated in north west of Iran) over the period of 2004-2009 were enrolled. FMF diagnosis was based on clinical criteria. RESULTS Forty four FMF patients (30 male and 14 female) with the mean [± Standard Deviation (SD)] age of first attack of 29 ± 7.8 years were enrolled. Abdominal pain (95.5%) and fever (91%) were the most common clinical findings. All of the patients had satisfactorily responded to therapy. Response was complete in 76.7% and partial in 23.3% of the patients. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence of amyloidosis at the time of diagnosis or during follow-up. CONCLUSION Our findings demonstrated that adult-onset FMF in Iran has different characteristics (more common in males, lesser prevalence of arthritis and erysipelas-like erythema, less delay in diagnosis) and treatment outcome (favorable response even to low-dose colchicine) in comparison with the previous data on early onset patients.

  3. Dysregulation of axonal sodium channel isoforms after adult-onset chronic demyelination.

    PubMed

    Rasband, Matthew N; Kagawa, Tetsushi; Park, Eunice W; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Trimmer, James S

    2003-08-15

    Demyelination results in conduction block through changes in passive cable properties of an axon and in the expression and localization of axonal ion channels. We show here that adult-onset chronic demyelination, such as occurs in demyelinating disorders and after nerve injury, alters the complement of axonal voltage-dependent Na+ (Nav) channel isoforms and their localization. As a model, we used heterozygous transgenic mice with two extra copies of the proteolipid protein gene (Plp/-). Retinal ganglion cell axons in these mice myelinate normally, with young Plp/- and wild-type mice expressing Nav1.2 at low levels, whereas Nav1.6 is clustered in high densities at nodes of Ranvier. At 7 months of age, however, Plp/- mice exhibit severe demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death, leading to a profound reduction in Nav1.6 clusters, loss of the paranodal axoglial apparatus, and a marked increase in Nav1.2. We conclude that myelin is crucial not only for node of Ranvier formation, but also to actively maintain the proper localization and complement of distinct axonal Nav channel isoforms throughout life. The altered Nav channel isoform localization and complement induced by demyelination may contribute to the pathophysiology of demyelinating disorders and nerve injury. PMID:12898531

  4. Intermittent rhabdomyolysis with adult onset associated with a mutation in the ACADVL gene.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana Patrícia; Nogueira, Célia; Rocha, Hugo; Vilarinho, Laura; Evangelista, Teresinha

    2013-12-01

    Deficiency of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is an autosomal recessive disease. Most common phenotypes occur in the neonatal period or in childhood with cardiomyopathy, hepatomegaly, and hypoketogenic hypoglycemia. Juvenile/adult-onset is characterized by exercise intolerance and recurrent rhabdomyolysis triggered by prolonged exercise or fasting. This article reports a patient with the homozygous mutation c.1097G>A (p.R366H) in the ACADVL gene. In Portugal, VLCAD deficiency became part of the neonatal screening plan in 2004, and as of 2012, 8 early-onset cases have been diagnosed, giving an incidence rate of 1:97.238 per 737.902 newborns. This patient was diagnosed outside of the neonatal screening plan. Beta-oxidation defects pose a diagnostic challenge because of their transient clinical and laboratorial manifestations and the absence of morphological changes in muscle biopsy further complicate matters, especially in the late-onset forms of the disease. The adult phenotype of VLCAD deficiency is highlighted, emphasizing the need for a high suspicion index and the value of tandem mass spectrometry for the diagnosis. PMID:24263034

  5. Juvenile versus adult-onset ankylosing spondylitis -- clinical, radiographic, and social outcomes. a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Deepak R; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Sengupta, Raj

    2013-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has 2 main modes of onset: juvenile-onset AS (JoAS) and adult-onset AS (AoAS). It is not known whether JoAS is a subtype of AS, or AS modulated by early age of onset and longer disease duration. We performed a systematic review of the literature, identifying 12 articles and 1 abstract directly comparing JoAS and AoAS cohorts, with observational study design. Patients with JoAS appear to have more peripheral joint involvement both clinically and radiographically (especially knees and ankles) and more root joint involvement (hips and shoulders); they are more likely to proceed to hip arthroplasty and often initially present with peripheral rather than axial symptoms. Patients with AoAS appear to have more axial symptoms and radiographic disease, particularly in the lumbar spine, and worse axial metrology. In terms of other characteristics, more evidence is needed to confidently state whether JoAS and AoAS are different.

  6. Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease Successfully Treated with Anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of Adult-Onset Still's disease (Still's disease). Whereas an increasing body of evidence supports interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade as a promising treatment for Still's disease, whether it is therapeutic for MAS associated with Still's disease remains unclear. We report a 34-year-old Caucasian man with one-decade history of TNF-blockade-responsive seronegative arthritis who presented with abrupt onset of fever, serositis, bicytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Striking hyperferritinemia was noted without evidence of infection, malignancy, or hemophagocytosis on bone marrow biopsy. NK cells were undetectable in the peripheral blood, whereas soluble IL-2 receptor was elevated. His multiorgan disease resolved in association with methylprednisolone pulse therapy, Anakinra, and a tapering course of prednisone. This case reinforces the notion that Still's disease is inherently poised to manifest MAS as one of the clinical phenotypes by shedding light on the role of IL-1 underlying both Still's disease and related MAS.

  7. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα.

  8. Pesticide use and adult-onset asthma among male farmers in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoppin, Jane A.; Umbach, David M.; London, Stephanie J.; Henneberger, Paul K.; Kullman, Greg J.; Coble, Joseph; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2010-01-01

    Although specific pesticides have been associated with wheeze in farmers, little is known about pesticides and asthma. We used data from 19,704 male farmers in the Agricultural Health Study to evaluate lifetime use of 48 pesticides and prevalent adult-onset asthma, defined as doctor-diagnosed asthma after age 20. We categorized asthma cases as allergic (N=127) and non-allergic (N=314) based on their history of eczema or hayfever. We used polytomous logistic regression controlling for age, state, smoking, and body mass to assess pesticide associations. High pesticide exposure events were associated with a doubling of both allergic and non-allergic asthma. For ever use, 12 individual pesticides were associated with allergic asthma and four with non-allergic asthma. For allergic asthma, coumaphos (odds ratio (OR) =2.34, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) =1.49,3.70), heptachlor (OR=2.01, 95%CI=1.30,3.11), parathion (OR=2.05, 95%CI=1.21,3.46), 80/20 mix (carbon tetrachloride/carbon disulfide) (OR=2.15, 95%CI=1.23,3.76) and ethylene dibromide (OR=2.07, 95%CI=1.02,4.20), all had odds ratios greater than 2.0 and significant exposure-response trends. For non-allergic asthma, DDT had the strongest association (OR=1.41, 95%CI=1.09,1.84) but with little evidence of increasing asthma with increasing use. Current animal handling and farm activities did not confound these results. We saw little evidence that allergy alone was driving these associations. Pesticides may be an overlooked contributor to asthma risk among farmers. PMID:19541724

  9. Parental smoking in pregnancy and the risks of adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Layla L; Harris, Holly R; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Willett, Walter C; Forman, Michele R; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Michels, Karin B

    2013-02-01

    Fetal exposure to parental smoking may lead to developmental adaptations and promote various diseases in later life. This study evaluated the associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the daughter in adulthood, and assessed whether these associations are explained by birth weight or body weight throughout life. We used data on 33086 participants of the Nurses' Health Study II and the Nurses' Mothers' Cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with the nurse daughter, with self-reported physician-diagnosed hypertension from 1989 until 2007. Overall, 8575 (25.9%) mothers and 18874 (57.0%) fathers smoked during pregnancy. During follow-up, 7825 incident cases of adult-onset hypertension were reported. Both maternal and paternal smoking of ≥ 15 cigarettes/d during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of hypertension (rate ratio, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.09-1.29; and rate ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12-1.25, respectively) in the age-adjusted models. Further adjustment for birth weight did not affect the effect estimates appreciably, whereas additional adjustment for body shape and weight until age 18, or current body mass index, attenuated the associations with both maternal and paternal smoking (rate ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.98-1.16; and rate ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12, respectively). The associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the offspring were largely explained by body weight throughout life, suggesting that these associations may not reflect direct intrauterine mechanisms.

  10. Characterisation of a syndrome of autoimmune adult onset focal epilepsy and encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Bleasel, Andrew; Parratt, John; Orr, Carolyn; Dale, Russell C; Vincent, Angela; Fung, Victor S C

    2014-07-01

    We report a series of patients with a clinical syndrome characterised by the explosive onset in adulthood of recurrent focal seizures of frontotemporal onset and features suggestive of autoimmune encephalitis. We propose that this presentation of "autoimmune adult onset focal epilepsy and encephalitis" is a recognisable clinical syndrome, and provide evidence it may be associated with heterogeneous immunological targets. Between 2008 and 2011 we encountered six patients with new-onset epilepsy in whom we suspected an autoimmune aetiology. We first characterised the clinical, electroencephalographic, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), imaging, and pathological findings of this syndrome. We subsequently tested them for antibodies against both intracellular and neuronal cell surface antigens. All patients presented with recurrent seizures with focal frontotemporal onset, refractory to multiple anticonvulsants. Four had focal T2-weighted hyperintensities on MRI. CSF mononuclear cells were variably elevated with positive oligoclonal bands in four. Brain biopsy in one patient demonstrated perivascular lymphocytic infiltration. Two were treated with immunosuppression and went on to achieve complete seizure control and return to baseline cognition. Three of four patients who received only pulsed steroids or no treatment had ongoing frequent seizures, with two dying of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Subsequently, three had antibodies identified against neuronal cell surface antigens including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1. We suggest that patients with such a presentation should be carefully evaluated for a suspected autoimmune aetiology targeting cell surface antigens and have a therapeutic trial of immunosuppression as this may improve their long-term outcome. PMID:24518268

  11. PARENTAL SMOKING IN PREGNANCY AND THE RISKS OF ADULT ONSET HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    De Jonge, Layla L.; Harris, Holly R.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Willett, Walter C.; Forman, Michele R.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Michels, Karin B.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal exposure to parental smoking may lead to developmental adaptations and promote various diseases in later life. This study evaluated the associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the daughter in adulthood, and assessed whether these associations are explained by birth weight or body weight throughout life. We used data on 33,086 participants of the Nurses’ Health Study II and the Nurses’ Mothers’ Cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with the nurse daughter, with self-reported physician-diagnosed hypertension from 1989 until 2007. Overall, 8,575 (25.9%) mothers and 18,874 (57.0%) fathers smoked during pregnancy. During follow-up, 7,825 incident cases of adult-onset hypertension were reported. Both maternal and paternal smoking of ≥15 cigarettes/day during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of hypertension (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.29, and RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.25, respectively) in the age-adjusted models. Further adjustment for birth weight did not affect the effect estimates appreciably, while additional adjustment for body shape and weight until age 18, or current body mass index, attenuated the associations with both maternal and paternal smoking (RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.16, and RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.12, respectively). The associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the offspring were largely explained by body weight throughout life, suggesting that these associations may not reflect direct intrauterine mechanisms. PMID:23266542

  12. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα. PMID:25533124

  13. Astrocyte leptin receptor (ObR) and leptin transport in adult-onset obese mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weihong; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Sakharkar, Amul; Cain, Courtney; Yu, Chuanhui; Kastin, Abba J

    2008-06-01

    The agouti viable yellow (A vy) spontaneous mutation generates an unusual mouse phenotype of agouti-colored coat and adult-onset obesity with metabolic syndrome. Persistent production of agouti signaling protein in A vy mice antagonizes melanocortin receptors in the hypothalamus. To determine how this disruption of neuroendocrine circuits affects leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), we measured leptin influx in A vy and B6 control mice after the development of obesity, hyperleptinemia, and increased adiposity. After iv bolus injection, (125)I-leptin crossed the BBB significantly faster in young (2 month old) B6 mice than in young A vy mice or in older (8 month old) mice of either strain. This difference was not observed by in situ brain perfusion studies, indicating the cause being circulating factors, such as elevated leptin levels or soluble receptors. Thus, A vy mice showed peripheral leptin resistance. ObRa, the main transporting receptor for leptin at the BBB, showed no change in mRNA expression in the cerebral microvessels between the age-matched (2 month old) A vy and B6 mice. Higher ObRb mRNA was seen in the A vy microvasculature with unknown significance. Immunofluorescent staining unexpectedly revealed that many of the ObR(+) cells were astrocytes and that the A vy mice showed significantly more ObR(+) astrocytes in the hypothalamus than the B6 mice. Although leptin permeation from the circulation was slower in the A vy mice, the increased ObR expression in astrocytes and increased ObRb mRNA in microvessels suggest the possibility of heightened central nervous system sensitivity to circulating leptin.

  14. Mutated CTSF in adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and FTD

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, Julie; Mariën, Peter; Crols, Roeland; Van Mossevelde, Sara; Dillen, Lubina; Perrone, Federica; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Verhoeven, Jo; D'aes, Tine; Ceuterick-De Groote, Chantal; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular basis of a Belgian family with autosomal recessive adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL or Kufs disease [KD]) with pronounced frontal lobe involvement and to expand the findings to a cohort of unrelated Belgian patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: Genetic screening in the ANCL family and FTD cohort (n = 461) was performed using exome sequencing and targeted massive parallel resequencing. Results: We identified a homozygous mutation (p.Ile404Thr) in the Cathepsin F (CTSF) gene cosegregating in the ANCL family. No other mutations were found that could explain the disease in this family. All 4 affected sibs developed motor symptoms and early-onset dementia with prominent frontal features. Two of them evolved to akinetic mutism. Disease presentation showed marked phenotypic variation with the onset ranging from 26 to 50 years. Myoclonic epilepsy in one of the sibs was suggestive for KD type A, while epilepsy was not present in the other sibs who presented with clinical features of KD type B. In a Belgian cohort of unrelated patients with FTD, the same heterozygous p.Arg245His mutation was identified in 2 patients who shared a common haplotype. Conclusions: A homozygous CTSF mutation was identified in a recessive ANCL pedigree. In contrast to the previous associations of CTSF with KD type B, our findings suggest that CTSF genetic testing should also be considered in patients with KD type A as well as in early-onset dementia with prominent frontal lobe and motor symptoms. PMID:27668283

  15. Exclusion of one pedigree affected by adult onset primary open angle glaucoma from linkage to the juvenile glaucoma locus on chromosome 1q21-q31.

    PubMed Central

    Avramopoulos, D; Kitsos, G; Economou-Petersen, E; Grigoriadou, M; Vassilopoulos, D; Papageorgiou, C; Psilas, K; Petersen, M B

    1996-01-01

    A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile onset primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) was recently assigned to chromosome region 1q21-q31. In the present study, a large Greek family with autosomal dominant adult onset POAG was investigated using microsatellite markers. Exclusion of linkage of the adult onset POAG gene to the region D1S194-D1S191 was obtained in this pedigree. Therefore, the data provide evidence that juvenile and adult onset POAG are genetically distinct disease entities. PMID:9004141

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Meng-Jie; Wang, Cai-Qin; Zhao, Kui; Wang, Guo-Lin; Sun, Mei-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Xu, Liqin

    2015-12-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) has become useful for the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory conditions, including rheumatic diseases, immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related disease and giant cell arteritis. However, few articles based on small sample sizes (n = 7) diagnosed as adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) have been published. The study aim was to observe the reliable characteristics and usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of consecutive patients with AOSD. Eligible patients were selected from among those who had undergone (18)F-FDG PET/CT between May 2007 and June 2014. Twenty-six consecutive AOSD patients were recruited retrospectively according to criteria set by Yamaguchi et al. All patients underwent evaluation by (18)F-FDG PET/CT. The characteristics and usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for evaluation of consecutive patients with AOSD were evaluated. All 26 patients had (18)F-FDG-avid lesion(s) related to their particular disease. Diffuse and homogeneous accumulation of (18)F-FDG was seen in the bone marrow (26/26; 100 %; maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax), 2.10-6.73) and spleen (25/26; 96.15 %). The SUVmax of affected lymph nodes was 1.3-9.53 (mean ± SD, 4.12 ± 2.24). The SUVmax and size factors (maximum diameter and areas) of affected lymph nodes were significantly different (P = 0.033 and P = 0.012, respectively). (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed the general distribution of (18)F-FDG accumulation. This factor helped to exclude malignant disease and aided the diagnosis of AOSD (42.3 %) in 11 cases when combined with clinical features and aided decisions regarding appropriate biopsy sites, such as the lymph nodes (n = 9) and bone marrow (n = 13). (18)F-FDG PET/CT is a unique imaging method for the assessment of metabolic activity throughout the body in subjects with AOSD. Characteristics or patterns of AOSD observed on (18)F-FDG PET/CT can be used for the

  17. An increased incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in patients with adult-onset sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sarcomas are rare, often fatal malignancies of connective tissues that can occur in genetic predisposition syndromes or result from carcinogen exposure. Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is not known to contribute to any recognised familial cancer syndrome comprising sarcomas, but is known to be associated with a variety of second cancers, including sarcomas. This study describes the prevalence of HL in families affected by sarcoma. Methods The International Sarcoma Kindred Study (ISKS) is a prospective cohort of 561 families ascertained via a proband with adult-onset sarcoma. Cancer-specific standardised incidence ratios (SIR) for multiple primary malignancies in probands were estimated. Clinical characteristics of individuals reporting both sarcoma and HL were described. Standardised incidence ratios for the occurrence of cancer in ISKS families were also estimated. Results Multiple primary cancers were reported in 16% of probands, significantly higher than in the general population. The risk of HL in probands was increased 15.8-fold (95%CI 7.9-31.6) and increased risks were also seen for breast cancer (SIR 2.9, 95%CI 1.9-4.4) and thyroid cancer (SIR 8.4, 95%CI 4.2-16.8). In 8 probands with both HL and sarcoma, the diagnosis of HL preceded that of sarcoma in 7 cases, and occurred synchronously in one case. Only 3 cases of sarcoma occurred in or close to prior radiotherapy fields. The overall incidence of HL in the ISKS cohort was not significantly increased by comparison with age- and gender-specific population estimates (SIR 1.63, 95%CI 1.05-2.43), suggesting that the association between HL and sarcomas did not extend to other family members. The age of onset of non-sarcoma, non-HL cancers in families affected by both HL and sarcoma was younger than the general population (56.2 y vs 65.6 y, P < 0.0001). Conclusions The basis for the association between HL and sarcomas may include the carcinogenic effects of therapy combined with excellent survival rates for HL

  18. Slowly rotating homogeneous masses revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reina, Borja

    2016-02-01

    Hartle's model for slowly rotating stars has been extensively used to compute equilibrium configurations of slowly rotating stars to second order in perturbation theory in general relativity, given a barotropic equation of state. A recent study based on the modern theory of perturbed matchings concludes that the functions in the (first and second order) perturbation tensors can always be taken as continuous at the surface of the star, except for the second-order function m0. This function presents a jump at the surface of the star proportional to the discontinuity of the energy density there. This concerns only a particular outcome of the model: the change in mass δM. In this paper, the amended change in mass is calculated for the case of constant density stars.

  19. Obesity-related abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K Hoa; Ande, Sudharsana R; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-29

    The incidence of adult-onset T1D in low-risk non-HLA type has increased several folds, whereas the contemporaneous incidence in high-risk HLA-type remains stable. Various factors behind this selective increase in T1D in young adults remain unclear. Obesity and its associated abnormalities appear to be an important determinant; however, the underlying mechanism involved is not understood. Recently, we have developed two novel transgenic obese mice models, Mito-Ob and m-Mito-Ob, by expressing a pleiotropic protein prohibitin (PHB) and a phospho mutant form of PHB (Y114F-PHB or m-PHB) from the aP2 gene promoter, respectively. Both mice models develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, independent of diet; but obesity associated chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance in a male sex-specific manner. Interestingly, on a high fat diet (HFD) only male m-Mito-Ob mice displayed marked mononuclear cell infiltration in pancreas and developed insulitis that mimic adult-onset T1D. Male Mito-Ob mice that share the metabolic phenotype of male m-Mito-Ob mice, and female m-Mito-Ob that harbor m-PHB similar to male m-Mito-Ob mice, did not develop insulitis. Thus, insulitis development in male m-Mito-Ob in response to HFD requires both, obesity-related abnormalities and m-PHB. Collectively, this data provides a proof-of-concept that obesity-associated abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D and reveals PHB as a potential susceptibility gene for T1D.

  20. Ethical and legal dilemmas arising during predictive testing for adult-onset disease: the experience of Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, M; Bloch, M; Kanani, S; Quarrell, O W; Theilman, J; Hedrick, A; Dickens, B; Lynch, A; Hayden, M

    1990-01-01

    The goal of predictive testing is to modify the risk for currently healthy individuals to develop a genetic disease in the future. Such testing using polymorphic DNA markers has had major application in Huntington disease. The Canadian Collaborative Study of Predictive Testing for Huntington Disease has been guided by major principles of medical ethics, including autonomy, beneficence, confidentiality, and justice. Numerous ethical and legal dilemmas have arisen in this program, challenging these principles and occasionally casting them into conflict. The present report describes these dilemmas and offers our approach to resolving them. These issues will have relevance to predictive-testing programs for other adult-onset disorders. PMID:1971997

  1. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage.

  2. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; Gasparini, L.; Ferrera, D.; Canale, C.; Guipponi, M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Brussino, A.; Brusco, A.

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  3. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    DOE PAGES

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; et al

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in amore » postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.« less

  4. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. This second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes. PMID:25701871

  5. The diagnostic evaluation of patients with potential adult-onset autoinflammatory disorders: our experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Muscari, Isabella; Iacoponi, Francesca; Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Simonini, Gabriele; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Vitale, Antonio; Frediani, Bruno; Cimaz, Rolando; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPFSs) are a group of inherited disorders of the innate immune system caused by mutations of genes involved in the regulation or activation of the inflammatory response, which belong to the category of autoinflammatory disorders. Most HPFs typically have an onset in pediatric age, while a limited number of patients experience disease onset during adulthood. The relative rarity and lack of information on adult-onset autoinflammatory diseases make it likely that genetic testing is often inconclusive. Recently, we have identified a set of variables related to the probability of detecting gene mutations in MEFV, responsible for familial Mediterranean fever, and TNFRSF1A, responsible for tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome. In addition, we have proposed a diagnostic score for identifying those patients at high risk of carrying mutations in these genes. However, before the score can be recommended for application, further evaluation by means of longitudinal studies on different ethnicities and different populations deriving from other geographical areas is needed in order to definitively verify both its sensitivity and its specificity. The present manuscript offers our suggestions on how to establish a differential diagnosis for adult-onset HPFs, as well as a review of the literature, and we also provide a score revision available online.

  6. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. PMID:27317840

  7. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner.

  8. Slowly rotating thin shell gravastars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikata, Nami; Yoshida, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    We construct the solutions of slowly rotating gravastars with a thin shell. In the zero-rotation limit, we consider the gravastar composed of a de Sitter core, a thin shell, and Schwarzschild exterior spacetime. The rotational effects are treated as small axisymmetric and stationary perturbations. The perturbed internal and external spacetimes are matched with a uniformly rotating thin shell. We assume that the angular velocity of the thin shell, Ω, is much smaller than the Keplerian frequency of the nonrotating gravastar, {{{Ω }}}{{k}}. The solutions within an accuracy up to the second order of {{Ω }}/{{{Ω }}}{{k}} are obtained. The thin shell matter is assumed to be described by a perfect fluid and to satisfy the dominant energy condition in the zero-rotation limit. In this study, we assume that the equation of state for perturbations is the same as that of the unperturbed solution. The spherically symmetric component of the energy density perturbations, δ {σ }0, is assumed to vanish independently of the rotation rate. Based on these assumptions, we obtain many numerical solutions and investigate properties of the rotational corrections to the structure of the thin shell gravastar.

  9. Wiki-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma: A New Paradigm in Sarcoma Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, S. J.; Thomas, D.; Desai, J.; Vuletich, C.; von Dincklage, J.; Olver, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Australia introduced Wiki-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma. These guidelines utilized a customized MediaWiki software application for guideline development and are the first evidence-based guidelines for clinical management of sarcoma. This paper presents our experience with developing and implementing web-based interactive guidelines and reviews some of the challenges and lessons from adopting an evidence-based (rather than consensus-based) approach to clinical sarcoma guidelines. Digital guidelines can be easily updated with new evidence, continuously reviewed and widely disseminated. They provide an accessible method of enabling clinicians and consumers to access evidence-based clinical practice recommendations and, as evidenced by over 2000 views in the first four months after release, with 49% of those visits being from countries outside of Australia. The lessons learned have relevance to other rare cancers in addition to the international sarcoma community. PMID:25784832

  10. Sporadic adult-onset neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease with the main presentation of repeated cerebellar ataxia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeo; Harada, Seiko; Wakida, Kenji; Yoshida, Mari; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2016-06-22

    A 66-year-old woman suddenly experienced unsteadiness while walking; she had experienced the same symptom before, but it had resolved immediately. Her neurological findings showed cerebellar ataxia, absence of tendon reflex in the extremities, and orthostatic hypotension. MRI with DWI of the brain showed linear high-intensity areas at the white matter just below the cerebral cortex. Therefore, we suspected neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID). In her cutaneous skin biopsy, intranuclear inclusion bodies, which tested positive for an anti-ubiquitin antibody and anti-p62 antibody, were observed in sweat gland cells and fibroblasts; therefore, we diagnosed her with NIID. As no one in her family had similar symptoms, this was a case of sporadic NIID. Adult-onset NIID with the main presentation of cerebellar ataxia is rare; in our case, this repeated acute-onset symptom was a unique manifestation of the condition. PMID:27181748

  11. Adult Onset of BRAFV600E-Mutated Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Cutaneous Involvement Successfully Diagnosed by Immunohistochemical Staining

    PubMed Central

    Tono, Hisayuki; Fujimura, Taku; Kakizaki, Aya; Furudate, Sadanori; Ishibashi, Masaya; Aiba, Setsuya

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is characterized by the clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells; it is categorized as a single-system disease with single or multifocal lesions, and as a multi-system disease with or without the risk of organ involvement. Although the skin is not categorized as a risk organ, the precise diagnosis of skin lesions is necessary to determine the protocol for the treatment of LCH. In this report, we describe a 28-year-old Japanese man with adult onset of BRAFV600E-mutated LCH with cutaneous involvement successfully diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining. Our report suggests that immunohistochemical staining for the BRAFV600E gene could be a diagnostic tool to determine the clinical type of LCH. PMID:26500535

  12. An unusual manifestation in a patient with adult-onset Still’s disease: Minimal glomerular lesion

    PubMed Central

    El Mezouar, Imane; Abourazzak, Fatima Zahra; Ghani, Najoua; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a multisystem inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by arthritis, hectic fever, transient rash and visceral lesions such as pleuropericarditis, lymphadenopathy and hepato splenomegaly. Although kidney involvement may appear in some cases of AOSD, minimal glomerular lesion (MGL) has not been described. We describe a female patient, who presented with multisystemic manifestations, including high spiking fever, arthralgias, striking hyperferritinemia, and proteinuria. Renal biopsy showed classic MGL. A diagnosis of AOSD was made on the basis of Yamaguchi’s criteria. The patient was treated with steroids, resulting in remission of the rheumatological condition closely paralleled by remission of proteinuria, thereby strongly suggesting a causative link between AOSD and MGL in this patient. Renal involvement in the AOSD was rarely reported in the literature. MGL may be a cause of unexplained proteinuria in AOSD. In this situation, renal biopsy is necessary to establish a definitive diagnosis.

  13. Adult-Onset Fatal Neurohepatopathy in a Woman Caused by MPV17 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Mehta, Neil; Hameed, Bilal; Pekmezci, Melike; Packman, Seymour; Ralph, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are classically considered diseases of early childhood, typically affecting the liver, peripheral, and central nervous systems with a rapidly progressive course. Evidence is emerging that initial symptom onset can extend into adulthood, though few such cases have been reported. We describe a 25-year-old woman who presented initially with secondary amenorrhea, followed by a megaloblastic anemia, lactic acidosis, leukoencephalopathy, progressive peripheral neuropathy, and liver cirrhosis. An apparently homozygous P98L mutation was identified in MPV17, a gene associated with a lethal infantile neurohepatopathy. Homozygosity for the same allele was recently reported in a man with a similar hepatic and neurologic phenotype. This is the first clinical report of an adult female with this disorder, and the first to describe amenorrhea and megaloblastic anemia as likely associated symptoms. PMID:24190800

  14. Adult Onset Henoch-Schonlein Purpura and Intussusception: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a young 26-year-old male who was diagnosed with Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP). Initial presentation was primarily mild gastrointestinal symptoms, which progressed to a life threatening intussusception and subsequently resolved with prompt glucocorticoid use rather than typical surgical intervention. Of importance, the patient's initial gastrointestinal symptoms without associated skin manifestations made the diagnosis difficult. In conclusion, it is important to recognize uncommon presentations of HSP as it may lead to life threatening complications and surgical intervention may be avoided with prompt treatment.

  15. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  16. Adult-onset painful axonal polyneuropathy caused by a dominant NAGLU mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tétreault, Martine; Gonzalez, Michael; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Allard, Pierre; Gehring, Kalle; Leblanc, Diane; Leclerc, Nadine; Schondorf, Ronald; Mathieu, Jean; Zuchner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset painful sensory neuropathies are usually acquired conditions associated with common diseases. Adult presentations of known hereditary forms are often accompanied by other organ involvement. We recruited a large French-Canadian family with a dominantly inherited late-onset painful sensory neuropathy. The main clinical feature is recurrent leg pain that progresses to constant painful paraesthesias in the feet and later the hands. As it evolves, some patients develop a mild sensory ataxia. We selected four affected individuals for whole exome sequencing. Analysis of rare variants shared by all cases led to a list of four candidate variants. Segregation analysis in all 45 recruited individuals has shown that only the p.Ile403Thr variant in the α-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAGLU) gene segregates with the disease. Recessive NAGLU mutations cause the severe childhood lysosomal disease mucopolysacharidosis IIIB. Family members carrying the mutation showed a significant decrease of the enzymatic function (average 45%). The late-onset and variable severity of the symptoms may have precluded the description of such symptoms in parents of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB cases. The identification of a dominant phenotype associated with a NAGLU mutation supports that some carriers of lysosomal enzyme mutations may develop later in life much milder phenotypes. PMID:25818867

  17. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington’s disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions. PMID:26863614

  18. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole; Perrier, Anselme L; Humbert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington's disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions.

  19. Adult-onset presentation of a hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria patient without prior history of neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Kamer; Louie, Kristal T; Qu, Yong; Velasquez, Jorge; Zaldivar, Frank; Rioseco-Camacho, Natalia; Camacho, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway caused by mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, ORNT1 (SLC25A15). In general, the majority of patients with HHH syndrome come to medical attention during infancy or early school years with symptoms such as learning disabilities, changes in cognitive development, spasticity, or liver dysfunction. In this report, we describe a 35-year-old male of Indian descent who was diagnosed with HHH syndrome after he presented to the emergency room with gastroenteritis, disorientation, and slurred speech. Molecular analysis revealed that this patient was heterozygous for two ORNT1 mutations, p.[Gly220Arg(+)Arg275X] (c.[658G>A(+)823C>T]) that had been previously reported in homozygous probands who presented during the first year of life. Cellular studies revealed that the ORNT1 p.Gly220Arg mutation was nonfunctional but targeted to the mitochondria. Given that this patient was a successful college graduate on a vegetarian diet without a prior history of learning or neurological impairment, additional factors such as gene redundancy, environmental, and epigenetic factors may have contributed to the delay in onset of presentation and lack of any previous symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an adult-onset HHH syndrome presentation without a prior history of neurological or cognitive deficiency.

  20. Metabolic impact of adult-onset, isolated, growth hormone deficiency (AOiGHD) due to destruction of pituitary somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Lin, Qing; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Subbaiah, Papasani V; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Vankelecom, Hugo; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2011-01-19

    Growth hormone (GH) inhibits fat accumulation and promotes protein accretion, therefore the fall in GH observed with weight gain and normal aging may contribute to metabolic dysfunction. To directly test this hypothesis a novel mouse model of adult onset-isolated GH deficiency (AOiGHD) was generated by cross breeding rat GH promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice (Cre) with inducible diphtheria toxin receptor mice (iDTR) and treating adult Cre(+/-),iDTR(+/-) offspring with DT to selectively destroy the somatotrope population of the anterior pituitary gland, leading to a reduction in circulating GH and IGF-I levels. DT-treated Cre(-/-),iDTR(+/-) mice were used as GH-intact controls. AOiGHD improved whole body insulin sensitivity in both low-fat and high-fat fed mice. Consistent with improved insulin sensitivity, indirect calorimetry revealed AOiGHD mice preferentially utilized carbohydrates for energy metabolism, as compared to GH-intact controls. In high-fat, but not low-fat fed AOiGHD mice, fat mass increased, hepatic lipids decreased and glucose clearance and insulin output were impaired. These results suggest the age-related decline in GH helps to preserve systemic insulin sensitivity, and in the context of moderate caloric intake, prevents the deterioration in metabolic function. However, in the context of excess caloric intake, low GH leads to impaired insulin output, and thereby could contribute to the development of diabetes.

  1. Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia linked CSF1R mutation: Report of four Korean cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joo; Shin, Jin-Hong; Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Jong Hun; Na, Duk L; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Hwang, Sun Jae; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Young Min; Shin, Myung-Jun; Lee, Myung Jun; Kim, Seong-Jang; Yoon, Uicheul; Park, Do Youn; Jung, Dae Soo; Ahn, Jae Woo; Sung, Suk; Huh, Gi Yeong

    2015-02-15

    We describe detailed clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and neuropathological features in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP), encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD), linked to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) mutations in four Korean cases. Clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and neuropathological findings were obtained by direct evaluation and from previous medical records. The genetic analysis of the CSF1R gene was done in two autopsy-confirmed ALSP cases and two cases where ALSP was suspected based on the clinical and neuroimaging characteristics. We identified two known mutations: c.2342C>T (p.A781V) in one autopsy-proven HDLS and clinically ALSP-suspected case and c.2345G>A (p.R782H) in another autopsy-proven POLD case. We also found a novel mutation (c.2296A>G; p.M766V) in a patient presenting with hand tremor, stuttering and hesitant speech, and abnormal behavior whose father died from a possible diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented ALSP-linked CSF1R mutation in Korea and supports the suggestion that HDLS and POLD, with pathological characteristics that are somewhat different but which are caused by CSF1R mutations, are the same spectrum of disease, ALSP.

  2. Adult-onset multiple acyl CoA dehydrogenation deficiency associated with an abnormal isoenzyme pattern of serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Fuminobu; Baba, Kousuke; Toyooka, Keiko; Liang, Wen-Chen; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamadera, Misaki; Sumi, Hisae; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old male with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). The patient had suffered from exercise intolerance in his hip and thigh muscles for one year. Then, restriction of carbohydrates for a diet made his symptoms rapidly deteriorate. Blood test revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel missense mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase gene (ETFDH), and an abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern: LDH-1 (60.0%) and LDH-2 (26.0%) predominated with abnormally elevated LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (2.3), compared with muscle-derived LDH-5 (4.0%). Oral riboflavin treatment significantly improved his exercise intolerance and the LDH profile: LDH-1 (34.4%), LDH-2 (34.9%), LDH-5 (6.9%) and LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (1.0). The abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern may be one feature of adult-onset MADD selectively affecting type I muscle fibers with relatively high LDH-1 content. PMID:21907580

  3. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eri; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS. PMID:27688774

  4. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Eri; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS. PMID:27688774

  5. The Phospholipase D2 Knock Out Mouse Has Ectopic Purkinje Cells and Suffers from Early Adult-Onset Anosmia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Schrewe, Heinrich; Wakelam, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is an enzyme that produces phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid messenger molecule involved in a number of cellular events including, through its membrane curvature properties, endocytosis. The PLD2 knock out (PLD2KO) mouse has been previously reported to be protected from insult in a model of Alzheimer's disease. We have further analysed a PLD2KO mouse using mass spectrophotometry of its lipids and found significant differences in PA species throughout its brain. We have examined the expression pattern of PLD2 which allowed us to define which region of the brain to analyse for defect, notably PLD2 was not detected in glial-rich regions. The expression pattern lead us to specifically examine the mitral cells of olfactory bulbs, the Cornus Amonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We find that the change to longer PA species correlates with subtle architectural defect in the cerebellum, exemplified by ectopic Purkinje cells and an adult-onset deficit of olfaction. These observations draw parallels to defects in the reelin heterozygote as well as the effect of high fat diet on olfaction. PMID:27658289

  6. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Eri; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS.

  7. Adult-onset Kawasaki disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) and concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuki; Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Noda, Ayako; Yamamoto, Yu; Matsumura, Masami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kawasaki disease (KD) most commonly develops in infants, although its specific cause is still unclear. We report here a rare case of adult-onset KD which revealed to be concurrently infected by Coxsackievirus A4. Case presentation The patient was a 37-year-old Japanese man who presented with fever, exanthema, changes in the peripheral extremities, bilateral non-exudative conjunctival injection, and changes in the oropharynx, signs that meet the diagnostic criteria for KD defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this case, the patient had a significantly high antibody titer for Coxsackievirus A4, which led us to presume that the occurrence of KD was concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection. Conclusion We reported a very rare case of KD which suggests that the disease can be concurrent Coxsackievirus A4 infection. Although KD is an acute childhood disease, with fever as one of the principal features, KD should also be considered in the differential diagnosis when adult patients present with a fever of unknown cause associated with a rash. PMID:26491373

  8. Adult-onset presentation of a hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria patient without prior history of neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Kamer; Louie, Kristal T; Qu, Yong; Velasquez, Jorge; Zaldivar, Frank; Rioseco-Camacho, Natalia; Camacho, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway caused by mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, ORNT1 (SLC25A15). In general, the majority of patients with HHH syndrome come to medical attention during infancy or early school years with symptoms such as learning disabilities, changes in cognitive development, spasticity, or liver dysfunction. In this report, we describe a 35-year-old male of Indian descent who was diagnosed with HHH syndrome after he presented to the emergency room with gastroenteritis, disorientation, and slurred speech. Molecular analysis revealed that this patient was heterozygous for two ORNT1 mutations, p.[Gly220Arg(+)Arg275X] (c.[658G>A(+)823C>T]) that had been previously reported in homozygous probands who presented during the first year of life. Cellular studies revealed that the ORNT1 p.Gly220Arg mutation was nonfunctional but targeted to the mitochondria. Given that this patient was a successful college graduate on a vegetarian diet without a prior history of learning or neurological impairment, additional factors such as gene redundancy, environmental, and epigenetic factors may have contributed to the delay in onset of presentation and lack of any previous symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an adult-onset HHH syndrome presentation without a prior history of neurological or cognitive deficiency. PMID:23430880

  9. Relationship between neuropsychological impairment and grey and white matter changes in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Baldanzi, Sigrid; Cecchi, Paolo; Fabbri, Serena; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Simoncini, Costanza; Angelini, Corrado; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Cosottini, Mirco; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) has a wide phenotypic spectrum and potentially may affect central nervous system with mild to severe involvement. Our aim was to investigate grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) structural alterations in a sample of adult-onset DM1 patients and to evaluate relationship with clinical and cognitive variables. Thirty DM1 patients underwent neuropsychological investigation and 3T-MRI protocol. GM and WM changes were evaluated calculating brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter lesion load (LL% and Fazekas scale) and tract based spatial statistical (TBSS). Patients showed main impairment in tests exploring executive and mnesic domains with visuo-spatial involvement, significantly related to BPF. VBM revealed clusters of widespread GM reduction and TBSS revealed areas of decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and axial diffusivity (AD) in patients compared to a group of matched healthy controls. Multiple regression analyses showed areas of significant negative relationship between left temporal atrophy and verbal memory, between RD and mnesic and visuo-spatial cognitive domains, and between AD and verbal memory. TBSS results indicate that the involvement of normal appearance WM, beyond the signal changes detected with conventional MR imaging (Fazekas scale and LL%), was associated with neuropsychological deficit. These data suggest that disrupted complex neuronal networks can underlie cognitive-behavioural dysfunctions in DM1. PMID:27437180

  10. Liver transplantation versus conservative treatment for adult-onset type II citrullinemia: our experience and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kimura, N; Kubo, N; Narumi, S; Toyoki, Y; Ishido, K; Kudo, D; Umehara, M; Yakoshi, Y; Hakamada, K

    2013-11-01

    Adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in the SLC25A13 gene, is characterized by increased serum citrulline and ammonia levels. Patients with CTLN2 also display various neuropsychiatric symptoms. Many individuals with CTLN2 are fond of protein-rich and/or lipid-rich foods with an aversion to carbohydrate-rich foods. We herein report two cases of CTLN2 treated with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and provide a review of the pertinent literature. Case 1 was a 43-year-old man admitted to our hospital for repetitive episodes of consciousness disturbance. Case 2 was a 37-year-old man admitted to our hospital because of abnormal behavior associated with hyperammonemia. A definitive diagnosis of CTLN2 was accomplished by DNA analysis in both patients, who successfully underwent LDLT using liver segments from donor siblings with confirmed heterozygous gene expression. Case 2 also underwent conservative therapy with arginine and a high-fat, carbohydrate-restricted diet prior to LDLT. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and food was unrestricted in both patients. We also identified 77 cases of CTLN2 in the literature and reviewed them in terms of outcome of both liver transplantation and conservative therapy. The survival rate in patients treated by liver transplantation was 100%, whereas that in patients treated by conservative treatment showed improvement from 39.5% to 76.5% over the years. Liver transplantation is a practical treatment that fundamentally improves patient quality of life after transplantation. However, recent studies have suggested that arginine and sodium pyruvate administration combined with intensive nutritional support is also an effective therapy for CTLN2. Further development of conservative therapy may provide a safer, more affordable alternative to liver transplantation in the near future.

  11. Prolonged remission state of refractory adult onset Still's disease following CD34-selected autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Dominici, M; Govoni, M; Moretti, S; Campioni, D; Corte, R L; Latorraca, A; Tieghi, A; Castagnari, B; Trotta, F; Castoldi, G

    2000-06-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient affected by refractory adult onset Still's disease who achieved a prolonged remission following CD34-selected ABMT. The conditioning regimen was based on the use of CY and anti-thymocyte globulin. A 3.0 and 2.0 log reduction of T (CD3+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes, respectively, was obtained using a Ceprate device to select CD34+ cells from PBSC. In the pre-transplant period (1994-1998) the patient had a chronic persistent disease course with frequent and recurrent systemic articular flares and loss of some functional abilities, despite daily prednisone, pulses of CY and immunosuppressive therapy (CYA or MTX). At the time of ABMT the patient had become non-ambulatory. Within 3 weeks of ABMT the patient showed a marked decrease in joint swelling, and morning stiffness. Joint pain and systemic symptoms disappeared, the patient was able to walk and run and gained general well being. ESR, C-reactive protein and WBC count were significantly decreased, while Hb level increased. This partial remission persisted for at least 1 year after ABMT, although at 15 months of follow-up a reappearance of moderate synovitis in the knees and wrists was noted. Our data further showed that both patient BM microenvironment and stem-progenitor cell function (as assessed by LTC-IC assay) were damaged even 1 year after CD34-selected ABMT, suggesting that the persistence of these alterations could have facilitated the favorable outcome of the disease following ABMT. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 1307-1310. PMID:10871738

  12. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease: A STROBE-compliant case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971-2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases.Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non-PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort).AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD.PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  13. Comparison of Glomerular Transcriptome Profiles of Adult-Onset Steroid Sensitive Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and Minimal Change Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hong; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Weijia; Wei, Chengguo; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiao; Wang, Weiming; Lv, Danfeng; He, John Cijiang; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To search for biomarkers to differentiate primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and minimal change disease (MCD). Methods We isolated glomeruli from kidney biopsies of 6 patients with adult-onset steroid sensitiveFSGS and 5 patients with MCD, and compared the profiles of glomerular transcriptomes between the two groups of patients using microarray analysis. Results Analysis of differential expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that up-regulated DEGs in FSGS patients compared with MCD patients were primarily involved in spermatogenesis, gamete generation, regulation of muscle contraction, response to unfolded protein, cell proliferation and skeletal system development. The down-regulated DEGs were primarily related to metabolic process, intracellular transport, oxidation/reduction andestablishment of intracellular localization. We validated the expression of the top 6 up-regulated and top 6 down-regulated DEGs using real-time PCR. Membrane metallo-endopeptidase (MME) is a down-regulated gene that was previously identified as a key gene for kidney development. Immunostaining confirmed that the protein expression of MME decreased significantly in FSGS kidneys compared with MCD kidneys. Conclusions This report was the first study to examine transcriptomes in Chinese patients with various glomerular diseases. Expressions of MME both in RNA and protein level decreased significantly in glomeruli of FSGS kidneys compared with MCD kidneys. Our data suggested that MME might play a role in the normal physiological function of podocytes and a decrease in MME expression might be related to podocyte injury. We also identified genes and pathways specific for FSGS versus MCD, and our data could help identify potential new biomarkers for the differential diagnosis between these two diseases. PMID:26536600

  14. Solitary mastocytoma presenting in an adult: report and literature review of adult-onset solitary cutaneous mastocytoma with recommendations for evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mastocytosis is either cutaneous (with skin-limited proliferation of mast cells) or systemic (with mast cells in extracutaneous sites). The onset of solitary mastocytoma in an adult is rare. Purpose: A woman with the new onset of solitary mastocytoma is described. The clinical features of patients with adult-onset solitary mastocytoma are summarized. Recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of individuals with adult-onset solitary mastocytoma are proposed. Methods: PubMed was searched with the key words: adult, CD2, CD25, cell, cutaneous, disease, KIT, KIT D816V, mast, mastocytoma, mutation, pigmentosa, solitary, tryptase, and urticarial. The papers generated by the search, and their references, were reviewed. Results: A 38-year-old Taiwanese woman presented with an asymptomatic brown patch, which morphologically mimicked a dysplastic nevus, on her right abdomen; biopsy demonstrated a solitary mastocytoma. Comprehensive evaluation (including serologic and bone marrow examination) excluded systemic mastocytosis and her residual mastocytoma is being monitored. Adult-onset solitary mastocytoma has been described in 16 patients. Lesions were either on the head and neck (5/14), torso (5/14) or extremities (4/14). Urtication following lesion rubbing was noted in 79% (11/14) of patients. Excision of the mastocytoma [75% (9/12)] was the most common treatment. Other management approaches included corticosteroids (topical or intralesional), antihistamines (systemic) or observation. Systemic symptoms were noted in 5 patients: flushing (3 women) and pruritus (3 women); gastrointestinal symptoms and headaches, flushing and/or anaphylaxis were each noted in one woman. None of the patients with adult-onset solitary mastocytoma had systemic mastocytosis; however, only 3 women were evaluated for systemic mastocytosis. Conclusions: Systemic mastocytosis is common in adults with new onset cutaneous mastocytosis. Therefore, a conservative work up for new onset

  15. Solitary mastocytoma presenting in an adult: report and literature review of adult-onset solitary cutaneous mastocytoma with recommendations for evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mastocytosis is either cutaneous (with skin-limited proliferation of mast cells) or systemic (with mast cells in extracutaneous sites). The onset of solitary mastocytoma in an adult is rare. Purpose: A woman with the new onset of solitary mastocytoma is described. The clinical features of patients with adult-onset solitary mastocytoma are summarized. Recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of individuals with adult-onset solitary mastocytoma are proposed. Methods: PubMed was searched with the key words: adult, CD2, CD25, cell, cutaneous, disease, KIT, KIT D816V, mast, mastocytoma, mutation, pigmentosa, solitary, tryptase, and urticarial. The papers generated by the search, and their references, were reviewed. Results: A 38-year-old Taiwanese woman presented with an asymptomatic brown patch, which morphologically mimicked a dysplastic nevus, on her right abdomen; biopsy demonstrated a solitary mastocytoma. Comprehensive evaluation (including serologic and bone marrow examination) excluded systemic mastocytosis and her residual mastocytoma is being monitored. Adult-onset solitary mastocytoma has been described in 16 patients. Lesions were either on the head and neck (5/14), torso (5/14) or extremities (4/14). Urtication following lesion rubbing was noted in 79% (11/14) of patients. Excision of the mastocytoma [75% (9/12)] was the most common treatment. Other management approaches included corticosteroids (topical or intralesional), antihistamines (systemic) or observation. Systemic symptoms were noted in 5 patients: flushing (3 women) and pruritus (3 women); gastrointestinal symptoms and headaches, flushing and/or anaphylaxis were each noted in one woman. None of the patients with adult-onset solitary mastocytoma had systemic mastocytosis; however, only 3 women were evaluated for systemic mastocytosis. Conclusions: Systemic mastocytosis is common in adults with new onset cutaneous mastocytosis. Therefore, a conservative work up for new onset

  16. Adult-Onset Obesity Reveals Prenatal Programming of Glucose-Insulin Sensitivity in Male Sheep Nutrient Restricted during Late Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Philip; Craigon, Jim; Gray, Clint; Rhind, Stuart M.; Loughna, Paul T.; Gardner, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity invokes a range of metabolic disturbances, but the transition from a poor to excessive nutritional environment may exacerbate adult metabolic dysfunction. The current study investigated global maternal nutrient restriction during early or late gestation on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in the adult offspring when lean and obese. Methods/Principal Findings Pregnant sheep received adequate (1.0M; CE, n = 6) or energy restricted (0.7M) diet during early (1–65 days; LEE, n = 6) or late (65–128 days; LEL, n = 7) gestation (term ∼147 days). Subsequent offspring remained on pasture until 1.5 years when all received glucose and insulin tolerance tests (GTT & ITT) and body composition determination by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). All animals were then exposed to an obesogenic environment for 6–7 months and all protocols repeated. Prenatal dietary treatment had no effect on birth weight or on metabolic endpoints when animals were ‘lean’ (1.5 years). Obesity revealed generalised metabolic ‘inflexibility’ and insulin resistance; characterised by blunted excursions of plasma NEFA and increased insulinAUC (from 133 to 341 [s.e.d. 26] ng.ml−1.120 mins) during a GTT, respectively. For LEL vs. CE, the peak in plasma insulin when obese was greater (7.8 vs. 4.7 [s.e.d. 1.1] ng.ml−1) and was exacerbated by offspring sex (i.e. 9.8 vs. 4.4 [s.e.d. 1.16] ng.ml−1; LEL male vs. CE male, respectively). Acquisition of obesity also significantly influenced the plasma lipid and protein profile to suggest, overall, greater net lipogenesis and reduced protein metabolism. Conclusions This study indicates generalised metabolic dysfunction with adult-onset obesity which also exacerbates and ‘reveals’ programming of glucose-insulin sensitivity in male offspring prenatally exposed to maternal undernutrition during late gestation. Taken together, the data suggest that metabolic function appears little compromised in young

  17. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    rearrangements, being observed in 6 of 10 PTC cases with ALK rearrangements versus 2 of 15 cases with no ALK rearrangements. The six radiation-exposed cases of PTC harboring both ALK rearrangements and solid/trabecular-like architecture were associated with higher radiation doses and younger ages at the time of the A-bombing and at diagnosis compared to the other 19 PTC with no detectable gene alterations. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ALK rearrangements are involved in the development of radiation-induced adult-onset PTC. PMID:23050789

  18. Adult onset asymmetric upper limb tremor misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease: A clinical and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Schwingenschuh, Petra; Ruge, Diane; Edwards, Mark J; Terranova, Carmen; Katschnig, Petra; Carrillo, Fatima; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Dickson, John; Lees, Andrew J; Quinn, Niall; Mir, Pablo; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-01-01

    different from controls. Taken together, these results may help differentiate these SWEDDs patients from PD and support our hypothesis that adult-onset dystonia is the underlying diagnosis in this sub-group of patients with SWEDDs. PMID:20131394

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to adult-onset Still's disease: Response to cyclosporine and sildenafil over 15 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Weatherald, Jason; Lategan, Johan; Helmersen, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an autoimmune disease characterized by systemic inflammation and is a rarely reported cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We describe the clinical course of a 40-year-old woman who presented with PAH 19 months after a diagnosis of AOSD. Sildenafil and immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine resulted in clinical and hemodynamic improvement with long-term survival 15 years after her initial presentation of AOSD. We review the literature for published cases of PAH due to AOSD and discuss the potential mechanisms relating inflammatory diseases and PAH. PMID:27408785

  20. A case of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type mimicking typical manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) with hemophagocytic syndrome: diagnostic consideration between malignant lymphoma without lymphadenopathy and AOSD.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takashi; Tanabe, Juichi; Kanemoto, Motoko; Kobayashi, Chiharu; Morita, Sho; Karahashi, Taro

    2009-01-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese man was suffering from high fever, sore throat, arthralgia, and macular salmon-pink eruption. The superficial lymph node was not palpable, and computed tomographic scans from the neck to pelvis demonstrated hepatosplenomegaly without apparent lymphadenopathy. Therefore, the possibility of malignant lymphoma was considered to be extremely low. Serology for Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus showed a postinfectious state, and blood culture was negative. Serum rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody were negative. Leukocytopenia (2.4 x 10(3)/mul) was observed, and thus a diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) was made. Fifty-five milligrams of prednisolone daily improved his symptoms and leukocytopenia promptly, but high fever with severe and progressive thrombocytopenia occurred 12 days later. Bone marrow aspiration revealed the presence of lymphoma cells and hemophagocytosis, and the CD45 gating analysis showed expanding population of CD2(+), CD3(-), and CD56(+) cells. Further, mucosal ulceration in the nasal cavity was detected. Therefore, a diagnosis of extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, concomitant with HPS was made, and treatment with dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide, carboplatin (DeVIC) regimen ameliorated his symptoms and platelet transfusion dependency. Later, a high titer of serum EBV-DNA was detected, which supported the diagnosis. Diagnosing AOSD, extranodal presentation of malignant lymphoma such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, should be carefully considered. PMID:19609486

  1. Nocturnal hydration--an effective modality to reduce recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Obideen, Kamil; Wehbi, Mohammad; Hoteit, Maarouf; Cai, Qiang

    2006-10-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis are common problems associated with some patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). There is no known effective method to prevent recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis in such patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether nocturnal hydration (NH) prevents recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent acute pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset CF. Adult CF patients who were referred to our Pancreatic Diseases Clinic for recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis were enrolled in the study. Each patient was encouraged to drink plenty of water during the night and established a 6-month diary (3 months before and 3 months after NH was initiated), recording the frequency and severity of their abdominal pain, the amount of pain medication taken, and the volume of their water intake. We also reviewed the number of doctor's clinic visits, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations for about 1 year before and 1 year after the initiation of the NH. The frequency and the severity of abdominal pain in this group of patients were significantly reduced. The amount of pain medication and the number of emergency room visits and hospitalizations for abdominal pain and acute pancreatitis were reduced. NH is a simple and cost-effective method to prevent recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset CF.

  2. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Longitudinal changes in cerebellar and subcortical volumes in adult-onset Niemann-Pick disease type C patients treated with miglustat.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Elizabeth A; Walterfang, Mark; Abel, Larry; Desmond, Patricia; Fahey, Michael; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a rare neurovisceral disorder resulting in impaired intracellular lipid trafficking. The only disease-modifying treatment available to date is miglustat, an iminosugar inhibiting the accumulation of lipid by-products in neurons. This study explored how changes in cerebellar grey and white matter volumes, and in subcortical volumes, related to patient treatment status and disability and ataxia ratings. Nine adult-onset NPC patients and 17 matched controls underwent T1-weighted MRI. One patient was not receiving miglustat, and pre-treatment data were available for a further patient. Semi-automated cerebellar and subcortical segmentation was undertaken, and the rates of change in putamen, hippocampal, thalamic and caudal volumes, and grey and white matter cerebellar volumes, were compared to rates of change in Iturriaga disability score, Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and horizontal saccadic gain. Untreated NPC patients appeared to lose cerebellar grey and white matter, bilateral thalamic volume, and right caudate volume faster than treated patients. Cerebellar grey matter volume loss and volume loss in the left thalamus were significantly correlated with Iturriaga disability scale changes. Change in both cerebellar grey and white matter was correlated with decrease in horizontal saccadic gain, but not with change in BARS. This is the first study to examine longitudinal treatment effects of miglustat on cerebellar and subcortical volumes in patients with adult-onset NPC, and is evidence that miglustat may have a protective effect on cerebellar and subcortical structure and function. PMID:26092521

  4. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Is Antimicrobial Resistance a Slowly Emerging Disaster?

    PubMed Central

    Viens, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of antimicrobial resistance is so dire that people are predicting that the era of antibiotics may be coming to an end, ushering in a ‘post-antibiotic’ era. A comprehensive policy response is therefore urgently needed. A part of this response will require framing the problem in such a way that adequately reflects its nature as well as encompassing an approach that has the best prospect of success. This paper considers framing the problem as a slowly emerging disaster, including its potential benefits and difficulties, from a conceptual and policy perspective. PMID:26566396

  6. Progressive skeletal myopathy, a phenotypic variant of desmin myopathy associated with desmin mutations.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Goudeau, Bertrand; Park, Kye-Yoon; Takeda, Kazuyo; Simon-Casteras, Monique; Vasconcelos, Olavo; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Shatunov, Alexey; Nagle, James W; Sivakumar, Kumaraswamy; Vicart, Patrick; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2003-03-01

    Desmin myopathy is a familial or sporadic disorder characterized by the presence of desmin mutations that cause skeletal muscle weakness associated with cardiac conduction block, arrhythmia and heart failure. Distinctive histopathologic features include intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin-reactive deposits and electron-dense granular aggregates in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. We describe two families with features of adult-onset slowly progressive skeletal myopathy without cardiomyopathy. N342D point mutation was present in the desmin helical rod domain in patients of family 1, and I451M mutation was found in the non-helical tail domain in patients of family 2. Of interest, the same I451M mutation has previously been reported in patients with cardiomyopathy and no signs of skeletal myopathy. Some carriers of the I451M mutation did not develop any disease, suggesting incomplete penetrance. Expression studies demonstrated inability of the N342D mutant desmin to form cellular filamentous network, confirming the pathogenic role of this mutation, but the network was not affected by the tail-domain I451M mutation. Progressive skeletal myopathy is a rare phenotypic variant of desmin myopathy allelic to the more frequent cardio-skeletal form.

  7. Neuroepidemiology of cancer and treatment-related neurocognitive dysfunction in adult-onset cancer patients and survivors.

    PubMed

    Jean-Pierre, P; McDonald, B C

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and treatment-related neurocognitive dysfunction (CRND) - impairments in aspects of cognition commonly including attention and memory, information-processing speed, and executive functioning - can negatively affect patients' and survivors' participation in routine activities of daily living and overall quality of life. CRND can be enduring, and varies in severity level. The epidemiology of CRND is not yet clearly established; reported incidence has ranged from 17% to 75% among patients and survivors of noncentral nervous system malignancies, including breast, prostate, cervical, and colorectal cancers. Progress in the development of strategies for assessing and treating CRND has been delayed by limitations in the knowledge of the precise etiology of this adverse condition, as well as the lack of sufficiently sensitive and reliable methods to determine its presence and quantify its severity. In this chapter, we present a brief description of the concept of CRND and its clinical presentation, and discuss the descriptive epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, and availability of treatment interventions. This neuroepidemiologic perspective provides a framework for characterizing CRND, determining its etiology, and understanding its negative effects on routine activities of daily living, to help support the development and testing of reliable interventions to treat this deleterious condition for patients and survivors. PMID:27637965

  8. In vivo and Ex vivo MR Imaging of Slowly Cycling Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Magnitsky, S.; Roesch, A.; Herlyn, M.; Glickson, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Slowly cycling cells are believed to play a critical role in tumor progression and metastatic dissemination. The goal of this study was to develop a method for in vivo detection of slowly cycling cells. To distinguish these cells from more rapidly proliferating cells that constitute the vast majority of cells in tumors, we utilized the well-known effect of label dilution due to division of cells with normal cycle and retention of contrast agent in slowly dividing cells. To detect slowly cycling cells melanoma cells were labeled with iron oxide particles. After labeling, we observed dilution of contrast agent in parallel with cell proliferation in the vast majority of normally cycling cells. A small and distinct sub-population of iron-retaining cells was detected by flow cytometry after 20 days of in vitro proliferation. These iron-retaining cells exhibited high expression of a biological marker of slowly cycling cells, JARID1B. After implantation of labeled cells as xenografts into immunocompromised mice, iron-retaining cells were detected in vivo and ex vivo by MRI that was confirmed by Prussian Blue staining. MR imaging detects not only iron retaining melanoma cells but also iron positive macrophages. Proposed method opens up opportunities to image subpopulation of melanoma cells, which is critical for continuous tumor growth. PMID:21523820

  9. A previously undiagnosed case of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease revealed by PRNP gene analysis in patients with adult-onset ataxia.

    PubMed

    Cagnoli, Claudia; Brussino, Alessandro; Sbaiz, Luca; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Atzori, Cristiana; Caroppo, Paola; Orsi, Laura; Migone, Nicola; Buffa, Carlo; Imperiale, Daniele; Brusco, Alfredo

    2008-07-30

    Ataxia is a frequently reported symptom in prion diseases (PD) and it is characteristic of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), a genetic PD mainly related to the P102L mutation in the PRNP gene. Our aim was to screen for the P102L and other six known PRNP gene mutations (P105L, A117V, Y145X, E200K, D202N, and V210I) a group of 206 consecutive patients diagnosed with adult-onset cerebellar ataxia of unknown origin. The patients, negative for the most common acquired and genetic forms, were analyzed using a combination of restriction endonuclease digestion and pyrosequencing; eight, affected by ataxia and cognitive dysfunction, were also sequenced for the PRNP gene. One patient resulted to be heterozygous for the P102L mutation. Retrospectively, the clinical picture was consistent with a "classical" GSS phenotype. In conclusion, the screening for the P102L mutation, or even the sequencing of the PRNP gene should be taken in consideration in patients with late-onset ataxia (>50 years).

  10. Targeting Proteostasis Through the Protein Quality Control Function of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based Chaperone Machinery for Treatment of Adult Onset Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, William B.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available therapies for adult onset neurodegenerative diseases provide symptomatic relief, but are not disease modifying. We explore here a new neuroprotective approach based on drugs targeting chaperone-directed protein quality control. Critical target proteins that unfold and aggregate in these diseases, such as the polylglutamine androgen receptor (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy), huntingtin (Huntington’s disease), α-synuclein (Parkinson’s disease) and tau (Alzheimer’s disease) are client proteins of Hsp90, and their turnover is regulated by the protein quality control function of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery. In protein quality control Hsp90 and Hsp70 have opposing effects on client protein stability; Hsp90 stabilizes the clients and inhibits their ubiquitination, whereas Hsp70 promotes CHIP-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. We discuss how drugs that modulate proteostasis by inhibiting Hsp90 function or by promoting Hsp70 function enhance the degradation of the critical aggregating proteins and ameliorate toxic symptoms in cell and animal disease models. PMID:25292434

  11. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and Machado-Joseph disease: Incidence of CAG expansions among adult-onset ataxia patients from 311 families with dominant, recessive, or sporadic ataxia

    SciTech Connect

    Ranum, L.P.W.; Gomez, C.; Orr, H.T.

    1995-09-01

    The ataxias are a complex group of diseases with both environmental and genetic causes. Among the autosomal dominant forms of ataxia the genes for two, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), have been isolated. In both of these disorders the molecular basis of disease is the expansion of an unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat. To assess the frequency of the SCA1 and MJD trinucleotide repeat expansions among individuals diagnosed with ataxia, we have collected DNA from individuals representing 311 families with adult-onset ataxia of unknown etiology and screened these samples for trinucleotide repeat expansions within the SCA1 and MJD genes. Within this group there are 149 families with dominantly inherited ataxia. Of these, 3% have SCA1 trinucleotide repeat expansions, whereas 21% were positive for the MJD trinucleotide expansion. Thus, together SCA1 and MJD represent 24% of the autosomal dominant ataxias in our group, and the frequency of MJD is substantially greater than that of SCA1. For the 57 patients with MJD trinucleotide repeat expansions, a strong inverse correlation between CAG repeat size and age at onset was observed (r = -.838). Among the MJD patients, the normal and affected ranges of CAG repeat size are 14-40 and 68-82 repeats, respectively. For SCA1 the normal and affected ranges are much closer, containing 19-38 and 40-81 CAG repeats, respectively. 30 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Successful Use of Higher-Dose Etanercept for Multirefractory Systemic Flare of Adult-Onset Still's Disease with Liver Failure with No Response to Tocilizumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamechika, Shinya; Iwagaitsu, Shiho; Maeda, Shinji; Togawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with refractory systemic flare of adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure despite high-dose corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and tocilizumab, was successfully treated with additional use of etanercept. Etanercept at a dose of 50 mg weekly was partially effective but could not reduce the dose of concomitant betamethasone from 5 mg/day. Etanercept at a dose of 75 mg weekly could lead her to clinical remission and enabled successful tapering off the corticosteroids and discontinuation of etanercept. Normalization of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and persistent elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor α under the treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressants suggest that tumor necrosis factor α was more deeply involved than at least interleukin 6 in the pathogenesis of refractoriness of the disease in this patient, and these findings might be indicative of potential efficacy for adjunctive use of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor rather than an interleukin 6 inhibitor. PMID:24455384

  13. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-01

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.). PMID:24566697

  14. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jaehong; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Wang, Lirong; Hafeez, Imran; Herz, Joachim; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Guénette, Suzanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    FE65 and FE65L1 are cytoplasmic adaptor proteins that bind a variety of proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein, and that mediate the assembly of multimolecular complexes. We previously reported that FE65/FE65L1 double knockout (DKO) mice display disorganized laminin in meningeal fibroblasts and a cobblestone lissencephaly-like phenotype in the developing cortex. Here, we examined whether loss of FE65 and FE65L1 causes ocular and muscular deficits, 2 phenotypes that frequently accompany cobblestone lissencephaly. Eyes of FE65/FE65L1 DKO mice develop normally, but lens degeneration becomes apparent in young adult mice. Abnormal lens epithelial cell migration, widespread small vacuole formation, and increased laminin expression underneath lens capsules suggest impaired interaction between epithelial cells and capsular extracellular matrix in DKO lenses. Cortical cataracts develop in FE65L1 knockout (KO) mice aged 16 months or more but are absent in wild-type or FE65 KO mice. FE65 family KO mice show attenuated grip strength, and the nuclei of DKO muscle cells frequently locate in the middle of muscle fibers. These findings reveal that FE65 and FE65L1 are essential for the maintenance of lens transparency, and their loss produce phenotypes in brain, eye, and muscle that are comparable to the clinical features of congenital muscular dystrophies in humans.—Suh, J., Moncaster, J. A., Wang, L., Hafeez, I., Herz, J., Tanzi, R. E., Goldstein, L. E., Guénette, S. Y. FE65 and FE65L1 amyloid precursor protein–binding protein compound null mice display adult-onset cataract and muscle weakness. PMID:25757569

  15. Localization of a locus (GLC1B) for adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma to the 2cen-q13 region

    SciTech Connect

    Stoilova, D.; Trifan, O.C.; Sarfarazi, M.

    1996-08-15

    Primary open angle glaucoma (GLC1) is a common ocular disorder with a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve and visual field defects that is often associated with an elevated intraocular pressure. The severe but rare juvenile-onset type has previously been mapped to 1q21-q31, and its genetic heterogeneity has been established. Herein, we present a new locus (GLC1B) for one form of GLC1 on chromosome 2cen-q13 with a clinical presentation of low to moderate intraocular pressure, onset in late 40s, and a good response to medical treatment. Two-point and haplotype analyses of affected and unaffected meioses in six families provided maximum linkage information with D2S417, GATA112EO3, D2S113, D2S373, and D2S274 (lod scores ranging from 3.11 to 6.48) within a region of 8.5 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S2264. Analysis of affected meioses alone revealed no recombination with an additional two markers (D2S2264 and D2S135) in a region of 11.2 cM that is flanked by D2S2161 and D2S176. Analysis of unaffected meioses identified only one healthy 86-year-old male who has inherited the entire affected haplotype and, hence, is a gene carrier for this condition. Eight additional families with similar and/or different clinical presentation did not show any linkage to this region and, therefore, provided evidence for genetic heterogeneity of adult-onset primary open angle glaucoma. 63 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Intrauterine protein restriction combined with early postnatal overfeeding was not associated with adult-onset obesity but produced glucose intolerance by pancreatic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We investigated if whether intrauterine protein restriction in combination with overfeeding during lactation would cause adult-onset obesity and metabolic disorders. After birth, litters from dams fed with control (17% protein) and low protein (6% protein) diets were adjusted to a size of four (CO and LO groups, respectively) or eight (CC and LC groups, respectively) pups. All of the offspring were fed a diet containing 12% protein from the time of weaning until they were 90 d old. Compared to the CC and LC groups, the CO and LO groups had higher relative and absolute food intakes, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production; lower brown adipose tissue weight and lipid content and greater weight gain and absolute and relative white adipose tissue weight and absolute lipid content. Compared with the CO and CC rats, the LC and LO rats exhibited higher relative food intake, brown adipose tissue weight and lipid content, reduced oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and spontaneous activity, increased relative retroperitoneal adipose tissue weight and unaltered absolute white adipose tissue weight and lipid content. The fasting serum glucose was similar among the groups. The area under the glucose curve was higher in the LO and CO rats than in the LC and CC rats. The basal insulinemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were lower in the LO group than in the other groups. The total area under the insulin curve for the LO rats was similar to the CC rats, and both were lower than the CO and LC rats. Kitt was higher in the LO, LC and CO groups than in the CC group. Thus, intrauterine protein restriction followed by overfeeding during lactation did not induce obesity, but produced glucose intolerance by impairing pancreatic function in adulthood. PMID:23305533

  17. Intrauterine protein restriction combined with early postnatal overfeeding was not associated with adult-onset obesity but produced glucose intolerance by pancreatic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Grazielle Vitória Ponti; Coutinho, Felipe Rodrigues; Faiad, Jaline Zandonato; Taki, Marina Satie; de Lima Reis, Silvia Regina; Ignácio-Souza, Letícia Martins; Paiva, Adriene Alexandra; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Gomes-da-Silva, Maria Helena Gaíva; Martins, Maria Salete Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    We investigated if whether intrauterine protein restriction in combination with overfeeding during lactation would cause adult-onset obesity and metabolic disorders. After birth, litters from dams fed with control (17% protein) and low protein (6% protein) diets were adjusted to a size of four (CO and LO groups, respectively) or eight (CC and LC groups, respectively) pups. All of the offspring were fed a diet containing 12% protein from the time of weaning until they were 90 d old. Compared to the CC and LC groups, the CO and LO groups had higher relative and absolute food intakes, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production; lower brown adipose tissue weight and lipid content and greater weight gain and absolute and relative white adipose tissue weight and absolute lipid content. Compared with the CO and CC rats, the LC and LO rats exhibited higher relative food intake, brown adipose tissue weight and lipid content, reduced oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and spontaneous activity, increased relative retroperitoneal adipose tissue weight and unaltered absolute white adipose tissue weight and lipid content. The fasting serum glucose was similar among the groups. The area under the glucose curve was higher in the LO and CO rats than in the LC and CC rats. The basal insulinemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were lower in the LO group than in the other groups. The total area under the insulin curve for the LO rats was similar to the CC rats, and both were lower than the CO and LC rats. Kitt was higher in the LO, LC and CO groups than in the CC group. Thus, intrauterine protein restriction followed by overfeeding during lactation did not induce obesity, but produced glucose intolerance by impairing pancreatic function in adulthood. PMID:23305533

  18. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara; Chakraborty, Subhadip; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  19. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  20. TLR4 Endogenous Ligand S100A8/A9 Levels in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease and Their Association with Disease Activity and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Han, Jae Ho; Kim, Woo-Jung; Noh, Hyun Jin; An, Jeong-Mi; Yim, Hyunee; Jung, Ju-Yang; Kim, You-Sun; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    S100A8/A9 has been suggested as a marker of disease activity in patients with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We evaluated the clinical significance of S100A8/A9 as a biomarker and its pathogenic role in AOSD. Blood samples were collected prospectively from 20 AOSD patients and 20 healthy controls (HCs). Furthermore, skin and lymph node biopsy specimens of AOSD patients were investigated for S100A8/A9 expression levels via immunohistochemistry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of active AOSD patients and HCs were investigated for S100A8/A9 cell signals. S100A8/A9, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in active AOSD patients were higher than those of HCs. S100A8/A9 levels correlated positively with IL-1β, TNF-α and C-reactive protein. The inflammatory cells expressing S100A8/A9 were graded from one to three in skin and lymph node biopsies of AOSD patients. The grading for S100A8/A9 was more intense in the skin lesions with karyorrhexis, mucin deposition, and neutrophil infiltration. Like lipopolysaccharide (LPS), S100A8/A9 induced phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) in PBMCs, suggesting that S100A8/A9 activates Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways. These findings suggest that S100A8/A9 may be involved in the inflammatory response with induction of proinflammatory cytokines and may serve as a clinicopathological marker for disease activity in AOSD. PMID:27537874

  1. Localization of the fourth locus (GLC1E) for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to the 10p15-p14 region.

    PubMed

    Sarfarazi, M; Child, A; Stoilova, D; Brice, G; Desai, T; Trifan, O C; Poinoosawmy, D; Crick, R P

    1998-03-01

    One of the major causes of blindness is primary open-angle glaucoma, which affects millions of elderly people worldwide. Genetic studies have so far mapped three loci for the adult-onset form of this condition to the 2cen-q13, 3q21-q24, and 8q23 regions. Herein, we report the localization of a fourth locus, to the 10p15-p14 region, in one large British family with a classical form of normal-tension open-angle glaucoma. Of the 42 meioses genotyped in this pedigree, 39 subjects (16 affected) inherited a haplotype compatible with their prior clinical designation, whereas the remaining 3 were classified as unknown. Although a maximum LOD score of 10.00 at a recombination fraction of straight theta=.00 was obtained with D10S1216, 21 other markers provided significant values, varying between 3.77 and 9.70. When only the affected meioses of this kindred were analyzed, LOD scores remained statistically significant, ranging from 3.16 (D10S527) to 3.57 (D10S506). Two critical recombinational events in the affected subjects positioned this new locus to a region of approximately 21 cM, flanked by D10S1729 and D10S1664. However, an additional recombination in a 59-year-old unaffected female suggests that this locus resides between D10S585 (or D10S1172) and D10S1664, within a genetic distance of 5-11 cM. However, the latter minimum region must be taken cautiously, because the incomplete penetrance has previously been documented for this group of eye conditions. A partial list of genes that positionally are considered as candidates includes NET1, PRKCT, ITIH2, IL2RA, IL15RA, IT1H2, hGATA3, the mRNA for open reading frame KIAA0019, and the gene for D123 protein.

  2. Stimulation-dependent myocardial calcium uptake into slowly exchangeable compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Fintel, M.; Langer, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial calcium uptake into slowly exchangeable sites was increased in response to beating following a period of prolonged quiescence (> 1 hr). Net calcium uptake was measured in rabbit interventricular septa using the /sup 45/Ca washout technique. The maximal increment of slowly exchangeable calcium induced by beating was 20 +/- 2% of calcium uptake during quiescence. The increment in calcium uptake induced by 282 beats in 10 minutes did not differ from the increment induced by 60 beats but was significantly greater than the increment induced by 35 and 15 beats. The total number of beats rather than the frequency of stimulation appeared to be the most critical factor which determined the increment in calcium uptake. Based on the increment of 0.12 +/- 0.02 mmoles/kg dry weight obtained when 15 beats occurred in 10 minutes, the minimum amount of calcium which entered slowly exchangeable sites per beat was calculated to be 1 ..mu..mol/kg wet weight. The increment in slowly exchangeable calcium induced by beating was not affected by ryanodine but was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitor CCCP. In conclusion, a net increment in slowly exchangeable calcium occurs when beating is resumed following a period of prolonged quiescence. This suggests that calcium influx exceeds efflux transiently, under these conditions, and that slowly exchangeable sites represent an important mechanism by which a fraction of incoming calcium is buffered.

  3. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP).

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F; Stanley, E Richard

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/- and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/- mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/- mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/- mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches. Furthermore

  4. Free Electron Lasers with Slowly Varying Beam and Undulator Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    The performance of a free electron lasers (FEL) is affected when the electron beam energy varies alone the undulator as would be caused by vacuum pipe wakefields and/or when the undulator strength parameter is tapered in the small signal regime until FEL saturation. In this paper, we present a self-consistent theory of FELs with slowly-varying beam and undulator parameters. A general method is developed to apply the WKB approximation to the beam-radiation system by employing the adjoint eigenvector that is orthogonal to the eigenfunctions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations. This method may be useful for other slowly varying processes in beam dynamics.

  5. AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AUTOMATED MALLEABLE ANNEALING OVENS SLOWLY HEAT AND COOL CASTINGS AS THEY MOVE IN BINS ALONG TRACKS IN THE OVEN BOTTOM IN THE MALLEABLE ANNEALING BUILDING. THIS PROCESS TRANSFORMS BRITTLE WHITE IRON CASTINGS INTO SOFTER, STRONGER MALLEABLE IRON. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Radiative transitions of excited ions moving slowly in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hongwei Chen, Wencong; Li, Peng; Zhao, Yongtao; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Zhen; Li, Fuli; Dong, Chenzhong

    2014-12-15

    The electric dipole transitions of excited ions moving slowly in plasmas are studied. The results show that some transitions forbidden for excited ions at rest become allowed for moving excited ions. The transition rates change with varying speed of the ions. Forbidden transitions are strongly influenced by the speed, non-forbidden transitions are weakly influenced.

  7. Molecular basis of adult-onset and chronic G sub M2 gangliosidoses in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin: Substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the. alpha. -subunit of. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Paw, B.H.; Kaback, M.M.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Chronic and adult-onset G{sub M2} gangliosidoses are neurological disorders caused by marked deficiency of the A isoenzyme of {beta}-hexosaminidase; they occur in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, though less frequently than classic (infantile) Tay-Sachs disease. Earlier biosynthetic studies had identified a defective {alpha}-subunit that failed to associate with the {beta}-subunit. The authors have now found a guanosine to adenosine transition at the 3{prime} end of exon 7, which causes substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the {alpha}-subunit. An RNase protection assay was used to localize the mutation to a segment of mRNA from fibroblasts of a patient with the adult-onset disorder. That segment of mRNA (after reverse transcription) and a corresponding segment of genomic DNA were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The sequence analysis, together with an assay based on the loss of a ScrFI restriction site, showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote who had inherited the 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation from his father and an allelic null mutation from his mother. The 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation, in compound heterozygosity with a presumed null allele, was also found in fetal fibroblasts with an association-defective phenotype and in cells from five patients with chronic G{sub M2} gangliosidosis.

  8. Studies for slowly rotating asteroids (168) Sibylla and (346) Hermentaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaobin; Muinonen, Karri; Han, Xianming L.; Kwok, Chi-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Studies for spin parameters and shapes of asteroids provide us with important information about the interior structure of asteroids and the physical processes they have undergone. A large sample of basic physical parameters can help us also understand the evolution of asteroids. There is scarce information for slowly-rotating larger asteroids because more effort is required for observing them. Because of this, we have established an international collaboration to study slowly-rotating asteroids. As the first step of this project, we have observed asteroids (168) Sibylla and (346) Hermentaria in 2014 and 2015 using several telescopes located in China, Chile, and U.S.A. Combining previous photometric data with our new data, we have performed preliminary analyses and obtained spin parameters and shapes with their uncertainties for these two slowly-rotating asteroids for the first time, using the convex inversion method and the virtual photometry Monte Carlo method. A pair of pole solutions for (168) Sibylla are found around (4.3°, 53.5°) and (183.5°, 52.6°) with a period of 47.0000 h. We have found that the shape of Sibylla resembles an oblate spheroid. For (346) Hermentaria, we have also found a pair of pole solutions around (134.5°, 16.7°) and (321.5°, 14.5°) with comparable rms-values with a spin period of about 17.79000 h, and a shape resembling a prolate spheroid.

  9. Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating material body: External metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Philippe; Poisson, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We construct the external metric of a slowly rotating, tidally deformed material body in general relativity. The tidal forces acting on the body are assumed to be weak and to vary slowly with time, and the metric is obtained as a perturbation of a background metric that describes the external geometry of an isolated, slowly rotating body. The tidal environment is generic and characterized by two symmetric trace-free tidal moments Ea b and Ba b, and the body is characterized by its mass M , its radius R , and a dimensionless angular-momentum vector χa≪1 . The perturbation accounts for all couplings between χa and the tidal moments. The body's gravitational response to the applied tidal field is measured in part by the familiar gravitational Love numbers K2el and K2mag , but we find that the coupling between the body's rotation and the tidal environment requires the introduction of four new quantities, which we designate as rotational-tidal Love numbers. All these Love numbers are gauge invariant in the usual sense of perturbation theory, and all vanish when the body is a black hole.

  10. Slowly rotating black holes with nonlinear electrodynamics in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendi, S. H.; Sepehri Rad, M.

    2014-10-01

    Employing linear order perturbation theory with the rotation parameter as the perturbative parameter, we obtain asymptotically AdS slowly rotating black hole solutions in the Einstein gravity with Born-Infeld (BI) type nonlinear electrodynamics (NED). We start from asymptotically AdS static black hole solutions coupled to BI type NED in five dimensions. Then, we consider the effect of adding a small amount of angular momenta to the seed solutions. Finally, we investigate the geometry and thermodynamic properties of the solutions.

  11. Bending of solitons in weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Abhik Janaki, M. S. Kundu, Anjan

    2015-12-15

    The bending of solitons in two dimensional plane is presented in the presence of weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous ion density for the propagation of ion acoustic soliton in unmagnetized cold plasma with isothermal electrons. Using reductive perturbation technique, a modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation is obtained with a chosen unperturbed ion density profile. The exact solution of the equation shows that the phase of the solitary wave gets modified by a function related to the unperturbed inhomogeneous ion density causing the soliton to bend in the two dimensional plane, while the amplitude of the soliton remains constant.

  12. Slowly moving disturbances in the X-ray corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Svestka, Z.

    1979-01-01

    Sequences of soft X-ray pictures, taken aboard Skylab between May and November, 1973, have made it possible to detect slowly moving disturbances originating in disrupted filaments and causing subsequent brightenings of distant coronal structures. With speeds decreasing from approximately 400 km/sec shortly after the filament disruption to approximately 10 km/sec four or five hours later, these disturbances appear to be identical with slow waves earlier inferred by Bruzel (1952, 1969), Oehman (1953), and Yajima (1971) from chromospheric observations.

  13. Shear flow destabilization of a slowly rotating tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz destabilizing effect of shear in toroidal rotation on ideal magnetohydrodynamic localized interchange is studied in a tokamak with a general geometry. The method of maximizing the growth rate given by Frieman and Rotenberg is utilized. An explicit stability criterion is given for a slowly rotating tokamak with a non-negligible shearing rate in its rotation profile. It is found that rotation shear can weaken the stabilizing effect of the magnetic field shear and also allow the coupling of the sound wave to the shear Alfvén wave which destabilizes the plasma.

  14. An atypical presentation of adult-onset Still’s disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and macrophage activation syndrome treated with immunosuppression: a case-based review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Daniel K.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Haythe, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known complication of rheumatologic diseases, but it is only rarely associated with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented in a pulmonary hypertension crisis and was found to have underlying AOSD with PAH and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with a course complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). She dramatically improved with steroids, cyclosporine A, and anakinra, with total resolution of the MAS and significant improvement of her pulmonary arterial pressures. While there are only select case reports of AOSD associated with PAH, this is the first reported case of (1) AOSD complicated by both PAH and MAS and (2) AOSD complicated by biopsy-proven NSIP. Clinically, this case highlights the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of PAH and MAS from underlying AOSD and supports their use in this setting. PMID:27162622

  15. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"-the time derivative of the driving field phase-matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient. PMID:27415271

  16. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"—the time derivative of the driving field phase—matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient.

  17. A slowly evolving host moves first in symbiotic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damore, James; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Symbiotic relationships, both parasitic and mutualistic, are ubiquitous in nature. Understanding how these symbioses evolve, from bacteria and their phages to humans and our gut microflora, is crucial in understanding how life operates. Often, symbioses consist of a slowly evolving host species with each host only interacting with its own sub-population of symbionts. The Red Queen hypothesis describes coevolutionary relationships as constant arms races with each species rushing to evolve an advantage over the other, suggesting that faster evolution is favored. Here, we use a simple game theoretic model of host- symbiont coevolution that includes population structure to show that if the symbionts evolve much faster than the host, the equilibrium distribution is the same as it would be if it were a sequential game where the host moves first against its symbionts. For the slowly evolving host, this will prove to be advantageous in mutualisms and a handicap in antagonisms. The model allows for symbiont adaptation to its host, a result that is robust to changes in the parameters and generalizes to continuous and multiplayer games. Our findings provide insight into a wide range of symbiotic phenomena and help to unify the field of coevolutionary theory.

  18. Dynamic control for nanostructures through slowly ramping parameters.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jaeyun; Blick, Robert; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a nanostructure control method which uses slowly ramping parameters. We demonstrate the dynamics of this method in both a nonlinear classical system and a quantum system. When a quantum mechanical two-level atom (quantum dot) is irradiated by an electric field with a slowly increasing frequency, there exists a sudden transition from ground (excited) to excited (ground) state. This occurs when the ramping rate is smaller than the square of the Rabi frequency. The transition arises when its "instant frequency"-the time derivative of the driving field phase-matches the resonance frequency, satisfying the Fermi golden rule. We also find that the parameter ramping is an efficient control manner for classical nanomechanical shuttles. For ramping of driving amplitudes, the shuttle's mechanical oscillation is amplified and even survives when the ramping is stopped outside the original oscillation region. This strange oscillation is due to the entrance into a multistable dynamic region in phase space. For ramping of driving frequencies, an onset of oscillation arises when the instant frequency enters the oscillation region. Thus, regardless of being classical or quantum, the instant frequency is physically relevant. We discuss in which conditions the dynamic control is efficient.

  19. A Search for slowly moving planets in the distant Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Edward; Jones, R.; Krughoff, K. Simon; Kavelaars, J. J.; Gladman, Brett

    2016-10-01

    Objects beyond several hundred AU from the Sun move so slowly that even at opposition their tiny apparent sky motions result in them not being detected in common search algorithms applied to imaging spaced at roughly hourly intervals. We are searching roughly 160 square degrees of imaging data from the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS) running on CFHT, which has a usable multi-night cadence. In that data, objects beyond about 300 AU appear to be stationary (within tolerances) on the sky on a given 2 hour period, but will move between days. Our search will thus be senstive to objects in the 300-1000 AU distance range (with rough corresponding minimum diameters, respectively, of 2,000-30,000 km). This will be acheived by creating catalogue of sources that are stationary in three images spaced an hour apart (known as a triplet) and matching it in catalogues of sources in nights that are up to two months either side of the triplet. Absence outside the triplet night yields candidates that could be very slowly moving planetary scale objects. Obviously dozens of planets are needed in the 300-1000 AU distance range if the expected number of found planets is one. We report our progress in this effort.

  20. The strange flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizota, Taketo; Kurogi, Kouhei; Ohya, Yuji; Okajima, Atsushi; Naruo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-05-01

    The strange three-dimensional flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls is one of the most interesting and unknown phenomenon associated with the trajectories of sports balls. Many spectators have experienced numerous exciting and emotional instances while observing the curious flight behaviour of these balls. We examine the aerodynamic mechanisms of erratic ball behaviours through real flight observations, unsteady force measurements and flow pattern visualisations. The strange behaviour is elucidated by the relationship between the unsteady forces on the ball and the wake flow. The irregular changes in position for twin longitudinal vortices have already been discovered in the supercritical Reynolds number region of a sphere with a smooth surface. This finding is applicable to the strange behaviour of the flight of soccer balls with this supercritical flow. The players, spectators, and television viewers will gain greater insight into the effects of soccer ball flights.

  1. Precise rotation rates for five slowly rotating A stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2014-04-01

    Projected rotation rates of five early A-type slowly rotating stars are measured spectroscopically to a precision of 0.2 km s{sup –1}. A detailed Fourier analysis is done, as well as a comparison of profiles directly. Macroturbulence is needed in addition to rotation to reproduce the profile shapes. An upper limit of ≲2 km s{sup –1} is placed on the microturbulence dispersion. Small unexplained differences between the models and the observations are seen in the sidelobe structure of the transforms. The v sin i results are: α Dra, 26.2; θ Leo, 22.5; α CMa A, 16.7; γ Gem A, 10.7; o Peg, 6.0 km s{sup –1}. These stars are suitable as standards for measuring rotation using less fundamental methods.

  2. Quantization of maximally charged slowly moving black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siopsis, George

    2001-05-01

    We discuss the quantization of a system of slowly moving extreme Reissner-Nordström black holes. In the near-horizon limit, this system has been shown to possess an SL(2,R) conformal symmetry. However, the Hamiltonian appears to have no well-defined ground state. This problem can be circumvented by a redefinition of the Hamiltonian due to de Alfaro, Fubini, and Furlan (DFF). We apply the Faddeev-Popov quantization procedure to show that the Hamiltonian with no ground state corresponds to a gauge in which there is an obstruction at the singularities of moduli space requiring a modification of the quantization rules. The redefinition of the Hamiltonian in the manner of DFF corresponds to a different choice of gauge. The latter is a good gauge leading to standard quantization rules. Thus the DFF trick is a consequence of a standard gauge-fixing procedure in the case of black hole scattering.

  3. Periodic attitude control of a slowly spinning spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todosiev, E. P.

    1973-01-01

    A periodic attitude control system is presented which permits control of secular errors of a slowly spinning spacecraft operating in a high disturbance environment. Attitude errors of the spin-axis are detected by sun sensors (or rate gyros) and are controlled by a periodic control law which modulates external control torques generated by mass expulsion torquers. Attitude stability during the uncontrolled periods is obtained passively via the vehicle spin momentum. Equations of motion, a system block diagram, and design parameters are presented for a typical spacecraft application. Simulation results are included which demonstrate the feasibility of the novel control concept. Salient features of the periodic control approach are implementation simplicity, excellent response, and a propellant utilization efficiency greater than 75 percent.

  4. Slowly digestible starch: concept, mechanism, and proposed extended glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genyi; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2009-11-01

    Starch is the major glycemic carbohydrate in foods, and its nutritional property is related to its rate and extent of digestion and absorption in the small intestine. A classification of starch into rapidly digestible starch (RDS), slowly digestible starch (SDS), and resistant starch (RS) based on the in vitro Englyst test is used to specify the nutritional quality of starch. Both the RDS and RS fractions have been extensively studied while there are only limited studies on the intermediate starch fraction of SDS, particularly regarding its structural basis and slow digestion mechanism. The current understanding of SDS including its concept, measurement method, structural basis and mechanism, physiological consequences, and approaches to make SDS is reviewed. An in vivo method of extended glycemic index (EGI) is proposed to evaluate its metabolic effect and related health consequences.

  5. The strange flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls.

    PubMed

    Mizota, Taketo; Kurogi, Kouhei; Ohya, Yuji; Okajima, Atsushi; Naruo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The strange three-dimensional flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls is one of the most interesting and unknown phenomenon associated with the trajectories of sports balls. Many spectators have experienced numerous exciting and emotional instances while observing the curious flight behaviour of these balls. We examine the aerodynamic mechanisms of erratic ball behaviours through real flight observations, unsteady force measurements and flow pattern visualisations. The strange behaviour is elucidated by the relationship between the unsteady forces on the ball and the wake flow. The irregular changes in position for twin longitudinal vortices have already been discovered in the supercritical Reynolds number region of a sphere with a smooth surface. This finding is applicable to the strange behaviour of the flight of soccer balls with this supercritical flow. The players, spectators, and television viewers will gain greater insight into the effects of soccer ball flights. PMID:23695000

  6. Calculation of trajectories using constant and slowly varying functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, B. K.

    1971-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating trajectories for the restricted problem of three bodies which utilizes conic propagation of the state vector with frequency correction of position and velocity by means of a constant or slowly varying function. This method of calculating trajectories was applied to the planar circular restricted three body problem, the planar elliptic restricted problem, and the ephemeral restricted problem. Two methods (the refined method and the straight forward method) of determining the direction of the position correction are presented for the circular restricted problem and the elliptic restricted problem of three bodies. Only the straight forward method was used with the ephemeral restricted problem. The earth, the moon, and a space vehicle comprise the restricted three body model that is used.

  7. The strange flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls

    PubMed Central

    Mizota, Taketo; Kurogi, Kouhei; Ohya, Yuji; Okajima, Atsushi; Naruo, Takeshi; Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The strange three-dimensional flight behaviour of slowly spinning soccer balls is one of the most interesting and unknown phenomenon associated with the trajectories of sports balls. Many spectators have experienced numerous exciting and emotional instances while observing the curious flight behaviour of these balls. We examine the aerodynamic mechanisms of erratic ball behaviours through real flight observations, unsteady force measurements and flow pattern visualisations. The strange behaviour is elucidated by the relationship between the unsteady forces on the ball and the wake flow. The irregular changes in position for twin longitudinal vortices have already been discovered in the supercritical Reynolds number region of a sphere with a smooth surface. This finding is applicable to the strange behaviour of the flight of soccer balls with this supercritical flow. The players, spectators, and television viewers will gain greater insight into the effects of soccer ball flights. PMID:23695000

  8. Slowly rotating black hole solutions to Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Sentuerk, Cetin

    2010-11-15

    We present a new stationary solution to the field equations of Horava-Lifshitz gravity with the detailed balance condition and for any value of the coupling constant {lambda}>1/3. This is the generalization of the corresponding spherically symmetric solution earlier found by Lue, Mei, and Pope to include a small amount of angular momentum. For the relativistic value {lambda}=1, the solution describes slowly rotating AdS type black holes. With a soft violation of the detailed balance condition and for {lambda}=1, we also find such a generalization for the Schwarzschild type black hole solution of the theory. Finally, using the canonical Hamiltonian approach, we calculate the mass and the angular momentum of these solutions.

  9. Slowly rotating black holes in Einstein-æther theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barausse, Enrico; Sotiriou, Thomas P.; Vega, Ian

    2016-02-01

    We study slowly rotating, asymptotically flat black holes in Einstein-æther theory and show that solutions that are free from naked finite area singularities form a two-parameter family. These parameters can be thought of as the mass and angular momentum of the black hole, while there are no independent æ ther charges. We also show that the æ ther has nonvanishing vorticity throughout the spacetime, as a result of which there is no hypersurface that resembles the universal horizon found in static, spherically symmetric solutions. Moreover, for experimentally viable choices of the coupling constants, the frame-dragging potential of our solutions only shows percent-level deviations from the corresponding quantities in General Relativity and Hořava gravity. Finally, we uncover and discuss several subtleties in the correspondence between Einstein-æther theory and Hořava gravity solutions in the cω→∞ limit.

  10. Nanoscale NMR velocimetry by means of slowly diffusing tracer particles.

    PubMed

    Wassenius, Helena; Callaghan, Paul T

    2004-08-01

    The resolution of NMR velocimetry is inherently limited by random displacements due to molecular self-diffusion, and has so far not extended below a few tens of microns. We report here an extension to the nanoscale domain, a result achieved by the use of slowly diffusing, NMR-visible core-shell latex particles. These particles comprise an oil core surrounded by a solid polymer shell, making spheres of diameter 370 nm. Using these particles in the annulus of a concentric cylinder Couette cell, we have measured flow-induced displacements down to a few hundreds of nanometers, allowing the observation of the solid-to-liquid transition of a glassy system. We envisage new possibilities for NMR velocimetry as an experimental tool for colloidal chemistry and physics.

  11. Nanoscale NMR velocimetry by means of slowly diffusing tracer particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassenius, Helena; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2004-08-01

    The resolution of NMR velocimetry is inherently limited by random displacements due to molecular self-diffusion, and has so far not extended below a few tens of microns. We report here an extension to the nanoscale domain, a result achieved by the use of slowly diffusing, NMR-visible core-shell latex particles. These particles comprise an oil core surrounded by a solid polymer shell, making spheres of diameter 370 nm. Using these particles in the annulus of a concentric cylinder Couette cell, we have measured flow-induced displacements down to a few hundreds of nanometers, allowing the observation of the solid-to-liquid transition of a glassy system. We envisage new possibilities for NMR velocimetry as an experimental tool for colloidal chemistry and physics.

  12. Weakly coupled oscillators in a slowly varying world.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngmin; Ermentrout, Bard

    2016-06-01

    We extend the theory of weakly coupled oscillators to incorporate slowly varying inputs and parameters. We employ a combination of regular perturbation and an adiabatic approximation to derive equations for the phase-difference between a pair of oscillators. We apply this to the simple Hopf oscillator and then to a biophysical model. The latter represents the behavior of a neuron that is subject to slow modulation of a muscarinic current such as would occur during transient attention through cholinergic activation. Our method extends and simplifies the recent work of Kurebayashi (Physical Review Letters, 111, 214101, 2013) to include coupling. We apply the method to an all-to-all network and show that there is a waxing and waning of synchrony of modulated neurons.

  13. Slowly rotating black holes in alternative theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Paolo; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Crispino, Luis C. B.; Cardoso, Vitor

    2011-10-15

    We present, in closed analytic form, a general stationary, slowly rotating black hole, which is a solution to a large class of alternative theories of gravity in four dimensions. In these theories, the Einstein-Hilbert action is supplemented by all possible quadratic, algebraic curvature invariants coupled to a scalar field. The solution is found as a deformation of the Schwarzschild metric in general relativity. We explicitly derive the changes to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit and at the light ring in closed form. These results could be useful when comparing general relativity against alternative theories by (say) measurements of x-ray emission in accretion disks, or by stellar motion around supermassive black holes. When gravitational-wave astronomy comes into force, strong constraints on the coupling parameters can in principle be made.

  14. Slowly Varying Dilaton Cosmologies and Their Field Theory Duals

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Adel; Das, Sumit R.; Ghosh, Archisman; Oh, Jae-Hyuk; Trivedi, Sandip P.; /Tata Inst. /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC

    2011-06-28

    We consider a deformation of the AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} solution of IIB supergravity obtained by taking the boundary value of the dilaton to be time dependent. The time dependence is taken to be slowly varying on the AdS scale thereby introducing a small parameter {epsilon}. The boundary dilaton has a profile which asymptotes to a constant in the far past and future and attains a minimum value at intermediate times. We construct the sugra solution to first non-trivial order in {epsilon}, and find that it is smooth, horizon free, and asymptotically AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} in the far future. When the intermediate values of the dilaton becomes small enough the curvature becomes of order the string scale and the sugra approximation breaks down. The resulting dynamics is analysed in the dual SU(N) gauge theory on S{sup 3} with a time dependent coupling constant which varies slowly. When N{epsilon} << 1, we find that a quantum adiabatic approximation is applicable, and use it to argue that at late times the geometry becomes smooth AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5} again. When N{epsilon} >> 1, we formulate a classical adiabatic perturbation theory based on coherent states which arises in the large N limit. For large values of the tHooft coupling this reproduces the supergravity results. For small 'tHooft coupling the coherent state calculations become involved and we cannot reach a definite conclusion. We argue that the final state should have a dual description which is mostly smooth AdS5 space with the possible presence of a small black hole.

  15. Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Eric

    2015-02-01

    In the first part of this article I determine the geometry of a slowly rotating black hole deformed by generic tidal forces created by a remote distribution of matter. The metric of the deformed black hole is obtained by integrating the Einstein field equations in a vacuum region of spacetime bounded by r slowly in time, and the metric is expressed in terms of generic tidal quadrupole moments Ea b and Ba b that characterize the tidal environment. The metric incorporates couplings between the black hole's spin vector and the tidal moments, and captures all effects associated with the dragging of inertial frames. In the second part of the article I determine the tidal moments by immersing the black hole in a larger post-Newtonian system that includes an external distribution of matter; while the black hole's internal gravity is allowed to be strong, the mutual gravity between the black hole and the external matter is assumed to be weak. The post-Newtonian metric that describes the entire system is valid when r >rmin , where rmin is a minimum distance that must be much larger than the black hole's radius. The black-hole and post-Newtonian metrics provide alternative descriptions of the same gravitational field in an overlap rmin

  16. The role of sea ice in slowly rotating aquaplanet simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Josiane; Popp, Max; Marotzke, Jochem

    2016-04-01

    A large fraction of recently discovered exoplanets are found in close orbit from their star. Their rotation period is expected to be slow due to important tidal forces. Therefore, in order to assess the habitability of slowly rotating planets, it is imperative to understand how slow rotation periods affect the climate. Under different Earth-like configurations, previous studies focused on the special case of synchronous rotation where the orbital and planetary rotation periods are identical. In addition, simulations with non-synchronous rotations did not account for sea ice. Therefore, we turn on the thermodynamics sea-ice model in the state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6 coupled to a mixed-layer ocean and investigate the aquaplanet's climate across rotation periods between one and 365 Earth days. Simulations with the sea-ice model turned on show a global-mean surface temperature up to 25 K lower than simulations with the sea-ice model turned off, particularly for rotation periods between 64 and 300 days. For both type of experiments, the climate cools with increasing rotation period. However, when sea ice is included, the significant drop in the global-mean surface temperature is due to sea-ice reaching low latitudes. Then, beyond a 200 days rotation period, sea ice grows over the equatorial region during the nighttime and persists well into the daytime. This causes a high contribution of the sea-ice albedo to the planetary albedo. Our study illustrates, thus, that sea-ice plays a crucial role in shaping the climate on slowly rotating planets.

  17. Progressive systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma in a child presenting as nocturnal seizures and Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Navon, P; Halevi, A; Brand, A; Branski, D; Rubinow, A

    1993-01-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis sine scleroderma, as well as neurological manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis are rare in adult-onset cases. Neither have been reported in children with progressive systemic sclerosis, either separately or together. We describe a six-year-old girl with nocturnal seizures and Raynaud's phenomenon of three years' duration. She died of cardiopulmonary sclerosis without ever fitting the required criteria of systemic sclerosis. Nailfold capillaroscopy revealed the specific "scleroderma-pattern" and provided the only clue for a diagnosis of progressive systemic sclerosis, confirmed eventually by skin biopsy.

  18. Proprioceptive recalibration arises slowly compared to reach adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zbib, Basel; Henriques, Denise Y P; Cressman, Erin K

    2016-08-01

    When subjects reach in a novel visuomotor environment (e.g. while viewing a cursor representing their hand that is rotated from their hand's actual position), they typically adjust their movements (i.e. bring the cursor to the target), thus reducing reaching errors. Additionally, research has shown that reaching with altered visual feedback of the hand results in sensory changes, such that proprioceptive estimates of hand position are shifted in the direction of the visual feedback experienced (Cressman and Henriques in J Neurophysiol 102:3505-3518, 2009). This study looked to establish the time course of these sensory changes. Additionally, the time courses of implicit sensory and motor changes were compared. Subjects reached to a single visual target while seeing a cursor that was either aligned with their hand position (50 trials) or rotated 30° clockwise relative to their hand (150 trials). Reach errors and proprioceptive estimates of felt hand position were assessed following the aligned reach training trials and at seven different times during the rotated reach training trials by having subjects reach to the target without visual feedback, and provide estimates of their hand relative to a visual reference marker, respectively. Results revealed a shift in proprioceptive estimates throughout the rotated reach training trials; however, significant sensory changes were not observed until after 70 trials. In contrast, results showed a greater change in reaches after a limited number of reach training trials with the rotated cursor. These findings suggest that proprioceptive recalibration arises more slowly than reach adaptation.

  19. Slowly switching between environments facilitates reverse evolution in small populations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Longzhi; Gore, Jeff

    2012-10-01

    Natural populations must constantly adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions. A particularly interesting question is whether such adaptations can be reversed by returning the population to an ancestral environment. Such evolutionary reversals have been observed in both natural and laboratory populations. However, the factors that determine the reversibility of evolution are still under debate. The time scales of environmental change vary over a wide range, but little is known about how the rate of environmental change influences the reversibility of evolution. Here, we demonstrate computationally that slowly switching between environments increases the reversibility of evolution for small populations that are subject to only modest clonal interference. For small populations, slow switching reduces the mean number of mutations acquired in a new environment and also increases the probability of reverse evolution at each of these "genetic distances." As the population size increases, slow switching no longer reduces the genetic distance, thus decreasing the evolutionary reversibility. We confirm this effect using both a phenomenological model of clonal interference and also a Wright-Fisher stochastic simulation that incorporates genetic diversity. Our results suggest that the rate of environmental change is a key determinant of the reversibility of evolution, and provides testable hypotheses for experimental evolution.

  20. The cerebellum ages slowly according to the epigenetic clock.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Steve; Mah, Vei; Lu, Ake T; Woo, Jennifer S; Choi, Oi-Wa; Jasinska, Anna J; Riancho, José A; Tung, Spencer; Coles, Natalie S; Braun, Jonathan; Vinters, Harry V; Coles, L Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Studies that elucidate why some human tissues age faster than others may shed light on how we age, and ultimately suggest what interventions may be possible. Here we utilize a recent biomarker of aging (referred to as epigenetic clock) to assess the epigenetic ages of up to 30 anatomic sites from supercentenarians (subjects who reached an age of 110 or older) and younger subjects. Using three novel and three published human DNA methylation data sets, we demonstrate that the cerebellum ages more slowly than other parts of the human body. We used both transcriptional data and genetic data to elucidate molecular mechanisms which may explain this finding. The two largest superfamilies of helicases (SF1 and SF2) are significantly over-represented (p=9.2x10-9) among gene transcripts that are over-expressed in the cerebellum compared to other brain regions from the same subject. Furthermore, SNPs that are associated with epigenetic age acceleration in the cerebellum tend to be located near genes from helicase superfamilies SF1 and SF2 (enrichment p=5.8x10-3). Our genetic and transcriptional studies of epigenetic age acceleration support the hypothesis that the slow aging rate of the cerebellum is due to processes that involve RNA helicases. PMID:26000617

  1. SETX mutations are a frequent genetic cause of juvenile and adult onset cerebellar ataxia with neuropathy and elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/background Ataxia with oculomotor apraxia defines a group of genetically distinct recessive ataxias including ataxia-telangectasia (A-T, ATM gene), ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1, APTX gene) and type 2 (AOA2, SETX gene). Although, a few unique clinical features differentiate each of these forms, the patients also share common clinical signs, such as the presence of cerebellar atrophy, sensorimotor axonal neuropathy, and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level. Materials and methods We selected 22 Italian patients from 21 families, presenting progressive cerebellar ataxia, axonal neuropathy, and elevated serum AFP. We screened the coding regions of ATM, APTX and SETX genes for point mutations by direct sequencing or DHPLC, and searched genomic rearrangements in SETX by MLPA analysis. In selected cases, quantification of ATM and senataxin proteins was performed by Western blot. Clinical, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging data were collected. Results Thirteen patients (12 families) carried SETX mutations (AOA2, 57%), two were mutated in ATM (A-T), and three in APTX (AOA1). In three remaining patients, we could not find pathogenic mutations, and in one case we found, in homozygosis, the SETX p.K992R polymorphism (population frequency 1-2%). In AOA2 cases, we identified 14 novel and three reported SETX mutations. Signs at onset were gait ataxia and facial dyskinesia, and the age ranged between 11 and 18 years. None had obvious oculomotor apraxia at the latest examination (age 14–45 years). The patient carrying the p.K992R SETX polymorphism had a phenotype similar to that of the diagnosed AOA2 patients, while the other three undiagnosed subjects had a very late onset and a few distinguishing clinical features. Discussion and conclusions We describe a large series of 13 AOA2 Italian patients. The phenotype was consistent with previous descriptions of AOA2, except for a higher frequency of strabism, and for the absence of oculomotor

  2. THE MOST SLOWLY DECLINING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2001ay

    SciTech Connect

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Gooding, Samuel D.; Li Weidong E-mail: sam.gooding86@gmail.com

    2011-09-15

    We present optical and near-infrared photometry, as well as ground-based optical spectra and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra, of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2001ay. At maximum light the Si II and Mg II lines indicated expansion velocities of 14,000 km s{sup -1}, while Si III and S II showed velocities of 9000 km s{sup -1}. There is also evidence for some unburned carbon at 12,000 km s{sup -1}. SN 2001ay exhibited a decline-rate parameter of {Delta}m{sub 15}(B) = 0.68 {+-} 0.05 mag; this and the B-band photometry at t {approx}> +25 day past maximum make it the most slowly declining Type Ia SN yet discovered. Three of the four super-Chandrasekhar-mass candidates have decline rates almost as slow as this. After correction for Galactic and host-galaxy extinction, SN 2001ay had M{sub B} = -19.19 and M{sub V} = -19.17 mag at maximum light; thus, it was not overluminous in optical bands. In near-infrared bands it was overluminous only at the 2{sigma} level at most. For a rise time of 18 days (explosion to bolometric maximum) the implied {sup 56}Ni yield was (0.58 {+-} 0.15)/{alpha} M{sub sun}, with {alpha} = L{sub max}/E{sub Ni} probably in the range 1.0-1.2. The {sup 56}Ni yield is comparable to that of many Type Ia SNe. The 'normal' {sup 56}Ni yield and the typical peak optical brightness suggest that the very broad optical light curve is explained by the trapping of {gamma} rays in the inner regions.

  3. H-ferritin and CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) monocytes/macrophages are increased in the skin of adult-onset Still's disease patients and correlate with the multi-visceral involvement of the disease.

    PubMed

    Ruscitti, P; Cipriani, P; Ciccia, F; Di Benedetto, P; Liakouli, V; Berardicurti, O; Carubbi, F; Guggino, G; Di Bartolomeo, S; Triolo, G; Giacomelli, R

    2016-10-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients may show an evanescent salmon-pink erythema appearing during febrile attacks and reducing without fever. Some patients may experience this eruption for many weeks. During AOSD, exceptionally high serum levels of ferritin may be observed; it is an iron storage protein composed of 24 subunits, heavy (H) subunits and light (L) subunits. The ferritin enriched in L subunits (L-ferritin) and the ferritin enriched in H subunits (H-ferritin) may be observed in different tissues. In this work, we aimed to investigate the skin expression of both H-and L-ferritin and the number of macrophages expressing these molecules from AOSD patients with persistent cutaneous lesions. We observed an increased expression of H-ferritin in the skin, associated with an infiltrate in the biopsies obtained from persistent cutaneous lesions of AOSD patients. Furthermore, a positive correlation between H-ferritin skin levels as well as the number of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells and the multi-visceral involvement of the disease was observed. Our data showed an increased expression of H-ferritin in the skin of AOSD patients, associated with a strong infiltrate of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells. Furthermore, a correlation between the levels of H-ferritin as well as of the number of CD68(+) /H-ferritin(+) cells and the multi-visceral involvement of the disease was observed. PMID:27317930

  4. Fetal programming, epigenetics, and adult onset disease.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    How early life events program adult disease is undergoing a transition from the broad field of maternal malnutrition to the current relevant issues of food deserts and prematurity. Although many adult diseases and morbidities associate with various early life events and programming, the morbidities of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and obesity seem to be common end points of many early life events despite potential confounders.

  5. Similar L-dopa-stimulated motor activity in mice with adult-onset 6-hydroxydopamine-induced symmetric dopamine denervation and in transcription factor Pitx3 null mice with perinatal-onset symmetric dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Sagot, Ben; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2015-07-30

    The transcription factor Pitx3 null mutant (Pitx3Null) mice have a constitutive perinatal-onset and symmetric bilateral dopamine (DA) loss in the striatum. In these mice l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) induces apparently normal horizontal movements (walking) but also upward movements consisting of the vertical body trunk and waving paws that are absent in normal animals and in animals with the classic unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion-induced DA denervation. Thus, a concern is that the perinatal timing of the DA loss and potential developmental abnormalities in Pitx3Null mice may underlie these upward movements, thus reducing the usefulness as a DA denervation model. Here we show that in normal wild-type (Pitx3WT) mice with adult-onset symmetric, bilateral 6-OHDA-induced DA lesion in the dorsal striatum, l-dopa induces normal horizontal movements and upward movements that are qualitatively identical to those in Pitx3Null mice. Furthermore, after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the residual DA innervation in the striatum in Pitx3Null mice, l-dopa induces contraversive rotation that is similar to that in Pitx3WT mice with the classic unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. These results indicate that in Pitx3Null mice, the bilateral symmetric DA denervation in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for expressing the l-dopa-induced motor phenotype and the perinatal timing of their DA loss is not a determining factor, providing further evidence that Pitx3Null mice are a convenient and suitable mouse model to study the consequences of DA loss and dopaminergic replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Number of women faculty in the geosciences increasing, but slowly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Cecily J.

    Why are there so few women faculty in the geosciences, while there are large numbers of women undergraduate and graduate students? According to National Science Foundation (NSF) estimates [e.g.,NSF, 1996] for 1995 in the Earth, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences, women made up 34% of the bachelor's degrees awarded, 35% of the graduate students enrolled, and 22% of the doctorates granted. Yet progress has been slower in achieving adequate representation of women geoscientists in academia, where women represent only 12% of the faculty. The barriers confronting the advancement of women scientists are complex and difficult to unravel. Proposed factors include cultural stereotypes, childhood socialization, lack of women mentors and role models, lack of critical mass, family responsibilities, dual-career-couple status, isolation from collegial networks, different research and publishing strategy, and less adequate access to institutional resources [c.f., Widnall, 1988; Zuckerman et al., 1991].

  7. Stationary axisymmetric and slowly rotating spacetimes in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anzhong

    2013-03-01

    Stationary, axisymmetric, and slowly rotating vacuum spacetimes in the Hořava-Lifshitz (HL) gravity are studied, and it is shown that, for any given spherical static vacuum solution of the HL theory (of any model, including the ones with an additional U(1) symmetry), there always exists a corresponding slowly rotating, stationary, and axisymmetric vacuum solution, which reduces to the former, when the rotation is switched off. The rotation is universal and only implicitly depends on the models of the HL theory and their coupling constants through the spherical seed solution. As a result, all asymptotically flat slowly rotating vacuum solutions are asymptotically identical to the slowly rotating Kerr solution. This is in contrast to the claim of Barausse and Sotiriou [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 181101 (2012)], in which slowly rotating black holes were reported (incorrectly) not to exist in the infrared limit of the nonprojectable HL theory.

  8. Numbers of women faculty in the geosciences increasing, but slowly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, C. J.

    2001-12-01

    Why are there so few women faculty in the geosciences, while there are large numbers of women undergraduate and graduate students? According to National Science Foundation (NSF) estimates for 1995 in the Earth, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences, women made up 34% of the bachelor's degrees awarded, 35% of the graduate students enrolled, and 22% of the doctorates granted. Yet progress has been slower in achieving adequate representation of women geoscientists in academia, where women represent only 12% of the overall faculty. This talk will present the results of a survey I conducted on the status of women faculty at the 20 top-ranked geology programs, which was originally published as a feature article in Eos [Wolfe, 1999]. Data from the 1997 AGI Directory of Geoscience Departments were used to compare the numbers of women faculty at different departments, as well as to consider the distribution of men and women faculty by year of Ph.D. Strong inequities were found to exist between the individual departments. The percentages of women in the departments ranged from 0% to as high as 23%, and 37% of the departments had either one woman faculty member or none. Histograms of the faculty sorted by year of Ph.D. showed that clear generational differences existed between the sets of men and women faculty. Thirty-nine percent of the men obtained their Ph.D. prior to 1970, whereas only 3% of the women obtained their Ph.D. before this date. The majority of women faculty members (64%) received their Ph.D. after 1980, but a minority of men (31%) received their degrees after 1980. In the 1960s and 1970s, the geosciences expanded and departments employed a high percentage of recent Ph.D.s, but hiring of young faculty decreased in the 1980s and 1990s. In contrast, the numbers of women graduate students only began to rise after 1970, and thus the quantity of women Ph.D.s increased as the number of young hires decreased. Two problems appeared evident from this study using 1997 data

  9. HD 18078: A very slowly rotating Ap star with an unusual magnetic field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathys, G.; Romanyuk, I. I.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Landstreet, J. D.; Pyper, D. M.; Adelman, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The existence of a significant population of Ap stars with very long rotation periods (up to several hundred years) has progressively emerged over the past two decades. However, only lower limits of the periods are known for most of them because their variations have not yet been observed over a sufficient timebase. Aims: We determine the rotation period of the slowly rotating Ap star HD 18078 and we derive constraints on the geometrical structure of its magnetic field. Methods: We combine measurements of the mean magnetic field modulus obtained from 1990 to 1997 with determinations of the mean longitudinal magnetic field spanning the 1999-2007 time interval to derive an unambiguous value of the rotation period. We show that this value is consistent with photometric variations recorded in the Strömgren uvby photometric system between 1995 and 2004. We fit the variations of the two above-mentioned field moments with a simple model to constrain the magnetic structure. Results: The rotation period of HD 18078 is (1358 ± 12) d. The geometrical structure of its magnetic field is consistent to first order with a colinear multipole model whose axis is offset from the centre of the star. Conclusions: HD 18078 is only the fifth Ap star with a rotation period longer than 1000 d for which the exact value of that period (as opposed to a lower limit) could be determined. The strong anharmonicity of the variations of its mean longitudinal magnetic field and the shift between their extrema and those of the mean magnetic field modulus are exceptional and indicative of a very unusual magnetic structure. Based in part on observations made at Observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France; at Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO Prop. ID: KP2442; PI: T. Lanz), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; at the Canada

  10. Slowly changing potential problems in Quantum Mechanics: Adiabatic theorems, ergodic theorems, and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, S.; Soffer, A.

    2016-07-01

    We employ the recently developed multi-time scale averaging method to study the large time behavior of slowly changing (in time) Hamiltonians. We treat some known cases in a new way, such as the Zener problem, and we give another proof of the adiabatic theorem in the gapless case. We prove a new uniform ergodic theorem for slowly changing unitary operators. This theorem is then used to derive the adiabatic theorem, do the scattering theory for such Hamiltonians, and prove some classical propagation estimates and asymptotic completeness.

  11. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende; Pedroso, José Luiz; Souza, Paulo Victor Sgobbi de; Albuquerque, Marcus Vinícius Cristino de; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2015-10-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  12. Study of velocities of dissipative Bragg solitons beyond the slowly-varying amplitude approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanov, Nikolai N; Tran, X T

    2007-08-31

    The properties of dissipative solitons propagating in an active nonlinear fibre with a Bragg grating are studied without using the slowly-varying amplitude approximation. It is shown that dissipative solitons with close initial velocities acquire during their propagation certain values from a discrete set of velocities. (selected papers reported at the conference 'laser optics 2006')

  13. No-go theorem for slowly rotating black holes in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2012-11-01

    We consider slowly rotating, stationary, axisymmetric black holes in the infrared limit of Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. We show that such solutions do not exist, provided that they are regular everywhere apart from the central singularity. This has profound implications for the viability of the theory, considering the astrophysical evidence for the existence of black holes with nonzero spin.

  14. Slowly digestible starch diets alter proximal glucosidase activity and glucose absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrase-isomaltase (Si) and maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) are mucosal glucosidases required for digestion of starch to glucose. Ablation of maltase-Mgam reduces in vivo starch digestion. We tested whether slowly digestible starch diets induce changes in glucosidase activities. Rice starch was encaps...

  15. Effect of a nonionic surfactant on biodegradation of slowly desorbing PAHs in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Montes, Marisa; Springael, Dirk; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2011-04-01

    The influence of the nonionic surfactant Brij 35 on biodegradation of slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in contaminated soils. We employed a soil originated from a creosote-polluted site, and a manufactured gas plant soil that had been treated by bioremediation. The two soils differed in their total content in five indicator 3-, 4-, and 5-ring PAHs (2923 mg kg(-1) and 183 mg kg(-1) in the creosote-polluted and bioremediated soils, respectively) but had a similar content (140 mg kg(-1) vs 156 mg kg(-1)) of slowly desorbing PAHs. The PAHs present in the bioremediated soil were highly recalcitrant. The surfactant at a concentration above its critical micelle concentration enhanced the biodegradation of slowly desorbing PAHs in suspensions of both soils, but it was especially efficient with bioremediated soil, causing a 62% loss of the total PAH content. An inhibition of biodegradation was observed with the high-molecular-weight PAHs pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in the untreated soil, possibly due to competition effects with other solubilized PAHs present at relatively high concentrations. We suggest that nonionic surfactants may improve bioremediation performance with soils that have previously undergone extensive bioremediation to enrich for a slowly desorbing profile.

  16. Hemispheric Specialization in Normally and Slowly Developing Children: A Tachistoscopic and Dichaptic Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, H. G.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Both right-and left-handed normally developing 6-year-olds showed considerable evidence of bilateralization of hemispheric functions for spatial and verbal information processing; the slowly developing children (ages 5-9) exhibited unusual patterns of hemispheric specialization usually opposite those typically expected in children or adults.…

  17. Progressive hemifacial atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sande, Abhijeet; Risbud, Mukund; Kshar, Avinash; Paranjpe, Arati Oka

    2013-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg Syndrome, is an uncommon degenerative and poorly understood condition. It is characterized by a slow and progressive but self-limited atrophy affecting one side of the face. The incidence and the cause of this alteration are unknown. A cerebral disturbance of fat metabolism has been proposed as a primary cause. Possible factors that are involved in the pathogenesis include trauma, viral infections, heredity, endocrine disturbances and auto-immunity. The most common complications that appear in association to this disorder are: trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresthesia, severe headache and epilepsy. Characteristically, the atrophy progresses slowly for several years and, it becomes stable. The objective of this work is, through the presentation of a clinical case, to accomplish a literature review concerning general characteristics, etiology, physiopathology and treatment of progressive hemifacial atrophy. PMID:23878573

  18. Slowly moving test charge in two-electron component non-Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.; Eliasson, B.

    2015-08-15

    Potential distributions around a slowly moving test charge are calculated by taking into account the electron-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma. Considering a neutralizing background of static positive ions, the supra-thermal hot and cold electrons are described by the Vlasov equations to account for the Kappa (power-law in velocity space) and Maxwell equilibrium distributions. Fourier analysis further leads to the derivation of electrostatic potential showing the impact of supra-thermal hot electrons. The test charge moves slowly in comparison with the hot and cold electron thermal speeds and is therefore shielded by the electrons. This gives rise to a short-range Debye-Hückel potential decaying exponentially with distance and to a far field potential decaying as inverse third power of the distance from the test charge. The results are relevant for both laboratory and space plasmas, where supra-thermal hot electrons with power-law distributions have been observed.

  19. On the slowly rising phase of the sodium gating current in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Keynes, R D; Elinder, F

    1998-02-22

    High-resolution records of the sodium gating current in the squid giant axon demonstrate the existence of a slowly rising phase that is first apparent at pulse potentials slightly below zero, and becomes increasingly pronounced at more positive potentials. At +80 mV the current reaches its peak with a delay of 30 microseconds at 10 degrees C. It is suggested that this current is generated by the first two steps labelled R-->P and P-->A in the S4 units of all four domains of the series-parallel gating system, activating the channel before its opening by the third steps A-->B in domains I, II and III in conjunction with hydration. The kinetics of the slowly rising phase can only be explained by the incorporation of an appropriate degree of voltage-dependent cooperativity between the S4 voltage-sensors for their two initial transitions.

  20. On the slowly rising phase of the sodium gating current in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, R D; Elinder, F

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution records of the sodium gating current in the squid giant axon demonstrate the existence of a slowly rising phase that is first apparent at pulse potentials slightly below zero, and becomes increasingly pronounced at more positive potentials. At +80 mV the current reaches its peak with a delay of 30 microseconds at 10 degrees C. It is suggested that this current is generated by the first two steps labelled R-->P and P-->A in the S4 units of all four domains of the series-parallel gating system, activating the channel before its opening by the third steps A-->B in domains I, II and III in conjunction with hydration. The kinetics of the slowly rising phase can only be explained by the incorporation of an appropriate degree of voltage-dependent cooperativity between the S4 voltage-sensors for their two initial transitions. PMID:9523427

  1. Characteristics of Quantum Radiation of Slowly Varying Nonstationary Kerr-Newman Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Jia-Chen; Huang, Yong-Chang

    Quantum radiative characteristics of slowly varying nonstationary Kerr-Newman black holes are investigated by using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. It is shown that the temperature and the shape of the event horizon of this kind of black holes depend on the time and the angle. Further, we reveal a previously ignored relationship between thermal radiation and nonthermal radiation, which is that the chemical potential in the thermal radiation spectrum is equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of particles in nonthermal radiation for slowly varying nonstationary Kerr-Newman black holes. Also, we show that the deduced general results can be degenerated to the known conclusion of stationary Kerr-Newman black holes.

  2. Testing gravity of a regular and slowly rotating phantom black hole by quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songbai; Wang, Mei; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-10-01

    We extend firstly the regular phantom black hole solution to a slowly rotating black hole case and find that the phantom field depresses the angular velocity of the event horizon and suppresses the super-radiation of the black hole. We also probe the dependence of quasi-periodic oscillations frequencies in a relativistic precession model on the phantom parameter. With the observation data of GRO J1655-40, we make a constraint on the parameters of the regular and slowly rotating phantom black hole. Our results show that although the best-fit value of the phantom parameter b is small, the allowed value of b in the 1σ region is b\\lt 0.619, which means that the phantom theoretical model cannot be excluded by the constraint from quasi-periodic oscillations with the observation data of GRO J1655-40.

  3. Failure of the method of slowly varying amplitude and phase for non-linear, singular oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.; Ramadhani, I.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the method of slowly varying amplitude and phase yields erroneous results in the study of the mathematical properties of nonlinear singular oscillator systems. The analytical solution is described in which the phase function is constant and for which a special limiting behavior exists when the wavelength is zero. The previous method based on the condition of boundedness cannot be satisfied for nonlinear singular characteristics, and the erroneous designation of the expansion parameter is identified.

  4. Gaussian beams for surface waves in laterally slowly-varying media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yomogida, K.

    1985-01-01

    Asymptotic ray theory is applied to surface waves in a medium where the lateral variations of structure are very smooth. The elastodynamic equations of motion in ray-centered coordinates are derived, and a laterally slowly-varying approximation for elastodynamic equations is obtained. Parabolic equations for Love and Rayleigh waves are studied and solved, and the properties of Gaussian beams of seismic surface waves are examined.

  5. Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kotob, S.; van Berkum, P.; Kaattari, I.; Vogelbein, W.; Quinn, F.; Floyd, M.M.; Butler, W.R.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria were isolated from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an epizootic of mycobacteriosis in the Chesapeake Bay. Growth characteristics, acid-fastness and results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing were consistent with those of the genus Mycobacterium. A unique profile of biochemical reactions was observed among the 21 isolates. A single cluster of eight peaks identified by analysis of mycolic acids (HPLC) resembled those of reference patterns but differed in peak elution times from profiles of reference species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. One isolate (M175T) was placed within the slowly growing mycobacteria by analysis of aligned 16S rRNA gene sequences and was proximate in phylogeny to Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum. However, distinct nucleotide differences were detected in the 16S rRNA gene sequence among M175T, M. ulcerans and M. marinum (99.2% similarity). Isolate M175T could be differentiated from other slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria by its inability to grow at 37??C, production of niacin and urease, absence of nitrate reductase and resistance to isoniazid (1 ??g ml-1), thiacetazone and thiophene-2-carboxylic hydrazide. Based upon these genetic and phenotypic differences, isolate M175T (= ATCC 700981T = NCTC 13215T) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov.

  6. Slowly rotating neutron and strange stars in R{sup 2} gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Staykov, Kalin V.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Kokkotas, Kostas D. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de E-mail: kostas.kokkotas@uni-tuebingen.de

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper we investigate self-consistently slowly rotating neutron and strange stars in R-squared gravity with Lagrangian f(R) = R + aR{sup 2}, where a is a parameter. For this purpose we first derive the equations describing the structure of the slowly rotating compact stars in f(R)-gravity and then simultaneously solve numerically the exterior and the interior problem. The structure of the slowly rotating neutron stars is studied for two different hadronic equations of state and a strange matter equation of state. The moment of inertia and its dependence on the stellar mass and the R-squared gravity parameter a is also examined in details. The numerical results show that the neutron star moment of inertia can be up to 30% larger compared to the corresponding general relativistic models. This is much higher than the change in the maximum mass induced by R-squared gravity and is beyond the EOS uncertainty. In this way the future observations of the moment of inertia of compact stars could allow us to distinguish between general relativity and f(R) gravity, and more generally to test the strong field regime of gravity.

  7. Prostate cancer stem-like cells proliferate slowly and resist etoposide-induced cytotoxicity via enhancing DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2014-10-15

    Despite the development of chemoresistance as a major concern in prostate cancer therapy, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this report, we demonstrate that DU145-derived prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) progress slowly with more cells accumulating in the G1 phase in comparison to DU145 non-PCSCs. Consistent with the important role of the AKT pathway in promoting G1 progression, DU145 PCSCs were less sensitive to growth factor-induced activation of AKT in comparison to non-PCSCs. In response to etoposide (one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs), DU145 PCSCs survived significantly better than non-PCSCs. In addition to etoposide, PCSCs demonstrated increased resistance to docetaxel, a taxane drug that is commonly used to treat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Etoposide produced elevated levels of γH2AX and triggered a robust G2/M arrest along with a coordinated reduction of the G1 population in PCSCs compared to non-PCSCs, suggesting that elevated γH2AX plays a role in the resistance of PCSCs to etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. We have generated xenograft tumors from DU145 PCSCs and non-PCSCs. Consistent with the knowledge that PCSCs produce xenograft tumors with more advanced features, we were able to demonstrate that PCSC-derived xenograft tumors displayed higher levels of γH2AX and p-CHK1 compared to non-PCSC-produced xenograft tumors. Collectively, our research suggests that the elevation of DNA damage response contributes to PCSC-associated resistance to genotoxic reagents. - Highlights: • Increased survival in DU145 PCSCs following etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. • PCSCs exhibit increased sensitivity to etoposide-induced DDR. • Resistance to cytotoxicity may be due to slower proliferation in PCSCs. • Reduced kinetics to growth factor induced activation of AKT in PCSCs.

  8. Chemical transfers along slowly eroding catenas developed on granitic cratons in southern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khomo, Lesego; Bern, Carleton R.; Hartshorn, Anthony S.; Rogers, Kevin H.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2013-01-01

    A catena is a series of distinct but co-evolving soils arrayed along a slope. On low-slope, slowly eroding catenas the redistribution of mass occurs predominantly as plasma, the dissolved and suspended constituents in soil water. We applied mass balance methods to track how redistribution via plasma contributed to physical and geochemical differentiation of nine slowly eroding (~ 5 mm ky− 1) granitic catenas. The catenas were arrayed in a 3 × 3 climate by relief matrix and located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Most of the catenas contained at least one illuviated soil profile that had undergone more volumetric expansion and less mass loss, and these soils were located in the lower halves of the slopes. By comparison, the majority of slope positions were eluviated. Soils from the wetter climates (550 and 730 mm precipitation yr− 1) generally had undergone greater collapse and lost more mass, while soils in the drier climate (470 mm yr− 1) had undergone expansion and lost less mass. Effects of differences in catena relief were less clear. Within each climate zone, soil horizon mass loss and strain were correlated, as were losses of most major elements, illustrating the predominant influence of primary mineral weathering. Nevertheless, mass loss and volumetric collapse did not become extreme because of the skeleton of resistant primary mineral grains inherited from the granite. Colloidal clay redistribution, as traced by the ratio of Ti to Zr in soil, suggested clay losses via suspension from catena eluvial zones. Thus illuviation of colloidal clays into downslope soils may be crucial to catena development by restricting subsurface flow there. Our analysis provides quantitative support for the conceptual understanding of catenas in cratonic landscapes and provides an endmember reference point in understanding the development of slowly eroding soil landscapes.

  9. Kv2 subunits underlie slowly inactivating potassium current in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guan, D; Tkatch, T; Surmeier, D J; Armstrong, W E; Foehring, R C

    2007-06-15

    We determined the expression of Kv2 channel subunits in rat somatosensory and motor cortex and tested for the contributions of Kv2 subunits to slowly inactivating K+ currents in supragranular pyramidal neurons. Single cell RT-PCR showed that virtually all pyramidal cells expressed Kv2.1 mRNA and approximately 80% expressed Kv2.2 mRNA. Immunocytochemistry revealed striking differences in the distribution of Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 subunits. Kv2.1 subunits were clustered and located on somata and proximal dendrites of all pyramidal cells. Kv2.2 subunits were primarily distributed on large apical dendrites of a subset of pyramidal cells from deep layers. We used two methods for isolating currents through Kv2 channels after excluding contributions from Kv1 subunits: intracellular diffusion of Kv2.1 antibodies through the recording pipette and extracellular application of rStromatoxin-1 (ScTx). The Kv2.1 antibody specifically blocked the slowly inactivating K+ current by 25-50% (at 8 min), demonstrating that Kv2.1 subunits underlie much of this current in neocortical pyramidal neurons. ScTx (300 nM) also inhibited approximately 40% of the slowly inactivating K+ current. We observed occlusion between the actions of Kv2.1 antibody and ScTx. In addition, Kv2.1 antibody- and ScTx-sensitive currents demonstrated similar recovery from inactivation and voltage dependence and kinetics of activation and inactivation. These data indicate that both agents targeted the same channels. Considering the localization of Kv2.1 and 2.2 subunits, currents from truncated dissociated cells are probably dominated by Kv2.1 subunits. Compared with Kv2.1 currents in expression systems, the Kv2.1 current in neocortical pyramidal cells activated and inactivated at relatively negative potentials and was very sensitive to holding potential.

  10. Fast Solar Wind from Slowly Expanding Magnetic Flux Tubes (P54)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    aks.astro.itbhu@gmail.com We present an empirical model of the fast solar wind, emanating from radially oriented slowly expanding magnetic flux tubes. We consider a single-fluid, steady state model in which the flow is driven by thermal and non-thermal pressure gradients. We apply a non-Alfvénic energy correction at the coronal base and find that specific relations correlate solar wind speed and non-thermal energy flux with the aerial expansion factor. The results are compared with the previously reported ones.

  11. Solitary fibrous tumor arising slowly in the vulva over 10 years: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Taki, Mana; Baba, Tsukasa; Mandai, Masaki; Suzuki, Ayako; Mikami, Yoshiki; Matsumura, Noriomi; Konishi, Ikuo

    2012-05-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), which was first described as a pleural lesion by Klemperer and Rabin in 1931, is a rare, slow-growing neoplasm characterized by the proliferation of fibroblast-like spindle cells arranged in a patternless manner with few nuclear atypia. Extrathoracic SFT have increasingly been recognized, but those in the genital tract are extremely rare. Gynecological SFT behave as tumors with low malignant potential to recur, metastasize, or affect nearby organs resulting in infertility. We report a case of vulvar SFT slowly growing for 10 years, and propose a strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of gynecological SFT.

  12. Slowly Replicating Lytic Viruses: Pseudolysogenic Persistence and Within-Host Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingshan; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2009-05-01

    We study the population dynamics of lytic viruses which replicate slowly in dividing host cells within an organism or cell culture, and find a range of viral replication rates that allows viruses to persist, avoiding extinction of host cells or dilution of viruses at too rapid or too slow viral replication. For the within-host competition between viral strains with different replication rates, a strain with a “stable” replication rate in the persistence range could outcompete another strain. However, when strains with higher and lower than the stable value replication rates are both present, competition between strains does not result in the dominance of one strain, but in their coexistence.

  13. Reservoir computing with a slowly modulated mask signal for preprocessing using a mutually coupled optoelectronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Miwa; Kanno, Kazutaka; Bunsen, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    Reservoir computing is a machine-learning paradigm based on information processing in the human brain. We numerically demonstrate reservoir computing with a slowly modulated mask signal for preprocessing by using a mutually coupled optoelectronic system. The performance of our system is quantitatively evaluated by a chaotic time series prediction task. Our system can produce comparable performance with reservoir computing with a single feedback system and a fast modulated mask signal. We showed that it is possible to slow down the modulation speed of the mask signal by using the mutually coupled system in reservoir computing.

  14. Narrow-band, slowly varying decimetric radiation from the dwarf M flare star YZ Canis Minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. R.; Willson, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of slowly varying radiation from the dwarf M star YZ Canis Minoris with a maximum flux density of 20 mJy and narrow-band frequency structure at frequencies near 1465 MHz are presented. Possible explanations for this radiation are examined. Thermal gyroresonant radiation would require impossibly large coronal loops and magnetic field strengths. The narrow-band structure cannot be explained by continuum emission processes such as thermal bremsstrahlung, thermal gyroresonant radiation, or nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation. Coherent burst mechanisms seem to be required.

  15. Slowly rotating charged fluid balls in the presence of a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    We examine charged slowly rotating perfect fluids in the presence of a cosmological constant. The asymptotic form of the vacuum solutions to the linearised Einstein-Maxwell field equations is found and the possibility of matching this vacuum to the slow rotating García metric is considered. We show that, contrary to the case of zero cosmological constant, this García metric can be matched to an asymptotically de Sitter vacuum in the slow rotation limit. We conclude the García metric may potentially be suitable for describing a charged isolated rotating body in a cosmological background.

  16. Calculation of stability derivatives for slowly oscillating bodies of revolution at Mach 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruo, S. Y.; Liu, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    A parabolic method for steady transonic flow is extended to bodies of revolution oscillating in a sonic flow field. A Laplace transform technique is employed to derive the dipole solution, and the Adams-Sears iterative technique is used in the stability derivative calculation. A computer program is developed to perform the stability derivative calculation for the slowly oscillating cone and parabolic ogive. Inputs for the program are body geometry thickness ratio, acceleration constant, and pitch axis location. Sample calculations were performed for the parabolic ogive and circular cone and results are compared with those obtained by using other techniques and the available experimental data for circular cones.

  17. Cooperative crosslink (un)binding in slowly driven bundles of semiflexible filaments.

    PubMed

    Heussinger, Claus

    2011-05-01

    Combining simulations and theory I study the interplay between bundle elastic degrees of freedom and crosslink binding propensity. By slowly driving bundles into a deformed configuration, and depending on the mechanical stiffness of the crosslinking agent, the binding affinity is shown to display a sudden and discontinuous drop. This indicates a cooperative unbinding process that involves the crossing of a free-energy barrier. Choosing the proper crosslinker therefore not only allows us to change the composite elastic properties of the bundle but also the relevant time scales which can be tuned from the single crosslink binding rate to the much longer escape time over the free-energy barrier.

  18. Analysis of Synchronization in a Slowly Changing Environment: How Slow Coupling Becomes Fast Weak Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Jonathan J.; Rubin, Jonathan E.; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2013-05-01

    Many physical and biological oscillators are coupled indirectly through a slowly evolving dynamic medium. We present a perturbation method that shows that slow dynamics of a coupling medium is effectively equivalent to weak coupling of oscillators. Our methods first apply the theory of averaging to obtain a periodic solution to a single system and then exploit small fluctuations around the mean to analyze coupling between systems. We use this method to explain the spike-to-spike asynchrony seen in a model for bursting neurons coupled through extracellular potassium and to explore synchronization in a model for quorum sensing.

  19. Accurate Detection of Interaural Time Differences by a Population of Slowly Integrating Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilkov, Viacheslav A.; Tikidji-Hamburyan, Ruben A.

    2012-03-01

    For localization of a sound source, animals and humans process the microsecond interaural time differences of arriving sound waves. How nervous systems, consisting of elements with time constants of about and more than 1 ms, can reach such high precision is still an open question. In this Letter we present a hypothesis and show theoretical and computational evidence that a rather large population of slowly integrating neurons with inhibitory and excitatory inputs (EI neurons) can detect minute temporal disparities in input signals which are significantly less than any time constant in the system.

  20. HERSCHEL AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF SLOWLY ROTATING, NEARBY ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Popov, S.; Wachter, S.

    2014-11-01

    Supernova fallback disks around neutron stars have been suspected to influence the evolution of the diverse neutron star populations. Slowly rotating neutron stars are the most promising places to find such disks. Searching for the cold and warm debris of old fallback disks, we carried out Herschel PACS (70 μm, 160 mu m) and Spitzer IRAC (3.6 μm, 4.5 μm) observations of eight slowly rotating (P ≈ 3-11 s) nearby (<1 kpc) isolated neutron stars. Herschel detected 160 μm emission (>5σ) at locations consistent with the positions of the neutron stars RX J0806.4-4123 and RX J2143.0+0654. No other significant infrared emission was detected from the eight neutron stars. We estimate probabilities of 63%, 33%, and 3% that, respectively, none, one, or both Herschel PACS 160 μm detections are unrelated excess sources due to background source confusion or an interstellar cirrus. If the 160 μm emission is indeed related to cold (10-22 K) dust around the neutron stars, this dust is absorbing and re-emitting ∼10% to ∼20% of the neutron stars' X-rays. Such high efficiencies would be at least three orders of magnitude larger than the efficiencies of debris disks around nondegenerate stars. While thin dusty disks around the neutron stars can be excluded as counterparts of the 160 μm emission, dusty asteroid belts constitute a viable option.

  1. Aerodynamics of the knuckleball pitch: Experimental measurements on slowly rotating baseballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, John P.; Morrissey, Michael P.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we characterize the lift and lateral forces on a two-seam versus four-seam knuckleball and measure the viscous shear stress. We believe these measurements to be the first reported for slowly rotating baseballs. Our findings indicate the seam acts to either delay or advance separation depending upon the ball angle; these results are supported with flow visualization. The combined effect produces significant lift and lateral forces that can rapidly change as the ball rotates. Furthermore, we found the shear stress to be asymmetric which can result in significant in-flight torque. Together, asymmetries in force and shear stress produce the complicated flight trajectories that can confound the hapless batter.

  2. Slowly but Surely: Adverbs Support Verb Learning in 2-Year-Olds.

    PubMed

    Syrett, Kristen; Arunachalam, Sudha; Waxman, Sandra R

    2014-07-01

    To acquire the meanings of verbs, toddlers make use of the surrounding linguistic information. For example, two-year-olds successfully acquire novel transitive verbs that appear in semantically rich frames containing content nouns ("The boy is gonna pilk a balloon"). But, they have difficulty with pronominal frames ("He is gonna pilk it") (Arunachalam & Waxman, 2010). We hypothesized that adverbs might facilitate toddlers' verb learning in these sparse pronominal frames, if their semantic content directed toddlers' attention to aspects of the event that are relevant to the verb's meaning (e.g., the manner of motion). As predicted, the semantic information from a specific manner-of-motion adverb (slowly) supported verb learning, but other adverbs lacking this semantic content (nicely, right now) did not. These results provide the first evidence that adverbs can facilitate verb learning in toddlers, and highlight the interaction of syntactic and semantic information in word learning.

  3. Flow of an elastico-viscous liquid in a curved pipe of slowly varying curvature.

    PubMed

    Sarin, V B

    1993-03-01

    Curvature forms an important feature of thoracic aorta and this paper deals with the flow of an idealized elastico-viscous liquid in a curved pipe of circular cross-section and slowly varying curvature, under a pressure gradient. The flow is assumed to be steady and at low Reynolds numbers. By using the series expansion method of Dean (Phil Mag 4 (1927) 208-223; Phil Mag 5 (1928) 673-693) in powers of a parameter L, which can be considered as the square of ratio of the centrifugal force induced by the circular motion of the fluid to the viscous force, it is shown that in a tube of increasing curvature, there will be delay in setting up of the secondary motion. The wall shear stress, an important parameter in physiological flows, is calculated. The flow of Newtonian fluid in a tube of circular cross section is discussed, as a particular case. PMID:8449591

  4. Entropy of Non-stationary and Slowly Changing Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Han

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying Dirac equation near the horizon, Hawking temperature is obtained by applying a new tortoise coordinate transformation. Using the improved thin film brick-wall model and WKB approximation, the entropy of Dirac field in the non-stationary and slowly changing Reissner-Nordström black hole is calculated. The result shows that the entropy of the black hole is still proportional to the horizon area, and black hole entropy is just identical to the entropy of the quantum state at the horizon. In addition, the new tortoise coordinate transformation can make the cut-off parameter introduced in solving the entropy of non-stationary black hole simplified to the same as that in the static and stationary cases.

  5. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity of slowly permeable and swelling materials from single-ring experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GéRard-Marchant, P.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Haverkamp, R.; Vauclin, M.; Groenevelt, P.; Elrick, D. E.

    1997-06-01

    The in situ determination of the field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of low-permeability porous materials is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regards to environmental protection or water resources management. Recent early-time single-ring infiltration experiments, involving sequential constant head and falling head conditions, allow its efficient estimation. Nevertheless, the theory on which the interpretation was based was still strictly valid to nondeformable soils and implicity relied on a particular form of the hydraulic conductivity-soil water pressure head relationship. This theory is now extended to deformable materials, without any restrictive hypothesis. A new concept, bulk sorptivity, which characterizes the solid phase movement, is introduced. Field experiments, conducted on two liners of swelling and slowly permeable materials, revealed that neglecting the soil deformation induces an underestimation of the actual coefficient of permeability of the soil.

  6. The slowly varying corona from DEMs with the EVE data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, Samuel J.; White, Stephen M.; Hock, Rachel A.; McAteer, James

    2016-05-01

    We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the slowly varying corona during the first half of solar cycle 24. Using the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) and the CHIANTI atomic line database we identify strong isolated iron emission lines present in the non-flaring spectrum with peak emissions covering the coronal temperature range of 5.7 < log(T) < 6.5. These lines are used to generate daily DEMs from EVE spectra to observe the long term variability of global coronal thermal properties. We discuss the choice of emission lines and the implications of this data set for the relationship between EUV and the F10.7 radio flux.

  7. Hairy black holes: Stability under odd-parity perturbations and existence of slowly rotating solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Bičák, Jiří; Saavedra, Joel

    2014-12-01

    We show that, independently of the scalar field potential and of specific asymptotic properties of the spacetime (asymptotically flat, de Sitter or anti-de Sitter), any static, spherically symmetric or planar, black hole solution of the Einstein theory minimally coupled to a real scalar field with a general potential is mode stable under linear odd-parity perturbations. To this end, we generalize the Regge-Wheeler equation for a generic self-interacting scalar field, and show that the potential of the relevant Schrödinger operator can be mapped, by the so-called S-deformation, to a semipositively defined potential. With these results at hand we study the existence of slowly rotating configurations. The frame dragging effect is compared with the corresponding effect in the case of a Kerr black hole.

  8. On-Line Modal State Monitoring of Slowly Time-Varying Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Erik A.; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Voulgaris, Petros G.

    1997-01-01

    Monitoring the dynamic response of structures is often performed for a variety of reasons. These reasons include condition-based maintenance, health monitoring, performance improvements, and control. In many cases the data analysis that is performed is part of a repetitive decision-making process, and in these cases the development of effective on-line monitoring schemes help to speed the decision-making process and reduce the risk of erroneous decisions. This report investigates the use of spatial modal filters for tracking the dynamics of slowly time-varying linear structures. The report includes an overview of modal filter theory followed by an overview of several structural system identification methods. Included in this discussion and comparison are H-infinity, eigensystem realization, and several time-domain least squares approaches. Finally, a two-stage adaptive on-line monitoring scheme is developed and evaluated.

  9. Monodisperse, polymeric microspheres produced by irradiation of slowly thawing frozen drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu (Inventor); Hyson, Michael T. (Inventor); Chung, Sang-Kun (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Chang, Manchium (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Monodisperse, polymeric microspheres are formed by injecting uniformly shaped droplets of radiation polymerizable monomers, preferably a biocompatible monomer, having covalent binding sites such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate, into a zone, impressing a like charge on the droplet so that they mutually repel each other, spheroidizing the droplets within the zone and collecting the droplets in a pool of cryogenic liquid. As the droplets enter the liquid, they freeze into solid, glassy microspheres, which vaporizes a portion of the cryogenic liquid to form a layer. The like-charged microspheres, suspended within the layer, move to the edge of the vessel holding the pool, are discharged, fall and are collected. The collected microspheres are irradiated while frozen in the cryogenic liquid to form latent free radicals. The frozen microspheres are then slowly thawed to activate the free radicals which polymerize the monomer to form evenly-sized, evenly-shaped, monodisperse polymeric microspheres.

  10. Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2007-04-15

    We study the geometry and dynamics of both isolated and dynamical trapping horizons by considering the allowed variations of their foliating two-surfaces. This provides a common framework that may be used to consider both their possible evolutions and their deformations as well as derive the well-known flux laws. Using this framework, we unify much of what is already known about these objects as well as derive some new results. In particular we characterize and study the 'almost isolated' trapping horizons known as slowly evolving horizons. It is for these horizons that a dynamical first law holds and this is analogous and closely related to the Hawking-Hartle formula for event horizons.

  11. Analogy between general relativity and electromagnetism for slowly moving particles in weak gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Edward G.

    1991-05-01

    Starting from the equations of general relativity, equations similar to those of electromagnetic theory are derived. It is assumed that the particles are slowly moving (v≪c), and the gravitational field is sufficiently weak that nonlinear terms in Einstein's field equations can be neglected. For static fields, the analogy to electrostatics and magnetostatics is very close. Results are compared with those of a previous derivation by Braginsky, Caves, and Thorne [Phys. Rev. D 15, 2047-2068 (1977)]. These results lead to very simple derivations of the Lense-Thirring precession [Phys. Z. 19, 156-163 (1918)] and the spin-curvature force of Papepetrou [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 209, 248-258 (1951)] and Pirani [Acta Phys. Pol. 15, 389-405 (1956)].

  12. Slowly rotating stars and black holes in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Chen, Yanbei

    2011-12-01

    Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity is an extension to general relativity (GR) in which the metric is coupled to a scalar field, resulting in modified Einstein field equations. In the dynamical theory, the scalar field is itself sourced by the Pontryagin density of the space-time. In this paper, the coupled system of equations for the metric and the scalar field is solved numerically for slowly rotating neutron stars described with realistic equations of state and for slowly rotating black holes. An analytic solution for a constant-density nonrelativistic object is also presented. It is shown that the black hole solution cannot be used to describe the exterior space-time of a star as was previously assumed. In addition, whereas previous analysis were limited to the small-coupling regime, this paper considers arbitrarily large coupling strengths. It is found that the CS modification leads to two effects on the gravitomagnetic sector of the metric: (i) Near the surface of a star or the horizon of a black hole, the magnitude of the gravitomagnetic potential is decreased and frame-dragging effects are reduced in comparison to GR. (ii) In the case of a star, the angular momentum J, as measured by distant observers, is enhanced in CS gravity as compared to standard GR. For a large coupling strength, the near-zone frame-dragging effects become significantly screened, whereas the far-zone enhancements saturate at a maximum value ΔJmax⁡˜(M/R)JGR. Using measurements of frame-dragging effects around the Earth by Gravity Probe B and the LAGEOS satellites, a weak but robust constraint is set to the characteristic CS length scale, ξ1/4≲108km.

  13. Eating slowly led to decreases in energy intake within meals in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Ana M; Greene, Geoffrey W; Melanson, Kathleen J

    2008-07-01

    Although reducing eating rate is frequently advocated for control of food intake and thus body weight, empirical evidence is extremely limited and inconsistent. We sought to compare the impact of slow and quick eating rates on development of satiation in healthy women. In a randomized design, 30 healthy women (22.9+/-7.1 years; body mass index [calculated as kg/m(2)] 22.1+/-2.9) were studied on two test visits to compare slow and quick eating rates. Satiation was examined as the main outcome, using the objective measure of energy intake during ad libitum meals. At designated times, subjects also rated perceived hunger, satiety, desire to eat, thirst and meal palatability on visual analogue scales. Slow rates of ingestion led to significant decreases in energy intake (quick: 645.7+/-155.9 kcal; slow: 579.0+/-154.7 kcal; P<0.05) and significant increases in water consumption (quick: 289.9+/-155.1 g; slow: 409.6+/-205.8 g; P<0.05). Despite higher energy intake upon meal completion under the quick condition, satiety was significantly lower than the slow condition (P<0.05). Accordingly, the quick condition showed a lower Satiating Efficiency Index (quick: 0.1; slow: 0.2; P<0.05). After meal completion, pleasantness ratings tended to be higher under the slow condition (P=0.04; but not significant after Bonferroni adjustment). Ad libitum energy intake was lower when the meal was eaten slowly, and satiety was higher at meal completion. Although more study is needed, these data suggest that eating slowly may help to maximize satiation and reduce energy intake within meals.

  14. A compositional anomaly at the Earth's core mantle boundary as an anchor to the relatively slowly moving surface hotspots and as source to the DUPAL anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Lianxing

    2006-06-01

    Analyses of the relative motion using hotspot tracks, age progressions and plate circuits, and of the absolute motion using paleolatitude data indicate that three major long-lived surface hotspots geographically within a very low velocity province (VLVP) at the base of the Earth's mantle, Tristan, Marion and Kerguelen, exhibit small relative motions (< 9 mm/yr) in the past 80 Ma. The geochemical DUPAL anomaly maximum in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans is also shown to geographically coincide with the VLVP boundary when the past plate motions are taken into account. These observations can be explained and related by invoking a mechanism that the VLVP, a compositional anomaly at the core-mantle boundary, serves as an anchor to thermochemical mantle plumes that give rise to these three long-lived and relatively-slowly moving surface hotspots with the DUPAL signature, and as source to the DUPAL anomaly in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

  15. Soluble settlement cue in slowly moving water within coral reefs induces larval adhesion to surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M. A. R.; Hadfield, M. G.

    2004-08-01

    Larvae of many benthic marine animals are induced to settle and metamorphose by dissolved chemical cues released by organisms on the substratum. Can dissolved cues released into the turbulent, wave-dominated flow typical of many shallow coastal areas affect the adhesion of settling larvae to benthic surfaces? We addressed this question using larvae of the nudibranch, Phestilla sibogae, which settle and metamorphose in response to a water-borne, species-specific metabolite of their prey, Porites compressa, abundant corals forming reefs in shallow habitats in Hawaii. Field measurements of water velocities showed oscillatory wave-driven flow above reefs with peak instantaneous velocities of 0.10-0.40 m/s, much slower back-and-forth water movement through the spaces within reefs with peak velocities of 0.02-0.04 m/s, and net shoreward transport of water through reefs of ˜0.01 m/s. We used a water channel in the laboratory to measure the wall shear stresses required to dislodge larvae of P. sibogae from various surfaces. We found that cue from P. compressa is necessary for the larvae to attach to surfaces and, if cue is dissolved in water bathing the larvae, they can adhere to surfaces other than living P. compressa. After 2 h of exposure to cue and a surface, the adhesive strength of the larvae reached its peak value and did not change during the next 20 h. The mean nominal wall shear stress required to dislodge larvae of P. sibogae attached to P. compressa tissue (1.59±0.64 Pa, n=10 experiments) was not significantly different from that necessary to wash them off coralline algae (2.53±2.45 Pa, n=8) encrusting coral skeleton collected within reefs, but they stuck more tightly to glass (4.26±1.04 Pa, n=13). It is likely that most P. sibogae larvae initially settle onto surfaces within reefs because (1) settlement cue released by P. compressa and sinking larvae of P. sibogae accumulate in the slowly moving water within a reef; (2) larvae exposed to cue are able to

  16. A cyclostrophic transformed Eulerian zonal mean model for the middle atmosphere of slowly rotating planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. F.; Yao, K.; Taketa, C.; Zhang, X.; Liang, M. C.; Jiang, X.; Newman, C. E.; Tung, K. K.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    With the advance of modern computers, studies of planetary atmospheres have heavily relied on general circulation models (GCMs). Because these GCMs are usually very complicated, the simulations are sometimes difficult to understand. Here we develop a semi-analytic zonally averaged, cyclostrophic residual Eulerian model to illustrate how some of the large-scale structures of the middle atmospheric circulation can be explained qualitatively in terms of simple thermal (e.g. solar heating) and mechanical (the Eliassen-Palm flux divergence) forcings. This model is a generalization of that for fast rotating planets such as the Earth, where geostrophy dominates (Andrews and McIntyre 1987). The solution to this semi-analytic model consists of a set of modified Hough functions of the generalized Laplace's tidal equation with the cyclostrohpic terms. As examples, we apply this model to Titan and Venus. We show that the seasonal variations of the temperature and the circulation of these slowly-rotating planets can be well reproduced by adjusting only three parameters in the model: the Brunt-Väisälä bouyancy frequency, the Newtonian radiative cooling rate, and the Rayleigh friction damping rate. We will also discuss the application of this model to study the meridional transport of photochemically produced tracers that can be observed by space instruments.

  17. Fast and slowly evolving vector solitons in mode-locked fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, Sergey V

    2014-10-28

    We report on a new vector model of an erbium-doped fibre laser mode locked with carbon nanotubes. This model goes beyond the limitations of the previously used models based on either coupled nonlinear Schrödinger or Ginzburg-Landau equations. Unlike the previous models, it accounts for the vector nature of the interaction between an optical field and an erbium-doped active medium, slow relaxation dynamics of erbium ions, linear birefringence in a fibre, linear and circular birefringence of a laser cavity caused by in-cavity polarization controller and light-induced anisotropy caused by elliptically polarized pump field. Interplay of aforementioned factors changes coherent coupling of two polarization modes at a long time scale and so results in a new family of vector solitons (VSs) with fast and slowly evolving states of polarization. The observed VSs can be of interest in secure communications, trapping and manipulation of atoms and nanoparticles, control of magnetization in data storage devices and many other areas. PMID:25246680

  18. Trajectory of a test particle around a slowly rotating relativistic star emitting isotropic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jae Sok; Kim, Hongsu; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2010-04-15

    We explored the motion of test particles near slowly rotating relativistic star having a uniform luminosity. In order to derive the test particle's equations of motion, we made use of the radiation stress-energy tensor first constructed by Miller and Lamb. From the particle's trajectory obtained through the numerical integration of the equations of motion, it is found that for sufficiently high luminosity, 'suspension orbit' exists, where the test particle hovers around at uniform angular velocity in the same direction as the star's spin. Interestingly, it turned out that the radial position of the suspension orbit was determined by the luminosity and the angular momentum of the star alone and was independent of the initial positions and the specific angular momentum of the particle. Also found is that there exist not only the radiation drag but also 'radiation counter drag', which depends on the stellar radius and the angular momentum, and it is this radiation counterdrag that makes the test particle in the suspension orbit hover around at a uniform angular velocity that is greater than that induced by the Lense-Thirring effect (i.e., general relativistic dragging of inertial frame).

  19. The Bayesian Decoding of Force Stimuli from Slowly Adapting Type I Fibers in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James; Khamis, Heba; Birznieks, Ingvars; van Schaik, André

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that signals encoded by mechanoreceptors facilitate precise object manipulation in humans. It is therefore of interest to study signals encoded by the mechanoreceptors because this will contribute further towards the understanding of fundamental sensory mechanisms that are responsible for coordinating force components during object manipulation. From a practical point of view, this may suggest strategies for designing sensory-controlled biomedical devices and robotic manipulators. We use a two-stage nonlinear decoding paradigm to reconstruct the force stimulus given signals from slowly adapting type one (SA-I) tactile afferents. First, we describe a nonhomogeneous Poisson encoding model which is a function of the force stimulus and the force’s rate of change. In the decoding phase, we use a recursive nonlinear Bayesian filter to reconstruct the force profile, given the SA-I spike patterns and parameters described by the encoding model. Under the current encoding model, the mode ratio of force to its derivative is: 1.26 to 1.02. This indicates that the force derivative contributes significantly to the rate of change to the SA-I afferent spike modulation. Furthermore, using recursive Bayesian decoding algorithms is advantageous because it can incorporate past and current information in order to make predictions—consistent with neural systems—with little computational resources. This makes it suitable for interfacing with prostheses. PMID:27077750

  20. Preparation of slowly digestible sweet potato Daeyumi starch by dual enzyme modification.

    PubMed

    Jo, A Ra; Kim, Ha Ram; Choi, Seung Jun; Lee, Joon Seol; Chung, Mi Nam; Han, Seon Kyeong; Park, Cheon-Seok; Moon, Tae Wha

    2016-06-01

    Sweet potato Daeyumi starch was dually modified using glycogen branching enzyme (BE) from Streptococcus mutans and amylosucrase (AS) from Neisseria polysaccharea to prepare slowly digestible starch (SDS). Dually modified starches had higher SDS and resistant starch (RS) contents than control starch. The branched chain length distributions of the BE-modified starches indicated an increase in short side-chains [degree of polymerization (DP)≤12] compared with native starch. AS treatment of the BE-modified starches decreased the proportion of short side-chains and increased the proportion of long side-chains (DP≥25) and molecular mass. It also resulted in a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern and an increased relative crystallinity. Regarding thermal properties, the BE-modified starches showed no endothermic peak, whereas the BEAS-modified starches had a broader melting temperature range and lower melting enthalpy compared to native starch. The combined enzymatic treatment resulted in novel glucan polymers with slow digestion properties. PMID:27083356

  1. Bursting mechanism in a time-delayed oscillator with slowly varying external forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Tang, Hongji; Han, Xiujing; Bi, Qinsheng

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the generation of complex bursting patterns in the Duffing oscillator with time-delayed feedback. We present the bursting patterns, including symmetric fold-fold bursting and symmetric Hopf-Hopf bursting when periodic forcing changes slowly. We make an analysis of the system bifurcations and dynamics as a function of the delayed feedback and the periodic forcing. We calculate the conditions of fold bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation as well as its stability related to external forcing and delay. We also identify two regimes of bursting depending on the magnitude of the delay itself and the strength of time delayed coupling in the model. Our results show that the dynamics of bursters in delayed system are quite different from those in systems without any delay. In particular, delay can be used as a tuning parameter to modulate dynamics of bursting corresponding to the different type. Furthermore, we use transformed phase space analysis to explore the evolution details of the delayed bursting behavior. Also some numerical simulations are included to illustrate the validity of our study.

  2. Propagation of solutions to the Fisher-KPP equation with slowly decaying initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    The Fisher-KPP equation is a model for population dynamics that has generated a huge amount of interest since its introduction in 1937. The speed with which a population spreads has been computed quite precisely when the initial data, u 0, decays exponentially. More recently, though, the case when the initial data decays more slowly has been studied. In Hamel F and Roques L (2010 J. Differ. Equ. 249 1726-45), the authors show that the level sets of height of m of u move super-linearly and may be bounded above and below by expressions of the form u0-1≤ft({{c}m}{{\\text{e}}-t}\\right) when u 0 decays algebraically of a small enough order. The constants c m for the upper and lower bounds that they obtain are not explicit and do not match. In this paper, we improve their precision for a broader class of initial data and for a broader class of equations. In particular, our approach yields the explicit highest order term in the location of the level sets, which in the most basic setting is given by u0-1≤ft(m{{\\text{e}}-t}/(1-m)\\right) as long as u 0 decays slower than {{\\text{e}}-\\sqrt{x}} . We generalize this to the previously unstudied setting when the nonlinearity is periodic in space. In addition, for large times, we characterize the profile of the solution in terms of a generalized logistic equation.

  3. A cyclostrophic transformed Eulerian zonal mean model for the middle atmosphere of slowly rotating planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, King-Fai; Yao, Kaixuan; Taketa, Cameron; Zhang, Xi; Liang, Mao-Chang; Jiang, Xun; Newman, Claire; Tung, Ka-Kit; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-04-01

    With the advance of modern computers, studies of planetary atmospheres have heavily relied on general circulation models (GCMs). Because these GCMs are usually very complicated, the simulations are sometimes difficult to understand. Here we develop a semi-analytic zonally averaged, cyclostrophic residual Eulerian model to illustrate how some of the large-scale structures of the middle atmospheric circulation can be explained qualitatively in terms of simple thermal (e.g. solar heating) and mechanical (the Eliassen-Palm flux divergence) forcings. This model is a generalization of that for fast rotating planets such as the Earth, where geostrophy dominates (Andrews and McIntyre 1987). The solution to this semi-analytic model consists of a set of modified Hough functions of the generalized Laplace's tidal equation with the cyclostrohpic terms. As an example, we apply this model to Titan. We show that the seasonal variations of the temperature and the circulation of these slowly-rotating planets can be well reproduced by adjusting only three parameters in the model: the Brunt-Väisälä bouyancy frequency, the Newtonian radiative cooling rate, and the Rayleigh friction damping rate. We will also discuss an application of this model to study the meridional transport of photochemically produced tracers that can be observed by space instruments.

  4. Slowly rotating neutron stars in scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Popchev, Dimitar

    2016-04-01

    In the scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field, the coupling constants, and the coupling functions in general, which are observationally allowed, can differ significantly from those in the massless case. This fact naturally implies that the scalar-tensor neutron stars with a massive scalar field can have rather different structure and properties in comparison with their counterparts in the massless case and in general relativity. In the present paper, we study slowly rotating neutron stars in scalar-tensor theories with a massive gravitational scalar. Two examples of scalar-tensor theories are examined—the first example is the massive Brans-Dicke theory and the second one is a massive scalar-tensor theory indistinguishable from general relativity in the weak-field limit. In the latter case, we study the effect of the scalar field mass on the spontaneous scalarization of neutron stars. Our numerical results show that the inclusion of a mass term for the scalar field indeed changes the picture drastically compared to the massless case. It turns out that mass, radius, and moment of inertia for neutron stars in massive scalar-tensor theories can differ drastically from the pure general relativistic solutions if sufficiently large masses of the scalar field are considered.

  5. Slowly rotating superfluid neutron stars with isospin dependent entrainment in a two-fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheto, Apurba; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the slowly rotating general relativistic superfluid neutron stars including the entrainment effect in a two-fluid model, where one fluid represents the superfluid neutrons and the other is the charge-neutral fluid, called the proton fluid, made of protons and electrons. The equation of state and the entrainment effect between the superfluid neutrons and the proton fluid are computed using a relativistic mean field (RMF) model where baryon-baryon interaction is mediated by the exchange of σ , ω , and ρ mesons, and scalar self-interactions are also included. The equations governing rotating neutron stars in the slow rotation approximation are second order in rotational velocities of neutron and proton fluids. We explore the effects of the isospin dependent entrainment and the relative rotation between two fluids on the global properties of rotating superfluid neutron stars such as mass, shape, and the mass-shedding (Kepler) limit within the RMF model with different parameter sets. It is observed that for the global properties of rotating superfluid neutron stars in particular, the Kepler limit is modified compared with the case that does not include the contribution of ρ mesons in the entrainment effect.

  6. Computation identifies structural features that govern neuronal firing properties in slowly adapting touch receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lesniak, Daine R; Marshall, Kara L; Wellnitz, Scott A; Jenkins, Blair A; Baba, Yoshichika; Rasband, Matthew N; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2014-01-01

    Touch is encoded by cutaneous sensory neurons with diverse morphologies and physiological outputs. How neuronal architecture influences response properties is unknown. To elucidate the origin of firing patterns in branched mechanoreceptors, we combined neuroanatomy, electrophysiology and computation to analyze mouse slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferents. These vertebrate touch receptors, which innervate Merkel cells, encode shape and texture. SAI afferents displayed a high degree of variability in touch-evoked firing and peripheral anatomy. The functional consequence of differences in anatomical architecture was tested by constructing network models representing sequential steps of mechanosensory encoding: skin displacement at touch receptors, mechanotransduction and action-potential initiation. A systematic survey of arbor configurations predicted that the arrangement of mechanotransduction sites at heminodes is a key structural feature that accounts in part for an afferent’s firing properties. These findings identify an anatomical correlate and plausible mechanism to explain the driver effect first described by Adrian and Zotterman. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01488.001 PMID:24448409

  7. Augmented brain function by coordinated reset stimulation with slowly varying sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Magteld; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Several brain disorders are characterized by abnormally strong neuronal synchrony. Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation was developed to selectively counteract abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. For this, phase resetting stimuli are delivered to different subpopulations in a timely coordinated way. In neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity CR stimulation may eventually lead to an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of abnormal synaptic connectivity and abnormal synchrony. The spatiotemporal sequence by which all stimulation sites are stimulated exactly once is called the stimulation site sequence, or briefly sequence. So far, in simulations, pre-clinical and clinical applications CR was applied either with fixed sequences or rapidly varying sequences (RVS). In this computational study we show that appropriate repetition of the sequence with occasional random switching to the next sequence may significantly improve the anti-kindling effect of CR. To this end, a sequence is applied many times before randomly switching to the next sequence. This new method is called SVS CR stimulation, i.e., CR with slowly varying sequences. In a neuronal network with strong short-range excitatory and weak long-range inhibitory dynamic couplings SVS CR stimulation turns out to be superior to CR stimulation with fixed sequences or RVS. PMID:25873867

  8. DISCOVERY OF 14 NEW SLOWLY PULSATING B STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 7654

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y. P.; Han, Z. W.

    2012-02-10

    We carried out time-series BV CCD photometric observations of the open cluster NGC 7654 (Messier 52) to search for variable stars. Eighteen slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars have been detected, among which 14 candidates are newly discovered, three known ones are confirmed, and a previously found {delta} Scuti star is also identified as an SPB candidate. Twelve SPBs are probable cluster members based on membership analysis. This makes NGC 7654 the richest galactic open cluster in terms of SPB star content. It is also a new discovery that NGC 7654 hosts three {gamma} Dor star candidates. We found that all these stars (18 SPB and 3 {gamma} Dor stars) have periods longer than their corresponding fundamental radial mode. With such a big sample of g-mode pulsators in a single cluster, it is clear that multi-mode pulsation is more common in the upper part of the main sequence than in the lower part. All the stars span a narrow strip on the period-luminosity plane, which also includes the {gamma} Dor stars at the low-luminosity extension. This result implies that there may be a single period-luminosity relation applicable to all g-mode main-sequence pulsators. As a by-product, three EA-type eclipsing binaries and an EW-type eclipsing binary are also discovered.

  9. Slowly rotating anisotropic neutron stars in general relativity and scalar-tensor theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Berti, Emanuele; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2015-07-01

    Some models (such as the Skyrme model, a low-energy effective field theory for quantum chromodynamics) suggest that the high-density matter prevailing in neutron star (NS) interiors may be significantly anisotropic. Anisotropy is known to affect the bulk properties of nonrotating NSs in general relativity (GR). In this paper we study the effects of anisotropy on slowly rotating stars in GR. We also consider one of the most popular extensions of Einstein’s theory, namely scalar-tensor theories allowing for spontaneous scalarization (a phase transition similar to spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnetic materials). Anisotropy affects the moment of inertia of NSs (a quantity that could potentially be measured in binary pulsar systems) in both theories. We find that the effects of scalarization increase (decrease) when the tangential pressure is bigger (smaller) than the radial pressure, and we present a simple criterion to determine the onset of scalarization by linearizing the scalar-field equation. Our calculations suggest that binary pulsar observations may constrain the degree of anisotropy or even, more optimistically, provide evidence for anisotropy in NS cores.

  10. Radial modes of slowly rotating compact stars in the presence of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, N. R.; Mohanta, K. K.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    Compact stars are composed of very high-density hadron matter. When the matter is above nuclear matter density, then there is a chance of different phases of matter such as hadron matter to quark matter. There is a possible phase which, having the quark core surrounded by a mixed phase followed by hadronic matter, may be considered as a hybrid phase inside the stars called hybrid star (HS). The star which consists of only u, d and s quarks is called quark star (QS) and the star which has only hadronic matter is called neutron star (NS). For the equation of state (EOS) of hadronic matter, we have considered the Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) theory and we incorporated the effect of strong magnetic fields. For the EOS of the quark phase we use the simple MIT bag model. We have assumed Gaussian parametrization to make the density dependent for both bag pressure in quark matter and magnetic field. We have constructed the intermediate mixed phase by using the Glendenning conjecture. Eigenfrequencies of radial pulsations of slowly rotating magnetized compact stars (NS, QS, HS) are calculated in a general relativistic formalism given by Chandrasekhar and Friedman. We have studied the effect of central density on the square of the frequencies of the compact stars in the presence of zero and strong magnetic field.

  11. Transient recirculation in a slowly varying tube impulsively rotated about its axis with constant angular velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D. A.

    2000-12-01

    For time t¯<0, viscous fluid is in slow flow through a long straight axially symmetric tube whose radius, ā, varies slowly with axial distance, x¯. When t¯=0 the tube is impulsively rotated about its axis with angular velocity, Ω¯, at which angular speed it is thereafter maintained. During the transition from zero angular velocity, when t¯<0, to solid body rotation, when t¯→∞, the flow in the tube can briefly exhibit striking physical behavior, markedly different from the flow in the stationary tube. We present a linearization of the Navier-Stokes equations, valid when the Blasius parameter ɛ, which governs the magnitude of the inertial forces, tends to zero and the swirl parameter, λ, which is the ratio of a representative tube wall velocity, Ω¯ā0, to a representative axial velocity, tends to infinity, with the product ɛλ2≡Γ held fixed. An analytic solution suitable for computation and valid for suitably large t¯ is presented and streamlines are plotted for a typical diverging and a typical converging tube at time t¯=0.6ā02/ν when Γ=40. The relevance of the results to the phenomenon of vortex breakdown in tubes is discussed.

  12. Fast and slowly evolving vector solitons in mode-locked fibre lasers.

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, Sergey V

    2014-10-28

    We report on a new vector model of an erbium-doped fibre laser mode locked with carbon nanotubes. This model goes beyond the limitations of the previously used models based on either coupled nonlinear Schrödinger or Ginzburg-Landau equations. Unlike the previous models, it accounts for the vector nature of the interaction between an optical field and an erbium-doped active medium, slow relaxation dynamics of erbium ions, linear birefringence in a fibre, linear and circular birefringence of a laser cavity caused by in-cavity polarization controller and light-induced anisotropy caused by elliptically polarized pump field. Interplay of aforementioned factors changes coherent coupling of two polarization modes at a long time scale and so results in a new family of vector solitons (VSs) with fast and slowly evolving states of polarization. The observed VSs can be of interest in secure communications, trapping and manipulation of atoms and nanoparticles, control of magnetization in data storage devices and many other areas.

  13. On accurate computations of slowly convergent atomic properties in few-electron ions and electron-electron correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Alexei M.; Wardlaw, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss an approach to accurate numerical computations of slowly convergent properties in two-electron atoms/ions which include the negatively charged Ps- ( e - e + e -) and H- ions, He atom and positively charged, helium-like ions from Li+ to Ni26+. All these ions are considered in their ground 11S-state(s). The slowly convergent properties selected in this study include the electron-nulceus ( r 2k eN) and electron-electron ( r 2k ee) expectation values for k = 2, 3, 4 and 5.

  14. Asymptotic analysis of the density of states in random matrix models associated with a slowly decaying weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijlaars, A. B. J.

    2001-08-01

    The asymptotic behavior of polynomials that are orthogonal with respect to a slowly decaying weight is very different from the asymptotic behavior of polynomials that are orthogonal with respect to a Freud-type weight. While the latter has been extensively studied, much less is known about the former. Following an earlier investigation into the zero behavior, we study here the asymptotics of the density of states in a unitary ensemble of random matrices with a slowly decaying weight. This measure is also naturally connected with the orthogonal polynomials. It is shown that, after suitable rescaling, the weak limit is the same as the weak limit of the rescaled zeros.

  15. Adult onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease with psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    del Valle-López, Pilar; Pérez-García, Rosa; Sanguino-Andrés, Rosa; González-Pablos, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare neurological disorder characterized by pyramidal and extrapyramidal manifestations, dysarthria and dementia. Its onset is usually in childhood and most patients have a fatal outcome in few years. A high percentage of cases are hereditary with a recessive autosomal pattern. In the majority of the patients reported, a mutation of the gene that encodes the pantothenate kinase (PANK2) located in the 20p13-p12.3 chromosome that causes iron storage in the basal ganglia of the brain has been found. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms as well as specific MRI imaging findings. The most common psychiatric features are cognitive impairment as well as depressive symptoms. There are few documented cases with psychotic disorders. We present the case of a patient with late onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease and psychotic symptoms that preceded the development of neurological manifestations. The pathophysiology and the treatment of psychotic symptomatology are presented and discussed. Key words: Psicosis, Hallervorden-Spatz, late onset, Basal ganglia. PMID:21769749

  16. Adult-Onset Asthma Might Raise Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... for 14 years. Researchers led by Dr. Matthew Tattersall published their findings Aug. 24 in the Journal ... and be aggressive in modifying any risk factors," Tattersall said in a journal news release. He is ...

  17. Adult Onset of Xanthelasmoid Mastocytosis: Report of a Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Nafiseh Sadat; Nejad, Masumeh Hosseini; Feli, Shahab; Bakhshoodeh, Behnoosh; Layegh, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Xanthelasmoid or pseudoxanthomatous mastocytosis is an extremely rare variant of diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis. Herein, we describe an adult male with cutaneous mastocytosis showing multiple widespread yellowish ovoid papules like eruptive xanthoma. A 60-year-old male visited our outpatient clinic with a 1-year history of generalized yellowish, ovoid, and skin color papular eruption located on the trunk, groin, extremities, with the modest pruritus. Vital signs were stable, and Darier's sign was negative. No other subjective and objective signs were detected during the examination. No abnormality was detected in his diagnostic laboratory tests. Skin biopsy was taken, and histopathologic examination revealed proliferation of mast cells with ovoid and spindle nuclei with distinct cytoplasm borders around the capillaries, which was compatible with mastocytosis. Antihistamine was prescribed for pruritus control which was successful, but eruptions were persistent, and even 1-year phototherapy was not useful. PMID:27512209

  18. Adult-Onset Asthma to Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asthma has been associated with atherosclerotic disease in several studies with some evidence that this association may be limited to women. However, most previous studies have failed to account for the heterogeneity of asthma subtypes. We previously reported increased carotid intima medial thickne...

  19. Adult onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease with psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    del Valle-López, Pilar; Pérez-García, Rosa; Sanguino-Andrés, Rosa; González-Pablos, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare neurological disorder characterized by pyramidal and extrapyramidal manifestations, dysarthria and dementia. Its onset is usually in childhood and most patients have a fatal outcome in few years. A high percentage of cases are hereditary with a recessive autosomal pattern. In the majority of the patients reported, a mutation of the gene that encodes the pantothenate kinase (PANK2) located in the 20p13-p12.3 chromosome that causes iron storage in the basal ganglia of the brain has been found. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms as well as specific MRI imaging findings. The most common psychiatric features are cognitive impairment as well as depressive symptoms. There are few documented cases with psychotic disorders. We present the case of a patient with late onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease and psychotic symptoms that preceded the development of neurological manifestations. The pathophysiology and the treatment of psychotic symptomatology are presented and discussed. Key words: Psicosis, Hallervorden-Spatz, late onset, Basal ganglia.

  20. Recurrent adult onset Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Neil; Guido, Bruce; Mago, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura is an immunoglobulin A (IgA)-immune complex mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis that classically manifests with palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria or proteinuria. The condition is much more predominant in children (90% of cases) and commonly follows an upper respiratory infection. We present a case of recurrent Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) complicated by nephritis in an adult female initially categorized as IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We review the pathophysiologic basis of HSP nephritis as the variant of HSP accompanied by renal involvement and its pathogenetic commonality with IgA nephropathy. PMID:27617937

  1. Adult-Onset Esophageal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasarala, George; Durrett, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal involvement is rarely seen in adults, especially at the initial diagnosis of CD. Esophageal symptoms as primary manifestations of the disease are extremely rare. We report a case of a CD with esophageal involvement at the time of her initial diagnosis of CD. PMID:27761477

  2. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, M; Smartt, S J; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T-W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-10-17

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10(44) ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of (56)Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to (56)Fe via (56)Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10(-6) times that of the core-collapse rate. PMID:24132291

  3. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholl, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Inserra, C.; McCrum, M.; Kotak, R.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Chen, T.-W.; Smith, K.; Young, D. R.; Sim, S. A.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Tonry, J. L.; Huber, M. E.; Rest, A.; Pastorello, A.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Mattila, S.; Kankare, E.; Kangas, T.; Leloudas, G.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Narayan, G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Foley, R. J.; Lunnan, R.; Soderberg, A.; Sanders, N.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kirshner, R. P.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Botticella, M. T.; Gezari, S.; Urata, Y.; Rodney, S.; Riess, A. G.; Scolnic, D.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K.; Flewelling, H. A.; Magnier, E. A.; Kaiser, N.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, J.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Waters, C.

    2013-10-01

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 1044 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of `pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.

  4. HD 314884: a slowly pulsating B star in a close binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher B.; Hynes, R. I.; Maccarone, T.; Britt, C. T.; Davis, H.; Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S.; Nelemans, G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic and photometric analysis of HD 314884, a slowly pulsating B star (SPB) in a binary system with detected soft-X-ray emission. We spectrally classify the B star as a B5V-B6V star with Teff = 15 490 ± 310 K, log g = 3.75 ± 0.25 dex, and a photometric period of P0 = 0.889 521(12) d. A spectroscopic period search reveals an orbital period for the system of Porb = 1.3654(11) d. The discrepancy in the two periods and the identification of a second and third distinct frequency in the photometric Fourier transform at P1 = 3.1347(56) and P2 = 1.517(28) d provides evidence that HD 314884 is an SPB with at least three oscillation frequencies. These frequencies appear to originate from higher order, non-linear tidal pulsations. Using the dynamical parameters obtained from the radial-velocity curve, we find the most probable companion mass to be M1 = ˜0.8 M⊙ assuming a typical mass for the B star and most probable inclination. We conclude that the X-ray source companion to HD 314884 is most likely a coronally active G-type star or a white dwarf, with no apparent emission lines in the optical spectrum. The mass probability distribution of the companion star mass spans 0.6-2.3 M⊙ at 99 per cent confidence which allows the possibility of a neutron star companion. The X-ray source is unlikely to be a black hole unless it is of a very low mass or low binary inclination.

  5. An argument for weakly magnetized, slowly rotating progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno Méndez, Enrique

    2014-01-20

    Using binary evolution with Case-C mass transfer, the spins of several black holes (BHs) in X-ray binaries (XBs) have been predicted and confirmed (three cases) by observations. The rotational energy of these BHs is sufficient to power up long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and hypernovae (HNe) and still leave a Kerr BH behind. However, strong magnetic fields and/or dynamo effects in the interior of such stars deplete their cores from angular momentum preventing the formation of collapsars. Thus, even though binaries can produce Kerr BHs, most of their rotation is acquired from the stellar mantle, with a long delay between BH formation and spin up. Such binaries would not form GRBs. We study whether the conditions required to produce GRBs can be met by the progenitors of such BHs. Tidal-synchronization and Alfvén timescales are compared for magnetic fields of different intensities threading He stars. A search is made for a magnetic field range that allows tidal spin up all the way in to the stellar core but prevents its slow down during differential rotation phases. The energetics for producing a strong magnetic field during core collapse, which may allow for a GRB central engine, are also estimated. An observationally reasonable choice of parameters is found (B ≲ 10{sup 2} G threading a slowly rotating He star) that allows Fe cores to retain substantial angular momentum. Thus, the Case-C mass-transfer binary channel is capable of explaining long GRBs. However, the progenitors must have low initial spin and low internal magnetic field throughout their H-burning and He-burning phases.

  6. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, M; Smartt, S J; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T-W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-10-17

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10(44) ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of (56)Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to (56)Fe via (56)Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10(-6) times that of the core-collapse rate.

  7. The slowly pulsating B-star 18 Pegasi: A testbed for upper main sequence stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgang, A.; Desphande, A.; Moehler, S.; Mugrauer, M.; Janousch, D.

    2016-06-01

    The predicted width of the upper main sequence in stellar evolution models depends on the empirical calibration of the convective overshooting parameter. Despite decades of discussions, its precise value is still unknown and further observational constraints are required to gauge it. Based on a photometric and preliminary asteroseismic analysis, we show that the mid B-type giant 18 Peg is one of the most evolved members of the rare class of slowly pulsating B-stars and, thus, bears tremendous potential to derive a tight lower limit for the width of the upper main sequence. In addition, 18 Peg turns out to be part of a single-lined spectroscopic binary system with an eccentric orbit that is greater than 6 years. Further spectroscopic and photometric monitoring and a sophisticated asteroseismic investigation are required to exploit the full potential of this star as a benchmark object for stellar evolution theory. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programmes 265.C-5038(A), 069.C-0263(A), and 073.D-0024(A). Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), proposals H2005-2.2-016 and H2015-3.5-008. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, proposal W15BN015. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University.

  8. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  9. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-01

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R1 of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R1 vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S-I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole 14N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of 27Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  10. Frequency Determination for the Slowly Pulsating B Star, HD21071, From Combined Geneva and Stromgren Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Melissa; Dukes, R. J., Jr.

    2006-12-01

    This project is comparison of several studies done on the variable star HD21071, which was previously determined to be Slowly Pulsating B star by Waelkens, et. al. (Astron. Astrophys. 330, 215-221, 1998) with a suggested period of .841 day (1.19 c d-1). Several later studies including Mills, L. R., et. al. (BAAS 31, 1482, 1999) and Andrews, J. E, et. al. (AAS Meeting 203, #83.14, 2003) confirmed the .841 period and tentatively suggested other possible periods based on new data, including 0.704 day (1.42 c d-1), 0.775 day (1.29 c d-1), and 1.14 day (0.878 c d-1) periods. This project merges Geneva V data and data from the y filter from the FCAPT data in the Stromgren uvby system by using a bilinear transformation from Harmanec et. al. (Astron. Astrophys. 369, 1140, 2001). Frequencies were determined using the Period04 program, which utilizes a least square fitting technique, to determine frequencies in the two data sets separately. We then analyzed the merged data set resulting in confirmation of the periods found in the individual data sets. The reality of the these frequencies was tested using multiple methods including least squares analysis and a check of the signal to noise ratio. We would like to thank Connie Aerts and Peter De Cat for providing the Geneva data as well as a copy of their preliminary analysis of this data. This work has been supported by NSF Grant AST-0071260 & AST-050755

  11. Optimizing Electrospray Interfaces Using Slowly Diverging Conical Duct (ConDuct) Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Padovan, Júlio C.; Cohen, Herbert; Chait, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the efficiency of ion transmission from atmosphere to vacuum through stainless steel electrodes that contain slowly divergent conical duct (ConDuct) channels can be close to 100%. Here, we explore the properties of 2.5 cm long electrodes with angles of divergence of 0°, 1°, 2°, 3°, 5°, 8°, 13°, and 21°, respectively. The ion transmission efficiency was observed to jump from 10–20% for the 0° (straight) channels to 90–95% for channels with an angle of divergence as small as 1°. Furthermore, the 2–3° ConDuct electrodes produced extraordinarily low divergence ion beams that propagated in a laser-like fashion over long distances in vacuum. To take advantage of these newly discovered properties, we constructed a novel atmosphere-to-vacuum ion interface utilizing a 2° ConDuct as an inlet electrode and compared its ion transmission efficiency with that of the interface used in the commercial (Thermo) Velos Orbitrap and Q Exactive mass spectrometers. We observed that the ConDuct interface transmitted up to 17 times more ions than the commercial reference interface and also yielded improved signal-to-noise mass spectra of peptides. We infer from these results that the performance of many current atmosphere-tovacuum interfaces utilizing metal capillaries can be substantially improved by replacing them with 1° or 2° metal ConDuct electrodes, which should preserve the convenience of supplying ion desolvation energy by heating the electrode while greatly increasing the efficiency of ion transmission into the mass spectrometer. PMID:25667060

  12. Testing the Completeness of the SDSS Colour Selection for Ultramassive, Slowly Spinning Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertemes, Caroline; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Schawinski, Kevin; Done, Chris; Elvis, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the colour-based quasar selection algorithm of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to several key physical parameters of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), focusing on BH spin (a★) at the high BH-mass regime (MBH ≥ 109 M⊙). We use a large grid of model spectral energy distribution, assuming geometrically-thin, optically-thick accretion discs, and spanning a wide range of five physical parameters: BH mass MBH, BH spin a★, Eddington ratio L/LEdd, redshift z, and inclination angle inc. Based on the expected fluxes in the SDSS imaging ugriz bands, we find that ˜99.8% of our models with MBH ≤ 109.5 M⊙ are selected as quasar candidates and thus would have been targeted for spectroscopic follow-up. However, in the extremely high-mass regime, ≥1010M⊙, we identify a bias against slowly/retrograde spinning SMBHs. The fraction of SEDs that would have been selected as quasar candidates drops below ˜50% for a★ < 0 across 0.5 < z < 2. For particularly massive BHs, with MBH ≃ 3 × 1010 M⊙, this rate drops below ˜20%, and can be yet lower for specific redshifts. We further find that the chances of identifying any hypothetical sources with MBH = 1011 M⊙ by colour selection would be extremely low at the level of ˜3%. Our findings, along with several recent theoretical arguments and empirical findings, demonstrate that the current understanding of the SMBH population at the high-MBH, and particularly the low- or retrograde-spinning regime, is highly incomplete.

  13. The CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells colonize the lymph nodes of the patients with adult onset Still's disease and are associated with increased extracellular level of H-ferritin in the same tissue: correlation with disease severity and implication for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruscitti, P; Ciccia, F; Cipriani, P; Guggino, G; Di Benedetto, P; Rizzo, A; Liakouli, V; Berardicurti, O; Carubbi, F; Triolo, G; Giacomelli, R

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we aimed to evaluate the levels of ferritin enriched in H subunits (H-ferritin) and ferritin enriched in L subunits (L-ferritin) and the cells expressing these two molecules in the lymph node (LN) biopsies obtained from adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients, and the possible correlation among these data and the severity of the disease. Ten patients with AOSD underwent LN biopsy. All the samples were stained by immunofluorescence. A statistical analysis was performed to estimate the possible correlation among both H-ferritin and L-ferritin tissue expression and the clinical picture of the disease. Furthermore, the same analysis was performed to evaluate the possible correlation among the number of CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) or CD68(+)/L-ferritin(+) cells and the clinical picture. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated an increased tissue H-ferritin expression in the LNs of AOSD patients. This increased expression correlated with the severity of the disease. An increased number of CD68 macrophages expressing H-ferritin was observed in the LN samples of our patients. Furthermore, we observed that the number of CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells correlated significantly with the severity of the clinical picture. Our data showed an imbalance between the levels of H- and L-ferritin in LNs of AOSD patients and the evidence of an increased number of CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells in the same organs. Furthermore, a correlation among both the tissue H-ferritin levels and the CD68(+)/H-ferritin(+) cells and the clinical picture was observed.

  14. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome). Case report.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, N; Fisher, J G; Mayer, M H; Mathieu, G P

    1995-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome) is a slowly progressing facial atrophy of subcutaneous fat and the wasting of associated skin, cartilage, and bone. This disorder includes an active progressive phase (2 to 10 years) followed by a burning out of the atrophic process with subsequent stability. This article presents a review of the literature and a case report with unique dental involvement as a result of this disease process.

  15. A Developmental Study of Static Postural Control and Superimposed Arm Movements in Normal and Slowly Developing Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Janet M.

    Selected electromyographic parameters underlying static postural control in 4, 6, and 8 year old normally and slowly developing children during performance of selected arm movements were studied. Developmental delays in balance control were assessed by the Cashin Test of Motor Development (1974) and/or the Williams Gross Motor Coordination Test…

  16. Shading reduces coral-disease progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, E. M.; van Woesik, R.

    2009-09-01

    The growing incidence of tropical-marine diseases is attributed to increases in pathogen prevalence and virulence associated with global warming. Additionally, the compromised-host hypothesis suggests that rising ocean temperatures may increase disease activity by making the corals more susceptible to ubiquitous pathogens. We tested the effects of reducing irradiance stress on coral-disease progression rates by shading corals showing signs consistent with white-plague disease. Our results showed that white-plague disease on shaded corals progressed significantly more slowly than on controls. Although the mechanisms are unknown, this study suggests that light intensity influences the rate of coral-disease progression.

  17. Progressive bilateral thinning of the parietal bones

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, C.G.; Andren, L.; Olivecrona, H.

    1982-03-01

    Observation of a case of progressive bilateral parietal thinning within a period of 14 years induced us to study skull films of 3 636 consecutive patients. Parietal thinning was found in 86 patients (2.37%). It was more common in women, with a sex ratio of 1:1.9. The mean age of the females was 72 years, and that of the males 63 years. Previous skull films of 25 of these patients were available and showed progression in 10. It is concluded that parietal thinning is a slowly progressive disease of middle-aged and old patients and is not an anatomical variant or congenital dysplasia of the dipole.

  18. Earthquakes in western Iberia: improving the understanding of lithospheric deformation in a slowly deforming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, S.; Dias, N. A.; Carrilho, F.; Góngora, E.; Rio, I.; Marreiros, C.; Morais, I.; Alves, P.; Matias, L.

    2015-10-01

    of western Iberia presented in this article opens important questions concerning the regional seismotectonics. This work shows that the study of low-magnitude earthquakes using dense seismic deployments is a powerful tool to study lithospheric deformation in slowly deforming regions, such as western Iberia, where high-magnitude earthquakes occur with long recurrence intervals.

  19. KIC 10526294: a slowly rotating B star with rotationally split, quasi-equally spaced gravity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pápics, P. I.; Moravveji, E.; Aerts, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Triana, S. A.; Bloemen, S.; Southworth, J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Massive stars are important for the chemical enrichment of the universe. Since internal mixing processes influence their lives, it is very important to place constraints on the corresponding physical parameters, such as core overshooting and the internal rotation profile, so as to calibrate their stellar structure and evolution models. Although asteroseismology has been shown to be able to deliver the most precise constraints so far, the number of detailed seismic studies delivering quantitative results is limited. Aims: Our goal is to extend this limited sample with an in-depth case study and provide a well-constrained set of asteroseismic parameters, contributing to the ongoing mapping efforts of the instability strips of the β Cep and slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars. Methods: We derived fundamental parameters from high-resolution spectra using spectral synthesis techniques. We used custom masks to obtain optimal light curves from the original pixel level data from the Kepler satellite. We used standard time-series analysis tools to construct a set of significant pulsation modes that provide the basis for the seismic analysis carried out afterwards. Results: We find that KIC 10526294 is a cool SPB star, one of the slowest rotators ever found. Despite this, the length of Kepler observations is sufficient to resolve narrow rotationally split multiplets for each of its nineteen quasi-equally spaced dipole modes. The number of detected consecutive (in radial order) dipole modes in this series is higher than ever before. The observed amount of splitting shows an increasing trend towards longer periods, which - largely independent of the seismically calibrated stellar models - points towards a non-rigid internal rotation profile. From the average splitting we deduce a rotation period of ~188 days. From seismic modelling, we find that the star is young with a central hydrogen mass fraction Xc> 0.64; it has a core overshooting αov ≤ 0.15. Based on

  20. Properties of Slowly Moving Thermal Waves in Saturn from Cassini CIRS Observations from 2004 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, G. S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Flasar, F. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Brown, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    Hemispherical maps of Saturn's atmosphere made by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) were surveyed for the presence and properties of zonal thermal waves and their variability in time. The most inclusive surveys in latitude, FIRMAPs (15 cm-1 spectral resolution), covered the planet from the equator to either the north or south pole, sweeping through the latitude range while the planet rotated beneath over its ~10-hour rotation. Four spectral ranges were sampled: two in a region dominated by upper-tropospheric emission (80-200 mbar) from collision-induced H2 opacity and two in regions dominated by stratospheric emission (0.5-3 mbar) from ethane (12.3 μm) and methane (7.7 μm), respectively. We examined maps that were taken between 2004 and Saturn's spring equinox in 2009. During this time, the strongest waves were found between planetographic latitudes of 30° and 45° S; in the northern hemisphere, they were found between the equator and 30°N. Some low-wavenumber components cover all 360° in longitude, similar to the slowly moving thermal waves in Jupiter's atmosphere, but the strongest waves were found in "trains" that covered only one hemisphere or less. In 2005, tropospheric waves had a mean peak-to-peak variance that was the equivalent of temperature variability of about 1 K. Between 2005 and 2007, they had subsided to about 0.5 K. During and after 2008 they soared to over 3 K. During this entire period, similar waves in the northern hemisphere were never larger than 0.8 K. In the stratosphere, waves followed a similar time sequence, with southern hemisphere waves in 2005 reaching as much as 3.5 K in brightness temperature, subsequently decreasing, then growing in 2008-2009 to over 5 K. Stratospheric waves in the northern hemisphere were nearly constant around 2 K, but with an instance of 6 K at one epoch in 2008. The phase of the waves moved about 0.5° of longitude per day retrograde with respect to System III. The phase of tropospheric and

  1. Telomeres shorten more slowly in slow-aging wild animals than in fast-aging ones.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, Ben; Fletcher, Quinn E

    2015-11-01

    Research on the physiological causes of senescence aim to identify common physiological mechanisms that explain age-related declines in fitness across taxonomic groups. Telomeres are repetitive nucleotide sequences found on the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Past research indicates that telomere attrition is strongly correlated with inter-specific rates of aging, though these studies cannot distinguish whether telomere attrition is a cause or consequence of the aging process. We extend previous research on this topic by incorporating recent studies to test the hypothesis that telomeres shorten more slowly with age in slow-aging animals than in fast-aging ones. We assembled all studies that have quantified cross-sectional (i.e. between-individual) telomere rates of change (TROC) over the lifespans of wild animals. This included 22 estimates reflecting absolute TROC (TROCabs, bp/yr, primarily measured using the terminal restriction fragment length method), and 10 estimates reflecting relative TROC (TROCrel, relative telomere length/yr, measured using qPCR), from five classes (Aves, Mammalia, Bivalvia, Reptilia, and Actinopterygii). In 14 bird species, we correlated between-individual (i.e. cross-sectional) TROCabs estimates with both maximum lifespan and a phylogenetically-corrected principle component axis (pcPC1) that reflected the slow-fast axis of life-history variation. Bird species characterized by faster life-histories and shorter maximum lifespans had faster TROCabs. In nine studies, both between-individual and within-individual TROC estimates were available (n=8 for TROCabs, n=1 for TROCrel). Within-individual TROC estimates were generally greater than between-individual TROC estimates, which is indicative of selective disappearance of individuals with shorter telomeres. However, the difference between within- and between-individual TROC estimates was only significant in two out of nine studies. The relationship between within-individual TROCabs and maximum

  2. Isotopic disequilibrium and lower crustal contamination in slowly ascending magmas: Insights from Proterozoic anorthosites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bybee, G. M.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-10-01

    disequilibrium geometries cannot be explained by melting of the lower crust. Assimilation of crust with distinctive Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions does, however, explain the origin of decoupling in internal mineral isotopic compositions. We also find unexpected patterns of internal isotopic disequilibrium, such as isotopically radiogenic orthopyroxene relative to plagioclase and differences in plagioclase isotopic disequilibrium between orthopyroxene- and olivine-bearing samples. These various lines of evidence provide strong support for the generation of crustal isotopic signatures through assimilation, and not anatexis, of the lower crust. These isotopic data show that anorthosite petrogenesis likely involves significant differentiation and solidification at lower crustal depths, followed by ascent of high-crystallinity bodies (⩾50% crystallinity) to mid- or upper crustal levels. We show that protracted lower crustal differentiation imparts a clear chemical and isotopic signature on mantle-derived magmas of Proterozoic anorthosites and that this process is central in the development of such slowly ascending, plagioclase-rich magmas.

  3. Early-branching or fast-evolving eukaryotes? An answer based on slowly evolving positions.

    PubMed

    Philippe, H; Lopez, P; Brinkmann, H; Budin, K; Germot, A; Laurent, J; Moreira, D; Müller, M; Le Guyader, H

    2000-06-22

    The current paradigm of eukaryotic evolution is based primarily on comparative analysis of ribosomal RNA sequences. It shows several early-emerging lineages, mostly amitochondriate, which might be living relics of a progressive assembly of the eukaryotic cell. However, the analysis of slow-evolving positions, carried out with the newly developed slow-fast method, reveals that these lineages are, in terms of nucleotide substitution, fast-evolving ones, misplaced at the base of the tree by a long branch attraction artefact. Since the fast-evolving groups are not always the same, depending on which macromolecule is used as a marker, this explains most of the observed incongruent phylogenies. The current paradigm of eukaryotic evolution thus has to be seriously re-examined as the eukaryotic phylogeny is presently best summarized by a multifurcation. This is consistent with the Big Bang hypothesis that all extant eukaryotic lineages are the result of multiple cladogeneses within a relatively brief period, although insufficiency of data is also a possible explanation for the lack of resolution. For further resolution, rare evolutionary events such as shared insertions and/or deletions or gene fusions might be helpful.

  4. Early-branching or fast-evolving eukaryotes? An answer based on slowly evolving positions.

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, H; Lopez, P; Brinkmann, H; Budin, K; Germot, A; Laurent, J; Moreira, D; Müller, M; Le Guyader, H

    2000-01-01

    The current paradigm of eukaryotic evolution is based primarily on comparative analysis of ribosomal RNA sequences. It shows several early-emerging lineages, mostly amitochondriate, which might be living relics of a progressive assembly of the eukaryotic cell. However, the analysis of slow-evolving positions, carried out with the newly developed slow-fast method, reveals that these lineages are, in terms of nucleotide substitution, fast-evolving ones, misplaced at the base of the tree by a long branch attraction artefact. Since the fast-evolving groups are not always the same, depending on which macromolecule is used as a marker, this explains most of the observed incongruent phylogenies. The current paradigm of eukaryotic evolution thus has to be seriously re-examined as the eukaryotic phylogeny is presently best summarized by a multifurcation. This is consistent with the Big Bang hypothesis that all extant eukaryotic lineages are the result of multiple cladogeneses within a relatively brief period, although insufficiency of data is also a possible explanation for the lack of resolution. For further resolution, rare evolutionary events such as shared insertions and/or deletions or gene fusions might be helpful. PMID:10902687

  5. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents a practical and informative approach to the evaluation of a patient with a rapidly progressive dementia (RPD). Recent Findings Prion diseases are the prototypical causes of RPD, but reversible causes of RPD might mimic prion disease and should always be considered in a differential diagnosis. Aside from prion diseases, the most common causes of RPD are atypical presentations of other neurodegenerative disorders, curable disorders including autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as some infections, and neoplasms. Numerous recent case reports suggest dural arterial venous fistulas sometimes cause RPDs. Summary RPDs, in which patients typically develop dementia over weeks to months, require an alternative differential than the slowly progressive dementias that occur over a few years. Because of their rapid decline, patients with RPDs necessitate urgent evaluation and often require an extensive workup, typically with multiple tests being sent or performed concurrently. Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, perhaps the prototypical RPD, is often the first diagnosis many neurologists consider when treating a patient with rapid cognitive decline. Many conditions other than prion disease, however, including numerous reversible or curable conditions, can present as an RPD. This chapter discusses some of the major etiologies for RPDs and offers an algorithm for diagnosis. PMID:27042906

  6. Use of HμREL Human Coculture System for Prediction of Intrinsic Clearance and Metabolite Formation for Slowly Metabolized Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Ia; Vedin, Charlotta; Abrahamsson, Anna; Winiwarter, Susanne; Darnell, Malin

    2016-08-01

    Design of slowly metabolized compounds is an important goal in many drug discovery projects. Standard hepatocyte suspension intrinsic clearance (CLint) methods can only provide reliable CLint values above 2.5 μL/min/million cells. A method that permits extended incubation time with maintained performance and metabolic activity of the in vitro system is warranted to allow in vivo clearance predictions and metabolite identification of slowly metabolized drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the static HμREL coculture of human hepatocytes with stromal cells to be set up in-house as a standard method for in vivo clearance prediction and metabolite identification of slowly metabolized drugs. Fourteen low CLint compounds were incubated for 3 days, and seven intermediate to high CLint compounds and a cocktail of cytochrome P450 (P450) marker substrates were incubated for 3 h. In vivo clearance was predicted for 20 compounds applying the regression line approach, and HμREL coculture predicted the human intrinsic clearance for 45% of the drugs within 2-fold and 70% of the drugs within 3-fold of the clinical values. CLint values as low as 0.3 μL/min/million hepatocytes were robustly produced, giving 8-fold improved sensitivity of robust low CLint determination, over the cutoff in hepatocyte suspension CLint methods. The CLint values of intermediate to high CLint compounds were at similar levels both in HμREL coculture and in freshly thawed hepatocytes. In the HμREL coculture formation rates for five P450-isoform marker reactions, paracetamol (CYP1A2), 1-OH-bupropion (CYP2B6), 4-OH-diclofenac (CYP2C9), and 1-OH-midazolam (3A4) were within the range of literature values for freshly thawed hepatocytes, whereas 1-OH-bufuralol (CYP2D6) formation rate was lower. Further, both phase I and phase II metabolites were detected and an increased number of metabolites were observed in the HμREL coculture compared to hepatocyte suspension. In conclusion, HμREL coculture can

  7. Phylogenetic clades of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) associate with sheep TMEM154 genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) is a lentivirus within the Retroviridae family that infects sheep. OPPV-induced clinical disease progresses slowly over time and manifests primarily in the lungs and central nervous system. Symptoms include weight loss, respiratory distress, and inevitably ...

  8. Oligomerization transforms human APOBEC3G from an efficient enzyme to a slowly dissociating nucleic acid-binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; McCauley, Micah J.; Wang, Wei; Qualley, Dominic F.; Wu, Tiyun; Kitamura, Shingo; Geertsema, Hylkje; Chan, Denise S. B.; Hertz, Amber; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Levin, Judith G.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 proteins are a family of DNA-editing enzymes that play an important role in the innate immune response against retroviruses and retrotransposons. APOBEC3G is a member of this family that inhibits HIV-1 replication in the absence of the viral infectivity factor Vif. Inhibition of HIV replication occurs by both deamination of viral single-stranded DNA and a deamination-independent mechanism. Efficient deamination requires rapid binding to and dissociation from ssDNA. However, a relatively slow dissociation rate is required for the proposed deaminase-independent roadblock mechanism in which APOBEC3G binds the viral template strand and blocks reverse transcriptase-catalysed DNA elongation. Here, we show that APOBEC3G initially binds ssDNA with rapid on-off rates and subsequently converts to a slowly dissociating mode. In contrast, an oligomerization-deficient APOBEC3G mutant did not exhibit a slow off rate. We propose that catalytically active monomers or dimers slowly oligomerize on the viral genome and inhibit reverse transcription.

  9. Road-Aided Ground Slowly Moving Target 2D Motion Estimation for Single-Channel Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhirui; Xu, Jia; Huang, Zuzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Long, Teng; Bao, Qian

    2016-03-16

    To detect and estimate ground slowly moving targets in airborne single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a road-aided ground moving target indication (GMTI) algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the road area is extracted from a focused SAR image based on radar vision. Second, after stationary clutter suppression in the range-Doppler domain, a moving target is detected and located in the image domain via the watershed method. The target's position on the road as well as its radial velocity can be determined according to the target's offset distance and traffic rules. Furthermore, the target's azimuth velocity is estimated based on the road slope obtained via polynomial fitting. Compared with the traditional algorithms, the proposed method can effectively cope with slowly moving targets partly submerged in a stationary clutter spectrum. In addition, the proposed method can be easily extended to a multi-channel system to further improve the performance of clutter suppression and motion estimation. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Road-Aided Ground Slowly Moving Target 2D Motion Estimation for Single-Channel Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhirui; Xu, Jia; Huang, Zuzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Long, Teng; Bao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    To detect and estimate ground slowly moving targets in airborne single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a road-aided ground moving target indication (GMTI) algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the road area is extracted from a focused SAR image based on radar vision. Second, after stationary clutter suppression in the range-Doppler domain, a moving target is detected and located in the image domain via the watershed method. The target's position on the road as well as its radial velocity can be determined according to the target's offset distance and traffic rules. Furthermore, the target's azimuth velocity is estimated based on the road slope obtained via polynomial fitting. Compared with the traditional algorithms, the proposed method can effectively cope with slowly moving targets partly submerged in a stationary clutter spectrum. In addition, the proposed method can be easily extended to a multi-channel system to further improve the performance of clutter suppression and motion estimation. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26999140

  11. A new reduction-based LQ control for dynamic systems with a slowly time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Haraguchi, Masakazu; Hu, Haiyan

    2009-08-01

    Time delays in the feedback control often deteriorate the control performance or even cause the instability of a dynamic system. This paper presents a control strategy for the dynamic system with a constant or a slowly time-varying input delay based on a transformation, which simplifies the time-delay system into a delay-free one. Firstly, the relation is discussed for two existing reduction-based linear quadratic controls. One is continuous and the other is discrete. By extending the relation, a new reduction-based control is then developed with a numerical algorithm presented for practical control implementation. The controller suggested by the proposed method has such a promising property that it can be used for the cases of different values of an input time delay without redesign of controller. This property provides the potential for stabilizing the dynamic system with a time-varying input delay. Consequently, the application of the proposed method to the dynamic system with a slowly time-varying delay is discussed. Finally, numerical simulations are given to show the efficacy and the applicability of the method.

  12. Road-Aided Ground Slowly Moving Target 2D Motion Estimation for Single-Channel Synthetic Aperture Radar

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhirui; Xu, Jia; Huang, Zuzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Long, Teng; Bao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    To detect and estimate ground slowly moving targets in airborne single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR), a road-aided ground moving target indication (GMTI) algorithm is proposed in this paper. First, the road area is extracted from a focused SAR image based on radar vision. Second, after stationary clutter suppression in the range-Doppler domain, a moving target is detected and located in the image domain via the watershed method. The target’s position on the road as well as its radial velocity can be determined according to the target’s offset distance and traffic rules. Furthermore, the target’s azimuth velocity is estimated based on the road slope obtained via polynomial fitting. Compared with the traditional algorithms, the proposed method can effectively cope with slowly moving targets partly submerged in a stationary clutter spectrum. In addition, the proposed method can be easily extended to a multi-channel system to further improve the performance of clutter suppression and motion estimation. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26999140

  13. Contributions of unfrozen fraction and of salt concentration to the survival of slowly frozen human erythrocytes: influence of warming rate

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Rigopoulos, N.

    1983-01-01

    The general belief is that slow freezing injury is either the result of exposure to high salt concentrations or the result of excessive cell shrinkage. Ordinarily, salt concentration and the amount of liquid in the unfrozen channels are reciprocally related; but they can be separated within limits by varying the total concentration of solutes in the suspending medium while holding the mass ratio of additive to salt constant, and by then slowly freezing samples to various subzero temperatures. The authors have recently reported that when human red cells are frozen under these conditions and thawed rapidly, survival is more dependent on the unfrozen water fraction than it is on the salt concentration in that fraction. The present work compares these results with those obtained with slow thawing. While the general conclusion remains unaltered, slowly thawed cells were able to survive the freezing of a higher fraction of extracellular water than were rapidly thawed cells. Calculations were made of the changes in cell volume during the equilibration with glycerol and the subsequent freezing involved in these experiments.

  14. Social Support Functions During a Slowly-Evolving Environmental Disaster: The Case of Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Libby, Montana.

    PubMed

    Cline, Rebecca J W; Orom, Heather; Child, Jeffrey T; Hernandez, Tanis; Black, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Previous research concluded that victims of rapid-onset natural disasters (e.g., hurricanes) receive and provide high levels of instrumental support. However, different kinds of disasters (natural or human caused [technological, environmental, intentional/terrorism], rapid or slow onset, short or long duration) may create different stressors and thus influence the types of social support most needed and provided. We explored social support functions during an ongoing "slowly-evolving environmental disaster" in Libby, Montana due to widespread exposure to amphibole asbestos. Analyses of focus groups and in-depth interviews focused on the relative salience of support functions (emotional, informational, instrumental, and spiritual) identified as needed or provided. Dominant themes emerged around each function. Results indicated that informational support is particularly salient in this type of disaster. Although not all community members had experienced the disaster's health consequences (asbestos-related disease [ARD]), all had been affected by the disaster and had informational needs. The nature of those informational needs (e.g., medical vs. financial) varied based on experience with ARD. Experience with ARD was associated with awareness of disaster-related emotional and instrumental support needed or provided. Results have implications for future research on slowly-evolving environmental disasters and institutional and community responses to them.

  15. Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing chromogenic species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; McNabb, A.; Deshayes, C.; Reyrat, J.-M.; Brown-Elliott, B. A.; Wallace, R.; Trott, K.A.; Parker, J.M.; Lifland, B.; Osterhout, G.; Kaattari, I.; Reece, K.; Vogelbein, W.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    A group of slowly growing photochromogenic mycobacteria was isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an epizootic of mycobacteriosis. Growth characteristics, acid-fastness and 16S rRNA gene sequencing results were consistent with those of the genus Mycobacterium. Biochemical reactions, growth characteristics and mycolic acid profiles (HPLC) resembled those of Mycobacterium shottsii, a non-pigmented mycobacterium also isolated during the same epizootic. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, the gene encoding the exported repeated protein (erp) and the gene encoding the 65 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp65) and restriction enzyme analysis of the hsp65 gene demonstrated that this group of isolates is unique. Insertion sequences associated with Mycobacterium ulcerans, IS2404 and IS2606, were detected by PCR. These isolates could be differentiated from other slowly growing pigmented mycobacteria by their inability to grow at 37 ??C, production of niacin and urease, absence of nitrate reductase, negative Tween 80 hydrolysis and resistance to isoniazid (1 ??g ml-1), p-nitrobenzoic acid, thiacetazone and thiophene-2-carboxylic hydrazide. On the basis of this polyphasic study, it is proposed that these isolates represent a novel species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii sp. nov. The type strain, L15T, has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection as ATCC BAA-883T and the National Collection of Type Cultures (UK) as NCTC 13318T. ?? 2005 IUMS.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of rapidly progressive dementias

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Ross W.; Takada, Leonel T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rapidly progressive dementias are conditions that typically cause dementia over weeks or months. They are a particular challenge to neurologists as the differential diagnosis often is different from the more typical, slowly progressive dementias. Early and accurate diagnosis is essential, as many of the etiologies are treatable. The information in this review is in part based on experience through our rapidly progressive dementia program at the University of California San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center. As treatment of a rapidly progressive dementia is entirely dependent on the diagnosis, we present a comprehensive, structured, but pragmatic approach to diagnosis, including key clinical, laboratory, and radiologic features. For the 2 most common causes of rapid dementia, treatment algorithms for the autoimmune encephalopathies and symptomatic management for the neurodegenerative causes are discussed. PMID:23634367

  17. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Complicated by Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Graves' Disease in Slowly Progressive Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (SPIDDM): A Case Report and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Naotaro; Hasegawa, Koji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Osamu; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman with a history of diabetes was admitted for nausea and vomiting with body weight loss. A blood examination revealed high plasma glucose and thyroid hormone levels and metabolic acidosis. She was therefore diagnosed with both diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperthyroidism. Nausea and vomiting continued intermittently despite the administration of saline and insulin. The patient was further diagnosed with superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) after abdominal computed tomography revealed that a horizontal portion of the duodenum was sandwiched between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. Clinicians should be vigilant for SMAS in patients with both DKA and hyperthyroidism who present body weight loss. PMID:27477411

  18. Both slowly developing embryos and a variable pace of luteal endometrial progression may conspire to prevent normal birth in spite of a capable embryo.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason M; Ruiz-Alonso, Maria; Scott, Richard T; Simón, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Embryonic implantation requires synchrony between the endometrium and the embryo. When analyzed in isolation, competent embryos may be unsuccessful when placed on a nonreceptive endometrium or vice versa, contributing to the "black box" of implantation failure. It is when the two are assessed together that dyssynchrony becomes evident, due to premature progesterone stimulus on the endometrium, physiologic displacement of the window of implantation or late blastulation of the embryo, or all combined. From the embryonic component, detailed assessment of the timing of blastulation is essential. The molecular diagnosis of endometrial receptivity based on its transcriptomic signature could be superior to other techniques used in the past for defining the endometrial window of implantation. PMID:26940791

  19. Transformation and utilization of slowly biodegradable organic matters in biological sewage treatment of anaerobic anoxic oxic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q H; Jin, P K; Ngo, H H; Shi, X; Guo, W S; Yang, S J; Wang, X C; Wang, X; Dzakpasu, M; Yang, W N; Yang, L

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the distribution of carbon sources in two anaerobic anoxic oxic (AAO) sewage treatment plants in Xi'an and investigated the transformation characteristics and utilization potential of slowly biodegradable organic matters (SBOM). Results indicated under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, SBOM could be transformed at a rate of 65% in 8h into more readily biologically utilizable substrates such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs), polysaccharides and proteins. Additionally, non-biodegradable humus-type substances which are difficult to biodegrade and readily accumulate, were also generated. These products could be further hydrolyzed to aldehyde and ketone compounds and then transformed into substances with significant oxygen-containing functional groups and utilized subsequently. The molecular weights of proteinoid substances had a wide distribution and tended to decrease over time. Long hours of microbial reaction increased the proportion of micromolecular substances. This particular increase generated significant bioavailability, which can greatly improve the efficiency of nitrogen removal. PMID:27347798

  20. Aerobic co-treatment of landfill leachate and domestic wastewater - are slowly biodegradable organics removed or simply diluted?

    PubMed

    Campos, R; Ferraz, F M; Vieira, E M; Povinelli, J

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the co-treatment of landfill leachate/domestic wastewater in bench-scale activated sludge (AS) reactors to determine whether the slowly biodegradable organic matter (SBOM) was removed rather than diluted. The AS reactors were loaded with mixtures of raw leachate and leachate that was pretreated by air stripping. The tested volumetric ratios were 0%, 0.2%, 2% and 5%. For all of the tested conditions, the reactors performed better when pretreated leachate was used rather than raw leachate, and the best volumetric ratio was 2%. The following removals were obtained: 97% for the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5,20), 79% for total suspended solids, 77% for dissolved organic carbon and 84% for soluble chemical oxygen demand. Most of the pretreated leachate SBOM (65%) was removed rather than diluted or adsorbed into the sludge, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses.

  1. A slowly rotating hollow sphere in a magnetic field: First steps to de-spin a space object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Leve, Frederick A.; Peck, Mason

    2016-03-01

    Modeling the interaction of a slowly rotating hollow conducting sphere in a magnetic field provided an understanding of the dynamics of orbiting space objects moving through the Earth's magnetic field. This analysis, performed in the late 1950s and limited to uniform magnetic fields, was innovative and acknowledged the pioneers who first observed rotary magnetism, in particular, the seminal work of Hertz in 1880. Now, there is interest in using a magnetic field produced by one space object to stop the spin of a second object so that docking can occur. In this paper, we consider, yet again, the interaction of a rotating hollow sphere in a magnetic field. We show that the predicted results can be tested experimentally, making this an interesting advanced student project. This analysis also sheds light on a rich set of previously unaddressed behaviors involving eddy currents.

  2. Aerobic co-treatment of landfill leachate and domestic wastewater - are slowly biodegradable organics removed or simply diluted?

    PubMed

    Campos, R; Ferraz, F M; Vieira, E M; Povinelli, J

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the co-treatment of landfill leachate/domestic wastewater in bench-scale activated sludge (AS) reactors to determine whether the slowly biodegradable organic matter (SBOM) was removed rather than diluted. The AS reactors were loaded with mixtures of raw leachate and leachate that was pretreated by air stripping. The tested volumetric ratios were 0%, 0.2%, 2% and 5%. For all of the tested conditions, the reactors performed better when pretreated leachate was used rather than raw leachate, and the best volumetric ratio was 2%. The following removals were obtained: 97% for the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5,20), 79% for total suspended solids, 77% for dissolved organic carbon and 84% for soluble chemical oxygen demand. Most of the pretreated leachate SBOM (65%) was removed rather than diluted or adsorbed into the sludge, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses. PMID:25521128

  3. Slowly balding black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-15

    The 'no-hair' theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively ''frozen in'' the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N{sub B}=e{Phi}{sub {infinity}}/({pi}c({h_bar}/2{pi})), where {Phi}{sub {infinity}}{approx_equal}2{pi}{sup 2}B{sub NS}R{sub NS}{sup 3}/(P{sub NS}c) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  4. Slowly balding black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-01

    The “no-hair” theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively “frozen in” the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes NB=eΦ∞/(πcℏ), where Φ∞≈2π2BNSRNS3/(PNSc) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole’s magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  5. The role of social toxicity in responses to a slowly-evolving environmental disaster: the case of amphibole asbestos exposure in Libby, Montana, USA.

    PubMed

    Cline, Rebecca J W; Orom, Heather; Chung, Jae Eun; Hernandez, Tanis

    2014-09-01

    Experiencing a disaster has significant negative effects on psychological adjustment. Case study accounts point to two consistent trends in slowly-evolving environmental disasters: (a) patterns of negative social dynamics, and (b) relatively worse psychological outcomes than in natural disasters. Researchers have begun to explicitly postulate that the social consequences of slowly-evolving environmental disasters (e.g., community conflict) have their own effects on victims' psychological outcomes. This study tested a model of the relationship between those social consequences and psychological adjustment of victims of a slowly-evolving environmental disaster, specifically those whose health has been compromised by the amphibole asbestos disaster in Libby, MT. Results indicate that experiencing greater community conflict about the disaster was associated with greater family conflict about the disaster which, in turn, was associated with greater social constraints on talking with others about their disease, both directly and indirectly through experiencing stigmatization. Experiencing greater social constraints was associated with worse psychological adjustment, both directly and indirectly through failed social support. Findings have implications for understanding pathways by which social responses create negative effects on mental health in slowly-evolving environmental disasters. These pathways suggest points for prevention and response (e.g., social support, stigmatization of victims) for communities experiencing slowly-evolving environmental disasters.

  6. Toward a novel membrane process for organic carbon removal-fate of slowly biodegradable substrate in super fast membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sözen, S; Teksoy Başaran, S; Akarsubaşı, A; Ergal, I; Insel, G; Karaca, C; Orhon, D

    2016-08-01

    The study tested the performance of super fast membrane bioreactor (SFMBR) using starch as a slowly biodegradable substrate, exploring the fate of starch, and the response of the microbial community. SFMBR was operated at extremely low sludge ages of 0.5-2.0 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 1.0 h. Average values for permeate chemical oxygen demand (COD) always remained in the narrow range between 14 and 18 mg/L, regardless of the selected mode of MBR operation at different sludge ages. Soluble COD levels in the reactor were consistently higher than the corresponding permeate COD. Parameters defining process kinetics, determined by model calibration of oxygen uptake rate (OUR) profiles, varied as a function of sludge age. Model simulation of SFMBR performance indicated total removal of hydrolysis products so that permeate COD consisted of residual microbial products. PCR-DGGE experiments revealed significant shifts in the composition of the microbial community imposed by variations in the sludge age, reflecting on corresponding process kinetics. PMID:27154840

  7. Structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch and resistant starch isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Joo; Moon, Tae Wha

    2015-07-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) fractions isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch. The waxy potato starch with 25.7% moisture content was heated at 120°C for 5.3h. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of RS and SDS+RS fractions revealed a growth ring structure. The branch chain-length distribution of debranched amylopectin from the RS fraction had a higher proportion of long chains (DP ≥ 37) than the SDS+RS fraction. The X-ray diffraction intensities of RS and SDS+RS fractions were increased compared to the control. The SDS+RS fraction showed a lower gelatinization enthalpy than the control while the RS fraction had a higher value than the SDS+RS fraction. In this study we showed the RS fraction is composed mainly of crystalline structure and the SDS fraction consists of weak crystallites and amorphous regions. PMID:25857975

  8. Evaluation of Simple Treat 3.0 for two hydrophobic and slowly biodegradable chemicals: polycyclic musks HHCB and AHTN.

    PubMed

    Artola-Garicano, Elsa; Hermens, Joop L M; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2003-11-01

    In the current study, predictions by Simple Treat 3.0, a fate model for organic chemicals in sewage treatment plants (STPs), are compared with actual measurements in three STPs. Two polycyclic musks, Tonalide (AHTN) and Galaxolide (HHCB), were used for model evaluation. Results show that Simple Treat 3.0 is able to predict the removal efficiency within a factor 4. Predicted concentrations of both chemicals within the different physical compartments of STPs show a high correlation (r(2)=0.80) with experimental values. Although predicted free concentration levels were similar to previously reported experimental data, the trends along the compartments showed an inverse relationship. This bias of the model can be caused by an underestimation of BOD-removal (solids), or an overestimation of bacterial growth, evaporation, or a combination of these three factors. Results show that Simple Treat 3.0 is a valid tool for the risk assessment of slowly biodegradable chemicals, but still some adjustments of the model could be incorporated from a scientific point of view.

  9. Generation mechanism of the slowly drifting narrowband structure in the type IV solar radio bursts observed by AMATERAS

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Kumamoto, A.; Ono, T.; Iwai, K.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.

    2014-05-20

    We investigate the type IV burst event observed by AMATERAS on 2011 June 7, and reveal that the main component of the burst was emitted from the plasmoid eruption identified in the EUV images of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA. We show that a slowly drifting narrowband structure (SDNS) appeared in the burst's spectra. Using statistical analysis, we reveal that the SDNS appeared for a duration of tens to hundreds of milliseconds and had a typical bandwidth of 3 MHz. To explain the mechanism generating the SDNS, we propose wave-wave coupling between Langmuir waves and whistler-mode chorus emissions generated in a post-flare loop, which were inferred from the similarities in the plasma environments of a post-flare loop and the equatorial region of Earth's inner magnetosphere. We assume that a chorus element with a rising tone is generated at the top of a post-flare loop. Using the magnetic field and plasma density models, we quantitatively estimate the expected duration of radio emissions generated from coupling between Langmuir waves and chorus emissions during their propagation in the post-flare loop, and we find that the observed duration and bandwidth properties of the SDNS are consistently explained by the proposed generation mechanism. While observations in the terrestrial magnetosphere show that the chorus emissions are a group of large-amplitude wave elements generated naturally and intermittently, the mechanism proposed in the present study can explain both the intermittency and the frequency drift in the observed spectra.

  10. Structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch and resistant starch isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Joo; Moon, Tae Wha

    2015-07-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) fractions isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch. The waxy potato starch with 25.7% moisture content was heated at 120°C for 5.3h. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of RS and SDS+RS fractions revealed a growth ring structure. The branch chain-length distribution of debranched amylopectin from the RS fraction had a higher proportion of long chains (DP ≥ 37) than the SDS+RS fraction. The X-ray diffraction intensities of RS and SDS+RS fractions were increased compared to the control. The SDS+RS fraction showed a lower gelatinization enthalpy than the control while the RS fraction had a higher value than the SDS+RS fraction. In this study we showed the RS fraction is composed mainly of crystalline structure and the SDS fraction consists of weak crystallites and amorphous regions.

  11. Nutritional property of endosperm starches from maize mutants: a parabolic relationship between slowly digestible starch and amylopectin fine structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genyi; Ao, Zihua; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2008-06-25

    The relationship between the slow digestion property of cooked maize starch and its molecular fine structure was investigated. Results of the in vitro Englyst assay showed a range of rapidly digestible starch (RDS) (70.1-98.9%), slowly digestible starch (SDS) (0.2-20.3%), and resistant starch (RS) (0.0-13.7%) among the tested maize mutant flour samples. Further analysis showed that amylose content was significantly correlated ( R = 0.763, P < 0.001) with RS amount but not with that of SDS, indicating that amylopectin is the starch molecule associated with SDS. Total starch debranching analysis revealed a parabolic relationship between SDS content and the weight ratio of amylopectin short chains (DP < 13, named SF) to long chains (DP >/= 13, named LF), which means amylopectin with a higher amount of either short chains or long chains can produce relatively high amounts of SDS. Furthermore, debranching analysis of the SDS materials from samples with the highest and lowest weight ratios of SF/LF (both had a high amount SDS) showed significantly different profiles, indicating there is not a uniform molecular structure for SDS. Thus, genetic mutants of maize samples have a good potential to provide raw starch materials of high nutritional quality. An additional finding showed that a simple and comparably high-throughput technique of Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) can be used to screen genetic mutants on the basis of their RVA profiles.

  12. The world's largest parafoil slowly deflates after carrying the X-38, V-131R, to a safe landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Looking like a giant air mattress, the world's largest parafoil slowly deflates seconds after it carried the latest version of the X-38, V-131R, to a landing on Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, at the end of its first free flight, November 2, 2000. The X-38 prototypes are intended to perfect technology for a planned Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) 'lifeboat' to carry a crew to safety in the event of an emergency on the International Space Station. Free-flight tests of X-38 V-131R are evaluating upgraded avionics and control systems and the aerodynamics of the modified upper body, which is more representative of the final design of the CRV than the two earlier X-38 test craft, including a simulated hatch atop the body. The huge 7,500 square-foot parafoil will enable the CRV to land in the length of a football field after returning from space. The first three X-38's are air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52B mother ship, while the last version, V-201, will be carried into space by a Space Shuttle and make a fully autonomous re-entry and landing.

  13. An `analytic dynamical magnetosphere' formalism for X-ray and optical emission from slowly rotating magnetic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; ud-Doula, Asif; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Petit, Veronique; Cohen, David H.; Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2016-11-01

    Slowly rotating magnetic massive stars develop `dynamical magnetospheres' (DMs), characterized by trapping of stellar wind outflow in closed magnetic loops, shock heating from collision of the upflow from opposite loop footpoints, and subsequent gravitational infall of radiatively cooled material. In 2D and 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the interplay among these three components is spatially complex and temporally variable, making it difficult to derive observational signatures and discern their overall scaling trends. Within a simplified, steady-state analysis based on overall conservation principles, we present here an `analytic dynamical magnetosphere' (ADM) model that provides explicit formulae for density, temperature, and flow speed in each of these three components - wind outflow, hot post-shock gas, and cooled inflow - as a function of colatitude and radius within the closed (presumed dipole) field lines of the magnetosphere. We compare these scalings with time-averaged results from MHD simulations, and provide initial examples of application of this ADM model for deriving two key observational diagnostics, namely hydrogen H α emission line profiles from the cooled infall, and X-ray emission from the hot post-shock gas. We conclude with a discussion of key issues and advantages in applying this ADM formalism towards derivation of a broader set of observational diagnostics and scaling trends for massive stars with such dynamical magnetospheres.

  14. Gap and out-gap solitons in modulated systems of finite length: exact solutions in the slowly varying envelope limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Kirr, K.; Kovalev, A. S.; Kroon, L.

    2011-06-01

    We discuss nonlinear excitations in finite-size one-dimensional modulated systems. Considering a binary modulated discrete nonlinear Schrödinger chain of large but finite length with periodic boundary conditions, we obtain exact elliptic-function solutions corresponding to stationary excitations in the slowly varying envelope limit. From these solutions, we analyze how the transformation between (localized) gap and (delocalized) out-gap solitons manifests itself in a system of finite length. The analogue of a localized gap soliton appears through a bifurcation at a critical point, so that gap soliton analogues exist only for chains longer than a critical value, which scales inversely proportional to the modulation depth. The total norm of these gap-out-gap states is found to be a monotonic function of the frequency, always inside a 'nonlinear gap' with edges defined by the main nonlinear modes which approach the linear spectrum gap boundaries in the small-amplitude limit. The transformation from a gap to an out-gap state is associated with a particular frequency, close to the lower boundary of the linear gap; at this point the elliptic functions become trigonometric, corresponding to a finite-size analogue of an algebraic soliton. We compare the scenario with earlier results obtained numerically for purely discrete chains with few degrees of freedom.

  15. Spending on mental and substance use disorders projected to grow more slowly than all health spending through 2020.

    PubMed

    Mark, Tami L; Levit, Katharine R; Yee, Tracy; Chow, Clifton M

    2014-08-01

    Spending on mental and substance use disorders will likely grow more slowly than all health spending through 2020. We project that spending on mental and substance use disorders, as a share of all health spending, will fall from 7.4 percent in 2009 ($172 billion out of $2.3 trillion) to 6.5 percent in 2020 ($281 billion out of $4.3 trillion). This trend is the projected result of reduced spending on mental health drugs because of patent expirations, the low likelihood of innovative drugs entering the market, and a slowdown in spending growth for hospital treatment. By 2020 the expansion of coverage to previously uninsured Americans under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), combined with the projected slowdown in Medicare provider payment rates under the ACA and the Budget Control Act of 2011, are expected to add 2.7 percent to behavioral health spending, compared to spending without these changes. PMID:25092843

  16. Spending on mental and substance use disorders projected to grow more slowly than all health spending through 2020.

    PubMed

    Mark, Tami L; Levit, Katharine R; Yee, Tracy; Chow, Clifton M

    2014-08-01

    Spending on mental and substance use disorders will likely grow more slowly than all health spending through 2020. We project that spending on mental and substance use disorders, as a share of all health spending, will fall from 7.4 percent in 2009 ($172 billion out of $2.3 trillion) to 6.5 percent in 2020 ($281 billion out of $4.3 trillion). This trend is the projected result of reduced spending on mental health drugs because of patent expirations, the low likelihood of innovative drugs entering the market, and a slowdown in spending growth for hospital treatment. By 2020 the expansion of coverage to previously uninsured Americans under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), combined with the projected slowdown in Medicare provider payment rates under the ACA and the Budget Control Act of 2011, are expected to add 2.7 percent to behavioral health spending, compared to spending without these changes.

  17. Slowly released molasses barrier system for controlling nitrate plumes in groundwater: a pilot-scale tank study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Sun; Lee, Kyuyeon; Um, Jae Yeon; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2014-02-01

    A well-type barrier system containing solidified molasses as a reactive medium was developed to promote the indigenous denitrifying activity and to treat nitrate plumes in groundwater. Three slowly released molasses (SRM) barrier systems harboring 60, 120, and 120 SRM rods, which were named System A, B, and C, respectively, were operated to examine nitrate removal efficiency in a pilot-scale sandy tank. These SRM systems induced a consistent removal of nitrate without pore clogging and hydraulic disturbance during the test period. The initial nitrate concentration was 142mgL(-1), and the concentrations decreased by 80%, 84%, and 79% in System A, B, and C, respectively. In particular, System C was inoculated with heterotrophic denitrifiers, but the nitrate removal efficiency was not enhanced compared to System B, probably due to the prior existence of indigenous denitrifiers in the sandy tank. The presence of nitrite reductase-encoding gene (i.e. nirK) at the site was confirmed by denatured gradient gel electrophoresis analysis.

  18. Linear waves in a slowly rotating, compressible and perfectly conducting gas embedded in magnetic and gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Biao; Yin, Chun-lin

    1980-12-01

    We discuss the dispersion relation of local linear waves in a compressible and perfectly conducting gas possessing magnetic and gravitational fields in a slowly rotating frame of reference. Instead of the full energy equation and a gas law, a not necessarily adiabatic equation of state p= p( ϱ) is used to close the system of equations, — an arguably flexible way of treatment when we are not clear about the contributions by radiation and conductivity to the energy transport. We give a general dimensionless dispersion relation, (8). This reduces to (9) if the magnetic field B is zero; to (10) if, further, rotation φ is zero; to the relation for accoustic waves (11), if further the gravitational field G is zero. When B is not zero, we consider various cases with the propagation vector K always perpendicular to B: the relation now reduces to (13) if K is not perpendicular to φ; to (14) if, further, K is parallel to G; to (15) if φ=0; to the relation for last magneto-accoustic waves (16) if G=0. It reduces to (17) if K is perpendicular to G; to the fast magneto-accoustic waves (18), if, further, φ=0. It reduces to (19) if K is perpendicular to φ and to (20), if, further, K is parallel to G. Our study shows that, in general, there are no pure modes, only hybrids. In particular, a rotation gives rise to modes that are dependent on the latitude, which we call "physico-geometrical" waves. The present study is preliminary, and we may expect even more interesting results when we take into consideration the energy equation and the effects of radiation.

  19. Modeling of plasma processes in the slowly diverging magnetic fields at the exit of an applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Min; Tang, Hai-Bin; Ren, Jun-Xue; York, Thomas M.

    2013-10-15

    The performance of plasma thrusters with applied electric and magnetic fields can be enhanced by increasing the magnetic field strength, which is applied in the thrust chamber and the exit region propulsive plume. The ejected plasma which passes through a slowly diverging magnetic field will expand but can be restricted within the magnetic nozzle fields. To examine in detail the processes that occur, a new method with Particle-in-cell calculations is applied here. A two-dimensional axisymmetric particle dynamic code is used to model an AF-MPDT (Applied-field Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster) for which extensive experimental data are available; it used Ar propellant and had applied magnetic coils of 101.5 mm radius and 153 mm length. From the results of the simulation study, it is found that total thrust increases linearly with magnetic field strength in the range of 0–0.1 T, but it decreases with increasing applied magnetic field up to 0.6 T. Thrust efficiency is found to increase to a maximum of 8.4% when B = 0.1 T; further, the peak value of nozzle efficiency reaches 91% at a moderate magnetic field (0.3 T). In detail, it is found that distributions of plasma density (10{sup 14}–10{sup 15} m{sup −3}) that form in the magnetic nozzle demonstrate a significant pattern of concentration up to fields of B = 0.3 T where ions begin to be magnetized. However, azimuthal velocities of ions behave differently with different degrees of magnetization, i.e., weakly magnetized ions follow rotating electrons in a right-handed direction, while fully magnetized ions revolve in left-handed direction due to electromagnetic forces. Notably, a feedback effect on total magnetic field due to plasma motion identified in other studies is not found to be present in the working conditions of the AF-MPDT examined here.

  20. Slowly ascending magmas in long-lived accretionary orogens: unraveling temporal variations in the Cordilleran-style Sveconorwegian Orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bybee, G. M.; Slagstad, T.; Roberts, N. M. W.; Coint, N.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Southwestern Norway is host to spatially associated magmatic provinces that have been interpreted as magmatic products of the Sveconorwegian Orogeny. The Sirdal Magmatic Belt (SMB) and the Hornblende-Biotite Granite (HBG) Suite were emplaced between 1050-1020 Ma and 980-930 Ma, respectively. Geochronology of the Rogaland Anorthosite Province (RAP) indicates that magmatism began at 1041 Ma (high pressure, cogenetic megacrysts) and culminated in anorthosite emplacement at ±930 Ma. Decompression exsolution ages for these high-P megacrysts indicate that decompression during anorthosite ascent took place ±80-100 m.y. after crystallization at the Moho. The contact aureole of the RAP shows concordant arrays of zircon ages between 1050-930 Ma, recording continuous, long-lived high temperature magmatic events in southwestern Norway. Zircon ages from outside the contact aureole show a metamorphic event at ±1035 Ma, but show no younger concordant arrays. Metapelites from the contact aureole of the RAP also show a spread of monazite ages, where monazite inclusions in garnet record ages of 1038-992 Ma, while groundmass monazite preserve ages of 952±10 Ma, indicative of multiple and/or long-lived thermal events. Age coincidence for several events, including matrix monazite formation, megacryst decompression (and anorthosite emplacement) and HBG granite crystallization suggest a dynamic system with multiple feedback loops. Varying isotopic signatures recorded in the region hint at changing sources and processes associated with the genesis of the magmas. These observations indicate that the Sveconorwegian orogeny was a long-lived magmatic system that featured slowly ascending magmas, punctuated periods of magmatism and temporal geochemical variation - features analogous to younger Cordilleran systems. When estimating magmatic tempos in arc environments, factors such as large degrees of differentiation in the lower crust, polybaric magma evolution and slow magma ascent rates

  1. Particle dynamics and effective temperature of jammed granular matter in a slowly sheared three-dimensional Couette cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Song, Chaoming; Briscoe, Christopher; Makse, Hernán A

    2008-06-01

    We report experimental measurements of particle dynamics on slowly sheared granular matter in a three-dimensional Couette cell. A closely packed ensemble of transparent spherical beads is confined by an external pressure and filled with fluid to match both the density and refractive index of the beads. This allows us to track tracer particles embedded in the system and obtain three-dimensional trajectories [r(t),theta(t),z(t)] as a function of time. We study the probability distribution function of the vertical and radial displacements, finding Gaussian and exponential distributions, respectively. For slow shear rates, the mean-square fluctuations in all three directions are found to be dependent only on the angular displacement of the Couette cell, Delta theta e, (Delta z 2) approximately Delta theta e, (Delta r2) approximately Delta theta e alpha, Delta theta 2 approximately Delta theta e beta, where alpha and beta are constants. With Delta theta e proportional to the time between measurements, the values of the constants, alpha and beta , are found to be subdiffusive and superdiffusive, respectively. ThFe linear relation between (Delta z 2) and angular displacement implies a diffusive process, from which we can calculate an "effective temperature," T eff, in the vertical direction, through a fluctuation-dissipation relation. It is of interest to determine whether these systems can be described by analogous equilibrium statistical mechanics concepts such as "effective temperature" and "compactivity." By studying the dynamics of tracer particles, we find the effective temperature defined by the Stokes-Einstein relation to be independent of the tracer particle characteristic features, such as density and size, and dependent only on the packing density of the system. For slow shear rate, both the diffusivity and mobility of tracer particles are proportional to the shear rate, giving rise to a constant effective temperature, characteristic of the jammed system. We

  2. Growing Slowly 1 locus encodes a PLS-type PPR protein required for RNA editing and plant development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tingting; Chen, Dan; Wu, Jian; Huang, Xiaorong; Wang, Yifan; Tang, Keli; Li, Jiayang; Sun, Mengxiang; Peng, Xiongbo

    2016-01-01

    Most pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are involved in organelle post-transcriptional processes, including RNA editing. The PPR proteins include the PLS subfamily, containing characteristic triplets of P, L, and S motifs; however, their editing mechanisms and roles in developmental processes are not fully understood. In this study, we isolated the Arabidopsis thaliana Growing slowly 1 (AtGRS1) gene and showed that it functions in RNA editing and plant development. Arabidopsis null mutants of grs1 exhibit slow growth and sterility. Further analysis showed that cell division activity was reduced dramatically in the roots of grs1 plants. We determined that GRS1 is a nuclear-encoded mitochondria-localized PPR protein, and is a member of the PLS subfamily. GRS1 is responsible for the RNA editing at four specific sites of four mitochondrial mRNAs: nad1-265, nad4L-55, nad6-103, and rps4-377. The first three of these mRNAs encode for the subunits of complex I of the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Thus, the activity of complex I is strongly reduced in grs1. Changes in RPS4 editing in grs1 plants affect mitochondrial ribosome biogenesis. Expression of the alternative respiratory pathway and the abscisic acid response gene ABI5 were up-regulated in grs1 mutant plants. Genetic analysis revealed that ABI5 is involved in the short root phenotype of grs1. Taken together, our results indicate that AtGRS1 regulates plant development by controlling RNA editing in Arabidopsis. PMID:27670716

  3. Sterilization in a liquid of a specific starch makes it slowly digestible in vitro and low glycemic in rats.

    PubMed

    Severijnen, Chantal; Abrahamse, Evan; van der Beek, Eline M; Buco, Amra; van de Heijning, Bert J M; van Laere, Katrien; Bouritius, Hetty

    2007-10-01

    Diabetics are recommended to eat a balanced diet containing normal amounts of carbohydrates, preferably those with a low glycemic index. For solid foods, this can be achieved by choosing whole-grain, fiber-rich products. For (sterilized) liquid products, such as meal replacers, the choices for carbohydrate sources are restricted due to technological limitations. Starches usually have a high glycemic index after sterilization in liquids, whereas low glycemic sugars and sugar replacers can only be used in limited amounts. Using an in vitro digestion assay, we identified a resistant starch (RS) source [modified high amylose starch (mHAS)] that might enable the production of a sterilized liquid product with a low glycemic index. Heating mHAS for 4-5 min in liquid increased the slowly digestible starch (SDS) fraction at the expense of the RS portion. The effect was temperature dependent and reached its maximum above 120 degrees C. Heating at 130 degrees C significantly reduced the RS fraction from 49 to 22%. The product remained stable for at least several months when stored at 4 degrees C. To investigate whether a higher SDS fraction would result in a lower postprandial glycemic response, the sterilized mHAS solution was compared with rapidly digestible maltodextrin. Male Wistar rats received an i.g. bolus of 2.0 g available carbohydrate/kg body weight. Ingestion of heat-treated mHAS resulted in a significant attenuation of the postprandial plasma glucose and insulin responses compared with maltodextrin. mHAS appears to be a starch source which, after sterilization in a liquid product, acquires slow-release properties. The long-term stability of mHAS solutions indicates that this may provide a suitable carbohydrate source for low glycemic index liquid products for inclusion in a diabetes-specific diet.

  4. On the possible existence of a self-regulating hydrodynamical process in slowly rotating stars. I. Setting the stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauclair, Sylvie

    1999-11-01

    It has been known for a long time (Mestel 1953) that the meridional circulation velocity in stars, in the presence of displaystyle mu -gradients, is the sum of two terms, one due to the classical thermal imbalance (displaystyle Omega -currents) and the other one due to the induced horizontal displaystyle mu -gradients (displaystyle mu -induced currents, or displaystyle mu -currents in short). In the most general cases, displaystyle mu -currents are opposite to displaystyle Omega -currents. Simple expressions for these currents are derived under some simplifying physical assumptions presented in the text, and their physical interpretations are discussed. Computations of the displaystyle Omega and displaystyle mu -currents in a 0.8 Mdisplaystyle sun halo stellar model including classical element settling show that the displaystyle mu -currents are larger (in absolute values) than the displaystyle Omega -currents in all the star: some new physics has thus to be invoked in this case. We show here how such processes could possibly lead to a quasi-equilibrium stage in which both the circulation and the helium settling could be cancelled out. As lithium diffuses in the same way as helium, we expect a very small lithium concentration gradient below the convective zone in ``plateau stars'' (main-sequence Pop II stars), much smaller than the one expected for pure element settling. This could possibly account for the very small dispersion observed for the lithium abundances at the surface of these stars. This should also have important consequences in other contexts which will be discussed in forthcoming papers. The present computations show that element settling in slowly rotating stars leads to surface abundances which depend on the competition between displaystyle mu -currents and displaystyle Omega -currents, in a way which had not been taken into account in previous computations. This may change our general understanding of the diffusion processes of chemical species in

  5. Spatial Analysis of Slowly Oscillating Electric Activity in the Gut of Mice Using Low Impedance Arrayed Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Mizuki; Kajioka, Shunichi; Shozib, Habibul B.; Sawamura, Kenta; Nakayama, Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    Smooth and elaborate gut motility is based on cellular cooperation, including smooth muscle, enteric neurons and special interstitial cells acting as pacemaker cells. Therefore, spatial characterization of electric activity in tissues containing these electric excitable cells is required for a precise understanding of gut motility. Furthermore, tools to evaluate spatial electric activity in a small area would be useful for the investigation of model animals. We thus employed a microelectrode array (MEA) system to simultaneously measure a set of 8×8 field potentials in a square area of ∼1 mm2. The size of each recording electrode was 50×50 µm2, however the surface area was increased by fixing platinum black particles. The impedance of microelectrode was sufficiently low to apply a high-pass filter of 0.1 Hz. Mapping of spectral power, and auto-correlation and cross-correlation parameters characterized the spatial properties of spontaneous electric activity in the ileum of wild-type (WT) and W/Wv mice, the latter serving as a model of impaired network of pacemaking interstitial cells. Namely, electric activities measured varied in both size and cooperativity in W/Wv mice, despite the small area. In the ileum of WT mice, procedures suppressing the excitability of smooth muscle and neurons altered the propagation of spontaneous electric activity, but had little change in the period of oscillations. In conclusion, MEA with low impedance electrodes enables to measure slowly oscillating electric activity, and is useful to evaluate both histological and functional changes in the spatio-temporal property of gut electric activity. PMID:24124480

  6. Delivery of two-dimensional spatially-slowly-varying intensity-modulated beams by jaws only (JO) in rotate-translate mode.

    PubMed

    Webb, S; Poludniowski, G

    2010-04-21

    IMRT can be delivered by jaws only (JO) provided some compromises are accepted. In this letter it is shown how the use of a rotate-translate methodology (ROTJO), also employing only jaws, can lead to the delivery of a two-dimensional intensity-modulated beam wherein the modulation is spatially slowly varying.

  7. A comparative study of three techniques for diameter selective fiber activation in the vagal nerve: anodal block, depolarizing prepulses and slowly rising pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Tosato, Marco; Struijk, Johannes J.

    2008-09-01

    The paper shows selective smaller fiber activation in the left and right vagal nerve in in vivo experiments in pigs using three different techniques: anodal block, depolarizing prepulses and slowly rising pulses. All stimulation techniques were performed with the same experimental setup. The techniques have been compared in relation to maximum achievable suppression of nerve activity, maximum required current, maximum achievable stimulation frequency and the required charge per phase. Suppression of the largest fiber activity (expressed as a percentage of the maximum response) was 0-40% for anodal block, 10-25% for depolarizing prepulses and 40-50% for slowly rising pulses (duration up to 5 ms). Incomplete suppression of activation was mainly attributed to the large size of the vagal nerve (3.0-3.5 mA) which resulted in a large difference of the excitation thresholds of nerve fibers at different distances from the electrode, as well as a relatively short duration of slowly rising pulses. The technique of anodal block required the highest currents. The techniques of slowly rising pulses and anodal block required comparable charge per phase that was larger than for the technique of depolarizing prepulses. Depolarizing prepulses were an optimal choice regarding maximum required current and charge per phase but were very sensitive to small changes of the current amplitude. The other two techniques were more robust regarding small changes of stimulation parameters. The maximum stimulation frequency, using typical values of stimulation parameters, was 105 Hz for depolarizing prepulses, 30 Hz for anodal block and 28 Hz for slowly rising pulses. Only a technique of depolarizing prepulses had a charge per phase within the safe limits. For the other two techniques it would be necessary to optimize the shape of a stimulation pulse in order to reduce the charge per phase.

  8. White noise analysis of pace-maker-response interactions and non-linearities in slowly adapting crayfish stretch receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Buño, W; Bustamante, J; Fuentes, J

    1984-01-01

    Input-output relations were investigated in the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ of crayfish using a Gaussian white noise length input with a 0.03-12.5 Hz band width and the resulting action potential output. The noise input was presented to the de-efferented receptor in situ, at three mean elongations and at four different amplitudes. The three mean elongations were set within the normal range in vivo, two at the extremes close to the minimum and maximum physiological lengths and the other in the mid-range. With white noise inputs there is a finite probability that the system will be tested in all possible conditions within the chosen band width because white noise has the advantage that it contains, with a finite probability, all possible stimulus wave forms at random. The analysis indicated similarities between the effects of the input variables, namely white noise amplitude and mean elongation. With low input variables the activity was periodic. With larger inputs, impulse rates were higher and irregular. The average length trajectories leading to a spike (i.e. the average stimulus) were either biphasic with high inputs or multiphasic and periodic with lower input variables. The frequency of periodicity increased with mean elongation. Although for a given length and noise amplitude a variety of individual length trajectories preceded spikes, the final biphasic shortening-lengthening average stimulus sequence before a spike was similar in all cases irrespective of the input variables. The number of possible trajectories decreased with increments in the input variables. The standard deviation of length values for each average stimulus was computed and displayed as a function of time relative to the spike. It was first constant, and decreased gradually to a minimum value at the spike reference. Standard deviation values were lower for higher white noise amplitudes and mean elongation. Simple, short-lasting stimulus wave forms in the white noise were isolated

  9. Progressive hemifacial atrophy. A natural history study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M T; Spencer, M A

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe two very different natural history courses in 2 patients with hemifacial atrophy. Progressive hemifacial atrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome, Romberg syndrome, PHA) is characterized by slowly progressive atrophy, frequently involving only one side of the face, primarily affecting the subcutaneous tissue and fat. The onset usually occurs during the first 2 decades of life. The cause and pathophysiology are unknown. Ophthalmic involvement is common, with progressive enophthalmos a frequent finding. Pupillary disturbances, heterochromia, uveitis, pigmentary disturbances of the ocular fundus, and restrictive strabismus have also been reported. Neurologic findings may be present, but the natural history and progression of ocular findings are often not described in the literature. METHODS: We studied the records and present findings of 2 patients with progressive hemifacial atrophy who were observed in our institution over a 10-year period. RESULTS: Both patients showed progression of ophthalmic findings, primarily on the affected side. One patient has had chronic uveitis with secondary cataract and glaucoma, in addition to retinal pigmentary changes. She also had a third-nerve paresis of the contralateral eye and mild seizure activity. The other patient had mild uveitis, some progression of unilateral retinal pigmentary changes, and a significant increase in hyperopia in the affected eye, in addition to hypotony at age 19 without a clear cause, but with secondary retinal and refractive changes. CONCLUSION: Ocular manifestations of progressive hemifacial atrophy are varied, but can progress from mild visual impairment to blindness. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719679

  10. Progressive loss of speech output and orofacial dyspraxia associated with frontal lobe hypometabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, P J; Kartsounis, L D; Frackowiak, R S; Findley, L J; Rossor, M N

    1991-01-01

    Three patients are described with slowly progressive loss of speech and dysarthria associated with orofacial dyspraxia, initially with intact written language, who subsequently developed more widespread cognitive abnormalities. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed bifrontal hypometabolism in all of the patients, most marked in the inferior and lateral portions of both frontal lobes, with some extension into the parietal and temporal cortices in one case. These patients may represent a further example of focal progressive cortical degeneration. Images PMID:2056322

  11. Contributions of soluble carbohydrates to the osmotic adjustment in the C4 grass Setaria sphacelata: a comparison between rapidly and slowly imposed water stress.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jorge Marques; Arrabaça, Maria Celeste

    2004-05-01

    Photosynthetic carbohydrate content in Setaria sphacelata var. splendida under rapidly and slowly induced water deficit and its contribution to osmotic adjustment were studied. In short-term stress experiments, a decrease in the total content of sucrose (Su) and starch (St) was observed in leaf discs submitted to stress. An increase in the ratio between free hexoses and sucrose was found in stressed leaves, but no significant differences were found in the amount of free hexoses nor in the ratio between soluble and insoluble sugars. In long-term stress experiments, a higher amount of soluble sugars and a lower amount of starch were found in stressed leaves, when compared to the control. The ratios of free hexoses to sucrose and of soluble to insoluble sugars were also higher in stressed leaves. The contribution of the accumulation of soluble sugars to osmotic adjustment was absent in rapidly stressed leaves and was of minor importance in slowly stressed leaves.

  12. Relative contributions of the fraction of unfrozen water and of salt concentration to the survival of slowly frozen human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.; Rall, W.F.; Rigopoulos, N.

    1981-12-01

    As suspensions of cells freeze, the electrolytes and other solutes in the external solution concentrate progressively, and the cells undergo osmotic dehydration if cooling is slow. The progressive concentration of solute comes about as increasing amounts of pure ice precipitate out of solution and cause the liquid-filled channels in which the cells are sequestered to dwindle in size. The consensus has been that slow freezing injury is related to the composition of the solution in these channels and not to the amount of residual liquid. The purpose of the research reported here was to test this assumption on human erythrocytes. Two solutes were used here: NaCl and the permeating protective addivitve glycerol. Human red cells were suspended in solutions with weight ratios of glycerol to NaCl of either 6.42 or 11.26, where the concentrations of NaCl were 0.6, 0.75, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, or 4.0 times isotonic. Samples were then frozen to various subzero temperatures, which were chosen to produce various molalities of NaCl (0.24-3.30) while holding the fraction of unfrozen water constant, or conversely to produce various unfrozen fractions (0.03-0.5) while holding the molality of salt constant. (Not all combinations of these values were possible). The following general findings emerged: (a) few cells survived the freezing of > 90% of the extracellular water regardless of the salt concentration in the residual unfrozen portion, (b) When the fraction of frozen water was < 75%, the majority of the cells survived even when the salt concentration in the unfrozen portion exceeded 2 molal. (c) Salt concentration affected survival significantly only when the frozen fractionlay between 75 and 90%

  13. Effects of gadolinium and tetrodotoxin on the response of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors to mechanical stimulation in frog dorsal skin.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mamoru; Nishikawa, Toshimi; Sato, Sumie; Aiyama, Shigeo; Matsumoto, Shigeji

    2003-12-01

    To elucidate the excitatory mechanism of mechanoreceptors innervating the frog skin, we examined the effects of gadolinium (Gd3+) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the response of single-unit activity of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors to mechanical stimulation topically applied to the receptive field (RF). Recordings were made from 46 fibers responding to mechanical stimulation with von Frey hairs, which caused an irregular firing pattern with slow adaptation. Application of a mechanically gated channel blocker, Gd3+ (30 microM), and a Na+ channel blocker, TTX (3 microM), caused the suppression of discharge rates, which was characterized by the conversion of a slowly adapting to a rapidly adapting discharge pattern. The administration of a high-voltage-activated (HVA) Ca2+ channel blocker, Cd2+ (100 microm), inhibited the unit discharge and caused the conversion of a slowly adapting to a rapidly adapting discharge pattern. Tonic discharges evoked by anodal electrical stimulation were inhibited by the application of Gd3+ or TTX. Electron microscopic examination showed that the cytoplasm of Merkel cells seen in the RF contained numerous Merkel granules. These results suggest that the excitatory mechanism of frog cutaneous mechanoreceptors may be mediated by the activation of Gd(3+)-sensitive stretch-activated channels in the Merkel cell-neurite complex, which are related to the Na+ influx via voltage-gated Na+ channels and/or the Ca2+ influx through HVA Ca2+ channels. PMID:14641651

  14. Every Newborn: progress, priorities, and potential beyond survival.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Joy E; Blencowe, Hannah; Oza, Shefali; You, Danzhen; Lee, Anne C C; Waiswa, Peter; Lalli, Marek; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Barros, Aluisio J D; Christian, Parul; Mathers, Colin; Cousens, Simon N

    2014-07-12

    In this Series paper, we review trends since the 2005 Lancet Series on Neonatal Survival to inform acceleration of progress for newborn health post-2015. On the basis of multicountry analyses and multi-stakeholder consultations, we propose national targets for 2035 of no more than 10 stillbirths per 1000 total births, and no more than 10 neonatal deaths per 1000 livebirths, compatible with the under-5 mortality targets of no more than 20 per 1000 livebirths. We also give targets for 2030. Reduction of neonatal mortality has been slower than that for maternal and child (1-59 months) mortality, slowest in the highest burden countries, especially in Africa, and reduction is even slower for stillbirth rates. Birth is the time of highest risk, when more than 40% of maternal deaths (total about 290,000) and stillbirths or neonatal deaths (5·5 million) occur every year. These deaths happen rapidly, needing a rapid response by health-care workers. The 2·9 million annual neonatal deaths worldwide are attributable to three main causes: infections (0·6 million), intrapartum conditions (0·7 million), and preterm birth complications (1·0 million). Boys have a higher biological risk of neonatal death, but girls often have a higher social risk. Small size at birth--due to preterm birth or small-for-gestational-age (SGA), or both--is the biggest risk factor for more than 80% of neonatal deaths and increases risk of post-neonatal mortality, growth failure, and adult-onset non-communicable diseases. South Asia has the highest SGA rates and sub-Saharan Africa has the highest preterm birth rates. Babies who are term SGA low birthweight (10·4 million in these regions) are at risk of stunting and adult-onset metabolic conditions. 15 million preterm births, especially of those younger than 32 weeks' gestation, are at the highest risk of neonatal death, with ongoing post-neonatal mortality risk, and important risk of long-term neurodevelopmental impairment, stunting, and non

  15. Every Newborn: progress, priorities, and potential beyond survival.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Joy E; Blencowe, Hannah; Oza, Shefali; You, Danzhen; Lee, Anne C C; Waiswa, Peter; Lalli, Marek; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Barros, Aluisio J D; Christian, Parul; Mathers, Colin; Cousens, Simon N

    2014-07-12

    In this Series paper, we review trends since the 2005 Lancet Series on Neonatal Survival to inform acceleration of progress for newborn health post-2015. On the basis of multicountry analyses and multi-stakeholder consultations, we propose national targets for 2035 of no more than 10 stillbirths per 1000 total births, and no more than 10 neonatal deaths per 1000 livebirths, compatible with the under-5 mortality targets of no more than 20 per 1000 livebirths. We also give targets for 2030. Reduction of neonatal mortality has been slower than that for maternal and child (1-59 months) mortality, slowest in the highest burden countries, especially in Africa, and reduction is even slower for stillbirth rates. Birth is the time of highest risk, when more than 40% of maternal deaths (total about 290,000) and stillbirths or neonatal deaths (5·5 million) occur every year. These deaths happen rapidly, needing a rapid response by health-care workers. The 2·9 million annual neonatal deaths worldwide are attributable to three main causes: infections (0·6 million), intrapartum conditions (0·7 million), and preterm birth complications (1·0 million). Boys have a higher biological risk of neonatal death, but girls often have a higher social risk. Small size at birth--due to preterm birth or small-for-gestational-age (SGA), or both--is the biggest risk factor for more than 80% of neonatal deaths and increases risk of post-neonatal mortality, growth failure, and adult-onset non-communicable diseases. South Asia has the highest SGA rates and sub-Saharan Africa has the highest preterm birth rates. Babies who are term SGA low birthweight (10·4 million in these regions) are at risk of stunting and adult-onset metabolic conditions. 15 million preterm births, especially of those younger than 32 weeks' gestation, are at the highest risk of neonatal death, with ongoing post-neonatal mortality risk, and important risk of long-term neurodevelopmental impairment, stunting, and non

  16. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  17. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis

  18. Chronologic Presentation of a Severe Case of Progressive Hemifacial Atrophy (Parry-Romberg Syndrome) with the Loss of an Eye

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mesut; Sel Yilmaz, Ceyda; Kurtaran, Hanifi; Gunduz, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Progressive hemifacial atrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a slowly advancing degenerative disease that mostly affects the cutaneous, subcutaneous fatty tissue, muscle tissue, and bone structures on one side of the face. We describe the chronological progression of this very rare syndrome from early childhood until adulthood in a patient who developed severe atrophy and lost one eye. We also discuss the aetiology and pathophysiology of this syndrome. PMID:25506017

  19. Learning numerical progressions.

    PubMed

    Vitz, P C; Hazan, D N

    1974-01-01

    Learning of simple numerical progressions and compound progressions formed by combining two or three simple progressions is investigated. In two experiments, time to solution was greater for compound vs simple progressions; greater the higher the progression's solution level; and greater if the progression consisted of large vs small numbers. A set of strategies is proposed to account for progression learning based on the assumption S computes differences between integers, differences between differences, etc., in a hierarchical fashion. Two measures of progression difficulty, each a summary of the strategies, are proposed; C1 is a count of the number of differences needed to solve a progression; C2 is the same count with higher level differences given more weight. The measures accurately predict in both experiments the mean time to solve 16 different progressions with C2 being somewhat superior. The measures also predict the learning difficulty of 10 other progressions reported by Bjork (1968).

  20. Neuropathologic and biochemical changes during disease progression in liver X receptor beta-/- mice, a model of adult neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Bigini, Paolo; Steffensen, Knut R; Ferrario, Anna; Diomede, Luisa; Ferrara, Giovanni; Barbera, Sara; Salzano, Sonia; Fumagalli, Elena; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mennini, Tiziana; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2010-06-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), there is selective degeneration of motor neurons that leads to paralysis and death. Although the etiology of ALS is unclear, its heterogeneity suggests that a combination of factors (endogenous and/or environmental) may induce progressive motor neuron stress that results in the activation of different cell death pathways. Alterations of brain cholesterol homeostasis have recently been considered as possible cofactors in many neurodegenerative disorders, including ALS. The liver X receptor beta (LXRbeta) receptor is involved in lipogenesis and cholesterol metabolism, and we previously found that adult-onset motor neuron pathology occurs in LXRbeta mice. Here, we investigated neuromuscular alterations of LXRbeta mice from ages 3 to 24 months. Increased cholesterol levels, gliosis, and inflammation preceded motor neuron loss and clinical disease onset; the mice showed progressivemotor neuron deficits starting from age 7 months. The numbers ofmotor neurons and neuromuscular junctions were decreased in 24-month-old mice, but neither paralysis nor reduced life span was observed. Moreover, other spinal neurons were also lost in these mice. These results suggest that LXRbeta may inhibit neuroinflammation and maintain cholesterol homeostasis, and that LXRbeta mice represent a potential model for investigating the role of cholesterol in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. IMPLICATIONS OF BURST OSCILLATIONS FROM THE SLOWLY ROTATING ACCRETING PULSAR IGR J17480-2446 IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER TERZAN 5

    SciTech Connect

    Cavecchi, Y.; Patruno, A.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.; Altamirano, D.; Wijnands, R.; Van der Klis, M.; Levin, Y.; Linares, M.

    2011-10-10

    The recently discovered accreting X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446 spins at a frequency of {approx}11 Hz. We show that Type I X-ray bursts from this source display oscillations at the same frequency as the stellar spin. IGR J17480-2446 is the first secure case of a slowly rotating neutron star (NS) which shows Type I burst oscillations (BOs), all other sources featuring such oscillations spin at hundreds of Hertz. This means that we can test BO models in a completely different regime. We explore the origin of Type I BOs in IGR J17480-2446 and conclude that they are not caused by global modes in the NS ocean. We also show that the Coriolis force is not able to confine an oscillation-producing hot spot on the stellar surface. The most likely scenario is that the BOs are produced by a hot spot confined by hydromagnetic stresses.

  2. Adult-onset Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma of the tongue: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, P.; Abboud, E.; Bier-Laning, C.; Gupta, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present here a very rare clinical case of a 38-year-old man with Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (khe) of the tongue who presented to our institution with a growth under the left side of the tongue with no pain or discomfort. There were no enlarged lymph nodes and no significant neurologic findings. Diagnostic histopathology confirmed the lesion to be khe. The tumour was removed surgically, and the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis. Follow-up at 3 months shows no clinical evidence of recurrence. PMID:27803613

  3. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia of adult onset due to STUB1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Depondt, Chantal; Donatello, Simona; Simonis, Nicolas; Rai, Myriam; van Heurck, Roxane; Abramowicz, Marc; D'Hooghe, Marc; Pandolfo, Massimo

    2014-05-13

    Autosomal recessive ataxias affect about 1 person in 20,000. Friedreich ataxia accounts for one-third of the cases in Caucasians; the others are due to a growing list of very rare molecular defects, including mild forms of metabolic diseases. In nearly 50%, the genetic cause remains undetermined.

  4. Effects of adult-onset calorie restriction on anxiety-like behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Levay, Elizabeth A; Govic, Antonina; Penman, Jim; Paolini, Antonio G; Kent, Stephen

    2007-12-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has consistently been shown to increase lifespan and ameliorate disease outcomes. Its effects on behavior are less clear, although anxiolytic-like effects have been observed. Rats were subjected to 1 of 4 dietary regimens: control, CR25%, CR50% and, an acute episode of CR and tested in 3 tests of anxiety: the open field test, the elevated plus maze, and the modified open field test. In the open field test, the CR25% and CR50% groups made more central zone entries than the control and Acute groups, which was primarily due to differences in the initial 5 min of the test. Moreover, both CR groups engaged in greater exploration of the central zone than the control group in the initial 5 min of the test. The Acute group also exhibited significantly longer latencies to leave the central zone at test onset than the control and CR50% group. In the elevated plus maze, the Acute group also displayed longer latencies to open arm entry as compared to the control and CR50% group and showed a lower ratio of open to total arm entries compared to all other groups. There were no effects of CR on any variable of the modified open field test. Possible neurochemical mechanisms underlying the anxiolytic-like effect of CR are discussed.

  5. Adult onset-hypothyroidism increases response latency and long-term potentiation (LTP) in rat hippocampus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during both development and in adulthood. The hippocampus is critical for some types of learning and memory and is particularly sensitive to thyroid hormone deficiency. Hypothyroidism in adulthood has been ass...

  6. Delineation of Early and Later Adult Onset Depression by Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongjun; Nie, Binbin; Li, Na; Luo, Chunrong; Li, Haijun; Liu, Fang; Bai, Yan; Shan, Baoci; Xu, Lin; Xu, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to a lack of evidence, there is no consistent age of onset to define early onset (EO) versus later onset (LO) major depressive disorder (MDD). Fractional anisotropy (FA), derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), has been widely used to study neuropsychiatric disorders by providing information about the brain circuitry, abnormalities of which might facilitate the delineation of EO versus LO MDD. Method In this study, 61 pairs of untreated, non-elderly, first-episode MDD patients and healthy controls (HCs) aged 18–45 years old received DTI scans. The voxel-based analysis method (VBM), classification analysis, using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), and regression analyses were used to determine abnormal FA clusters and their correlations with age of onset and clinical symptoms. Results Classification analysis suggested in the best model that there were two subgroups of MDD patients, delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, by which MDD patients could be divided into EO (18–29 years old) and LO (30–45 years old) groups. LO MDD was characterized by decreased FA, especially in the white matter (WM) of the fronto-occipital fasciculus and posterior limb of internal capsule, with a negative correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms; in marked contrast, EO MDD showed increased FA, especially in the WM of the corpus callosum, corticospinal midbrain and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, while FA of the WM near the midbrain had a positive correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms. Conclusion Specific abnormalities of the brain circuitry in EO vs. LO MDD were delineated by an age of onset of 30 years old, as demonstrated by distinct abnormal FA clusters with opposite correlations with clinical symptoms. This DTI study supported the evidence of an exact age for the delineation of MDD, which could have broad multidisciplinary importance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703742 PMID:25393297

  7. Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Anchlia, Sonal; Vyas, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation. PMID:27134456

  8. Sporadic early adult-onset distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles: immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ceuterick, C; Martin, J J

    1996-08-01

    We report the histoenzymology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy of the tibialis anterior muscle of a 50-year-old male patient affected by a sporadic distal myopathy with onset during adolescence. There was no family history of muscle disorder and no clinical signs of cardiomyopathy. Extremely large variations in muscle fibre diameter (the size of some fibres exceeding 200-250 microns), rimmed vacuoles, necrotic fibres invaded by macrophages, atrophic fibres and perimysial fibrosis were observed. Using a wide range of antibodies raised against membrane- and cytoskeletal muscle proteins, granular desmin immunoreactivity was observed in muscle fibre lesions. There were no inflammatory parameters. Of special interest was the occurrence of autophagic vacuoles without 18-20 nm thick sarcoplasmic filaments and the presence of small aggregates of intermediate desmin-like filaments among a great diversity of ultrastructural findings. The morphological differential diagnosis is discussed. Our results stress the importance of combined immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy in the delineation of distal myopathies. DNA defects, however, still have to be identified which would improve the present classifications of distal myopathies.

  9. Adult-onset liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Stefan; Chakrabarti, Rima S.; Xing, Chao; Gotway, Garrett; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Hobbs, Helen H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The etiology of liver disease remains elusive in some adults presenting with severe hepatic dysfunction. Methods and results Here we describe a woman of Pakistani descent who had elevated aminotransferases at age 23. She developed muscle weakness in her mid-20s, and was diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma at age 29. She died without a diagnosis at age 32 after having a liver transplant. Exome sequencing revealed that she was homozygous for a missense mutation (R49H) in AHCY, the gene encoding S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) hydrolase. SAH hydrolase catalyzes the final step in conversion of methionine to homocysteine and inactivating mutations in this enzyme cause a rare autosomal recessive disorder, SAH hydrolase deficiency, that typically presents in infancy. An asymptomatic 7-year old son of the proband is also homozygous for the AHCY-R49H mutation and has elevated serum aminotransferase levels, as well as markedly elevated serum levels of SAH, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and methionine, which are hallmarks of SAH hydrolase deficiency. Conclusion This report reveals several new aspects of SAH hydrolase deficiency. Affected women with SAH hydrolase deficiency can give birth to healthy children. SAH hydrolase deficiency can remain asymptomatic in childhood, and the disorder can be associated with early onset hepatocellular carcinoma. The measurement of serum amino acids should be considered in patients with liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma of unknown etiology. PMID:26527160

  10. Adult onset motor neuron disease: worldwide mortality, incidence and distribution since 1950.

    PubMed Central

    Chancellor, A M; Warlow, C P

    1992-01-01

    This review examines the commonly held premise that, apart from the Western Pacific forms, motor neuron disease (MND), has a uniform worldwide distribution in space and time; the methodological problems in studies of MND incidence; and directions for future epidemiological research. MND is more common in men at all ages. Age-specific incidence rises steeply into the seventh decade but the incidence in the very elderly is uncertain. A rise in mortality from MND over recent decades has been demonstrated wherever this has been examined and may be real rather than due to improved case ascertainment. Comparison of incidence studies in different places is complicated by non-standardised methods of case ascertainment and diagnosis but there appear to be differences between well studied populations. In developed countries in the northern hemisphere there is a weak positive correlation between standardised, age-specific incidence and distance from the equator. There is now strong evidence for an environmental factor as the cause of the Western Pacific forms of MND. A number of clusters of sporadic MND have been reported from developed countries, but no single agent identified as responsible. Images PMID:1479386

  11. Childhood dyspraxia predicts adult-onset nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Jason; Mittal, Vijay; Kline, Emily; Mortensen, Erik L; Michelsen, Niels; Ekstrøm, Morten; Millman, Zachary B; Mednick, Sarnoff A; Sørensen, Holger J

    2015-11-01

    Several neurological variables have been investigated as premorbid biomarkers of vulnerability for schizophrenia and other related disorders. The current study examined whether childhood dyspraxia predicted later adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders. From a standardized neurological examination performed with children (aged 10-13) at genetic high risk of schizophrenia and controls, several measures of dyspraxia were used to create a scale composed of face/head dyspraxia, oral articulation, ideomotor dyspraxia (clumsiness), and dressing dyspraxia (n = 244). Multinomial logistic regression showed higher scores on the dyspraxia scale predict nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders relative to other psychiatric disorders and no mental illness outcomes, even after controlling for genetic risk, χ2 (4, 244) = 18.61, p < .001. Findings that symptoms of dyspraxia in childhood (reflecting abnormalities spanning functionally distinct brain networks) specifically predict adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders are consistent with a theory of abnormal connectivity, and they highlight a marked early-stage vulnerability in the pathophysiology of nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders. PMID:26439077

  12. Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Sumit; Shah, Vandana; Anchlia, Sonal; Vyas, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation. PMID:27134456

  13. Familial adult onset hyperinsulinism due to an activating glucokinase mutation: Implications for pharmacological glucokinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Challis, Benjamin G.; Harris, Julie; Sleigh, Alison; Isaac, Iona; Orme, Steve M.; Seevaratnam, Nandini; Dhatariya, Ketan; Simpson, Helen L.; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Context Glucokinase (GCK) phosphorylates and thereby “traps” glucose in cells, thus serving as a gatekeeper for cellular glucose metabolism, particularly in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells. In humans, activating GCK mutations cause familial hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (GCK-HH), leading to keen interest in the potential of small molecule glucokinase activators (GKAs) as treatments for diabetes mellitus. Many such agents have been developed, however observation of side effects including hypertriglyceridaemia and hepatic steatosis have delayed their clinical development. Objective To describe the clinical presentation and metabolic profiles of affected family members in a kindred with familial hyperinsulinism of adult presentation due to a known activating mutation in GCK. Design Clinical, biochemical and metabolic assessment, and GCK sequencing in affected family members. Results In the 60 year-old female proband, hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (blood glucose 2.1mmol/mol, insulin 18pmol/l) was confirmed following 34 hours of fasting, however abdominal computed tomography (CT), pancreatic MRI, endoscopic ultrasound, octreotide scintigraphy and selective arterial calcium stimulation failed to localise an insulinoma. A prolonged OGTT revealed fasting hypoglycaemia that was exacerbated after glucose challenge, consistent with dysregulated glucose-stimulated insulin release. A heterozygous activating mutation, p.Val389Leu, in the glucokinase gene (GCK) was found in the proband and four other family members. Of these, two had been investigated elsewhere for recurrent hypoglycaemia in adulthood, while the other two adult relatives were asymptomatic despite profound hypoglycaemia. All three of the available family members with the p.Val389Leu mutation had normal serum lipid profiles, normal rates of fasting hepatic de novo lipogenesis and had hepatic triglyceride levels commensurate with their degree of adiposity. Conclusion Activating GCK mutations may present in late adulthood with hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia, and should be considered even in older patients being investigated for insulinoma. Normal circulating lipids, rates of hepatic de novo lipogenesis and appropriate hepatic triglyceride content for degree of adiposity in the patients we describe suggests that even lifelong GCK activation in isolation is insufficient to produce fatty liver and metabolic dyslipidaemia. PMID:24890200

  14. Two clinicopathological cases of a dominantly inherited, adult onset orthochromatic leucodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Letournel, F; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Verny, C; Barthelaix, A; Dubas, F

    2003-01-01

    The first patient, aged 58 years, had frontal dementia and epilepsy; the second, aged 38 years, had motor signs and dementia, but no epilepsy. The histopathological features of our two cases were leucodystrophy of orthochromatic subtype. However, the radiological features (MRI and mostly FLAIR sequences) of the first case did not suggest leucodystrophy. PMID:12700318

  15. Synfuels from biomass grow slowly

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.; Wedlock, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Current developments in the manufacture of synfuels are discussed with emphasis on the sources of biomass suitable for synfuels production, processes for converting biomass to synfuels, and the economics of the technology. The sources include wood, nonwood crops, root crops, aquatic biomass, and oils from plants such as soybean, safflower, and peanut. The biomass conversion processes discussed include pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction, and aerobic and anaerobic digestion.

  16. Slowly forgetting the Pavlovian adventure?

    PubMed

    Buser, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses an interesting story, that of the physiologist Ivan Petrovitch Pavlov. While investigating the causes of salivary secretions in the waking, behaving dog, he discovered a class of causes that he called psychic, since they were associated with perceiving a visual, acoustic or other signal, delivered before food that normally created salivation. A temporary relationship was therefore established, between the secretory command and the cerebral site associated with an initially neutral stimulus that had become a signal. This gave rise to the "conditional reflex". Pavlov was probably not the first who had observed this kind of association, but he very skillfully exploited these data to create a coherent conceptual system. In 23 "lectures", he very precisely summarized his views and retraced the fundamental issues explaining the main features of the purely physiological cerebral command of behaviour. The Pavlovian system necessarily became, in the particular environment of the soviet regime, a kind of credo on physical-mental relationships based upon a generalized reflexology, not allowing any deviation, nor any dissidence, nor any concession to subjectivity. The notion of conditional reflex has indeed resisted to time, but number of subtleties of the Pavlovian thinking and many phenomena that he described now seem forgotten and to have lost much of their heuristic value. Most of the recent theories of learning have only rarely followed Pavlov's line, to concentrate on more complex learning modalities.

  17. Nonrotating and slowly rotating holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Douglas A.; Price, Richard H.; Thorne, Kip S.; Suen, Wai-Mo

    The 3+1 formalism is applied to model Schwarzschild spacetime around a black hole. Particular note is taken of the 3+1 split of the laws of electrodynamics, and of the tendency of the approach to freeze motion at the event horizon. The null horizon is replaced with a timelike physical membrane which exhibits mechanical, thermodynamic and electrical properties, and which 'stretches' the horizon. The usefulness of the stretching approach is illustrated by considering a black hole penetrated by vibrating magnetic field lines anchored in a perfectly conducting surrounding sphere. The necessity of modeling the field structure near the actual horizon is avoided by having the field end at the membrane. The surface charge, current, resistivity and ohmic heating of the stretched horizon are also considered, and the Lorentz force imparted to the stretched horizon surface by the field lines is investigated by examining a nearly Schwarzschild hole behaving as the rotor of an electric motor.

  18. Slowly forgetting the Pavlovian adventure?

    PubMed

    Buser, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses an interesting story, that of the physiologist Ivan Petrovitch Pavlov. While investigating the causes of salivary secretions in the waking, behaving dog, he discovered a class of causes that he called psychic, since they were associated with perceiving a visual, acoustic or other signal, delivered before food that normally created salivation. A temporary relationship was therefore established, between the secretory command and the cerebral site associated with an initially neutral stimulus that had become a signal. This gave rise to the "conditional reflex". Pavlov was probably not the first who had observed this kind of association, but he very skillfully exploited these data to create a coherent conceptual system. In 23 "lectures", he very precisely summarized his views and retraced the fundamental issues explaining the main features of the purely physiological cerebral command of behaviour. The Pavlovian system necessarily became, in the particular environment of the soviet regime, a kind of credo on physical-mental relationships based upon a generalized reflexology, not allowing any deviation, nor any dissidence, nor any concession to subjectivity. The notion of conditional reflex has indeed resisted to time, but number of subtleties of the Pavlovian thinking and many phenomena that he described now seem forgotten and to have lost much of their heuristic value. Most of the recent theories of learning have only rarely followed Pavlov's line, to concentrate on more complex learning modalities. PMID:16731497

  19. Aluminum involvement in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Walton, J R

    2013-01-01

    The neuroanatomic specificity with which Alzheimer's disease (AD) progresses could provide clues to AD etiopathology. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of AD clinical progression have confirmed general conclusions from earlier studies of AD neuropathological progression wherein neurofibrillary tangle pathology was observed to spread along a well-defined sequence of corticocortical and corticosubcortical connections, preferentially affecting certain cell types, while sparing others. Identical and non-identical twin studies have consistently shown AD has mixed (environmental and genetic) etiopathogenesis. The decades-long prodromal phase over which AD develops suggests slow but progressive accumulation of a toxic or infective agent over time. Major environmental candidates are reviewed to assess which best fits the profile of an agent that slowly accrues in susceptible cell types of AD-vulnerable brain regions to toxic levels by old age, giving rise to AD neuropathology without rapid neuronal lysis. Chronic aluminum neurotoxicity best matches this profile. Many humans routinely ingest aluminum salts as additives contained in processed foods and alum-treated drinking water. The physical properties of aluminum and ferric iron ions are similar, allowing aluminum to use mechanisms evolved for iron to enter vulnerable neurons involved in AD progression, accumulate in those neurons, and cause neurofibrillary damage. The genetic component of AD etiopathogenesis apparently involves a susceptibility gene, yet to be identified, that increases aluminum absorption because AD and Down syndrome patients have higher than normal plasma, and brain, aluminum levels. This review describes evidence for aluminum involvement in AD neuropathology and the clinical progression of sporadic AD.

  20. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  1. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A: Co-existence of two rare neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Anna; Scaioli, Vidmer; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Salsano, Ettore; Dalla Bella, Eleonora; Gellera, Cinzia; Pareyson, Davide

    2015-10-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene; it is clinically characterized by adult-onset, slowly progressive weakness and atrophy mainly affecting proximal limb and bulbar muscles. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is an autosomal dominant polyneuropathy due to peripheral myelin protein 22 gene duplication and characterized by slowly progressive distal limb muscle weakness, atrophy and sensory loss with foot deformities. Here we report the co-occurrence of both neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same male patient. Difficulties in climbing stairs and jaw weakness were presenting symptoms consistent with SBMA. However, predominant distal weakness and bilateral pes cavus were rather suggestive of a hereditary polyneuropathy. The combination of two diseases, even if extremely rare, should be considered in the presence of atypical symptoms; in the case of genetic diseases this event may have important implications on family members' counseling.

  2. A U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter slowly lowers the X-40 sub-scale technology demonstrator to the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A U.S. Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter slowly lowers the X-40 sub-scale technology demonstrator to the ground under the watchful eyes of ground crew at the conclusion of a captive-carry test flight at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. Several captive-carry flights were conducted to check out all operating systems and procedures before the X-40 made its first free flight at Edwards, gliding to a fully-autonomous approach and landing on the Edwards runway. The X-40 is an unpowered 82 percent scale version of the X-37, a Boeing-developed spaceplane designed to demonstrate various advanced technologies for development of future lower-cost access to space vehicles. The X-37 will be carried into space aboard a space shuttle and then released to perform various maneuvers and a controlled re-entry through the Earth's atmosphere to an airplane-style landing on a runway, controlled entirely by pre-programmed computer software. Flight tests of the X-40 are designed to reduce the risks associated with research flights of the larger, more complex X-37.

  3. Microstructural and drug release properties of oven-dried and of slowly or fast frozen freeze-dried MCC-Carbopol pellets.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carracedo, Ana; Souto, Consuelo; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón; Concheiro, Angel; Gómez-Amoza, José Luis

    2007-08-01

    The influence of the procedure and conditions of drying (oven-drying and freeze-drying after slow or fast freezing) and of the CaCl(2) concentration in the wetting liquid on the physical characteristics and drug release behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC)-carbopol 40:60 pellets containing theophylline or ketoprofen has been evaluated. The microstructural, morphological and mechanical properties can be modulated, to a large extent, through the control of the drying step and the CaCl(2) proportion. The drying step determines the volumetric contraction of the pellets and, consequently, the porosity parameters. When freeze-drying is applied, the freezing conditions have a marked influence on total porosity and mean pore size of the pellets. Slowly frozen pellets present the lowest porosity but the pores are the greatest. Pore size appears as a critical factor for achieving controlled release; the greater the pores, the faster the entrance of water and, consequently, the drug release. Therefore, if freeze-drying is used to remove water from wet pellets, the control of the ice formation is essential to modulate the release profiles. The practical possibilities of such modulation are especially clear for a slightly-water soluble drug, such as ketoprofen.

  4. New slowly pulsating B stars in the field of the young open cluster NGC 2244 discovered by the MOST photometric satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, D.; Saio, H.; Kuschnig, R.; Fossati, L.; Handler, G.; Zwintz, K.; Weiss, W. W.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.

    2012-02-01

    During two weeks of nearly continuous optical photometry of the young open cluster NGC 2244 obtained by the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite, we discovered two new slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars, GSC 00154-00785 and GSC 00154-01871. We present frequency analyses of the MOST light curves of these stars, which reveal two oscillation frequencies (0.61 and 0.71 cycle d-1) in GSC 00154-00785 and two (0.40 and 0.51 cycle d-1) in GSC 00154-01871. These frequency ranges are consistent with g modes of ℓ≤ 2 excited in models of main-sequence or pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars of masses 4.5-5 M⊙ and solar composition (X, Z) = (0.7, 0.02). Published proper motion measurements and radial velocities are insufficient to establish unambiguously cluster membership for these two stars. However, the PMS models which fit best their eigenspectra have ages consistent with NGC 2244. If cluster membership can be confirmed, these would be the first known PMS SPB stars, and would open a new window on testing asteroseismically the interior structures of PMS stars. Based on data from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission operated by Microsat Systems Canada Inc. (formerly the space division of Dynacon, Inc.) and the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  5. Discovery of the New Slowly Pulsating B Star HD 163830 (B5 II/III) from MOST Space-based Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, C.; De Cat, P.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Weiss, W. W.

    2006-05-01

    We report the discovery of a new slowly pulsating B star, with the largest number of detected frequencies to date by more than a factor of 3, based on 37 days of MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars) satellite guide star photometry. The star HD 163830 (V=9.3, B5 II/III) varies in 20 detected frequencies in the range 0.035-1.06 day-1 (0.4-12.3 μHz) with amplitudes from 0.7 to 7.6 mmag (with a signal-to-noise ratio from 4 to 41). Eighteen of these frequencies are consistent with low-degree, high-order nonradial g-modes of seismic models of an evolved 4.5 Msolar star. We are unable to identify one unique model due to lack of mode identifications. The lowest two frequencies may be associated with the rotation of HD 163830, but firm proof of this must await future spectroscopic data. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  6. Slowly Delivered Icariin/Allogeneic Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote the Healing of Calvarial Critical-Size Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tianlin; Luo, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering technique is a promising strategy to repair large-volume bone defects. In this study, we developed a 3-dimensional construct by combining icariin (a small-molecule Chinese medicine), allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), and a siliceous mesostructured cellular foams-poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (SMC-PHBHHx) composite scaffold. We hypothesized that the slowly released icariin could significantly promote the efficacy of SMC-PHBHHx/allogeneic BMSCs for repairing critical-size bone defects in rats. In in vitro cellular experiments, icariin at optimal concentration (10−6 mol/L) could significantly upregulate the osteogenesis- and angiogenesis-related genes and proteins, such as Runx2, ALP, osteocalcin, vascular endothelial growth factors, and fibroblast growth factors, as well as the mineralization of BMSCs. Icariin that was adsorbed onto the SMC-PHBHHx scaffold showed a slow release profile within a 2-week monitoring span. Eight weeks after implantation in calvarial critical-size bone defects, the constructs with icariin were associated with significantly higher bone volume density, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, and significantly lower trabecular separation than the constructs without icariin. Histomorphometric analysis showed that icariin was also associated with a significantly higher density of newly formed blood vessels. These data suggested a promising application potential of the icariin/SMC-PHBHHx/allogeneic BMSCs constructs for repairing large-volume bone defects in clinic. PMID:27721833

  7. Modeling of scanning laser polarimetry images of the human retina for progression detection of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Koen A; Vos, Frans M; Lo, Barrick; Zhou, Qienyuan; Lemij, Hans G; Vossepoel, Albert M; van Vliet, Lucas J

    2006-05-01

    The development of methods to detect slowly progressing diseases is often hampered by the time-consuming acquisition of a sufficiently large data set. In this paper, a method is presented to model the change in images acquired by scanning laser polarimetry, for the detection of glaucomatous progression. The model is based on image series of 23 healthy eyes and incorporates colored noise, incomplete cornea compensation and masking by the retinal blood vessels. Additionally, two methods for detecting progression, taking either one or two follow-up visits into account, are discussed and tested on these simulated images. Both methods are based on Student's t-tests, morphological operations and anisotropic filtering. The images simulated by the model are visually pleasing, show corresponding statistical properties to the real images and are used to optimize the detection methods. The results show that detecting progression based on two follow-up visits greatly improves the sensitivity without adversely affecting the specificity.

  8. Fos Protein Expression in Olfactory-Related Brain Areas after Learning and after Reactivation of a Slowly Acquired Olfactory Discrimination Task in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roullet, Florence; Lienard, Fabienne; Datiche, Frederique; Cattarelli, Martine

    2005-01-01

    Fos protein immunodetection was used to investigate the neuronal activation elicited in some olfactory-related areas after either learning of an olfactory discrimination task or its reactivation 10 d later. Trained rats (T) progressively acquired the association between one odor of a pair and water-reward in a four-arm maze. Two groups of…

  9. Tight asteroseismic constraints on core overshooting and diffusive mixing in the slowly rotating pulsating B8.3V star KIC 10526294

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravveji, E.; Aerts, C.; Pápics, P. I.; Triana, S. A.; Vandoren, B.

    2015-08-01

    Context. KIC 10526294 was recently discovered to be a very slowly rotating and slowly pulsating late B-type star. Its 19 consecutive dipole gravity modes constitute a series with almost constant period spacing. This unique collection of identified modes probes the near-core environment of this star and holds the potential to reveal the size and structure of the overshooting zone above the convective core, as well as the mixing properties of the star. Aims: We revisit the asteroseismic modelling of this star with specific emphasis on the properties of the core overshooting, while considering additional diffusive mixing throughout the radiative envelope of the star. Methods: We pursued forward seismic modelling based on adiabatic eigenfrequencies of equilibrium models for eight extensive evolutionary grids tuned to KIC 10526294 by varying the initial mass, metallicity, chemical mixture, and the extent of the overshooting layer on top of the convective core. We examined models for both OP and OPAL opacities and tested the occurrence of extra diffusive mixing throughout the radiative interior. Results: We find a tight mass-metallicity relation within the ranges M ∈ [ 3.13,3.25 ] M⊙ and Z ∈ [ 0.014,0.028 ]. We deduce that an exponentially decaying diffusive core overshooting prescription describes the seismic data better than a step function formulation and derive a value of fov between 0.017 and 0.018. Moreover, the inclusion of extra diffusive mixing with a value of log Dmix between 1.75 and 2.00 dex (with Dmix in cm2 s-1) improves the goodness-of-fit based on the observed and modelled frequencies by a factor ~11 compared to the case where no extra mixing is considered, irrespective of the (M,Z) combination within the allowed seismic range. Conclusions: The inclusion of diffusive mixing in addition to core overshooting is essential to explain the structure in the observed period spacing pattern of this star. Moreover, for the input physics and chemical mixtures

  10. (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronological age distribution in a slowly cooled plutonic complex (Ploumanac'h intrusion, France): insights into helium diffusion processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recanati, A. C.; Gautheron, C.; Barbarand, J.; Tassan-Got, L.; Missenard, Y.; Pinna-Jamme, R.

    2015-12-01

    (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology is widely used to determine the thermal histories of mountain ranges and sedimentary basins. Apatite crystals retain helium at low temperatures, thus giving an insight into upper crustal evolution (e.g. exhumation, subsidence, erosion). Advanced models predict He production and diffusion rates in apatite crystals, thereby allowing determination of helium dates by integration over time/temperature paths (e.g. Gautheron et al., 2009). However, scattered dates and discordance between predicted and measured dates suggest that other parameters than time or temperature may also influence helium contents in apatite. The present study determines the variables that affect He diffusion in apatite over long timescales. We report the (U-Th-Sm)/He date distribution within a slowly cooled intrusion, along with AFT data, as well as extensive petrological and chemical characterization. The Ploumanac'h site (Brittany, France) was chosen because it includes small-scale spatial variations in petrology and chemistry (6-9106 tracks/cm2). GAUTHERON C., TASSAN-GOT L., BARBARAND J., PAGEL M., 2009. Effect of alpha-damage annealing on apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology. Chem. Geol. 266, 166-179.

  11. Extending the time range of apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry in slowly cooled terranes: Palaeozoic to Cenozoic exhumation history of southeast Sweden [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderlund, Pia; Juez-Larré, Joaquim; Page, Laurence M.; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2005-11-01

    The use of (U-Th)/He thermochronometry in old slowly cooled terranes has long been debated. Hence, studies of natural setting are needed to verify the expected diffusivity behaviour of helium. Our results demonstrate that the (U-Th)/He method can be applicable to samples older than 200 Ma, and that available helium diffusion models can reproduce the results obtained from the age-vs.-depth trends. In addition, the results shed some light on the cross-validation with the apatite fission-track thermochronometer. (U-Th)/He thermochronometry on apatites has been applied to samples taken from drill cores in the Precambrian basement in southeast Sweden to unravel the time of exhumation of the uppermost 1-3 km of the crust. Much of the Phanerozoic exhumation history in Sweden is poorly constrained due to a large hiatus in the sediment record. Results from the drill cores yield He ages decreasing with increasing depth from ˜270 Ma at the surface down to ˜120 Ma at 1700 m depth. The age-vs.-depth trend shows an inflection point at ˜1400 m depth, which coincides with the upper boundary of the present Helium Partial Retention Zone. A period of slow exhumation (˜17 m/my), probably linked to the isostatic uplift of the Caledonian foreland basin, is revealed by the upper section of the trend in the data. The results demonstrate that the area has not been reheated since the mid-Permian. This argues against the existence of a thick Mesozoic sedimentary cover in this region, which, if present at all, cannot have exceeded 100 m in thickness. Furthermore, the age-vs.-depth trend below the inflection point allows dating the cessation of exhumation at approximately 100 Ma. The area has had no significant amount of sedimentation, erosion or uplift since this time.

  12. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Deletion Leads to Progressive Hypertension, Associated Organ Damage, and Reduced Survival: Novel Model for Human Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Nini, Ryan; Tonne, Jason M; Peng, Kah-Whye; Geurts, Aron; Jacob, Howard J; Burnett, John C; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Altered myocardial structure and function, secondary to chronically elevated blood pressure, are leading causes of heart failure and death. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a guanylyl cyclase A agonist, is a cardiac hormone integral to cardiovascular regulation. Studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between reduced production or impaired BNP release and the development of human hypertension. However, the consequences of BNP insufficiency on blood pressure and hypertension-associated complications remain poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to create and characterize a novel model of BNP deficiency to investigate the effects of BNP absence on cardiac and renal structure, function, and survival. Genetic BNP deletion was generated in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Compared with age-matched controls, BNP knockout rats demonstrated adult-onset hypertension. Increased left ventricular mass with hypertrophy and substantially augmented hypertrophy signaling pathway genes, developed in young adult knockout rats, which preceded hypertension. Prolonged hypertension led to increased cardiac stiffness, cardiac fibrosis, and thrombi formation. Significant elongation of the QT interval was detected at 9 months in knockout rats. Progressive nephropathy was also noted with proteinuria, fibrosis, and glomerular alterations in BNP knockout rats. End-organ damage contributed to a significant decline in overall survival. Systemic BNP overexpression reversed the phenotype of genetic BNP deletion. Our results demonstrate the critical role of BNP defect in the development of systemic hypertension and associated end-organ damage in adulthood.

  13. Population genetics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a high-prevalence community using a hypervariable outer membrane porB and 13 slowly evolving housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Viscidi, Raphael P; Demma, James C; Zenilman, Jonathan; Crandall, Keith A

    2005-09-01

    Baltimore, Md., is an urban community with a high prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Due to partially protective immune responses, introduction of new strains from other host populations, and exposure of N. gonorrhoeae to antibiotics, the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the circulating strains can fluctuate over time. Understanding the overall genetic diversity and population structure of N. gonorrhoeae is essential for informing public health interventions to eliminate this pathogen. We studied gonococci population genetics in Baltimore by analyzing a hypervariable and strongly selected outer membrane porB gene and 13 slowly evolving and presumably neutral housekeeping genes (abcZ, adk, aroE, fumC, gdh, glnA, gnd, pdhC, pgm, pilA, ppk, pyrD, and serC) in 204 isolates collected in 1991, 1996, and 2001 from male and female patients of two public sexually transmitted diseases clinics. Genetic diversity (), recombination (C), growth (g), population structure, and adaptive selection under codon-substitution and amino acid property models were estimated and compared between these two gene classes. Estimates of the F(ST) fixation index and the chi(2) test of sequence absolute frequencies revealed significant temporal substructuring for both gene types. Baltimore's N. gonorrhoeae populations have increased since 1991 as indicated by consistent positive values of g. Female patients showed similar or lower levels of and C than male patients. Within the MLST housekeeping genes, levels of and C ranged from 0.001-0.013 and 0.000-0.018, respectively. Overall recombination seems to be the dominant force driving evolution in these populations. All loci showed amino acid sites and physicochemical properties under adaptive (or positive-destabilizing) selection, rejecting the generally assumed hypothesis of stabilizing selection for these MLST genes. Within the porB gene, protein I B showed higher and C values than protein I A. Directional positive selection possibly

  14. Deep-seated slowly moving rock slides in foliated metamorphic rock masses: New findings about kinematical and hydro-mechanical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, Christian; Strauhal, Thomas; Holzmann, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Deep-seated slowly moving rock slides are characterised by deformation along one or several shear zones where most of the measured total slope displacement localizes. Many of these rock slides move downwards at mean annual rates of some centimetres or even less and do not show any evidence for non-reversible acceleration in the past or in the future. Whereas some of these rock slides are currently inactive (dormant) or have even reached a stabilised final state others show a temporally variable deformation behaviour characterized by low base activities superimposed by acceleration phases. The trigger for these phases can be manifold and include heavy rainfall, snow melt, water level fluctuations of reservoirs, changes in the slope's equilibrium state due to antecedent slow creeping processes, variations in the material behaviour within the shear/sliding zone, erosion along the foot of the slope, etc. In order to improve the understanding of the activity behaviour and trigger factors, to increase the quality of slope stability analyses and to assess the hazard potential detailed information about the rock slide geometry and kinematics are essential. Given that subsurface investigations such as boreholes and investigation adits on large-scale rock slides are costly, most published studies are related to investigations in the surroundings of infrastructures and human settlements. Within this study new field mapping, deformation monitoring, geophysical exploration and in-situ subsurface investigation data are presented which are obtained on case studies in paragneissic rock masses of the Austroalpine Ötztal-Stubai complex (Tyrol, Austria). The new investigations contribute to develop geometrical rock slide models, to study the internal deformation characteristics of the rock slide mass and to develop kinematical deformation models. In addition, results show that all case studies are characterised by slope deformation mechanisms due to shear/slide processes along dm to

  15. Properties of Slowly Moving Thermal Waves in Saturn from Cassini CIRS and Ground-Based Thermal Observations from 2003 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, L. N.; Flasar, F.; Achterberg, R. K.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Lewis, M.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Bell, J.; Christian, J.; Brown, S. K.

    2013-10-01

    Hemispherical maps of Saturn’s atmosphere made both by Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, 7-1000 µm) and ground-based mid-infrared observations (7-25 µm) were surveyed for the presence and properties of zonal thermal waves and their variability in time. The most inclusive CIRS surveys, FIRMAPs (15 cm-1 spectral resolution), covered the planet from the equator to either north or south pole, sweeping through the latitude range while the planet rotated beneath over its ~10-hour rotation. Ground-based observations were made at the Infrared Telescope Facility using the MIRSI instrument, the Very Large Telescope using VISIR and the Subaru Telescope using COMICS. We sampled spectral ranges dominated both by upper-tropospheric emission (80-200 mbar) and by stratospheric emission (0.5-3 mbar). We examined data that were taken between 2003 and Saturn’s spring equinox in 2009. During this time, the strongest waves were found between planetographic latitudes of 30° - 45°S and 0° - 30°N. Some low-wavelength components cover all 360° in longitude, similar to the slowly moving thermal waves in Jupiter’s atmosphere, but the strongest waves were found in “trains” that covered less than 180°. In 2005, tropospheric waves had a mean peak-to-peak variance that was the equivalent of temperature variability of about 1 K. Between 2005 and 2007, they had subsided to about 0.5 K. During and after 2008, they soared to over 3 K. During this entire period, similar waves in the northern hemisphere were never larger than 0.8 K. In the stratosphere, waves followed a similar time sequence, with southern hemisphere waves in 2005 reaching amplitudes as high as 3.5 K in brightness temperature, subsequently decreasing, then growing in 2008-2009 to over 5 K. Stratospheric waves in the northern hemisphere were nearly constant ~2 K, but with an instance of 6 K at one epoch in 2008. We were able to track the phase of some of the waves in the southern hemisphere, which

  16. Room-temperature serial crystallography at synchrotron X-ray sources using slowly flowing free-standing high-viscosity microstreams.

    PubMed

    Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Barends, Thomas R M; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Latz, Beatrice; Dworkowski, Florian; Foucar, Lutz; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Wang, Meitian; Shoeman, Robert L; Schlichting, Ilme; Doak, R Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron sources, beamline optics and detectors are driving a renaissance in room-temperature data collection. The underlying impetus is the recognition that conformational differences are observed in functionally important regions of structures determined using crystals kept at ambient as opposed to cryogenic temperature during data collection. In addition, room-temperature measurements enable time-resolved studies and eliminate the need to find suitable cryoprotectants. Since radiation damage limits the high-resolution data that can be obtained from a single crystal, especially at room temperature, data are typically collected in a serial fashion using a number of crystals to spread the total dose over the entire ensemble. Several approaches have been developed over the years to efficiently exchange crystals for room-temperature data collection. These include in situ collection in trays, chips and capillary mounts. Here, the use of a slowly flowing microscopic stream for crystal delivery is demonstrated, resulting in extremely high-throughput delivery of crystals into the X-ray beam. This free-stream technology, which was originally developed for serial femtosecond crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers, is here adapted to serial crystallography at synchrotrons. By embedding the crystals in a high-viscosity carrier stream, high-resolution room-temperature studies can be conducted at atmospheric pressure using the unattenuated X-ray beam, thus permitting the analysis of small or weakly scattering crystals. The high-viscosity extrusion injector is described, as is its use to collect high-resolution serial data from native and heavy-atom-derivatized lysozyme crystals at the Swiss Light Source using less than half a milligram of protein crystals. The room-temperature serial data allow de novo structure determination. The crystal size used in this proof-of-principle experiment was dictated by the available flux density. However, upcoming

  17. Progress in AMSR Snow Algorithm Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alfred; Koike, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) will be flown on-board of the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-II (ADEOS-II) and United States Earth Observation System (EOS) PM-1 satellite. AMSR is a passive microwave radiometer with frequency ranges from 6.9 GHz to 89 GHz. It scans conically with a constant incidence angle of 55 deg at the Earth's surface. The swath width is about 1600 km. With a large antenna, AMSR will provide the best spatial resolution of multi-frequency radiometer from space. This provides us an opportunity to improve the snow parameter retrieval. Accurate determination of snow parameters from space is a challenging effort. Over the years, many different techniques have been used to account for the complicated snow parameters such as the density, stratigraphy, snow grain size, temperature variation of the snow-pack. Forest type, fractional forest cover and land use type also need to be considered in developing an improved retrieval algorithm. However, snow is such a dynamic variable, snow-pack parameter keeps changing once the snow is deposited on the earth surface. Currently, NASDA and NASA are developing AMSR snow retrieval algorithms. These algorithms are now being carefully tested and evaluated using the SSM/I data. Due to limited snow-pack data available for comparison, this activity is progressing slowly. However, it is clear that in order to improve the snow retrieval algorithm, it is necessary to model the metamorphism history of the snow-pack.

  18. Aluminum involvement in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Walton, J R

    2013-01-01

    The neuroanatomic specificity with which Alzheimer's disease (AD) progresses could provide clues to AD etiopathology. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of AD clinical progression have confirmed general conclusions from earlier studies of AD neuropathological progression wherein neurofibrillary tangle pathology was observed to spread along a well-defined sequence of corticocortical and corticosubcortical connections, preferentially affecting certain cell types, while sparing others. Identical and non-identical twin studies have consistently shown AD has mixed (environmental and genetic) etiopathogenesis. The decades-long prodromal phase over which AD develops suggests slow but progressive accumulation of a toxic or infective agent over time. Major environmental candidates are reviewed to assess which best fits the profile of an agent that slowly accrues in susceptible cell types of AD-vulnerable brain regions to toxic levels by old age, giving rise to AD neuropathology without rapid neuronal lysis. Chronic aluminum neurotoxicity best matches this profile. Many humans routinely ingest aluminum salts as additives contained in processed foods and alum-treated drinking water. The physical properties of aluminum and ferric iron ions are similar, allowing aluminum to use mechanisms evolved for iron to enter vulnerable neurons involved in AD progression, accumulate in those neurons, and cause neurofibrillary damage. The genetic component of AD etiopathogenesis apparently involves a susceptibility gene, yet to be identified, that increases aluminum absorption because AD and Down syndrome patients have higher than normal plasma, and brain, aluminum levels. This review describes evidence for aluminum involvement in AD neuropathology and the clinical progression of sporadic AD. PMID:23380995

  19. Progress in renewables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Martin, R. L.

    This is a status report on progress made in the conduct of eleven Federally-supported renewable energy programs. Considerable progress has been made in the establishment and development of an infrastructure to support sustained growth. Unique technical problems led to the research and development of materials and designs which have achieved energy conversion efficiencies of up to 25% for electricity and 92% for heat in solar thermal systems. Overall, enough real progress has been made to provide a sound technology base upon which renewable energy systems industries can reasonably continue development.

  20. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  1. Progress toward seasonal prediction in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaff, John Albert

    Seasonal prediction in the tropics has been a slowly developing, yet very important topic in Atmospheric Science. Its slow evolution is a product of its history, a history determined by the rise and fall of empires, technological advances, and scientific opinions, but motivated ultimately by profit. In recent years, long-lead forecasting techniques in the tropics have again become popular. The occurrence of strong El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, droughts, floods, and intense landfalling tropical cyclones, has again prompted the meteorological community to use their knowledge to create useful seasonal forecasts for several regions of the tropics. Such forecasts will facilitate better management of natural resources, disaster preparation, and economic growth in these regions. Much has been learned about seasonal forecasting in the tropics in the last 125 years and much will be learned in the future, but progress is gained slowly by the piecing together of a great number of observation studies. This paper details but a few such studies. Within, the history of seasonal prediction in the tropics is discussed. Following this discussion the paper examines the physical implications of summertime sea level pressure anomalies (SLPAs) in the tropical Atlantic, the development of a simple regression model to predict June through September SLPAs in the Caribbean Sea region, and the development of a statistical ENSO prediction method which is based entirely on the optimal combination of persistence, trends of initial conditions and climatology. The future of seasonal forecasting in the tropics is bright. New technology along with improved datasets is allowing diagnostic and predictive studies that were once thought too exhaustive to be undertaken. This optimistic opinion must be tempered by this fields long history. Public and scientific opinion can rapidly change if seasonal prediction is not approached responsibly. This responsibility entails a rigorous definition

  2. A size threshold governs Caenorhabditis elegans developmental progression.

    PubMed

    Uppaluri, Sravanti; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-08-22

    The growth of organisms from humans to bacteria is affected by environmental conditions. However, mechanisms governing growth and size control are not well understood, particularly in the context of changes in food availability in developing multicellular organisms. Here, we use a novel microfluidic platform to study the impact of diet on the growth and development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This device allows us to observe individual worms throughout larval development, quantify their growth as well as pinpoint the moulting transitions marking successive developmental stages. Under conditions of low food availability, worms grow very slowly, but do not moult until they have achieved a threshold size. The time spent in larval stages can be extended by over an order of magnitude, in agreement with a simple threshold size model. Thus, a critical worm size appears to trigger developmental progression, and may contribute to prolonged lifespan under dietary restriction. PMID:26290076

  3. A size threshold governs Caenorhabditis elegans developmental progression

    PubMed Central

    Uppaluri, Sravanti; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    The growth of organisms from humans to bacteria is affected by environmental conditions. However, mechanisms governing growth and size control are not well understood, particularly in the context of changes in food availability in developing multicellular organisms. Here, we use a novel microfluidic platform to study the impact of diet on the growth and development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This device allows us to observe individual worms throughout larval development, quantify their growth as well as pinpoint the moulting transitions marking successive developmental stages. Under conditions of low food availability, worms grow very slowly, but do not moult until they have achieved a threshold size. The time spent in larval stages can be extended by over an order of magnitude, in agreement with a simple threshold size model. Thus, a critical worm size appears to trigger developmental progression, and may contribute to prolonged lifespan under dietary restriction. PMID:26290076

  4. Progress and prospects: stem cells and neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gögel, S; Gubernator, M; Minger, S L

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system has limited capacity of regenerating lost tissue in slowly progressive, degenerative neurological conditions such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease or Huntington's disease (HD), or in acute injuries resulting in rapid cell loss for example, in cerebrovascular damage (for example, stroke) or spinal cord injury. Although the adult brain contains small numbers of stem cells in restricted areas, they do not contribute significantly to functional recovery. Transplantation of stem cells or stem cell-derived progenitors has long been seen as a therapeutic solution to repair the damaged brain. With the advent of the induced pluripotent stem cells technique a new and potentially better source for transplantable cells may be available in future. This review aims to highlight current strategies to replace lost cellular populations in neurodegenerative diseases with the focus on HD and PD and traumatic brain injuries such as stroke, discussing many of the technical and biological issues associated with central nervous system cell transplantation. PMID:20882052

  5. Progress and promise.

    PubMed

    Kamphaus, Randy W

    2012-12-01

    This editorial introduces the current issue of the journal School Psychology Quarterly (SPQ).There has been an impressive and promising progress of school psychology science has been reflected in every issue of SPQ, including the current one.

  6. Orion Progress - Spring 2010

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA and contractor teams are designing, building and testing the next generation human spacecraft Orion. Progress on Orion is highlighted by employees working on the project, along with video of t...

  7. Comparison of spectacle classical progressive and office progressive lenses.

    PubMed

    Kozlík, Marek; Knollová, Libuse Nováková

    2013-04-01

    This paper elaborates on analysis of progressive spectacle lenses, to correct presbyopia, which are nowadays offered at the market. The paper describes different types of progressive lenses, their parameters, length and width of their progressive segments. It also describes degressive spectacles lenses--progressive lenses on middle and near distance. The main part of the paper is a comparison of functional differences among different types of progressive spectacles lenses. The paper also addresses correctness of choice of progressive lenses for different works and professions. Lastly, it elaborates on differences of centration of different types of progressive lenses and parameters for correct choice of glasses frame for progressive spectacles lenses. PMID:23837232

  8. [Progressive visual agnosia].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Futamura, Akinori; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Progressive visual agnosia was discovered in the 20th century following the discovery of classical non-progressive visual agnosia. In contrast to the classical type, which is caused by cerebral vascular disease or traumatic injury, progressive visual agnosia is a symptom of neurological degeneration. The condition of progressive visual loss, including visual agnosia, and posterior cerebral atrophy was named posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) by Benson et al. (1988). Progressive visual agnosia is also observed in semantic dementia (SD) and other degenerative diseases, but there is a difference in the subtype of visual agnosia associated with these diseases. Lissauer (1890) classified visual agnosia into apperceptive and associative types, and it in most cases, PCA is associated with the apperceptive type. However, SD patients exhibit symptoms of associative visual agnosia before changing to those of semantic memory disorder. Insights into progressive visual agnosia have helped us understand the visual system and discover how we "perceive" the outer world neuronally, with regard to consciousness. Although PCA is a type of atypical dementia, its diagnosis is important to enable patients to live better lives with appropriate functional support.

  9. The underrecognized progressive nature of N370S Gaucher disease and assessment of cancer risk in 403 patients

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Tamar H.; Kacena, Katherine A.; Yang, Mei; Yang, Ruhua; Malhotra, Advitya; Boxer, Michael; Aleck, Kirk A.; Rennert, Gadi; Pastores, Gregory M.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in GBA1 gene that encodes lysosomal glucocerebrosidase result in Type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD), the commonest lysosomal storage disorder; the most prevalent disease mutation is N370S. We investigated the heterogeneity and natural course of N370S GD in 403 patients. Demographic, clinical, and genetic characteristics of GD at presentation were examined in a cross-sectional study. In addition, the relative risk (RR) of cancer in patients compared with age-, sex-, and ethnic-group adjusted national rates of cancer was determined. Of the 403 patients, 54% of patients were homozygous (N370S/N370S) and 46% were compound heterozygous for the N370S mutation (N370S/other). The majority of N370S/N370S patients displayed a phenotype characterized by late onset, predominantly skeletal disease, whereas the majority of N370S/other patients displayed early onset, predominantly visceral/hematologic disease, P < 0.0001. There was a striking increase in lifetime risk of multiple myeloma in the entire cohort (RR 25, 95% CI 9.17–54.40), mostly confined to N370S homozygous patients. The risk of other hematologic malignancies (RR 3.45, 95% CI 1.49–6.79), and overall cancer risk (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.32–2.40) was increased. Homozygous N370S GD leads to adult-onset progressive skeletal disease with relative sparing of the viscera, a strikingly high risk of multiple myeloma, and an increased risk of other cancers. High incidence of gammopathy suggests an important role of the adaptive immune system in the development of GD. Adult patients with GD should be monitored for skeletal disease and cancers including multiple myeloma. PMID:19260119

  10. Progressive trichodysplasia spinulosa in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce S-S; Frederiksen, Peter; Kossard, Steven

    2008-02-01

    A 70-year old Caucasian man with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia developed trichodysplasia spinulosa 2 months after ceasing chemotherapy. Histological features characteristic to this condition include dilated and enlarged hair follicles, hyperplastic hair bulbs, hyperplasia of inner root sheath cells with numerous large, eosinophilic, trichohyaline granules, and hypercornification. Although he was in remission for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, lesions were slowly progressive 15 months after cessation of chemotherapy. We also describe a painless pull-test where spicules can be easily plucked and assessed microscopically for inner root sheath keratinization, or observed with surface microscopy in a clinic setting.

  11. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  12. Pesticide reregistration progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The report is produced by the Special Review and Reregistration Division (SRRD), Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), on progress towards pesticide reregistration as mandated under 1988 amendments to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. The report shows the status of reregistration through the first quarter of the 1993 fiscal year. SRRD is in the process of re-evaluating the format and information in the Progress Report, as a result of the October 1992 Customer Survey sent to the recipients of the report. Results of the survey will be incorporated in the April 1993 issue of the report.

  13. 1992 PVUSA progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellyn, W.

    1992-12-31

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) electric generating systems. This report updates the progress of the PVUSA project, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1992, and summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions from work to date.

  14. Opportunities and progress.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, John H

    2014-01-01

    In this review, I cover my professional experiences in food science and technology and related areas of applied and industrial microbiology over the span of my career. It emphasizes opportunities and technological problems that I encountered together with my progress in follow-up development of products and processes. PMID:24580071

  15. Basic Measures of Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Julia; Ling, Thomson; Moore, Eric; Halle, Tamara; Hair, Beth; Moore, Kris; Zaslow, Marty

    This document provides a compilation of measures of progress toward school readiness and three contributing conditions as used in several local, state, and national surveys. The report begins with a legend listing the surveys examined, their acronyms, and contact information. The remainder of the report, in tabular format, lists measures of…

  16. Mystery in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kristen

    1989-01-01

    Describes "Mystery in Progress," a traveling exhibit which traces the development of Predynastic Egypt. The exhibit provides a time line for Predynastic Egypt, depicts the history of the Hierakonpolis expedition, documents the formation of Egypt's first centralized nation state, and summarizes the emergence of a unified Egypt. (LS)

  17. Learning Progressions & Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Joyce M.; de los Santos, Elizabeth X.; Anderson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Our society is currently having serious debates about sources of energy and global climate change. But do students (and the public) have the requisite knowledge to engage these issues as informed citizenry? The learning-progression research summarized here indicates that only 10% of high school students typically have a level of understanding…

  18. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Forrest B.; Bull, Jeffrey S.; Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  19. Progressive Response Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, V. J.; Swiler, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Response surface functions are often used as simple and inexpensive replacements for computationally expensive computer models that simulate the behavior of a complex system over some parameter space. Progressive response surfaces are ones that are built up progressively as global information is added from new sample points in the parameter space. As the response surfaces are globally upgraded based on new information, heuristic indications of the convergence of the response surface approximation to the exact (fitted) function can be inferred. Sampling points can be incrementally added in a structured fashion, or in an unstructured fashion. Whatever the approach, at least in early stages of sampling it is usually desirable to sample the entire parameter space uniformly. At later stages of sampling, depending on the nature of the quantity being resolved, it may be desirable to continue sampling uniformly over the entire parameter space (Progressive response surfaces), or to switch to a focusing/economizing strategy of preferentially sampling certain regions of the parameter space based on information gained in early stages of sampling (Adaptive response surfaces). Here we consider Progressive response surfaces where a balanced indication of global response over the parameter space is desired.We use a variant of Moving Least Squares to fit and interpolate structured and unstructured point sets over the parameter space. On a 2-D test problem we compare response surface accuracy for three incremental sampling methods: Progressive Lattice Sampling; Simple-Random Monte Carlo; and Halton Quasi-Monte-Carlo sequences. We are ultimately after a system for constructing efficiently upgradable response surface approximations with reliable error estimates.

  20. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  1. The Role of Astrocytes in Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Jorge; Farez, Mauricio F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disorder causing central nervous system (CNS) demyelination and axonal injury. Although its etiology remains elusive, several lines of evidence support the concept that autoimmunity plays a major role in disease pathogenesis. The course of MS is highly variable; nevertheless, the majority of patients initially present a relapsing–remitting clinical course. After 10–15 years of disease, this pattern becomes progressive in up to 50% of untreated patients, during which time clinical symptoms slowly cause constant deterioration over a period of many years. In about 15% of MS patients, however, disease progression is relentless from disease onset. Published evidence supports the concept that progressive MS reflects a poorly understood mechanism of insidious axonal degeneration and neuronal loss. Recently, the type of microglial cell and of astrocyte activation and proliferation observed has suggested contribution of resident CNS cells may play a critical role in disease progression. Astrocytes could contribute to this process through several mechanisms: (a) as part of the innate immune system, (b) as a source of cytotoxic factors, (c) inhibiting remyelination and axonal regeneration by forming a glial scar, and (d) contributing to axonal mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, regulatory mechanisms mediated by astrocytes can be affected by aging. Notably, astrocytes might also limit the detrimental effects of pro-inflammatory factors, while providing support and protection for oligodendrocytes and neurons. Because of the dichotomy observed in astrocytic effects, the design of therapeutic strategies targeting astrocytes becomes a challenging endeavor. Better knowledge of molecular and functional properties of astrocytes, therefore, should promote understanding of their specific role in MS pathophysiology, and consequently lead to development of novel and more successful therapeutic approaches. PMID:26347709

  2. Progressive cone dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Ripps, H; Noble, K G; Greenstein, V C; Siegel, I M; Carr, R E

    1987-01-01

    Psychophysical, reflectometric, and electrophysiological studies were performed on four members of a dominant pedigree with progressive cone dystrophy. The two youngest individuals were asymptomatic at the initial examination, and none of the subjects complained of problems associated with night vision. Absent or grossly reduced cone-mediated ERG responses revealed the widespread loss of cone function. Moderate elevations (1 log unit) in absolute threshold together with reductions in rhodopsin levels in the midperipheral retina provided evidence of a mild impairment of the rod system also, although not to the degree seen in a cone-rod dystrophy. The progressive nature of the disease was apparent from the case histories and the changes in visual performance that occurred on re-test after a 5-year interval. Likewise, the results of incremental threshold measurements at several retinal loci suggested that peripheral cones may be affected earlier and more severely than those in the central retina. PMID:3502298

  3. Progressive compressive imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evladov, Sergei; Levi, Ofer; Stern, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    We have designed and built a working automatic progressive sampling imaging system based on the vector sensor concept, which utilizes a unique sampling scheme of Radon projections. This sampling scheme makes it possible to progressively add information resulting in tradeoff between compression and the quality of reconstruction. The uniqueness of our sampling is that in any moment of the acquisition process the reconstruction can produce a reasonable version of the image. The advantage of the gradual addition of the samples is seen when the sparsity rate of the object is unknown, and thus the number of needed measurements. We have developed the iterative algorithm OSO (Ordered Sets Optimization) which employs our sampling scheme for creation of nearly uniform distributed sets of samples, which allows the reconstruction of Mega-Pixel images. We present the good quality reconstruction from compressed data ratios of 1:20.

  4. Progress in Scientific Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    2004-11-15

    Visualization of observed data or simulation output is important to science and engineering. I have been particularly interested in visualizing 3-D structures, and report here my personal impressions on progress in the last 20 years in visualizing molecules, scalar fields, and vector fields and their associated flows. I have tried to keep the survey and list of references manageable, so apologize to those authors whose techniques I have not mentioned, or have described without a reference citation.

  5. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of January 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Marketing and customer service activities in this period are presented as is the progress report of NASTRAN maintenance and support. Tables of disseminations and budget summary conclude the report.

  6. ISABELLE: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed.

  7. Progression of myopia.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, R H

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myopia is an important public health problem because it is common and is associated with increased risk for chorioretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, and other vision-threatening abnormalities. In animals, ocular elongation and myopia progression can be lessened with atropine treatment. This study provides information about progression of myopia and atropine therapy for myopia in humans. METHODS: A total of 214 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (118 girls and 96 boys; median age, 11 years; range, 6 to 15 years) received atropine for myopia from 1967 through 1974. Control subjects were matched by age, sex, refractive error, and date of baseline examination to 194 of those receiving atropine. Duration of treatment with atropine ranged from 18 weeks to 11.5 years (median 3.5 years). RESULTS: Median follow-up from initial to last refraction in the atropine group (11.7 years) was similar to that in the control group (12.4 years). Photophobia and blurred vision were frequently reported, but no serious adverse effects were associated with atropine therapy. Mean myopia progression during atropine treatment adjusted for age and refractive error (0.05 diopters per year) was significantly less than that among control subjects (0.36 diopters per year) (P < .001). Final refractions standardized to the age of 20 years showed a greater mean level of myopia in the control group (3.78 diopters) than in the atropine group (2.79 diopters) (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The data support the view that atropine therapy is associated with decreased progression of myopia and that beneficial effects remain after treatment has been discontinued. PMID:8719698

  8. Primary-Progressive MS (PPMS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... MS? Types of MS Primary progressive MS (PPMS) Primary progressive MS (PPMS) Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this article Overview PPMS is characterized by worsening neurologic function ( ...

  9. MELAS phenotype associated with m.3302A>G mutation in mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masahide; Komaki, Hirofumi; Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Nishino, Ichizo; Goto, Yu-Ichi

    2014-02-01

    The m.3302A>G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene has been identified in only 12 patients from 6 families, all manifesting adult-onset slowly progressive myopathy with minor central nervous system involvement. An 11-year-old boy presented with progressive proximal-dominant muscle weakness from age 7years. At age 10, he developed recurrent stroke-like episodes. Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, plus stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was diagnosed by clinical symptoms and muscle biopsy findings. Mitochondrial gene analysis revealed a heteroplasmic m.3302A>G mutation. Histological examination showed strongly SDH reactive blood vessels (SSVs), not present in previous cases with myopathies due to the m.3302A>G mutation. These findings broaden the phenotypic spectrum of this mutation.

  10. Cochleo-saccular degeneration in one of three sisters with hereditary deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and progressive sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, M; MacRae, D; O-Uchi, T; Alford, B R

    1981-01-01

    This is a report of cochleo-saccular degeneration found in temporal bones from a patient who had suffered from slowly progressive and total sensorineural deafness which had an inherited origin. At age 8, this patient began to complain of hearing loss, and by age 10 she was totally deaf. The patient was 1 of 3 female siblings who have suffered from an exactly identical progressive disease: deafness, absent gastric motility, small bowel diverticulitis and ulceration, and sensory neuropathy. The temporal bone pathology found in this case was the degenerative change in the cochlear duct and sacculus. No pathology was found in the utriculus and semicircular canals. PMID:6937848

  11. Rapidly progressive asymmetrical weakness in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J resembles chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cottenie, Ellen; Menezes, Manoj P; Rossor, Alexander M; Morrow, Jasper M; Yousry, Tarek A; Dick, David J; Anderson, Janice R; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Blake, Julian C; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J (CMT4J), a rare form of demyelinating CMT, caused by recessive mutations in the phosphoinositide phosphatase FIG4 gene, is characterised by progressive proximal and distal weakness and evidence of chronic denervation in both proximal and distal muscles. We describe a patient with a previous diagnosis of CMT1 who presented with a two year history of rapidly progressive weakness in a single limb, resembling an acquired inflammatory neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies showed an asymmetrical demyelinating neuropathy with conduction block and temporal dispersion. FIG4 sequencing identified a compound heterozygous I41T/K278YfsX5 genotype. CMT4J secondary to FIG4 mutations should be added to the list of inherited neuropathies that need to be considered in suspected cases of inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, especially if there is a background history of a more slowly progressive neuropathy.

  12. Progressive failure of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khozeimeh, K.; Toridis, G. T. G.; Zanganeh, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure is presented for determining the nonlinear behavior of structures subjected to extreme loading and the possibility of development of potential for progressive failure. The methodology takes into account the effect of both material and geometric nonlinearities. At a given stage of analysis, the individual components of the structure are checked against predetermined failure criteria. Subsequently, the failing components are removed and the modified structure is analyzed for overall failure. Examples, obtained from a computer program based on the proposed procedure, showing the applicability of the method are presented.

  13. Progress in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio

    2012-02-01

    After more than one century from Alois Alzheimer and Gaetano Perusini's first report, progress has been made in understanding the pathogenic steps of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as in its early diagnosis. This review discusses recent findings leading to the formulation of novel criteria for diagnosis of the disease even in a preclinical phase, by using biological markers. In addition, treatment options will be discussed, with emphasis on new disease-modifying compounds and future trial design suitable to test these drugs in an early phase of the disease.

  14. MEIC Design Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Douglas, D; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Li, R; Lin, F; Morozov, V S; Nissen, E W; Pilat, F C; Satogata, T; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Yunn, C; Barber, D P; Filatov, Y; Hyde, C; Kondratenko, A M; Manikonda, S L; Ostroumov, P N; Sullivan, M K

    2012-07-01

    This paper will report the recent progress in the conceptual design of MEIC, a high luminosity medium energy polarized ring-ring electron-ion collider at Jefferson lab. The topics and achievements that will be covered are design of the ion large booster and the ERL-circulator-ring-based electron cooling facility, optimization of chromatic corrections and dynamic aperture studies, schemes and tracking simulations of lepton and ion polarization in the figure-8 collider ring, and the beam-beam and electron cooling simulations. A proposal of a test facility for the MEIC electron cooler will also be discussed.

  15. Fructose consumption and moderate zinc deficiency influence growth and adipocyte metabolism in young rats prone to adult-onset obesity.

    PubMed

    Streiff, Erin L; Stanhope, Kimber L; Graham, James; Havel, Peter J; King, Janet C

    2007-07-01

    The effects of low zinc, high fructose diet on growth and adipocyte metabolism were examined in rats. At 28 days of age, animals were assigned to diets either adequate in zinc (30 ppm) with water (AZW) or fructose solution (AZF), or low in zinc (5 ppm) with water (LZW) or fructose solution (LZF). Body weight and food and fructose solution intake were measured three times a week. Blood samples were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks, and energy expenditure was measured. The rats were killed at 12 weeks. Adipocytes were cultured in medium containing C14-glucose and physiological insulin concentrations. The animals in the LZF group consumed less energy and gained less weight than the other groups. Serum zinc concentrations were lower in the LZF than the AZF group. Energy expenditure over a 24-h period did not differ between groups; however, the respiratory quotient in the fed state was higher in the groups consuming fructose solution than in those consuming water. The mesenteric adipocytes from the animals in the LZF group utilized more glucose. Thus, the addition of fructose to a LZ diet reduced energy intake and growth and altered adipocyte fuel metabolism in young growing rats.

  16. Brief Report: No Association between Premorbid Adjustment in Adult-Onset Schizophrenia and Genetic Variation in Dysbindin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirmbeck, Frederike; Georgi, Alexander; Strohmaier, Jana; Schmael, Christine; Boesshenz, Katja V.; Muhleisen, Thomas W.; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Jamra, Rami Abou; Schumacher, Johannes; Maier, Wolfgang; Propping, Peter; Nothen, Markus M.; Cichon, Sven; Rietschel, Marcella; Schulze, Thomas G.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas "Dysbindin" is considered a schizophrenia vulnerability gene, there is no consistency of findings. Phenotype refinement approaches may help to increase the genetic homogeneity and thus reconcile conflicting results. Premorbid adjustment (PMA) has been suggested to aid the phenotypic dissection. Gornick et al. ("J Autism Dev Disord"…

  17. Alterations in male sexual behaviour, attractiveness and testosterone levels induced by an adult-onset calorie restriction regimen.

    PubMed

    Govic, Antonina; Levay, Elizabeth A; Hazi, Agnes; Penman, Jim; Kent, Stephen; Paolini, Antonio G

    2008-06-26

    Despite an abundance of research on calorie restriction (CR) altering gonadal and appetite regulating hormones, the sexual behavioural consequences of CR remain to be examined systematically. This study compared the sexual behaviour, partner preference, serum testosterone and leptin levels of male adult Hooded Wistar rats administered a CR (continuous 25%, 50% CR or a temporary restriction) with ad libitum fed controls. The temporary restriction (Previous CR) failed to alter sexual behaviour, partner preference and levels of testosterone and leptin. The moderately 25% CR males did not demonstrate an impairment in sexual behaviour but did demonstrate a reduced level of attractiveness to females in one measure of partner preference. Sexual performance was affected by a substantial CR, as the CR 50% group exhibited a longer latency to the first intromission, indicating alteration in sexual arousal. Females also consistently demonstrated a clear preference for the control group compared to the CR 50% group. These findings indicate a possible reduction in the overall reproductive potential of the substantially CR animals. Testosterone levels were equally suppressed by both the 25% and 50% CR, while leptin levels were only reduced in the CR 50% group. Leptin, rather than testosterone, may have influenced the impairment in sexual behaviour only demonstrated by the substantially CR animals. Testosterone, may, however, play a role in modulating the preference of control over CR males, as attractiveness was totally reduced by a substantial CR, and partially reduced by a moderate restricted regimen.

  18. Adult Onset-hypothyroidism has Minimal Effects on Synaptic Transmission in the Hippocampus of Rats Independent of Hypothermia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during development and in adulthood. The hippocampus, a brain area critical for learning and memory is sensitive to TH insufficiency. Synaptic transmission in the hippocampus is impaired following...

  19. Adult-onset dysphagia lusoria secondary to a dissecting aberrant right subclavian artery associated with type B acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Grewal, Puneet Dhillon; Symons, John; Ahmed, Aziz; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit

    2008-01-01

    The case of a 78-year-old African American woman who presented at the Mount Sinai Medical Center (Chicago, USA) with excruciating backache is presented. Computed tomography of the chest at the time of admission showed dissection of the aortic arch, descending aorta and dissection of an aberrant right subclavian artery. She was managed medically for Stanford type B acute aortic dissection. The patient was asymptomatic at presentation, but started complaining of new-onset dysphagia during her stay in the hospital. An esophagogram was performed and suggested posterior impingement of the esophagus, a classic sign of an aberrant right subclavian artery. Because the patient had multiple underlying comorbidities and the dysphagia was mild and intermittent, surgery was deferred. The patient was discharged home after complete stabilization and was scheduled for a follow-up appointment. PMID:18209773

  20. Increased Expression of the Large Conductance, Calcium-Activated K+ (BK) Channel in Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Samuel T.; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Velinov, Milen; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic J protein co-chaperone that opposes neurodegeneration. Mutations in CSPα (i.e., Leu115 to Arg substitution or deletion (Δ) of Leu116) cause adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease. We have previously demonstrated that CSPα limits the expression of large conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels in neurons, which may impact synaptic excitability and neurotransmission. Here we show by western blot analysis that expression of the pore-forming BKα subunit is elevated ~2.5 fold in the post-mortem cortex of a 36-year-old patient with the Leu116∆ CSPα mutation. Moreover, we find that the increase in BKα subunit level is selective for ANCL and not a general feature of neurodegenerative conditions. While reduced levels of CSPα are found in some postmortem cortex specimens from Alzheimer’s disease patients, we find no concomitant increase in BKα subunit expression in Alzheimer’s specimens. Both CSPα monomer and oligomer expression are reduced in synaptosomes prepared from ANCL cortex compared with control. In a cultured neuronal cell model, CSPα oligomers are short lived. The results of this study indicate that the Leu116∆ mutation leads to elevated BKα subunit levels in human cortex and extend our initial work in rodent models demonstrating the modulation of BKα subunit levels by the same CSPα mutation. While the precise sequence of pathogenic events still remains to be elucidated, our findings suggest that dysregulation of BK channels may contribute to neurodegeneration in ANCL. PMID:25905915

  1. Episodic cervical dystonia associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux. A case of adult-onset Sandifer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shahnawaz, M; van der Westhuizen, L R; Gledhill, R F

    2001-12-01

    Sandifer syndrome is a dystonic movement disorder described in children with severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. We now report a patient who had the features of Sandifer syndrome first developing in adult life. Onset of dystonic episodes followed closely the occurrence of a Bell's palsy, while symptoms of peptic oesophagitis had been present for several months beforehand. Successful symptomatic treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux was accompanied by cessation of the dystonic episodes. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms of the abnormal movements in Sandifer syndrome are discussed. PMID:11714563

  2. Adult-onset hyperthyroidism impairs spatial learning: possible involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Bitiktaş, Soner; Kandemir, Başak; Tan, Burak; Kavraal, Şehrazat; Liman, Narin; Dursun, Nurcan; Dönmez-Altuntaş, Hamiyet; Aksan-Kurnaz, Işil; Suer, Cem

    2016-08-01

    Given evidence that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is part of the nongenomic actions of thyroid hormones, we investigated the possible consequences of hyperthyroidism for the cognitive functioning of adult rats. Young adult rats were treated with L-thyroxine or saline. Twenty rats in each group were exposed to Morris water maze testing, measuring their performance in a hidden-platform spatial task. In a separate set of rats not exposed to Morris water maze testing (untrained rats), the expression and phosphorylated levels of p38-MAPK and of its two downstream effectors, Elk-1 and cAMP response element-binding protein, were evaluated using quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Rats with hyperthyroidism showed delayed acquisition of learning compared with their wild-type counterparts, as shown by increased escape latencies and distance moved on the last two trials of daily training in the water maze. The hyperthyroid rats, however, showed no difference during probe trials. Western blot analyses of the hippocampus showed that hyperthyroidism increased phosphorylated p38-MAPK levels in untrained rats. Although our study is correlative in nature and does not exclude the contribution of other molecular targets, our findings suggest that the observed impairments in acquisition during actual learning in rats with hyperthyroidism may result from the increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK. PMID:27258653

  3. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age.

  4. Alzheimer's disease and CADASIL are heritable, adult-onset dementias that both involve damaged small blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Vincent T

    2014-03-01

    This essay explores an alternative pathway to Alzheimer's dementia that focuses on damage to small blood vessels rather than late-stage toxic amyloid deposits as the primary pathogenic mechanism that leads to irreversible dementia. While the end-stage pathology of AD is well known, the pathogenic processes that lead to disease are often assumed to be due to toxic amyloid peptides that act on neurons, leading to neuronal dysfunction and eventually neuronal cell death. Speculations as to what initiates the pathogenic cascade have included toxic abeta peptide aggregates, oxidative damage, and inflammation, but none explain why neurons die. Recent high-resolution NMR studies of living patients show that lesions in white matter regions of the brain precede the appearance of amyloid deposits and are correlated with damaged small blood vessels. To appreciate the pathogenic potential of damaged small blood vessels in the brain, it is useful to consider the clinical course and the pathogenesis of CADASIL, a heritable arteriopathy that leads to damaged small blood vessels and irreversible dementia. CADASIL is strikingly similar to early onset AD in that it is caused by germ line mutations in NOTCH 3 that generate toxic protein aggregates similar to those attributed to mutant forms of the amyloid precursor protein and presenilin genes. Since NOTCH 3 mutants clearly damage small blood vessels of white matter regions of the brain that lead to dementia, we speculate that both forms of dementia may have a similar pathogenesis, which is to cause ischemic damage by blocking blood flow or by impeding the removal of toxic protein aggregates by retrograde vascular clearance mechanisms.

  5. Adult-onset demodicosis in two dogs due to Demodex canis and a short-tailed demodectic mite.

    PubMed

    Saridomichelakis, M; Koutinas, A; Papadogiannakis, E; Papazachariadou, M; Liapi, M; Trakas, D

    1999-11-01

    Infestation with a short-tailed demodectic mite and Demodex canis was diagnosed in both a six-and-a-half-year-old and a four-year-old dog. The clinical picture was compatible with generalised demodicosis complicated by staphylococcal pyoderma (case 1), or localised demodicosis (case 2). In both cases, the short-tailed demodectic mite outnumbered D canis in superficial skin scrapings. The laboratory findings (lymphopenia, eosinopenia, increased serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities, diluted urine and proteinuria) and the results of a low dose dexamethasone suppression test were suggestive of underlying hyperadrenocorticism in the first case. Hypothyroidism was considered a possibility in the second case, owing to the sustained bradycardia and the extremely low basal total thyroxine value. Systemic treatment with ivermectin and cephalexin (case 1), or topical application of an amitraz solution in mineral oil, along with sodium levothyroxine replacement therapy (case 2), resulted in a complete resolution of the skin lesions and the disappearance of both types of demodectic mite after two and one and a half months, respectively.

  6. Observational clinical study of 22 adult-onset Pompe disease patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy over 5years.

    PubMed

    Stepien, Karolina M; Hendriksz, Christian J; Roberts, Mark; Sharma, Reena

    2016-04-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disease resulting from deficiency of the acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The late-onset Pompe Disease (LOPD) patients develop muscular and respiratory complications later in life. We describe a retrospective observational cohort study including 22 patients with LOPD. The cohort was assessed at baseline before Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alpha (20mg/kg biweekly) was commenced and subsequently relevant information was collected at 2, 4 and 5years later. The median age of the patients at study entry was 44years (16-64years), with median disease duration of 11.5years (4-31years). At baseline, 10 patients (45%) could walk without support, 12 (55%) could walk with unilateral or bilateral support including 3/12 were wheelchair bound. Mean predicted FVC % was 55.7 (95% CI 45-66) of predicted normal at baseline and showed no significant change after 5years (54.6 (95% CI 43-66)), (all p=0.9815). Mean FVC % supine was 41.8 (95% CI 33.8-49) of predicted normal at baseline and remained significantly unchanged at 5years (48.4 (95% CI 37-59.6)), (all p=0.8680). The overnight non-invasive ventilator dependence increased by 18.2% as compared with baseline and requirement of mobility aids increased during this period by 5.2% as compared with the baseline. Mean walking distance at 6min walk test was 411.5 (95% CI 338-485) at baseline, 266.5 (95% CI 187-346) m at 2years, 238.6 (95% CI 162-315) m at 4years and 286.8 (95% CI 203-370) m at 5years (p=0.1981; ANOVA was completed only for 14 patients). A gradual decline in FVC% predicted was noted only in four cases and a decline in FVC% supine in two other. Only one patient showed a decline in both pulmonary function tests. In all remaining cases (17/22) respiratory function remains stable. In conclusion overall pulmonary function tests and mobility remained stable for 5years in majority of patients on ERT. However, in some patients they continued to decline in spite of ERT resulting in increased number of patients requiring ventilation and increase wheel chair dependence at the end of 5years. PMID:26873529

  7. Monosomy 3 status of uveal melanoma metastases is associated with rapidly progressive tumors and short survival.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Cebulla, Colleen M; Verma, Vishal; Christopher, Benjamin N; Carson, William E; Olencki, Thomas; Davidorf, Frederick H

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular genetics of uveal melanoma (UM) metastases and correlate it with disease progression. Twelve pathologically confirmed UM metastases from 11 patients were included. Molecular genetic alterations in chromosomes 3 (including the BAP1 region), 8q, 6p, and 1p were investigated by microsatellite genotyping. Mutations in codon 209 of GNAQ and GNA11 genes were studied by restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We identified monosomy of chromosome 3 in tumors from four patients with an average survival of 5 months (range 1-8 months) from time of diagnosis of metastatic disease. In contrast, tumors with either disomy or partial chromosome 3 alterations showed significantly slower metastatic disease progression with an average survival of 69 months (range 40-123 months, p = 0.003). Alterations in chromosomal arms 1p, 6p, and 8q and mutations in either GNAQ or GNA11 showed no association with disease progression. Prominent mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate was observed in tumors from patients with slowly progressive disease. In conclusion, in UM metastases, monosomy 3 is associated with highly aggressive, rapidly progressive disease while disomy or partial change of 3 and prominent mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate in the tumor is associated with better prognosis. These findings should be considered when designing clinical trials testing effectiveness of various therapies of metastatic UM.

  8. [Clinical features of the patients with "secondary infection" of Mycobacterium avium complex--Radiographic pattern of progressions in the patients with and without underlying pulmonary conditions].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Amitani, R; Kuze, F

    1993-01-01

    We reviewed the radiographic features of 42 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. Six cases were definite "primary", 20 were "secondary", and 15 were indeterminate (probably "primary"). In the definite and probable "primary" cases, and some of the "secondary" cases, pulmonary lesions slowly progressed following a common and characteristic sequence from a cluster of small nodules or fibro-productive nodules to those with subpleural thickening, or with thickening of the draining bronchi, or with both subpleural and bronchial thickening, and to cystic bronchiectatic changes associated with collapse of the segment or the lobe, in the final stage. Cases of airspace pneumonia appeared rarely. In these cases, neither apical-subapical region prevalence, pleural effusion, nor mediastinal lymphadenopathy were found. On the contrary, in five cases of "secondary" infection, MAC lesions located at the same place with the predisposing lung disease and did not progress during more than five years of observation. In the progressive cases of "secondary" infection, however, the appearance of new lesions and the progressions thereafter showed the same pattern as in "primary" infection. These features would suggest that MAC infection would occur and progress slowly among patients who had unknown pathogenetical factor, whether they had underlying predisposing lung conditions or not.

  9. Conceptions of Progress: How Is Progress Perceived? Mainstream versus Alternative Conceptions of Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itay, Anat

    2009-01-01

    Progress is a powerful political concept, encompassing different and sometimes contradictory conceptions. This paper examines the results of a survey on progress conducted at the OECD World Forum entitled "Measuring and Fostering the Progress of Societies" held in Istanbul in June 2007. First, a distinction is drawn between the two approaches to…

  10. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  11. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  12. Progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Girard, Jean-Marie; Turnbull, Julie; Ramachandran, Nivetha; Minassian, Berge A

    2013-01-01

    The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) consist of a group of diseases with myoclonic seizures and progressive neurodegeneration, with onset in childhood and/or adolescence. Lafora disease is a neuronal glycogenosis in which normal glycogen is transformed into starch-like polyglucosans that accumulate in the neuronal somatodendritic compartment. It is caused by defects of two genes of yet unknown function, one encoding a glycogen phosphatase (laforin) and the other an ubiquitin E3 ligase (malin). Early cognitive deterioration, visual seizures affecting over half, and slowing down of EEG basic activity are three major diagnostic clues. Unverricht-Lundborg disease is presently thought to be due to damage to neurons by lysosomal cathepsins and reactive oxygen species due to absence of cystatin B, a small protein that inactivates cathepsins and, by ways yet unknown, quenches damaging redox compounds. Preserved cognition and background EEG activity, action myoclonus early morning and vertex spikes in REM sleep are the diagnostic clues. Sialidosis, with cherry-red spot, neuronopathic Gaucher disease, with paralysis of verticality, and ataxia-PME, with ataxia at onset in the middle of the first decade, are also lysosomal diseases. How the lysosomal defect culminates in myoclonus and epilepsy in these conditions remains unknown. PMID:23622396

  13. The Progressive Era.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    The American College of Dentists was founded in 1920 for the purpose of encouraging young dentists to continue study and to apply science to their practices. This ideal emerged in the Progressive Era, which lasted roughly from 1895 to 1920. The animating spirit of this period was that the human condition could be improved and that the way to achieve this was through science and the use of experts working together. The Progressive Era saw inventions, such as automobiles and airplanes, telephone and radio, that required mass production and brought people together. It also spawned many political and legislative innovations that we now take for granted. Among these are the Food and Drug Administration, the Department of Commerce, and the Federal Trade Commission. Workers' compensation and other social protections were introduced, as were city commissions; the income tax; women's suffrage; and initiative, referendum, and recall. Medicine, for the first time, became an effective way to treat disease as it developed a scientific foundation. PMID:16350929

  14. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adang, Laura; Berger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a devastating demyelinating disease with significant morbidity and mortality and no effective, targeted therapies. It is most often observed in association with abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity, in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, but also occurs in association with lymphoproliferative diseases, certain immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory regimens, and other conditions. The etiologic agent of PML is a small, ubiquitous polyomavirus, the JC virus (JCV, also known as JCPyV), for which at least 50% of the adult general population is seropositive. PML results when JCV replicates within cerebral oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, leading to oligodendrocyte death and demyelination. Unfortunately, no treatments have been convincingly demonstrated to be effective, though some have been employed in desperation; treatment otherwise includes attempts to restore any immune system defect, such as the withdrawal of the causative agent if possible, and general supportive care. PMID:26918152

  15. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  16. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  17. Progress in Stockholm talks

    SciTech Connect

    Borawski, J.

    1986-02-01

    Public interest focuses on whether the superpowers will eventually agree to reduce their strategic nuclear arsenals by 50% or better, and on whether Star Wars should be bargained away or preserved at all costs. Yet progress in arms control quietly proceeded in Stockholm at the multilateral Conference on Confidence- and Security-Building Measures and Disarmament in Europe (CDE), convened on January 17, 1984. The Conference examined ways to reduce the risks of war, but not arbitrarily lowering weapons levels or restricting the deployment of certain systems. Rather, the goal is to lower these risks by clarifying politico-military intentions and regulating the uses of military activities by means of confidence- and security-building measures. Through information exchange, observation, and inspection, along with operational restraints on military activities, these measure seek to diminish the opportunities for wars to start by surprise attack, miscalculation, or accident, and to inhibit the threat or indirect use of force for political intimidation. 2 references.

  18. Progress toward synthetic cells.

    PubMed

    Blain, J Craig; Szostak, Jack W

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of even the simplest known life forms makes efforts to synthesize living cells from inanimate components seem like a daunting task. However, recent progress toward the creation of synthetic cells, ranging from simple protocells to artificial cells approaching the complexity of bacteria, suggests that the synthesis of life is now a realistic goal. Protocell research, fueled by advances in the biophysics of primitive membranes and the chemistry of nucleic acid replication, is providing new insights into the origin of cellular life. Parallel efforts to construct more complex artificial cells, incorporating translational machinery and protein enzymes, are providing information about the requirements for protein-based life. We discuss recent advances and remaining challenges in the synthesis of artificial cells, the possibility of creating new forms of life distinct from existing biology, and the promise of this research for gaining a deeper understanding of the nature of living systems. PMID:24606140

  19. 1992 PVUSA progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) electric generating systems. This report updates the progress of the PVUSA project, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1992, and summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions from work to date. Fall PV module costs and rising environmental pressures could make PV a significant source of large-scale power within the next decade. However, utility acceptance of this technology requires knowledge of PV operational characteristics in a utility system and confidence in predicting PV performance, reliability, and economics. PVUSA consists of two types of demonstrations: Emerging Module Technologies (EMTs), which are unproven but promising state-of-the-art PV technologies in 20-kW (nominal) arrays; and Utility Scale (US) systems, which represent more mature PV technologies in 200- to 500-kW (nominal) turnkey systems.

  20. Indochinese power progress

    SciTech Connect

    Hennagir, T.

    1995-07-01

    Fifty years ago, U.S. engineers, fresh with the new-found success of building North America`s landmark dam projects, first considered building a series of multipurpose hydro-electric dams along the ancient Southeast Asian Mekong River descending from Tibet`s snowy plateau to the warm waters of the South China Sea. Recent transmission interconnection agreements such as those between Laos and Thailand and the incorporation of international partnering agreements for power project development are helping to reshape electric industry relationships throughout the region of the Mekong. Former economic pragmatism is being rapidly replaced by a general movement toward positive market forces. Progress continues as international players bring a varied assortment of financial packages and models to the project development table.