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Sample records for adult-onset stills disease

  1. Adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    van de Putte, L B; Wouters, J M

    1991-08-01

    Adult onset Still's disease seems to be the adult form of Still's disease in children. The key symptoms of the disease are high spiking fever, arthritis and a macular or maculopapular, salmon-pink evanescent rash, almost always accompanied by neutrophilic leukocytosis and frequently by sore throat, intense myalgias, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and signs of serositis. Tests for IgM rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody are characteristically negative. With respect to haematologic abnormalities, the disease may give rise to several problems. First, there is a neutrophilic leukocytosis, which currently is unexplained, and often a normocytic normochromic anaemia, that may be profound. The anaemia has the characteristics of anaemia of chronic inflammatory disease. Both abnormalities disappear after effective treatment of the disease or at spontaneous remission. Secondly, there might be a problem to differentiate AOSD from malignant haematological disorders, including malignant lymphoma and leukaemia, especially when the picture is dominated by lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, fever and leukocytosis. Although in rare cases the differential diagnosis is extremely difficult, diagnosis can mostly be made or excluded by peripheral blood smear staining, bone marrow biopsies and occasionally lymph node biopsy. Finally, like the juvenile counterpart, AOSD is occasionally complicated by sometimes life-threatening diffuse intravascular coagulation. Factors that might be important in the development of this complication include severe disease activity, liver abnormalities and particular drugs including salicylates, other NSAIDs and some slow-acting antirheumatic drugs. Prompt therapy, including withdrawal of the drug, corticosteroids and sometimes anticoagulant therapy have been successfully applied to most patients.

  2. Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Hot, Arnaud; Iwaz, Jean; Ninet, Jacques; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Sève, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a retrospective observational study to describe a cohort and identify the prognostic factors in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Patients enrolled in this retrospective chart review fulfilled either Yamaguchi or Fautrel criteria. Candidate variables were analyzed with logistic unadjusted and adjusted regression models. Fifty-seven patients were seen in the internal medicine (75%) and rheumatology (25%) departments over a mean period of 8.4 years. The median time to diagnosis was 4 months. The course of AOSD was monocyclic in 17 patients, polycyclic in 25, and chronic in 15. The assessment of glycosylated ferritin (GF) in 37 patients was correlated with early diagnosis. Nine 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18FDG-PET) scans identified the lymph nodes and glands as the main sites of hypermetabolism. Complications were frequent (n = 19), including reactive hemophagocytic syndrome (n = 8). None of the 3 deaths could be attributed to AOSD. Corticosteroid dependence, as predicted by a low GF level, occurred in 23 patients (45%). A quarter of the patients received tumor necrosis factor-α blockers or anakinra with good tolerance. Fever >39.5°C was predictive of monocyclic AOSD, while arthritis and thrombocytopenia were associated with chronic and complicated AOSD, respectively. The youngest patients had the highest risks of resistance to first-line treatments. AOSD remains difficult to diagnose. Mortality is low despite frequent complications. GF and 18FDG-PET scans were of value in the diagnostic approach. The condition in highly symptomatic patients evolved to systemic AOSD, whereas more progressive patterns with arthritis predicted chronic AOSD. PMID:24646465

  3. Myocarditis in adult-onset still disease.

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Sève, Pascal; Iwaz, Jean; Gagnard, Anne; Broussolle, Christiane; Durieu, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Hot, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    This study highlights the clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of the rare myocarditis in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Among a case series of 57 patients fulfilling either Yamaguchi or Fautrel AOSD criteria and seen between 1998 and 2010, we identified 4 cases of myocarditis. From a comprehensive literature review, we collected 20 additional cases of myocarditis-complicated AOSD. The characteristics of patients with myocarditis were compared with those of AOSD patients without myocarditis.In these 24 myocarditis-complicated AOSD cases, myocarditis occurred early and was present at AOSD onset in 54% of the cases. Myocarditis was often symptomatic (96% of patients) with nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormalities (79% of patients) and a left ventricle ejection fraction ≤50% (67% of patients). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed features consistent with myocarditis in 4 patients and a mononuclear interstitial inflammatory infiltrate in 4 others. Steroids alone were effective in 50% of patients with myocarditis. Intravenous immunoglobulins, methotrexate, and tumor necrosis factor-α-blockers were also prescribed and often found effective. Only 1 patient died from cardiogenic shock. Patients with myocarditis-complicated AOSD were younger and more frequently male than patients with AOSD alone. Pericarditis was more frequent in the myocarditis group; white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear cell count, and serum ferritin levels were also higher.Myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening complication of AOSD but responds positively to steroids and other immunomodulatory drugs. Its prognosis remains good (only 1 death occurred), but the condition requires close monitoring of heart function.

  4. Myocarditis in Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Sève, Pascal; Iwaz, Jean; Gagnard, Anne; Broussolle, Christiane; Durieu, Isabelle; Ninet, Jacques; Hot, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study highlights the clinical features, treatments, and outcomes of the rare myocarditis in adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). Among a case series of 57 patients fulfilling either Yamaguchi or Fautrel AOSD criteria and seen between 1998 and 2010, we identified 4 cases of myocarditis. From a comprehensive literature review, we collected 20 additional cases of myocarditis-complicated AOSD. The characteristics of patients with myocarditis were compared with those of AOSD patients without myocarditis. In these 24 myocarditis-complicated AOSD cases, myocarditis occurred early and was present at AOSD onset in 54% of the cases. Myocarditis was often symptomatic (96% of patients) with nonspecific electrocardiographic abnormalities (79% of patients) and a left ventricle ejection fraction ≤50% (67% of patients). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsies showed features consistent with myocarditis in 4 patients and a mononuclear interstitial inflammatory infiltrate in 4 others. Steroids alone were effective in 50% of patients with myocarditis. Intravenous immunoglobulins, methotrexate, and tumor necrosis factor-α-blockers were also prescribed and often found effective. Only 1 patient died from cardiogenic shock. Patients with myocarditis-complicated AOSD were younger and more frequently male than patients with AOSD alone. Pericarditis was more frequent in the myocarditis group; white blood cell count, polymorphonuclear cell count, and serum ferritin levels were also higher. Myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening complication of AOSD but responds positively to steroids and other immunomodulatory drugs. Its prognosis remains good (only 1 death occurred), but the condition requires close monitoring of heart function. PMID:25398063

  5. Adult Onset Still's Disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Persad, Paul; Patel, Rajendrakumar; Patel, Niki

    2010-01-01

    Adult Still's Disease was first described in 1971 by Bywaters in fourteen adult female patients who presented with symptoms indistinguishable from that of classic childhood Still's Disease (Bywaters, 1971). George Still in 1896 first recognized this triad of quotidian (daily) fevers, evanescent rash, and arthritis in children with what later became known as juvenile inflammatory arthritis (Still, 1990). Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory condition of unknown etiology characterized by an evanescent rash, quotidian fevers, and arthralgias. Numerous infectious agents have been associated with its presentation. This case is to our knowledge the first presentation of AOSD in the setting of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Although numerous infectious agents have been suggested, the etiology of this disorder remains elusive. Nevertheless, infection may in fact play a role in triggering the onset of symptoms in those with this disorder. Our case presentation is, to our knowledge, the first case of Adult Onset Still's Disease associated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF).

  6. Hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, S; Mossad, S; Hoffman, G

    2000-07-01

    Fever, rash, and arthritis may be components of the prodrome of viral hepatitis. In the absence of jaundice and abnormal liver function tests, this form of polyarthritis is easily confused with primary autoimmune diseases. Whereas the association of systemic illness with musculoskeletal symptoms and numerous viral infections is well known, such an association with hepatitis A has only been rarely reported. We describe a case of hepatitis A infection mimicking adult onset Still's disease, and review the pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of Still's disease and the extraarticular manifestations of hepatitis.

  7. Successful treatment of refractory adult onset Still's disease with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Belfeki, N; Smiti Khanfir, M; Said, F; Hamzaoui, A; Ben Salem, T; Ben Ghorbel, I; Lamloum, M; Houman, M H

    2016-12-16

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon inflammatory condition of unknown origin. In chronic disease, joint involvement is often predominant and erosions are noted in one third of patients. Therapeutic strategies derive from observational data. Corticosteroids are usually the first-line treatment. With inadequate response to corticosteroids, methotrexate appears the best choice to control disease activity and allow for tapering of steroid use. For refractory disease, biological therapy seems the most promising. We report here the case of a 38-year-old female patient with AOSD refractory to cytotoxic agents, treated by rituximab infusion therapy with favorable outcome.

  8. Coexistence of sarcoidosis and adult onset Still disease.

    PubMed

    Semiz, Huseyin; Kobak, Senol

    2017-05-19

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic, inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma formations. It can be presented with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, eye involvement and locomotor system findings. Adult onset Still disease (AOSD) is a chronic inflammatory disease which presents with fever, arthritis and typical skin rashes. The disease is rare and can be misdiagnosed due to the absence of typical clinical and laboratory findings. The association of sarcoidosis and AOSD has not been previously reported in the literature. Herein we reported the development of AOSD in a patient followed by the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient did not respond to high-dose corticosteroids and methotrexate therapy, and the disease was under control with anti-IL-6 (Tocilizumab) drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  9. Refractory Genital HPV Infection and Adult-Onset Still Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Zheng, Heyi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic autoimmune disease (AIID) that can develop after exposure to infectious agents. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been reported to induce or exacerbate AIIDs, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). No guidelines are available for the management of genital warts in AOSD. Case report and literature review. We report a patient who was diagnosed AOSD in the setting of refractory and recurrent genital HPV infection, demonstrating a possible link between HPV infection and AOSD. In addition, we also discuss the management of genital warts in patients with AOSD. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of AOSD with genital HPV infection have been reported in literature. We then conclude that the patient AOSD may be triggered by primary HPV infection. Larger number of patient samples is needed to confirm whether HPV could trigger AOSD. PMID:27082556

  10. Treatment of adult-onset still's disease: up to date.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Hyun

    2017-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology, and approximately 60-70% of patients may develop a chronic polyphasic form of the disease or a chronic polyarthritis. Due to rarity of disease, treatment of AOSD is not based on controlled study, but on case based experiences. Areas covered: Recently, the application of anti-cytokine therapy based on pathophysiology has resulted in significant progress in the treatment of AOSD. Here, we review current knowledge of the pathogenesis, disease progression, currently available biomarkers of disease activity, standard therapeutic agents, utility of biologic agents, future perspectives for treatment and treatment of macrophage activation syndrome. Expert commentary: Accumulated clinical data suggest that chronic disease can be classified into two subsets: dominant systemic disease, and the arthritis subgroup. IL-1 inhibitors may be more efficient for systemic manifestations and IL-6 inhibitor for both joint involvement and systemic manifestations. TNF inhibitors must be reserved for patients with purely chronic articular manifestations. For ideal management of patients, it is very important to measure disease activity accurately during follow up, but no single biomarker has been classified as ideal. New therapeutic agents and composite biomarkers are needed to improve the outcome of patients with AOSD by identifying disease activity properly.

  11. [Adult-onset Still's disease. An underdiagnosed condition?].

    PubMed

    Stenstad, T

    1995-11-30

    Adult onset Still's disease is a variant of systemic juvenile chronic arthritis in adulthood. The clinical picture is characterized by high spiking fever, arthralgia/arthritis, transient erythema, acute-phase reaction including elevated ESR, CRP and neutrophilia, resembling acute bacterial infections. Hyperferritinaemia and hepatic dysfunction are usually present, and the patients frequently have a sore throat. Extraarticular features, such as splenomegalia, serositis and pericarditis may be parts of this disease as well. Two cases are described, who were admitted to the Department of Internal Medicine of a small Norwegian hospital. Both patients were subjected to exhaustive and laborious investigations for the purpose of disclosing malignancy and/or septicaemia. Following adequate glucocorticoid therapy, both were asymptomatic after less than a week's treatment and after five months' follow-up. Two sets of diagnostic criteria are presented, having different sensitivity, although almost equal specificity. Still's disease in the adult may be an underdiagnosed clinical entity, but should definitely be considered to be a possible differential diagnosis when investigating suspected malignancy, including lymphoma and febrile conditions suspected of septicaemia.

  12. Adult onset Still's disease: review of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Riera, E; Olivé, Al; Narváez, J; Holgado, S; Santo, P; Mateo, L; Bianchi, M M; Nolla, J M

    2011-01-01

    To describe the clinical, laboratory and radiological features, treatment and prognosis of patients with adult onset Still's disease (AOSD). Specific clinical features were retrospectively recorded in 41 patients fulfilling the Yamaguchi criteria. Patients were reviewed in two academic hospitals with a referral area of 700,000-1,000,000 inhabitants. Laboratory tests including haemogram, ferritin, biochemistry and autoimmunity were reviewed. Radiological studies, treatment and ACR functional class were determined. Forty-one patients with AOSD were identified, 25 of whom were female. Mean age at diagnosis: 38.19 years (range 17-68). Feverish polyarthritis was the most common clinical presentation. Acute phase reactants were invariably high in all patients. Serum ferritin levels were elevated in 86% of patients. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies) were negative in all patients except one. The course of the disease was monocyclic in 44% of the patients, polycyclic in 26%, and chronic articular in 30%. ACR class was as follows: 29 (72.5%) class I, 7 (17.5%) class II, 2 (5%) class III and 2 (5%) class IV. As for the treatment received, aspirin or NSAIDs controlled the disease in eight patients (19.5%) and high-dose corticosteroids (0.5-1 mg/kg/day) in 32 (78%). Almost half of the patients (49%) required an additional diseasemodifying agent, usually methotrexate. Finally, in seven of them (17%) a biological treatment with TNF-α or specially anti-IL-1 had to be added to control the disease. The clinical and laboratory findings were similar to previous studies. Anti-CCP antibodies were almost always negative. A monocyclic course was associated with a good prognosis. Most of the patients were in ACR functional class I and II. Biological agents were required in 7 patients (17%).

  13. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971–2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases. Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non–PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort). AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD. PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  14. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María.L.; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A.; Hernández, María V.; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A.; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R.; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; Riscos, Marina de los; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J.; González-Vela, M. Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2–6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3–47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0–10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5–50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations. PMID:26426623

  15. Adult-onset Still's disease with atypical cutaneous manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Narváez Garcia, Francisco Javier; Pascual, María; López de Recalde, Mercè; Juarez, Pablo; Morales-Ivorra, Isabel; Notario, Jaime; Jucglà, Anna; Nolla, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) can be very difficult. There are no specific tests available, and diagnosis is usually based on a symptom complex and the well-described typical evanescent rash seen in the majority of patients. However, in recent years, other atypical cutaneous manifestations of AOSD have been reported. These atypical skin eruptions often present in addition to the typical evanescent rash but may also be the only skin manifestation, resulting in delayed diagnosis because of under-recognition. In this study, we present 3 new cases of AOSD with atypical cutaneous manifestations diagnosed during a 30-year period in our department and review 78 additional cases previously reported (PubMed 1990–2016). These 81 patients form the basis of the present analysis. The overall prevalence of atypical cutaneous manifestations in our AOSD population was 14%. These manifestations may appear at any time over the course of the disease, and usually occur in patients who have persistent and severe disease, with a considerable frequency of clinical complications (23%), including serositis, myopericarditis, lung involvement, abdominal pain, neurologic involvement, and reactive hemophagocytic syndrome. The most representative and frequent lesion among the nonclassical skin rashes is the development of persistent pruritic papules and/or plaques. Interestingly, these lesions show a distinctive histological pattern. Other, less frequently observed lesions include urticaria and urticaria-like eruptions, generalized or widespread non-pruritic persistent erythema, vesiculopustular eruptions, a widespread peau d’orange appearance of the skin, and edema of the eyelids mimicking dermatomyositis without any accompanying skin lesion. The great majority of these patients required medium or high doses of glucocorticoids (including intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy in some cases) and, in nearly 40%, a more potent or maintenance immunotherapy

  16. Adult-onset Still's disease associated with collapsing glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Reitbock, Pablo; Halliday, Kirsty; Onwubalili, James; Jayasena, Dakshina; Dupont, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A young woman of African descent presented with fevers, arthralgia, lymphadenopathy and a skin rash. Modest proteinuria was also noted. The clinical picture suggested an acute HIV sero-conversion illness, and a renal biopsy showed a collapsing glomerulopathy compatible with that diagnosis. However, HIV serology proved persistently negative and a diagnosis of Adult Still's disease was subsequently made (by Yamaguchi criteria). Following steroid treatment, the patient's fever abated and her inflammatory markers returned to normal. Collapsing glomerulopathy is a rare but important complication of Adult Still's disease. Immunosuppressive treatment may be effective in improving renal outcome. PMID:25949406

  17. Adult-onset Still's disease and cardiac tamponade: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Carrilho-Ferreira, Pedro; Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-06-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity.

  18. Adult-Onset Still's Disease and Cardiac Tamponade: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Doroteia; de Jesus Silva, Maria; André, Rui; Varela, Manuel Gato; Diogo, António Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder with potentially severe clinical features, including cardiac involvement. This systemic inflammatory disease of unknown origin should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pericarditis, with or without pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade is a very rare sequela that requires an invasive approach, such as percutaneous or surgical pericardial drainage, in addition to the usual conservative therapy. The authors describe a case of adult-onset Still's disease rendered more difficult by pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, and they briefly review the literature on this entity. PMID:26175648

  19. [Adult onset Still's disease as a diagnostics challenge in case of fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Debski, Marcin; Stepniewski, Piotr; Wróbel, Michał

    2013-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin is often a diagnostic challenge. Here we present a case of 55-year-old woman with a history of a few months fever, progressing weakness and salmon-coloured, macular skin rash. The differential diagnosis included neoplasmatic conditions, infections and connective tissue disorders. Finally adult onset Still's disease was suspected. Glucocorticosteroid treatment was induced. During the therapy a central nervous system infection occurred, which was fatal for the patient. The presented clinical case shows that among many causes of fever of unknown origin, adult onset Still's disease should be taken into account.

  20. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  1. Bilateral low lobar atelectasis in a young woman with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Ibn Yacoub, Yousra; Amine, Bouchra; Laatiris, Assia; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2010-11-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon inflammatory condition of unknown origin and pathogenesis. Pulmonary manifestations are rare and include pleuritis and transient radiological infiltrations. We report a case of a young woman with AOSD who developed unusual respiratory symptoms, with bilateral lower lobar atelectasis and restrictive syndrome and reviewed the literature on it. We illustrate the difficulties in diagnosis of atypical pulmonary defect with unusual radiological aspects and discuss causality relationship between lung abnormalities and Still's disease.

  2. A Case of Adult-Onset Still's Disease Complicated with Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Ismail; Birlik, Merih; Binicier, Omer; Akar, Servet; Yilmaz, Erkan; Onen, Fatos

    2009-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease that presents with a variety of clinical symptoms. Pulmonary involvement is well-known in AOSD and is seen in up to 53% of AOSD cases, with the most common pulmonary diseases being pleural effusion and transient pulmonary infiltrates. We present the first case of chronic AOSD complicated with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage during the acute flare of the disease. PMID:19270830

  3. [Adult-onset Still's disease following severe sore throat and fever. Case report].

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuki; Toriumi, Sayaka; Otake, Rika; Suzuki, Mitsuya

    2008-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is characterized by fever, rash, and joint pain and may lead to chronic arthritis. The cause of AOSD is unknown, and it is rare. In children, Still's Disease is called systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. We encountered a patient with adult-onset Still's disease following a severe sore throat and fever. The patient was a 17-year-old woman who consulted our hospital because of a sore throat and fever. She was admitted and treated with antibiotics, but the fever persisted. Laboratory parameters of inflammatory activity increased at an accelerated rate, and after ruling out sepsis, EBV-associated disease, and malignant lymphoma, a diagnosis of AOSD was made. Steroid therapy was very effective. When acute pharyngitis is observed in association with significant changes in laboratory parameters despite mild local symptoms, or when pharyngitis is observed in association with joint pain, continuous fever, and a rash, it is important to consider AOSI).

  4. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied. PMID:27407236

  5. Adult-onset Still's disease as a mask of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dudziec, Ewa; Pawlak-Buś, Katarzyna; Leszczyński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare disorder, which creates difficulties in making a proper diagnosis. Ambiguous symptoms and results of auxiliary tests, lack of unequivocal diagnostic tests and the need to exclude other causes of the disease are major problems in clinical practice. A case of a 22-year-old woman with dominated recurrent fever, significantly elevated inflammation markers and arthritis is presented. Based on clinical signs after exclusion of infection, hematological and other reasons, the patient was diagnosed with adult-onset Still's disease. Standard treatment, with high doses of glucocorticoids and a disease-modifying drug, was applied, without the anticipated effects. The diagnostic tests were conducted again due to the lack of clinical improvement, increase of inflammatory markers and unusual response to treatment. A new symptom of significance, i.e. mediastinal lymphadenopathy, was found. After the histopathological examination of lymph nodes, Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed and targeted therapy for hematological malignancy was applied.

  6. Adult-onset Still's disease revealed by perimyocarditis and a concomitant reactivation of an EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Meckenstock, Roderich; Therby, Audrey; Gibault-Genty, Geraldine; Khau, David; Monnier, Sebastien; Greder-Belan, Alix

    2012-01-01

    We describe a 17-year-old patient presenting perimyocarditis as the initial manifestation of the adult-onset Still's disease. Corticotherapy was rapidly successful but induced major acute hepatitis in relation with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. After 1 year, even if the global outcome is favourable, a slightly lowered ejection fraction still persists. Former case reports and differential diagnosis with reactive haemophagocytic syndrome would be discussed. PMID:23166163

  7. [Pathophysiology, subtypes, and treatments of adult-onset Still's disease: An update].

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Sève, P; Hot, A; Broussolle, C; Jamilloux, Y

    2015-05-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare and difficult to diagnose multisystemic disorder considered as a multigenic autoinflammatory syndrome. Its immunopathogenesis seems to be at the crossroads between inflammasomopathies and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, the most severe manifestation of the disease. According to recent insights in the pathophysiology and thanks to cohort studies and therapeutic trials, two phenotypes of adult-onset Still's disease may be distinguished: a systemic pattern, initially highly symptomatic and with a higher risk to exhibit life-threatening complications such as reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, where interleukin-1 blockade seems to be very effective, a chronic articular pattern, more indolent with arthritis in the foreground and less severe systemic manifestations, which would threat functional outcome and where interleukin-6 blockade seems to be more effective. This review focuses on these data.

  8. Adult onset Still's disease diagnosed concomitantly with occult papillary thyroid cancer: paraneoplastic manifestation or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Oh, Ji-Min; Lee, Jaejoon; Kim, Sun Wook; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2010-02-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, characterized by spiking fever, evanescent salmon pink maculopapular rash, arthritis, and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Malignant lymphoma is one of the most important differential diagnoses of AOSD. AOSD has been reported as one of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with breast cancer. We report a rare case of occult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) diagnosed coincidently with AOSD. A 32-year-old woman was diagnosed with AOSD according to the diagnostic criteria of Yamaguchi as follows: leukocytosis with neutrophilia, high fever with 39 degrees C and above, arthralgia/arthritis, sore throat, liver dysfunctions, and lymphadenopathy. Excisional biopsy of cervical lymph node showed metastatic papillary carcinoma, and immunohistochemical staining for thyroglobulin and thyroid transcription factor-1 was strongly positive. There was no evidence of focal lesion in the thyroid glands. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult onset Still's disease diagnosed concomitantly with occult PTC.

  9. [Adult-onset Still's disease with pulmonary and cardiac involvement and response to intravenous immunoglobulin].

    PubMed

    Neto, Nilton Salles Rosa; Waldrich, Leandro; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) include pericarditis, pleural effusion, transient pulmonary infiltrates, pulmonary interstitial disease and myocarditis. Serositis are common but pneumonitis and myocarditis are not and bring elevated risk of mortality. They may manifest on disease onset or flares. Previously reported cases were treated with high-dose glucocorticoids and immunosupressants and, when refractory, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). We report an AOSD patient whose flare presented with severe pleupneumonitis and myopericarditis and, following nonresponse to a methylprednisolone pulse, high dose of prednisone and cyclosporine A, recovered after a 2-day 1g/kg/day IVIG infusion.

  10. [Adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure requiring liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Terán, Alvaro; Casafont, Fernando; Fábrega, Emilio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Pons-Romero, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    We present the case of a 23-year-old man with fever of unknown origin, who developed acute liver failure 2 months after symptom onset, requiring an urgent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease was established after the reappearance of symptoms after transplantation, and high doses of corticosteroids were used to control disease activity. Subsequently, given the impossibility of tapering the steroid dose, interleukin-1 receptor blocking treatment was started with satisfactory outcome. We also review the published literature.

  11. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  12. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  13. Bartonella henselae infection presenting with a picture of adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Durey, Areum; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Sun Myoung; Baek, JiHyeon; Han, Seung Baik; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture of suggestive for adult-onset Still's Disease (ASOD) due to Bartonella infection. A 42-year-old immunocompetent man was admitted with fever, rash, arthralgia and sore throat. As his clinical picture suggested ASOD except unusual skin manifestation, we treated him on steroid and ibuprofen. His fever and constitutional symptoms responded immediately within 24hrs of commencing therapy, yet rash and leukocytosis remained. Meanwhile, Bartonella infection was proved by culture of bone marrow. Minocyclin treatment started combined with hydroxychloroquine sulfate and the patient discharged with overall improvement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Adult-onset Still disease with peculiar persistent plaques and papules.

    PubMed

    Yoshifuku, A; Kawai, K; Kanekura, T

    2014-06-01

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized clinically by high spiking fever, polyarthralgia/arthritis, a salmon-pink evanescent rash, predominantly neutrophilic leucocytosis, lymphadenopathy, liver dysfunction, and splenomegaly. Recently, a nonclassic, nonevanescent skin rash has been reported. We report a 27-year-old woman with AOSD showing persistent pruritic papular lesions. Histologically, dyskeratotic keratinocytes were seen in the upper epidermis. We describe this case in detail and review the previous literature. Nonclassic pruritic eruptions with characteristic dyskeratotic keratinocytes might provide an important clue for the diagnosis of AOSD.

  15. Adult-onset Still's disease and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: a hitherto undescribed manifestation of autoinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rech, J; Manger, B; Lang, B; Schett, G; Wilhelm, M; Birkmann, J

    2012-06-01

    Still's disease and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) are febrile rheumatic diseases of unknown etiology, which predominantly affect children but can also have their initial manifestation in adults. Both can present as intermittent, relapsing episodes and are considered potential candidates within the expanding spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders, although no genetic abnormalities have been described for either of them. Here, we describe a man with an initial manifestation of abacterial multifocal osteitis at the age of 41. During a relapsing-remitting course of his illness, he increasingly developed symptoms of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), and the diagnosis was established according to the Yamaguchi criteria. When treated with anakinra, not only the acute symptoms disappeared promptly, but also the osteitis went into complete remission. This is to our knowledge the first description of a simultaneous occurrence of these two manifestations of autoinflammation in adulthood.

  16. Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease Successfully Treated with Anakinra

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal complication of Adult-Onset Still's disease (Still's disease). Whereas an increasing body of evidence supports interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade as a promising treatment for Still's disease, whether it is therapeutic for MAS associated with Still's disease remains unclear. We report a 34-year-old Caucasian man with one-decade history of TNF-blockade-responsive seronegative arthritis who presented with abrupt onset of fever, serositis, bicytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Striking hyperferritinemia was noted without evidence of infection, malignancy, or hemophagocytosis on bone marrow biopsy. NK cells were undetectable in the peripheral blood, whereas soluble IL-2 receptor was elevated. His multiorgan disease resolved in association with methylprednisolone pulse therapy, Anakinra, and a tapering course of prednisone. This case reinforces the notion that Still's disease is inherently poised to manifest MAS as one of the clinical phenotypes by shedding light on the role of IL-1 underlying both Still's disease and related MAS. PMID:27818826

  17. Adult Onset Still's Disease With Different Antibodies: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Mobini, Maryam; Ghasemian, Roya; Zameni, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

     Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. There is not currently any specific serological markers for AOSD , and  diagnosis still relying on the exclusion of other likely diagnoses. Yamaguchi's criteria are used as a diagnostic criterion which contains negative serologic markers for other collagen vascular diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Here we report a 28-year-old woman with arthralgia, fever, rash, leukocytosis, lymphadenopathy, sore throat, abnormal liver function and negative rheumatoid factor and ANA but  seropositive for anti-CCP, anti-dsDNA, and C-ANCA. It seems that despite AOSD is considered as a seronegativedisorder; it should be remembered in patients with compatible findings who are seropositive.

  18. Hidden in plain sight: macrophage activation syndrome complicating Adult Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Lourdes; Vila, Salvador; Mellado, Robert Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Hemophagocytic Lymphystiocytosis is a rare and fatal complication of rheumatic diseases, particularly Adult Onset Still's Disease (AOSD). It may be precipitated with immunosuppressive drugs and with viral and bacterial infections. A diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion associated to certain clinical manifestations (fever, rash, Splemomegaly, any cytology blood dyscrasia, hipertrigliceridemia, hiperfibrinogenemia, and others), as well as pathologic evidence of hemophagocitosis from bone marrow biopsy or tissue samples of affected organs. Therapy consists of high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a 42 year old woman with AOSD in remission who developed HLH in spite of receiving therapy with high dose steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. She had 2 negative bone marrow aspirates. Evidence of Hemophagocytosis was detected in both bone marrow biopsies. Timely evaluation and recognition of the signs and symptoms of HLH is crucial for the prompt management and a decrease in the mortality associated with this disease.

  19. Limited diagnostic value of procalcitonin in early diagnosis of adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient was referred to the Infectious Diseases Ward because of fever lasting for 14 days. On admission to the hospital the patient was in a generally good state, without any abnormalities on physical examination. Laboratory investigation revealed elevated inflammatory markers. Diagnostic imaging comprising chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasonography, and echocardiography showed no abnormalities. During the hospitalization, there occurred episodes of fever with skin rash and musculoskeletal pain of the lower limbs. Procalcitonin concentrations continued to increase. C-reactive protein concentrations decreased during therapy, starting from 191 mg/l. On the 23(rd) day of the disease, edema of the feet, ankles, and knees appeared. On the basis of the clinical picture and after excluding other possible causes of fever, the patient was diagnosed with adult onset Still's disease. The procalcitonin concentration was normalized after 5 days of steroid therapy. The patient was discharged under ambulatory rheumatologic supervision.

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection associated with urticarial vasculitis mimicking adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Dua, Janet; Nandagudi, Anupama; Sutcliffe, Nurhan

    2012-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is well known to be a frequent cause of atypical pneumonia worldwide. However, it may also present with a wide variety of clinical features, including cutaneous symptoms, which are not widely recognised. Urticarial vasculitis occurring with M. pneumoniae has been described to occur in only one other case report. This amalgamation of non-specific clinical symptoms and signs can lead to a diagnostic dilemma. We describe a case of M. pneumoniae infection presenting with extrapulmonary manifestations and urticarial vasculitis, which was misdiagnosed as adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD). Had immunosuppressive therapy been commenced for AOSD in the presence of undiagnosed infection, this may have resulted in potentially serious consequences. This case highlights the need to remain vigilant about diagnosing M. pneumoniae as its serological diagnosis may take weeks and it has many extrapulmonary manifestations, which can masquerade as other conditions.

  1. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered.

  2. Adult onset Still's disease and collapsing glomerulopathy: successful treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins and mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A N; Peterson, P; Sangle, S; Hangartner, R; Abbs, I C; Hughes, G R V; D'Cruz, D P

    2004-06-01

    In this Grand Round we present a 32-yr-old African man who became severely ill after a 5-month history of weight loss, pyrexia, arthralgia, sweats and rash. He went on to develop pericarditis, pericardial effusion with tamponade, hepatomegaly with abnormal liver function tests, lymphadenopathy, massive proteinuria and required ventilatory, circulatory and renal support. The differential diagnosis was adult onset Still's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), infection and lymphoma. Primary infection and lymphoma were excluded and he was treated, with dramatic success, with intravenous immunoglobulins (i.v.IG). Subsequent renal biopsy excluded SLE but confirmed collapsing glomerulopathy. The proteinuria improved dramatically following treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. We discuss some of the difficult diagnostic and management issues raised by this patient and the different uses and mechanisms of action of i.v.IG.

  3. Refractory adult-onset Still disease complicated by macrophage activation syndrome and acute myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Federico; Paglionico, Annamaria; Varriano, Valentina; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Gremese, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Myocarditis is a rare but potentially fatal complication of Still's disease (about 7% of total cases). Patient concerns: A 42-year-old woman was admitted to our ward with high-grade fever, rash and polyarthralgia, lasting since 4 weeks and rapidly complicated by MAS and acute heart failure. Diagnoses: Adult Onset Still's Disease rapidly developping macrophage activation syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, further complicated by iperacute myocarditis with cardiac arrest. Interventions: After failure of conventional therapies (steroids plus cyclosporine and then biological therapy with Anakinra 100 mg/day), the patient was treated with anakinra 100 mg sc 1 fl 4 times a day. Outcomes: Fast clinical and laboratoristic improvement and subsequent disease remission with complete recovery of cardiac function. Lessons: This is the first case report in which high doses of Anakinra have been used to treat a refractory AOSD complicated by MAS and myocarditis. In AOSD complicated by life-threatening conditions, probably we need to consider aggressive therapeutic approaches with higher doses of Il-1 receptor blocker to switch off the hyper-inflammation. PMID:28614216

  4. Updates in adult-onset Still disease: Atypical cutaneous manifestations and associations with delayed malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Natalie Z; Brezinski, Elizabeth A; Berliner, Jacqueline; Haemel, Anna; Connolly, M Kari; Gensler, Lianne; McCalmont, Timothy H; Shinkai, Kanade

    2015-08-01

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder that is clinically characterized by a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms and signs. Though an evanescent eruption is the classic cutaneous finding, recent literature has highlighted atypical rashes associated with Still disease. A second emerging concept in presentations of AOSD is its association with malignancy. This review focuses on these concepts: the clinical spectrum of atypical skin manifestations and AOSD as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. PubMed-MEDLINE was screened for peer-reviewed articles describing atypical presentations of AOSD and cases associated with malignancy. Erythematous, brown or violaceous, persistent papules and plaques were the most common cutaneous finding (28/30 [93%]). Linear configurations were also rarely described. Of these patients, 81% concurrently had the typical evanescent skin eruption. There were 31 patients with associated malignancies, most commonly breast cancer and lymphoma. The diagnosis of malignancy did not precede or immediately follow a clinical presentation otherwise consistent with AOSD in a considerable subset of patients (42%). Understanding the cutaneous spectrum of AOSD and heightened awareness for its delayed association with malignancy may lead to improved recognition of cutaneous variants and reinforce the need for diagnostic evaluation and long-term follow-up for malignancy in patients with this clinical presentation.

  5. Clinical and histopathological features of cutaneous manifestations of adult-onset Still disease.

    PubMed

    Santa, Erin; McFalls, Jeanne M; Sahu, Joya; Lee, Jason B

    2017-03-25

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a rare autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by recurring fevers, arthralgia, and consistent laboratory abnormalities that include leukocytosis and hyperferritinemia. Skin findings accompany the disease in nearly 90% of the cases. Early reports described evanescent, pruritic, salmon-pink or urticarial lesions, referred to as the typical eruption of AOSD. Histopathologic findings consist of superficial perivascular dermatitis with varying number of interstitial neutrophils. Later reports described a more persistent rash that tended to be photodistributed, hyperpigmented, often in a linear configuration, sometimes in a rippled pattern, referred to as the atypical eruption of AOSD. The presence of individual necrotic keratinocytes in the upper spinous layer has been the consistent histopathologic finding. The persistent rash may not represent an atypical presentation of AOSD as recent reports indicate a high prevalence of the rash. Emerging data also suggest that patients with persistent eruption have a worse prognosis. The recognition of the clinical and histopathological findings of skin eruptions of AOSD may facilitate an earlier diagnosis, potentially improving disease outcome. Herein, clinical and histopathological features of cutaneous manifestation of AOSD in two Asian women are highlighted accompanied by relevant review of the disease.

  6. Tocilizumab for uncontrollable systemic inflammatory response syndrome complicating adult-onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Masui-Ito, Asami; Okamoto, Ryuji; Ikejiri, Kaoru; Fujimoto, Mika; Tanimura, Muneyoshi; Nakamori, Shiro; Murata, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Eiji; Yamada, Norikazu; Imai, Hiroshi; Ito, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology characterized by evanescent salmon-pink rash, fever spikes, arthralgia, and lymphadenopathy. AOSD usually has a good prognosis, but it can sometimes be fatal, especially when it is complicated by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure. Patient concerns: A previously healthy 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for persistent high fever and mild systemic edema. Five days later, the patient presented with dyspnea, hypotension, and anuria. Anasarca developed with massive pleural effusion, ascites, and systemic edema, resulting in an increase of 47 kg in body weight. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed as AOSD after infection, malignancy, hematologic disorders, and other autoimmune diseases were excluded. Interventions: We administered tocilizumab, an IL-6 receptor inhibitor, intravenously in addition to cyclosporine, prednisolone, plasma exchange, and continuous hemodiafiltration. Outcomes: The patient's systemic condition improved. After stabilization by all medications, the patient was managed and responded to tocilizumab alone. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first case of severe SIRS complicating AOSD that was successfully treated with an anti- IL-6 receptor antibody. Lessons: SIRS should not be overlooked in a patient with steroid-resistant AOSD and edema. Inhibitors of the IL-6 receptor can be used safely and effectively to control AOSD complicated with severe SIRS. PMID:28723802

  7. Occasional detection of thymic epithelial tumor 4 years after diagnosis of adult onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Bajocchi, Gianluigi; Caruso, Andrea; Valli, Riccardo; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Salvarani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Thymoma is a T cell neoplasm arising from the thymic epithelium that due to its immunological role, frequently undercover derangements of immunity such a tumors and autoimmune diseases. Methods: Herein, we report, to the best of our knowledge, the first description of an association between thymoma and adult onset Still disease (AOSD) in a 47-year-old man. The first one was occasionally detected 4 years later the diagnosis of AOSD, and surgically removed via right lateral thoracotomy. Histology confirmed an encapsulated thymic tumor (type AB sec. WHO-classification). Results: The AOSD was particularly resistant to the therapy, requiring a combination of immunosuppressant followed by anti-IL1R, that was the only steroids-sparing treatment capable to induce and maintain the remission. The differential diagnosis was particularly challenging because of the severe myasthenic-like symptoms that, with normal laboratory tests, were initially misinterpreted as fibromyalgia. The pathogenic link of this association could be a thymus escape of autoreactive T lymphocytes causing autoimmunity. Conclusion: Clinicians should be always include the possibility of a thymoma in the differential diagnosis of an unusual new onset of weakness and normal laboratories data, in particular once autoimmune disease is present in the medical history. PMID:27603335

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Alessandra; Papagrigoraki, Anastasia; Biasi, Domenico; Colato, Chiara; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-05-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology and pathogenesis characterized by high spiking fever, arthralgia or arthritis, sore throat, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, serositis, and transient cutaneous manifestations. Although more common in children, cases are seen also in adults. Cutaneous involvement is common and may be suggestive for the diagnosis. A case of AOSD in a 35-year-old man is reported here, presenting with urticarial maculopapular rash of trunk, high spiking fever, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and myopericarditis. Skin biopsy showed interstitial and perivascular mature CD15(+) neutrophils. A comprehensive review of literature showed that cutaneous involvement occurs in about 80 % of patients, with various clinical presentations. The most common skin manifestation is an evanescent salmon pink or erythematous maculopapular exanthema, predominantly on the trunk and proximal limbs, with rare involvement of face and distal limbs. Less common manifestations include persistent erythematous plaques and pustular lesions. A constant histopathologic finding is the presence of interstitial dermal neutrophils aligned between the collagen bundles. This pattern may provide an easy accessible clue for the definitive diagnosis of AOSD and exclude other diagnosis such as drug eruptions or infectious diseases.

  9. Interleukin 18: a biomarker for differential diagnosis between adult-onset Still's disease and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Priori, Roberta; Colafrancesco, Serena; Alessandri, Cristiano; Minniti, Antonina; Perricone, Carlo; Iaiani, Giancarlo; Palazzo, Donatella; Valesini, Guido

    2014-06-01

    The differential diagnosis between rheumatic diseases and infectious conditions is a great challenge in clinical practice. Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory syndrome that shares several clinical and laboratory variables with sepsis. Interleukin (IL)-18 is overexpressed in AOSD, suggesting a possible role as a disease biomarker. The aim of our study was to detect IL-18 serum levels in a cohort of patients with AOSD and sepsis and to address its possible role as a biomarker for differential diagnosis. A group of unselected patients with AOSD diagnosed according to the Yamaguchi criteria and consecutive patients with sepsis diagnosed according to the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine Consensus Conference criteria were enrolled. The clinical and laboratory data were collected. In the AOSD group, disease activity was assessed by Pouchot's and Rau's criteria. IL-18 serum levels were detected by ELISA. Thirty-nine patients with AOSD and 18 patients with sepsis were enrolled. Two out of 18 patients with sepsis (11.1%) also fulfilled the Yamaguchi criteria. A significant difference was found in IL-18 serum levels between patients with active and inactive disease (p < 0.001), and it positively correlated with disease activity (p = 0.0003), ferritin serum level (p = 0.016), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.041). IL-18 was significantly increased in patients with AOSD when compared with sepsis (p = 0.014). For a cutoff of 148.9 pg/ml, this test had a specificity of 78.3% and a sensitivity of 88.6%. We have demonstrated that IL-18 can be a biomarker for differential diagnosis between AOSD and sepsis.

  10. A case of adult onset Still's disease complicated with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Yokoe, Isamu; Nishio, Shinya; Onishi, Tsubasa; Takao, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Haraoka, Hitomi

    2011-01-01

    Only a few pathologic reports exist describing adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) with pulmonary involvement. We report this very rare case of AOSD complicated with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). A 32-year-old woman was referred with high spiking fever, salmon-pink rash in her arms and legs, and polyarthralgia. The laboratory data showed marked increases in white blood cell count, an erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C reactive protein, ferritin, and liver dysfunction. All cultures remained negative, as were autoantibodies and rheumatoid factor. The patient was strongly suspected of AOSD according to specific diagnostic criteria. However, chest X ray disclosed an infiltrative shadow accompanied by air bronchogram in the upper lobe of the right lung and therapy with antibiotics was initiated. As the patient did not respond to antibiotics and a remittent fever of over 38°C, a flexible bronchoscopy was performed. Organizing pneumonia was diagnosed by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) histology and radiologically, and the lesions were thought to be due to pulmonary involvement of AOSD. Therefore, she was diagnosed with AOSD complicated with COP. Oral treatment with prednisolone (30 mg/day) resulted in rapid disappearance of the infiltrative shadow. Symptoms and markers of inflammation also improved. Clinicians should be aware that COP can be a complication of AOSD.

  11. Unique histopathologic findings in a patient with adult-onset Still disease.

    PubMed

    Wolgamot, Greg; Yoo, Jane; Hurst, Stan; Gardner, Greg; Olerud, John; Argenyi, Zsolt

    2007-04-01

    Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD) is an uncommon disorder characterized by fever, polyarthralgia, elevated white blood cell count, and a maculopapular rash, the histologic features of which have not been well-known. A 55-year-old Asian woman presented initially with a "burning" and severely pruritic eruption on her face, hands, and arms, thought clinically to be urticaria. Within 1 month, she began spiking high fevers, developed diffuse joint pain, and had marked elevations of ferritin, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, characteristic of AOSD. The cutaneous eruption became more widespread, involving the trunk, scalp, and remainder of the extremities, with diffuse thickening of the skin with papular and linear hyperpigmentation and accentuation. Biopsies from several locations showed focal hyperkeratosis associated with dyskeratotic keratinocytes with a peculiar, distinctive distribution in the upper epidermis and cornified layers. In addition, increased dermal mucin was present, with minimal fibroblast proliferation and inflammation. This unusual combination of diffuse dermal mucinosis and a unique pattern of dyskeratosis can present a challenge in generating an accurate differential diagnosis, and may represent an unusual response to chronic scratching or be a distinctive histologic manifestation of AOSD.

  12. Elevated serum levels of free interleukin-18 in adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Girard, Charlotte; Rech, Jürgen; Brown, Michael; Allali, Danièle; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Spertini, François; Schiffrin, Eduardo J; Schett, Georg; Manger, Bernhard; Bas, Sylvette; Del Val, Greg; Gabay, Cem

    2016-12-01

    IL-18 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine of the IL-1 family that is naturally inhibited by IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP). High levels of IL-18 have been described in the serum of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) patients, but only total IL-18 levels (including inactive IL-18 bound to IL-18BP) have been measured. With a specific immunoassay, we aimed to measure free IL-18 serum levels in AOSD patients and other rheumatic diseases. An ELISA was developed to measure free IL-18. Its sensitivity and specificity were tested by spiking recombinant IL-18 or IL-18BP in serum and PBS supplemented with 5% BSA. The binding affinity of IL-18 to IL-18BP was calculated by titration experiments using the ELISA and by Biacore analysis. Sera of 37 AOSD patients and 138 controls (40 healthy controls, 30 RA, 29 SLE, 21 AS and 18 PsA) were assayed for free IL-18, IL-18BP, total IL-18 and other cytokines. Correlations were performed between free IL-18 and markers of disease activity in AOSD patients. Free IL-18 serum levels were significantly higher in AOSD patients (median 8.89 pg/ml) than in healthy and disease controls (1.37 pg/ml; P < 0.01). Free IL-18 serum levels correlated with AOSD activity. The affinity of IL-18 to IL-18BP was found to be much higher than previously described, with a dissociation constant ranging from 30 to 50 pM. Free IL-18 levels are specifically elevated in AOSD compared with other inflammatory diseases, suggesting that IL-18 represents a potential target for the treatment of AOSD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Adult-onset Still's disease presenting as fever of unknown origin in a patient with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Sally; Skidmore, Peter

    2008-02-15

    A 43-year-old African American man with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was found to have adult-onset Still's disease manifesting as fever of unknown origin. In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients are preserving their immune status and, thus, must be evaluated in a manner similar to that for the general population.

  14. Validation of the Fautrel classification criteria for adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Delphine; Mestrallet, Stéphanie; Dehoux, Monique; Golmard, Jean Louis; Granger, Benjamin; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Arnaud, Laurent; Grateau, Gilles; Pouchot, Jacques; Fautrel, Bruno

    2017-07-12

    To validate the Fautrel classification criteria for adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and to compare the discriminative performance to that of the Yamaguchi criteria. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 426 patients who had serum ferritin level and percentage glycosylated ferritin assayed at the biochemistry laboratory of Bichat Hospital. Medical data were extracted by use of a standardized form. All clinical, biological, and imaging features were collected, as well, evidence favoring an alternative diagnosis, specifically symptoms suggestive of other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) or active infections. Patients were classified as AOSD patients or controls according to a predefined procedure, including consultation with a multidisciplinary expert group. Algorithms corresponding to the Fautrel and Yamaguchi classification criteria were applied for each patient. In all, 54 AOSD and 278 control patients were included. For the Fautrel criteria, the sensitivity was 87.0%, specificity 97.8%, and positive and negative predictive values 88.7% and 97.5%, respectively. For the standard Yamaguchi set-without strict application of exclusion criteria-the sensitivity was 96.3%, specificity 98.9%, and positive and negative predictive values 94.5% and 99.3%, respectively. If we applied a stricter definition of exclusion criteria, the sensitivity of the Yamaguchi set decreased to 31.5%. As wall, 37 AOSD diagnoses were missed. This study validates the Fautrel classification criteria with a cohort independent of that used for the original publication. This criteria set demonstrates good sensitivity and specificity, overcomes exclusion criteria, and includes glycosylated ferritin level. It also confirms the high discriminative power of the Yamaguchi criteria, albeit substantially affected by how exclusion criteria are interpreted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum calprotectin--a promising diagnostic marker for adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qian; Zha, Xicao; Li, Chun; Jia, Yuan; Zhu, Lei; Guo, Jianping; Su, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin is a calcium-binding cytosolic protein, mainly expressed in immune cells, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. Our study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of calprotectin for adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), by comparing serum calprotectin concentrations in patients with AOSD (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 34), primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS, n = 40), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 39), osteoarthritis (OA, n = 20), and healthy controls (HCs, n = 49). Calprotectin concentrations were significantly higher in patients with AOSD (55.26 ± 18.00 ng/ml), compared to patients with RA (39.17 ± 18.90 ng/ml), pSS (35.31 ± 19.47 ng/ml), SLE (32.21 ± 25.01 ng/ml), OA (19.24 ± 10.67 ng/ml), and HCs (8.46 ± 5.17 ng/ml). All the differences were highly significant (p < 0.001). Using receiver-operating characteristic curve, the cut-off value of calprotectin was defined as 45.488 ng/ml, and its sensitivity and specificity for AOSD diagnosis were 63.0 and 80.1%, respectively. The positive rate of calprotectin was significantly higher in AOSD cases compared to patients with other diseases and healthy controls (p < 0.001). Serum calprotectin was positively correlated with ferritin (r = 0.294, p < 0.05), and concentration of hemoglobin was significantly lower in calprotectin-positive patients compared to negative patients in AOSD (103.49 ± 20.21 g/l vs 115.71 ± 15.59 g/l, t = -2.142, p = 0.038). These findings suggest that serum calprotectin may serve as a promising marker for the diagnosis of AOSD and monitor disease activity to a certain extent.

  16. Fever of unknown origin and leukemoid reaction as initial presentation of adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Cabello, Alfredo José; Manzano-Gamero, Victoria; Javier-Martínez, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Adult Still's Disease has been reported as cause of Fever of Unknown Origin. Leukocytosis has been described as a common haematological abnormality in Adult Still's Disease. In some rare cases, leukemoid reaction has been reported associated to Still's Disease. We report the case of Adult Still's Disease presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin and leukemoid reaction in a patient with Down Syndrome. The patient needed high dosage of corticosteroids to control the disease and haematological findings.

  17. [Recurrent effusive pericarditis in the course of adult-onset Still's disease--case reports of two patients].

    PubMed

    Bilska, Anna; Wilińska, Ewelina; Szturmowicz, Monika; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Fijałkowska, Anna; Oniszh, Karina; Swiatowiec, Andrzej; Wsół, Agnieszka; Torbicki, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Pericardial effusion is caused by various pathological agents. In differential diagnosis infectious as well as non-infectious factors have to be considered. Adult-onset Still disease (AOSD)--relatively uncommon systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology--is among possible diagnosis. The disease typically affects patients in the age between 16-35 years and is characterized by spiking fever, arthralgia, evanescent salmon rash with other abnormalities including pharingitis, serositis (especially pleuritis and pericarditis) and leucocytosis as well as increased serum levels of inflammatory indicators. We present two patients with recurrent pericardial effusion in the course of AOSD.

  18. Neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (NUD) in probable adult-onset Still disease responding to anakinra.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Ingo; Schroeder, Johann Oltmann; Mrowietz, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Differential diagnosis of urticarial skin lesions not representing classic urticaria remains a challenge. Long-lasting nonpruritic urticarial plaques and the histopathologic finding of a dense infiltrate with neutrophil granulocytes are indicative for a rare entity within a group of diseases termed neutrophilic dermatoses. Here, we report a case of neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis characterized by nonpruritic urticarial skin lesions, histopathologic changes resembling Sweet syndrome, and simultaneous Still syndrome. After treatment with conventional immunosuppressives including systemic corticosteroids without disease control, the patient responded to anakinra therapy within days achieving complete remission of skin lesions and systemic symptoms including fever and high C-reactive protein.

  19. Combination Immunosuppressive Therapy Including Rituximab for Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Eva Johanna; Jung, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphopcytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening condition. It can occur either as primary form with genetic defects or secondary to other conditions, such as hematological or autoimmune diseases. Certain triggering factors can predispose individuals to the development of HLH. We report the case of a 25-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with HLH in the context of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) during a primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). During therapy with anakinra and dexamethasone, he was still symptomatic with high-spiking fevers, arthralgia, and sore throat. His laboratory values showed high levels of ferritin and C-reactive protein. His condition improved after the addition of rituximab and cyclosporine to his immunosuppressive regimen with prednisolone and anakinra. This combination therapy led to a sustained clinical and serological remission of his condition. While rituximab has been used successfully for HLH in the context of EBV-associated lymphoma, its use in autoimmune diseases is uncommon. We hypothesize that the development of HLH was triggered by a primary EBV infection and that rituximab led to elimination of EBV-infected B-cells, while cyclosporine ameliorated the cytokine excess. We therefore propose that this combination immunosuppressive therapy might be successfully used in HLH occurring in the context of autoimmune diseases. PMID:28018698

  20. Combination Immunosuppressive Therapy Including Rituximab for Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Adult-Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Eva Johanna; Jung, Wolfram; Korsten, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphopcytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening condition. It can occur either as primary form with genetic defects or secondary to other conditions, such as hematological or autoimmune diseases. Certain triggering factors can predispose individuals to the development of HLH. We report the case of a 25-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with HLH in the context of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) during a primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). During therapy with anakinra and dexamethasone, he was still symptomatic with high-spiking fevers, arthralgia, and sore throat. His laboratory values showed high levels of ferritin and C-reactive protein. His condition improved after the addition of rituximab and cyclosporine to his immunosuppressive regimen with prednisolone and anakinra. This combination therapy led to a sustained clinical and serological remission of his condition. While rituximab has been used successfully for HLH in the context of EBV-associated lymphoma, its use in autoimmune diseases is uncommon. We hypothesize that the development of HLH was triggered by a primary EBV infection and that rituximab led to elimination of EBV-infected B-cells, while cyclosporine ameliorated the cytokine excess. We therefore propose that this combination immunosuppressive therapy might be successfully used in HLH occurring in the context of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Retrospective study of 61 patients with adult-onset Still's disease admitted with fever of unknown origin in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Dong; Yu, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Shu; Weng, Xin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), as a category of connective tissue diseases, has about 5∼9% of fever of unknown origin (FUO) cases. Diagnosis of AOSD was challenging because of its nonspecific characteristics. The present study analyzed clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in a series of patients with AOSD from eastern China. Medical records of 61 patients admitted with FUO and with a discharge diagnosis of AOSD were retrospectively evaluated and analyzed with special focus on clinical manifestations and laboratory findings. Compared with previous reports, most features of our patients had a similar incidence rate. Rash (79%), arthralgia (80%), and sore throat (84%) were the most frequent clinical manifestations in our series. Leukocytosis (80%), elevated ESR (98%) and CRP (100%), negative ANA (90%) and RF (93%), and high ferritin level (94%) were the most sensitive laboratory findings in our patients. AOSD was not a rare reason of FUO in eastern China. Fever, arthralgia, rash, sore throat, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, elevated ESR and CRP, negative ANA and RF, and high ferritin level were the most common clinical features in our series. The lack of highly specific characteristic makes the diagnosis of AOSD difficult compared with other diseases in FUO.

  2. Adult-onset Still's disease-like manifestation accompanied by the cancer recurrence after long-term resting state.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Kazuhito; Miyamoto, Ayako; Ozawa, Yuko; Ikegaya, Noriko; Maesono, Tomohiro; Komagata, Yoshinori; Kaname, Shinya; Arimura, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-09

    A 72-year-old woman presented 9 months ago with skin rash on her bilateral forearms, which was followed by intermittent high fever, and stiffness and swelling of her bilateral fingers. She was diagnosed with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA). She had a past history of breast cancer and had undergone breast preservation surgery 13 years previously. During admission in our hospital, she developed high fever and leukocytosis with a relapsing skin rash, sore throat, polyarthralgia and increased levels of serum ALT/AST and ferritin, all of which fulfilled Yamaguchi's criteria for adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD). While we tried to exclude other diseases that may show AOSD-like manifestations, pancytopenia rapidly developed and bone marrow biopsy strongly suggested the diagnosis of macrophage activating syndrome (MAS). Accordingly, steroid pulse therapy was begun, followed by oral glucocorticoid therapy. Thereafter, all of her symptoms improved, but systemic rash, inflammatory signs and pancytopenia gradually progressed. The results of bone marrow pathology, which returned 2 weeks after the beginning of treatment, revealed hemophagocytosis with CK7-positive/CK20-negative atypical cells that suggested recurrence of breast cancer in the bone marrow, thus all of her AOSD-like symptoms were considered to be paraneoplastic manifestations of late-onset metastatic breast cancer. She was treated successfully with chemotherapy. When we see the patients showing AOSD-like symptoms with a history of malignancy, we should consider the possibility of paraneoplastic syndrome due to cancer recurrence.

  3. Clinical characteristics and follow-up analysis of adult-onset Still's disease complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Yang, Yingyun; Bai, Yujia; Yang, Dan; Xiong, Yangyang; Zeng, Xuejun

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated clinical characteristics and prognosis for adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) complicated by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We retrospectively identified cases of AOSD with (n = 10) and without (n = 305) HLH complications. We reviewed their medical records, completed follow-up through outpatient clinic and telephone interviews, and analyzed their clinical symptoms, signs, laboratory test results, treatments, and prognosis. More AOSD patients with HLH developed hepatomegaly, bleeding, serositis, and neurologic symptoms than those without HLH, and they more commonly presented with leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, severe anemia, severe liver function abnormalities, decreased fibrinogen, elevated immunoglobulin, and bone marrow hemophagocytosis. The ten patients with AOSD complicated by HLH were treated with high-dose steroids or pulse steroid therapy, and eight of them also received cytotoxic drugs, while biological agents showed poor response. Follow-up results indicated that AOSD patients overall had good prognosis, while those with HLH showed worse prognosis, including higher relapse and readmission rates and increased mortality. In patients with AOSD, unexplained decreased blood cells, severe liver dysfunction, and/or hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow should be considered as signs of HLH complication. Patients with AOSD complicated by HLH have worse prognosis and higher relapse rates compared to AOSD patients without HLH complications. Thus, these patients should undergo frequent and careful follow-up.

  4. Biologic drugs in adult onset Still's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Ruscitti, Piero; Ursini, Francesco; Cipriani, Paola; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2017-09-21

    Biological drugs, mainly interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 antagonists, but also tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, have been used in the treatment of adult onset Still's disease patients (AOSD). We summarised the available evidence for the effectiveness of biologic drugs in AOSD. A systematic review of the literature was performed in order to identify all the available data concerning the effectiveness of biologic drugs in AOSD. The proportion of patients achieving complete remission or any clinical response was calculated. The meta-analysis was thus performed using a random-effects model accounting for the expected high level of heterogeneity. Nineteen observational published studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled analysis under a random-effects model showed an overall rate of clinical response of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.77-0.91, p < 0.0001) and an overall rate of complete remission of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.54-0.77, p = 0.01). The heterogeneity across studies was high (Q = 59.82 with df = 19.0, p < 0.0001, I(2) = 68.23%). Our meta-analysis suggests that AOSD patients may experience a clinical response and/or a complete remission when treated with biologic drugs. Specifically designed and powered studies are needed to fully investigate the role of such medications in the management of AOSD patients.

  5. A series of 22 patients with adult-onset Still's disease presenting with fever of unknown origin. A difficult diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Baxevanos, Gerasimos; Tzimas, Thomas; Pappas, Georgios; Akritidis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) remains a perplexing, difficult to diagnose clinical entity, with clinical characteristics that are often broad and encountered in numerous other clinical entities. This vague clinical presentation is depicted in the commonly used diagnostic criteria, as the ones by Yamaguchi and Fautrel. The authors sought to investigate how diagnostic criteria apply in a series of 22 new cases of AOSD patients presenting with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and diagnosed at the Internal Medicine Department of Hatzikosta General Hospital of Ioannina, Greece. The aims of the study were: (1) to study the incidence of AOSD and (2) to retrospectively apply different classifications to the data of these patients in search of a more efficient way of diagnosing these patients in the future. The annual incidence of AOSD was estimated at two new cases per 10(5). The clinical manifestations of the patients are discussed, with an emphasis on specific manifestations being considered as criteria by Yamaguchi and Fautrel classifications. Four patients exhibited markedly increased serum D: -dimers, a finding of which the potential pathophysiologic implications are discussed. Serum ferritin levels have additive values, both for diagnostic and cost-reduction purposes in cases presenting as FUO; serum ferritin values are not included in any diagnostic set of criteria at present. The finding of high levels of D-dimers in AOSD needs further studies.

  6. Interleukin 1 inhibition with anakinra in adult-onset Still disease: a meta-analysis of its efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dongsheng; Yang, Zhihai; Han, Shuyin; Liang, Xingguang; Ma, Kuifen; Zhang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Anakinra is the first interleukin-1 inhibitor to be used in clinical practice, and recent evidence showed that interleukin-1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of adult-onset Still disease (AoSD). However, data concerning efficacy with anakinra use in different clinical trials has not been evaluated, and the overall remission of AoSD with anakinra treatment has not been well defined. We conducted a search on Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for relevant trials. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the overall remission rates, odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI), by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity. Of the 273 articles that were identified, 265 were excluded. Eight studies were eligible for inclusion. The overall remission rate and complete remission rate of anakinra in AoSD patients were 81.66% (95% CI: 69.51%-89.69%) and 66.75% (95% CI: 59.94%-75.3%), respectively. Compared with the controls, the use of anakinra was associated with a significant remission in AoSD, with an OR of 0.16 (95% CI: 0.06-0.44, P=0.0005). There were also significant reductions of the dosage of corticosteroid (mean difference =21.19) (95% CI: 13.2-29.18, P<0.0001) from anakinra onset to the latest follow up time. Clinical and laboratory parameters were all improved, and anakinra was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Our study has shown that anakinra is effective in remitting the manifestations of AoSD, with reduction of the dose of corticosteroid in patients with AoSD. Further, anakinra therapy was not associated with increased risk of adverse events, and it was well tolerated in patients with AoSD. Further research is still recommended to investigate these findings.

  7. Effects of HLA-DRB1 alleles on susceptibility and clinical manifestations in Japanese patients with adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tomoyuki; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Shuzo; Yashiro, Makiko; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Eiji; Ito, Tomoyuki; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Fujikawa, Keita; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Tadashi; Koga, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Nonaka, Fumiaki; Yasunami, Michio; Ueki, Yukitaka; Eguchi, Katsumi; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Ohira, Hiromasa; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-09-12

    HLA-DRB1 alleles are major determinants of genetic predisposition to rheumatic diseases. We assessed whether DRB1 alleles are associated with susceptibility to particular clinical features of adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) in a Japanese population by determining the DRB1 allele distributions. DRB1 genotyping of 96 patients with AOSD and 1,026 healthy controls was performed. Genomic DNA samples from the AOSD patients were also genotyped for MEFV exons 1, 2, 3, and 10 by direct sequencing. In Japanese patients with AOSD, we observed a predisposing association of DRB1*15:01 (p = 8.60 × 10(-6), corrected p (Pc) = 0.0002, odds ratio (OR) = 3.04, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.91-4.84) and DR5 serological group (p = 0.0006, OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.49-3.83) and a protective association of DRB1*09:01 (p = 0.0004, Pc = 0.0110, OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.18-0.66) with AOSD, and amino acid residues 86 and 98 of the DRβ chain were protectively associated with AOSD. MEFV variants were identified in 49 patients with AOSD (56.3%). The predisposing effect of DR5 was confirmed only in patients with AOSD who had MEFV variants and not in those without MEFV variants. Additionally, DR5 in patients with AOSD are associated with macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) and steroid pulse therapy. The DRB1*15:01 and DR5 are both associated with AOSD susceptibility in Japanese subjects. A protective association between the DRB1*09:01 allele and AOSD was also observed in these patients. Our data also highlight the effects of DRB1 alleles in susceptibility to AOSD.

  8. Efficacy of Anakinra in Refractory Adult-Onset Still's Disease: Multicenter Study of 41 Patients and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Blanco, Ricardo; Riancho-Zarrabeitia, Leyre; Castañeda, Santos; Olivé, Alejandro; Riveros, Anne; Velloso-Feijoo, María L; Narváez, Javier; Jiménez-Moleón, Inmaculada; Maiz-Alonso, Olga; Ordóñez, Carmen; Bernal, José A; Hernández, María V; Sifuentes-Giraldo, Walter A; Gómez-Arango, Catalina; Galíndez-Agirregoikoa, Eva; Blanco-Madrigal, Juan; Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; del Blanco-Barnusell, Jordi; De Dios, Juan R; Moreno, Mireia; Fiter, Jordi; de los Riscos, Marina; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Valls, María J; González-Vela, M Carmen; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; Pina, Trinitario; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-09-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is often refractory to standard therapy. Anakinra (ANK), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has demonstrated efficacy in single cases and small series of AOSD. We assessed the efficacy of ANK in a series of AOSD patients. Multicenter retrospective open-label study. ANK was used due to lack of efficacy to standard synthetic immunosuppressive drugs and in some cases also to at least 1 biologic agent. Forty-one patients (26 women/15 men) were recruited. They had a mean age of 34.4 ± 14 years and a median [interquartile range (IQR)] AOSD duration of 3.5 [2-6] years before ANK onset. At that time the most common clinical features were joint manifestations 87.8%, fever 78%, and cutaneous rash 58.5%. ANK yielded rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement. After 1 year of therapy, the frequency of joint and cutaneous manifestations had decreased to 41.5% and to 7.3% respectively, fever from 78% to 14.6%, anemia from 56.1% to 9.8%, and lymphadenopathy from 26.8% to 4.9%. A dramatic improvement of laboratory parameters was also achieved. The median [IQR] prednisone dose was also reduced from 20 [11.3-47.5] mg/day at ANK onset to 5 [0-10] at 12 months. After a median [IQR] follow-up of 16 [5-50] months, the most important side effects were cutaneous manifestations (n = 8), mild leukopenia (n = 3), myopathy (n = 1), and infections (n = 5). ANK is associated with rapid and maintained clinical and laboratory improvement, even in nonresponders to other biologic agents. However, joint manifestations are more refractory than the systemic manifestations.

  9. Evaluation of clinical measures and different criteria for diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lindi; Wang, Zhen; Dai, Xiaomin; Jin, Xuejuan

    2011-04-01

    To determine the value of clinical measures in diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD), and to identify the optimal set of proposed classification criteria, in a Chinese population. A total of 70 patients with AOSD and 140 non-AOSD inpatients with fever were retrospectively identified at Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai, from January 2003 to December 2009. Clinical measures and 4 sets of diagnostic criteria (Yamaguchi, Calabro, Cush, and Reginato) were evaluated by sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative predictive value (PPV, NPV), and positive/negative likelihood ratio (PLR, NLR) for diagnosis of AOSD. In our series, higher sensitivity included hyperpyrexia (temperature ≥ 39°C, 94.29%), arthralgia (80.0%), polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) ≥ 75% (84.29%), serum ferritin ≥ 2-fold the upper normal value (90.0%), negative antinuclear antibodies (85.29%), and rheumatoid factor (84.38%); while higher specificity included transient erythema (98.57%), sore throat (85.0%), leukocytes ≥ 15,000/mm(3) (87.86%), and PMN ≥ 85% (85.0%). Rash, arthralgia, and sore throat were found to have better sensitivity and specificity (PLR 3.29-4.86). Leukocytes ≥ 10,000/mm(3), PMN ≥ 80%, and serum ferritin ≥ 5-fold the upper normal limit were set as critical points. The Reginato criteria set had the highest specificity, 99.29%. The Yamaguchi set had the highest sensitivity, 78.57%, with a better accuracy of 87.14%. The Yamaguchi diagnostic criteria had better accuracy in Chinese patients. Indicators such as rash, arthralgia, sore throat, leukocytes ≥ 10,000/mm(3), PMN ≥ 80%, and serum ferritin ≥ 5-fold the upper normal limit were helpful for diagnosis of AOSD. We recommend using these indicators in combination instead of alone.

  10. Adult-Onset Still’s Disease: Still a Serious Health Problem (a Case Report and Literature Review)

    PubMed Central

    Agha-Abbaslou, Mojgan; Bensaci, Ana Maria; Dike, Oluchi; Poznansky, Mark C.; Hyat, Arooj

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 53 Final Diagnosis: Adult-onset Still’s Disease Symptoms: Abdominal pain • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Adult-onset Still’s Disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease accompanied by a triad of spiking fever, maculopapular exanthema, and arthralgia. To date, there is no definite laboratory or imaging test available for diagnosing AOSD, and the diagnosis is one of exclusion, which can be very challenging. Case Report: We report on the case of a 53-year-old female who presented with fever, arthralgia, and abdominal pain. Her initial laboratory tests showed elevated AST and ALT, and normal leukocytes with bandemia. During her hospitalization, we evaluated the patient for other potential differential diagnoses. After an extensive workup, the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on Yamaguchi criteria. Her serum ferritin levels were measured and found to be markedly elevated, which is a non-specific finding in AOSD patients. Conclusions: This case highlights the important role of a detailed history and physical examination for timely diagnosis of AOSD to prevent complications and improve patient’s prognosis. PMID:28154368

  11. A case report of successful treatment of 90° knee flexion contracture in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Xiao, Lin; Ma, Jianbing; Zhao, Guanghui

    2016-02-09

    Severe knee flexion contractures greater than 80° are rare and challenging to manage. Previous studies have demonstrated unsatisfactory clinical results after correcting these deformities because residual flexion contractures were not corrected within a short period of time. We herein report the case of a patient with adult-onset Still's disease with 90° of bilateral knee flexion contracture, which was successfully corrected by total knee arthroplasty and serial casting over a period of five weeks. A 47-year-old male was admitted to our orthopedic department for bilateral knee pain and a preoperative fixed flexion contracture of 90°. A diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease was made based on the patient's medical history of a high spiking fever, salmon-colored rash and bilateral knee and wrist pain. Bilateral total knee arthroplasty was carried out to address these deformities, but residual flexion contracture was present. Subsequently, serial casting was used to achieve full extension at four weeks after surgery. Excellent function and patient satisfaction were observed at two years of follow-up. The new protocol of total knee arthroplasty with subsequent serial casting seems to be an efficient solution for knee flexion contractures greater than 80°. This report adds to the very small number of reported cases of adult-onset Still's disease with severe knee flexion contractures and describes a patient who was successfully treated with a new protocol.

  12. When uncommon and common coalesce: adult onset Still's disease associated with breast augmentation as part of autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Dagan, A; Kogan, M; Shoenfeld, Y; Segal, G

    2016-06-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon, multisystemic, auto-inflammatory disorder, while breast augmentation is a very common cosmetic procedure. We describe a case in which these two coalesce, AOSD, manifested with pleuritis and pericarditis, developed after breast mammoplasty. The pathogenetic, missing link, behind the development of AOSD following mammoplasty, is thought to be the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). We reviewed other cases of AOSD associated with breast mammoplasty published to date and the literature regarding AOSD and ASIA syndrome. The review is followed by a short debate of whether silicone implants should be explanted in similar, future cases.

  13. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adult Onset Still's Disease with a Serum Ferritin of 26,387 μg/L.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheetal; Monemian, Seyed; Khalid, Ayesha; Dosik, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Serum ferritin rises in the anemia of chronic inflammation reflecting increased iron storage and other changes mediated by inflammation. When iron deficiency coexists, the ferritin may not always decline into the subnormal range. We describe the rare interaction of iron deficiency with the extreme hyperferritinemia characteristic of adult onset Still's disease. The combination has clinical relevance and allows deductions about the presence of serum ferritin at 26,387 μg/L despite obvious iron depletion. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was delayed and became fully obvious when her Still's disease remitted and serum ferritin decreased to 6.5 μg/L. The coexistence of iron deficiency should be considered when evaluating a patient with anemia of chronic inflammation even when the ferritin level is elevated several hundredfold. Further insights on ferritin metabolism in Still's disease are suggested by the likelihood that the patient's massive hyperferritinemia in the acute phase of Still's disease was almost entirely of the iron-free apoferritin form.

  14. Application of the 2016 EULAR/ACR/PRINTO Classification Criteria for Macrophage Activation Syndrome in Patients with Adult-onset Still Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Yoo, Byung-Woo; Jung, Seung Min; Lee, Sang-Won; Park, Yong-Beom; Song, Jason Jungsik

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the 2016 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO) classification criteria for macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with adult-onset Still disease (AOSD). We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with AOSD with fever who were admitted to Severance Hospital between 2005 and 2016. The patients with AOSD were evaluated for MAS using the 2016 classification criteria for MAS. Clinical features, laboratory findings, and overall survival were analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the factors associated with in-hospital mortality. Among 64 patients with AOSD, 36 (56.3%) were classified as having MAS. The overall survival rate was significantly lower in patients with MAS than in those without (67% vs 100%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that a low erythrocyte sedimentation rate, a low albumin level, an increase in ferritin of over 2 folds, and the development of MAS on admission were significantly associated with mortality in patients with AOSD. The 2016 EULAR/ACR/PRINTO classification criteria for MAS are potentially useful for the identification of patients with AOSD at high risk for a poor outcome. Febrile patients with AOSD should be monitored with the 2016 classification criteria for MAS in the early diagnosis and proper treatment of MAS.

  15. [Adult-onset rare diseases].

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, György; Kovács, Erzsébet; Kovács, György; Urbán, Krisztián; Nagy, Valéria; Brúgós, Boglárka

    2014-03-02

    The present paper is focusing on rare diseases manifesting in late childhood or adulthood. A part of these syndromes are not of genetic origin, such as relatively or absolutely rare infections, autoimmune diseases, tumours, or diseases due to rare environmental toxic agents. In addition, even a large proportion of genetic disorders may develop in adulthood or may have adult forms as well, affecting are almost each medical specialization. Examples are storage disorders (e.g. adult form of Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher-disease), enzyme deficiencies (e.g. ornithin-transcarbamylase deficiency of the urea cycle disorders), rare thrombophilias (e.g. homozygous factor V. Leiden mutation, antithrombin deficiency), or some rare monogenic disorders such as Huntington-chorea and many others. It is now generally accepted that at least half of the 6-8000 "rare diseases" belong either to the scope of adult-care (e.g. internal medicine, neurology), or to "age-neutral" specialities such as ophtalmology, dermatology etc.).

  16. Adult onset Still's disease-The evidence that anti-interleukin-1 treatment is effective and well-tolerated (a comprehensive literature review).

    PubMed

    Junge, Guido; Mason, June; Feist, Eugen

    2017-10-01

    The literature contains many reports of the use of commercially available anti-IL-1 agents (anakinra/Kineret(®), canakinumab/Ilaris(®), or rilonacept/Arcalyst(®)) in treatment-resistant adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD). These have been widely summarized in many review articles, but a full account of all reports with each of the agents used is not available. This literature review includes all reports of treatment outcomes in patients treated for AOSD with any commercially available anti-IL-1 agent (excluding cases of unconfirmed or atypical AOSD or treatments only for rare AOSD complications). The summary makes use of tabular formats, to identify the available reports and to provide data for compiling and comparison to classical therapies. For each anti-IL-1 agent used, a table shows the frequency of remission during treatment and the frequency of stopping or reducing steroid use, which were reported in almost all articles. A brief textual summary is used to describe other relevant but less often described efficacy aspects and any safety information. The compiled data show that treatment with all anti-IL-1 agents is effective in AOSD, indicating that IL-1 has a central role in the pathogenesis of AOSD. Rates of full or partial remission with each agent were similar to each other (91-100%) and superior to the outcomes published for classical therapies. Primary treatment failures were rare, but efficacy was lost over time in some cases. Of note, the newer anti-IL-1 agents with longer half-lives may show prolonged efficacy. An articular involvement seems to be less responsive than systemic features of disease. However, long-term follow-up shows that efficacy may persist for many years. There is substantial evidence that anti-IL-1 agents have a strong steroid-sparing effect and considerable evidence that the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs can also be reduced or stopped. Thus, the use of anti-IL-1 agents may reduce the side-effects of co

  17. Refractory Coats’ Disease of Adult Onset

    PubMed Central

    Beselga, D.; Campos, A.; Mendes, S.; Carvalheira, F.; Castro, M.; Castanheira, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We present the case of an 18-year-old Caucasian male with a unilateral macular star and retinal vascular anomalies compatible with adult onset Coats’ disease. Methods Diagnosis was based on fundoscopic, fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography findings. Results The patient presented to our emergency department with complaints of low vision in his left eye (LE) detected 10 days before. The best-corrected visual acuity in the LE was 20/50. Fundoscopy of the LE evidenced a complete macular star. Optical coherence tomography showed increased retinal thickness, infiltration of the retinal wall, and detachment of the neuroepithelium. Angiography revealed no appreciable diffusion in the macula. Above the superior temporal (ST) arcade, anomalies in the retinal vasculature were found, with interruption of the peripheral vessels and vessels which were ‘sausage’-like. After 1 month, the LE vision evolved to hand movements. Laser photocoagulation was performed in the ST quadrant. Intravitreal injection of bevacizumab 1.25 mg/0.05 ml and photodynamic therapy were performed without any significant changes, progression of ST serous detachment of the neuroepithelium, and finally progression to macular fibrosis. Discussion Coats’ disease is usually diagnosed in childhood, but rare cases may occur in adults. Those cases usually have a more indolent course which was not observed in our patient. When there is macular involvement, prognosis is more guarded, despite treatment. PMID:22548045

  18. A case of extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type mimicking typical manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) with hemophagocytic syndrome: diagnostic consideration between malignant lymphoma without lymphadenopathy and AOSD.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takashi; Tanabe, Juichi; Kanemoto, Motoko; Kobayashi, Chiharu; Morita, Sho; Karahashi, Taro

    2009-01-01

    A 25-year-old Japanese man was suffering from high fever, sore throat, arthralgia, and macular salmon-pink eruption. The superficial lymph node was not palpable, and computed tomographic scans from the neck to pelvis demonstrated hepatosplenomegaly without apparent lymphadenopathy. Therefore, the possibility of malignant lymphoma was considered to be extremely low. Serology for Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus showed a postinfectious state, and blood culture was negative. Serum rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody were negative. Leukocytopenia (2.4 x 10(3)/mul) was observed, and thus a diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) was made. Fifty-five milligrams of prednisolone daily improved his symptoms and leukocytopenia promptly, but high fever with severe and progressive thrombocytopenia occurred 12 days later. Bone marrow aspiration revealed the presence of lymphoma cells and hemophagocytosis, and the CD45 gating analysis showed expanding population of CD2(+), CD3(-), and CD56(+) cells. Further, mucosal ulceration in the nasal cavity was detected. Therefore, a diagnosis of extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, concomitant with HPS was made, and treatment with dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide, carboplatin (DeVIC) regimen ameliorated his symptoms and platelet transfusion dependency. Later, a high titer of serum EBV-DNA was detected, which supported the diagnosis. Diagnosing AOSD, extranodal presentation of malignant lymphoma such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, should be carefully considered.

  19. Fetal programming, epigenetics, and adult onset disease.

    PubMed

    Lane, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    How early life events program adult disease is undergoing a transition from the broad field of maternal malnutrition to the current relevant issues of food deserts and prematurity. Although many adult diseases and morbidities associate with various early life events and programming, the morbidities of insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and obesity seem to be common end points of many early life events despite potential confounders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinicopathological features of adult-onset neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease

    PubMed Central

    Sone, Jun; Mori, Keiko; Inagaki, Tomonori; Katsumata, Ryu; Takagi, Shinnosuke; Yokoi, Satoshi; Araki, Kunihiko; Kato, Toshiyasu; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Koike, Haruki; Takashima, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Kohno, Yutaka; Kurashige, Takashi; Kuriyama, Masaru; Takiyama, Yoshihisa; Tsuchiya, Mai; Kitagawa, Naoyuki; Kawamoto, Michi; Yoshimura, Hajime; Suto, Yutaka; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Uehara, Naoko; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kokubun, Norito; Konno, Takuya; Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease (NIID) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by eosinophilic hyaline intranuclear inclusions in the central and peripheral nervous system, and also in the visceral organs. NIID has been considered to be a heterogeneous disease because of the highly variable clinical manifestations, and ante-mortem diagnosis has been difficult. However, since we reported the usefulness of skin biopsy for the diagnosis of NIID, the number of NIID diagnoses has increased, in particular adult-onset NIID. In this study, we studied 57 cases of adult-onset NIID and described their clinical and pathological features. We analysed both NIID cases diagnosed by post-mortem dissection and by ante-mortem skin biopsy based on the presence of characteristic eosinophilic, hyaline and ubiquitin-positive intanuclear inclusion: 38 sporadic cases and 19 familial cases, from six families. In the sporadic NIID cases with onset age from 51 to 76, dementia was the most prominent initial symptom (94.7%) as designated ‘dementia dominant group’, followed by miosis, ataxia and unconsciousness. Muscle weakness and sensory disturbance were also observed. It was observed that, in familial NIID cases with onset age less than 40 years, muscle weakness was seen most frequently (100%), as designated ‘limb weakness group’, followed by sensory disturbance, miosis, bladder dysfunction, and dementia. In familial cases with more than 40 years of onset age, dementia was most prominent (100%). Elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein and abnormal nerve conduction were frequently observed in both sporadic and familial NIID cases. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity signal in corticomedullary junction in diffusion-weighted image in both sporadic and familial NIID cases, a strong clue to the diagnosis. All of the dementia dominant cases presented with this type of leukoencephalopathy on head magnetic resonance imaging. Both sporadic and

  1. [Kimura's disease: an unrecognized cause of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease].

    PubMed

    Shehwaro, N; Langlois, A-L; Gueutin, V; Debchi, L; Charlotte, F; Rouvier, P; Rottembourg, J; Izzedine, H

    2014-02-01

    Kimura's disease (KD) is an angiolymphoid proliferative disorder of soft tissue with eosinophilia, with a predilection for head and neck regions in young Oriental men. Kidney disease is thought to be rare in KD. About a case of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease, we comment Kimura's disease and its associated kidney damage. Kimura disease should be suspected and included in the diagnosis of adult-onset nephrotic syndrome with minimal change disease.

  2. Endocrine disruptor vinclozolin induced epigenetic transgenerational adult-onset disease.

    PubMed

    Anway, Matthew D; Leathers, Charles; Skinner, Michael K

    2006-12-01

    The fetal basis of adult disease is poorly understood on a molecular level and cannot be solely attributed to genetic mutations or a single etiology. Embryonic exposure to environmental compounds has been shown to promote various disease states or lesions in the first generation (F1). The current study used the endocrine disruptor vinclozolin (antiandrogenic compound) in a transient embryonic exposure at the time of gonadal sex determination in rats. Adult animals from the F1 generation and all subsequent generations examined (F1-F4) developed a number of disease states or tissue abnormalities including prostate disease, kidney disease, immune system abnormalities, testis abnormalities, and tumor development (e.g. breast). In addition, a number of blood abnormalities developed including hypercholesterolemia. The incidence or prevalence of these transgenerational disease states was high and consistent across all generations (F1-F4) and, based on data from a previous study, appears to be due in part to epigenetic alterations in the male germ line. The observations demonstrate that an environmental compound, endocrine disruptor, can induce transgenerational disease states or abnormalities, and this suggests a potential epigenetic etiology and molecular basis of adult onset disease.

  3. Characteristics in youth indicative of adult-onset Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Paffenbarger, R S; Wing, A L; Hyde, R T

    1977-05-01

    From the college entrance health data of 50,000 male former students, the records of 45 who eventually died of Hodgkin's disease were compared with those of 180 surviving classmates with reference to certain indicator characteristics. Risk ratios of Hodgkin's disease tended to be lower for men who had experienced various common contagious diseases in childhood. This reduced incidence of clinical contagions may signify that: 1) Inadequate early challenge of immune mechanisms left subjects more susceptible to later Hodgkin's disease, whether or not it is of infectious origin; 2) heightened immune mechanisms that led to subclinical attacks of early contagious diseases promoted an autoimmune response that evolved as Hodgkin's disease; or 3) early childhood infections eliminated some subjects who otherwise would have attended college and ultimately developed adult-onset Hodgkin's disease. Also, Hodgkin's disease risk was higher for students who had reported early death of a parent, particularly from cancer. Moreover, the risk tended to be increased among collegians who were obese, heavy cigarette smokers, and coffee drinkers. None of these indicator characteristics was associated with 89 fatal lymphomas of other types that occurred in the same study population.

  4. Ultra-wide field imaging in the diagnosis and management of adult-onset Coats' disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Chandra, Parijat; Kumar, Atul

    2017-01-01

    The conventional fundus imaging covers up to 60 degrees of retina only. Although various montaging techniques can significantly increase the area that can be imaged, it is still difficult to image and document the peripheral retina. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of ultra-wide field imaging in the diagnosis and management of adult-onset Coats' disease. This is a retrospective case series of three patients diagnosed with adult-onset Coats' disease that were treated at the retina clinic of our institute. The case records, conventional and ultra-wide field fluorescein angiograms and optical coherence tomography scans were reviewed. The ultra-wide field pseudo-colour photographs and fluorescein angiograms were able to provide clinically useful information over and above that provided by conventional imaging. In all three patients, ultra-wide field angiography showed the temporal avascular periphery. In addition, it revealed retinal neovascularisation, peripheral vascular leakage and documented peripheral telangiectasia in selected patients. Ultra-wide field imaging provides information that can help in the diagnosis and management of adult-onset Coat's disease. This may lead to better visual outcomes in Coats' disease. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  5. Adult onset Still’s disease with dermatopathic lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ahmad Z.; AlSheef, Mohammad; Qureshi, Waqas T.; Amjad, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving multiple systems. The symptoms mimic those of lymphomas, therefore, the diagnosis of lymphoma needs to be excluded prior to establishing the diagnosis of AOSD. Another similar condition is dermatopathic lymphadenopathy (DL). In DL, the histopathological appearance of lymph node biopsy may also mimic AOSD. The DL is associated with several systemic pathologies, such as malignant lymphomas, and rarely AOSD. We present a case of a 43-year-old male presented with 3 months history of fatigue, fever, and lymphadenopathy. Initial work-up satisfactorily met the criteria for diagnosis of AOSD. But considering the well-known association of DL with hematological malignancies, detailed pathological studies were considered, including tumor markers to rule out the possibility of malignancy. The patient was started on steroids and showed remarkable recovery within 2 weeks. Evaluation of malignant lymphomas in a patient with DL is important, in order to diagnose AOSD and rule out hematological malignancy. PMID:27761568

  6. Adult-Onset Esophageal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasarala, George; Durrett, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal involvement is rarely seen in adults, especially at the initial diagnosis of CD. Esophageal symptoms as primary manifestations of the disease are extremely rare. We report a case of a CD with esophageal involvement at the time of her initial diagnosis of CD. PMID:27761477

  7. Epigenetics and developmental programming of adult onset diseases.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Lee; Combes, Alexander N; Moritz, Karen M

    2012-12-01

    Maternal perturbations or sub-optimal conditions during development are now recognized as contributing to the onset of many diseases manifesting in adulthood. This "developmental programming" of disease has been explored using animal models allowing insights into the potential mechanisms involved. Impaired renal development, resulting in a low nephron number, has been identified as a common outcome that is likely to contribute to the development of hypertension in the offspring as adults. Changes in other organs and systems, including the heart and the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, have also been found. Evidence has recently emerged suggesting that epigenetic changes may occur as a result of developmental programming and result in permanent changes in the expression patterns of particular genes. Such epigenetic modifications may be responsible not only for an increased susceptibility to disease for an individual, but indirectly for the establishment of a disease state in a subsequent generation. Further research in this field, particularly examination as to whether epigenetic changes to genes affecting kidney development do occur, are essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of developmental programming of disease.

  8. Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of vinclozolin induced mouse adult onset disease and associated sperm epigenome biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Covert, Trevor R; Haque, Md M; Settles, Matthew; Nilsson, Eric E; Anway, Matthew D; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-12-01

    The endocrine disruptor vinclozolin has previously been shown to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease in the rat. The current study was designed to investigate the transgenerational actions of vinclozolin on the mouse. Transient exposure of the F0 generation gestating female during gonadal sex determination promoted transgenerational adult onset disease in F3 generation male and female mice, including spermatogenic cell defects, testicular abnormalities, prostate abnormalities, kidney abnormalities and polycystic ovarian disease. Pathology analysis demonstrated 75% of the vinclozolin lineage animals developed disease with 34% having two or more different disease states. Interestingly, the vinclozolin induced transgenerational disease was observed in the outbred CD-1 strain, but not the inbred 129 mouse strain. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified differential DNA methylation regions that can potentially be utilized as epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational exposure and disease.

  9. Adult-Onset Asthma to Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Asthma has been associated with atherosclerotic disease in several studies with some evidence that this association may be limited to women. However, most previous studies have failed to account for the heterogeneity of asthma subtypes. We previously reported increased carotid intima medial thickne...

  10. Dioxin (TCDD) induces epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Tracey, Rebecca; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2012-01-01

    Environmental compounds can promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in subsequent generations following ancestral exposure during fetal gonadal sex determination. The current study examined the ability of dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo[p]dioxin, TCDD) to promote epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and DNA methylation epimutations in sperm. Gestating F0 generation females were exposed to dioxin during fetal day 8 to 14 and adult-onset disease was evaluated in F1 and F3 generation rats. The incidences of total disease and multiple disease increased in F1 and F3 generations. Prostate disease, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F1 generation dioxin lineage. Kidney disease in males, pubertal abnormalities in females, ovarian primordial follicle loss and polycystic ovary disease were increased in F3 generation dioxin lineage animals. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome identified 50 differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) in gene promoters. These DMR provide potential epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures. Observations demonstrate dioxin exposure of a gestating female promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease and sperm epimutations.

  11. Sandhoff disease mimicking adult-onset bulbospinal neuronopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P K; Young, E; King, R H

    1989-01-01

    A 32 year old male is described with an onset of upper limb postural tremor in adolescence followed by muscle cramps. Progressive proximal amyotrophy and weakness in the limbs developed late in the third decade. Examination disclosed, in addition, bilateral facial weakness and mild dysarthria. Enzyme studies revealed hexosaminidase A and B deficiency, indicating a diagnosis of Sandhoff disease. Intra-axonal membranocytoplasmic bodies were present in a rectal biopsy. The presentation, which resembled that of X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy, widens the clinical spectrum for disorders related to G(M2) gangliosidosis. Images PMID:2795083

  12. Adult onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease with psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    del Valle-López, Pilar; Pérez-García, Rosa; Sanguino-Andrés, Rosa; González-Pablos, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz disease is a rare neurological disorder characterized by pyramidal and extrapyramidal manifestations, dysarthria and dementia. Its onset is usually in childhood and most patients have a fatal outcome in few years. A high percentage of cases are hereditary with a recessive autosomal pattern. In the majority of the patients reported, a mutation of the gene that encodes the pantothenate kinase (PANK2) located in the 20p13-p12.3 chromosome that causes iron storage in the basal ganglia of the brain has been found. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms as well as specific MRI imaging findings. The most common psychiatric features are cognitive impairment as well as depressive symptoms. There are few documented cases with psychotic disorders. We present the case of a patient with late onset Hallervorden-Spatz disease and psychotic symptoms that preceded the development of neurological manifestations. The pathophysiology and the treatment of psychotic symptomatology are presented and discussed. Key words: Psicosis, Hallervorden-Spatz, late onset, Basal ganglia.

  13. Postoperative acute respiratory failure caused by adult-onset pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dingyu; Xu, Jun; Yang, Yi; Gu, Ming; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-06-20

    Pompe disease, which leads to dysfunction of the enzyme acid a-glucosidase, is a genetic disorder seen in 1 in 40000 births. Adult-onset Pompe disease is known as a slowly progressive myasthenia with or without respiratory dysfunction. We herein report two cases of adult-onset Pompe disease, in which postoperative acute respiratory failure was the the initial manifestation. The two patients showed no symptoms of ambulatory and respiratory dysfunction before operation. The diagnosis of Pompe disease was determined by muscle biopsy and acid a-glucosidase assay in the blood. Rapid deterioration of already struggling diaphragmatic function induced by stress of surgery and anesthesia were thought to be the main reason of postoperative acute respiratory failure. Physicians should be aware of the existence of an adult form of Pompe disease which may present with postoperative acute respiratory failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A rare cause of pleural effusion: adult onset Still’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Demirbas, Soner; Kutlu, Orkide; Kandemir, Bahar; Sakin, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Adult onset Still’s disease is a rare systemic inflammatory disorder. At the onset of the disease sore throat, pharyngitis; which does not respond to antibiotics, one or two times peaking febrile episodes, marked salmon-colored rash on the trunk and extremities, arthralgia, arthritis, myalgia, fatigue, loss of appetite with nausea and weight loss; hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy can be seen. Among laboratory examinations levels of ferritin and other acute phase reactants distinctly rise, and neutrophilic leukocytosis; ANA and RF negativity are detected. Pleural and pericardial effusions, transient pulmonary infiltration, and rarely myocarditis can be seen during the course of the disease. Here we report a patient who was examined for fever of unknown origin and diagnosed with adult onset Still’s disease which is a rare etiology of pleural effusion. PMID:28058358

  15. Genetic architecture differences between pediatric and adult-onset inflammatory bowel diseases in the Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Lazowska, Izabella; Ambrozkiewicz, Filip; Goryca, Krzysztof; Kulecka, Maria; Rawa, Tomasz; Karczmarski, Jakub; Dabrowska, Michalina; Zeber-Lubecka, Natalia; Tomecki, Roman; Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Katarzyna; Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Socha, Piotr; Lodyga, Michal; Rydzewska, Grazyna; Klopocka, Maria; Mierzwa, Grazyna; Iwanczak, Barbara; Krzesiek, Elzbieta; Bak-Drabik, Katarzyna; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Klincewicz, Beata; Radwan, Piotr; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Korczowski, Bartosz; Starzynska, Teresa; Albrecht, Piotr; Mikula, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Most inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are classic complex disorders represented by common alleles. Here we aimed to define the genetic architecture of pediatric and adult-onset IBDs for the Polish population. A total of 1495 patients were recruited, including 761 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD; 424 pediatric), 734 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC; 390 pediatric), and 934 healthy controls. Allelotyping employed a pooled-DNA genome-wide association study (GWAS) and was validated by individual genotyping. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on 44 IBD patients diagnosed before 6 years of age, 45 patients diagnosed after 40 years of age, and 18 healthy controls. Altogether, out of 88 selected SNPs, 31 SNPs were replicated for association with IBD. A novel BRD2 (rs1049526) association reached significance of P = 5.2 × 10−11 and odds ratio (OR) = 2.43. Twenty SNPs were shared between pediatric and adult patients; 1 and 7 were unique to adult-onset and pediatric-onset IBD, respectively. WES identified numerous rare and potentially deleterious variants in IBD-associated or innate immunity-associated genes. Deleterious alleles in both groups were over-represented among rare variants in affected children. Our GWAS revealed differences in the polygenic architecture of pediatric- and adult-onset IBD. A significant accumulation of rare and deleterious variants in affected children suggests a contribution by yet unexplained genetic components. PMID:28008999

  16. Pesticide methoxychlor promotes the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease through the female germline.

    PubMed

    Manikkam, Mohan; Haque, M Muksitul; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Nilsson, Eric E; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures.

  17. Familial Adult-onset Alexander Disease: Clinical and Neuroradiological Findings of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    ELMALI, Ayşe Deniz; ÇETİNÇELİK, Ümran; IŞLAK, Civan; UZUN ADATEPE, Nurten; KARAALİ SAVRUN, Feray; YALÇINKAYA, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The adult-onset Alexander disease (AOAD) dramatically differs from the early onset AD with respect to clinical and neuroradiological findings. Herein we report the detailed clinical and neuroradiological findings of a Turkish family with AOAD. In all three cases, magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked atrophy of the mesencephalon, bulbus, and cervical spinal cord accompanied with signal abnormalities in the same regions along with supratentorial white matter. Basal ganglia were affected in two cases. Molecular genetic analysis revealed heterozygous mutation in the 8th exon of the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene M451I (c.1245G>A), leading to the diagnosis of AOAD in all cases. PMID:28360791

  18. Childhood onset systemic sclerosis: classification, clinical and serologic features, and survival in comparison with adult onset disease.

    PubMed

    Scalapino, Kenneth; Arkachaisri, Thaschawee; Lucas, Mary; Fertig, Noreen; Helfrich, David J; Londino, Aldo V; Steen, Virginia D; Medsger, Thomas A

    2006-05-01

    To describe the differences between patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) having childhood versus adult onset evaluated at a single medical center. Patients were divided into those with childhood onset (first SSc symptom or finding before age 16 yrs) and those with early adult and late adult onset. The 3 groups were compared with respect to disease classification, clinical, laboratory and serologic data, and survival. One hundred eleven childhood onset SSc cases seen between 1960 and 2003 were compared with 2559 adult onset SSc cases (1087 with onset age 16-40 and 1472 with onset after age 40 yrs) first evaluated between 1972 and 2001. Age distribution at onset was unimodal, suggesting that childhood disease is part of the spectrum of adult onset SSc. A significantly greater proportion of childhood onset patients had overlap syndromes, most frequently with polymyositis-dermatomyositis (PM-DM), and skeletal muscle involvement. Children with diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc had significantly lower maximum mean total skin thickness scores than adult patients with dcSSc. Renal involvement was uncommon in childhood onset cases, and the frequency increased with age of onset. Serum anti-PM-Scl and anti-U1RNP antibodies were detected significantly more frequently in childhood than in adult onset cases. In contrast, anti-RNA polymerase III and anticentromere antibodies were found significantly more frequently in adults. Survival was significantly better among childhood than all adult onset cases combined, but similar to survival in young adult onset SSc cases. Scleroderma heart disease was a frequent cause of death among children with SSc. Patients with juvenile onset SSc more frequently have an overlap syndrome with PM-DM, higher frequency of skeletal muscle involvement, serum anti-PM-Scl and anti-U1RNP antibody, fatal cardiac disease, and improved survival compared with adult onset SSc cases.

  19. Chinese new immigrant mothers' perception about adult-onset non-communicable diseases prevention during childhood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linda Dong Ling; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Wu, Joseph Tsz Kei; Fielding, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Many non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are largely preventable via behaviour change and healthy lifestyle, which may be best established during childhood. This study sought insights into Chinese new immigrant mothers' perceptions about adult-onset NCDs prevention during childhood. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with new immigrant mothers from mainland China who had at least one child aged 14 years or younger living in Hong Kong. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach. The present study identified three major themes: perceived causes of adult NCDs, beliefs about NCDs prevention and everyday health information practices. Unhealthy lifestyle, contaminated food and environment pollution were perceived as the primary causes of adult NCDs. Less than half of the participants recognized that parents had responsibility for helping children establish healthy behaviours from an early age to prevent diseases in later life. Most participants expressed helplessness about chronic diseases prevention due to lack of knowledge of prevention, being perceived as beyond individual control. Many participants experienced barriers to seeking health information, the most common sources of health information being interpersonal conversation and television. Participants' everyday information practice was passive and generally lacked awareness regarding early prevention of adult-onset NCDs. Updated understanding of this issue has notable implications for future health promotion interventions. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Adult-onset Still’s disease: current challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mariam; Putman, Michael S; Dua, Anisha B

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) – a multi-systemic inflammatory condition characterized by high fevers, polyarthritis, an evanescent rash, and pharyngitis – has been a challenging condition to diagnose expediently and treat effectively. Questions remain regarding the underlying pathophysiology and etiology of AOSD. Pathognomonic diagnostic tests and reliable biomarkers remain undiscovered. Over the past decade, important progress has been made. Diagnostic criteria employing glycosylated ferritin have improved specificity. More important, novel biologic therapies have offered important clues to AOSD’s underlying pathophysiology. Cytokine-specific biologic therapies have been instrumental in providing more effective treatment for disease refractory to conventional treatment. While IL-1 therapy has demonstrated efficacy in refractory disease, novel therapies targeting IL-6 and IL-18 show great promise and are currently under investigation. PMID:27843366

  1. Limited diagnostic value of procalcitonin in early diagnosis of adult onset Still’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient was referred to the Infectious Diseases Ward because of fever lasting for 14 days. On admission to the hospital the patient was in a generally good state, without any abnormalities on physical examination. Laboratory investigation revealed elevated inflammatory markers. Diagnostic imaging comprising chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasonography, and echocardiography showed no abnormalities. During the hospitalization, there occurred episodes of fever with skin rash and musculoskeletal pain of the lower limbs. Procalcitonin concentrations continued to increase. C-reactive protein concentrations decreased during therapy, starting from 191 mg/l. On the 23rd day of the disease, edema of the feet, ankles, and knees appeared. On the basis of the clinical picture and after excluding other possible causes of fever, the patient was diagnosed with adult onset Still’s disease. The procalcitonin concentration was normalized after 5 days of steroid therapy. The patient was discharged under ambulatory rheumatologic supervision. PMID:27826176

  2. Acute pneumonitis in a patient with adult-onset disease after toclizumab treatment with good response to anakinra.

    PubMed

    Sangüesa Gómez, Clara; Flores Robles, Bryan Josué; Jara Chinarro, Beatriz; Espinosa Malpartida, María; Barbadillo Mateos, Carmen

    Pulmonary involvement in the form of acute pneumonitis in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon manifestation, with few cases reported in the literature. We report the case of a 61-year-old male with 3 years of AOSD evolution, treated with methotrexate (MTX) and half-dose corticosteroids, which debuted with symptoms of fever, dyspnea and dry cough after 3 weeks of receiving the first dose of tocilizumab (TCZ). In the follow-up study showed leukocytosis with left shift, elevated serum ferritin and C-reactive protein standard. The chest CT scan showed ground-glass pattern predominantly in central and upper lobes and the BAL shows an increase in the percentage of lymphocyte with normal subpopulations and negative cultures. MTX and TCM were suspended, prednisone was increased to 30mg/day and within a week Anakinra 100mg/day SC was iniciated, noting in a few days a progressive clinical, analytical and radiological improvement.

  3. The ocular motor features of adult-onset alexander disease: a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Abegg, Mathias; Vertinsky, A Talia; Ceccherini, Isabella; Caroli, Francesco; Barton, Jason J S

    2011-06-01

    A 51-year-old Chinese man presented with gaze-evoked nystagmus, impaired smooth pursuit and vestibular ocular reflex cancellation, and saccadic dysmetria, along with a family history suggestive of late-onset autosomal dominant parkinsonism. MRI revealed abnormalities of the medulla and cervical spinal cord typical of adult-onset Alexander disease, and genetic testing showed homozygosity for the p.D295N polymorphic allele in the gene encoding the glial fibrillary acidic protein. A review of the literature shows that ocular signs are frequent in adult-onset Alexander disease, most commonly gaze-evoked nystagmus, pendular nystagmus, and/or oculopalatal myoclonus, and less commonly ptosis, miosis, and saccadic dysmetria. These signs are consistent with the propensity of adult-onset Alexander disease to cause medullary abnormalities on neuroimaging.

  4. Cardiovascular Disease Among Survivors of Adult-Onset Cancer: A Community-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Armenian, Saro H; Xu, Lanfang; Ky, Bonnie; Sun, Canlan; Farol, Leonardo T; Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Douglas, Pamela S; Bhatia, Smita; Chao, Chun

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), including ischemic heart disease, stroke, and heart failure, are well-established late effects of therapy in survivors of childhood and young adult (< 40 years at diagnosis) cancers; less is known regarding CVD in long-term survivors of adult-onset (≥ 40 years) cancer. A retrospective cohort study design was used to describe the magnitude of CVD risk in 36,232 ≥ 2-year survivors of adult-onset cancer compared with matched (age, sex, and residential ZIP code) noncancer controls (n = 73,545) within a large integrated managed care organization. Multivariable regression was used to examine the impact of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs; hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia) on long-term CVD risk in cancer survivors. Survivors of multiple myeloma (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.70; P < .01), carcinoma of the lung/bronchus (IRR, 1.58; P < .01), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (IRR, 1.41; P < .01), and breast cancer (IRR, 1.13; P < .01) had significantly higher CVD risk when compared with noncancer controls. Conversely, prostate cancer survivors had a lower CVD risk (IRR, 0.89; P < .01) compared with controls. Cancer survivors with two or more CVRFs had the highest risk of CVD when compared with noncancer controls with less than two CVRFs (IRR, 1.83 to 2.59; P < .01). Eight-year overall survival was significantly worse among cancer survivors who developed CVD (60%) when compared with cancer survivors without CVD (81%; P < .01). The magnitude of subsequent CVD risk varies according to cancer subtype and by the presence of CVRFs. Overall survival in survivors who develop CVD is poor, emphasizing the need for targeted prevention strategies for individuals at highest risk of developing CVD. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. A new structural approach to genomic discovery of disease: example of adult-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of disease discovery from genomic data, by methods which depart substantially from customary practices found in the investigation of genome-wide association studies. Such data in general are composed of the genomic content from two contrasting phenotypes, e.g., disease versus control populations, and the analysis proceeds under the hypothesis that populational dissimilarities might reveal disease risk alleles. The proposed suite of new methods is in part based on information theory (Shannon in Bell Syst Tech J 27:379-423, 1948a; Bell Syst Tech J 27:623-656, 1948b; Jaynes in Phys Rev 106:620-630, 1957), and strong evidence will be given of the effectiveness of this new approach. The methodology extends naturally and successfully to predicting genomic disposition to disease arising from large collections of weakly contributing genomic loci. Evidence will be advanced that the example of adult-onset diabetes ("type 2 diabetes") is such a candidate disease, and in this case, probably for the first time, it can be demonstrated that disease prediction is possible. Another novel element of this study is the search and identification of potential beneficial genomic loci that may counter a disease. The generality of the methodology suggests that it might extend to other diseases.

  6. Targeting Hsp90/Hsp70-based protein quality control for treatment of adult onset neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Pratt, William B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Currently available therapies for adult onset neurodegenerative diseases provide symptomatic relief but do not modify disease progression. Here we explore a new neuroprotective approach based on drugs targeting chaperone-directed protein quality control. Critical target proteins that unfold and aggregate in these diseases, such as the polyglutamine androgen receptor in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, huntingtin in Huntington's disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, and tau in Alzheimer's disease, are client proteins of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), and their turnover is regulated by the protein quality control function of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery. Hsp90 and Hsp70 have opposing effects on client protein stability in protein quality control; Hsp90 stabilizes the clients and inhibits their ubiquitination, whereas Hsp70 promotes ubiquitination dependent on CHIP (C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) and proteasomal degradation. We discuss how drugs that modulate proteostasis by inhibiting Hsp90 function or promoting Hsp70 function enhance the degradation of the critical aggregating proteins and ameliorate toxic symptoms in cell and animal disease models.

  7. Delay in the Diagnosis of Adult-Onset Still’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    Adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD) is a systemic autoinflammatory disease characterized by symptoms including spiking fever, arthralgia, myalgia, maculopapular rash, and pharyngitis. The lack of diagnostic biomarker, non-specific clinical presentation, and the rarity of AOSD often result in a significant delay in diagnosis and treatment. While the average time of initial presentation to diagnosis is four months, we present a case of AOSD diagnosis three years after initial onset of classical symptoms. By reporting the case of delayed diagnosis for AOSD, we hope to raise awareness in our medical community about the diagnostic difficulty in AOSD. The present case describes an otherwise healthy male who presented with typical symptoms of AOSD, but the diagnosis of AOSD was missed during his first presentation. In the second flaring episode, the diagnosis of AOSD was established. He had an excellent therapeutic response to anakinra and prednisone during the acute flaring episode. He is currently in complete remission on methotrexate as maintenance therapy. PMID:28690954

  8. Patient fibroblasts-derived induced neurons demonstrate autonomous neuronal defects in adult-onset Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Oh, Ki-Wook; Nahm, Minyeop; Xue, Yuanchao; Choi, Jae Hyeok; Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Young-Eun; Chung, Ki Wha; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by defective β-galactosylceramidase (GALC), a lysosomal enzyme responsible for cleavage of several key substrates including psychosine. Accumulation of psychosine to the cytotoxic levels in KD patients is thought to cause dysfunctions in myelinating glial cells based on a comprehensive study of demyelination in KD. However, recent evidence suggests myelin-independent neuronal death in the murine model of KD, thus indicating defective GALC in neurons as an autonomous mechanism for neuronal cell death in KD. These observations prompted us to generate induced neurons (iNeurons) from two adult-onset KD patients carrying compound heterozygous mutations (p.[K563*];[L634S]) and (p.[N228_S232delinsTP];[G286D]) to determine the direct contribution of autonomous neuronal toxicity to KD. Here we report that directly converted KD iNeurons showed not only diminished GALC activity and increased psychosine levels, as expected, but also neurite fragmentation and abnormal neuritic branching. The lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 (LAMP1) was expressed at higher levels than controls, LAMP1-positive vesicles were significantly enlarged and fragmented, and mitochondrial morphology and its function were altered in KD iNeurons. Strikingly, we demonstrated that psychosine was sufficient to induce neurite defects, mitochondrial fragmentation, and lysosomal alterations in iNeurons derived in healthy individuals, thus establishing the causal effect of the cytotoxic GALC substrate in KD and the autonomous neuronal toxicity in KD pathology. PMID:27780934

  9. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  10. [Adult-onset Hartnup disease presenting with neuropsychiatric symptoms but without skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Mori, E; Yamadori, A; Tsutsumi, A; Kyotani, Y

    1989-06-01

    Hartnup disease is an inborn abnormality of renal and intestinal transport involving the neutral amino acids. Intermittent pellagra-like rash, attacks of cerebellar ataxia and psychiatric disturbance are characteristic symptoms of this disease. We described here a patient with adult-onset Hartnup disease who presented unique neuropsychiatric symptoms but no dermatologic symptoms, and reported features of amino acids transport in this patient and his family. The patient, a man aged 37 years, was referred to us because of lasting daytime bruxism. He is the second child of healthy parents who are first cousin; his elder brother who has been mentally retarded became bed-ridden and died at 32 years of age. His younger brother is completely healthy. Although the patient's development in infancy has been slightly retarded, he completed compulsory 9-year education. At 29 years of age, he experienced episodes of diplopia, ataxic gait and insomnia, and at 33 years of age, of transient stupor. There had been no history of photosensitivity or dermatitis. On neurological examination, there were trunkal ataxia, increased muscular tone and decreased mental activity besides bruxism. These symptoms remained unchanged despite of several medications including trihexyphenidyl, diazepam, halloperidol, tiapride and sulpiride. Two months later, the patient became stuporous; bruxism and hypertonicity became exaggerated. Myerson's sign, sucking reflex and grasp reflex in both hand appeared. There was no dermal lesion. A cranial computed tomography revealed a small calcification in the right frontal subcortical region and a single photon emission tomography indicated possible bifrontal hypoperfusion. Electroencephalograms demonstrated non-specific slowing. Somatosensory evoked potentials and nerve conduction velocities were normal. There were constant indicanuria and amino-aciduria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Adult-onset Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Amrinder Jit

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset atopic dermatitis is still an under recognized condition as there are only few studies regarding this entity. As compared to childhood onset atopic dermatitis, clinical features of adult onset atopic dermatitis are still not categorized. Adult atopic dermatitis can present for the first time in adult age with atypical morphology or may progress from childhood onset. This article reviews the characteristic clinical features of adult atopic dermatitis, associated risk factors and management. PMID:27904186

  12. Novel case of Trevor’s disease: Adult onset and later recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Amrit S; Kumar, Neil S; Chin, Matthew A; Lackman, Richard D

    2017-01-01

    Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor’s disease, is an osteocartilaginous epiphyseal overgrowth typically occurring in children. The literature reports 6 adult cases and none describe recurrence requiring additional procedures. We present a new-onset proximal tibial DEH in an adult recurring approximately 3 years after open excision. A 39-year-old female presented with a history of right knee pain, swelling, and instability. Physical examination revealed a firm proximal tibial mass. Computed tomography (CT) imaging showed an exophytic, lobulated, sclerotic mass involving the anterolateral margin of the lateral tibial plateau. Magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of an osteochondroma. The patient underwent curettage of the lesion due to its periarticular location. Histology revealed benign and reactive bone and cartilage consistent with periosteal chondroma. Two and a half years later, the patient presented with a firm, palpable mass larger than the initial lesion. CT revealed a lateral tibial plateau sclerotic mass consistent with recurrent intra-articular DEH. A complete excision was performed and histology showed sclerotic bone with overlying cartilage consistent with exostosis. DEH is a rare epiphyseal osteocartilaginous outgrowth frequently occurring in the long bones of children less than 8 years old. DEH resembles an osteochondroma due to its pediatric presentation and similar histologic appearance. Adult-onset cases comprise less than 1% of reported cases. Recurrence rate after surgical intervention is unknown. Only 1 such case, occurring in a child, has been described. Clinicians contemplating operative treatment for DEH should note the potential for recurrence and consider complete excision. A follow-up period of several years may be warranted to identify recurrent lesions. PMID:28144583

  13. Adult-onset Alexander disease: a series of eleven unrelated cases with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Fancellu, Roberto; Mariotti, Caterina; Romano, Silvia; Salmaggi, Andrea; Carella, Francesco; Girotti, Floriano; Gattellaro, Grazietta; Carriero, Maria Rita; Farina, Laura; Ceccherini, Isabella; Savoiardo, Mario

    2008-09-01

    Alexander disease (AD) in its typical form is an infantile lethal leucodystrophy, characterized pathologically by Rosenthal fibre accumulation. Following the identification of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene as the causative gene, cases of adult-onset AD (AOAD) are being described with increasing frequency. AOAD has a different clinical and neuroradiological presentation with respect to early-onset AD, as abnormalities are mainly concentrated in the brainstem-spinal cord junction. We report detailed clinical and genetic data of 11 cases of AOAD, observed over a 4-year period, and a review of the previously reported 25 cases of genetically confirmed AOAD. In our series, onset occurred as late as age 62, and up to 71 in an affected deceased relative. Most cases appeared sporadic, but family history may be misleading. The most frequent symptoms were related to bulbar dysfunction-with dysarthria, dysphagia, dysphonia (seven patients)-, pyramidal involvement (seven patients) and cerebellar ataxia (seven patients). Four patients had palatal myoclonus. Sleep disorders were also observed (four cases). Bulbar symptoms, however, were infrequent at onset and two symptomatic patients had an almost pure pyramidal involvement. Two subjects were asymptomatic. Misdiagnosis at presentation was frequent and MRI was instrumental in suggesting the correct diagnosis by showing, in all cases, mild to severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata extending caudally to the cervical spinal cord. In ten patients, molecular studies revealed six novel missense mutations and three previously reported changes in GFAP. The last typical patient carried no definitely pathogenic mutation, but a missense variant (p.D157N), supposedly a rare polymorphism. Revision of the literature and the present series indicate that the clinical picture is not specific, but AOAD must be considered in patients of any age with lower brainstem signs. When present, palatal myoclonus is strongly suggestive

  14. Inadvertent Skipping of Steroids in Septic Shock Leads to a Diagnosis of Adult Onset Still’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Vinoth K; Balasubramanian, Kavitha; Aghoram, Rajeswari

    2017-01-01

    Adult onset Still’s disease is uncommon in middle-aged and elderly individuals and can rarely present with shock; shock is usually associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiorgan dysfunction syndrome or acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report a post-menopausal woman with arthritis, fever, pneumonitis and hypotension which was managed as septic shock. Steroids were inadvertently missed during the second day of hospitalization in the intensive care unit. Persistence of hypotension on inotropes, with normal renal, hepatic and neurological function and recurrence of fever when steroids were skipped, led to suspicion of an inflammatory disorder. A diagnosis of Still’s disease may be entertained in postmenopausal women with polyarthritis, rash, and fever with leukocytosis. Sepsis is mimicked, and multiple antibiotics use is common before the diagnosis of such an entity is made. Shock is rare in adult onset Still’s disease and is not necessarily associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, or multiorgan dysfunction. PMID:28191382

  15. New Insights in Vanishing White Matter Disease-Isolated Bilateral Optic Neuropathy in Adult Onset Disease.

    PubMed

    Barros, Sandra R; Parreira, Sónia C R; Miranda, Ana F B; Pereira, Ana M B; Campos, Nuno M P

    2017-09-07

    Vanishing white matter disease (VWMD) is a rare disease affecting cerebral white matter. The adult form is even rarer and manifests with motor symptoms, behavioral problems, and dementia. There is no treatment and progression is inevitable. We describe a case with atypical manifestations and an unusual course. Description of a 42-year-old man with VWMD complaining of progressive visual loss in the right eye. The patient's visual acuity was 20/60, right eye, and 20/25, left eye, with pale optic nerves bilaterally. MRI showed atrophy of the corpus callosum, diffuse rarefaction of cerebral white matter including the anterior and posterior visual pathways. Our patient had no further symptoms besides loss of visual acuity, which is rare in patients with VWMD of the same age and genetic mutation.

  16. Unilateral acute maculopathy associated with adult onset hand, foot and mouth disease: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Bhan, Kanchan; Balaggan, Kam; Lee, Richard Wj; Pavesio, Carlos E; Addison, Peter Kf

    2015-01-01

    Acute maculopathy is a rare condition of unknown aetiology and Coxsackie virus is known to be associated with this macular chorioretinitis. We report a case of acute unilateral maculopathy in a 35-year-old woman with concurrent hand foot and mouth disease. Furthermore, we display multimodal imaging (colour fundus photographs, autofluorescence, spectral domain ocular coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography) charting the course of the disease. The source of the virus was thought to be the patient's child. Empirical treatment with oral corticosteroids was commenced and the inflammation resolved, leaving a residual macular scar. We present this case combined with the review of literature of adult onset Coxsackie-virus-associated retinitis. This case reiterates the fact that Coxsackie virus is an uncommon but important consideration in the differential diagnosis of chorioretinitis and posterior uveitis with atypical retinopathy.

  17. Adult-onset motor neuron disease and infantile Werdnig-Hoffmann disease (spinal muscular atrophy type 1) in the same family.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P J; Ince, P G; Goodship, J; Burn, J; Slade, J; Bates, D; Medwin, D G

    1992-08-01

    We describe a family in which infantile Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and adult-onset progressive muscular atrophy both occurred. The possibility of these two diseases developing within the same family by chance is unlikely, and several genetic hypotheses may be put forward to explain the association. We suggest that the molecular pathogenesis of these two subtypes of lower motor neuron degeneration may be linked. The genetic defect in the childhood spinal muscular atrophies has been mapped to chromosome 5q in close proximity to the microtubule-associated protein 1B locus. The association of diseases within this family suggests that chromosome 5q should also be studied in relation to adult-onset familial motor neuron disease.

  18. Immunohistochemical identification of messenger RNA-related proteins in basophilic inclusions of adult-onset atypical motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kengo; Ito, Hidefumi; Nakano, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Yoshimi; Wate, Reika; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2008-10-01

    This report concerns an immunohistochemical investigation on RNA-related proteins in the basophilic inclusions (BIs) from patients with adult-onset atypical motor neuron disease. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of the motor cortex and the lumbar spinal cord were examined. The BIs appeared blue in color with H&E and Nissl stain, and pink with methylgreen-pyronin stain. Ribonuclease pretreatment abolished the methylgreen-pyronin staining, suggesting that the BIs contained RNA. Immunohistochemically, the BIs were distinctly labeled with the antibodies against poly(A)-binding protein 1, T cell intracellular antigen 1, and ribosomal protein S6. These proteins are essential constituents of stress granules. In contrast, the BIs were not immunoreactive for ribosomal protein L28 and decapping enzyme 1, which are core components of transport ribonucleoprotein particles and processing bodies, respectively. Moreover, the BIs were not immunopositive for TDP-43. Our results imply that translation attenuation could be involved in the processes of BI formation in this disorder.

  19. Adult onset motor neuron disease: worldwide mortality, incidence and distribution since 1950.

    PubMed Central

    Chancellor, A M; Warlow, C P

    1992-01-01

    This review examines the commonly held premise that, apart from the Western Pacific forms, motor neuron disease (MND), has a uniform worldwide distribution in space and time; the methodological problems in studies of MND incidence; and directions for future epidemiological research. MND is more common in men at all ages. Age-specific incidence rises steeply into the seventh decade but the incidence in the very elderly is uncertain. A rise in mortality from MND over recent decades has been demonstrated wherever this has been examined and may be real rather than due to improved case ascertainment. Comparison of incidence studies in different places is complicated by non-standardised methods of case ascertainment and diagnosis but there appear to be differences between well studied populations. In developed countries in the northern hemisphere there is a weak positive correlation between standardised, age-specific incidence and distance from the equator. There is now strong evidence for an environmental factor as the cause of the Western Pacific forms of MND. A number of clusters of sporadic MND have been reported from developed countries, but no single agent identified as responsible. Images PMID:1479386

  20. Inhibition of GSK-3 Ameliorates Aβ Pathology in an Adult-Onset Drosophila Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killick, Richard; Augustin, Hrvoje; Gandy, Carina; Allen, Marcus J.; Hardy, John; Lovestone, Simon; Partridge, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Aβ peptide accumulation is thought to be the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), with downstream neurotoxic effects including the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is increasingly implicated as playing a pivotal role in this amyloid cascade. We have developed an adult-onset Drosophila model of AD, using an inducible gene expression system to express Arctic mutant Aβ42 specifically in adult neurons, to avoid developmental effects. Aβ42 accumulated with age in these flies and they displayed increased mortality together with progressive neuronal dysfunction, but in the apparent absence of neuronal loss. This fly model can thus be used to examine the role of events during adulthood and early AD aetiology. Expression of Aβ42 in adult neurons increased GSK-3 activity, and inhibition of GSK-3 (either genetically or pharmacologically by lithium treatment) rescued Aβ42 toxicity. Aβ42 pathogenesis was also reduced by removal of endogenous fly tau; but, within the limits of detection of available methods, tau phosphorylation did not appear to be altered in flies expressing Aβ42. The GSK-3–mediated effects on Aβ42 toxicity appear to be at least in part mediated by tau-independent mechanisms, because the protective effect of lithium alone was greater than that of the removal of tau alone. Finally, Aβ42 levels were reduced upon GSK-3 inhibition, pointing to a direct role of GSK-3 in the regulation of Aβ42 peptide level, in the absence of APP processing. Our study points to the need both to identify the mechanisms by which GSK-3 modulates Aβ42 levels in the fly and to determine if similar mechanisms are present in mammals, and it supports the potential therapeutic use of GSK-3 inhibitors in AD. PMID:20824130

  1. Magnetic resonance characteristics of adult-onset Lhermitte-Duclos disease: An indicator for active cancer surveillance?

    PubMed

    Wei, Guangquan; Zhang, Wei; Li, Qinlong; Kang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Haitao; Liu, Xianping; Tang, Xing; Wu, Yuanming; Han, Juntao; Yin, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) is a rare, non-cancerous entity characterized by enlarged, abnormally developed cerebellar folia containing dysplastic cells. Symptomatic LDD is commonly observed in adults (adult-onset LDD, aLDD) as an isolated condition or associated with Cowden's disease (CD). The present study aimed to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and the underlying pathological findings in 7 cases of aLDD, with emphasis on the association with CD and the need for active cancer surveillance once the diagnosis of LDD is confirmed. The MRI findings along with the clinical and histopathological data collected from 7 patients with aLDD were retrospectively reviewed. The diagnosis of CD was based on a range of clinical characteristics, according to the International Cowden Consortium Criteria. A thorough review of the published data was conducted and our results indicated that all 7 cases shared similar MRI characteristics, whether the aLDD was sporadic (2 cases) or associated with CD (5 cases), including a highly typical non-enhancing striated MRI appearance of thickened folia, consisting of alternating bands on T1- and T2-weighted images. On gross examination, the involved cerebellar folia were distorted and enlarged, whereas the histopathological examination revealed that the molecular layer was widened and occupied by abnormal ganglion cells. Moreover, a reduction in the number or absence of the Purkinje cells and hypertrophy of the granular cell layer were observed. Our findings were consistent with the diagnosis of LDD. Variable levels of vacuolization of the white matter and the molecular layer were observed in all the cases. Notably, CD34 immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of angiogenesis within the lesions. aLDD associated with CD exhibited no pathological or immunohistochemical characteristics that were distinct from those of isolated aLDD. Of the 7 cases of aLDD, 5 presented with symptoms suggestive of CD

  2. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  3. Adult onset asymmetric upper limb tremor misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease: A clinical and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Schwingenschuh, Petra; Ruge, Diane; Edwards, Mark J; Terranova, Carmen; Katschnig, Petra; Carrillo, Fatima; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Dickson, John; Lees, Andrew J; Quinn, Niall; Mir, Pablo; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2010-01-01

    different from controls. Taken together, these results may help differentiate these SWEDDs patients from PD and support our hypothesis that adult-onset dystonia is the underlying diagnosis in this sub-group of patients with SWEDDs. PMID:20131394

  4. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  5. [Still's disease in the adult].

    PubMed

    Mitterhofer, A P; Bonomo, L

    1994-05-01

    The adult Still's disease (ASD) is an uncommon inflammatory systemic disorder which affects the young adult. It is characterized by high spiking fever, vanishing rash, oligopolyarthritis, neutrophilic leucocytosis, negative titers for rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies. Polyserositis, sore throat, uveitis are sometimes present and in one third of the cases it is possible to find hepato-splenomegaly with lymph node enlargement. G. Still first described the disease in child, in 1897, and in the adult it was recognized as a nosologic entity more than 70 years later. The ASD diagnosis is difficult and it is possible after the exclusion of many other diseases. Clinical manifestation are all nonspecific. In particular the presence of adenopathy, hepato-splenomegaly may suggest the possibility of a malignant lymphoma. Important exclusions include many other diseases such as the rheumatic fever, periodic fever, Lyme disease. At the same time a probable diagnosis of ASD should be considered in all the cases of high fever with rash, arthritis, neutrophilic leucocytosis or in the cases of fever of unknown origin (FUO). The prognosis is considered overall benign. The disease is usually sensible to salicylate treatment, even but the association with corticosteroids or, sometimes, with cytotoxic therapy is often required.

  6. Functional Characterization of a Novel Mutation in NKX2-5 Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Adult-Onset Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Mauro W.; Guo, Guanglan; Wolstein, Orit; Vale, Molly; Castro, M. Leticia; Wang, Libin; Otway, Robyn; Riek, Peter; Cochrane, Natalie; Furtado, Milena; Semsarian, Christopher; Weintraub, Robert G.; Yeoh, Thomas; Hayward, Christopher; Keogh, Anne; Macdonald, Peter; Feneley, Michael; Graham, Robert M.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Rosenthal, Nadia; Fatkin, Diane; Harvey, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The transcription factor NKX2-5 is crucial for heart development and mutations in this gene have been implicated in diverse congenital heart diseases (CHD) and conduction defects (CD) in mouse models and humans. Whether NKX2-5 mutations have a role in adult-onset heart disease is unknown. Methods and Results Mutation screening was performed in 220 probands with adult-onset dilated cardiomypathy (DCM). Six NKX2-5 coding sequence variants were identified, including 3 non-synonymous variants. A novel heterozygous mutation, I184M, located within the NKX2-5 homeodomain (HD), was identified in one family. A subset of family members had CHD, but there was an unexpectedly high prevalence of DCM. Functional analysis of I184M in vitro demonstrated a striking increase in protein expression when transfected into COS-7 cells or HL-1 cardiomyocytes, due to reduced degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In functional assays, DNA binding activity of I184M was reduced, resulting in impaired activation of target genes, despite increased expression levels of mutant protein. Conclusions Certain NKX2-5 HD mutations show abnormal protein degradation via the UPS and partially impaired transcriptional activity. We propose that this class of mutation can impair heart development and mature heart function, and contribute to NKX2-5-related cardiomyopathies with graded severity. PMID:23661673

  7. Psychogenic Stuttering of Adult Onset.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahr, Greg; Leith, William

    1992-01-01

    The characteristic features of psychogenic stuttering of adult onset are reviewed, and four cases of this disorder are presented. Psychogenic stuttering of adult onset is classified as a conversion reaction, and tentative criteria for this diagnosis are proposed. (Author/JDD)

  8. Comparison of methylprednisolone plus prednisolone with prednisolone alone as initial treatment in adult-onset minimal change disease: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa, Maki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Nagasawa, Yasuyuki; Oseto, Susumu; Mori, Daisuke; Tomida, Kodo; Hayashi, Terumasa; Izumi, Masaaki; Fukunaga, Megumu; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2014-06-06

    Previous studies suggested that intravenous methylprednisolone possibly accelerates remission of proteinuria in adult-onset minimal change disease; its impact on relapse of proteinuria is unknown. This multicenter retrospective cohort study included 125 adult-onset minimal change disease patients diagnosed by kidney biopsy between 2000 and 2009 and treated initially with corticosteroid in five nephrology centers in Japan participating in the Study of Outcomes and Practice Patterns of Minimal Change Disease. Times to first remission and first relapse of proteinuria after initiating the first immunosuppressive therapy were compared between 65 patients with initial use of intravenous methylprednisolone followed by prednisolone and 60 patients with initial use of prednisolone alone using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. After calculating the probability of receiving methylprednisolone and prednisolone using a logistic regression model (propensity score), the results were ascertained using propensity score-matched and -stratified models. During the median 3.6 years of observation (interquartile range=2.0-6.9), all 65 patients in the methylprednisolone and prednisolone group achieved remission within 11 (8-20) days of the corticosteroid initiation, whereas in the prednisolone group, 58 of 60 patients (96.7%) achieved remission within 19 (12-37) days (P<0.001). After achieving first remission, 32 (49.2%) patients in the methylprednisolone and prednisolone group and 43 (74.1%) patients in the prednisolone group developed at least one relapse. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models revealed that methylprednisolone and prednisolone use was significantly associated with early remission (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 2.30) and lower incidence of relapse (0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.29 to 0.85) compared with prednisolone use alone. These results were ascertained in propensity score-based models. No significant

  9. Comparison of Methylprednisolone Plus Prednisolone with Prednisolone Alone as Initial Treatment in Adult-Onset Minimal Change Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Shinzawa, Maki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Nagasawa, Yasuyuki; Oseto, Susumu; Mori, Daisuke; Tomida, Kodo; Hayashi, Terumasa; Izumi, Masaaki; Fukunaga, Megumu; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Previous studies suggested that intravenous methylprednisolone possibly accelerates remission of proteinuria in adult-onset minimal change disease; its impact on relapse of proteinuria is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This multicenter retrospective cohort study included 125 adult-onset minimal change disease patients diagnosed by kidney biopsy between 2000 and 2009 and treated initially with corticosteroid in five nephrology centers in Japan participating in the Study of Outcomes and Practice Patterns of Minimal Change Disease. Times to first remission and first relapse of proteinuria after initiating the first immunosuppressive therapy were compared between 65 patients with initial use of intravenous methylprednisolone followed by prednisolone and 60 patients with initial use of prednisolone alone using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. After calculating the probability of receiving methylprednisolone and prednisolone using a logistic regression model (propensity score), the results were ascertained using propensity score-matched and -stratified models. Results During the median 3.6 years of observation (interquartile range=2.0–6.9), all 65 patients in the methylprednisolone and prednisolone group achieved remission within 11 (8–20) days of the corticosteroid initiation, whereas in the prednisolone group, 58 of 60 patients (96.7%) achieved remission within 19 (12–37) days (P<0.001). After achieving first remission, 32 (49.2%) patients in the methylprednisolone and prednisolone group and 43 (74.1%) patients in the prednisolone group developed at least one relapse. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models revealed that methylprednisolone and prednisolone use was significantly associated with early remission (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 2.30) and lower incidence of relapse (0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.29 to 0.85) compared with prednisolone use

  10. Phenotypes, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Adult-Onset Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E.; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with many phenotypes, and age at disease onset is an important factor in separating the phenotypes. Genetic factors, atopy, and early respiratory tract infections are well-recognized factors predisposing to childhood-onset asthma. Adult-onset asthma is more often associated with obesity, smoking, depression, or other life-style or environmental factors, even though genetic factors and respiratory tract infections may also play a role in adult-onset disease. Adult-onset asthma is characterized by absence of atopy and is often severe requiring treatment with high dose of inhaled and/or oral steroids. Variety of risk factors and nonatopic nature of adult-onset disease suggest that variety of mechanisms is involved in the disease pathogenesis and that these mechanisms differ from the pathobiology of childhood-onset asthma with prevailing Th2 airway inflammation. Recognition of the mechanisms and mediators that drive the adult-onset disease helps to develop novel strategies for the treatment. The aim of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on the pathogenesis of adult-onset asthma and to concentrate on the mechanisms and mediators involved in establishing adult-onset asthma in response to specific risk factors. We also discuss the involvement of these mechanisms in the currently recognized phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. PMID:26538828

  11. TLR4 Endogenous Ligand S100A8/A9 Levels in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease and Their Association with Disease Activity and Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Han, Jae Ho; Kim, Woo-Jung; Noh, Hyun Jin; An, Jeong-Mi; Yim, Hyunee; Jung, Ju-Yang; Kim, You-Sun; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    S100A8/A9 has been suggested as a marker of disease activity in patients with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We evaluated the clinical significance of S100A8/A9 as a biomarker and its pathogenic role in AOSD. Blood samples were collected prospectively from 20 AOSD patients and 20 healthy controls (HCs). Furthermore, skin and lymph node biopsy specimens of AOSD patients were investigated for S100A8/A9 expression levels via immunohistochemistry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of active AOSD patients and HCs were investigated for S100A8/A9 cell signals. S100A8/A9, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in active AOSD patients were higher than those of HCs. S100A8/A9 levels correlated positively with IL-1β, TNF-α and C-reactive protein. The inflammatory cells expressing S100A8/A9 were graded from one to three in skin and lymph node biopsies of AOSD patients. The grading for S100A8/A9 was more intense in the skin lesions with karyorrhexis, mucin deposition, and neutrophil infiltration. Like lipopolysaccharide (LPS), S100A8/A9 induced phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) in PBMCs, suggesting that S100A8/A9 activates Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways. These findings suggest that S100A8/A9 may be involved in the inflammatory response with induction of proinflammatory cytokines and may serve as a clinicopathological marker for disease activity in AOSD. PMID:27537874

  12. Targeting Proteostasis Through the Protein Quality Control Function of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based Chaperone Machinery for Treatment of Adult Onset Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, William B.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Osawa, Yoichi; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available therapies for adult onset neurodegenerative diseases provide symptomatic relief, but are not disease modifying. We explore here a new neuroprotective approach based on drugs targeting chaperone-directed protein quality control. Critical target proteins that unfold and aggregate in these diseases, such as the polylglutamine androgen receptor (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy), huntingtin (Huntington’s disease), α-synuclein (Parkinson’s disease) and tau (Alzheimer’s disease) are client proteins of Hsp90, and their turnover is regulated by the protein quality control function of the Hsp90/Hsp70-based chaperone machinery. In protein quality control Hsp90 and Hsp70 have opposing effects on client protein stability; Hsp90 stabilizes the clients and inhibits their ubiquitination, whereas Hsp70 promotes CHIP-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. We discuss how drugs that modulate proteostasis by inhibiting Hsp90 function or by promoting Hsp70 function enhance the degradation of the critical aggregating proteins and ameliorate toxic symptoms in cell and animal disease models. PMID:25292434

  13. Highly Expression of CD11b and CD32 on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Adult-Onset Still’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Choi, Bunsoon; Suh, Chang-Hee; Han, Mi Hwa; Jung, Ju-Yang; Sayeed, Hasan M.; Kim, Ye Won; Sohn, Seonghyang

    2017-01-01

    Background: We investigated the potential role of several pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs; CD11b, CD11c, CD32, CD206, CD209, and dectin-1) in adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). Methods: The study included 13 untreated AOSD patients, 19 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (as a disease control), and 19 healthy controls (HCs). The PRRs were quantified in peripheral blood using flow cytometry. The serum levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-18, and IL-23 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Significantly higher mean frequencies of cells presenting CD11b and CD32 from whole blood were observed in patients with AOSD than in patients with RA or HC. The levels of IL-17, IL-18, and IL-23 were elevated in AOSD patients compared to HCs. CD11b frequencies from whole cells correlated with systemic scores, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, aspartate transaminase levels, interleukin-23 (IL-23) levels, and IL-18. Frequencies of CD209 from granulocytes were significantly correlated with systemic scores, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and levels of C-reactive protein, ferritin, LDH, IL-23, and interleukin-18 (IL-18). Conclusions: Elevated frequencies of circulating CD11b-positive cells and positive correlations with disease activity markers suggest that circulating CD11b-positive cells contribute to the pathogenesis of AOSD. PMID:28106835

  14. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage.

  15. An autopsied case of adult-onset bulbospinalform Alexander disease with a novel S393R mutation in the GFAP gene.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Mori, Keiko; Ito, Masumi; Mimuro, Maya; Aiba, Ikuko; Saito, Kozo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Yoshida, Tomokatsu; Nakagawa, Masanori; Yoshida, Mari

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Japanese man with no apparent family history noticed diplopia. He gradually showed gait disturbance and dysuria. Abducens disorder of eye movement with nystagmus, tongue atrophy with fasciculation, spastic tetraparesis, and sensory disturbance were also observed. MRI showed severe atrophy of the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord ("tadpole appearance"). Tracheotomy and gastrostomy were performed 7 years after onset due to the development of bulbar palsy. Death occurred following respiratory failure after 11 years total disease duration. The brain weighed 1,380 g. The cerebrum, cerebellum, midbrain, and upper pons were preserved from atrophy, but the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. A few Rosenthal fibers were observed in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, whereas numerous Rosenthal fibers were observed in the medulla oblongata to the cervical cord. Myelin loss with relatively preserved axons was extensively observed from the middle of the pons to the spinal cord. The clinicopathological diagnosis was adult-onset bulbospinal-form Alexander disease. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene analysis revealed a novel mutation of S393R. Expression patterns of S393R mutant GFAP using adrenal carcinoma-derived cells (SW13 cells) showed a decreased number of filamentous structures and abnormal aggregates.

  16. Are evoked potentials in patients with adult-onset pompe disease indicative of clinically relevant central nervous system involvement?

    PubMed

    Wirsching, Andreas; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang; Schoser, Benedikt

    2014-08-01

    Pompe disease is a multisystem autosomal recessive glycogen storage disease. Autoptic findings in patients with classic infantile and late-onset Pompe disease have proven that accumulation of glycogen can also be found in the peripheral and central nervous system. To assess the functional role of these pathologic findings, multimodal sensory evoked potentials were analyzed. Serial recordings for brainstem auditory, visual, and somatosensory evoked potentials of 11 late-onset Pompe patients were reviewed. Data at the onset of the enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alfa were compared with follow-up recordings at 12 and 24 months. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials showed a delayed peak I in 1/10 patients and an increased I-III and I-V interpeak latency in 1/10 patients, respectively. The III-V interpeak latencies were in the normal range. Visual evoked potentials were completely normal. Median somatosensory evoked potentials showed an extended interpeak latency in 3/9 patients. Wilcoxon tests comparing age-matched subgroups found significant differences in brainstem auditory evoked potentials and visual evoked potentials. We found that the majority of recordings for evoked potentials were within the ranges for standard values, therefore reflecting the lack of clinically relevant central nervous system involvement. Regular surveillance by means of evoked potentials does not seem to be appropriate in late-onset Pompe patients.

  17. Heterogeneity and frequency of movement disorders in juvenile and adult-onset Niemann-Pick C disease.

    PubMed

    Anheim, Mathieu; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaïd; Fleury-Lesaunier, Marie-Céline; Valenti-Hirsch, Maria-Paola; Hirsch, Edouard; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Thobois, Stéphane; Vanier, Marie T; Latour, Philippe; Tranchant, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a recessive neurolipidosis. We report five adolescent and adult NPC cases to underscore the frequency and heterogeneity of movement disorders in NPC. Clinical, morphologic, biochemical and genetic study was performed in the five patients. Disease onset was between 8 and 50 years. Movement disorders were present in all cases, were heterogeneous and often combined [cerebellar ataxia (5/5), myoclonus (3/5), dystonia (2/5), chorea (1/5) and tremor (1/5)] and were the first sign in 4/5. Two patients were reported to have no vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP) at the first examination. Two patients experienced acute neuropsychiatric signs leading to death in one case due to myoclonic storm. Filipin staining was always positive. Two NPC1 mutations were identified in three patients, only one in two siblings. NPC should be considered in case of unexplained movement disorders, even when VSGP or cataplexy are not reported. Filipin staining remains a strong support for the diagnosis. Treatment with miglustat should be considered which is currently the only approved disease-specific treatment of NPC in children and adults.

  18. Metabolic Disturbances in Adult-Onset Still’s Disease Evaluated Using Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Hsieh, Chia-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Hung, Wei-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Objective Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based comprehensive analysis of metabolic profiles with metabolomics approach has potential diagnostic and predictive implications. However, no metabolomics data have been reported in adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). This study investigated the metabolomic profiles in AOSD patients and examined their association with clinical characteristics and disease outcome. Methods Serum metabolite profiles were determined on 32 AOSD patients and 30 healthy controls (HC) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)/MS analysis, and the differentially expressed metabolites were quantified using multiple reactions monitoring (MRM)/MS analysis in 44 patients and 42 HC. Pure standards were utilized to confirm the presence of the differentially expressed metabolites. Results Eighteen differentially expressed metabolites were identified in AOSD patents using LC/MS-based analysis, of which 13 metabolites were validated by MRM/MS analysis. Among them, serum levels of lysoPC(18:2), urocanic acid and indole were significantly lower, and L-phenylalanine levels were significantly higher in AOSD patients compared with HC. Moreover, serum levels of lysoPC(18:2), PhePhe, uridine, taurine, L-threonine, and (R)-3-Hydroxy-hexadecanoic acid were significantly correlated with disease activity scores (all p<0.05) in AOSD patients. A different clustering of metabolites was associated with a different disease outcome, with significantly lower levels of isovalerylsarcosine observed in patients with chronic articular pattern (median, 77.0AU/ml) compared with monocyclic (341.5AU/ml, p<0.01) or polycyclic systemic pattern (168.0AU/ml, p<0.05). Conclusion Thirteen differentially expressed metabolites identified and validated in AOSD patients were shown to be involved in five metabolic pathways. Significant associations of metabolic profiles with disease activity and outcome of AOSD suggest their involvement in AOSD pathogenesis. PMID

  19. Observational clinical study of 22 adult-onset Pompe disease patients undergoing enzyme replacement therapy over 5years.

    PubMed

    Stepien, Karolina M; Hendriksz, Christian J; Roberts, Mark; Sharma, Reena

    2016-04-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disease resulting from deficiency of the acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The late-onset Pompe Disease (LOPD) patients develop muscular and respiratory complications later in life. We describe a retrospective observational cohort study including 22 patients with LOPD. The cohort was assessed at baseline before Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alpha (20mg/kg biweekly) was commenced and subsequently relevant information was collected at 2, 4 and 5years later. The median age of the patients at study entry was 44years (16-64years), with median disease duration of 11.5years (4-31years). At baseline, 10 patients (45%) could walk without support, 12 (55%) could walk with unilateral or bilateral support including 3/12 were wheelchair bound. Mean predicted FVC % was 55.7 (95% CI 45-66) of predicted normal at baseline and showed no significant change after 5years (54.6 (95% CI 43-66)), (all p=0.9815). Mean FVC % supine was 41.8 (95% CI 33.8-49) of predicted normal at baseline and remained significantly unchanged at 5years (48.4 (95% CI 37-59.6)), (all p=0.8680). The overnight non-invasive ventilator dependence increased by 18.2% as compared with baseline and requirement of mobility aids increased during this period by 5.2% as compared with the baseline. Mean walking distance at 6min walk test was 411.5 (95% CI 338-485) at baseline, 266.5 (95% CI 187-346) m at 2years, 238.6 (95% CI 162-315) m at 4years and 286.8 (95% CI 203-370) m at 5years (p=0.1981; ANOVA was completed only for 14 patients). A gradual decline in FVC% predicted was noted only in four cases and a decline in FVC% supine in two other. Only one patient showed a decline in both pulmonary function tests. In all remaining cases (17/22) respiratory function remains stable. In conclusion overall pulmonary function tests and mobility remained stable for 5years in majority of patients on ERT. However, in some patients they continued to decline in spite of ERT

  20. Adult Onset Asthma and Periocular Xanthogranuloma (AAPOX), a Rare Entity With a Strong Link to IgG4-Related Disease: An Observational Case Report Study.

    PubMed

    London, Jonathan; Martin, Antoine; Soussan, Michael; Badelon, Isabelle; Gille, Thomas; Uzunhan, Yurdagul; Giroux-Leprieur, Bénédicte; Warzocha, Ursula; Régent, Alexis; Galatoire, Olivier; Dhote, Robin; Abad, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Adult onset asthma and periocular xanthogranuloma (AAPOX) is a rare non-Langerhans histiocytosis characterized histopathologically by a periocular infiltration of foamy histiocytes and Touton giant cells. Benign hyperplasia with plasma cell infiltration is classically described in eyelids or lymph nodes of AAPOX patients. It is also a characteristic feature of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), a new entity defined by an IgG4-bearing plasma cell infiltration of organs.To determine if AAPOX syndrome shares clinical, biological, and histopathological characteristics with IgG4-RD, we used the comprehensive clinical diagnostic criteria for IgG4-RD in a retrospective case series of three consecutive patients with histologically-proven AAPOX. Patients who were diagnosed with AAPOX at a French academic referral center for orbital inflammation between November 1996 and March 2013 were enrolled. Biopsies from ocular adnexa or other organs were systematically reexamined. For each patient, clinical and serological data, radiologic findings, and treatment were retrospectively analyzed.Two AAPOX patients fulfilled all of the diagnostic criteria for a definite IgG4-RD. One patient who lacked the serological criteria fulfilled the criteria of a probable IgG4-RD.These 3 cases of AAPOX patients fulfilled the IgG4-RD comprehensive clinical diagnostic criteria. To our knowledge, this is the first observational case report study to clearly show a strong relationship between IgG4-RD and AAPOX syndrome.

  1. Adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) and Nasu-Hakola disease: lesion staging and dynamic changes of axons and microglial subsets.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Suzuki-Kouyama, Emi; Inoue, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Asa; Tokiwai, Mika; Arai, Nobutaka; Satoh, Jun-Ichi; Aoki, Naoya; Jinnai, Kenji; Yazawa, Ikuru; Arai, Kimihito; Ishihara, Kenji; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Yagisita, Saburo; Amano, Naoji; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Terada, Seishi; Yoshida, Mari; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mitsuyama, Yoshio; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2016-09-08

    The brains of 10 Japanese patients with adult onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and eight Japanese patients with Nasu-Hakola disease (N-HD) and five age-matched Japanese controls were examined neuropathologically with special reference to lesion staging and dynamic changes of microglial subsets. In both diseases, the pathognomonic neuropathological features included spherically swollen axons (spheroids and globules), axon loss and changes of microglia in the white matter. In ALSP, four lesion stages based on the degree of axon loss were discernible: Stage I, patchy axon loss in the cerebral white matter without atrophy; Stage II, large patchy areas of axon loss with slight atrophy of the cerebral white matter and slight dilatation of the lateral ventricles; Stage III, extensive axon loss in the cerebral white matter and dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles without remarkable axon loss in the brainstem and cerebellum; Stage IV, devastated cerebral white matter with marked dilatation of the ventricles and axon loss in the brainstem and/or cerebellum. Internal capsule and pontine base were relatively well preserved in the N-HD, even at Stage IV, and the swollen axons were larger with a higher density in the ALSP. Microglial cells immunopositive for CD68, CD163 or CD204 were far more obvious in ALSP, than in N-HD, and the shape and density of the cells changed in each stage. With progression of the stage, clinical symptoms became worse to apathetic state, and epilepsy was frequently observed in patients at Stages III and IV in both diseases. From these findings, it is concluded that (i) shape, density and subsets of microglia change dynamically along the passage of stages and (ii) increase of IBA-1-, CD68-, CD163- and CD204-immunopositive cells precedes loss of axons in ALSP.

  2. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Eveline S.; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B.; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A.; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M.; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E.; Yeo, Gene W.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43Q331K and TDP-43M337V), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43–dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43Q331K, but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43Q331K enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  3. Adult-onset food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shmuel

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is increasing in both the pediatric and adult populations. While symptom onset occurs mostly during childhood, there are a considerable number of patients whose symptoms first begin to appear after the age of 18 years. The majority of patients with adult-onset food allergy suffer from the pollen-plant allergy syndromes. Many of them manifest their allergy after exercise and consuming food to which they are allergic. Eosinophilic esophagitis, an eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus affecting individuals of all ages, recently emerged as another allergic manifestation, with both immediate and late response to the ingested food. This review provides a condensed update of the current data in the literature on adult-onset allergy.

  4. Peyronie's Disease: Still a Surgical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Daniel; Ercole, Cesar E.; Hakky, Tariq S.; Kramer, Andrew; Carrion, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Peyronie's Disease (PD) remains a challenging and clinically significant morbid condition. Since its first description by François Gigot de la Peyronie, much of the treatment for PD remains nonstandardized. PD is characterized by the formation of fibrous plaques at the level of the tunica albuginea. Clinical manifestations include morphologic changes, such as curvatures and hourglass deformities. Here, we review the common surgical techniques for the management of patients with PD. PMID:22956943

  5. An atypical presentation of adult-onset Still’s disease complicated by pulmonary hypertension and macrophage activation syndrome treated with immunosuppression: a case-based review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Daniel K.; Horn, Evelyn M.; Haythe, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known complication of rheumatologic diseases, but it is only rarely associated with adult-onset Still’s disease (AOSD). We describe the case of a 30-year-old woman who presented in a pulmonary hypertension crisis and was found to have underlying AOSD with PAH and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with a course complicated by macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). She dramatically improved with steroids, cyclosporine A, and anakinra, with total resolution of the MAS and significant improvement of her pulmonary arterial pressures. While there are only select case reports of AOSD associated with PAH, this is the first reported case of (1) AOSD complicated by both PAH and MAS and (2) AOSD complicated by biopsy-proven NSIP. Clinically, this case highlights the efficacy of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of PAH and MAS from underlying AOSD and supports their use in this setting. PMID:27162622

  6. The Scottish Motor Neuron Disease Register: a prospective study of adult onset motor neuron disease in Scotland. Methodology, demography and clinical features of incident cases in 1989.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The Scottish Motor Neuron Disease Register (SMNDR) is a prospective, collaborative, population based study of motor neuron disease (MND) in Scotland. The register started in January 1989 with the aim of studying the clinical and epidemiological features of MND by prospectively identifying incident patients. It is based on a system of registration by recruitment from multiple sources, followed by the collection of complete clinical data and follow up, mainly through general practitioners. In this report the register's methodology and the demography and incidence data for the first year of study are presented. One hundred and fourteen newly diagnosed patients were identified in 1989 giving a crude incidence for Scotland of 2.24/100,000/year. Standardised incidence ratios showed a non-significant trend towards lower rates in north eastern regions and island areas. PMID:1640227

  7. Functional and Structural Analyses of CYP1B1 Variants Linked to Congenital and Adult-Onset Glaucoma to Investigate the Molecular Basis of These Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Kunal

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness, appears in various forms. Mutations in CYP1B1 result in primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) by an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance while it acts as a modifier locus for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). We investigated the molecular basis of the variable phenotypes resulting from the defects in CYP1B1 by using subclones of 23 CYP1B1 mutants reported in glaucoma patients, in a cell based system by measuring the dual activity of the enzyme to metabolize both retinol and 17β-estradiol. Most variants linked to POAG showed low steroid metabolism while null or very high retinol metabolism was observed in variants identified in PCG. We examined the translational turnover rates of mutant proteins after the addition of cycloheximide and observed that the levels of enzyme activity mostly corroborated the translational turnover rate. We performed extensive normal mode analysis and molecular-dynamics-simulations-based structural analyses and observed significant variation of fluctuation in certain segmental parts of the mutant proteins, especially at the B-C and F-G loops, which were previously shown to affect the dynamic behavior and ligand entry/exit properties of the cytochrome P450 family of proteins. Our molecular study corroborates the structural analysis, and suggests that the pathologic state of the carrier of CYP1B1 mutations is determined by the allelic state of the gene. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to dissect biological activities of CYP1B1 for correlation with congenital and adult onset glaucomas. PMID:27243976

  8. Hyperferritinemic syndrome: Still's disease and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome triggered by fulminant Chikungunya infection: a case report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Juan-Felipe; Navarro, Erika-Paola; Echeverry, Alex; Moncada, Pablo A; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    There are four medical conditions characterized by high levels of ferritin, the macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), adult onset Still' s disease (AOSD), catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), and septic shock, that share similar clinical and laboratory features, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. This common syndrome entity is termed "the hyperferritinemic syndrome." Here, we describe two different cases of hyperferritinemic syndrome triggered by Chikungunya fever virus infection: a 21-year-old female with SLE and a 32-year-old male patient who developed AOSD after the coinfection of dengue and Chikungunya viruses.

  9. Expression of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein-I (CRABP-I) in the cerebrospinal fluid of adult onset moyamoya disease and its association with clinical presentation and postoperative haemodynamic change.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Moon, Youn-Joo; Cho, Won-Sang; Son, Young-Je; Kim, Seung-Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Bang, Jae Seung; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Oh, Chang Wan

    2014-07-01

    The elevation of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein-I (CRABP-I) has been suggested as a candidate in the pathogenesis of paediatric moyamoya disease (MMD). However, few studies have addressed CRABP-I in adult onset MMD. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of CRABP-I in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of adult onset MMD, and to evaluate its association with clinical presentation and postoperative haemodynamic change. This study examined the CSF from 103 patients: bilateral MMD, n=58 (56.3%); unilateral MMD, n=19 (18.4%); atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease (ACVD), n=21 (20.4%); and control group, n=5 (4.9%). The intensity of CRABP-I was confirmed by western blotting and expressed as the median (25th-75th percentile). The differences in CRABP-I expression according to disease entity (unilateral MMD vs bilateral MMD vs ACVD), initial presenting symptoms (haemorrhage vs ischaemia) and postoperative haemodynamic change (vascular reserve in single photon emission CT and basal collateral vessels in digital subtraction angiography) were analysed. CRABP-I intensities in bilateral MMD (1.45(0.86-2.52)) were significantly higher than in unilateral MMD (0.91(0.78-1.20)) (p=0.044) or ACVD (0.85(0.66-1.11)) (p=0.004). No significant differences were noted based on the initial presenting symptoms (p=0.687). CRABP-I was not associated with improvement in vascular reserve (p=0.327), but with decrease in basal collateral vessels (p=0.023) postoperatively. Higher CRABP-I in the CSF can be associated with typical bilateral MMD pathogenesis in adults. Additionally, postoperative basal collateral change may be related to the degree of CRABP-I expression. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Reviewing Dengue: Still a Neglected Tropical Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Horstick, Olaf; Tozan, Yesim; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is currently listed as a “neglected tropical disease” (NTD). But is dengue still an NTD or not? Classifying dengue as an NTD may carry advantages, but is it justified? This review considers the criteria for the definition of an NTD, the current diverse lists of NTDs by different stakeholders, and the commonalities and differences of dengue with other NTDs. We also review the current research gaps and research activities and the adequacy of funding for dengue research and development (R&D) (2003–2013). NTD definitions have been developed to a higher precision since the early 2000s, with the following main features: NTDs are characterised as a) poverty related, b) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, c) lacking public health attention, d) having poor research funding and shortcomings in R&D, e) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and f) often having no specific treatment available. Dengue meets most of these criteria, but not all. Although dengue predominantly affects resource-limited countries, it does not necessarily only target the poor and marginalised in those countries. Dengue increasingly attracts public health attention, and in some affected countries it is now a high profile disease. Research funding for dengue has increased exponentially in the past two decades, in particular in the area of dengue vaccine development. However, despite advances in dengue research, dengue epidemics are increasing in frequency and magnitude, and dengue is expanding to new areas. Specific treatment and a highly effective vaccine remain elusive. Major research gaps exist in the area of integrated surveillance and vector control. Hence, although dengue differs from many of the NTDs, it still meets important criteria commonly used for NTDs. The current need for increased R&D spending, shared by dengue and other NTDs, is perhaps the key reason why dengue should continue to be considered an NTD. PMID:25928673

  11. Etiopathogenesis and Therapeutic Approach to Adult Onset Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Verma, Poonam; Sangwan, Ankita; Dayal, Surabhi; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is usually considered as a skin disorder that primarily affects adolescents reaching a peak at the age of 14–17 years in females and 16–19 years in males. However, recent epidemiologic studies have shown that a significant number of female patients aged >25 years experience acne. As it is regarded as a disease of teenagers, adults are more apprehensive and experience social anxiety. Hence, adult onset acne has become a matter of concern. PMID:27512185

  12. "Petrified ears" with idiopathic adult-onset pituitary insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Yashpal; Gangadhar, Prathosh; Walia, Rama R; Bhansali, Anil

    2012-09-01

    "Petrified ears" or calcification of auricular cartilage is an uncommonly reported condition. The most common causes of this phenomenon are local trauma, frost bite, and inflammation. Adrenal insufficiency is the most frequent systemic disease associated with auricular calcification. We present a case of idiopathic adult-onset pituitary insufficiency with hypocortisolism and bilateral auricular calcification. Recognition of the association between auricular calcification and adrenal insufficiency can be an important step toward the identification of a life-threatening cortisol deficiency.

  13. Adult onset pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy with ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Verghese, J; Weidenheim, K; Malik, S; Rapin, I

    2002-11-01

    Pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) is an adult-onset leukodystrophy, characterized pathologically by the presence of glial and microglial cytoplasmic pigment inclusions. The complete phenotype, genotype and pathogenetic mechanisms in POLD have not been elucidated. We followed for 18 years a woman with autopsy-proven POLD, who presented with 'frontal' dementia and spasticity. Her further course was marked by progressive mutism, apraxia and seizures. Her sister had died of the same disease after a much more rapidly progressing course. These sisters had primary infertility with pathologic evidence of streak ovaries. Diagnosis was confirmed in both cases by post-mortem examination. POLD is a rare cause of adult-onset leukodystrophy presenting with dementia. Ovarian dysgenesis is extremely rare in the absence of demonstrable chromosomal abnormalities and extends the clinical spectrum of POLD.

  14. Clinical predictors of remission and persistence of adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Guus A; Coumou, Hanneke; de Nijs, Selma B; Weersink, Els J; Bel, Elizabeth H

    2017-04-22

    Adult-onset asthma is an important but relatively understudied asthma phenotype and little is known about its natural course and prognosis. The remission rate is believed to be low, and it is still obscure which factors predict remission or persistence of the disease. This study sought to determine the remission rate and identify predictors of persistence and remission of adult-onset asthma. Two hundred adult patients with recently diagnosed (<1 year) asthma were recruited from secondary and tertiary pulmonary clinics and prospectively followed for 5 years. Clinical, functional, and inflammatory parameters were assessed at baseline and at yearly visits. Asthma remission was defined as absence of asthma symptoms for ≥1 year and no asthma medication use for ≥1 year. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were performed. Five-year follow-up data of 170 patients (85%) was available. Of these, 27 patients (15.9%) experienced asthma remission. Patients with asthma persistence were older, had worse asthma control, required higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids, had more severe airway hyperresponsiveness, more often nasal polyps, and higher levels of blood neutrophils as compared to patients who experienced clinical remission. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, only moderate to severe bronchial hyperresponsiveness and nasal polyps were independent predictors of asthma persistence. Patients with these 2 characteristics had <1% chance of asthma remission. One in 6 patients with adult-onset asthma experiences remission within the first 5 years of the disease. In patients with moderate to severe bronchial hyperresponsiveness and nasal polyposis, the chance of remission is close to zero. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of Adult Onset Seizures.

    PubMed

    Crepeau, Amy Z; Sirven, Joseph I

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy is a common yet heterogeneous disease. As a result, management often requires complex decision making. The ultimate goal of seizure management is for the patient to have no seizures and no considerable adverse effects from the treatment. Antiepileptic drugs are the mainstay of therapy, with more than 20 medications currently approved in the United States. Antiepileptic drug selection requires an understanding of the patient's epilepsy, along with consideration of comorbidities and potential for adverse events. After a patient has failed at least 2 appropriate antiepileptic drugs, they are determined to be medically refractory. At this time, additional therapy, including dietary, device, or surgical treatments, need to be considered, typically at a certified epilepsy center. All these treatments require consideration of the potential for seizure freedom, balanced against potential adverse effects, and can have a positive effect on seizure control and quality of life. This review article discussed the treatment options available for adults with epilepsy, including medical, surgical, dietary, and device therapies. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interleukin 6 SNP rs1800797 associates with the risk of adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, T K; Jaakkola, J J K; Jaakkola, M S

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL6) is an inflammatory cytokine that has been suggested to have an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with levels of IL6, and with childhood and prevalent adult asthma. A recent study also suggested that IL6 SNPs associate especially with atopic asthma. However, association of IL6 SNPs with adult-onset asthma has not been studied. In a population-based study of 467 incident adult-onset asthma cases and 613 disease-free controls from South Finland, we analyzed association of 6 tagging SNPs of the IL6 locus with the risk of adult-onset asthma and with atopy. Asthma was clinically diagnosed, and atopy was defined based on Phadiatop test. IL6 SNP rs1800797 associated with the risk of adult-onset asthma in a log additive model, with adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.09-1.57), and especially with the risk of atopic adult-onset asthma when compared with non-atopic controls, aOR 1.46 (95% CI 1.12-1.90). This is the first study to show an association of IL6 with adult-onset asthma, and especially with atopic adult-onset asthma.

  17. Adult Onset Vitiligo: Multivariate Analysis Suggests the Need for a Thyroid Screening.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, L; Colucci, R; Cammi, A; Dragoni, F; Moretti, S

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of age at onset on disease features in vitiligo. Objectives. To identify factors associated with adult onset vitiligo in comparison with childhood onset vitiligo. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively collected medical records of 191 patients. Such records included clinical examination, personal and familial medical history, laboratory evaluations, concomitant vitiligo treatment and drug assumption. Results. 123 patients with a disease onset after the age of 40 (adult onset vitiligo) were compared with 68 patients who developed vitiligo before the age of 12 (childhood onset vitiligo). Multivariate analysis revealed that personal history of thyroid diseases (P = 0.04; OR 0.4), stress at onset (P = 0.002; OR = 0.34), personal history of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) (P = 0.003; OR = 0.23), and thyroid nodules (P = 0.001; OR 0.90) were independently associated with adult onset vitiligo, whereas family history of dermatological diseases (P = 0.003; OR = 2.87) and Koebner phenomenon (P < 0.001; OR = 4.73) with childhood onset vitiligo. Moreover, in the adult onset group, concomitant thyroid disease preceded vitiligo in a statistically significant number of patients (P = 0.014). Conclusions. Childhood onset and adult onset vitiligo have different clinical features. In particular, ATD and thyroid nodules were significantly associated with adult onset vitiligo, suggesting that a thyroid screening should be recommended in this group of patients.

  18. Adult Onset Vitiligo: Multivariate Analysis Suggests the Need for a Thyroid Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, L.; Cammi, A.; Dragoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are limited epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of age at onset on disease features in vitiligo. Objectives. To identify factors associated with adult onset vitiligo in comparison with childhood onset vitiligo. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively collected medical records of 191 patients. Such records included clinical examination, personal and familial medical history, laboratory evaluations, concomitant vitiligo treatment and drug assumption. Results. 123 patients with a disease onset after the age of 40 (adult onset vitiligo) were compared with 68 patients who developed vitiligo before the age of 12 (childhood onset vitiligo). Multivariate analysis revealed that personal history of thyroid diseases (P = 0.04; OR 0.4), stress at onset (P = 0.002; OR = 0.34), personal history of autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) (P = 0.003; OR = 0.23), and thyroid nodules (P = 0.001; OR 0.90) were independently associated with adult onset vitiligo, whereas family history of dermatological diseases (P = 0.003; OR = 2.87) and Koebner phenomenon (P < 0.001; OR = 4.73) with childhood onset vitiligo. Moreover, in the adult onset group, concomitant thyroid disease preceded vitiligo in a statistically significant number of patients (P = 0.014). Conclusions. Childhood onset and adult onset vitiligo have different clinical features. In particular, ATD and thyroid nodules were significantly associated with adult onset vitiligo, suggesting that a thyroid screening should be recommended in this group of patients. PMID:27747240

  19. Triglycerides and heart disease: still a hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ira J; Eckel, Robert H; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport, and its tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, their influence on high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein, or the underlying diseases that lead to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate very-low-density lipoprotein and their remnants and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development, but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease.

  20. Triglycerides and Heart Disease, Still a Hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Eckel, Robert H.; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport and tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride rich lipoproteins, their influence on HDL and LDL, or the underlying diseases leading to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate VLDL and their remnants, and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development; but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population, and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease. PMID:21527746

  1. [Human hantavirus diseases - still neglected zoonoses?].

    PubMed

    Vrbovská, V; Chalupa, P; Straková, P; Hubálek, Z; Rudolf, I

    2015-10-01

    Hantavirus disease is the most common rodent-borne viral infection in the Czech Republic, with a mean annual incidence of 0.02 cases per 100 000 population and specific antibodies detected in 1% of the human population. Four hantaviruses (Puumala, Dobrava-Belgrade, Tula, and Seewis) circulate in this country, of which Puumala virus (responsible for a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome called nephropathia epidemica) and Dobrava-Belgrade virus (causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome) have been proven to cause human disease. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive review of the hantaviruses occurring in the Czech Republic, based on the literature published during the past three decades, including their geographical distribution and clinical symptoms. The recent detection of Tula virus in an immunocompromised person as well as reports of Seoul virus infections in Europe highlight the possible emergence of neglected hantavirus infections in the foreseeable future.

  2. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome as a manifestation of brazilian lyme disease-like syndrome: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Spera, Raphael Ribeiro; de Campos, Fernando Peixoto Ferraz; Freitas, Christian Henrique de Andrade; Garcia, Márcio Ricardo Taveira; Lopes, Leonardo da Costa; Prokopowitsch, Aleksander Snioka

    2014-01-01

    Described in 1962, the opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome (OMAS) is a rare, neurologically debilitating disorder with distinct characteristics that may begin in childhood or adult life. Although many cases remain without etiological diagnosis, others are related to neoplasms and infectious diseases. We report a 41-year-old previously healthy male with an 8-day history of headache, vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and nystagmus. After a normal brain computed tomography and lymphocytic pleocytosis in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), intravenous acyclovir therapy was initiated in the emergency room. On the third day of hospitalization, the diagnosis of OMAS was made based on the presence of chaotic and irregular eye movements, dysarthric speech, gait instability, generalized tremor, and myoclonic jerks. In the face of his neurological worsening, ampicillin followed by nonspecific immunotherapy (methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin) was prescribed, with mild clinical improvement. After a thorough laboratory workup, the definite diagnosis of neuroborreliosis was established and ceftriaxone (4 g/daily/3 wks) and doxycycline (200 mg/day/2 mo) was administered. Toward the end of the ceftriaxone regimen, the neurologic signs substantially improved. We believe this to be the first case description of OMAS as clinical presentation of Brazilian Lyme disease-like syndrome (Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome). PMID:28652990

  3. Iron hypothesis of cardiovascular disease: still controversial.

    PubMed

    Aursulesei, Viviana; Cozma, A; Krasniqi, A

    2014-01-01

    Iron hypothesis has been a controversial subject for over 30 years as many studies support its role as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, while other studies found no evidence to support it. The conflicting results are accounted for by the non-homogeneity of trial design in terms of population inclusion criteria and different endpoints, non-uniform use of parameters for assessing iron role, and incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action. The nature of iron is dual, being of crucial importance for the human body, but also toxic as "free iron" induces oxidative stress. Under physiological conditions, there are efficient and complex mechanisms against iron-induced oxidative stress, which could be reproduced for creating new, intelligent antioxidants. Iron depletion improves the cardiovascular prognosis only if serum concentration is at the lowest limit of normal ranges. However, low iron levels and the type of dietary iron intake correlate with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, influence the ischemic endpoints in the elderly, and exert negative impact on heart failure prognosis. So far, the causal relation and involved mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Iron overload is a difficult and frequent condition, involving the cardiovascular system by specific pathogenic pathways, therefore determining a particular form of restrictive cardiomyopathy and vaso-occlusive arterial damage.

  4. [Cat scratch disease: still current zoonosis].

    PubMed

    Hozáková, L; Rožnovský, L; Bílková Fránková, H

    2014-03-01

    A retrospective evaluation of a group of patients which is focused on clinical picture, serological diagnosis, therapy and familial occurrence of the disease. Cat scratch disease (CSD) was considered within the scope of a differential diagnosis of lymphadenopathy. Serological diagnosis was based on detection of antibodies against Bartonella henselae by indirect immunofluorescence, where the level of IgG antibodies of at least 1 : 256 or any positive level of IgM antibodies were considered positive for CSD. If a histological examination was conducted, the suspicion of CSD was supported by finding granulomatous inflammation. Macrolides were used for treatment in both children and adults. In addition to macrolides, doxycycline was used in adults. From 2004 to 2013, a total of 27 patients aged 7-73 years were diagnosed with CSD at the Clinic of Infectious Medicine, University Hospital in Ostrava. None of them suffered from immunodeficiency detected earlier. Diagnostic extirpation of a lymph node was performed in 5 patients diagnosed with granulomatous inflammation. Lymph node syndrome was observed in all patients, with cervical, inguinal and axillary nodes being most frequently affected. However, two patients had supraclavicular nodes affected and a 52-year-old woman had unusual swelling of lymphatic tissue in the scapular region with skin lesions. Lymph node syndrome accompanied by encephalopathy was observed in one 50-year-old patient. Positive IgM antibodies were detected in only 8 patients. There were two cases of familial occurrence affecting 2 and 3 family members. Antibiotic therapy with full resolution of clinical findings was successful in 24 patients, including the patient with encephalopathy. In spite of the antibiotic treatment, three patients developed lymph node colliquation requiring surgical intervention. Atypical lymph node localization in 3 patients, encephalopathy in 1 patient, positive levels of IgM antibodies in 8 only patients, delayed antibodies

  5. Similarity of HLA-DQ profiles in adult-onset type 1 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without extra-pancreatic auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, X F; Larger, E; Clauser, E; Assan, R

    1992-01-01

    Some insulin-dependent diabetic patients present with auto-immune diseases involving extra pancreatic tissues (type 1b diabetes mellitus). The genetic specificity of this syndrome, as opposed to insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) free of such associations (Type 1a IDDM) is not clearly established. We have analyzed the HLA-DQB1 and DQA1, loci, after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, in 44 Type 1b IDDM patients, 78 Type 1a IDDM patients and 105 control subjects. No essential difference in HLA-DQ profiles appeared between Type 1b and Type 1a IDDM patients. Both diabetic groups displayed a significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles negative for aspartate at position 57 (Type 1b: 83%; Type 1a: 89%; controls 48%; p < 0.001 vs both patient groups) and in DQB1 Asp 57 negative homozygosity: 71% of Type 1b; 80% of Type 1a; 25% of controls (p < 0.01). This enrichment in DQB1 Asp 57 negative alleles was accounted for by DQB1* 0201 in the Type 1b group, and by DQB1 % 0201 and 0302 in the Type 1a patients. Conversely, alleles DQB1* 0602 and 0301 (DQB1 Asp 57 positive) were protective. Both diabetic groups also displayed a significant enrichment in DQA1 alleles positives for arginine at position 52 (65% of Type 1b; 76% of Type 1a; 50% of control subjects; p < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, vs controls), and in DQA1 Arg 52 positive homozygotes (48% of Type 1b, 58% of Type 1a, 22% of control subjects; p < 0.01). All differences between diabetic groups and the control group were more pronounced in the case of Type 1a than of Type 1b patients. The HLA-DQ genes shared by Type 1a and Type 1b patients must therefore be closely associated with islet autoimmunity. Genetic differences between Type 1a and Type 1b syndromes, if any, must be investigated in other MHC and non-MHC regions of the genome.

  6. Anakinra-Induced Acute Liver Failure in an Adolescent Patient with Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sarah A; Vittorio, Jennifer M; Martinez, Mercedes; Fester, Keith A; Lagana, Stephen M; Lobritto, Steven J; Ovchinsky, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) family consists of 11 cytokines that play key regulatory roles in many immune and inflammatory processes. Anakinra (Kineret, Amgen, Inc.) is an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Increased levels of IL-1 are found in several disease states suggesting that anakinra may be beneficial in disorders associated with elevated IL-1 levels. Anakinra has been effectively used in the treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD). Despite its therapeutic benefits, anakinra also has potential side effects, including hepatotoxicity. We present a case of AOSD in an adolescent male that was treated with anakinra. During treatment, the patient developed acute liver failure that resolved upon withdrawal of anakinra. Although anakinra-induced liver injury has been reported in adults, including one case of subacute liver failure, we believe our case is the first to show severe acute liver failure in an adolescent treated with anakinra. This case provides significant insight into a potentially serious complication associated with anakinra. It is important to further delineate these complications as the treatment indications for this drug expand. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  7. Season of Birth and Risk for Adult Onset Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult onset glioma is a rare cancer which occurs more frequently in Caucasians than African Americans, and in men than women. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the only well established environmental risk factor, and this factor explains only a small percentage of cases. Several recent studies have reported an association between season of birth and glioma risk. This paper reviews the plausibility of evidence focusing on the seasonal interrelation of farming, allergies, viruses, vitamin D, diet, birth weight, and handedness. To date, a convincing explanation for the occurrence of adult gliomas decades after a seasonal exposure at birth remains elusive. PMID:20623001

  8. Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes: current knowledge and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Buzzetti, Raffaella; Zampetti, Simona; Maddaloni, Ernesto

    2017-09-08

    Adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is a heterogeneous disease that is characterized by a reduced genetic load, a less intensive autoimmune process and a mild metabolic decompensation at onset compared with young-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The majority of patients with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes do not require insulin treatment for at least 6 months after diagnosis. Such patients are defined as having latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), which is distinct from classic adult-onset T1DM. The extensive heterogeneity of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes is apparent beyond the distinction between classic adult-onset T1DM and LADA. LADA is characterized by genetic, phenotypic and humoral heterogeneity, encompassing different degrees of insulin resistance and autoimmunity; this heterogeneity is probably a result of different pathological mechanisms, which have implications for treatment. The existence of heterogeneous phenotypes in LADA makes it difficult to establish an a priori treatment algorithm, and therefore, a personalized medicine approach is required. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding and gaps in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology and clinical features of adult-onset autoimmune diabetes and highlight the similarities and differences with classic T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klaas, James P; Ahlskog, J Eric; Pittock, Sean J; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Aksamit, Allen J; Bartleson, J D; Kumar, Rajeev; McEvoy, Kathleen F; McKeon, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) outside of individual case reports. OBJECTIVE To describe adult-onset OMS. DESIGN Review of medical records (January 1, 1990, through December 31, 2011), prospective telephone surveillance, and literature review (January 1, 1967, through December 31, 2011). SETTING Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. PATIENTS Twenty-one Mayo Clinic patients and 116 previously reported patients with adult-onset OMS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Clinical course and longitudinal outcomes. RESULTS The median age at onset of the 21 OMS patients at the Mayo Clinic was 47 years (range, 27-78 years); 11 were women. Symptoms reported at the first visit included dizziness, 14 patients; balance difficulties, 14; nausea and/or vomiting, 10; vision abnormalities, 6; tremor/tremulousness, 4; and altered speech, 2. Myoclonus distribution was extremities, 15 patients; craniocervical, 8; and trunk, 4. Cancer was detected in 3 patients (breast adenocarcinoma, 2; and small cell lung carcinoma, 1); a parainfectious cause was assumed in the remainder of the patients. Follow-up of 1 month or more was available for 19 patients (median, 43 months; range, 1-187 months). Treatment (median, 6 weeks) consisted of immunotherapy and symptomatic therapy in 16 patients, immunotherapy alone for 2, and clonazepam alone for 1. Of these 19 patients, OMS remitted in 13 and improved in 3; 3 patients died (neurologic decline, 1; cancer, 1; and myocardial infarction, 1). The cause of death was of paraneoplastic origin in 60 of 116 literature review patients, with the most common carcinomas being lung (33 patients) and breast (7); the most common antibody was antineuronal nuclear antibody type 2 (anti-Ri, 15). Other causes were idiopathic in origin, 38 patients; parainfectious, 15 (human immunodeficiency virus, 7); toxic/metabolic, 2; and other autoimmune, 1. Both patients with N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody had

  10. Adult onset tics after peripheral injury.

    PubMed

    Erer, Sevda; Jankovic, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    We describe a case with adult onset motor tics after peripheral trauma. A 43-year-old man suffered a left shoulder dislocation during a motorcycle accident 21 years ago. Within 2 weeks after the injury, he noticed the gradual onset of involuntary jerking movements of his left shoulder, which was markedly exacerbated after second left shoulder injury 2 years later. The involuntary movements are phenomenologically identical to tics typically associated with Tourette syndrome (TS), but without the involvement of any other body part and without phonic tics or the typical TS co-morbidities, such as attention deficit or obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  11. Thrombangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease): still a limb threatening disease.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, H; De Leval, L; Creemers, E; Limet, R

    1997-10-01

    use. Buerger's disease still entails considerable risk of major amputation. Complete abstinence from tobacco use is crucial to expect stabilization of the process. However, in advanced stages of the disease and despite cessation of smoking recurrent episodes of ischaemia or tissue loss are not excluded.

  12. Adult-onset offenders: Is a tailored theory warranted?

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Amber L.; Caspi, Avshalom; Harrington, Honalee; Houts, Renate M.; Mcgee, Tara Renae; Morgan, Nick; Schroeder, Felix; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe official adult-onset offenders, investigate their antisocial histories and test hypotheses about their origins. Methods We defined adult-onset offenders among 931 Dunedin Study members followed to age 38, using criminal-court conviction records. Results Official adult-onset offenders were 14% of men, and 32% of convicted men, but accounted for only 15% of convictions. As anticipated by developmental theories emphasizing early-life influences on crime, adult-onset offenders’ histories of antisocial behavior spanned back to childhood. Relative to juvenile-offenders, during adolescence they had fewer delinquent peers and were more socially inhibited, which may have protected them from conviction. As anticipated by theories emphasizing the importance of situational influences on offending, adult-onset offenders, relative to non-offenders, during adulthood more often had schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and alcohol-dependence, had weaker social bonds, anticipated fewer informal sanctions, and self-reported more offenses. Contrary to some expectations, adult-onset offenders did not have high IQ or high socioeconomic-status families protecting them from juvenile conviction. Conclusions A tailored theory for adult-onset offenders is unwarranted because few people begin crime de novo as adults. Official adult-onset offenders fall on a continuum of crime and its correlates, between official non-offenders and official juvenile-onset offenders. Existing theories can accommodate adult-onset offenders. PMID:27134318

  13. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, M K; Samples, J R; Kramer, P L; Rust, K; Topinka, J R; Yount, J; Koler, R D; Acott, T S

    1997-01-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. PMID:9012402

  14. Epidemiological, clinical and genetic aspects of adult onset isolated focal dystonia in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Williams, L; McGovern, E; Kimmich, O; Molloy, A; Beiser, I; Butler, J S; Molloy, F; Logan, P; Healy, D G; Lynch, T; Walsh, R; Cassidy, L; Moriarty, P; Moore, H; McSwiney, T; Walsh, C; O'Riordan, S; Hutchinson, M

    2017-01-01

    Adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia presents with a number of phenotypes. Reported prevalence rates vary considerably; well-characterized cohorts are important to our understanding of this disorder. To perform a nationwide epidemiological study of adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia in the Republic of Ireland. Patients with adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia were recruited from multiple sources. Diagnosis was based on assessment by a neurologist with an expertise in movement disorders. When consent was obtained, a number of clinical features including family history were assessed. On the prevalence date there were 592 individuals in Ireland with adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia, a point prevalence of 17.8 per 100 000 (95% confidence interval 16.4-19.2). Phenotype numbers were cervical dystonia 410 (69.2%), blepharospasm 102 (17.2%), focal hand dystonia 39 (6.6%), spasmodic dysphonia 18 (3.0%), musician's dystonia 17 (2.9%) and oromandibular dystonia six (1.0%). Sixty-two (16.5%) of 375 consenting index cases had a relative with clinically confirmed adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia (18 multiplex and 24 duplex families). Marked variations in the proportions of patients with tremor, segmental spread, sensory tricks, pain and psychiatric symptoms by phenotype were documented. The prevalence of adult onset idiopathic isolated focal dystonia in Ireland is higher than that recorded in many similar service-based epidemiological studies but is still likely to be an underestimate. The low proportion of individuals with blepharospasm may reflect reduced environmental exposure to sunlight in Ireland. This study will serve as a resource for international comparative studies of environmental and genetic factors in the pathogenesis of the disorder. © 2016 EAN.

  15. Meniere's disease: Still a mystery disease with difficult differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, A; Vlastarakos, P V; Maragoudakis, P; Candiloros, D; Nikolopoulos, T P

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six years after its first description, the differential diagnosis of Meniere's disease remains very challenging. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the new diagnostic methods for Meniere's disease. The importance of accurate diagnosis for primary healthcare systems is also discussed. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline and other available database sources. Information from electronic links and related books were also included. Controlled clinical studies, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, written guidelines, systematic reviews, and books were selected. The typical clinical triad of symptoms from the vestibular and cochlear systems (recurrent vertigo, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) is usually the key for clinical diagnosis. Glycerol dehydration test and electrocochleography are the main diagnostic tests in current practice, while vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may be used in disease staging. Imagine techniques are not specific enough to set alone the diagnosis of Meniere's disease, although they may be necessary to exclude other pathologies. Recently developed 3D MRI protocols can delineate the perilymphatic/endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear and aid diagnosis. Meniere's disease is a continuous problem for the patients and affects their quality of life. Taking into account the frequent nature of the disease in certain countries, efforts for reliable diagnosis, prompt referral, and successful management are undoubtedly cost-effective for healthcare systems.

  16. [Consequences of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease still unclear].

    PubMed

    Jansen, Peter L M

    2012-01-01

    There is still a lack of clarity concerning the long-term outcome and severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Results of a study recently conducted by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed that patients with NAFLD diagnosed 30 years ago did not experience decreased survival when compared with persons without NAFLD. But questions arise about the diagnostic methods in this study and the consequences for daily practice. Is NAFLD really a disease, and what is the diagnostic method of choice?

  17. Update on differences between childhood-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease and occurs worldwide in both children and adults. The estimated annual incidence among children is 2.22/100,000 and among adults is 23.2/100,000 in the United States. There is increasing understanding about differences in disease manifestations, medication use, and disease severity between those with childhood-onset SLE as compared with adult-onset SLE. Children have a more fulminant disease onset and course than adults with SLE, resulting in two to three times higher mortality. In future years, we anticipate more insight into the genetics between childhood-onset SLE and adult-onset SLE to help delineate the best therapies for both subsets of patients. PMID:23998441

  18. Adult-onset hypophosphatemic osteomalacia associated with Sjogren syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guohua; Zhang, Yuwei; Hu, Shuang; Liu, Bin; Kuang, Anren

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hypophosphatemic osteomalacia (HO) is a metabolic bone disease, exhibiting different etiologies such as genetic mutation, tumor induction, dysimmunity, or renal disease. Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a connective tissue disorder commonly involving exocrine glands; however kidney involvement is also encountered, leading to abnormal phosphorus metabolism, even HO. Patient concerns: A 47-year-old female patient presented progressively worsening pain in the chest wall, back and bilateral lower extremities as well as muscle weakness was referred to our department. Diagnoses, interventions and outcomes: Due to the laboratory test results, radiographic findings and pathologic results, she was diagnosed with adult-onset HO associated with SS. She was then treated with alkalinization, steroids, neutral phosphate, calcium supplements together with activated vitamin D. So far, she recovered uneventfully with relieved pain and increased serum phosphorus level. Lessons: HO may be secondary to renal tubular acidosis of SS patients, and it might be a diagnostic challenge when the kidney involvement in SS is latent and precede the typical sicca symptoms. PMID:28353596

  19. Prognostic Factors and Outcomes of Adult-Onset Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: A Retrospective Analysis of 34 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Oto, Masafumi; Yoshitsugu, Kanako; Uneda, Shima; Nagamine, Michiko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) has features that are distinct from that of HLH in pediatric patients. The clinical records at the Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Hospital were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed 34 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of HLH-2004. The median age of patients was 60.0 (range 15-86). Underlying diseases were diagnosed in 17 patients. They consisted of malignant lymphoma (n=3), other neoplastic disease (n=3), viral infection (n=4), collagen vascular disease (n=3), Kikuchi’s disease (n=3) and drug (n=1). Underlying diseases were not diagnosed in 17 patients despite examination. The treatments were steroids (n=18), dexamethasone + cyclosporine A (CSA) + etoposide (n=4), multidrug chemotherapy (n=2), steroids and CSA (n=3). Eleven patients died during observation. In a multivariate analysis, the significant predictor for death was age at onset (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95%CI, 1.02-1.44; P=0.027). Autopsy was performed in 4 cases, but the underlying disease remained unknown in 3 of those cases. Adult-onset HLH has high diversity and various outcomes. The mechanism of adult-onset HLH is not fully understood and further research is required. PMID:26331000

  20. Serum Protein Changes in Still's Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gout

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, H. G. Minchin; Freeman, T.; Pryse-Phillips, W. E. M.

    1970-01-01

    Numerous workers have reported the electrophoretic changes in gout, rheumatoid arthritis and Still's disease. The recent introduction of an analytical technique capable of measuring discrete proteins rather than groups of proteins prompted a reassessment of the protein changes in these conditions. Eleven discrete α- and β-globulins were studied in all 3 conditions. All 3 showed statistically significant differences from normal values. The results obtained are discussed in relation to previous work and to the so called “acute phase reaction”. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4099410

  1. Periocular xanthogranulomas associated with severe adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobiec, F A; Mills, M D; Hidayat, A A; Dallow, R L; Townsend, D J; Brinker, E A; Charles, N C

    1993-01-01

    This article describes six patients who presented, usually bilaterally, with yellow-orange, elevated, indurated, and nonulcerated xanthomatous eyelid lesions, typically extending into the anterior orbital fat, and sometimes involving the extraocular muscles and the lacrimal gland. Because the eyelids remained intact and because the process did not reach the deep orbital and perioptic connective tissues, visual acuity was well preserved. There is cosmetic morbidity and occasionally motility restriction with advancing involvement of the extraocular muscles. All patients had variably severe adult-onset asthma that required treatment with systemic prednisone and inhalants. No evidence of Erdheim-Chester disease was found in any patient, but the appearance in one patient, after 25 years of follow-up, of a separate subcutaneous necrobiotic xanthogranulomatous lesion in the mandibular region with an associated paraproteinemia, suggests that at least some of our cases might be a mild form of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. For this reason, we would suggest repeated periodic serum protein immunoelectrophoretic studies as well as evaluation for lymphoma. Therapy probably should consist of low doses of periorbital radiotherapy coupled with high doses of corticosteroids. Should this not be successful, then systemic administration of corticosteroids with chemotherapeutic agents might be efficacious, as in necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:8140711

  2. Niemann-Pick type C: focus on the adolescent/adult onset form.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Marano, Massimo; Florio, Lucia; De Santis, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is an inherited sphingolipidosis characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and early mortality. The symptomatology and disease progression of NP-C are markedly affected by the age at onset of neurological manifestations, and categorization into early-infantile, late-infantile, juvenile, adolescent/adult neurological onset forms can aid evaluation of disease course and responses to therapy. Here, we review current information on the detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of NP-C, with a focus on the adolescent/adult-onset form. A recent analysis indicated that the combined incidence of NP-C related to NPC1 gene mutations (NPC1) and NP-C related to NPC2 gene mutations (NPC2) is approximately 1 case in every 89 000 live births. In particular, late-onset phenotypes might well provide a greater contribution to the overall incidence than has previously been reported. Some neuropathological features in NP-C are held in common with other advanced age-onset diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Visceral symptoms such as splenomegaly are frequently asymptomatic in patients with adolescent/adult-onset NP-C, and are only occasionally detected during routine ultrasound assessments. In contrast, most patients with adolescent/adult-onset exhibit some degree of slowly progressive, non-disease-specific movement disorders (e.g. cerebellar ataxia), and/or more pathognomonic neurological signs such as vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. An increasing number of adolescent/adult-onset cases have been reported following initial recognition of cognitive impairment and/or psychiatric signs. The recent development and implementation of new clinical screening tools (e.g. the NP-C suspicion index) and biomarkers (e.g. plasma oxysterols) should help identify patients who warrant further investigation and possible treatment.

  3. Iron: Protector or Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease? Still Controversial

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bravo, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Bedmar, Mario; Gómez-Aracena, Jorge; García-Rodríguez, Antonio; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the second most abundant metal in the Earth’s crust. Despite being present in trace amounts, it is an essential trace element for the human body, although it can also be toxic due to oxidative stress generation by the Fenton reaction, causing organic biomolecule oxidation. This process is the basis of numerous pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The relationship between iron and cardiovascular disease was proposed in 1981 by Jerome Sullivan. Since then, numerous epidemiological studies have been conducted to test this hypothesis. The aim of this review is to present the main findings of the chief epidemiological studies published during the last 32 years, since Sullivan formulated his iron hypothesis, suggesting that this element might act as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have analyzed 55 studies, of which 27 supported the iron hypothesis, 20 found no evidence to support it and eight were contrary to the iron hypothesis. Our results suggest that there is not a high level of evidence which supports the hypothesis that the iron may be associated with CVD. Despite the large number of studies published to date, the role of iron in cardiovascular disease still generates a fair amount of debate, due to a marked disparity in results. PMID:23857219

  4. Guinea worm cause of adult onset asthmatic attack, a radiological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Marchie, T T

    1999-01-01

    A case report of a fifty years old Hausa male from Sokoto town, Nigeria an endemic region of guinea worm infestation, who presented with sudden adult onset of asthmatic attack and was evaluated radiologically and the diagnosis of acute obstructive airway disease was confirmed. It was noted, that there were associated calcified chain of guinea worms in the lung parenchyma. A rare association of acute asthmatic attack. Patient responded there-after to an anti-asthmatic regime of management.

  5. Adult-onset acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Dainari; Ueda, Kohei; Tsukuda, Kyozo; Utsu, Noriaki; Kohki, Shimazu; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Miyakoshi, Kazuho

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was hospitalized for acute rheumatic fever. He had previously suffered from rheumatic fever at 15 years of age. The rheumatic fever was complicated by carditis, which caused valve disease that required surgical treatment. The incidence of rheumatic fever has decreased in most developed countries with improvements in sanitary conditions. The low incidence of this disease makes a timely and accurate diagnosis difficult. Due to the fact that both the first occurrence and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever can occur in the elderly and adults, this potential disease should not be overlooked when making a differential diagnosis.

  6. [Rubella (German measles)--still a major infectious disease].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Rubella viruses are single-stranded ribonucleic acid viruses, which are surrounded by a lipid-containing membrane. From the taxonomic point of view, these serologically uniform viruses belong to the family of Togaviridae, and to the genus Rubivirus. After birth, infection with rubella virus occurs through inhalation of contaminated droplets. In children infected after birth, rubella viruses usually cause uncomplicated diseases that are associated with an unspecific rash (postnatal rubella). Rubella virus infections in adults might be more severe and can be accompanied by complications such as joint pain and inflammation in the joints. Rubella virus infection during pregnancy can lead to the infection of the fetus. In the first and second trimester of pregnancy, fetal rubella infection often lead to severe abnormalities of the newborn, which are summarized as rubella embryopathy or congenital rubella syndrome. One of these disorders, the Gregg syndrome, is associated with serious damage to heart, ears and eyes of the newborn. Therefore, in suspected cases of rubella virus infection during pregnancy, or after contact of a pregnant woman with an infected person, a serological diagnosis must be performed. The diagnosis of an acute rubella virus infection usually consists of the detection of rubella-specific IgM. Critical to avoiding a rubella virus infection is the immune prophylaxis, for which a live attenuated vaccine, usually given as trivalent vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR vaccine), is available. Since the introduction of the rubella vaccination in the 1970s, in many areas of the world the number of rubella diseases has declined dramatically. Nevertheless, rubella is still widespread in some countries, and still occurs in Germany. Postnatal rubella virus infections can be treated symptomatically. A specific (antiviral) therapy is not available.

  7. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  8. Is Electrocochleography Still Helpful in Early Diagnosis of Meniere Disease?

    PubMed

    Mammarella, Fulvio; Zelli, Melissa; Varakliotis, Theodoros; Eibenstein, Alberto; Pianura, Claudio Maria; Bellocchi, Gianluca

    2017-07-01

    Despite the extensive research for the Meniere's disease (MD), it's pathophysiology still remains uncertain and questionable among scientists. Clinical symptoms and audiometric tests form the basis for the diagnosis. Nevertheless the differential diagnosis can be extremely challenging, due to subjective and not specific results. Incorrect diagnosis is most likely and for this reason there is a great demand for objective and reliable tests. The presence of endolymphatic hydrops is necessary condition but non enough for the diagnosis. In this study we analyze retrospectively the summating potentials (SP)/action protentials (AP) ratio from peritympanic electrocochleography in 34 patients,divided in two groups (13 patients classified as defined MD and 21 patients classified as probable MD). The purpose was to identify the utility of the exam so to be able to achieve an early defined diagnosis. Furthermore our intention was to obtain an objective test, besides the clinical criteria currently in use for the diagnosis and the classification of the MD. The analysis of the SP/AP results shows high predictability for the MD (positive in six out of seven cases with a sensitivity greater than 80%). Our study demonstrates a satisfactory sensibility percentage in recurrent defined MD presentation (>80%). Early identification of MD can lead to an early treatment and control of the progression of the disease. Furthermore it could be a valuable instrument for the follow up and evaluation of the patients classified as probable MD in accordance with the criteria of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (1995).

  9. Mapping a gene for adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma to chromosome 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, M.K.; Samples, J.R.; Kramer, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    Glaucoma is the third-leading cause of blindness in the world, affecting >13.5 million people. Adult-on-set primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma in the United States. We present a family in which adult-onset POAG is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Twelve affected family members were identified from 44 at-risk individuals. The disease-causing gene was mapped to chromosome 3q21-24, with analysis of recombinant haplotypes suggesting a total inclusion region of 11.1 cM between markers D3S3637 and D3S1744. This is the first report of mapping of an adult-onset POAG gene to chromosome 3q, gene symbol GLC1C. 57 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Effects of diabetes mellitus on bone mass in juvenile and adult-onset diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levin, M E; Boisseau, V C; Avioli, L V

    1976-01-29

    To assess the influence of diabetes mellitus on bone metabolism, we measured skeletal mass in the forearms of 35 patients with juvenile diabetes on insulin and 101 stable patients with adult-onset diabetes, on diet alone, insulin, or oral hypoglycemic agents. There was a significant loss of bone mass in both juvenile and adult-onset diabetes (P less than 0.01) as compared to controls matched for age and sex. The decrease was already present in patients with diabetes of less than five years' duration. Bone loss and duration of the diabetes did not correlate; the greatest decrease in bone mass was observed in the patients receiving oral agents. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the loss of skeletal tissue in diabetes reflects the underlying disease since it occurs early and is not related to severity as evidenced by the need for insulin, to duration, or to treatment with insulin or diet alone.

  11. Adult-onset stereotypical motor behaviors.

    PubMed

    Maltête, D

    Stereotypies have been defined as non-goal-directed movement patterns repeated continuously for a period of time in the same form and on multiple occasions, and which are typically distractible. Stereotypical motor behaviors are a common clinical feature of a variety of neurological conditions that affect cortical and subcortical functions, including autism, tardive dyskinesia, excessive dopaminergic treatment of Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia. The main differential diagnosis of stereotypies includes tic disorders, motor mannerisms, compulsion and habit. The pathophysiology of stereotypies may involve the corticostriatal pathways, especially the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulated cortices. Because antipsychotics have long been used to manage stereotypical behaviours in mental retardation, stereotypies that present in isolation tend not to warrant pharmacological intervention, as the benefit-to-risk ratio is not great enough. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Is Electrocochleography Still Helpful in Early Diagnosis of Meniere Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Mammarella, Fulvio; Zelli, Melissa; Varakliotis, Theodoros; Eibenstein, Alberto; Pianura, Claudio Maria; Bellocchi, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite the extensive research for the Meniere’s disease (MD), it’s pathophysiology still remains uncertain and questionable among scientists. Clinical symptoms and audiometric tests form the basis for the diagnosis. Nevertheless the differential diagnosis can be extremely challenging, due to subjective and not specific results. Incorrect diagnosis is most likely and for this reason there is a great demand for objective and reliable tests. Subjects and Methods The presence of endolymphatic hydrops is necessary condition but non enough for the diagnosis. In this study we analyze retrospectively the summating potentials (SP)/action protentials (AP) ratio from peritympanic electrocochleography in 34 patients,divided in two groups (13 patients classified as defined MD and 21 patients classified as probable MD). The purpose was to identify the utility of the exam so to be able to achieve an early defined diagnosis. Furthermore our intention was to obtain an objective test, besides the clinical criteria currently in use for the diagnosis and the classification of the MD. Results The analysis of the SP/AP results shows high predictability for the MD (positive in six out of seven cases with a sensitivity greater than 80%). Conclusions Our study demonstrates a satisfactory sensibility percentage in recurrent defined MD presentation (>80%). Early identification of MD can lead to an early treatment and control of the progression of the disease. Furthermore it could be a valuable instrument for the follow up and evaluation of the patients classified as probable MD in accordance with the criteria of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (1995). PMID:28704892

  13. Aluminium in Alzheimer's disease: are we still at a crossroad?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Veer Bala; Anitha, S; Hegde, M L; Zecca, L; Garruto, R M; Ravid, R; Shankar, S K; Stein, R; Shanmugavelu, P; Jagannatha Rao, K S

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium, an environmentally abundant non-redox trivalent cation has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the definite mechanism of aluminium toxicity in AD is not known. Evidence suggests that trace metal homeostasis plays a crucial role in the normal functioning of the brain, and any disturbance in it can exacerbate events associated with AD. The present paper reviews the scientific literature linking aluminium with AD. The focus is on aluminium levels in brain, region-specific and subcellular distribution, its relation to neurofibrillary tangles, amyloid beta, and other metals. A detailed mechanism of the role of aluminium in oxidative stress and cell death is highlighted. The importance of complex speciation chemistry of aluminium in relation to biology has been emphasized. The debatable role of aluminium in AD and the cross-talk between aluminium and genetic susceptibility are also discussed. Finally, it is concluded based on extensive literature that the neurotoxic effects of aluminium are beyond any doubt, and aluminium as a factor in AD cannot be discarded. However, whether aluminium is a sole factor in AD and whether it is a factor in all AD cases still needs to be understood.

  14. Histological healing in inflammatory bowel disease: A still unfulfilled promise

    PubMed Central

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Geboes, Karel; Casella, Giovanni; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is traditionally based on several drugs, including salicylates, corticosteroids, and antibiotics; in addition, the therapeutic armamentarium has considerably evolved with the advent of newer, effective therapeutic measures (such as the biological agents) that are able to improve in a considerable manner both the clinical and endoscopic variables. Thus, mucosal healing, at least considered from an endoscopic point of view, is today regarded as the ultimate endpoint for treatment of these conditions. However, it is also increasingly clear that endoscopic healing is not necessarily paralleled by histological healing; There are few doubts that the latter should be considered as a true, objective healing and the ultimate goal to reach when treating patients with IBD. Unfortunately, and surprisingly, only a few, incomplete, and somewhat conflicting data exist on this topic, especially because there is still the need to standardize both histological assessment and the severity grading of these disorders; Issues that have not been yet been resolved for clinical practice and therapeutic trials. Hopefully, with the help of an increased awareness on the clinical researchers’ side, and the availability of dedicated pathologists on the other side, this matter will be effectively faced and resolved in the near future. PMID:23467585

  15. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  16. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  17. Epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus: institutional experience with 2001 patients.

    PubMed

    Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Sun, Hai; Guthikonda, Bharat; Notarianni, Christina; Nanda, Anil

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult-onset hydrocephalus is not commonly discussed in the literature, especially regarding its demographic distribution. In contrast to pediatric hydrocephalus, which is related to a primary CSF pathway defect, its development in adults is often secondary to other pathologies. In this study, the authors investigated the epidemiology of adult-onset hydrocephalus as it pertains to different etiologies and in reference to age, sex, and race distributions. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical notes of 2001 patients with adult-onset hydrocephalus who presented to Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center within a 25-year span. Significant differences between the groups were analyzed by a chi-square test; p < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall mean (± SEM) incidence of adult hydrocephalus in this population was 77 ± 30 per year, with a significant increase in incidence in the past decade (55 ± 3 [1990-2003] vs 102 ± 6 [2004-2015]; p < 0.0001). Hydrocephalus in a majority of the patients had a vascular etiology (45.5%) or was a result of a tumor (30.2%). The incidence of hydrocephalus in different age groups varied according to various pathologies. The incidence was significantly higher in males with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (p = 0.03) or head injury (p = 0.01) and higher in females with pseudotumor cerebri (p < 0.0001). In addition, the overall incidence of hydrocephalus was significantly higher in Caucasian patients (p = 0.0002) than in those of any other race. CONCLUSIONS Knowledge of the demographic variations in adult-onset hydrocephalus is helpful in achieving better risk stratification and better managing the disease in patients. For general applicability, these results should be validated in a large-scale meta-analysis based on a national population database.

  18. Adult-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study of Decision-Making Needs.

    PubMed

    Jull, Janet; Witteman, Holly O; Ferne, Judi; Yoganathan, Manosila; Stacey, Dawn

    2016-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease resulting from insulin deficiency and must be carefully managed to prevent serious health complications. Diabetes education and management strategies usually focus on meeting the decision-making needs of children and their families, but little is known about the decisional needs of people with adult-onset type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to explore the diabetes-related decision-making needs of people diagnosed with adult-onset type 1 diabetes. An interpretive descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Participants who self-identified as having adult-onset type 1 diabetes were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Transcripts were coded to identify needs, supports and barriers using thematic analysis. Participating in the study were 8 adults (2 men, 6 women), ages 33 to 57, with type 1 diabetes for durations of 1 to 20 or more years. Their decision-making needs are summarized in 6 broad themes: 1) people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are launched into a process of decision-making; 2) being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes means you will always have to make decisions; 3) knowledge is crucial; 4) personal preferences matter; 5) support is critical for decisions about self-care in type 1 diabetes; 6) living with type 1 diabetes means making very individualized decisions about daily life. The findings describe the sudden and ubiquitous nature of type 1 diabetes decision-making and the need to tailor approaches for making care decisions in type 1 diabetes. People diagnosed with adult-onset type 1 diabetes require access to reliable information, support and opportunities for participation in decision-making. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Need for Improved Detection and Management of Adult-Onset Hearing Loss in Australia

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Reath, Jennifer; Hickson, Louise; Leeder, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Paul; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset hearing loss is insidious and typically diagnosed and managed several years after onset. Often, this is after the loss having led to multiple negative consequences including effects on employment, depressive symptoms, and increased risk of mortality. In contrast, the use of hearing aids is associated with reduced depression, longer life expectancy, and retention in the workplace. Despite this, several studies indicate high levels of unmet need for hearing health services in older adults and poor use of prescribed hearing aids, often leading to their abandonment. In Australia, the largest component of financial cost of hearing loss (excluding the loss of well-being) is due to lost workplace productivity. Nonetheless, the Australian public health system does not have an effective and sustainable hearing screening strategy to tackle the problem of poor detection of adult-onset hearing loss. Given the increasing prevalence and disease burden of hearing impairment in adults, two key areas are not adequately met in the Australian healthcare system: (1) early identification of persons with chronic hearing impairment; (2) appropriate and targeted referral of these patients to hearing health service providers. This paper reviews the current literature, including population-based data from the Blue Mountains Hearing Study, and suggests different models for early detection of adult-onset hearing loss. PMID:23710184

  20. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  1. [100 years of Hashimoto thyroiditis, still an intriguing disease].

    PubMed

    Baretić, Maja

    2011-12-01

    In 1912 Japanese physician Hashimoto Hakaru described 4 patients with chronic thyroid disease. The histopathology findings exactly 100 years ago described lymphocyte infiltration, fibrosis, parenchymal atrophy and eosinophilic changes of some acinar cells. Those findings are typical for the autoimmune thyroid disease named by the author Hashimoto thyroiditis or lymphocytic thyroiditis. Hashimoto thyroiditis: The pathophysiology of thyroid autoimmunity during the past decades was described in details. Many thyroid antigens were identified (thyroid - stimulating hormone or TSH, thyroglobulin, thyreoperoxidase) and antibodies are directed towards them. Thyreocyte is also able to function as antigen presenting cell. It presents antigen on its surface and expresses MHC class II and class I molecules. Etiology of autoimmune thyroiditis combines genetic and environmental factors. Genetic factors dominate, and influence with about 80% on the occurrence of immunity. Some HLA genes (HLA-DR3, HLA-DR4, HLA-DR5 and HLA-DQA) and some non-HLA genes (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 -CTLA-4, CD40 gene, gene for protein tyrosine phosphatase 22 -PTPN22, thyroglobulin and TSH gene) are involved. 20% of etiology is attributed to environmental factors (smoking, iodine intake, selenium deficiency, pollution, infectious conditions, physical and emotional stress) and physiological states (puberty, rapid growth, pregnancy, menopause, aging, female gender). Although Hashimoto thyroiditis is known for many years, it is still sometimes presented with surprisingly diverse clinical entities and frequently astonishes many physicians. A case of a female patient with long-standing hypothesis (fine needle aspiration showed lymphocytic infiltration, thyreoperoxidase antibodies were positive) is presented. During the postpartum period, complicated with septic endometritis a new onset of hyperthyreosis appeared. The etiology of hyperthyroidism was unclear, with three possible explanations. The first

  2. Adult-onset Nemaline Myopathy Coexisting With Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lingling; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanxia; Li, Nianchun; Qiu, Guoping; Luo, Yun; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder which is characterized by fluctuating muscle fatigue. However, the association of MG with nemaline myopathy is rarely reported. Here we report a case of MG coexisting with adult-onset nemaline myopathy. A 55-year-old man endured fluctuating muscle weakness with positive acetylcholine receptor and titin antibodies. After the patient was administrated cholinergic drugs and immunosuppression, the muscle weakness of the patient had mildly been alleviated. Electromyography showed a progressive decrement in the amplitude of muscle action potential at low frequency. Muscle biopsy showed numerous nemalines in the muscle fibers. This is the first reported case of nemalines present in the muscle fibers of adult patient with MG. The pathogenesis of nemaline may be related to titin antibody in adult-onset nemaline myopathy with MG. PMID:26825889

  3. Juvenile and adult-onset psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Emami, Mehrdad

    2013-09-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) tend to begin in adolescence and young adulthood, although the seizures can occur in a wide range of ages. In the current study, we investigated the age of onset in patients with PNES and tried to determine the correlation between the age of onset and the demographic and clinical characteristics and factors potentially predisposing to PNES. In this cross-sectional study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of PNES were recruited at the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from 2008 to 2012. We dichotomized the patients into two groups; those with age of onset below 18 years (juvenile), and those with age of onset at 18-55 years (adult-onset). We studied the demographic and clinical characteristics and factors potentially predisposing to PNES between these two groups. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi square and Fisher's Exact tests and Mann-Whitney U test. Fifty-seven patients with juvenile and 129 people with adult-onset PNES were studied. Demographic characteristics of these two groups were not different significantly. Seizure characteristics and semiology in these two groups were not significantly different either. However, factors potentially predisposing to PNES were significantly different between these two groups. History of being abused, academic failure, epilepsy or family history of epilepsy were more frequently observed in juvenile PNES, while medical comorbidities were more frequent among patients with adult-onset PNES. Age of onset of PNES is not correlated with the clinical manifestations; however, factors potentially predisposing to PNES are significantly different in patients with juvenile compared to those with adult-onset PNES. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and genetic characteristics of sporadic adult-onset degenerative ataxia.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Ilaria; Harmuth, Florian; Jacobi, Heike; Paap, Brigitte; Vielhaber, Stefan; Machts, Judith; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Sturm, Marc; Tallaksen, Chantal; Wedding, Iselin M; Boesch, Sylvia; Eigentler, Andreas; van de Warrenburg, Bart; van Gaalen, Judith; Kamm, Christoph; Dudesek, Ales; Kang, Jun-Suk; Timmann, Dagmar; Silvestri, Gabriella; Masciullo, Marcella; Klopstock, Thomas; Neuhofer, Christiane; Ganos, Christos; Filla, Alessandro; Bauer, Peter; Tezenas du Montcel, Sophie; Klockgether, Thomas

    2017-09-05

    To define the clinical phenotype and natural history of sporadic adult-onset degenerative ataxia and to identify putative disease-causing mutations. The primary measure of disease severity was the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). DNA samples were screened for mutations using a high-coverage ataxia-specific gene panel in combination with next-generation sequencing. The analysis was performed on 249 participants. Among them, 83 met diagnostic criteria of clinically probable multiple system atrophy cerebellar type (MSA-C) at baseline and another 12 during follow-up. Positive MSA-C criteria (4.94 ± 0.74, p < 0.0001) and disease duration (0.22 ± 0.06 per additional year, p = 0.0007) were associated with a higher SARA score. Forty-eight participants who did not fulfill MSA-C criteria and had a disease duration of >10 years were designated sporadic adult-onset ataxia of unknown etiology/non-MSA (SAOA/non-MSA). Compared with MSA-C, SAOA/non-MSA patients had lower SARA scores (13.6 ± 6.0 vs 16.0 ± 5.8, p = 0.0200) and a slower annual SARA increase (1.1 ± 2.3 vs 3.3 ± 3.2, p = 0.0013). In 11 of 194 tested participants (6%), a definitive or probable genetic diagnosis was made. Our study provides quantitative data on the clinical phenotype and progression of sporadic ataxia with adult onset. Screening for causative mutations with a gene panel approach yielded a genetic diagnosis in 6% of the cohort. NCT02701036. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Periodic fever: From Still's disease to Muckle-Wells syndrome.

    PubMed

    Solís Marquínez, Marta Nataya; García Fernández, Edilia; Morís de la Tassa, Joaquín

    2017-06-02

    Muckle-Wells syndrome is a systemic autoinflammatory disease included in the group of hereditary periodic febrile syndromes. We report the case of a patient with this rare disease to call the attention to the singularity of this condition, its low incidence, its atypical presentation and the subsequent delay in the diagnosis, which is reached when late and devastating consequences have taken place. In this case, the first-line therapy, anti-interleukin 1 (IL-1), failed to control the disease. Nevertheless, the IL-6 inhibitor, tocilizumab, proved effective, achieving the total remission of nephrotic syndrome associated with AA secondary amyloidosis, changing the bleak prognosis of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. Health technologies for rare diseases: does conventional HTA still apply?

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven

    2014-06-01

    As part of a health technology assessment, economic evaluation of health technologies for rare diseases poses specific challenges given that such technologies are rarely cost-effective. Therefore, conventional economic evaluation techniques appear to be less relevant to health technologies for rare diseases. However, the definition of health technology assessment points to multi-criteria decision analysis by stating that a health technology needs to be assessed against multiple criteria in order to pronounce a judgement about the value of the health technology. Thus, this editorial argues that a full health technology assessment which uses a multi-criteria decision analysis framework to evaluate the value of a technology can be applied to health technologies for rare diseases. Past experiences demonstrate that the specific characteristics of health technologies for rare diseases can fit in the conventional health technology assessment paradigm by means of multi-criteria decision analysis.

  7. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: Clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Stefanie H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Sims, Katherine B.; Hedley-Whyte, E. T.; Vossough, Arastoo; Frosch, Matthew P.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2009-01-01

    Pigmented orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids HDLS are two adult onset leukodystrophies with neuroaxonal spheroids presenting with prominent neurobehavioral, cognitive, and motor symptoms. These are familial or sporadic disorders characterized by cerebral white matter degeneration including myelin and axonal loss, gliosis, macrophages, and axonal spheroids. We report clinical, neuroimaging and pathological correlations of four women ages 34–50 years with adult onset leukodystrophy. Their disease course ranged from 1.5–8 years. Three patients had progressive cognitive and behavioral changes whereas one had acute onset. Neuroimaging revealed white matter abnormalities characterized by symmetric, bilateral, T2 hyperintense and T1 hypointense MRI signal involving frontal lobe white matter in all patients. Extensive laboratory investigations were negative apart from abnormalities in some mitochondrial enzymes and immunologic parameters. Autopsies demonstrated severe leukodystrophy with myelin and axonal loss, axonal spheroids, and macrophages with early and severe frontal white matter involvement. The extent and degree of changes outside the frontal lobe appeared to correlate with disease duration. The prominent neurobehavioral deficits and frontal white matter disease provides clinical-pathologic support for association pathways linking distributed neural circuits subserving cognition. These observations lend further support to the notion that white matter disease alone can account for dementia. PMID:18422757

  8. Pregnancy outcomes in women with childhood-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Miranda-Hernández, Dafhne; Sánchez, Antonio; Morales, Sara; Cruz-Domínguez, Pilar; Medina, Gabriela; Jara, Luis Javier

    2016-10-01

    To compare the maternal and fetal outcomes between childhood-onset and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we reviewed the medical records of SLE pregnant women treated from January 2005 to August 2013. For comparison, patients were allocated to one of the two groups, those pregnant patients with SLE onset before 18 years of age (childhood-onset) and ≥18 years (adult-onset). The patients were evaluated at least once in each trimester and postpartum. Relevant maternal and fetal outcomes were extracted, such as lupus flare, preeclampsia/eclampsia, rate of liveborns, fetal loss (spontaneous abortion and stillbirth), term delivery, preterm birth, neonatal death, low birth weight, low birth weight at term, and congenital malformations. We studied 186 pregnancies (in 180 women), 58 of them had childhood-onset SLE, and the remaining 128 had adult-onset SLE. The rate of maternal and fetal complications was similar in both groups. Multivariate analysis showed that active SLE before pregnancy, primigravida, renal flare, preeclampsia, lupus flare, anticardiolipin antibodies, and low serum complement were associated with an increased risk of poor maternal and fetal outcomes. The diagnosis of childhood-onset had no impact on maternal-fetal outcome. The maternal and fetal outcome in women with childhood-onset SLE is similar to that reported in women with adult-onset SLE. Pregnancy in women with childhood-onset SLE should not be contraindicated if the disease is well controlled.

  9. Cerebellar pathology in childhood-onset vs. adult-onset essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Tate, William J; Kelly, Geoffrey C; Faust, Phyllis L

    2017-09-01

    Although the incidence of ET increases with advancing age, the disease may begin at any age, including childhood. The question arises as to whether childhood-onset ET cases manifest the same sets of pathological changes in the cerebellum as those whose onset is during adult life. We quantified a broad range of postmortem features (Purkinje cell [PC] counts, PC axonal torpedoes, a host of associated axonal changes [PC axonal recurrent collateral count, PC thickened axonal profile count, PC axonal branching count], heterotopic PCs, and basket cell rating) in 60 ET cases (11 childhood-onset and 49 adult-onset) and 30 controls. Compared to controls, childhood-onset ET cases had lower PC counts, higher torpedo counts, higher heterotopic PC counts, higher basket cell plexus rating, and marginally higher PC axonal recurrent collateral counts. The median PC thickened axonal profile count and median PC axonal branching count were two to five times higher in childhood-onset ET than controls, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. Childhood-onset and adult-onset ET had similar PC counts, torpedo counts, heterotopic PC counts, basket cell plexus rating, PC axonal recurrent collateral counts, PC thickened axonal profile count and PC axonal branching count. In conclusion, we found that childhood-onset and adult-onset ET shared similar pathological changes in the cerebellum. The data suggest that pathological changes we have observed in the cerebellum in ET are a part of the pathophysiological cascade of events in both forms of the disease and that both groups seem to reach the same pathological endpoints at a similar age of death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jordi; de Jonge, Peter; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Liu, Zhaorui; O'Neill, Siobhan; Stein, Dan J; Viana, Maria Carmen; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Borges, Guilherme; Ciutan, Marius; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fiestas, Fabian; Haro, Josep Maria; Hu, Chiyi; Kessler, Ronald C; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Posada-Villa, Jose; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J; Scott, Kate M

    2014-12-01

    Associations between asthma and anxiety and mood disorders are well established, but little is known about their temporal sequence. We examined associations between a wide range of DSM-IV mental disorders with adult onset of asthma and whether observed associations remain after mental comorbidity adjustments. During face-to-face household surveys in community-dwelling adults (n = 52,095) of 19 countries, the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Asthma was assessed by self-report of physician's diagnosis together with age of onset. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma, without and with comorbidity adjustment. 1860 adult onset (21 years+) asthma cases were identified, representing a total of 2,096,486 person-years of follow up. After adjustment for comorbid mental disorders several mental disorders were associated with subsequent adult asthma onset: bipolar (OR = 1.8; 95%CI 1.3-2.5), panic (OR = 1.4; 95%CI 1.0-2.0), generalized anxiety (OR = 1.3; 95%CI 1.1-1.7), specific phobia (OR = 1.3; 95%CI 1.1-1.6); post-traumatic stress (OR = 1.5; 95%CI 1.1-1.9); binge eating (OR = 1.8; 95%CI 1.2-2.9) and alcohol abuse (OR = 1.5; 95%CI 1.1-2.0). Mental comorbidity linearly increased the association with adult asthma. The association with subsequent asthma was stronger for mental disorders with an early onset (before age 21). A wide range of temporally prior mental disorders are significantly associated with subsequent onset of asthma in adulthood. The extent to which asthma can be avoided or improved among those with early mental disorders deserves study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Yellow fever in China is still an imported disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-05-23

    Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease endemic to tropical regions of Africa and South America. A recent outbreak in Angola caused hundreds of deaths. Six cases of yellow fever imported from Angola were reported recently in China. This raised the question of whether it will spread in China and how it can be prevented. This article discusses the possibility of yellow fever transmission in China and the strategies to counter it.

  12. Adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Yapp, Liam Z; McClymont, Liusaidh; Beggs, Ian; Gaston, Paul; Salter, Donald M

    2017-05-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old man diagnosed with adult-onset idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip. Chondrolysis of the hip is a disorder most frequently seen in children who have suffered with slipped capital femoral epiphyses. Idiopathic chondrolysis of the hip is extremely rare and to our knowledge, its onset has never been documented in adults aged over 20. With reference to the available medical literature, we summarise the current clinical management of this unusual but important cause of young adult hip pain.

  13. Antioxidant intake and adult-onset wheeze: a case-control study. Aberdeen WHEASE Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bodner, C; Godden, D; Brown, K; Little, J; Ross, S; Seaton, A

    1999-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of wheezing illness in the UK has coincided with a reduction in the consumption of natural antioxidants, which may modulate the lung's response to oxidant stress, limiting the expression of airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms. The hypothesis that intakes and plasma levels of natural antioxidants would be determinants of adult-onset wheezing illness was tested. A nested case-control study was conducted in 94 cases with adult-onset wheeze and 203 controls aged 39-45 yrs identified in a 30-yr follow-up survey. Antioxidant intake was measured by a food frequency questionnaire, and plasma and red cell measurements of antioxidant status were obtained. Outcome measures were onset of wheeze since age 15 yrs (ever wheeze) and wheeze occurring in the past 12 months (current wheeze). After adjusting for the effects of smoking, socioeconomic status, atopy, family history of atopic disease and total energy intake, intakes of vitamin E (odds ratio (OR) = 4.02 for low compared to high tertile of intake) and plasma levels of ascorbate (OR = 0.98 per unit) and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio (OR = 0.34 per log(e) unit) were inversely related to adult-onset wheeze. In analyses stratified by social class and smoking, intakes of vitamin C and E and plasma levels of ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio were inversely related to current wheeze in the manual social class and among current smokers. No independent associations of vitamin A, beta-carotene or total plasma antioxidant capacity were found. The results support the hypothesis that deficiencies of vitamins C and E are associated with wheezing symptoms. Smokers in the manual social class are particularly susceptible to these effects.

  14. The synergistic effect of heredity and exposure to second-hand smoke on adult-onset asthma.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Taina K; Jaakkola, Jouni J K; Jaakkola, Maritta S

    2013-10-01

    Identification of the subpopulation especially susceptible to the adverse effects of second-hand smoke exposure (SHS) would be useful for preventive actions and interventions. To investigate whether asthmatic heredity indicates susceptibility to the effects of SHS on the risk of adult-onset asthma. A population-based incident case-control study of clinically defined adult-onset asthma and randomly drawn control subjects (adults 21-63 yr old) from a geographically defined area in South Finland. After excluding current and ex-smokers there were 226 cases and 450 disease-free control subjects. Our outcome measure was new adult-onset asthma. Parental asthma and recent SHS had a synergistic effect on the risk of asthma, the adjusted odds ratio being 1.97 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.45) for SHS; 2.64 (1.65-4.24) for parental asthma; and 12.69 (3.44-46.91) for their joint effect (relative excess risk due interaction, 9.08 [-0.22 to 43.18]). Synergistic effect followed a dose-dependent pattern with both recent and cumulative SHS exposures, with relative excess risk due interaction for parental asthma and over 100 SHS cigarette-years of 6.17 (0.57-19.16). This is the first study showing that individuals with asthmatic heredity have a considerably increased risk of adult-onset asthma when exposed to SHS. SHS exposure has dose-dependent synergism with family history of asthma, the joint effect being stronger with higher exposure levels. Avoiding SHS could be an important preventive measure for reducing the risk of adult-onset asthma among those with asthmatic heredity. Asking about family history of asthma is a useful tool for identifying these susceptible individuals in clinical and preventive settings.

  15. Disease patterns in vasculitis-still a mystery.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2008-01-01

    In the field of autoimmunity, much has been learned from studying circulating and tissue bound immune-reactive cells, cytokines and antibodies. However, what has brought those cells to the site of injury, for most forms of vasculitis remains a mystery. Might the etiology of at least certain forms of vasculitis be related to generation of neoantigens in the native vessel, making that vessel the target of a pathogenic immune response? How might one explain organ targeting and patterns of disease that are so critical to the diagnostic process? Embryologists have demonstrated great diversity in the vasculature of different organs. Unique quantitative and qualitative features become apparent in vascular territories as early as the third week of gestation. These differences are later amplified by the effects of further development, aging, infection, spontaneous mutations and other co-morbidities. Based on data from these observations a testable hypothesis would be that many forms of vasculitis may begin with emergence of new antigens within affected vessel walls and the resulting immune response may in fact be a normal reaction to perceived foreign protein(s).

  16. Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 in a family with adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Lynch, David R.; Lukas, Thomas; Ahmeti, Kreshnik; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Ryan, Eanna; Schadt, Kimberly A.; Newman, Jordan H.; Deng, Han-Xiang; Siddique, Nailah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic defect for adult-onset primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) in a family with 5 patients. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify the shared genetic variants in 3 affected members in a PLS family with 5 affected individuals. Sanger sequencing was used for validation of the variants and for cosegregation analysis. Mitochondrial activity for both patients and unaffected siblings was measured using a SeaHorse metabolic analyzer. Results: Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent cosegregation analysis demonstrated that compound heterozygous missense variants L695P and I743T in SPG7 were the only mutations cosegregating with the disease in an autosomal recessive fashion in this family. The parents and siblings are genetically heterozygous and clinically unaffected. Functional studies suggested that the PLS-associated SPG7 mutants affect mitochondrial function when glucose is reduced. Conclusions: Compound heterozygote mutations in SPG7 are associated with adult-onset PLS, extending the spectrum of SPG7-linked neurologic diseases. Patients with the PLS phenotype should have genetic testing for paraplegin, especially when the condition is familial. PMID:27123479

  17. Olestra? The Jury's Still Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-04-01

    Although it has been more than a year since the FDA approved the use of olestra in certain foods, this fat substitute, a mixture of sucrose polyesters, is still controversial. It would seem that a fat substitute that is heat stable and has an acceptable flavor and texture would be welcomed enthusiastically in a country where increasing numbers of people, young and old, exceed their ideal body weight. Obesity and diets containing high levels of fat have been linked to numerous health problems, including cardiovascular diseases, certain types of cancer, and adult-onset diabetes; they may also exacerbate some chronic problems such as arthritis in joints of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some scientists and consumer groups question olestra's safety and usefulness.

  18. Stroke after adult-onset epilepsy: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wannamaker, Braxton B; Wilson, Dulaney A; Malek, Angela M; Selassie, Anbesaw W

    2015-02-01

    older warrants consideration for occult cerebrovascular disease as an etiology of the epilepsy, which may also increase the risk of subsequent stroke. Somatic comorbidities frequently associated with epilepsy include comorbid conditions that share the same underlying pathology with stroke (i.e., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes, and arteriosclerosis). This increased risk of stroke in patients with adult-onset epilepsy should dictate the evaluation and management of stroke risk factors to prevent stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictive Medicine: Recombinant DNA Technology and Adult-Onset Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Genetic factors are of great importance in common adult-onset disorders such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and neuro-degenerative diseases. Advances in DNA technology now allow identification of persons at high-risk of developing some of these diseases. This advance is leading to predictive medicine. In some genetic disorders, such as those leading to atherosclerosis and cancer, identification of high-risk individuals allows intervention which alters the natural history of the disorder. In other diseases, for which there is no treatment, such as Huntington's disease, the application of this technology provides information that relieves uncertainty and may affect quality of life, but does not alter the course of the illness. General implementation of predictive testing programs awaits the results of pilot projects, which will demonstrate the needs, appropriate levels of support, and guidelines for delivery of such testing. PMID:21253100

  20. Association between mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; de Jonge, Peter; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Liu, Zhaorui; O'Neill, Siobhan; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria Carmen; Al-Hamzawi, Ali Obaid; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Borges, Guilherme; Ciutan, Marius; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fiestas, Fabian; Haro, Josep Maria; Hu, Chiyi; Kessler, Ronald C.; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Posada-Villa, Jose; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J; Scott, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Associations between asthma and anxiety and mood disorders are well established, but little is known about their temporal sequence. We examined associations between a wide range of DSM-IV mental disorders with adult onset of asthma and whether observed associations remain after mental comorbidity adjustments. Methods During face-to-face household surveys in community-dwelling adults (n = 52,095) of 19 countries, the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Asthma was assessed by self-report of physician’s diagnosis together with age of onset. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent adult onset asthma, without and with comorbidity adjustment. Results 1,860 adult onset (21 years+) asthma cases were identified, representing a total of 2,096,486 person-years of follow up. After adjustment for comorbid mental disorders several mental disorders were associated with subsequent adult asthma onset: bipolar (OR=1.8; 95%CI 1.3–2.4), panic (OR=1.4; 95%CI 1.0–2.0), generalized anxiety (OR=1.3; 95%CI 1.1–1.7), specific phobia (OR=1.4; 95%CI 1.2–1.6); post-traumatic stress (OR=1.5; 95%CI 1.1–2.0); binge eating (OR=1.9; 95%CI 1.2–2.9) and alcohol abuse (OR=1.5; 95%CI 1.2–2.0). Mental comorbidity linearly increased the association with adult asthma. The association with subsequent asthma was stronger for mental disorders with an early onset (before age 21). Conclusions A wide range of temporally prior mental disorders are significantly associated with subsequent onset of asthma in adulthood. The extent to which asthma can be avoided or improved among those with early mental disorders deserves study. PMID:25263276

  1. Gastrointestinal Pathologic Abnormalities in Pediatric- and Adult-Onset Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Ravelli, Alberto; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Soresina, Annarosa; Fuoti, Maurizio; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Lanzini, Alberto; Plebani, Alessandro; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2015-08-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is the most common form of primary symptomatic immunodeficiency. Gastrointestinal manifestations, such as gastritis, diarrhea, gastrointestinal infections, and malabsorption, may complicate the clinical history in almost 50 % of patients. To evaluate gastrointestinal histopathological findings in pediatric- and in adult-onset common variable immunodeficiency patients. Twenty-two patients with common variable immunodeficiency (13 children, nine adults) were retrospectively studied from a clinical and histopathological point of view. Increased T lymphocyte infiltrate and the absence of plasma cells in duodenal lamina propria and submucosa were the most frequent findings, independently from onset age, whereas follicular lymphoid hyperplasia and polymorphonuclear infiltrate, as well as parasitic and viral infections, were only present in the adult group. Common variable immunodeficiency patients with minor gastrointestinal symptoms also presented pathological findings, mainly the absence of plasma cells, T cell infiltrate, and infections, independently of age. Gastrointestinal pathological abnormalities are common in both pediatric- and adult-onset common variable immunodeficiency patients. Histological alterations may vary depending upon the age of onset, possibly due to duration of disease. Minor gastrointestinal symptoms are also associated with pathological findings; therefore, these should be searched in all symptomatic patients.

  2. Comparisons of intellectual capacities between mild and classic adult-onset phenotypes of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1).

    PubMed

    Jean, Stéphane; Richer, Louis; Laberge, Luc; Mathieu, Jean

    2014-11-26

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an autosomal dominant genetic multisystem disorder and the commonest adult-onset form of muscular dystrophy. DM1 results from the expansion of an unstable trinucleotide cytosine-thymine-guanine (CTG) repeat mutation. CTG repeats in DM1 patients can range from 50 to several thousands, with a tendency toward increased repeats with successive generations (anticipation). Associated findings can include involvements in almost every systems, including the brain, and cognitive abnormalities occur in the large majority of patients. The objectives are to describe and compare the intellectual abilities of a large sample of DM1 patients with mild and classic adult-onset phenotypes, to estimate the validity of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) in DM1 patients with muscular weakness, and to appraise the relationship of intelligence quotient (IQ) to CTG repeat length, age at onset of symptoms, and disease duration. A seven-subtest WAIS-R was administered to 37 mild and 151 classic adult-onset DM1 patients to measure their Full-Scale (FSIQ), Verbal (VIQ) and Performance IQ (PIQ). To control for potential bias due to muscular weakness, Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM), a motor-independent test of intelligence, were also completed. Total mean FSIQ was 82.6 corresponding to low average IQ, and 82% were below an average intelligence. Mild DM1 patients had a higher mean FSIQ (U=88.7 vs 81.1, p<0.001), VIQ (U=87.8 vs 82.3, p=0.001), and PIQ (U=94.8 vs 83.6, p<0.001) than classic adult-onset DM1 patients. In both mild and classic adult-onset patients, all subtests mean scaled scores were below the normative sample mean. FSIQ also strongly correlate with SPM (r s =0.67, p<0.001), indicating that low intelligence scores are not a consequence of motor impairment. FSIQ scores decreased with both the increase of (CTG)n (r s =-0.41, p<0.001) and disease duration (r s =-0.26, p=0.003). Results show that intellectual impairment is an

  3. Distinguishing adult-onset asthma from COPD: a review and a new approach

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Michael J; Perret, Jennifer L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; McDonald, Vanessa M; McDonald, Christine F

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. This review presents a comprehensive synopsis of their epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentations; describes how they can be distinguished; and considers both established and proposed new approaches to their management. Both adult-onset asthma and COPD are complex diseases arising from gene–environment interactions. Early life exposures such as childhood infections, smoke, obesity, and allergy influence adult-onset asthma. While the established environmental risk factors for COPD are adult tobacco and biomass smoke, there is emerging evidence that some childhood exposures such as maternal smoking and infections may cause COPD. Asthma has been characterized predominantly by Type 2 helper T cell (Th2) cytokine-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. In established COPD, the inflammatory cell infiltrate in small airways comprises predominantly neutrophils and cytotoxic T cells (CD8 positive lymphocytes). Parenchymal destruction (emphysema) in COPD is associated with loss of lung tissue elasticity, and small airways collapse during exhalation. The precise definition of chronic airflow limitation is affected by age; a fixed cut-off of forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity leads to overdiagnosis of COPD in the elderly. Traditional approaches to distinguishing between asthma and COPD have highlighted age of onset, variability of symptoms, reversibility of airflow limitation, and atopy. Each of these is associated with error due to overlap and convergence of clinical characteristics. The management of chronic stable asthma and COPD is similarly convergent. New approaches to the management of obstructive airway diseases in adults have been proposed based on inflammometry and also multidimensional assessment, which focuses on the four domains of the airways, comorbidity, self-management, and

  4. A novel mouse model that recapitulates adult-onset glycogenosis type 4

    PubMed Central

    Orhan Akman, H.; Emmanuele, Valentina; Kurt, Yasemin Gülcan; Kurt, Bülent; Sheiko, Tatiana; DiMauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age at onset. Complete loss of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy and affects primarily the muscle and the liver. However, residual enzyme activity as low as 5–20% leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects the central and peripheral nervous system and muscles and in the latter is termed adult polyglucosan body disease (APBD). Here, we describe a mouse model of GSD IV that reflects this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to knock in the most common GBE1 mutation p.Y329S c.986A > C found in APBD patients of Ashkenazi Jewish decent. Mice homozygous for this allele (Gbe1ys/ys) exhibit a phenotype similar to APBD, with widespread accumulation of PG. Adult mice exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. While the onset of symptoms is limited to adult mice, PG accumulates in tissues of newborn mice but is initially absent from the cerebral cortex and heart muscle. Thus, PG is well tolerated in most tissues, but the eventual accumulation in neurons and their axons causes neuropathy that leads to hind limb spasticity and premature death. This mouse model mimics the pathology and pathophysiologic features of human adult-onset branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:26385640

  5. Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy as a rare cause of slowly progressive muscle weakness with young adult onset.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Meiko Hashimoto; Ohta, Hikari; Izutsu, Koji; Shimizu, Jun; Uesaka, Yoshikazu

    2015-05-01

    Sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy (SLONM) is a rare intractable acquired myopathy characterized by progressive muscle weakness and atrophy, usually with middle to late adult onset. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) has been reported to be a promising treatment for SLONM. In this study we performed clinical characterization, muscle histopathological analysis, and muscle power monitoring after auto-PBSCT in a 27-year-old HIV-negative man with monoclonal gammopathy. He showed improved muscle strength after treatment with high-dose melphalan and auto-PBSCT. Considering the recent reports of successful treatment of SLONM, early and correct diagnosis of this condition in association with monoclonal gammopathy is important. SLONM should be added to the list of diseases to consider in the differential diagnosis of progressive muscle weakness with young adult onset. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Adult-onset nemaline myopathy in a dog presenting with persistent atrial standstill and primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R K; Russell, N J; Shelton, G D

    2012-06-01

    A nine-year-old neutered female mixed breed dog presented for evaluation following a five-day history of lethargy, inappetence, weakness, abdominal distension and generalised muscle atrophy. Persistent vatrial standstill with a junctional rhythm was identified on electrocardiogram. Echocardiogram identified moderate dilation of all cardiac chambers and mild thickening of the mitral and tricuspid valves. Serology was negative for Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii. Permanent pacemaker implantation was performed in addition to endomyocardial and skeletal muscle biopsies. Cryosections from the biceps femoris muscle showed numerous nemaline rod bodies while endomyocardial biopsies were possibly consistent with end-stage myocarditis. Rod bodies have rarely been reported in the veterinary literature. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of adult-onset nemaline rod myopathy and hypothyroidism with concurrent cardiac disease in a dog. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lujia; Chen, Liang; Wang, Hairong; Dai, Lihua; Pan, Shuming

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown.

  8. Case report: An adult-onset type II citrin deficiency patient in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    TANG, LUJIA; CHEN, LIANG; WANG, HAIRONG; DAI, LIHUA; PAN, SHUMING

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25A13) gene may result in neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency and/or adult-onset type II citrullinemia. These conditions are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The current case report describes a 43-year-old man who presented with sudden delirium and upper limb weakness. Upon admission, the patient was fully conscious and alert but later lost consciousness subsequent to a sudden convulsive seizure. Hyperammonemia was detected and analysis of the SLC25A13 gene identified an 851del4 mutation. Thus, the possibility of genetic disease should be considered as a potential cause of the symptoms of patients with altered states of consciousness, such as delirium and loss of consciousness, in cases where the cause of the disturbance is unknown. PMID:27347070

  9. Clinical Value of NPHS2 Analysis in Early- and Adult-Onset Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Santín, Sheila; Tazón-Vega, Bárbara; Silva, Irene; Cobo, María Ángeles; Giménez, Isabel; Ruíz, Patricia; García-Maset, Rafael; Ballarín, José

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives To date, very few cases with adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) carrying NPHS2 variants have been described, all of them being compound heterozygous for the p.R229Q variant and one pathogenic mutation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Mutation analysis was performed in 148 unrelated Spanish patients, of whom 50 presented with FSGS after 18 years of age. Pathogenicity of amino acid substitutions was evaluated through an in silico scoring system. Haplotype analysis was carried out using NPHS2 single nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite markers. Results Compound heterozygous or homozygous NPHS2 pathogenic mutations were identified in seven childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) cases. Six additional cases with late childhood- and adult-onset SRNS were compound heterozygotes for p.R229Q and one pathogenic mutation, mostly p.A284V. p.R229Q was more frequent among SRNS cases relative to controls (odds ratio = 2.65; P = 0.02). Significantly higher age at onset of the disease and slower progression to ESRD were found in patients with one pathogenic mutation plus the p.R229Q variant in respect to patients with two NPHS2 pathogenic mutations. Conclusions NPHS2 analysis has a clinical value in both childhood- and adult-onset SRNS patients. For adult-onset patients, the first step should be screening for p.R229Q and, if positive, for p.A284V. These alleles are present in conserved haplotypes, suggesting a common origin for these substitutions. Patients carrying this specific NPHS2 allele combination did not respond to corticoids or immunosuppressors and showed FSGS, average 8-year progression to ESRD, and low risk for recurrence of FSGS after kidney transplant. PMID:20947785

  10. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  11. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  12. Cluster Analysis on Longitudinal Data of Patients with Adult-Onset Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E; Niemelä, Onni; Tommola, Minna; Haanpää, Jussi; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    Previous cluster analyses on asthma are based on cross-sectional data. To identify phenotypes of adult-onset asthma by using data from baseline (diagnostic) and 12-year follow-up visits. The Seinäjoki Adult Asthma Study is a 12-year follow-up study of patients with new-onset adult asthma. K-means cluster analysis was performed by using variables from baseline and follow-up visits on 171 patients to identify phenotypes. Five clusters were identified. Patients in cluster 1 (n = 38) were predominantly nonatopic males with moderate smoking history at baseline. At follow-up, 40% of these patients had developed persistent obstruction but the number of patients with uncontrolled asthma (5%) and rhinitis (10%) was the lowest. Cluster 2 (n = 19) was characterized by older men with heavy smoking history, poor lung function, and persistent obstruction at baseline. At follow-up, these patients were mostly uncontrolled (84%) despite daily use of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) with add-on therapy. Cluster 3 (n = 50) consisted mostly of nonsmoking females with good lung function at diagnosis/follow-up and well-controlled/partially controlled asthma at follow-up. Cluster 4 (n = 25) had obese and symptomatic patients at baseline/follow-up. At follow-up, these patients had several comorbidities (40% psychiatric disease) and were treated daily with ICS and add-on therapy. Patients in cluster 5 (n = 39) were mostly atopic and had the earliest onset of asthma, the highest blood eosinophils, and FEV1 reversibility at diagnosis. At follow-up, these patients used the lowest ICS dose but 56% were well controlled. Results can be used to predict outcomes of patients with adult-onset asthma and to aid in development of personalized therapy (NCT02733016 at ClinicalTrials.gov). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The association of childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders with adult onset chronic physical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kate M.; Von Korff, Michael; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Benjet, Corina; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Haro, Josep Maria; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, José; Tachimori, Hisateru; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Context The physical health consequences of childhood psychosocial adversities may be as substantial as the mental health consequences but whether this is the case remains unclear because much prior research has involved unrepresentative samples and a selective focus on particular adversities or physical outcomes. The association between early onset mental disorders and subsequent poor physical health in adulthood has not been investigated. Objective To investigate whether childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders are independently associated with increased risk of a range of adult onset chronic physical conditions in culturally diverse samples spanning the full adult age range. Design Cross-sectional community surveys of adults in ten countries. Setting General population. Participants Adults (>= 18 years; n = 18,303), with diagnostic assessment and determination of age of onset of DSM-IV mental disorders; assessment of childhood familial adversities; and age of diagnosis/onset of chronic physical conditions. Main Outcome Measures Risk (hazard ratios) of adult onset (> age 20) heart disease, asthma, diabetes, arthritis, chronic spinal pain, and chronic headache as a function of specific childhood adversities and early onset (< age 21) DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders, with mutual adjustment. Results A history of three or more childhood adversities was independently associated with onset of all six physical conditions (hazard ratios from 1.44–2.19). Controlling for current mental disorder made little difference to these associations. Early onset mental disorders were independently associated with onset of five physical conditions (hazard ratios from 1.43–1.66). Conclusions These results are consistent with the hypothesis that childhood adversities and early onset mental disorders have independent, broad spectrum effects that increase risks of diverse chronic physical conditions in later life. They require confirmation in a prospective design

  14. Childhood abuse and adult-onset asthma among Peruvian women.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Dipti; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2017-06-26

    Childhood abuse has been found to be associated with adult-onset asthma; however, this association has not been studied in low- and middle-income countries with a high burden of gender-based violence, including childhood abuse. We examined the odds of asthma diagnosed at age 18 or older in relation to history of physical and sexual abuse among Peruvian pregnant women. This cross-sectional study collected demographic characteristics, history of abuse and asthma diagnoses from 3081 pregnant women. Logistic regression procedures estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (aOR, [95% CI]) for asthma diagnoses in relation to abuse. Overall, 71% of the women reported a history of abuse (<18 years), and asthma was diagnosed among 2.6% of the cohort participants. The prevalence of physical only, sexual only and both physical and sexual childhood abuse was 38, 8 and 25%, respectively. The history of physical only (1.16, [0.63-2.17]), sexual only (2.11, [0.92-4.84]) or both physical and sexual childhood abuse (1.75, [0.94-3.29]) was positively associated with increased odds of asthma, although the associations were not statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. However, the odds of asthma increased with increasing numbers of abuse events (ptrend = 0.01). Women who reported ≥3 abuse events had an increased odds of asthma (1.88, [1.06-3.34]). Our results do not provide convincing evidence that childhood abuse is associated with asthma among pregnant Peruvian women; however, we were able to demonstrate that an increased number of abuse events are associated with asthma. Further research is required to better understand the effects of abuse on asthma.

  15. Fever of unknown origin in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Zenone, Thierry

    2007-12-01

    Noninfectious inflammatory diseases (connective tissue diseases, vasculitis syndromes, granulomatous diseases) emerged as the most frequent cause of fever of unknown origin in western countries. Among these diseases, giant cell arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica are the most frequent specific diagnosis in the elderly and adult-onset Still's disease the most frequent in younger patients. This article focuses on noninfectious inflammatory diseases as a cause of classic fever of unknown origin (mainly rheumatic diseases, such as vasculitis and connective tissue diseases).

  16. Educational and vocational outcomes of adults with childhood- and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: nine years of followup.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Erica F; Hersh, Aimee O; Trupin, Laura; von Scheven, Emily; Okumura, Megumi J; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward H

    2014-05-01

    To compare educational and vocational outcomes among adults with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and adult-onset SLE. We used data derived from the 2002–2010 cycles of the Lupus Outcomes Study, a longitudinal cohort of 1,204 adult subjects with SLE. Subjects ages 18–60 years living in the US (n = 929) were included in the analysis and were classified as childhood-onset SLE if age at diagnosis was <18 years (n = 115). Logistic regression was used to assess the unadjusted and adjusted effect of childhood-onset SLE, sex, race/ethnicity, baseline age, urban or rural location, and US region on the likelihood of completing a bachelor's degree. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the effect of childhood-onset SLE, demographics, education, and disease-related factors on the odds of employment, accounting for multiple observations over the study period. Subjects with childhood-onset SLE were on average younger (mean ± SD 29 ± 10 years versus 44 ± 9 years), with longer disease duration (mean ± SD 15 ± 10 years versus 11 ± 8 years). Subjects with adult-onset SLE and childhood-onset SLE subjects were equally likely to complete a bachelor's degree. However, subjects with childhood-onset SLE were significantly less likely to be employed, independent of demographic and disease characteristics (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.42–0.91). While subjects with SLE are just as likely as those with adult-onset SLE to complete college education, childhood-onset SLE significantly increases the risk of not working in adulthood, even when controlling for disease and demographic factors. Exploring reasons for low rates of employment and providing vocational support may be important to maximize long-term functional outcomes in patients with childhood-onset SLE.

  17. Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort VI: A cross-sectional comparison of outcomes between adults with pediatric-onset and adult-onset morphea

    PubMed Central

    Condie, Daniel; Grabell, Daniel; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies have looked at outcomes of adults with pediatric-onset morphea. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life in adults with pediatric-onset morphea to those of patients with adult-onset morphea. Methods Participants in the study were drawn from the Morphea in Adults and Children Cohort and included 68 adults with pediatric-onset morphea and 234 patients with adult-onset morphea. Outcome measures included the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), physical exam findings, and quality of life questionnaires. Results Adults with pediatric-onset morphea were younger, had longer disease duration, and were more likely to have the linear subtype of morphea. Patients with pediatric-onset disease were less likely to have active disease. Among patients with active disease, those with pediatric-onset morphea had less disease activity as measured by the LoSCAT. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had higher disease damage as measured by the Physician Global Assessment of Damage, but similar disease damage as measured by the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had more favorable quality of life scores for all measures that reached statistical significance. Conclusion Adults with pediatric-onset morphea differ from patients with adult-onset disease with respect to subtype, disease activity, disease damage, and health-related quality of life. PMID:25156342

  18. Nephrin mutations cause childhood- and adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santín, Sheila; García-Maset, Rafael; Ruíz, Patricia; Giménez, Isabel; Zamora, Isabel; Peña, Antonia; Madrid, Alvaro; Camacho, Juan A; Fraga, Gloria; Sánchez-Moreno, Ana; Cobo, Maria Angeles; Bernis, Carmen; Ortiz, Alberto; de Pablos, Augusto Luque; Pintos, Guillem; Justa, Maria Luisa; Hidalgo-Barquero, Emilia; Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Ballarín, José; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the NPHS1 gene cause congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type presenting before the first 3 months of life. Recently, NPHS1 mutations have also been identified in childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and milder courses of disease, but their role in adults with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis remains unknown. Here we developed an in silico scoring matrix to evaluate the pathogenicity of amino-acid substitutions using the biophysical and biochemical difference between wild-type and mutant amino acid, the evolutionary conservation of the amino-acid residue in orthologs, and defined domains, with the addition of contextual information. Mutation analysis was performed in 97 patients from 89 unrelated families, of which 52 presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome after 18 years of age. Compound heterozygous or homozygous NPHS1 mutations were identified in five familial and seven sporadic cases, including one patient 27 years old at onset of the disease. Substitutions were classified as 'severe' or 'mild' using this in silico approach. Our results suggest an earlier onset of the disease in patients with two 'severe' mutations compared to patients with at least one 'mild' mutation. The finding of mutations in a patient with adult-onset focal segmental glomerulosclerosis indicates that NPHS1 analysis could be considered in patients with later onset of the disease.

  19. Dominant-Negative Effects of Adult-Onset Huntingtin Mutations Alter the Division of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Carla; Aubert, Sophie; Bourgois-Rocha, Fany; Barnat, Monia; Rego, Ana Cristina; Déglon, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the huntingtin protein (HTT) gene underlie both adult-onset and juvenile forms of Huntington’s disease (HD). HTT modulates mitotic spindle orientation and cell fate in mouse cortical progenitors from the ventricular zone. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESC) characterized as carrying mutations associated with adult-onset disease during pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, we investigated the influence of human HTT and of an adult-onset HD mutation on mitotic spindle orientation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESCs. The RNAi-mediated silencing of both HTT alleles in neural stem cells derived from hESCs disrupted spindle orientation and led to the mislocalization of dynein, the p150Glued subunit of dynactin and the large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. We also investigated the effect of the adult-onset HD mutation on the role of HTT during spindle orientation in NSCs derived from HD-hESCs. By combining SNP-targeting allele-specific silencing and gain-of-function approaches, we showed that a 46-glutamine expansion in human HTT was sufficient for a dominant-negative effect on spindle orientation and changes in the distribution within the spindle pole and the cell cortex of dynein, p150Glued and NuMA in neural cells. Thus, neural derivatives of disease-specific human pluripotent stem cells constitute a relevant biological resource for exploring the impact of adult-onset HD mutations of the HTT gene on the division of neural progenitors, with potential applications in HD drug discovery targeting HTT-dynein-p150Glued complex interactions. PMID:26863614

  20. Genetics Home Reference: adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia

    MedlinePlus

    ... it causes a severe decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia). Over time, motor skills are affected, ... Schmahmann JD. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids: clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathologic observations. Brain Pathol. 2009 Jan; ...

  1. Adult-onset nemaline rods in a patient treated for suspected dermatomyositis: study with two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Danon, M.J.; Giometti, C.S.; Manaligod, J.R.; Perurena, O.H.; Skosey, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    A 65-year-old woman with progressive muscle weakness and a diffuse rash of three years' duration was examined. Muscle tissue was studied with histochemical techniques, phase-contrast microscopy, electron microscopy, and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Histochemical studies showed numerous nemaline rods, with a normal ratio of types I and II fibers. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed abnormalities in the myosin light chain and tropomyosin protein patterns when compared with normal and diseased muscle biopsy samples, including those from two patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis.

  2. Differential diagnosis of sporadic adult-onset ataxia: The role of REM sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Arruda, Walter O; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Munhoz, Renato P

    2015-06-01

    Sporadic adult-onset ataxia encompasses a group of degenerative, non-hereditary disorders, including idiopathic adult-onset ataxia and the cerebellar form of multiple system atrophy. Our objective was to analyze the diagnosis at follow-up of 50 sporadic adult-onset ataxia patients. Clinical and laboratory findings of 50 adult patients with sporadic adult-onset ataxia were analyzed. Diagnosis of probable REM sleep behavior disorder was based predominantly on clinically accepted criteria. Multiple system atrophy was diagnosed in 48% of cases, the remaining 52% received a diagnosis of sporadic adult-onset ataxia. REM sleep behavior disorder was diagnosed in 46% of the patients. However, among patients with probable multiple system atrophy, the corresponding figure was 83.34% versus 11.53% among those with sporadic ataxia (p < 0.001). REM sleep behavior disorder is an important aid to the differentiation of multiple system atrophy from sporadic adult-onset ataxia and its use for this purpose should be encouraged. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Juvenile versus adult-onset ankylosing spondylitis -- clinical, radiographic, and social outcomes. a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Deepak R; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Sengupta, Raj

    2013-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has 2 main modes of onset: juvenile-onset AS (JoAS) and adult-onset AS (AoAS). It is not known whether JoAS is a subtype of AS, or AS modulated by early age of onset and longer disease duration. We performed a systematic review of the literature, identifying 12 articles and 1 abstract directly comparing JoAS and AoAS cohorts, with observational study design. Patients with JoAS appear to have more peripheral joint involvement both clinically and radiographically (especially knees and ankles) and more root joint involvement (hips and shoulders); they are more likely to proceed to hip arthroplasty and often initially present with peripheral rather than axial symptoms. Patients with AoAS appear to have more axial symptoms and radiographic disease, particularly in the lumbar spine, and worse axial metrology. In terms of other characteristics, more evidence is needed to confidently state whether JoAS and AoAS are different.

  4. Effect Size of Memory Deficits in Mice with Adult-Onset P301L Tau Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Holly C.; Rudy, Carolyn C.; Weitzner, Daniel S.; Zhang, Chong; Tosto, David E.; Knowlan, Kevin; Xu, Ying; Reed, Miranda N.

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing mutations in tau have yielded essential discoveries for Alzheimer’s disease. One of the most commonly used tau mouse models is the tet-off Tg(tauP301L)4510 model that expresses P301L human tau driven by the calcium-calmodulin kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) promoter system. Tau expression in this model is regulatable, allowing for suppression of mutant tau expression until adulthood and prevention of possible developmental alterations resulting from P301L tau expression during development. Here, we compared the effect and sample sizes needed for three learning and memory tasks in mice with adult-onset P301L tau expression. Our findings indicate that the Incremental Repeated Acquisition (IRA) and trace fear conditioning tasks, neither of which have previously been published with these mice, were highly sensitive to P301L tau expression, whereas the Morris water maze, the most commonly used task with this model, was the least sensitive. Memory deficits were observed at a time when tau pathology was subtle and prior to readily detectable neuronal loss. Thus, we provide essential information (effect and sample sizes needed) for establishing experimental designs at a time point when memory deficits are likely to go undetected if inadequate sample sizes are used. Our work also suggests the tet-off Tg4510 model provides a way to avoid mutant tau expression during the perinatal and early postnatal stages, thereby preventing possible developmental alterations unrelated to Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25004446

  5. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Still a Work in Progress?

    PubMed Central

    Mosna, Federico; Capelli, Debora; Gottardi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Minimal residual disease evaluation refers to a series of molecular and immunophenotypical techniques aimed at detecting submicroscopic disease after therapy. As such, its application in acute myeloid leukemia has greatly increased our ability to quantify treatment response, and to determine the chemosensitivity of the disease, as the final product of the drug schedule, dose intensity, biodistribution, and the pharmakogenetic profile of the patient. There is now consistent evidence for the prognostic power of minimal residual disease evaluation in acute myeloid leukemia, which is complementary to the baseline prognostic assessment of the disease. The focus for its use is therefore shifting to individualize treatment based on a deeper evaluation of chemosensitivity and residual tumor burden. In this review, we will summarize the results of the major clinical studies evaluating minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia in adults in recent years and address the technical and practical issues still hampering the spread of these techniques outside controlled clinical trials. We will also briefly speculate on future developments and offer our point of view, and a word of caution, on the present use of minimal residual disease measurements in “real-life” practice. Still, as final standardization and diffusion of the methods are sorted out, we believe that minimal residual disease will soon become the new standard for evaluating response in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28587190

  6. Variation in genes related to cochlear biology is strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in border collies.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S; Lam, Ernest T; Ruhe, Alison L; Erdman, Carolyn A; Robertson, Kathryn R; Webb, Aubrey A; Williams, D Colette; Chang, Melanie L; Hytönen, Marjo K; Lohi, Hannes; Hamilton, Steven P; Neff, Mark W

    2012-09-01

    Domestic dogs can suffer from hearing losses that can have profound impacts on working ability and quality of life. We have identified a type of adult-onset hearing loss in Border Collies that appears to have a genetic cause, with an earlier age of onset (3-5 years) than typically expected for aging dogs (8-10 years). Studying this complex trait within pure breeds of dog may greatly increase our ability to identify genomic regions associated with risk of hearing impairment in dogs and in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to detect loci underlying adult-onset deafness in a sample of 20 affected and 28 control Border Collies. We identified a region on canine chromosome 6 that demonstrates extended support for association surrounding SNP Chr6.25819273 (p-value = 1.09 × 10(-13)). To further localize disease-associated variants, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of one affected and two unaffected dogs was performed. Through additional validation based on targeted genotyping of additional cases (n = 23 total) and controls (n = 101 total) and an independent replication cohort of 16 cases and 265 controls, we identified variants in USP31 that were strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in Border Collies, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB pathway. We found additional support for involvement of RBBP6, which is critical for cochlear development. These findings highlight the utility of GWAS-guided fine-mapping of genetic loci using targeted NGS to study hereditary disorders of the domestic dog that may be analogous to human disorders.

  7. Role of Immunofluorescence in Adult Onset Nephrotic Syndrome-A Study in a Tertiary Care Centre of Western India.

    PubMed

    Rane, Sharada; Mutyal, Prerana; Dcunha, Nicholas; Parkhi, Mayur; Jadhav, Meenal

    2017-05-01

    Study of renal Immunofluorescence (IF) is an ancillary but essential technique in evaluation of renal biopsies in glomerulopathies and also it enlightens on the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. To determine the role of IF in evaluating definite subtyping and diagnosis of adult onset nephrotic syndrome and attempting clinicopathological correlation. A total of 52 patients of adult onset nephrotic syndrome were evaluated clinically and with pertinent investigations; and subjected to USG guided percutaneous renal biopsy which was processed and stained for light microscopy and for immunofluorescence by direct method (DIF) using antibodies against IgG, IgM, IgA and C3. The predominant age group affected was 18-47 years (78.85%). Male:female ratio was 1:0.63. The most frequent glomerular lesion encountered was Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, 36.54%) followed by lupus nephritis (26.92%) and IgA nephropathy (9.62%). The most common glomerular lesion in males was FSGS and that in females was lupus nephritis. DIF was mainly coarsely granular whenever present. One case of lupus nephritis and diabetic nephropathy, showed non specific IF. It was negative in all cases of FSGS, Minimal Change Disease (MCD) and renal amyloidosis. The IF helped in differentiating eight cases that were normal on light microscopy as IgA nephropathy (n=5) and authentic MCD (n=3). It helped in endorsing 19 cases of FSGS to be a progression of MCD. It was also of help in sub-typing all cases of Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis (MPGN) (n=3) as MPGN-Type I. IF was of great help in diagnosing exact type of glomerulopathy in adult onset nephrotic syndrome and provided insight in its pathogenesis.

  8. Variation in Genes Related to Cochlear Biology Is Strongly Associated with Adult-Onset Deafness in Border Collies

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Alison L.; Erdman, Carolyn A.; Robertson, Kathryn R.; Webb, Aubrey A.; Williams, D. Colette; Chang, Melanie L.; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Lohi, Hannes; Hamilton, Steven P.; Neff, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic dogs can suffer from hearing losses that can have profound impacts on working ability and quality of life. We have identified a type of adult-onset hearing loss in Border Collies that appears to have a genetic cause, with an earlier age of onset (3–5 years) than typically expected for aging dogs (8–10 years). Studying this complex trait within pure breeds of dog may greatly increase our ability to identify genomic regions associated with risk of hearing impairment in dogs and in humans. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to detect loci underlying adult-onset deafness in a sample of 20 affected and 28 control Border Collies. We identified a region on canine chromosome 6 that demonstrates extended support for association surrounding SNP Chr6.25819273 (p-value = 1.09×10−13). To further localize disease-associated variants, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) of one affected and two unaffected dogs was performed. Through additional validation based on targeted genotyping of additional cases (n = 23 total) and controls (n = 101 total) and an independent replication cohort of 16 cases and 265 controls, we identified variants in USP31 that were strongly associated with adult-onset deafness in Border Collies, suggesting the involvement of the NF-κB pathway. We found additional support for involvement of RBBP6, which is critical for cochlear development. These findings highlight the utility of GWAS–guided fine-mapping of genetic loci using targeted NGS to study hereditary disorders of the domestic dog that may be analogous to human disorders. PMID:23028339

  9. Young-onset parkinsonism in a Hong Kong Chinese man with adult-onset Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chloe Miu; Sheng, Bun; Lee, Hencher Han-chih; Lau, Kwok-kwong; Chan, Wing-tak; Lam, Ching-wan; Chan, Yan-wo

    2011-04-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of disorders varied in genetic etiologies, clinical presentations, and radiological features. NBIA is an iron homeostasis disorder with progressive iron accumulation in the central nervous systems and is clinically characterized by extrapyramidal movement abnormalities, retinal pigmentary changes, and cognitive impairment. Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is the commonest disorder of NBIA with a prevalence of one-three per million. Clinically, it is classified into early-onset childhood, atypical late-onset, and adult-onset type. Adult-onset type is rarer. We report the first case of adult-onset panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration in Hong Kong in a 28-year-old Chinese man who presented with pure young-onset parkinsonism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed the presence of eye-of-the-tiger sign. Two compound heterozygous mutations PANK2 NM_153638.2: c.445G > T; NP_705902.2: p.E149X and PANK2 NM_153638.2: c.1133A > G; NP_705902.2: p.D378G were detected. Parkinsonism per se is a very heterogeneous phenotypic group. In view of the readily available genetic analysis of PANK2, panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration should be considered in adult patients with young-onset parkinsonism with or without the eye-of-the-tiger sign. The exact diagnosis offers a different management approach and genetic counseling. NBIA is likely under- or misdiagnosed in Hong Kong Chinese.

  10. The diagnostic evaluation of patients with potential adult-onset autoinflammatory disorders: our experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Muscari, Isabella; Iacoponi, Francesca; Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Simonini, Gabriele; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Vitale, Antonio; Frediani, Bruno; Cimaz, Rolando; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPFSs) are a group of inherited disorders of the innate immune system caused by mutations of genes involved in the regulation or activation of the inflammatory response, which belong to the category of autoinflammatory disorders. Most HPFs typically have an onset in pediatric age, while a limited number of patients experience disease onset during adulthood. The relative rarity and lack of information on adult-onset autoinflammatory diseases make it likely that genetic testing is often inconclusive. Recently, we have identified a set of variables related to the probability of detecting gene mutations in MEFV, responsible for familial Mediterranean fever, and TNFRSF1A, responsible for tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome. In addition, we have proposed a diagnostic score for identifying those patients at high risk of carrying mutations in these genes. However, before the score can be recommended for application, further evaluation by means of longitudinal studies on different ethnicities and different populations deriving from other geographical areas is needed in order to definitively verify both its sensitivity and its specificity. The present manuscript offers our suggestions on how to establish a differential diagnosis for adult-onset HPFs, as well as a review of the literature, and we also provide a score revision available online. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A nonsense mutation of human XRCC4 is associated with adult-onset progressive encephalocardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Leonardo; Nasca, Alessia; Zanolini, Alice; Cendron, Filippo; d'Adamo, Pio; Costa, Rodolfo; Lamperti, Costanza; Celotti, Lucia; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We studied two monozygotic twins, born to first cousins, affected by a multisystem disease. At birth, they both presented with bilateral cryptorchidism and malformations. Since early adulthood, they developed a slowly progressive neurological syndrome, with cerebellar and pyramidal signs, cognitive impairment, and depression. Dilating cardiomyopathy is also present in both. By whole-exome sequencing, we found a homozygous nucleotide change in XRCC4 (c.673C>T), predicted to introduce a premature stop codon (p.R225*). XRCC4 transcript levels were profoundly reduced, and the protein was undetectable in patients' skin fibroblasts. XRCC4 plays an important role in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), a system that is involved in repairing DNA damage from, for example, ionizing radiations. Gamma-irradiated mutant cells demonstrated reduction, but not abolition, of DSB repair. In contrast with embryonic lethality of the Xrcc4 KO mouse, nonsense mutations in human XRCC4 have recently been associated with primordial dwarfism and, in our cases, with adult-onset neurological impairment, suggesting an important role for DNA repair in the brain. Surprisingly, neither immunodeficiency nor predisposition to malignancy was reported in these patients. PMID:25872942

  12. Adult-Onset Hypothyroidism Enhances Fear Memory and Upregulates Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Fernández-Lamo, Iván; Alieva, María; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Venero, César; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most common hormonal disease in adults, which is frequently accompanied by learning and memory impairments and emotional disorders. However, the deleterious effects of thyroid hormones deficiency on emotional memory are poorly understood and often underestimated. To evaluate the consequences of hypothyroidism on emotional learning and memory, we have performed a classical Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm in euthyroid and adult-thyroidectomized Wistar rats. In this experimental model, learning acquisition was not impaired, fear memory was enhanced, memory extinction was delayed and spontaneous recovery of fear memory was exacerbated in hypothyroid rats. The potentiation of emotional memory under hypothyroidism was associated with an increase of corticosterone release after fear conditioning and with higher expression of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala, nuclei that are critically involved in the circuitry of fear memory. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adult-onset hypothyroidism potentiates fear memory and also increases vulnerability to develop emotional memories. Furthermore, our findings suggest that enhanced corticosterone signaling in the amygdala is involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of fear memory potentiation. Therefore, we recommend evaluating whether inappropriate regulation of fear in patients with post-traumatic stress and other mental disorders is associated with abnormal levels of thyroid hormones, especially those patients refractory to treatment. PMID:22039511

  13. Adult-onset eculizumab-resistant hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with cobalamin C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Delmas, Yahsou; De Parscau, Loïc; Doucet, Laurent; Ogier, Hélène; Benoist, Jean-François; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Le Meur, Yannick

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old man was hospitalized for malignant hypertension, mechanical hemolysis, and kidney failure. Kidney biopsy confirmed glomerular and arteriolar thrombotic microangiopathy. Etiologic analyses, which included ADAMTS13 activity, stool culture, complement factor proteins (C3, C4, factor H, factor I, and MCP [membrane cofactor protein]), anti-factor H antibodies, HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) serology, and antinuclear and antiphospholipid antibodies, returned normal results. Malignant hypertension was diagnosed. Ten months later, we observed a relapse of acute kidney injury and mechanical hemolysis. Considering a diagnosis of complement dysregulation-related atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), we began treatment with eculizumab. Despite the efficient complement blockade, the patient's kidney function continued to decline. We performed additional analyses and found that the patient's homocysteine levels were dramatically increased, with no vitamin B12 (cobalamin) or folate deficiencies. We observed very low plasma methionine levels associated with methylmalonic aciduria, which suggested cobalamin C disease. We stopped the eculizumab infusions and initiated specific treatment, which resulted in complete cessation of hemolysis. MMACHC (methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein) sequencing revealed compound heterozygosity for 2 causative mutations. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult-onset cobalamin C-related HUS. Considering the wide availability and low cost of the homocysteine assay, we suggest that it be included in the diagnostic algorithm for adult patients who present with HUS. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The distinction between juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Haines, J.L.; Damji, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Because of the significant differences between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma, especially with regard to inheritance, prevalence, severity, and age of onset, we read with interest the recent publication by Morissette et al., describing a pedigree with a phenotype that overlaps the distinctive features of juvenile-onset open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucoma (usually abbreviated as POAG or COAG). These authors conclude that a gene mapped to human chromosome 1q21-q31 (GLC1A) can be responsible for both juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. The implications of such a result could be extremely important, in light of the high prevalence of the adult form of the disease. However, while the data presented in this report suggest that variable expressivity of the GLC1A gene may lead to a broader range of onset for this form of juvenile glaucoma, these data do not identify the GLC1A gene as an important cause of POAG. To prevent misleading interpretations of this and similar studies, we wish to clarify the distinction between the juvenile and adult forms of open-angle glaucoma. 8 refs.

  15. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-08-05

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability.

  16. Genes and Pathways Involved in Adult Onset Disorders Featuring Muscle Mitochondrial DNA Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Naghia; Ronchi, Dario; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Replication and maintenance of mtDNA entirely relies on a set of proteins encoded by the nuclear genome, which include members of the core replicative machinery, proteins involved in the homeostasis of mitochondrial dNTPs pools or deputed to the control of mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. Mutations in their coding genes have been observed in familial and sporadic forms of pediatric and adult-onset clinical phenotypes featuring mtDNA instability. The list of defects involved in these disorders has recently expanded, including mutations in the exo-/endo-nuclease flap-processing proteins MGME1 and DNA2, supporting the notion that an enzymatic DNA repair system actively takes place in mitochondria. The results obtained in the last few years acknowledge the contribution of next-generation sequencing methods in the identification of new disease loci in small groups of patients and even single probands. Although heterogeneous, these genes can be conveniently classified according to the pathway to which they belong. The definition of the molecular and biochemical features of these pathways might be helpful for fundamental knowledge of these disorders, to accelerate genetic diagnosis of patients and the development of rational therapies. In this review, we discuss the molecular findings disclosed in adult patients with muscle pathology hallmarked by mtDNA instability. PMID:26251896

  17. Adult-Onset Offending: A Neglected Reality? Findings From a Contemporary British General Population Cohort.

    PubMed

    Sapouna, Maria

    2017-09-01

    There is disagreement in the literature as to whether there are any true adult-onset offenders. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and correlates of adult-onset offenders in a contemporary British general population cohort consisting of 739 individuals aged between 18 and 25 years. Sixteen percent of participants reported offending for the first time after the age of 18. It is concluded that adult-onset exists and deserves to be studied further. Adult-onset offenders were more likely to report using drugs, associating with deviant peers, and having mental health problems in adulthood than non-offenders. Compared with early-onset offenders, the adult-onset offenders were people with a stronger attachment to school, which may have protected them from the risk of offending in adolescence. It is possible that when that protection was removed in adulthood and they were exposed to negative life events, such as drug use and mental illness, they became involved in crime for the first time.

  18. [The Brill-Zinsser disease still occurs in Croatia: retrospective analysis of 25 hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Turcinov, Drago; Kuzman, Ilija; Puljiz, Ivan

    2002-10-01

    The article presents epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic characteristics of Brill-Zinsser disease (BZD). A total of 25 cases of BZD were retrospectively analyzed during the period from January 1, 1980 through December 31, 2000, and etiology was confirmed by rickettsial complement-fixation test (CFT). The majority of cases 15 (60%) quoted history of primary attack of epidemic typhus during or after the World War II. During the course of the disease in our patients different organic systems were involved. Aseptic meningitis was verified in 21 (84%) patients, rash in 17 (68%), liver lesion in 14 (56%), pneumonitis in 7 (28%), myopericarditis in 7 (28%) and 5 (20%) had renal lesion. Not a single clinical symptom or finding of disease has a diagnostic particularity. However, long term fever, headache, rash and aseptic meningitis, or information of infestation with lice in childhood, or a history of epidemic typhus should arouse a suspicion of this disease, which still occurs in Croatia.

  19. Meniere’s disease: Still a mystery disease with difficult differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliou, A.; Vlastarakos, P. V.; Maragoudakis, P.; Candiloros, D.; Nikolopoulos, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six years after its first description, the differential diagnosis of Meniere’s disease remains very challenging. The aim of the present study is to review the current knowledge on the advantages and disadvantages of the new diagnostic methods for Meniere’s disease. The importance of accurate diagnosis for primary healthcare systems is also discussed. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline and other available database sources. Information from electronic links and related books were also included. Controlled clinical studies, prospective cohort studies, retrospective cohort studies, cross-sectional studies, case reports, written guidelines, systematic reviews, and books were selected. The typical clinical triad of symptoms from the vestibular and cochlear systems (recurrent vertigo, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus) is usually the key for clinical diagnosis. Glycerol dehydration test and electrocochleography are the main diagnostic tests in current practice, while vestibular evoked myogenic potentials may be used in disease staging. Imagine techniques are not specific enough to set alone the diagnosis of Meniere’s disease, although they may be necessary to exclude other pathologies. Recently developed 3D MRI protocols can delineate the perilymphatic/endolymphatic spaces of the inner ear and aid diagnosis. Meniere’s disease is a continuous problem for the patients and affects their quality of life. Taking into account the frequent nature of the disease in certain countries, efforts for reliable diagnosis, prompt referral, and successful management are undoubtedly cost-effective for healthcare systems. PMID:21633608

  20. Mutated CTSF in adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and FTD

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, Julie; Mariën, Peter; Crols, Roeland; Van Mossevelde, Sara; Dillen, Lubina; Perrone, Federica; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Verhoeven, Jo; D'aes, Tine; Ceuterick-De Groote, Chantal; Sieben, Anne; Versijpt, Jan; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the molecular basis of a Belgian family with autosomal recessive adult-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL or Kufs disease [KD]) with pronounced frontal lobe involvement and to expand the findings to a cohort of unrelated Belgian patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: Genetic screening in the ANCL family and FTD cohort (n = 461) was performed using exome sequencing and targeted massive parallel resequencing. Results: We identified a homozygous mutation (p.Ile404Thr) in the Cathepsin F (CTSF) gene cosegregating in the ANCL family. No other mutations were found that could explain the disease in this family. All 4 affected sibs developed motor symptoms and early-onset dementia with prominent frontal features. Two of them evolved to akinetic mutism. Disease presentation showed marked phenotypic variation with the onset ranging from 26 to 50 years. Myoclonic epilepsy in one of the sibs was suggestive for KD type A, while epilepsy was not present in the other sibs who presented with clinical features of KD type B. In a Belgian cohort of unrelated patients with FTD, the same heterozygous p.Arg245His mutation was identified in 2 patients who shared a common haplotype. Conclusions: A homozygous CTSF mutation was identified in a recessive ANCL pedigree. In contrast to the previous associations of CTSF with KD type B, our findings suggest that CTSF genetic testing should also be considered in patients with KD type A as well as in early-onset dementia with prominent frontal lobe and motor symptoms. PMID:27668283

  1. Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids and pigmented glia: report of five cases and a new mutation.

    PubMed

    Kleinfeld, Kirk; Mobley, Bret; Hedera, Peter; Wegner, Adam; Sriram, Subramaniam; Pawate, Siddharama

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this work is to report on a series of five patients with adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP). ALSP is a rare adult-onset leukodystrophy, which encompasses hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy. This was a retrospective chart review and literature review. Five previously healthy women presented with a rapidly progressive neurological disorder at ages 39, 37, 40, 30, and 47, respectively. All five individuals were initially diagnosed as suffering from multiple sclerosis. The clinical courses of the five patients were dominated by progressive spastic quadriparesis (patient 5, newly diagnosed, has paraparesis at this time) and dementia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse cerebral atrophy, corpus callosal atrophy, and diffuse T2 hyperintensities in the subcortical and periventricular white matter with no gadolinium enhancing lesions. Three patients showed involvement of pyramidal tracts from motor cortex to the brainstem. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal in all cases. Diagnosis of ALSP was established by biopsy (two cases) and autopsy (two cases). Histopathology showed the presence of neuroaxonal spheroids in all four cases and pigmented glia in three. In the fifth case, diagnosis was established by genetic analysis alone that showed a disease-causing mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Genetic analysis was done in three patients with available DNA, and identified the disease-causing mutation in all three, including a novel mutation F828S. ALSP may be suspected in adults with rapid to subacute progression of neurological disease when (1) MRI shows corpus callosal atrophy on a background of generalized brain atrophy and diffuse white matter disease without postcontrast enhancement, (2) CSF studies are normal, and (3) studies for systemic inflammatory diseases and specific leukodystrophies are

  2. [Epidemiologic profile of juvenile-onset compared to adult-onset spondyloarthritis in a large Brazilian cohort].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Angela P; Marques, Cláudia D L; Bortoluzzo, Adriana B; Gonçalves, Célio R; da Silva, José Antonio Braga; Ximenes, Antonio Carlos; Bértolo, Manoel B; Ribeiro, Sandra Lúcia E; Keiserman, Mauro; Skare, Thelma L; Carneiro, Sueli; Menin, Rita; Azevedo, Valderilio F; Vieira, Walber P; Albuquerque, Elisa N; Bianchi, Washington A; Bonfiglioli, Rubens; Campanholo, Cristiano; Carvalho, Hellen M S; Costa, Izaias P; Kohem, Charles L; Leite, Nocy; Lima, Sonia A L; Meirelles, Eduardo S; Pereira, Ivânio A; Pinheiro, Marcelo M; Polito, Elizandra; Resende, Gustavo G; Rocha, Francisco Airton C; Santiago, Mittermayer B; Sauma, Maria de Fátima L C; Valim, Valéria; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D; Barros, Percival D Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of juvenile-onset spondyloarthritis (SpA) (< 16 years) and compare them with a group of adult-onset (≥ 16 years) SpA patients. Prospective, observational and multicentric cohort with 1,424 patients with the diagnosis of SpA according to the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group (ESSG) submitted to a common protocol of investigation and recruited in 29 reference centers participants of the Brazilian Registry of Spondyloarthritis (RBE - Registro Brasileiro de Espondiloartrites). Patients were divided in two groups: age at onset<16 years (JOSpA group) and age at onset ≥ 16 years (AOSpA group). Among the 1,424 patients, 235 presented disease onset before 16 years (16.5%). The clinical and epidemiologic variables associated with JOSpA were male gender (p<0.001), lower limb arthritis (p=0.001), enthesitis (p=0.008), anterior uveitis (p=0.041) and positive HLA-B27 (p=0.017), associated with lower scores of disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index - BASDAI; p=0.007) and functionality (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index - BASFI; p=0.036). Cutaneous psoriasis (p<0.001), inflammatory bowel disease (p=0.023), dactylitis (p=0.024) and nail involvement (p=0.004) were more frequent in patients with adult-onset SpA. Patients with JOSpA in this large Brazilian cohort were characterized predominantly by male gender, peripheral involvement (arthritis and enthesitis), positive HLA-B27 and lower disease scores. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Adult-onset hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia in clinical practice: diagnosis, aetiology and management.

    PubMed

    Challis, Benjamin G; Powlson, Andrew S; Casey, Ruth T; Pearson, Carla; Lam, Brian Y; Ma, Marcella; Pitfield, Deborah; Yeo, Giles S H; Godfrey, Edmund; Cheow, Heok K; Chatterjee, V Krishna; Carroll, Nicholas R; Shaw, Ashley; Buscombe, John R; Simpson, Helen L

    2017-10-01

    In adults with hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH), in particular those with insulinoma, the optimal diagnostic and management strategies remain uncertain. Here, we sought to characterise the biochemical and radiological assessment, and clinical management of adults with HH at a tertiary centre over a thirteen-year period. Clinical, biochemical, radiological and histological data were reviewed from all confirmed cases of adult-onset hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia at our centre between 2003 and 2016. In a subset of patients with stage I insulinoma, whole-exome sequencing of tumour DNA was performed. Twenty-nine patients were identified (27 insulinoma, including 6 subjects with metastatic disease; 1 pro-insulin/GLP-1 co-secreting tumour; 1 activating glucokinase mutation). In all cases, hypoglycaemia (glucose ≤2.2 mmol/L) was achieved within 48 h of a supervised fast. At fast termination, subjects with stage IV insulinoma had significantly higher insulin, C-peptide and pro-insulin compared to those with insulinoma staged I-IIIB. Preoperative localisation of insulinoma was most successfully achieved with EUS. In two patients with inoperable, metastatic insulinoma, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with (177)Lu-DOTATATE rapidly restored euglycaemia and lowered fasting insulin. Finally, in a subset of stage I insulinoma, whole-exome sequencing of tumour DNA identified the pathogenic Ying Yang-1 (YY1) somatic mutation (c.C1115G/p.T372R) in one tumour, with all tumours exhibiting a low somatic mutation burden. Our study highlights, in particular, the utility of the 48-h fast in the diagnosis of insulinoma, EUS for tumour localisation and the value of PRRT therapy in the treatment of metastatic disease. © 2017 The authors.

  4. B-cell populations discriminate between pediatric- and adult-onset multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Alexander; Balint, Bettina; Korporal-Kuhnke, Mirjam; Jarius, Sven; von Engelhardt, Kathrin; Fürwentsches, Alexandra; Bussmann, Cornelia; Ebinger, Friedrich; Haas, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively assess the B-cell composition in blood and CSF of patients with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (pedMS) and adult-onset multiple sclerosis (adMS). Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we obtained blood and CSF samples from 25 patients with pedMS (8–18 years) and 40 patients with adMS (23–65 years) and blood specimens from 66 controls (1–55 years). By using multicolor flow cytometry, we identified naive, transitional, isotype class-switched memory, nonswitched memory, and double-negative memory B-cell subsets as well as plasmablasts (PB) and terminally differentiated plasma cells (PC). Flow cytometric data were compared to concentrations of B-cell-specific cytokines in serum and CSF as determined by ELISA. Results: Frequencies of circulating naive B-cells decreased with higher age in controls but not in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). B-cell patterns in CSF differed between pedMS and adMS with an acute relapse: in pedMS-derived CSF samples, high frequencies of nonswitched memory B cells and PB were present, whereas class-switched memory B cells and PC dominated in the CSF of patients with adMS. In pedMS, PB were also elevated in the periphery. Accumulation of PB in the CSF correlated with high intrathecal CXCL-13 levels and augmented intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M. Conclusions: We demonstrate distinct changes in intrathecal B-cell homeostasis in patients with pedMS during active disease, which differ from those in adults by an expansion of plasmablasts in blood and CSF and similarly occur in prototypic autoantibody-driven autoimmune disorders. This emphasizes the particular importance of activated B-lymphocyte subsets for disease progression in the earliest clinical stages of MS. PMID:28053999

  5. Precursors in adolescence of adult-onset bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Ayako; Sabet, Julia A; Sjöqvist, Hugo; Melinder, Carren; Brummer, Robert J; Montgomery, Scott

    2017-08-15

    Although the estimated contribution of genetic factors is high in bipolar disorder, environmental factors may also play a role. This Swedish register-based cohort study of men examined if physical and psychological characteristics in late adolescence, including factors previously linked with bipolar disorder (body mass index, asthma and allergy), are associated with subsequent bipolar disorder in adulthood. Unipolar depression and anxiety are analysed as additional outcomes to identify bipolar disorder-specific associations. A total of 213,693 men born between 1952 and 1956, who participated in compulsory military conscription assessments in late adolescence were followed up to 2009, excluding men with any psychiatric diagnoses at baseline. Cox regression estimated risk of bipolar disorder, depression and anxiety in adulthood associated with body mass index, asthma, allergy, muscular strength stress resilience and cognitive function in adolescence. BMI, asthma and allergy were not associated with bipolar disorder. Higher grip strength, cognitive function and stress resilience were associated with a reduced risk of bipolar disorder and the other disease outcomes. The sample consisted only of men; even though the characteristics in adolescence pre-dated disease onset, they may have been the consequence of prodromal disease. Associations with body mass index and asthma found by previous studies may be consequences of bipolar disorder or its treatment rather than risk factors. Inverse associations with all the outcome diagnoses for stress resilience, muscular strength and cognitive function may reflect general risks for these psychiatric disorders or intermediary factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Multi-organ failure as first clinical sign of macrophage activation syndrome in childhood Still's disease].

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, M; Rubio-López, I; Obeso-González, T; Teja-Barbero, J L; Santidrián-Miguel, J P; Peiro-Callizo, E

    2010-10-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a form of secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis seen in the context of rheumatic diseases. It is seen most frequently in association with systemic onset juvenile arthritis or childhood Still's disease. Hemophagocytosis is part of a sepsis-like clinical syndrome caused by hypercytokinemia due to a highly stimulated but ineffective immune response. Coagulopathy and hemorrhages, decreased white cell count, elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase, fever, rash, hepatosplenomegaly and central nervous system dysfunction are some of diagnostic criteria of macrophage activation syndrome, but it is very difficult to diagnose due to the lack of specific clinical signs. We report a 8-year-old child who was admitted to the ICU with lethargy, fever, acute respiratory failure, coagulopathy, metabolic acidosis and multiorgan failure. Septic shock was suspected, but he was diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome and treated with corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin and later discharged from the ICU.

  7. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  8. Childhood adversities and adult-onset chronic pain: Results from the World Mental Health Survey, Japan.

    PubMed

    Stickley, A; Koyanagi, A; Kawakami, N

    2015-11-01

    Childhood adversities (CAs) have been associated with adult-onset chronic pain. However, to date, most single country studies on this association have been undertaken in Western countries. This study examined the association in Japan where information is scarce. Data were drawn from the World Mental Health Survey Japan, a population-based cross-sectional survey undertaken in 11 areas of Japan in 2002-2006. We analyzed data from adults aged ≥20 years who provided information on CAs occurring before age 18 years and chronic pain (n = 1740). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk for different forms of adult-onset chronic pain (arthritis/rheumatism, neck/back pain, headache and any pain) as a function of the presence of 11 different types of CA and the number of CAs. In the adjusted models, significant associations were observed between: physical abuse and neck/back pain (HR 2.55) and any pain (HR 1.88); sexual abuse and any pain (HR 2.84). Significant dose-dependent relationships were also observed between a greater number of CAs and some adult-onset chronic pain conditions (neck/back and any pain). The results of this study suggest that in Japan, some forms of CA may be associated with certain types of adult-onset chronic pain, in particular neck/back pain. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  9. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  10. De Novo Advanced Adult-Onset Offending: New Evidence from a Population of Federal Correctional Clients.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Matt; Tahja, Katherine N; Drury, Alan J; Elbert, Michael J; Caropreso, Daniel E; Heinrichs, Timothy

    2017-05-11

    Adult antisocial behavior is almost always predated by delinquency during childhood or adolescence; however, there is also evidence of adult-onset criminal offending. This study examined this controversial subgroup of offenders using self-reported and official data from a total population of federal correctional clients selected from the Midwestern United States. Difference of means t-tests, chi-square tests, and logistic regression models found that 11.7% of clients had an adult onset of offending and 2.7% of clients (n = 23) had an onset occurring at age 60 years or older. This group-introduced as de novo advanced adult-onset offenders-had high socioeconomic status, mixed evidence of adverse childhood experiences, and virtually no usage of drugs with the exception of alcohol. These offenders were primarily convicted of social security and white-collar crimes and evinced remarkably low psychopathology and criminal risk. More research is needed to replicate the phenomenon of de novo advanced adult-onset offending. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Adult-Onset Antisocial Behavior Trajectories: Associations with Adolescent Family Processes and Emerging Adulthood Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Guided by conceptual and empirical work on emerging adulthood, this study investigated the role of closeness to mother and father and behavioral autonomy during adolescence on the development of adult-onset antisocial behavior. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we identified four aggressive…

  12. Adult-onset autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy due to BIN1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Johann; Biancalana, Valérie; Malfatti, Edoardo; Dondaine, Nicolas; Koch, Catherine; Vasli, Nasim; Kress, Wolfram; Strittmatter, Matthias; Taratuto, Ana Lia; Gonorazky, Hernan; Laforêt, Pascal; Maisonobe, Thierry; Olivé, Montse; Gonzalez-Mera, Laura; Fardeau, Michel; Carrière, Nathalie; Clavelou, Pierre; Eymard, Bruno; Bitoun, Marc; Rendu, John; Fauré, Julien; Weis, Joachim; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Romero, Norma B; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2014-12-01

    Centronuclear myopathies are congenital muscle disorders characterized by type I myofibre predominance and an increased number of muscle fibres with nuclear centralization. The severe neonatal X-linked form is due to mutations in MTM1, autosomal recessive centronuclear myopathy with neonatal or childhood onset results from mutations in BIN1 (amphiphysin 2), and dominant cases were previously associated to mutations in DNM2 (dynamin 2). Our aim was to determine the genetic basis and physiopathology of patients with mild dominant centronuclear myopathy without mutations in DNM2. We hence established and characterized a homogeneous cohort of nine patients from five families with a progressive adult-onset centronuclear myopathy without facial weakness, including three sporadic cases and two families with dominant disease inheritance. All patients had similar histological and ultrastructural features involving type I fibre predominance and hypotrophy, as well as prominent nuclear centralization and clustering. We identified heterozygous BIN1 mutations in all patients and the molecular diagnosis was complemented by functional analyses. Two mutations in the N-terminal amphipathic helix strongly decreased the membrane-deforming properties of amphiphysin 2 and three stop-loss mutations resulted in a stable protein containing 52 supernumerary amino acids. Immunolabelling experiments revealed abnormal central accumulation of dynamin 2, caveolin-3, and the autophagic marker p62, and general membrane alterations of the triad, the sarcolemma, and the basal lamina as potential pathological mechanisms. In conclusion, we identified BIN1 as the second gene for dominant centronuclear myopathy. Our data provide the evidence that specific BIN1 mutations can cause either recessive or dominant centronuclear myopathy and that both disorders involve different pathomechanisms. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights

  13. Parental smoking in pregnancy and the risks of adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Layla L; Harris, Holly R; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Willett, Walter C; Forman, Michele R; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Michels, Karin B

    2013-02-01

    Fetal exposure to parental smoking may lead to developmental adaptations and promote various diseases in later life. This study evaluated the associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the daughter in adulthood, and assessed whether these associations are explained by birth weight or body weight throughout life. We used data on 33086 participants of the Nurses' Health Study II and the Nurses' Mothers' Cohort. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the associations of maternal and paternal smoking during pregnancy with the nurse daughter, with self-reported physician-diagnosed hypertension from 1989 until 2007. Overall, 8575 (25.9%) mothers and 18874 (57.0%) fathers smoked during pregnancy. During follow-up, 7825 incident cases of adult-onset hypertension were reported. Both maternal and paternal smoking of ≥ 15 cigarettes/d during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of hypertension (rate ratio, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.09-1.29; and rate ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12-1.25, respectively) in the age-adjusted models. Further adjustment for birth weight did not affect the effect estimates appreciably, whereas additional adjustment for body shape and weight until age 18, or current body mass index, attenuated the associations with both maternal and paternal smoking (rate ratio, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.98-1.16; and rate ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.12, respectively). The associations of parental smoking during pregnancy with the risk of hypertension in the offspring were largely explained by body weight throughout life, suggesting that these associations may not reflect direct intrauterine mechanisms.

  14. How Much Do We Know about Adult-onset Primary Tics? Prevalence, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Robakis, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Background Tic disorders are generally considered to be of pediatric onset; however, reports of adult-onset tics exist in the literature. Tics can be categorized as either primary or secondary, with the latter being the larger group in adults. Primary or idiopathic tics that arise in adulthood make up a subset of tic disorders whose epidemiologic and clinical features have not been well delineated. Methods Articles to be included in this review were identified by searching PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science using the terms adult- and late-onset tics, which resulted in 120 unique articles. Duplicates were removed. Citing references were identified using Google Scholar; all references were reviewed for relevance. Results The epidemiologic characteristics, clinical phenomenology, and optimal treatment of adult-onset tics have not been ascertained. Twenty-six patients with adult-onset, primary tics were identified from prior case reports. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities may be lower in adults than in children, and obsessive compulsive disorder was the most common comorbidity. Adult-onset primary tics tend to wax and wane, occur predominantly in males, are often both motor and phonic in the same individual, and are characterized by a poor response to treatment. Discussion We know little about adult-onset tic disorders, particularly ones without a secondary association or cause. They are not common, and from the limited data available, appear to share some but not all features with childhood tics. Further research will be important in gaining a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder. PMID:28546883

  15. How Much Do We Know about Adult-onset Primary Tics? Prevalence, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    Tic disorders are generally considered to be of pediatric onset; however, reports of adult-onset tics exist in the literature. Tics can be categorized as either primary or secondary, with the latter being the larger group in adults. Primary or idiopathic tics that arise in adulthood make up a subset of tic disorders whose epidemiologic and clinical features have not been well delineated. Articles to be included in this review were identified by searching PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science using the terms adult- and late-onset tics, which resulted in 120 unique articles. Duplicates were removed. Citing references were identified using Google Scholar; all references were reviewed for relevance. The epidemiologic characteristics, clinical phenomenology, and optimal treatment of adult-onset tics have not been ascertained. Twenty-six patients with adult-onset, primary tics were identified from prior case reports. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities may be lower in adults than in children, and obsessive compulsive disorder was the most common comorbidity. Adult-onset primary tics tend to wax and wane, occur predominantly in males, are often both motor and phonic in the same individual, and are characterized by a poor response to treatment. We know little about adult-onset tic disorders, particularly ones without a secondary association or cause. They are not common, and from the limited data available, appear to share some but not all features with childhood tics. Further research will be important in gaining a better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder.

  16. The Genetic Link between Parkinson's Disease and the Kynurenine Pathway Is Still Missing

    PubMed Central

    Török, Nóra; Török, Rita; Szolnoki, Zoltán; Somogyvári, Ferenc; Klivényi, Péter; Vécsei, László

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is substantial evidence that the kynurenine pathway (KP) plays a role in the normal physiology of the brain and is involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD). Objective. We set out to investigate the potential roles in PD of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from one of the key enzymes of the KP, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). Methods. 105 unrelated, clinically definitive PD patients and 131 healthy controls were enrolled to investigate the possible effects of the different alleles of KMO. Fluorescently labeled TaqMan probes were used for allele discrimination. Results. None of the four investigated SNPs proved to be associated with PD or influenced the age at onset of the disease. Conclusions. The genetic link between the KP and PD is still missing. The investigated SNPs presumably do not appear to influence the function of KMO and probably do not contain binding sites for regulatory proteins of relevance in PD. This is the first study to assess the genetic background behind the biochemical alterations of the kynurenine pathway in PD, directing the attention to this previously unexamined field. PMID:25785227

  17. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Baslund, Bo

    2008-06-09

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients with Wegeners granulomatosis seems promising. Anti-TNF and IL1 receptor antagonist can control disease activity in most patients with adult morbus still.

  18. [Periodontal disease and occlusal trauma: a still debated controversy? A review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Sbordone, L; Bortolaia, C

    2002-03-01

    In the "Glossary of Periodontics Terms" written by the American Academy of Periodontology, the occlusal trauma is defined as "an injury to the attachment apparatus as a result of excessive occlusal forces". Nowadays, the effects of occlusal trauma on tooth support tissues, the onset and the progression of periodontal disease are still debated: many commonplaces have been disproved, but some doubts and not yet clear points remain, even owing to the difficult diagnosis of the presence and the real clinical impact of a traumatic occlusion. Then, ethical reasons prevent researchers from prospective clinical trials. At the beginning of the last century occlusal trauma has been supposed to be an etiologic factor of "alveolar pyorrhea", but several studies attending more strict scientific criteria failed to prove such correlation. On the basis of the bacterial genesis of periodontal disease, researchers started evaluating the possible effects of occlusal discrepancies on incidence, progression and treatment outcomes of periodontitis, but all the results underlined the more relevant role played by micro-organisms. The present review of the literature runs through this controversy again, analysing the most significant studies published.

  19. Dengue is still an imported disease in China: a case study in Guangzhou.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shaowei; Chen, Bin; Wu, Haixia; Yang, Zhicong; Di, Biao; Wang, Lihua; Tao, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiaobo; Liu, Qiyong

    2015-06-01

    Dengue virus and its four serotypes (DENV 1-4) infect approximately 390 million people worldwide each year, with most cases in tropical and subtropical regions. Because of repeated introduction of DENV from epidemic regions and suitable weather conditions, many regions have shifted from hypo-endemicity to hyper-endemicity over recent decades. Since the first dengue outbreak in 1978, it is crucial to understand the current situation in China over nearly 40 years. The purpose of the study was to examine whether dengue in China was endemic or not, which is essential for relevant dengue control and prevention strategy implementation in China. The study, combining epidemiological characteristics of dengue from the disease notification system, phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses, showed that all four serotypes had been detected in Guangzhou, China, which was dominated by DENV 1-2. The Maximum Likelihood tree analytic results showed that the virus detected in Guangzhou localized in different clades, except of virus of 2002 and 2003 clustered together. There existed the mutual introductions between Guangzhou and Southeast Asia. Most of the viruses were imported from Southeast Asia and the sources of outbreaks in Guangzhou mainly originated from Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The study indicates that dengue in China still remains as an imported disease, with the possibility of localization.

  20. Adult-onset focal expression of mutated human tau in the hippocampus impairs spatial working memory of rats.

    PubMed

    Mustroph, Martina L; King, Michael A; Klein, Ronald L; Ramirez, Julio J

    2012-07-15

    Tauopathy in the hippocampus is one of the earliest cardinal features of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition characterized by progressive memory impairments. In fact, density of tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampus strongly correlates with severity of cognitive impairments in AD. In the present study, we employed a somatic cell gene transfer technique to create a rodent model of tauopathy by injecting a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with a mutated human tau gene (P301L) into the hippocampus of adult rats. The P301L mutation is causal for frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17), but it has been used for studying memory effects characteristic of AD in transgenic mice. To ascertain if P301L-induced mnemonic deficits are persistent, animals were tested for 6 months. It was hypothesized that adult-onset, spatially restricted tau expression in the hippocampus would produce progressive spatial working memory deficits on a learned alternation task. Rats injected with the tau vector exhibited persistent impairments on the hippocampal-dependent task beginning at about 6 weeks post-transduction compared to rats injected with a green fluorescent protein vector. Histological analysis of brains for expression of human tau revealed hyperphosphorylated human tau and NFTs in the hippocampus in experimental animals only. Thus, adult-onset, vector-induced tauopathy spatially restricted to the hippocampus progressively impaired spatial working memory in rats. We conclude that the model faithfully reproduces histological and behavioral findings characteristic of dementing tauopathies. The rapid onset of sustained memory impairment establishes a preclinical model particularly suited to the development of potential tauopathy therapeutics.

  1. Two Sides of the Same Coin: Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Common Variable Immune Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Lauren A; Maggadottir, Solrun Melkorka; Pantell, Matthew S; Lugar, Patricia; Rundles, Charlotte Cunningham; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-07-28

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a complex, heterogeneous immunodeficiency characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections, and poor antibody response to vaccination. While antibiotics and immunoglobulin prophylaxis have significantly reduced infectious complications, non-infectious complications of autoimmunity, inflammatory lung disease, enteropathy, and malignancy remain of great concern. Previous studies have suggested that CVID patients diagnosed in childhood are more severely affected by these complications than adults diagnosed later in life. We sought to discern whether the rates of various infectious and non-infectious conditions differed between pediatric-diagnosed (ages 17 or younger) versus adult-diagnosed CVID (ages 18 or older). Using the United States Immunodeficiency Network (USIDNET) database, we performed a retrospective analysis of 457 children and adults with CVID, stratified by age at diagnosis. Chi-squared testing was used to compare pediatric versus adult groups. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we identified few statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.0004) between pediatric and adult groups. Pediatric-onset CVID patients had more frequent diagnoses of otitis media, developmental delay, and failure to thrive compared with adult-onset CVID patients. Adult CVID patients were more frequently diagnosed with bronchitis, arthritis, depression, and fatigue. Diagnoses of autoimmunity, lymphoma, and other malignancies were higher in adults but not to a significant degree. Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and lymphocyte subsets did not differ significantly between the two groups. When complications of infections and co-morbid conditions were viewed categorically, there were few differences between pediatric-onset and adult-onset CVID patients. These results suggest that pediatric CVID is not a distinct phenotype. Major features were comparable across the groups. This study underscores the need for

  2. Adult-onset Nemaline Myopathy Coexisting With Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingling; Wang, Yanling; Liu, Xiaofeng; Hu, Yanxia; Li, Nianchun; Qiu, Guoping; Luo, Yun; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder which is characterized by fluctuating muscle fatigue. However, the association of MG with nemaline myopathy is rarely reported. Here we report a case of MG coexisting with adult-onset nemaline myopathy. A 55-year-old man endured fluctuating muscle weakness with positive acetylcholine receptor and titin antibodies. After the patient was administrated cholinergic drugs and immunosuppression, the muscle weakness of the patient had mildly been alleviated. Electromyography showed a progressive decrement in the amplitude of muscle action potential at low frequency. Muscle biopsy showed numerous nemalines in the muscle fibers. This is the first reported case of nemalines present in the muscle fibers of adult patient with MG. The pathogenesis of nemaline may be related to titin antibody in adult-onset nemaline myopathy with MG.

  3. Failure of globe conservation in a case of adult onset retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khetan, Vikas; Bindu, Appukuttan; Kamat, Pradnya; Kumar, S Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Adult onset retinoblastoma is a rare intraocular malignancy. The majority of the cases are treated with enucleation, due to late presentation and advanced-stage tumors. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old female who presented with an intraocular mass with exudative retinal detachment in her right eye. B-scan ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of retinoblastoma. In an attempt to salvage the globe, she was treated with chemotherapy, which resulted in excellent regression of the tumor mass by the end of 8 months follow-up. The patient was followed-up regularly with focal treatment whenever necessary. Two years later, she developed a massive recurrence necessitating enucleation. Histopathologic examination revealed a moderately differentiated retinoblastoma with choroidal invasion. Attempt to salvage the globe in adult onset retinoblastoma with chemoreduction and focal therapy may be possible; however, regular long-term follow-up is necessary for recurrence which warrants timely intervention.

  4. A comparison between nailfold capillaroscopy patterns in adulthood in juvenile and adult-onset systemic sclerosis: A EUSTAR exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Boracchi, Patrizia; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Smith, Vanessa; Cutolo, Maurizio; Foeldvari, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Qualitative capillaroscopy patterns in juvenile- and adult-onset systemic sclerosis (SSc) were studied in adulthood using data from the EULAR Scleroderma Trials and Research (EUSTAR) database. Data collected between June 2004 and April 2013 were examined with focus on capillaroscopy. In this retrospective exploratory study, series of patients with juvenile-onset SSc were matched with series of adult-onset SSc having the same gender and autoantibody profile. 30 of 123 patients with juvenile-onset and 2108 of 7133 with adult-onset SSc had data on capillaroscopy. Juvenile-onset SSc showed scleroderma pattern more frequently than adult-onset SSc (93.3% and 88%). The OR was 2.44 and 95% CI 0.57-10.41. An active scleroderma pattern was present in 58% of juvenile- and 61% of adult-onset SSc. The OR was 0.91 and 95% CI 0.28-2.93. The late scleroderma pattern was present in 61% of juvenile- and 55.5% of adult-onset SSc. The OR was 1.06 and 95% CI 0.34-3.56. This is the first exploratory study on the comparison of capillaroscopy between juvenile- and adult-onset SSc in adulthood. Juvenile-onset SSc had an increase prevalence of scleroderma pattern, but a similar distribution of the three patterns was suggested. Further studies are needed to define this issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Biochemical analysis of ferritin subunits in sera from adult Still's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Higashi, S; Ota, T; Eto, S

    1995-01-01

    To determine the origin of the increased serum ferritin that occurs in adult Still's disease (ASD), we analyzed subunits of the serum ferritin as follows. Gel filtration with Sepharose CL-6B demonstrated that the molecular weight of serum ferritin was about 490 kDa. Western blot analysis revealed only L-subunits (molecular weight 19 kDa) in patients with serum ferritin levels higher than 1,000 ng/ml. Patients with serum ferritin levels higher than 1,000 ng/ml, however, showed G-subunits (molecular weight 23 kDa) in addition to the L-subunits. When concanavalin A (Con-A) Sepharose 4B was used in an absorption test, the percentage absorption was extremely low in the patients with serum ferritin levels higher than 1,000 ng/ml. Isoferritin patterns of the patients determined by chromatofocusing revealed traces of acidic ferritin. The findings suggested that glycosylated ferritin does not account for the major portion of the increased serum ferritin.

  7. [Sinusoidal obstruction disease (SOS), previous hepatic venoocclusive disease (VOD)--still serious complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gozdzik, Jolanta; Krasowska-Kwiecień, Aleksandra; Wedrychowicz, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Hepatic venocclusive disease (VOD) lastly named sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a serious toxicity associated with high dose therapy used to prepare patients for stem cell transplantation. A sizable proportion of patients who develop VOD/SOS die. It is clear that injury to endothelial cells and hepatocytes in zone 3 of the liver acinus is the initial event in the pathogenesis of VOD/SOS. Although clinical presentation and diagnostic criteria are well known, the cause of VOD/SOS, its prevention and treatment remain still unclear. Currently treatment of VOD/SOS has largely consisted of supportive measures designed to maintain intravascular volume and decrease interstitial edema. Other treatments used with various measures of success have included substitution of antitrombine and glutamine or aggressive fibrinolitic and antithrombotic therapy. Despite these treatments, the outcome remains fairly dismal.

  8. Comparison of outcomes in adults with pediatric-onset morphea and those with adult-onset morphea: a cross-sectional study from the morphea in adults and children cohort.

    PubMed

    Condie, Daniel; Grabell, Daniel; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have examined outcomes in adults with pediatric-onset morphea. The objective of the present study was to compare clinical outcomes and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adults with onset of morphea in childhood to those in patients with adult onset of morphea. Participants in the study were drawn from the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort and included 68 adults with pediatric-onset morphea and 234 patients with adult-onset morphea. Outcome measures included the Localized Scleroderma Cutaneous Assessment Tool (LoSCAT), physical examination findings, and HRQOL questionnaires. Adults with pediatric-onset morphea were younger, had longer disease duration, and were more likely to have the linear subtype of morphea. Patients with pediatric-onset disease were less likely to have active disease. Among patients with active disease, those with pediatric-onset morphea had less disease activity as measured by the LoSCAT. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had higher severity of disease damage when measured by the physician's global assessment of damage, but had similar levels of disease damage when measured by the Localized Scleroderma Skin Damage Index. Patients with pediatric-onset disease had more favorable HRQOL scores for all measures, all of which were statistically significantly different from those in patients with adult-onset morphea. Adults with pediatric-onset morphea differ from patients with adult-onset disease with respect to disease subtype, severity of disease activity and damage, and levels of HRQOL. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Abuse during childhood and adolescence and risk of adult-onset asthma in African American women.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Patricia F; Wise, Lauren A; O'Connor, George T; Brown, Timothy A; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2013-04-01

    Experiences of violence contribute to the occurrence of childhood asthma, but there is little information on the effect of early-life abuse on adult-onset asthma. We prospectively assessed the relation between physical and sexual abuse during childhood and adolescence and the incidence of adult-onset asthma in the Black Women's Health Study. We followed 28,456 women from 1995 through 2011 with biennial mailed questionnaires. Experiences of physical and sexual abuse that occurred during childhood and adolescence were obtained in 2005. Cox regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs. During 417,931 person-years of follow-up, 1,160 participants reported physician-diagnosed asthma and concurrent use of asthma medication. Compared with women who experienced no abuse during childhood or adolescence, the multivariable IRR for any childhood abuse was 1.24 (95% CI, 1.06-1.45), and for any adolescent abuse, it was 1.10 (95% CI, 0.88-1.36). The IRR was higher for childhood physical abuse (IRR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.07-1.49) than for childhood sexual abuse (IRR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.88-1.49). IRRs for physical and sexual abuse during adolescence were compatible with 1.0. The association between childhood abuse and asthma incidence was stronger in older compared with younger women. In this large cohort of African American women, there was a positive association between adult-onset asthma and childhood physical abuse and weaker associations for childhood sexual abuse and any abuse during adolescence. Given the high prevalence of asthma and childhood abuse, this association is of public health importance. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stabilization in early adult-onset myopia with corneal refractive therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Méijome, José M; Carracedo, Gonzalo; Lopes-Ferreira, Daniela; Faria-Ribeiro, Miguel A; Peixoto-de-Matos, Sofia C; Queirós, António

    2016-02-01

    To describe the stabilization of early adult-onset myopia in three university students after initiating orthokeratology treatment with corneal refractive therapy contact lenses. Three Caucasian early adult-onset progressing myopic subjects (1 male, 2 females) were fitted with corneal refractive therapy lenses to correct myopia between -1.50 and -2.50 D of sphere using Paragon CRT (Paragon Vision Sciences, Mesa, AZ) lenses for overnight orthokeratology. The pre-treatment refractive history from 2005 as well as refraction and axial length after treatment onset are reported over a period of 3 years between December 2009 and January 2013 with an additional year of follow-up after treatment discontinuation (January-December 2013). The peripheral refractive patterns and topographic changes are also reported individually. Treatment was successful in all three subjects achieving uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better monocularly. During a period of 3 years of follow-up the subjects did not experience progression in their refractive error, nor in their axial length (measured during the last 2 years of treatment and 1 year after discontinuation). Furthermore, the subjects recovered to their baseline refraction and did not progressed further over the following year after lens wear discontinuation. We cannot attribute a causative effect to the orthokeratology treatment alone as underlying mechanism for myopia stabilization in this 3 patients. However, the present report points to the possibility of stabilization of early adult-onset myopia progression in young adults using corneal refractive therapy treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adult-onset diabetes among Arabs and Jews in Israel: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kalter-Leibovici, O; Chetrit, A; Lubin, F; Atamna, A; Alpert, G; Ziv, A; Abu-Saad, K; Murad, H; Eilat-Adar, S; Goldbourt, U

    2012-06-01

    To study the age at presentation and factors associated with adult-onset diabetes (≥ 20 years) among Arabs and Jews in Israel. Participants (n = 1100) were randomly selected from the urban population of the Hadera District in Israel. The study sample was stratified into equal groups according to sex, ethnicity (Arabs and Jews) and age. Information on age at diabetes presentation, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics was obtained through personal interviews. Self reports of diabetes were compared with medical records and were found reliable (κ = 0.87). The risk for diabetes was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Factors associated with diabetes in both ethnic groups were studied using Cox proportional hazard model. The prevalence of adult-onset diabetes was 21% among Arabs and 12% among Jews. Arab participants were younger than Jews at diabetes presentation. By the age of 57 years, 25% of Arabs had diagnosed diabetes; the corresponding age among Jews was 68 years, a difference of 11 years (P < 0.001). The greater risk for diabetes among Arabs was independent of lifestyle factors, family history of diabetes and, among women, history of gestational diabetes; adjusted hazard ratio 1.70; 95% confidence interval 1.19-2.43. Arabs in Israel are at greater risk for adult-onset diabetes than Jews and are younger at diabetes presentation. Culturally sensitive interventions aimed at maintaining normal body weight and active lifestyle should be targeted at this population. Possible genetic factors and gene-environmental interactions underlying the high risk for diabetes among Arabs should be investigated. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  12. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome due to West Nile Virus treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Julien; Armstrong, David; Daneman, Nick; Jain, Jennifer Deborah; Perry, James

    2017-02-01

    A 63-year-old female with no significant past medical history was presented with a 5-day history of progressive opsoclonus-myoclonus, headaches, and fevers. Her workup was significant only for positive West-Nile Virus serum serologies. She received a 2-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIG). At an 8-week follow up, she had a complete neurological remission. Adult-onset opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is a rare condition for which paraneoplastic and infectious causes have been attributed. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported of opsoclonus-myoclonus secondary to West-Nile Virus treated with intravenous immunoglobulin monotherapy.

  13. Adult onset primary focal dystonia of the foot: an orthopaedic intervention.

    PubMed

    Logan, Loretta; Resseque, Barbara; Dontamsetti, Monica Sakshi

    2016-03-30

    A 54-year-old woman presented to a foot centre with a chief symptom of cramping in her toes, which, she believed, was of a secondary cause originating from a bunion. She was treated conservatively; however, she returned a month later as the symptoms had progressed to painful cramping of toes, toe-curling and instability while walking, due to involuntary movement of her toes. It was believed that the patient presented with a rare case of primary adult onset focal foot dystonia. This case report explains dystonia further in detail and delves into the different treatment and management options available today, including the unique orthopaedic intervention provided for this patient.

  14. Non-motor symptoms in patients with adult-onset focal dystonia: Sensory and psychiatric disturbances.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonella; Berardelli, Isabella; Ferrazzano, Gina; Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Fabbrini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by the presence of involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and posture. Adult onset focal dystonia include cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, arm dystonia and laryngeal dystonia. Besides motor manifestations, patients with focal dystonia frequently also display non-motor signs and symptoms. In this paper, we review the evidence of sensory and psychiatric disturbances in adult patients with focal dystonia. Clinical studies and neurophysiological investigations consistently show that the sensory system is involved in dystonia. Several studies have also demonstrated that neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, are more frequent in patients with focal dystonia, whereas data on obsessive compulsive disorders are more contrasting.

  15. With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-04

    In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

  16. Prenatal Testing for Adult-Onset Conditions: the Position of the National Society of Genetic Counselors.

    PubMed

    Hercher, Laura; Uhlmann, Wendy R; Hoffman, Erin P; Gustafson, Shanna; Chen, Kelly M

    2016-12-01

    Advances in genetic testing and the availability of such testing in pregnancy allows prospective parents to test their future child for adult-onset conditions. This ability raises several complex ethical issues. Prospective parents have reproductive rights to obtain information about their fetus. This information may or may not alter pregnancy management. These rights can be in conflict with the rights of the future individual, who will be denied the right to elect or decline testing. This paper highlights the complexity of these issues, details discussions that went into the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) Public Policy Task Force's development of the Prenatal testing for Adult-Onset Conditions position statement adopted in November 2014, and cites relevant literature on this topic through December 2015. Issues addressed include parental rights and autonomy, rights of the future child, the right not to know, possible adverse effects on childhood and the need for genetic counseling. This paper will serve as a reference to genetic counselors and healthcare professionals when faced with this situation in clinical practice.

  17. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids and demyelinating plaque-like lesions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Saez, Elena; Shah, Sachit; Costa, Carme; Fleminger, Simon; Connor, Stephen; Bodi, Istvan

    2012-06-01

    Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids is an uncommon cause of dementia. Both hereditary (autosomal dominant) and sporadic cases have been described. A 41-year-old African woman presented with inappropriate behavior and personality change consistent with frontal lobe dysfunction. MRI demonstrated diffuse frontoparietal white matter signal abnormality and volume loss, as well as focal enhancing white matter lesions, while CT scan showed white matter calcifications. She had been gradually deteriorating over the last 5 years, diagnosed as having progressive demyelinating illness. She died of recurrent chest infections. There was no familial history. The brain showed prominent symmetrical white matter changes with greyish discolorization mainly affecting the frontal and parietal lobes, with less involvement of the temporal lobe and only mildly affecting the occipital white matter. Histology revealed deep white matter atrophy with many neuroaxonal spheroids labelled by neurofilament and β-amyloid precursor protein. In addition, scattered inactive demyelinating plaque-like lesions were found in the periventricular areas, brainstem and the cervical spinal cord. This case had typical features of an adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids. However, we also demonstrated demyelinating plaque-like lesions, which has not been previously described. The possibility of a demyelinating origin contributing to the changes may be considered in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  18. Examination of validity in spoken language evaluations: Adult onset stuttering following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Roth, Carole R; Cornis-Pop, Micaela; Beach, Woodford A

    2015-01-01

    Reports of increased incidence of adult onset stuttering in veterans and service members with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan lead to a reexamination of the neurogenic vs. psychogenic etiology of stuttering. This article proposes to examine the merit of the dichotomy between neurogenic and psychogenic bases of stuttering, including symptom exaggeration, for the evaluation and treatment of the disorder. Two case studies of adult onset stuttering in service members with mTBI from improvised explosive device blasts are presented in detail. Speech fluency was disrupted by abnormal pauses and speech hesitations, brief blocks, rapid repetitions, and occasional prolongations. There was also wide variability in the frequency of stuttering across topics and conversational situations. Treatment focused on reducing the frequency and severity of dysfluencies and included educational, psychological, environmental, and behavioral interventions. Stuttering characteristics as well as the absence of objective neurological findings ruled out neurogenic basis of stuttering in these two cases and pointed to psychogenic causes. However, the differential diagnosis had only limited value for developing the plan of care. The successful outcomes of the treatment serve to illustrate the complex interaction of neurological, psychological, emotional, and environmental factors of post-concussive symptoms and to underscore the notion that there are many facets to symptom presentation in post-combat health.

  19. Similarities in speech and white matter characteristics in idiopathic developmental stuttering and adult-onset stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Soo-Eun; Synnestvedt, Anna; Ostuni, John

    2009-01-01

    Adult-onset stuttering (AS) typically occurs following neurological and/or psychological trauma, considered different from developmental stuttering (DS), which starts during early childhood with few if any new cases reported after adolescence. Here we report four cases of AS, two with apparent psychological trigger and two without, none with evidence of neurological injury, and none conforming to previously reported characteristics of psychogenic stuttering. We asked whether this group of AS would have similar speech and neuroanatomical characteristics to those with DS. We conducted blinded analyses of speech samples in both AS cases and 14 cases of DS on type, frequency, and loci of disfluencies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to compare white matter tracts using fractional anisotropy (FA). We found that AS did not differ significantly from DS in any of the speech characteristics measured. On DTI, DS had significantly increased FA relative to controls in the right superior longitudinal tract. AS cases showed a similar trend for increases in these regions when compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that symptoms of idiopathic stuttering can begin during adulthood, and that similar neuroanatomical differences from controls may be associated with both developmental and adult onset idiopathic stuttering. PMID:20640049

  20. The role of air pollution in adult-onset asthma: a review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Benedicte; Schikowski, Tamara; Carsin, Anne Elie; Hansell, Anna; Krämer, Ursula; Sunyer, Jordi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kauffmann, Francine; Künzli, Nino

    2012-12-01

    The causes of adult-onset asthma are poorly established, and the asthmogenic role of air pollution has been investigated primarily in children. This review assesses the current evidence of the association between air pollution and asthma incidence among subjects free of asthma at least until late childhood. Seven publications from five study populations fulfilled the inclusion criteria (one case-control and six cohort studies). All but one used markers of local traffic-related air pollution to characterize long-term exposure. Those studies reported similar associations with traffic-related air pollution. However, protocols, definitions of asthma, and exposure assignment were rather heterogeneous, and three publications relied on the same study; thus we abstain from meta-analytic summaries. Reported patterns of effect modification (e.g., by sex, atopy, or smoking) were inconsistent. Overall, the role of traffic-related air pollution in adult-onset asthma is less conclusive than in childhood asthma. Larger studies with more consistent definitions of phenotypes and exposure assessment for local traffic-related pollutants (e.g., ultrafine particles) are needed. Pooling existing cohorts such as in the ongoing European ESCAPE and TRANSPHORM consortia are promising steps. There is, however, a need for large-scale megacohorts to investigate these effects in standardized ways and to identify the most susceptible populations. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency: a rare cause of adult-onset rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Liewluck, Teerin; Mundi, Manpreet S; Mauermann, Michelle L

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation that may be due to mutations in 2 different nuclear genes, HADHA and HADHB. Perturbation of this multienzyme complex compromises the oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, which leads to multiorgan dysfunction. Childhood- or adolescent-onset recurrent rhabdomyolysis is a common muscular manifestation and is preceded frequently by clinically overt peripheral neuropathy. In this report we describe a patient with late adult-onset recurrent rhabdomyolysis. Despite normal sensory examination, nerve conduction studies showed a mild axonal peripheral neuropathy. The acylcarnitine profile showed elevated long-chain and 3-hydroxy long-chain acylcarnitine species. HADHA sequencing revealed known compound heterozygous mutations c.180+3A>G (p.Thr37SerfsX6) and c.1528G>C (p.Glu510Gln). During a 10-month follow-up period, he had no further episodes of rhabdomyolysis after appropriate dietary modifications. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency should be considered in patients with adult-onset recurrent rhabdomyolysis, especially in those with either clinically overt or subclinical peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. From NAFLD to Cardiovascular Disease. Is it (Still) the Metabolic Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    MUNTEANU, MIHAI ALEXANDRU; MIRCEA, PETRU ADRIAN

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most prevalent liver disease in developed countries. The incidence of NAFLD in the general population is 30–38% deppending on the geographical area and the diagnostic method used. NAFLD is considered to be the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. A better understanding of the natural evolution would have practical consequences related mainly to the need of early and aggressive diagnosis, active monitoring and therapeutic solutions. Cardiovascular disease appears to be the main cause of death in these patients. The mechanisms linking NAFLD with cardiovascular disease are not fully understood yet, but attention was focused primarily on insulin resistance. The visceral adipose tissue, the epicardial adipose tissue, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, the lipid profile, the procoagulants factors, the oxidative stress, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, they all might play a role in the link between NAFLD and cardiovascular disease. Currently, there isn’t any medication specifically recommended for the treatment of NAFLD. Although the mechanisms underlying the association between NAFLD and cardiovascular disease are not fully known, attention must be paid to this association, given that these patients are more likely to die due to heart disease rather than liver disease. PMID:26528002

  3. Care of the injured worldwide: trauma still the neglected disease of modern society.

    PubMed

    Sakran, Joseph V; Greer, Sarah E; Werlin, Evan; McCunn, Maureen

    2012-09-15

    Traditionally, surgical diseases including emergency and injury care have garnered less attention and support internationally when compared to other medical specialties. Over the past decade however, healthcare professionals have increasingly advocated for the need to address the global burden of non-communicable diseases. Surgical disease, including traumatic injury, is among the top causes of death and disability worldwide and the subsequent economic burden is substantial, falling disproportionately on low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The future of global health in these regions depends on a redirection of attention to diseases managed within surgical, anesthesia and emergency specialties. Increasing awareness of these disparities, as well as increasing focus in the realms of policy and advocacy, is crucial. While the barriers to providing quality trauma and emergency care worldwide are not insurmountable, we must work together across disciplines and across boundaries in order to negotiate change and reduce the global burden of surgical disease.

  4. Genes Interacting with Occupational Exposures to Low Molecular Weight Agents and Irritants on Adult-Onset Asthma in Three European Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rava, Marta; Ahmed, Ismail; Kogevinas, Manolis; Le Moual, Nicole; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Curjuric, Ivan; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Dumas, Orianne; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Imboden, Medea; Mehta, Amar J.; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Zock, Jan-Paul; Jarvis, Deborah; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Demenais, Florence; Nadif, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Background: The biological mechanisms by which cleaning products and disinfectants—an emerging risk factor—affect respiratory health remain incompletely evaluated. Studying genes by environment interactions (G × E) may help identify new genes related to adult-onset asthma. Objectives: We identified interactions between genetic polymorphisms of a large set of genes involved in the response to oxidative stress and occupational exposures to low molecular weight (LMW) agents or irritants on adult-onset asthma. Methods: Our data came from three large European cohorts: Epidemiological Family-based Study of the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Disease in Adults (SAPALDIA), and European Community Respiratory Health Survey in Adults (ECRHS). A candidate pathway–based strategy identified 163 genes involved in the response to oxidative stress and potentially related to exposures to LMW agents/irritants. Occupational exposures were evaluated using an asthma job-exposure matrix and job-specific questionnaires for cleaners and healthcare workers. Logistic regression models were used to detect G × E interactions, adjusted for age, sex, and population ancestry, in 2,599 adults (mean age, 47 years; 60% women, 36% exposed, 18% asthmatics). p-Values were corrected for multiple comparisons. Results: Ever exposure to LMW agents/irritants was associated with current adult-onset asthma [OR = 1.28 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.58)]. Eight single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) by exposure interactions at five loci were found at p < 0.005: PLA2G4A (rs932476, chromosome 1), near PLA2R1 (rs2667026, chromosome 2), near RELA (rs931127, rs7949980, chromosome 11), PRKD1 (rs1958980, rs11847351, rs1958987, chromosome 14), and PRKCA (rs6504453, chromosome 17). Results were consistent across the three studies and after accounting for smoking. Conclusions: Using a pathway-based selection process, we identified novel genes potentially involved

  5. Complete staghorn calculus in polycystic kidney disease: infection is still the cause.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Xu, Jing; Ye, Chaoyang; Chen, Dongping; Mei, Changlin

    2013-08-01

    Kidney stones in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are common, regarded as the consequence of the combination of anatomic abnormality and metabolic risk factors. However, complete staghorn calculus is rare in polycystic kidney disease and predicts a gloomy prognosis of kidney. For general population, recent data showed metabolic factors were the dominant causes for staghorn calculus, but for polycystic kidney disease patients, the cause for staghorn calculus remained elusive. We report a case of complete staghorm calculus in a polycystic kidney disease patient induced by repeatedly urinary tract infections. This 37-year-old autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease female with positive family history was admitted in this hospital for repeatedly upper urinary tract infection for 3 years. CT scan revealed the existence of a complete staghorn calculus in her right kidney, while there was no kidney stone 3 years before, and the urinary stone component analysis showed the composition of calculus was magnesium ammonium phosphate. UTI is an important complication for polycystic kidney disease and will facilitate the formation of staghorn calculi. As staghorn calculi are associated with kidney fibrosis and high long-term renal deterioration rate, prompt control of urinary tract infection in polycystic kidney disease patient will be beneficial in preventing staghorn calculus formation.

  6. Complete staghorn calculus in polycystic kidney disease: infection is still the cause

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kidney stones in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease are common, regarded as the consequence of the combination of anatomic abnormality and metabolic risk factors. However, complete staghorn calculus is rare in polycystic kidney disease and predicts a gloomy prognosis of kidney. For general population, recent data showed metabolic factors were the dominant causes for staghorn calculus, but for polycystic kidney disease patients, the cause for staghorn calculus remained elusive. Case presentation We report a case of complete staghorm calculus in a polycystic kidney disease patient induced by repeatedly urinary tract infections. This 37-year-old autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease female with positive family history was admitted in this hospital for repeatedly upper urinary tract infection for 3 years. CT scan revealed the existence of a complete staghorn calculus in her right kidney, while there was no kidney stone 3 years before, and the urinary stone component analysis showed the composition of calculus was magnesium ammonium phosphate. Conclusion UTI is an important complication for polycystic kidney disease and will facilitate the formation of staghorn calculi. As staghorn calculi are associated with kidney fibrosis and high long-term renal deterioration rate, prompt control of urinary tract infection in polycystic kidney disease patient will be beneficial in preventing staghorn calculus formation. PMID:24070202

  7. Does cyclophosphamide still have a role in the treatment of severe inflammatory eye disease?

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Denis

    2014-08-01

    Cyclophosphamide is a highly effective immunosuppressive drug that has proven efficacy in the treatment of patients with severe inflammatory eye disease. It has the advantage of being able to be used either orally or intravenously, has a potent steroid-sparing effect, and is effective in inducing disease remission. The major limitations to the use of this alkylating agent are its frequent side effects. With the increasing availability of alternate forms of therapy it is time to review the therapeutic regimen for cyclophosphamide use in patients with inflammatory eye disease.

  8. Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia linked CSF1R mutation: Report of four Korean cases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joo; Shin, Jin-Hong; Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Jong Hun; Na, Duk L; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Hwang, Sun Jae; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Young Min; Shin, Myung-Jun; Lee, Myung Jun; Kim, Seong-Jang; Yoon, Uicheul; Park, Do Youn; Jung, Dae Soo; Ahn, Jae Woo; Sung, Suk; Huh, Gi Yeong

    2015-02-15

    We describe detailed clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and neuropathological features in adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP), encompassing hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) and pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD), linked to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) mutations in four Korean cases. Clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and neuropathological findings were obtained by direct evaluation and from previous medical records. The genetic analysis of the CSF1R gene was done in two autopsy-confirmed ALSP cases and two cases where ALSP was suspected based on the clinical and neuroimaging characteristics. We identified two known mutations: c.2342C>T (p.A781V) in one autopsy-proven HDLS and clinically ALSP-suspected case and c.2345G>A (p.R782H) in another autopsy-proven POLD case. We also found a novel mutation (c.2296A>G; p.M766V) in a patient presenting with hand tremor, stuttering and hesitant speech, and abnormal behavior whose father died from a possible diagnosis of spinocerebellar ataxia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented ALSP-linked CSF1R mutation in Korea and supports the suggestion that HDLS and POLD, with pathological characteristics that are somewhat different but which are caused by CSF1R mutations, are the same spectrum of disease, ALSP.

  9. Adult onset leukodystrophy with neuroaxonal spheroids and pigmented glia: report of a family, historical perspective, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marotti, Jonathan D; Tobias, Sharon; Fratkin, Jonathan D; Powers, James M; Rhodes, C Harker

    2004-06-01

    We present a two-generation family consisting of a father and two daughters, who had an adult-onset leukodystrophy characterized by widespread destruction of cerebral white matter with neuroaxonal spheroids. The mode of inheritance appears to be autosomal dominant. All three patients presented with a variety of motor and cognitive symptoms, including frontal lobe signs, 4-7 years before death. Each followed a chronic course until death at ages 39, 46, and 51. At autopsy, the white matter loss was widespread but most prominent in the cerebrum with descending corticospinal tract degeneration and relative sparing of subcortical U-fibers. Pigmented glial cells were present, most of which appear to be macrophages, but inconstantly Prussian blue-positive. This disease is consistent with published reports of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS). However, a review of the literature and a personal review of the neuropathology of the original case of the pigmentary type of orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) reveal overlapping clinical and neuropathologic features between these two previously distinct entities, suggesting a common pathogenetic and perhaps etiological relationship between the two.

  10. The Phospholipase D2 Knock Out Mouse Has Ectopic Purkinje Cells and Suffers from Early Adult-Onset Anosmia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qifeng; Smethurst, Elizabeth; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Schrewe, Heinrich; Wakelam, Michael J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is an enzyme that produces phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid messenger molecule involved in a number of cellular events including, through its membrane curvature properties, endocytosis. The PLD2 knock out (PLD2KO) mouse has been previously reported to be protected from insult in a model of Alzheimer's disease. We have further analysed a PLD2KO mouse using mass spectrophotometry of its lipids and found significant differences in PA species throughout its brain. We have examined the expression pattern of PLD2 which allowed us to define which region of the brain to analyse for defect, notably PLD2 was not detected in glial-rich regions. The expression pattern lead us to specifically examine the mitral cells of olfactory bulbs, the Cornus Amonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus and the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We find that the change to longer PA species correlates with subtle architectural defect in the cerebellum, exemplified by ectopic Purkinje cells and an adult-onset deficit of olfaction. These observations draw parallels to defects in the reelin heterozygote as well as the effect of high fat diet on olfaction. PMID:27658289

  11. [Curative treatment of Alzheimer's disease is still missing--is amyloid plaque hypothesis the wrong starting point?].

    PubMed

    Tanila, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    For more than a quarter century, the research of and drug development for Alzheimer's diseases have been governed by the amyloid plaque hypothesis, whereby deranged metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein leads to the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques, which in turn causes the activation of microglial cells, destruction of neurons and a progressive memory disease. The ending of three extensive clinical trials in disappointment has raised the question whether the amyloid plaque hypothesis is the correct starting point in the development of curative treatment for Alzheimer's disease at all. Two commencing new trials with patients that are still symptomless will be the final challenge for the hypothesis.

  12. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis of diffusion-tensor imaging data in pediatric- and adult-onset multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, Rachel; Cox, Jennifer L; Donohue, Katelyn; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Yeh, E Ann; Polak, Paul; Dwyer, Michael G; Zivadinov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    White matter (WM) microstructure may vary significantly in pediatric-onset (PO) and adult-onset (AO) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a difference that could be explained by the effects of an inherent plasticity in the affected pediatric brains early in the disease, and a phenomenon that does not occur later in life. This hypothesis would support the observation that disease progression is much slower in POMS compared to AOMS patients. To examine WM microstructure in the brain of adults with POMS and AOMS, using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Adults with relapsing-remitting (RR) POMS, who were diagnosed before age of 18 years (n = 16), were compared with age-matched (AOA, n = 23) and disease duration-matched (AOD, n = 22) RR patients who developed MS after the age of 18 years. Scans were analyzed using the FSL software package (Oxford, UK) and statistics were performed using TBSS to evaluate WM microstructure between groups based on the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values obtained from the DTI. Widespread cortical and deep WM area differences characterized by increased FA values were seen in the AOAMS compared with POMS group (P < 0.05, TFCE corrected). Significantly increased FA values of posterior WM areas were detected in the AODMS compared with POMS group (P < 0.05, TFCE corrected). Increased FA values in WM areas of the AOMS compared with the POMS patients suggest that diffuse WM microstructure changes are more attributable to age of onset than a simple function of disease duration and age. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Demonstration of insulin resistance in untreated adult onset diabetic subjects with fasting hyperglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, H; Kimmerling, G; Olefsky, J M; Reaven, G M

    1975-01-01

    We have used a continuous intravenous infusion of glucose (6 mg/kg/min), insulin (80 mU/min), epinephrine (6 mug/min), and propranolol (0.08 mg/min) to directly assess insulin resistance in 14 untreated adult onset diabetics with a mean (plus or minus SE) fasting plasma glucose level of 217 plus or minus 17 mg/100 ml. During the infusion endogenous insulin secretion is inhibited and steady-state plasma glucose and insulin levels are achieved after 90 min. Since similar steady-state levels of plasma insulin are achieved in all subjects, the plasma glucose concentration observed during the steady-state period is a measure of an individual's insulin resistance. Under these conditions, the mean (plus or minus SE) steady-state plasma glucose level of the 14 diabetic patients was 350 plus or minus 16 mg/100 ml, while that of 12 normal subjects was 121 plus or minus 4 mg/100 ml. Additional studies were performed in which control subjects and patients with diabetes had their fasting plasma glucose levels acutely raised or lowered to comparable levels before receiving the basic infusion mixture of glucose, insulin, epinephrine, and propranolol. The results of these studies indicated that differences in initial plasma glucose levels could not account for the different glucose responses of the two groups to the basic infusion. Finally, the mean (plus or minus SE) steady-state plasma glucose level of 104 plus or minus 17 mg/100 ml observed during the same basic infusion in five patients with fasting hyperglycemia (mean plus or minus SE, 142 plus or minus 12 mg/100 ml) secondary to chronic pancreatitis suggested that neither chronic hyperglycemia nor hypoinsulinemia per se necessarily lead to insulin resistance. These results demonstrate that marked insulin resistance exists in adult onset diabetics with fasting hyperglycemia. Since previous studies have documented the presence of insulin resistance in patients with chemical diabetes, the possibility exists that insulin

  14. Juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: still a mystery disease with difficult management.

    PubMed

    Stamataki, Sofia; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Korres, Stavros; Felekis, Dimitrios; Tzangaroulakis, Antonios; Ferekidis, Eleftherios

    2007-02-01

    Juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is the most common benign neoplastic disease of the larynx in children and adolescents and has a significant impact on patients and the health care system with a cost ranging from $60,000 to $470,000 per patient. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on RRP and summarize the recent advances. RRP is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV; mainly by types 6 and 11). Patients suffer from wart-like growths in the aerodigestive tract. The course of the disease is unpredictable. Although spontaneous remission is possible, pulmonary spread and malignant transformation have been reported. Surgical excision, including new methods like the microdebrider, aims to secure an adequate airway and improve and maintain an acceptable voice. Repeated recurrences are common and thus overenthusiastic attempts to eradicate the disease may cause serious complications. When papillomas recur, old and new adjuvant methods may be tried. In addition, recent advances in immune system research may allow us to improve our treatment modalities and prevention strategies. A new vaccine is under trial to prevent HPV infection in women; the strongest risk factor for juvenile RRP is a maternal history of genital warts (transmitted from mother to child during delivery). Better understanding of the etiology of the disease and the knowledge of all available therapies is crucial for the best management of the affected patients.

  15. Vapor, Dust and Smoke Exposure in relation to adult-onset asthma and chronic respiratory symptoms: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    LeVan, Tricia D.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lee, Hin-Peng; Koh, David; Yu, Mimi C.; London, Stephanie J.

    2006-01-01

    Occupational factors contribute to a significant fraction of respiratory disease and symptoms. We evaluated the role of occupational exposures on asthma, chronic bronchitis, and respiratory symptoms in a population-based cohort, the Singapore Chinese Health Study. History of occupations, occupational exposures, and respiratory conditions were collected by interviews with 52,325 Singaporeans born 1918–1953. Exposure to dusts, from cotton, wood, metal, mineral and/or asbestos, was associated with non-chronic cough and/or phlegm (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.08, 1.30), chronic bronchitis (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.57) and adult-onset asthma (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.30). Cotton dust was the major component contributing to respiratory symptoms. Vapor exposure, from chemical solvents, dyes, cooling oils, paints, wood preservatives and/or pesticides, was associated with non-chronic cough or phlegm (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.27), chronic dry cough (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19, 2.01) and adult-onset asthma (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.56). Chemical solvents, cooling oils and pesticides were the major sources contributing to respiratory symptoms. These data support the role of occupational exposures in the etiology of respiratory illness in a population-based cohort in Singapore with a low prevalence of atopic illness. PMID:16707657

  16. Congenital encephalomyopathy and adult-onset myopathy and diabetes mellitus: Different phenotypic associations of a new heteroplasmic mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.G.; Nelson, I.; Sweeney, M.G.; Cooper, J.M.; Watkins, P.J.; Morgan-Hughes, J.A.; Harding, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We report the clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetic findings in a family with an unusual mitochondrial disease phenotype harboring a novel mtDNA tRNA glutamic acid mutation at position 14709. The proband and his sister presented with congenital myopathy and mental retardation and subsequently developed cerebellar ataxia. Other family members had either adult-onset diabetes mellitus with muscle weakness or adult-onset diabetes mellitus alone. Ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibers were present in muscle biopsies. Biochemical studies of muscle mitochondria showed reduced complex I and IV activities. The mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic in blood and muscle in all matrilineal relatives analyzed. Primary myoblast, but not fibroblast, cultures containing high proportions of mutant mtDNA exhibited impaired mitochondrial translation. These observations indicate that mtDNA tRNA point mutations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital myopathy. In addition they illustrate the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation in the same family and further highlight the association between mtDNA mutations and diabetes mellitus. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. [Scurvy, an old disease still in the news: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Pailhous, S; Lamoureux, S; Caietta, E; Bosdure, E; Chambost, H; Chabrol, B; Bresson, V

    2015-01-01

    Scurvy is the clinical manifestation of a deficiency in vitamin C, which is present in fresh fruits and vegetables. It is historically linked to the era of great maritime expeditions. Manifestations are misleading in children, in contrast with adults: bone disease and hemorrhagic syndrome are the earliest and most frequent manifestations due to a collagen biosynthesis defect. Scurvy is an old, potentially fatal disease but is easily curable with ascorbic acid. It can be prevented with vitamin C treatment in pediatric populations with unusual eating habits. We describe two cases of pediatric scurvy in two 7-year-old boys who had dietary restrictions stemming from developmental disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. mHealth Interventions to Counter Noncommunicable Diseases in Developing Countries: Still an Uncertain Promise.

    PubMed

    Beratarrechea, Andrea; Moyano, Daniela; Irazola, Vilma; Rubinstein, Adolfo

    2017-02-01

    mHealth constitutes a promise for health care delivery in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where health care systems are unprepared to combat the threat of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). This article assesses the impact of mHealth on NCD outcomes in LMICs. A systematic review identified controlled studies evaluating mHealth interventions that addressed NCDs in LMICs. From the 1274 abstracts retrieved, 108 articles were selected for full text review and 20 randomized controlled trials were included from 14 LMICs. One-way SMS was the most commonly used mobile function to deliver reminders, health education, and information. mHealth interventions in LMICs have positive but modest effects on chronic disease outcomes.

  19. Drug-coated balloons: "Do they still have a role in treating coronary artery disease?"

    PubMed

    Shatila, Wassim; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2017-09-01

    Small vessels with coronary artery disease (CAD) are at high risk of restenosis, despite the use of drug-eluting stents (DESs). Drug-coated balloon (DCB) therapy offers a viable alternative to DESs for the management of small vessel CAD. The literature regarding the use of DCBs in lieu of the newer generation DESs to treat small vessel CAD is controversial. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [A case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia in an elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Mayuko; Sakaeda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Mika; Miki, Toshifumi; Saito, Junko; Chikamori, Masayasu; Tomita, Hideharu; Ichikawa, Hiromoto; Yoshimoto, Kaori; Takamatsu, Masahiro; Okada, Mitsuo; Aono, Rei; Enzan, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Takako

    2013-03-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with consciousness disturbance. The results of brain magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid examination were normal, but triphasic waves were noted on electroencephalography. His plasma ammonia level was elevated due to which encephalopathy secondary to hyperammonemia was suspected. However, his liver function was normal, and no evidence of cirrhosis or portal-systemic shunt was noted. The patient's medical history revealed that he had a tendency to excessively consume pulse products since childhood, and an amino acid analysis showed elevation of citrulline and arginine levels. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with an extremely rare case of adult-onset type II citrullinemia, which was triggered by cessation of the intake of pulse foods (soybeans and peanuts) due to dental problems.

  1. Adult-onset intradural spinal teratoma in the lumbar spine: A case report.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Masaki; Takeda, Koutarou; Shitoto, Katsuo

    2000-12-01

    Intradural spinal teratoma is a very rare tumour that can be associated with dysraphic defects. We report a case of adult-onset intradural spinal teratoma in the lumbar spine. The patient was a 54-year-old female who had chief complaints of a gait disturbance. X-rays showed an enlargement of the interpedicular distance at L3/L4 and spina bifida distal to L4. MRI showed a spindle-shaped tumour between L2 and L5. We performed laminotomy using an ultrasonic surgical knife. Pathological diagnosis of the resected tumour was matured teratoma. The diagnosis of matured teratoma was made because the tumour had no epithelium and a layered structure including prostate tissue, matured fat, cartilage and sweat gland.

  2. A common gene for juvenile and adult-onset primary open-angle glaucomas confined on chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Morissette, J.; Plante, M.; Raymond, V.

    1995-06-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), which causes progressive loss of the visual fields, was subdivided into two groups according to age at onset: (1) chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) diagnosed after 40 years and (2) juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) diagnosed between 3 years of age and early adulthood. A JOAG gene (GLC1A) was recently mapped to chromosome 1q. We studied 142 members of a huge multigenerational French Canadian family affected with autosomal dominant POAG. Either JOAG or COAG was diagnosed with ocular hypertension (OHT), which may lead to POAG. To localize a common disease gene that might be responsible for both glaucoma subsets, we performed linkage analysis considering JOAG and COAG under the same phenotypic category. JOAG/COAG was tightly linked to seven microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q23-q25; a maximum lod score of 6.62 was obtained with AF-M278ye5. To refine the disease locus, we exploited a recombination mapping strategy based on a unique founder effect. The same characteristic haplotype, composed of 14 markers spanning 12 cM between loci D1S196 and D1S212, was recognized in all persons affected by JOAG, COAG, or OHT, but it did not occur in unaffected spouses and in normal family members >35 years of age, except for three obligatory carriers. Key combination events confined the disease region within a 9-cM interval between loci D1S445 and D1S416/D1S480. These observations demonstrate that the GLC1A gene is responsible for both adult-onset and juvenile glaucomas and suggest that the JOAG and COAG categories within this family may be part of a clinical continuum artificially divided at age 40 years. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Occupational exposures and uncontrolled adult-onset asthma in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II.

    PubMed

    Le Moual, Nicole; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Siroux, Valérie; Radon, Katja; Norback, Dan; Torén, Kjell; Olivieri, Mario; Urrutia, Isabel; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Benke, Geza; Kromhout, Hans; Mirabelli, Maria C; Mehta, Amar J; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sigsgaard, Torben; Blanc, Paul D; Kogevinas, Manolis; Antó, Josep M; Zock, Jan-Paul

    2014-02-01

    Occupational exposure is a well-recognised modifiable risk factor for asthma, but the relationship between occupational exposure and asthma control has not been studied. We aimed to study this association among working-age adults from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Data were available for 7077 participants (mean age 43 years, 45% never-smokers, 5867 without asthma and 1210 with current asthma). Associations between occupational exposure to specific asthmagens and asthma control status (33% with uncontrolled asthma, based on the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines) were evaluated using logistic and multinomial regressions, adjusted for age, sex and smoking status, with study areas included as a random effect. Statistically significant positive associations were observed between uncontrolled adult-onset asthma and both past 12-month and 10-year exposure to any occupational asthmagens (OR (95% CI) 1.6 (1.0-2.40) and 1.7 (1.2-2.5), respectively); high (1.7 (1.0-2.8) and 1.9 (1.3-2.9), respectively) and low (1.6 (1.0-2.7) and 1.8 (1.2-2.7), respectively) molecular weight agents; and cleaning agents (2.0 (1.1-3.6) and 2.3 (1.4-3.6), respectively), with stronger associations for long-term exposures. These associations were mainly explained by the exacerbation domain of asthma control and no associations were observed between asthmagens and partly controlled asthma. These findings suggest that occupational exposure to asthmagens is associated with uncontrolled adult-onset asthma. Occupational risk factors should be quickly identified to prevent uncontrolled asthma.

  4. Plasma Epstein Barr viral load in adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma in South India.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahua; Rao, Clementina Rama; Shafiulla, Mohammed; Shankaranand, Bharatnur; Viveka, Belathur K; Lakshmaiah, Kuntegowdanahalli C; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Babu, Govind K; Jayshree, Rudrapatna S

    2016-03-01

    Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) DNA load is increasingly being used as a noninvasive biomarker for detecting EBV association in lymphomas. Since there is a need of data from India, we undertook to prospectively evaluate plasma EBV DNA load as a marker of EBV association in newly diagnosed adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). EBV DNA was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In a subset of patients, an assay was validated qualitatively with EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) immunohistochemistry (IHC). Wherever possible, follow-up plasma samples post three cycles of chemotherapy were obtained. Over a period of 10 months, 33 newly diagnosed adult-onset HL were enrolled in the study. Pretherapy plasma EBV DNA was detectable in ∼49% (16/33) patients (viral loads range, 1.0-51.2×10(3)copies/mL) and undetectable in 30 voluntary blood donors. LMP1 IHC was positive in 56% of cases tested (14/25). Sensitivity and specificity of plasma EBV DNA with respect to LMP1 IHC were 86% and 100%, respectively. Of the eight patients in whom follow-up plasma was available, in five EBV baseline-positive patients EBV load reverted to negative postchemotherapy and corroborated with clinical remission. Plasma EBV DNA load estimation may be useful in detecting EBV-association and possibly monitoring the response to therapy in EBV-related HL especially in our country where EBV association of HL is higher than in developed nations. Copyright © 2015 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  6. Chronic disease and the shifting focus of public health: is prevention still a political lightweight?

    PubMed

    Mayes, Rick; Oliver, Thomas R

    2012-04-01

    Why is it so politically difficult to obtain government investment in public health initiatives that are aimed at addressing chronic disease? This article examines the structural disadvantage faced by those who advocate for public health policies and practices to reduce chronic disease related to people's unhealthy lifestyles and physical environments. It identifies common features that make it difficult to establish and maintain initiatives to prevent or reduce costly illness and physical suffering: (1) public health benefits are generally dispersed and delayed; (2) benefactors of public health are generally unknown and taken for granted; (3) the costs of many public health initiatives are concentrated and generate opposition from those who would pay them; and (4) public health often clashes with moral values or social norms. The article concludes by discussing the importance of a new paradigm, "health in all policies," that targets the enormous health and economic burdens associated with chronic conditions and asserts a need for new policies, practices, and participation beyond the confines of traditional public health agencies and services.

  7. Is idiopathic granulomatous mastitis a surgical disease? The jury is still out.

    PubMed

    Moris, Demetrios; Damaskos, Christos; Davakis, Spyridon; Vailas, Michail; Garmpis, Nikolaos; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Kontos, Michael; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM), is a rare entity of chronic inflammatory disorder of the breast of unknown etiology. Very few cases have been described so far, almost exclusively in women. Here we describe a case of IGM in a 53-year-old man presented with a right breast mass, progressively enlarging during the last 6 months. Due to the findings of clinical examination and CT-scan, the suspicion for a potentially malignant lesion was given and the decision for surgical resection was made. Microscopic analysis of the specimen showed non-caseating granulomas around mammary lobules, findings compatible with IGM. The patient is recurrence-free at 18-month follow-up. IGM is a rare benign inflammatory breast disease, usually seen in females of reproductive age. Establishing a diagnosis can be challenging for a surgeon and requires a high index of suspicion as most patients are initially misdiagnosed by their primary care physicians. Steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are considered as fundamental treatment modalities but they are correlated with increased rates of disease response and recurrence. On the contrary, surgical resection demonstrated significantly superior results compared to steroid-alone treatment in terms of recurrence and post-treatment recovery.

  8. Vitamin C in human health and disease is still a mystery? An overview.

    PubMed

    Naidu, K Akhilender

    2003-08-21

    this vitamin/nutraceutical in human biology and health is still a mystery in view of many beneficial claims and controversies.

  9. Enhanced parasympathetic activity in Chagas disease still stands in need of proof

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; Lombardi, Federico; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Costa Rocha, Manoel Otávio

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac vagal modulation impairment is a typical feature of Chagas disease (ChD) and is correlated to antagonistic anti-M2 autoantibodies activity. In this letter, we analyze the hypothesis that, in ChD, anti-muscarinic antibody activity could simultaneously increase parasympathetic tonus (decreasing heart rate) and decrease vagal modulation over cardiac sinus node (reducing heart rate variability — HRV). Although attractive, this hypothesis is not supported by empirical data, since reduction of vagal-specific HRV indexes has been demonstrated in the absence of bradycardia. Moreover, anti-muscarinic antibody levels correlate with HRV indexes, but not with heart rate. In the absence of reduced heart rate and, consequently, of tonic vagal enhancement, it is impossible to explain the reduction of vagal-mediated HRV by continuous and strong muscarinic activity of autoantibodies in ChD. PMID:18599135

  10. Investigating emotions in Parkinson's disease: what we know and what we still don't know.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Igor; Rusconi, Maria L

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increasing attention to the role played by emotional processes in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, most of what is known in this area is based on research conducted in laboratory or clinical settings. In this article, the authors underline the need to expand our current knowledge of the psychological correlates of PD by investigating patients' everyday emotions in natural contexts. Specifically, the authors illustrate new research avenues based on the implementation of experience sampling methods. It is argued that these methods could permit future researchers to ecologically assess the frequency and intensity with which parkinsonian patients experience specific emotions (either negative or positive) during their everyday life, providing at the same time precious information on what are the most typical situations in which these emotions occur and on how patients behave in these circumstances. Potential practical implications associated with investigating these issues are discussed.

  11. Relapsing macrophage activating syndrome in a 15-year-old girl with Still's disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophage activating syndrome is a severe, potentially life-threatening condition that may accompany Still's disease. It is characterized by fever, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, severe cytopenia, serious liver dysfunction, coagulopathy and neurologic involvement. The principal treatment for patients with this syndrome includes etoposide 150 mg/2 M twice a week for two weeks, dexamethasone 10 mg/2 M for two weeks and cyclosporine 3 mg/kg to 5 mg/kg for a longer period. Cases of relapse of macrophage activating syndrome are relatively rare. Case presentation We describe the case of a 15-year-old Iraqi girl with Still's disease who developed macrophage activating syndrome with acute respiratory distress syndrome that required resuscitation and mechanical ventilation. Following intensive treatment, including high dose steroids and cyclosporine, the patient improved significantly. Two weeks after cyclosporine was discontinued, however, she was readmitted with an acute relapse of macrophage activating syndrome manifested by spiking fever, arthralgias, maculopapular rash and leukocytosis. This time the patient recovered following the reintroduction of treatment with cyclosporine and the addition of mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept). Conclusion We believe that cyclosporine is a cornerstone for the treatment of Still's disease. We recommend continuing this medication for several weeks following the patient's clinical recovery in order to prevent macrophage activating syndrome relapses. PMID:20062775

  12. Adult-Onset Leukoencephalopathy with Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia Caused by a Novel R782G Mutation in CSF1R

    PubMed Central

    Foulds, Nicola; Pengelly, Reuben J.; Hammans, Simon R.; Nicoll, James A. R.; Ellison, David W.; Ditchfield, Adam; Beck, Sarah; Ennis, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant inheritance of a late onset rapidly progressive leukodystrophy in which exome sequencing has revealed a novel mutation p.R782G in the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor gene (CSF1R). Neuropathology of two affected family members showed cerebral white matter degeneration with axonal swellings and pigmented macrophages. The few recently reported families with CSF1R mutations had been previously labelled “hereditary diffuse leukencephalopathy with axonal spheroids” (HDLS) and “pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy” (POLD), disorders which now appear to form a disease continuum. The term “adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia” (ALSP) has been proposed to encompass this spectrum. As CSF1R regulates microglia this mutation implies that dysregulation of microglia is the primary cause of the disease. PMID:25975230

  13. Adult-Onset Leukoencephalopathy with Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia Caused by a Novel R782G Mutation in CSF1R.

    PubMed

    Foulds, Nicola; Pengelly, Reuben J; Hammans, Simon R; Nicoll, James A R; Ellison, David W; Ditchfield, Adam; Beck, Sarah; Ennis, Sarah

    2015-05-15

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant inheritance of a late onset rapidly progressive leukodystrophy in which exome sequencing has revealed a novel mutation p.R782G in the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor gene (CSF1R). Neuropathology of two affected family members showed cerebral white matter degeneration with axonal swellings and pigmented macrophages. The few recently reported families with CSF1R mutations had been previously labelled "hereditary diffuse leukencephalopathy with axonal spheroids" (HDLS) and "pigmentary orthochromatic leukodystrophy" (POLD), disorders which now appear to form a disease continuum. The term "adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia" (ALSP) has been proposed to encompass this spectrum. As CSF1R regulates microglia this mutation implies that dysregulation of microglia is the primary cause of the disease.

  14. Mast Cells are Important Modifiers of Autoimmune Disease: With so Much Evidence, Why is There Still Controversy?

    PubMed

    Brown, Melissa A; Hatfield, Julianne K

    2012-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens, and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  15. Early Pathogenesis in the Adult-Onset Neurodegenerative Disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    van Zundert, Brigitte; Izaurieta, Pamela; Fritz, Elsa; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motor neurons starting in adulthood. Most of our knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms of ALS comes from transgenic mice models that emulate a subgroup of familial ALS cases (FALS), with mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD1). In the more than 15 years since these mice were generated, a large number of abnormal cellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration have been identified, but to date this effort has led to few improvements in therapy, and no cure. Here, we consider that this surfeit of mechanisms is best interpreted by current insights that suggest a very early initiation of pathology in motor neurons, followed by a diversity of secondary cascades and compensatory mechanisms that mask symptoms for decades, until trauma and/or aging overloads their protective function. This view thus posits that adultonset ALS is the consequence of processes initiated during early development. In fact, motor neurons in neonatal mutant SOD mice display important alterations in their intrinsic electrical properties, synaptic inputs and morphology that are accompanied by subtle behavioral abnormalities. We consider evidence that human mutant SOD1 protein in neonatal hSOD1G93A mice instigates motor neuron degeneration by increasing persistent sodium currents and excitability, in turn altering synaptic circuits that control excessive motor neuron firing and leads to excitotoxicity. We also discuss how therapies that are aimed at suppressing abnormal neuronal activity might effectively mitigate or prevent the onset of irreversible neuronal damage in adulthood. PMID:22740507

  16. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessed March 14, 2017. Review Date 2/8/2017 Updated by: Gordon A. Starkebaum, MD, Professor of ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  17. Adult Still's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  18. Adult-onset hypogonadism: evaluation and role of testosterone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Davidiuk, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency (TD) has become a growing concern in the field of men’s sexual health, with an increasing number of men presenting for evaluation of this condition. Given the increasing demand for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), a panel of experts met in August of 2015 to discuss the treatment of men who present for evaluation in the setting of low or normal gonadotropin levels and the associated signs and symptoms of hypogonadism. This constellation of factors can be associated with elements of both primary and secondary hypogonadism. Because this syndrome commonly occurs in men who are middle-aged and older, it was termed adult-onset hypogonadism (AOH). AOH can be defined by the following elements: low levels of testosterone, associated signs and symptoms of hypogonadism, and low or normal gonadotropin levels. Although there are significant benefits of TRT for patients with AOH, candidates also need to understand the potential risks. Patients undergoing TRT will need to be monitored regularly because there are potential complications that can develop with long-term use. This review is aimed at providing a deeper understanding of AOH, discussing the benefits and risks of TRT, and outlining each modality of TRT in use for AOH. PMID:28078213

  19. Effects of Aging and Adult-Onset Hearing Loss on Cortical Auditory Regions

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, Velia

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common feature in human aging. It has been argued that dysfunctions in central processing are important contributing factors to hearing loss during older age. Aging also has well documented consequences for neural structure and function, but it is not clear how these effects interact with those that arise as a consequence of hearing loss. This paper reviews the effects of aging and adult-onset hearing loss in the structure and function of cortical auditory regions. The evidence reviewed suggests that aging and hearing loss result in atrophy of cortical auditory regions and stronger engagement of networks involved in the detection of salient events, adaptive control and re-allocation of attention. These cortical mechanisms are engaged during listening in effortful conditions in normal hearing individuals. Therefore, as a consequence of aging and hearing loss, all listening becomes effortful and cognitive load is constantly high, reducing the amount of available cognitive resources. This constant effortful listening and reduced cognitive spare capacity could be what accelerates cognitive decline in older adults with hearing loss. PMID:27242405

  20. Clinical and Metabolic Features of Adult-Onset Diabetes Caused by ABCC8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Rousseau, Elise; Reznik, Yves; Fetita, Sabrina; Philippe, Julien; Dechaume, Aurélie; Hartemann, Agnès; Polak, Michel; Petit, Catherine; Charpentier, Guillaume; Gautier, Jean-François; Froguel, Philippe; Vaxillaire, Martine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Gain-of-function ABCC8/sulfonylurea (SU) receptor 1 mutations cause neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) or late-onset diabetes in adult relatives. Given the effectiveness of SU treatment in ABCC8-NDM patients, we further characterized late-onset ABCC8-associated diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seven adult subjects from three NDM families and one family with type 2 diabetes were studied. Insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were assessed using clamp techniques. We screened 139 type 2 diabetic patients who were well controlled by SU for ABCC8 mutations. RESULTS ABCC8 mutation carriers exhibited glucose intolerance, frank diabetes, or insulin-requiring diabetes since diagnosis. HbA1c improved in five SU-treated patients. Insulin secretion capacity was impaired in three patients compared with adult control subjects but was restored after a 4-week SU trial in two patients. Cohort screening revealed four SU-treated patients with ABCC8 mutations, two of which are likely causal. CONCLUSIONS Although of rare occurrence, recognition of adult-onset ABCC8-associated diabetes may help in targeting patients for SU therapy. PMID:22210575

  1. Adult-onset obesity is triggered by impaired mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Kara L.; Ferreira, Nicola; Richman, Tara R.; Ermer, Judith A.; Kuznetsova, Irina; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.; Lee, Richard G.; Viola, Helena M.; Johnstone, Victoria P. A.; Matthews, Vance; Hool, Livia C.; Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is essential for energy production; however, an understanding of how it can influence physiology and metabolism is lacking. Several proteins from the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family are essential for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, but the functions of the remaining members of this family are poorly understood. We created knockout mice to investigate the role of the PPR domain 1 (PTCD1) protein and show that loss of PTCD1 is embryonic lethal, whereas haploinsufficient, heterozygous mice develop age-induced obesity. The molecular defects and metabolic consequences of mitochondrial protein haploinsufficiency in vivo have not been investigated previously. We show that PTCD1 haploinsufficiency results in increased RNA metabolism, in response to decreased protein synthesis and impaired RNA processing that affect the biogenesis of the respiratory chain, causing mild uncoupling and changes in mitochondrial morphology. We demonstrate that with age, these effects lead to adult-onset obesity that results in liver steatosis and cardiac hypertrophy in response to tissue-specific differential regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Our findings indicate that changes in mitochondrial gene expression have long-term consequences on energy metabolism, providing evidence that haploinsufficiency of PTCD1 can be a major predisposing factor for the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:28835921

  2. Adult-onset obesity is triggered by impaired mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Perks, Kara L; Ferreira, Nicola; Richman, Tara R; Ermer, Judith A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Lee, Richard G; Viola, Helena M; Johnstone, Victoria P A; Matthews, Vance; Hool, Livia C; Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is essential for energy production; however, an understanding of how it can influence physiology and metabolism is lacking. Several proteins from the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family are essential for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, but the functions of the remaining members of this family are poorly understood. We created knockout mice to investigate the role of the PPR domain 1 (PTCD1) protein and show that loss of PTCD1 is embryonic lethal, whereas haploinsufficient, heterozygous mice develop age-induced obesity. The molecular defects and metabolic consequences of mitochondrial protein haploinsufficiency in vivo have not been investigated previously. We show that PTCD1 haploinsufficiency results in increased RNA metabolism, in response to decreased protein synthesis and impaired RNA processing that affect the biogenesis of the respiratory chain, causing mild uncoupling and changes in mitochondrial morphology. We demonstrate that with age, these effects lead to adult-onset obesity that results in liver steatosis and cardiac hypertrophy in response to tissue-specific differential regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Our findings indicate that changes in mitochondrial gene expression have long-term consequences on energy metabolism, providing evidence that haploinsufficiency of PTCD1 can be a major predisposing factor for the development of metabolic syndrome.

  3. High frequency of germline TP53 mutations in a prospective adult-onset sarcoma cohort.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gillian; Ballinger, Mandy L; Wong, Stephen; Hewitt, Chelsee; James, Paul; Young, Mary-Anne; Cipponi, Arcadi; Pang, Tiffany; Goode, David L; Dobrovic, Alex; Thomas, David M

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are a key feature of Li-Fraumeni and related syndromes (LFS/LFL), associated with germline TP53 mutations. Current penetrance estimates for TP53 mutations are subject to significant ascertainment bias. The International Sarcoma Kindred Study is a clinic-based, prospective cohort of adult-onset sarcoma cases, without regard to family history. The entire cohort was screened for mutations in TP53 using high-resolution melting analysis and Sanger sequencing, and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification and targeted massively parallel sequencing for copy number changes. Pathogenic TP53 mutations were detected in blood DNA of 20/559 sarcoma probands (3.6%); 17 were germline and 3 appeared to be somatically acquired. Of the germline carriers, one appeared to be mosaic, detectable in the tumor and blood, but not epithelial tissues. Germline mutation carriers were more likely to have multiple cancers (47% vs 15% for non-carriers, P = 3.0×10(-3)), and earlier cancer onset (33 vs 48 years, P = 1.19×10(-3)). The median survival of mutation carriers following first cancer diagnosis was not significantly different from non-carriers. Only 10/17 (59%) pedigrees met classical or Chompret criteria for LFS. In summary, germline TP53 mutations are not rare in adult patients with sarcoma, with implications for screening, surveillance, treatment and genetic counselling of carriers and family members.

  4. High Frequency of Germline TP53 Mutations in a Prospective Adult-Onset Sarcoma Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephen; Hewitt, Chelsee; James, Paul; Young, Mary-Anne; Cipponi, Arcadi; Pang, Tiffany; Goode, David L.; Dobrovic, Alex; Thomas, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are a key feature of Li-Fraumeni and related syndromes (LFS/LFL), associated with germline TP53 mutations. Current penetrance estimates for TP53 mutations are subject to significant ascertainment bias. The International Sarcoma Kindred Study is a clinic-based, prospective cohort of adult-onset sarcoma cases, without regard to family history. The entire cohort was screened for mutations in TP53 using high-resolution melting analysis and Sanger sequencing, and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification and targeted massively parallel sequencing for copy number changes. Pathogenic TP53 mutations were detected in blood DNA of 20/559 sarcoma probands (3.6%); 17 were germline and 3 appeared to be somatically acquired. Of the germline carriers, one appeared to be mosaic, detectable in the tumor and blood, but not epithelial tissues. Germline mutation carriers were more likely to have multiple cancers (47% vs 15% for non-carriers, P = 3.0×10−3), and earlier cancer onset (33 vs 48 years, P = 1.19×10−3). The median survival of mutation carriers following first cancer diagnosis was not significantly different from non-carriers. Only 10/17 (59%) pedigrees met classical or Chompret criteria for LFS. In summary, germline TP53 mutations are not rare in adult patients with sarcoma, with implications for screening, surveillance, treatment and genetic counselling of carriers and family members. PMID:23894400

  5. A search for the primary abnormality in adult-onset type II citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Saheki, Takeyori ); Kumashiro, Ryukichi; Tanikawa, Kyuichi ); O'Brien, W.E.; Beaudet, A.L. )

    1993-11-01

    Deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) causes citrullinemia in human beings. Type II citrullinemia is found in most patients with adult-onset citrullinemia in Japan, and ASS deficiency is found specifically in the liver. Previous studies have shown that the decrease of hepatic ASS activity is caused by a decrease in enzyme protein with normal kinetic properties and that there were no apparent abnormalities in the amount, translational activity, and gross structure of hepatic ASS mRNA. In the present work, the authors show by sequencing analysis that there was no mutation in the ASS mRNA from two patients with type II citrullinemia. The authors also report RFLP analysis of a consanguineous family with type II citrullinemia, by using three DNA polymorphisms located within the ASS gene locus. In spite of having consanguineous parents, the patient was not a homozygous haplotype for the ASS gene. The RFLP analysis of 16 affected patients from consanguineous parents showed that 5 of 16 patients had the heterozygous pattern for one of the three DNA probes and that the frequency of the heterozygous haplotype was not different from the control frequency. These results suggest that the primary defect of type II citrullinemia is not within the ASS gene locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts, known as Labrune syndrome, is a rare syndrome. The etiology is unknown; in some cases it is difficult to differentiate from Coats plus syndrome and diagnosed as cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts. We present the case of a patient with adult leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts and discuss recently described entities in view of the relevant literature. Case presentation A previously healthy 19-year-old Chinese man presented with weakness of his right limbs that rapidly worsened over a short interval. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed numerous low-density cysts, calcifications, and abnormal signal change of white matter. A visual field examination showed irregular visual field defects in both eyes. A neuro-ophthalmologic examination did not find evidence of Coats retinopathy. A larger excisional biopsy was carried out and a diagnosis of leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts was confirmed. Conclusions We present an example of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts and have expanded the clinical spectrum of features associated with this syndrome. Previous reports have not, to the best of our knowledge, previously reported visual field defects. Based on the latest findings, we believe that leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts and Coats plus syndrome are genetically distinct entities. PMID:23742313

  7. Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaming; Cheng, Gang; Dong, Chao; Zhang, Jianning; Meng, Yuhong

    2013-06-06

    Leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts, known as Labrune syndrome, is a rare syndrome. The etiology is unknown; in some cases it is difficult to differentiate from Coats plus syndrome and diagnosed as cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts. We present the case of a patient with adult leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts and discuss recently described entities in view of the relevant literature. A previously healthy 19-year-old Chinese man presented with weakness of his right limbs that rapidly worsened over a short interval. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed numerous low-density cysts, calcifications, and abnormal signal change of white matter. A visual field examination showed irregular visual field defects in both eyes. A neuro-ophthalmologic examination did not find evidence of Coats retinopathy. A larger excisional biopsy was carried out and a diagnosis of leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts was confirmed. We present an example of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts and have expanded the clinical spectrum of features associated with this syndrome. Previous reports have not, to the best of our knowledge, previously reported visual field defects. Based on the latest findings, we believe that leukoencephalopathy, brain calcifications and cysts and Coats plus syndrome are genetically distinct entities.

  8. Adult-onset NREM parasomnia with hypnopompic hallucinatory pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mantoan, Laura; Eriksson, Sofia H; Nisbet, Angus P; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-02-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old woman presenting with nocturnal episodes of pain and screaming during sleep starting at age 30. There was no childhood or family history of parasomnia. The events had gradually become more frequent over the years, occurring in the first half of the night within 2 h of sleep onset. There were no triggers, and she had partial amnesia for the events. A diagnosis of adult-onset sleep terrors was made on clinical grounds and supported polysomnographically. Seizures and periodic limb movements were excluded as triggering factors. There was some mild sleep disordered breathing (predominantly non-desaturating hypopnea with a propensity for REM sleep of debatable significance). Imaging of the brain and spine and neurophysiological investigations ruled out lesions, entrapments, or neuropathies as possible causes of pain. Treatment (clonazepam, paroxetine, or gabapentin) was poorly tolerated and made no difference to the nocturnal episodes, while trazodone worsened them. This is the first report of hypnopompic psychic pain in association with a NREM parasomnia. We hypothesize that the pain may represent a sensory hallucination analogous to the more commonly recognized visual NREM parasomnia-associated hypnopompic visual hallucinations and that, as such, it may arise during arousal of the sensory neocortex as confabulatory response.

  9. A comparison of cases of paediatric-onset and adult-onset cryptococcosis detected through population-based surveillance, 2005-2007.

    PubMed

    Meiring, Susan T; Quan, Vanessa C; Cohen, Cheryl; Dawood, Halima; Karstaedt, Alan S; McCarthy, Kerrigan M; Whitelaw, Andrew C; Govender, Nelesh P

    2012-11-28

    We compared the epidemiology of laboratory-confirmed paediatric cryptococcal disease with adult-onset disease in the South African population. The study was an active, prospective, population-based, laboratory-based surveillance in South Africa. We compared cases of paediatric cryptococcosis (<15 years) with cases of adult-onset cryptococcosis that were reported to the surveillance programme between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007. The case definition was based on a positive India ink test, cryptococcal antigen test or cryptococcal culture. Clinical case data were obtained at enhanced surveillance sites. Of 16,192 incident episodes of cryptococcosis in South Africa, 361 (2%) episodes occurred among children. In 2007, incidence was one and 19 cases per 100,000 persons in the general paediatric and adult populations and was 47 and 120 cases per 100,000 persons for HIV-infected children and adults, respectively. Among children, a bimodal peak in incidence was evident in the less than 1-year age group and in the 5 age group. Most children (64%) and adults (63%) were severely immunocompromised (CD4 T-lymphocyte cell count < 50 cells/μl) at the time of diagnosis. On multivariable analysis, children were significantly more likely than adults to be male, diagnosed on blood culture, infected with Cryptococcus gattii, treated with amphotericin B and admitted for a longer stay in hospital. This series of 361 cases of paediatric cryptococcosis is by far the largest described to date. The diagnosis of cryptococcosis should be considered in the paediatric HIV-infected population, especially among those who are severely immunocompromised.

  10. Adult onset asthma and interaction between genes and active tobacco smoking: The GABRIEL consortium

    PubMed Central

    Postma, D. S.; Moffatt, M. F.; Jarvis, D.; Ramasamy, A.; Wjst, M.; Omenaas, E. R.; Bouzigon, E.; Demenais, F.; Nadif, R.; Siroux, V.; Polonikov, A. V.; Solodilova, M.; Ivanov, V. P.; Curjuric, I.; Imboden, M.; Kumar, A.; Probst-Hensch, N.; Ogorodova, L. M.; Puzyrev, V. P.; Bragina, E. Yu; Freidin, M. B.; Nolte, I. M.; Farrall, A. M.; Cookson, W. O. C. M.; Strachan, D. P.; Koppelman, G. H.; Boezen, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified novel genetic associations for asthma, but without taking into account the role of active tobacco smoking. This study aimed to identify novel genes that interact with ever active tobacco smoking in adult onset asthma. Methods We performed a genome-wide interaction analysis in six studies participating in the GABRIEL consortium following two meta-analyses approaches based on 1) the overall interaction effect and 2) the genetic effect in subjects with and without smoking exposure. We performed a discovery meta-analysis including 4,057 subjects of European descent and replicated our findings in an independent cohort (LifeLines Cohort Study), including 12,475 subjects. Results First approach: 50 SNPs were selected based on an overall interaction effect at p<10−4. The most pronounced interaction effect was observed for rs9969775 on chromosome 9 (discovery meta-analysis: ORint = 0.50, p = 7.63*10−5, replication: ORint = 0.65, p = 0.02). Second approach: 35 SNPs were selected based on the overall genetic effect in exposed subjects (p <10−4). The most pronounced genetic effect was observed for rs5011804 on chromosome 12 (discovery meta-analysis ORint = 1.50, p = 1.21*10−4; replication: ORint = 1.40, p = 0.03). Conclusions Using two genome-wide interaction approaches, we identified novel polymorphisms in non-annotated intergenic regions on chromosomes 9 and 12, that showed suggestive evidence for interaction with active tobacco smoking in the onset of adult asthma. PMID:28253294

  11. [Adult-onset ataxia-telangiectasia. A clinical and therapeutic observation].

    PubMed

    Gazulla, J; Benavente, I; Sarasa Barrio, M

    2006-10-01

    A case of adult-onset ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is presented, with debut at the age of 18 years and survival into the fourth decade. The clinical picture included cerebellar ataxia, distal weakness and hypopalesthesia in the lower limbs, oculomotor apraxia, dysarthria, and conjunctival telangiectasiae. Carcinoembrionic antigen was raised in plasma. MR imaging showed atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and thinning of the spinal cord. Deficiencies of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate have been found in the cerebellar cortex in a case of AT. These were attributed to the loss of Purkinje cells and granule cells. In spite of some ataxias having improved with the gabaergic drugs gabapentin and tiagabine, the administration of gabapentin, acetazolamide and a placebo, did not benefit this patient. Pregabalin, 225 mg/day, ameliorated the ataxia unexpectedly, with further improvement after the addition of tiagabine. The authors suggest that the beneficial effect observed might have been due, either to the higher affinity of pregabalin towards alpha2-delta, a subtype of the alpha2-delta subunit which forms part of the voltage-gated calcium channel; either to the profusion of this subtype in the Purkinje cell layer, or to its larger capacity to let calcium into the neuron; or to the combination of these. These differences with gabapentin could explain the higher power of pregabalin in the stimulation of the cerebellar structures, thus justifying the improvement of ataxia in this case of AT. A synergistic effect with pregabalin is proposed as the cause of the improvement obtained with the addition of tiagabine.

  12. Multistage still

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, J.; Saravia, L.R.; Esteban, S.

    1999-07-01

    A new design for a passive atmospheric multiple effect solar distillation unit is proposed. Inclined glass surfaces with a 4{degree} slope and placed one over the other in an isolated box are used. The cold salty water is fed only in the upper stage and flows along each surface, falling from one stage to the next by gravity and reaching finally a heated tray at the bottom. Vapor condenses below each surface and produces the water evaporation in the upper side of the same surface. For heating the bottom of the still a simple 1.3 m{sup 2} solar collector with a fresnel type concentrator is used. The collector is separated from the still and heat is transported from one unit to the other using a 4 kg aluminium slab, which is placed in the absorber and it is heated at a temperature about 350 C. The slab is then placed below the tray in an isolated box. Four slabs are used and they are changed periodically when the slab temperature drops below approximately 180 C. Several slabs can be used for heat storage if several collectors are built, allowing the use of the still during some hours at night, improving its daily productivity. Experiments have been performed with a prototype and the results are discussed and compared with the values obtained with another electrically heated prototype.

  13. Hereditary leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids: a spectrum of phenotypes from CNS vasculitis to parkinsonism in an adult onset leukodystrophy series

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Phadke, Rahul; Brandner, Sebastian; Milonas, Ionnis; Dean, Andrew; Bajaj, Nin; McNicholas, Nuala; Costello, Daniel; Cronin, Simon; McGuigan, Chris; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with neuroaxonal spheroids (HDLS) is a hereditary, adult onset leukodystrophy which is characterised by the presence of axonal loss, axonal spheroids and variably present pigmented macrophages on pathological examination. It most frequently presents in adulthood with dementia and personality change. HDLS has recently been found to be caused by mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. Methods In this study, we sequenced the CSF1R gene in a cohort of 48 patients from the UK, Greece and Ireland with adult onset leukodystrophy of unknown cause. Results Five pathogenic mutations were found, including three novel mutations. The presentations ranged from suspected central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis to extrapyramidal to cognitive phenotypes. The case histories and imaging are presented here, in addition to neuropathological findings from two cases with novel mutations. Conclusion We estimate that CSF1R mutations account for 10% of idiopathic adult onset leukodystrophies and that genetic testing for CSF1R mutations is essential in adult patients presenting with undefined CNS vasculitis or a leukodystrophy with prominent neuropsychiatric signs or dementia. PMID:25935893

  14. Socioeconomic factors do not but GH treatment does affect mortality in adult-onset growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Berglund, Agnethe; Juul, Svend; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Christiansen, Jens S

    2014-11-01

    GH deficiency is associated with changes in body composition, increased cardiovascular risk markers, and reduced bone mineral density. There seem to be multiple causes of the reported increased morbidity and mortality. The objective was to study the socioeconomic status in patients with adult-onset GH deficiency and its impact on mortality. This is a nationwide registry study in which the socioeconomic status in adult-onset GH deficient patients was identified in the Danish registries and compared with controls matched on age and gender. The socio-economic status included cohabitation, education, income, parenthood, convictions, and retirement. All patients had adult-onset GH deficiency and were born between 1950 and 1980. Two-hundred seventy-six patients (53.6% men) and 25 717 controls were included. GH-treated patients had a reduced mortality in total and due to malignancy compared with untreated patients. This difference remained after adjustment for cohabitation and education. Compared with the background population, the incidence of cohabitation, parenthood, and convictions was significantly reduced in patients, whereas education was unaffected. Retirement was significantly increased. Mortality was increased in patients, especially among patients not treated with GH. In GH-treated patients, mortality was decreased in total and due to malignancy compared with untreated patients, even after adjustment for all possible measured confounders. The patients had an impaired socioeconomic profile on most parameters compared with controls. This study does not support the suggestion that GH replacement therapy causes increased mortality.

  15. Should We Still Focus That Much on Cardiovascular Mortality in End Stage Renal Disease Patients? The CONvective TRAnsport STudy

    PubMed Central

    den Hoedt, Claire H.; Bots, Michiel L.; Grooteman, Muriel P. C.; Mazairac, Albert H. A.; Penne, E. Lars; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; ter Wee, Piet M.; Nubé, Menso J.; Levesque, Renée; Blankestijn, Peter J.; van den Dorpel, Marinus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied the distribution of causes of death in the CONTRAST cohort and compared the proportion of cardiovascular deaths with other populations to answer the question whether cardiovascular mortality is still the principal cause of death in end stage renal disease. In addition, we compared patients who died from the three most common death causes. Finally, we aimed to study factors related to dialysis withdrawal. Methods We used data from CONTRAST, a randomized controlled trial in 714 chronic hemodialysis patients comparing the effects of online hemodiafiltration versus low-flux hemodialysis. Causes of death were adjudicated. The distribution of causes of death was compared to that of the Dutch dialysis registry and of the Dutch general population. Results In CONTRAST, 231 patients died on treatment. 32% died from cardiovascular disease, 22% due to infection and 23% because of dialysis withdrawal. These proportions were similar to those in the Dutch dialysis registry and the proportional cardiovascular mortality was similar to that of the Dutch general population. cardiovascular death was more common in patients <60 years. Patients who withdrew were older, had more co-morbidity and a lower mental quality of life at baseline. Patients who withdrew had much co-morbidity. 46% died within 5 days after the last dialysis session. Conclusions Although the absolute risk of death is much higher, the proportion of cardiovascular deaths in a prevalent end stage renal disease population is similar to that of the general population. In older hemodialysis patients cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular death risk are equally important. Particularly the registration of dialysis withdrawal deserves attention. These findings may be partly limited to the Dutch population. PMID:23620729

  16. Do stones still kill? An analysis of death from stone disease 1999-2013 in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Kum, Francesca; Mahmalji, Wasim; Hale, Jemma; Thomas, Kay; Bultitude, Matthew; Glass, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    To analyse the trends in the number of deaths attributable to urolithiasis in England and Wales over the past 15 years (1999-2013). Urolithiasis has an estimated lifetime risk of 12% in males and 6% in females and is not perceived as a life-threatening pathology. Admissions with urinary calculi contribute to 0.5% of all inpatient hospital stays, and the number of deaths attributable to stone disease has yet to be identified and presented. Office of National Statistics data relating to causes of death from urolithiasis, coded as International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 N20-N23, was collated and analysed for the 15-year period from 1999 to 2013 in England and Wales. These data were sub-categorised into anatomical location of calculi, age, and gender. In all, 1954 deaths were attributed to urolithiasis from 1999 to 2013 (mean 130.3 deaths/year). Of which, 141 were attributed to ureteric stones (mean 9.4 deaths/year). Calculi of the kidney and ureter accounted for 91% of all deaths secondary to urolithiasis; lower urinary tract (bladder or urethra) calculi contributed to only 7.9% of deaths. The data revealed an overall increasing trend in mortality from urolithiasis over this 15-year period, with an increase of 3.8 deaths/year based on a linear trend (R(2) = 0.65). Overall, the number of deaths in females was significantly higher than in males (ratio 1.5:1, P < 0.001); kidney and ureteric calculi causing death had a female preponderance (1.7:1, female:male); whereas calculi of the lower urinary tract was more common in males (1:2.2, female:male). Stone disease still causes death in the 21st century in England and Wales. This trend of increasing deaths must be placed in the context of the concurrent rising incidence of urolithiasis in the UK and the number of stone-related hospital episodes. The primary cause of death relating to complications of stone disease for each individual case should be further investigated to facilitate prevention of complications of

  17. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies an Adult-Onset Case of Methylmalonic Aciduria and Homocystinuria Type C (cblC) with Non-Syndromic Bull's Eye Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Collison, Frederick T; Xie, Yajing Angela; Gambin, Tomasz; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Lupski, James R; Fishman, Gerald A; Allikmets, Rando

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (cblC), a disorder of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) metabolism caused by mutations in the MMACHC gene, presents with many systemic symptoms, including neurological, cognitive, psychiatric, and thromboembolic events. Retinal phenotypes, including maculopathy, pigmentary retinopathy, and optic atrophy are common in early onset form of the disease but are rare in adult onset forms. An adult Hispanic female presented with decreased central vision, bilateral pericentral ring scotomas and bull's eye-appearing macular lesions at 28 years of age. Her medical history was otherwise unremarkable except for iron deficiency anemia and both urinary tract and kidney infections. Screening of the ABCA4 gene, mutations in which frequently cause bull's eye maculopathy, was negative. Subsequently, analysis with whole exome sequencing was performed. Whole exome sequencing discovered compound heterozygous mutations in MMACHC, c.G482A:p.Arg161Gln and c.270_271insA:p.Arg91Lysfs*14, which segregated with the disease in the family. The genetic diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical laboratory testing, showing highly elevated urine methylmalonic acid/creatinine and homocysteine levels, and suggesting disease management with hydroxycobalamin injections and carnitine supplementation. In summary, a unique case of an adult patient with bull's eye macular lesions and no clinically relevant systemic symptoms was diagnosed with cblC by genetic screening and follow-up biochemical laboratory tests.

  18. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies an Adult-Onset Case of Methylmalonic Aciduria and Homocystinuria Type C (cblC) with Non-Syndromic Bull’s Eye Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Frederick T.; Xie, Yajing (Angela); Gambin, Tomasz; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Lupski, James R.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Allikmets, Rando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (cblC), a disorder of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) metabolism caused by mutations in the MMACHC gene, presents with many systemic symptoms, including neurological, cognitive, psychiatric, and thromboembolic events. Retinal phenotypes, including maculopathy, pigmentary retinopathy, and optic atrophy are common in early onset form of the disease but are rare in adult onset forms. Materials and Methods: An adult Hispanic female presented with decreased central vision, bilateral pericentral ring scotomas and bull’s eye-appearing macular lesions at 28 years of age. Her medical history was otherwise unremarkable except for iron deficiency anemia and both urinary tract and kidney infections. Screening of the ABCA4 gene, mutations in which frequently cause bull’s eye maculopathy, was negative. Subsequently, analysis with whole exome sequencing was performed. Results: Whole exome sequencing discovered compound heterozygous mutations in MMACHC, c.G482A:p.Arg161Gln and c.270_271insA:p.Arg91Lysfs*14, which segregated with the disease in the family. The genetic diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical laboratory testing, showing highly elevated urine methylmalonic acid/creatinine and homocysteine levels, and suggesting disease management with hydroxycobalamin injections and carnitine supplementation. Conclusions: In summary, a unique case of an adult patient with bull’s eye macular lesions and no clinically relevant systemic symptoms was diagnosed with cblC by genetic screening and follow-up biochemical laboratory tests. PMID:25687216

  19. Obesity-related abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K Hoa; Ande, Sudharsana R; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-29

    The incidence of adult-onset T1D in low-risk non-HLA type has increased several folds, whereas the contemporaneous incidence in high-risk HLA-type remains stable. Various factors behind this selective increase in T1D in young adults remain unclear. Obesity and its associated abnormalities appear to be an important determinant; however, the underlying mechanism involved is not understood. Recently, we have developed two novel transgenic obese mice models, Mito-Ob and m-Mito-Ob, by expressing a pleiotropic protein prohibitin (PHB) and a phospho mutant form of PHB (Y114F-PHB or m-PHB) from the aP2 gene promoter, respectively. Both mice models develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, independent of diet; but obesity associated chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance in a male sex-specific manner. Interestingly, on a high fat diet (HFD) only male m-Mito-Ob mice displayed marked mononuclear cell infiltration in pancreas and developed insulitis that mimic adult-onset T1D. Male Mito-Ob mice that share the metabolic phenotype of male m-Mito-Ob mice, and female m-Mito-Ob that harbor m-PHB similar to male m-Mito-Ob mice, did not develop insulitis. Thus, insulitis development in male m-Mito-Ob in response to HFD requires both, obesity-related abnormalities and m-PHB. Collectively, this data provides a proof-of-concept that obesity-associated abnormalities couple environmental triggers with genetic susceptibility in adult-onset T1D and reveals PHB as a potential susceptibility gene for T1D.

  20. [Therapy of adult-onset laryngeal papilloma: integrallty submucosal dissection of the tumor by CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Lei, W B; Liu, Q H; Chai, L P; Zhu, X L; Wang, Z F; Li, Q M; Tang, H C; Jiang, A Y; Wen, Y H; Wen, W P

    2016-10-07

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the integrallty submucosal resection of adult-onset laryngeal papilloma by CO2 laser. Methods: A group of 64 cases (36 males and 28 females, multipe lesions 54 cases and single lesion 10 cases, aged 18-75 years, mean age 43.13 years) with adult-onset laryngeal papilloma encountered in the first affliated hospital of Sun Yatsen university from 2009 to 2015 was retrospectively analyzed. All cases were treated with integrallty submucosal dissection of the tumor by CO2 laser, and observed the changes of tumor integral scope, inter-operative, operative processes, postoperative voice quality, postoperative scarring, and the tracheotomy conditions, which were analysed and evaluated. Results: A total of 64 patients were followed up from 1 year to 5 years. Preoperative tumor integral scope of these patients averaged of 7.00. A total of 62 cases kept 0 score of the tumor integral scope for at least one year, which lead to a clinical cure rate of 96.9%. The inter-operative averaged of 25.7 months. The total operative processes of these patients were 87 times (mean time 1.36). Four cases resulted in postoperative scarring. However these was a good result in postoperative voice quality with a mean score 4.25. As to the changes of tumor integral scope, all cases got a declining score (mean score 6.72), which resulted in a remission rate of 100%. Conclusion: The integrallty submucosal dissection of adult-onset 1aryngeal papilloma by CO2 laser was an effective way to reduce the tumor integral scope; lengthen their inter-operative; decrease the operative processes, avoid the occurrence of tracheotomy; and improve the postoperative voice quality. Most of the patients could even be cured ultimately.

  1. Intrathecal antibody production against Epstein-Barr and other neurotropic viruses in pediatric and adult onset multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Jacobi, Christian; Lange, Peter; Nau, Roland; Krone, Bernd; Hanefeld, Folker

    2010-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent reports proposed an increased EBV-targeted humoral immune response in MS, which appears to be more pronounced in pediatric patients. However, little is known about the CNS-derived antibody production against EBV in patients with MS. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency and intensity of intrathecal antibody production against EBV as compared to other neurotropic viruses in pediatric and adult onset MS. In cohorts of 43 childhood, 50 adult onset MS patients, 20 children and 12 adults with other CNS disorders, paired CSF and serum samples were studied. Frequency and intensity of intrathecal antibody production against EBV as compared to measles, rubella, varicella zoster (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) were analyzed by determination of virus-specific CSF-to-serum Antibody Indices (AI). Intrathecally synthesized EBV antibodies were detectable in 26% pediatric and 10% adult onset MS patients, compared to frequencies ranging in both groups from 10 to 60% for the other viruses. Median AIs for EBV were lower than those for all other viruses, with more than twofold higher median AI for measles, rubella and VZV. The EBV-targeted humoral immune response in the CNS is only part of the intrathecal polyspecific antibody production in MS, directed against various neurotropic viruses. Our results do not rule out the possibility that EBV is involved in the pathogenesis of MS by triggering diverse cellular immune mechanisms, but they argue against a direct pathogenic role of EBV-targeted humoral immune response within the CNS.

  2. Solitary, adult-onset, intraosseous myofibroma of the finger: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yihong; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2015-09-01

    Myofibroma is a rare benign neoplasm of myofibroblastic origin. It typically occurs in the skin and subcutaneous tissues of the head and neck in infants and young children as multicentric lesions known as infantile myofibromatosis. Intraosseous myofibromas are very rare and are typically destructive lesions that predominantly affect craniofacial bones in the setting of myofibromatosis. Solitary, intraosseous myofibromas in adults are exceedingly rare. Herein, we report a myofibroma involving the middle phalanx of the right index finger in a 58-year-old man who presented with a pathologic fracture. Twelve other cases of adult-onset, intraosseous myofibroma were compiled from the English language literature and integrated with this report.

  3. Differences in clinical features observed between childhood-onset versus adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bundhun, Pravesh Kumar; Kumari, Alka; Huang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects people in childhood (childhood onset) or in adulthood (adult onset). Observational studies that have previously compared childhood-onset versus adult-onset SLE were often restricted to 1 ethnic group, or to a particular area, with a small sample size of patients. We aimed to systematically compare childhood-onset versus adult-onset SLE through a meta-analysis. Electronic databases were searched for relevant publications comparing childhood-onset with adult-onset SLE. Adverse clinical features were considered as the endpoints. The Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies and RevMan software (version 5.3) was used to carry out this analysis whereby risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as the statistical parameters. A total number of 10,261 participants (1560 participants with childhood-onset SLE and 8701 participants with adult-onset SLE) were enrolled. Results of this analysis showed that compared with childhood-onset SLE, pulmonary involvement was significantly higher with adult-onset SLE (RR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.18-1.93; P = .001), whereas renal involvement was significantly higher with childhood-onset SLE (RR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.55-0.77; P = .00001). Raynaud phenomenon and photosensitivity were significantly higher in adult-onset SLE (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.04-1.60; P = .02) and (RR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.17; P = .03), respectively. Malar rash significantly favored adult-onset SLE (RR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75-0.94; P = .002). Childhood-onset SLE was associated with significantly higher hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and lymphopenia. Seizure and ocular manifestations were significantly higher with childhood-onset SLE (RR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.47-0.70; P = .00001) and (RR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.21-0.55; P = .00001), respectively, whereas pleuritis was significantly higher with adult-onset SLE (RR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1

  4. Effect of adult onset hypothyroidism on behavioral parameters and acetylcholinesterase isoforms activity in specific brain regions of male mice.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, Catherine G; Constantinou, Caterina; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Giompres, Panagiotis; Margarity, Marigoula

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are essential for normal development and function of mammalian central nervous system (CNS); TH dysregulation has been implicated in several cognitive and behavioral deficits related to dysfunctions of neurotransmitter systems. In the present study, we investigated the effects of adult onset hypothyroidism on the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and on related behavioral parameters. For this purpose we used adult male Balb/cJ mice that were divided randomly into euthyroid and hypothyroid animal groups. Animals were rendered hypothyroid through administration of 1% w/v KClO4 in their drinking water for 8weeks. At the end of the treatment, learning/memory procedures were examined through step-through passive avoidance task while fear/anxiety was assessed using elevated plus-maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. AChE activity was determined colorimetrically in two different fractions, salt-soluble fraction (SS) (containing mainly the G1 isoform) and detergent-soluble fraction (DS) (containing mainly the G4 isoform) in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, midbrain, hippocampus and striatum. Our results indicate that adult onset hypothyroidism caused significant memory impairment and increased fear/anxiety. Moreover, the activity of both isoforms of AChE was reduced in all brain regions examined in a brain region- and isoform-specific manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. GC-MS metabolomic analysis reveals significant alterations in cerebellar metabolic physiology in a mouse model of adult onset hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis K; Margarity, Marigoula; Klapa, Maria I

    2011-02-04

    Although adult-onset hypothyroidism (AOH) has been connected to neural activity alterations, including movement, behavioral, and mental dysfunctions, the underlying changes in brain metabolic physiology have not been investigated in a systemic and systematic way. The current knowledge remains fragmented, referring to different experimental setups and recovered from various brain regions. In this study, we developed and applied a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics protocol to obtain a holistic view of the cerebellar metabolic physiology in a Balb/cJ mouse model of prolonged adult-onset hypothyroidism induced by a 64-day treatment with 1% potassium perchlorate in the drinking water of the animals. The high-throughput analysis enabled the correlation between multiple parallel-occurring metabolic phenomena; some have been previously related to AOH, while others implicated new pathways, designating new directions for further research. Specifically, an overall decline in the metabolic activity of the hypothyroid compared to the euthyroid cerebellum was observed, characteristically manifested in energy metabolism, glutamate/glutamine metabolism, osmolytic/antioxidant capacity, and protein/lipid synthesis. These alterations provide strong evidence that the mammalian cerebellum is metabolically responsive to AOH. In light of the cerebellum core functions and its increasingly recognized role in neurocognition, these findings further support the known phenotypic manifestations of AOH into movement and cognitive dysfunctions.

  6. Mutations in Zebrafish lrp2 Result in Adult-Onset Ocular Pathogenesis That Models Myopia and Other Risk Factors for Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Veth, Kerry N.; Willer, Jason R.; Collery, Ross F.; Gray, Matthew P.; Willer, Gregory B.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Mullins, Mary C.; Udvadia, Ava J.; Smith, Richard S.; John, Simon W. M.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Link, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, Bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals—but not all—develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease. PMID:21379331

  7. Adult-Onset Ligneous Conjunctivitis with Detection of a Novel Plasminogen Gene Mutation and Anti-Plasminogen IgA Antibody: A Clinicopathologic Study and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yufei; Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Kolomeyer, Anton M; Cohen, Alice; Pruzon, Joanna; Milman, Tatyana; Chu, David S

    2016-01-01

    To report a novel plasminogen gene mutation and detection of anti-plasminogen antibodies in a patient with ligneous conjunctivitis successfully treated with 60% fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Retrospective data collected on a 45-year-old Caucasian female presenting with unilateral chronic membranous lesions. Laboratory investigation demonstrated decreased plasminogen antigen level, plasminogen activity, and rate of plasminogen activation by u-PA or t-PA, and elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Anti-plasminogen IgG and IgA antibodies were detected. DNA analysis revealed a novel Asp432Asn heterozygous missense mutation in the plasminogen gene (exon 11). The patient was treated with topical 60% FFP, achieved complete remission after four months, and remained membrane-free for over five years of follow-up. A novel plasminogen gene mutation, deficiency of plasminogen antigen and activity, and anti-plasminogen IgG and IgA antibodies were identified in a patient with adult-onset ligneous conjunctivitis. Sixty percent FFP maintained this patient disease-free for over five years.

  8. Mutations in zebrafish lrp2 result in adult-onset ocular pathogenesis that models myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Veth, Kerry N; Willer, Jason R; Collery, Ross F; Gray, Matthew P; Willer, Gregory B; Wagner, Daniel S; Mullins, Mary C; Udvadia, Ava J; Smith, Richard S; John, Simon W M; Gregg, Ronald G; Link, Brian A

    2011-02-01

    The glaucomas comprise a genetically complex group of retinal neuropathies that typically occur late in life and are characterized by progressive pathology of the optic nerve head and degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. In addition to age and family history, other significant risk factors for glaucoma include elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and myopia. The complexity of glaucoma has made it difficult to model in animals, but also challenging to identify responsible genes. We have used zebrafish to identify a genetically complex, recessive mutant that shows risk factors for glaucoma including adult onset severe myopia, elevated IOP, and progressive retinal ganglion cell pathology. Positional cloning and analysis of a non-complementing allele indicated that non-sense mutations in low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (lrp2) underlie the mutant phenotype. Lrp2, previously named Megalin, functions as an endocytic receptor for a wide-variety of bioactive molecules including Sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenic protein 4, retinol-binding protein, vitamin D-binding protein, and apolipoprotein E, among others. Detailed phenotype analyses indicated that as lrp2 mutant fish age, many individuals--but not all--develop high IOP and severe myopia with obviously enlarged eye globes. This results in retinal stretch and prolonged stress to retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately show signs of pathogenesis. Our studies implicate altered Lrp2-mediated homeostasis as important for myopia and other risk factors for glaucoma in humans and establish a new genetic model for further study of phenotypes associated with this disease.

  9. Maturity of judgement in decision making for predictive testing for nontreatable adult-onset neurogenetic conditions: a case against predictive testing of minors.

    PubMed

    Richards, F H

    2006-11-01

    International guidelines developed to minimize harm from predictive testing for adult-onset, nontreatable neurogenetic conditions such as Huntington disease (HD) state that such testing should not be available to minors. Some authors have proposed that predictive testing for these conditions should be available to minors at the request of parents and/or of younger adolescents themselves. They highlight the lack of empirical evidence that predictive testing of minors causes harm and suggest that refusing to test minors may be detrimental. The current study focuses on the context of predictive test requests by adolescents younger than 18 years, and presents arguments and evidence that the risk of potential harm from testing such young people is sufficiently high to justify continued caution in this area. A study based on a model of psychosocial maturity found that the 3 factors involved in maturity of judgement in decision making - responsibility, temperance and perspective - continue to develop into late adolescence. There is also evidence that the prefrontal areas of the brain, which are involved in executive functions such as decision making, are not fully developed until early adulthood. Combined with evidence of adverse long-term effects, from research with adults who have undergone predictive testing, these findings constitute grounds for retaining a minimum age of 18 years for predictive testing for nontreatable conditions. Further research on assessment of maturity will assist with reaching a consensus on this issue.

  10. Molecular basis of adult-onset and chronic G sub M2 gangliosidoses in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin: Substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the. alpha. -subunit of. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Paw, B.H.; Kaback, M.M.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Chronic and adult-onset G{sub M2} gangliosidoses are neurological disorders caused by marked deficiency of the A isoenzyme of {beta}-hexosaminidase; they occur in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, though less frequently than classic (infantile) Tay-Sachs disease. Earlier biosynthetic studies had identified a defective {alpha}-subunit that failed to associate with the {beta}-subunit. The authors have now found a guanosine to adenosine transition at the 3{prime} end of exon 7, which causes substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the {alpha}-subunit. An RNase protection assay was used to localize the mutation to a segment of mRNA from fibroblasts of a patient with the adult-onset disorder. That segment of mRNA (after reverse transcription) and a corresponding segment of genomic DNA were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The sequence analysis, together with an assay based on the loss of a ScrFI restriction site, showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote who had inherited the 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation from his father and an allelic null mutation from his mother. The 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation, in compound heterozygosity with a presumed null allele, was also found in fetal fibroblasts with an association-defective phenotype and in cells from five patients with chronic G{sub M2} gangliosidosis.

  11. Changing Paradigms in Detection of Dysplasia and Management of Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Is Colectomy Still Necessary?

    PubMed

    Velayos, Fernando; Kathpalia, Priya; Finlayson, Emily

    2017-02-01

    This review chronicles the evolution of dysplasia detection and management in inflammatory bowel disease since 1925, the year the first case report of colitis-related colorectal cancer was published. We conclude that colorectal cancer prevention and dysplasia management for patients with inflammatory bowel disease has changed since this first case report, from somewhat hopeless to hopeful.

  12. Wiki-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma: A New Paradigm in Sarcoma Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, S. J.; Thomas, D.; Desai, J.; Vuletich, C.; von Dincklage, J.; Olver, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Australia introduced Wiki-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adult Onset Sarcoma. These guidelines utilized a customized MediaWiki software application for guideline development and are the first evidence-based guidelines for clinical management of sarcoma. This paper presents our experience with developing and implementing web-based interactive guidelines and reviews some of the challenges and lessons from adopting an evidence-based (rather than consensus-based) approach to clinical sarcoma guidelines. Digital guidelines can be easily updated with new evidence, continuously reviewed and widely disseminated. They provide an accessible method of enabling clinicians and consumers to access evidence-based clinical practice recommendations and, as evidenced by over 2000 views in the first four months after release, with 49% of those visits being from countries outside of Australia. The lessons learned have relevance to other rare cancers in addition to the international sarcoma community. PMID:25784832

  13. A Case of Adult-Onset Acute Rheumatic Fever With Long-Lasting Atrioventricular Block Requiring Permanent Pacemaker Implantation.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yusuke; Watanabe, Hiroaki; Nishimura, Yoshioki; Ueno, Shuichi; Nagashima, Takao; Imai, Yasushi; Shimpo, Masahisa; Kario, Kazuomi

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old hypertensive Japanese woman presented with epigastric pain on inspiration, fever, complete atrioventricular block and polyarthritis. Her antistreptolysin O levels were markedly elevated. A diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made according to the modified Jones criteria. She was prescribed loxoprofen sodium, which was partially effective for her extracardiac clinical symptoms. However, she had syncope due to complete atrioventricular block with asystole longer than 10 seconds. Consequently, we implanted a permanent pacemaker. Although we prescribed prednisolone, the efficacy of which was limited for the patient's conduction disturbance, the complete atrioventricular block persisted. In our systematic review of 12 similar cases, the duration of complete heart block was always transient and there was no case requiring a permanent pacemaker. We thus encountered a very rare case of adult-onset acute rheumatic fever with persistent complete atrioventricular block necessitating permanent pacemaker implantation.

  14. Simultaneous POMC Gene Transfer to Hypothalamus and Brainstem Increases Physical Activity, Lipolysis and Reduces Adult-Onset Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Rodrigues, Enda; Li, Gang; Gao, Yongxin; King, Michael; Carter, Christy S.; Tumer, Nihal; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Scarpace, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are identified in two brain sites, the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in brainstem. Earlier pharmacological and POMC gene transfer studies demonstrate melanocortin activation in either site alone improves insulin sensitivity and reduces obesity. The present study, for the first time, investigated the long-term efficacy of POMC gene transfer concurrently into both sites in the regulation of energy metabolism in aged F344xBN rats bearing adult-onset obesity. Pair feeding was included to reveal food-independent POMC impact on energy expenditure. We introduced adeno-associated virus encoding either POMC or green fluorescence protein to the two brain areas in 22-month-old rats, then recorded food intake and body weight, assessed oxygen consumption, serum leptin, insulin and glucose, tested voluntary wheel running, analyzed POMC expression, and examined fat metabolism in brown and white adipose tissues. POMC mRNA was significantly increased in both the hypothalamus and NTS region at termination. Relative to pair feeding, POMC caused sustained weight reduction and additional fat loss, lowered fasting insulin and glucose, and augmented white fat hormone-sensitive lipase activity and brown fat uncoupling protein 1 level. By wheel running assessment, the POMC-animals ran twice the distance as the control or pair-fed rats. Thus, the dual-site POMC treatment ameliorated adult-onset obesity effectively, involving a moderate hypophagia lasting ~ 60 days, enhanced lipolysis and thermogenesis, and increased physical activity in the form of voluntary wheel running. The latter finding provides a clue for countering age-related decline in physical activity. PMID:21366729

  15. Snippets From the Past: Cohort Analysis of Disease Rates—Another Piece in a Seemingly Still Incomplete Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    For almost a century, epidemiologists have stratified age-specific disease rates by year of birth to better understand the distribution of a disease in a population and its evolution across time. In the present article, I review the contributions of John Brownlee, Kristian Feyer Andvord, and Wade Hampton Frost and, to accentuate the similarities of their approaches, redraw their original graphs of age-specific death rates of tuberculosis organized either by year of death or year of birth. In addition, this article reports on an apparently universally forgotten publication in the American Journal of Hygiene published in 1929, which both upsets the conventional history of the earliest reports of disease rates stratified by birth cohorts and challenges the theory that Frost discovered cohort analysis independently and gave it its name. PMID:24920785

  16. Tetanus is still a deadly disease: a report of six tetanus cases and reminder of our knowledge.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Mehmet; Celik, Erkan Cem; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Karakaya, Muhammet Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    We analysed the data in the medical records of six patients admitted for tetanus in the intensive care unit (ICU) of the anaesthesia department in the Medical Faculty of Ataturk University from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012. All patients received the generalized form of treatment for tetanus in the ICU. The average age of the patients was 65.33 ± 13.45 years. Treatment modalities were administered to the patients in accordance with the literature. Four patients died despite all therapeutic interventions and two patients were discharged uneventfully. All those who died had chronic disease and infected wounds on their head, but only one patient had an infected wound on his leg. The surviving patients had no chronic illnesses but did have injuries on their legs. The presence of chronic disease increases tetanus-related mortality. More information about the disease must be made available in order to make it preventable with regular vaccinations.

  17. Clinical and genetic characterization of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia associated with CSF1R mutation.

    PubMed

    Konno, T; Yoshida, K; Mizuno, T; Kawarai, T; Tada, M; Nozaki, H; Ikeda, S-I; Nishizawa, M; Onodera, O; Wszolek, Z K; Ikeuchi, T

    2017-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) related adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) have been only partially elucidated. Clinical data from CSF1R mutation carriers who had been seen at our institutions or reported elsewhere were collected and analysed using a specific investigation sheet to standardize the data. In all, 122 cases from 90 families with CSF1R mutations were identified. The mean age of onset was 43 years (range 18-78 years), the mean age at death was 53 years (range 23-84 years) and the mean disease duration was 6.8 years (range 1-29 years). Women had a significantly younger age of onset than men (40 vs. 47 years, P = 0.0006, 95% confidence interval 3.158-11.177). There was an age-dependent penetrance that was significantly different between the sexes (P = 0.0013). Motor dysfunctions were the most frequent initial symptom in women whose diseases began in their 20s. Thinning of the corpus callosum, abnormal signalling in pyramidal tracts, diffusion-restricted lesions and calcifications in the white matter were characteristic imaging findings of ALSP. The calcifications were more frequently reported in our case series than in the literature (54% vs. 3%). Seventy-nine per cent of the mutations were located in the distal part of the tyrosine kinase domain of CSF1R (102 cases). There were no apparent phenotype-genotype correlations. The characteristics of ALSP were clarified. The phenotype of ALSP caused by CSF1R mutations is affected by sex. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Neurology.

  18. Juvenile- and adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study in a large cohort from the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Lupus Registry (RELESSER).

    PubMed

    Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Salman Monte, Tarek Carlos; Rúa-Figueroa, Iñigo; Sánchez-Alonso, Fernando; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Galindo-Izquierdo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; Olivé-Marqués, Alejandro; Ibañez-Ruán, Jesús; Horcada, Loreto; Sánchez-Atrio, Ana; Montilla, Carlos; Melero González, Rafael Benito; Díez-Álvarez, Elvira; Martinez-Taboada, Victor; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández-Berrizbeitia, Olaia; Hernández-Beriain, José Ángel; Gantes, Marian; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Pecondón-Español, Ángela; Marras, Carlos; Bonilla, Gema; Pego-Reigosa, José M

    2017-06-12

    We aimed to describe juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (jSLE) features and to establish its differences compared to adult-onset SLE (aSLE) from a large national database. Data from patients (≥4 ACR criteria) included in Spanish Society of Rheumatology Lupus Registry (RELESSER) were analysed. Sociodemographic, clinical, serological, activity, treatment, cumulative damage, comorbidities and severity data were collected. Patients with disease onset <18 years were described and compared to those with disease onset ≥18 years. We reviewed 3,428 aSLE patients (89.6% women) and 484 jSLE patients (89.8% girls), 93% Caucasian (both groups). Mean age at diagnosis was 38.1±14 and 16.6±6.3 years (p<0.001) and mean age at the end of follow-up was 48.8±14.3 and 31.5±30 years (p<0.001), respectively. jSLE showed significantly more clinical (including lymphadenopathy, fever, malar rash, mucosal ulcers, pericarditis, pleuritis, Raynaud's phenomenon, lupus nephritis, recurrent nephritis, histologic nephritis changes, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, seizures, lupus headache and organic brain syndrome) and immunological (a-dsDNA and a-Sm antibodies, hypocomplementaemia) involvement than did aSLE, except for secondary Sjögren's syndrome, a-Ro antibodies, fibromyalgia and osteoporosis. jSLE also showed more SLE family history, longer diagnosis delay, higher SLEDAI and Katz scores, but lower Charlson scores than aSLE. Several specific domains were more frequently involved in SLICC/ACR DI in jSLE. jSLE patients more frequently underwent all SLE-related treatment and procedures, as well as dialysis and kidney transplantations. jSLE shares many clinical and serological features with aSLE. However, jSLE patients typically manifested more activity, severity, cumulative damage in certain areas, than their aSLE counterparts.

  19. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia of adult onset due to STUB1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Depondt, Chantal; Donatello, Simona; Simonis, Nicolas; Rai, Myriam; van Heurck, Roxane; Abramowicz, Marc; D'Hooghe, Marc; Pandolfo, Massimo

    2014-05-13

    Autosomal recessive ataxias affect about 1 person in 20,000. Friedreich ataxia accounts for one-third of the cases in Caucasians; the others are due to a growing list of very rare molecular defects, including mild forms of metabolic diseases. In nearly 50%, the genetic cause remains undetermined.

  20. Yellow fever live attenuated vaccine: A very successful live attenuated vaccine but still we have problems controlling the disease.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Alan D T

    2017-10-20

    Yellow fever (YF) is regarded as the original hemorrhagic fever and has been a major public health problem for at least 250years. A very effective live attenuated vaccine, strain 17D, was developed in the 1930s and this has proved critical in the control of the disease. There is little doubt that without the vaccine, YF virus would be considered a biosafety level 4 pathogen. Significantly, YF is currently the only disease where an international vaccination certificate is required under the International Health Regulations. Despite having a very successful vaccine, there are occasional issues of supply and demand, such as that which occurred in Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo in 2016 when there was insufficient vaccine available. For the first time fractional dosing of the vaccine was approved on an emergency basis. Thus, continued vigilance and improvements in supply and demand are needed in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Novel Bi-allelic Splice Mutations in CARD9 Causing Adult-onset Candida Endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Gavino, Christina; Mellinghoff, Sibylle; Cornely, Oliver A; Landekic, Marija; Le, Catherine; Langelier, Melanie; Golizeh, Makan; Proske, Susanna; Vinh, Donald C

    2017-10-06

    CARD9 deficiency (CANDF2; OMIM# 212050) is an autosomal-recessive monogenic inborn error of immunity conferring susceptibility to invasive fungal diseases, including the very distinct syndrome of spontaneous central nervous system candidiasis, in which opportunistic yeasts of the genus Candida infect the central nervous system (either brain parenchyma and/or meninges) in the absence of trauma, chemotherapy or underlying systemic disease. We present a patient with spontaneous endophthalmitis of the right eye due to Candida albicans; further investigations revealed concomitant cerebral abscess. She had a history of left endophthalmitis due to the dematiaceous mold, Aureobasidium pullulans, fifteen years earlier. Targeted sequencing of the CARD9 gene revealed two novel variants (c.184G>A and c.288C>T). Analysis in silico predicted each variant altered splicing, which was confirmed by sequencing of cDNA from proband and carrier offsprings: c.184G>A results in a 4-base pair frameshift deletion with loss of allelic expression; c.288C>T results in an in-frame 36-bp pair deletion with detectable protein. CARD9 deficiency can present with a phenotype of spontaneous candidal endophthalmitis. We report two novel mutations in CARD9, both affecting splicing, expanding the range of morbid variants causing CARD9 deficiency, emphasizing the importance of both genomic and cDNA sequencing for this condition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  3. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary "myopathic" changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions.

  4. Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.

    PubMed

    Newell, Diane G; Koopmans, Marion; Verhoef, Linda; Duizer, Erwin; Aidara-Kane, Awa; Sprong, Hein; Opsteegh, Marieke; Langelaar, Merel; Threfall, John; Scheutz, Flemming; van der Giessen, Joke; Kruse, Hilde

    2010-05-30

    The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease, mainly due to contaminated food and water, as a cause of death will decline worldwide. Evidence for such a downward trend is limited. This prediction presumes that improvements in the production and retail of microbiologically safe food will be sustained in the developed world and, moreover, will be rolled out to those countries of the developing world increasingly producing food for a global market. In this review evidence is presented to indicate that the microbiological safety of food remains a dynamic situation heavily influenced by multiple factors along the food chain from farm to fork. Sustaining food safety standards will depend on constant vigilance maintained by monitoring and surveillance but, with the rising importance of other food-related issues, such as food security, obesity and climate change, competition for resources in the future to enable this may be fierce. In addition the pathogen populations relevant to food safety are not static. Food is an excellent vehicle by which many pathogens (bacteria, viruses/prions and parasites) can reach an appropriate colonisation site in a new host. Although food production practices change, the well-recognised food-borne pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli, seem able to evolve to exploit novel opportunities, for example fresh produce, and even generate new public health challenges, for example antimicrobial resistance. In addition, previously unknown food-borne pathogens, many of which are zoonotic, are constantly emerging. Current understanding of the trends in food-borne diseases for bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens has been reviewed. The bacterial pathogens are exemplified by those well

  5. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and herpes simplex virus type 2 are possible risk factors for adult-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (prospective case-control study).

    PubMed

    Formánek, M; Jančatová, D; Komínek, P; Matoušek, P; Zeleník, K

    2017-06-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP). Although HPV prevalence is high, the incidence of papillomatosis is low. Thus, factors other than HPV infection probably contribute to RRP. This study investigated whether patients with papillomatosis are more often infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 and chlamydia trachomatis (ChT) and whether laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs in this group of patients more often. Prospective case-control study. Department of Otorhinolaryngology of University Hospital. The study included 20 patients with adult-onset RRP and 20 adult patients with vocal cord cyst and no pathology of laryngeal mucosa (control group). Immunohistochemical analysis of pepsin, HPV, herpes simplex virus type 2 and ChT was performed in biopsy specimens of laryngeal papillomas and of healthy laryngeal mucosa (control group) obtained from medial part of removed vocal cord cyst during microlaryngoscopy procedures. Pathologic LPR (pepsin in tissue) was diagnosed in 8/20 (40.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .003). Herpes simplex virus type 2 was present in 9/20 (45.0%) patients with papillomatosis and in 0/20 control patients (P = .001). Five specimens were positive for both pepsin and herpes simplex virus type 2. No samples were positive for ChT. There were no significant differences between groups for age, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and gastrooesophageal reflux disease. Tobacco exposure was not more frequent in RRP group either (P = .01). Results show that LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 are significantly more often present in patients with RRP. LPR and herpes simplex virus type 2 might activate latent HPV infection and thereby be possible risk factors for RRP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sex-specific associations of low birth weight with adult-onset diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Mueller, Noel T; Duncan, Bruce B; Chor, Dóra; Bensenor, Isabela M; Griep, Rosane H; Appel, Lawrence J; Barreto, Sandhi M; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests sex differences in the early origins of adult metabolic disease, but this has been little investigated in developing countries. We investigated sex-specific associations between low birth weight (LBW; <2.5 kg) and adult-onset diabetes in 12,525 participants from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Diabetes was defined by self-reported information and laboratory measurements. In confounder-adjusted analyses, LBW (vs. 2.5–4 kg) was associated with higher prevalence of diabetes in women (Prevalence Ratio (PR) 1.54, 95% CI: 1.32–1.79), not in men (PR 1.06, 95% CI: 0.91–1.25; Pheterogeneity = 0.003). The association was stronger among participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.60, 95% CI: 1.35–1.91), than those without (PR 1.15, 95% CI: 0.99–1.32; Pheterogeneity = 0.03). When jointly stratified by sex and maternal diabetes, the association was observed for women with (PR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.37–2.29) and without (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.20–1.75) maternal diabetes. In contrast, in men, LBW was associated with diabetes in participants with maternal diabetes (PR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.83), but not in those without (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.74–1.14). These sex-specific findings extended to continuous measures of glucose homeostasis. LBW was associated with higher diabetes prevalence in Brazilian women, and in men with maternal diabetes, suggesting sex-specific intrauterine effects on adult metabolic health. PMID:27845438

  7. Bacterial coinfections in dengue virus disease: what we know and what is still obscure about an emerging concern.

    PubMed

    Trunfio, Mattia; Savoldi, Alessia; Viganò, Ottavia; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus is the most frequent arthropod-borne viral infection worldwide. Simultaneously to the growth of its incidence, cases of bacterial coinfection in dengue have been increasingly reported. The clinical course of dual infections may worsen for reciprocal interactions and delays in the diagnosis, so that clinicians should be aware of this eventuality. Therefore, we reviewed literature to provide an overview of the epidemiological, clinical, and physiopathological issues related to bacterial coinfections and bacteremia in dengue. Clinical studies and case reports regarding bacteremia and bacterial coinfections in dengue and the interactions between the pathogens published on PubMed were reviewed. We found 26 case reports, only 3 studies on concurrent bacteremia and 12 studies reporting data on bacterial coinfections in dengue. According to the three available studies, the 0.18-7 % of dengue infections are accompanied by concurrent bacteremia, while the 14.3-44.4 % of dengue-related deaths seem associated to bacterial coinfections. Comorbidities, advanced age, and more severe dengue manifestations could be risk factors for dual infections. A longer duration of fever and alterations in laboratory parameters such as procalcitonin, hyponatremia, leukocyte count, and renal function tests can raise the suspicion. Despite the real burden and consequences of this emerging concern is still not computable accurately due to the lack of a significant number of studies on large cohorts, clinicians need a greater awareness about it to early recognize warning signs, to properly use available diagnostic tools and to readily start antibiotic treatment able to prevent worsening in mortality and morbidity.

  8. Comprehensive Audiometric Analysis of Hearing Impairment and Tinnitus After Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Survivors of Adult-Onset Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frisina, Robert D.; Wheeler, Heather E.; Fossa, Sophie D.; Kerns, Sarah L.; Fung, Chunkit; Sesso, Howard D.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Feldman, Darren R.; Hamilton, Robert; Vaughn, David J.; Beard, Clair J.; Budnick, Amy; Johnson, Eileen M.; Ardeshir-Rouhani-Fard, Shirin; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Travis, Lois B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cisplatin is widely used but highly ototoxic. Effects of cumulative cisplatin dose on hearing loss have not been comprehensively evaluated in survivors of adult-onset cancer. Patients and Methods Comprehensive audiological measures were conducted on 488 North American male germ cell tumor (GCT) survivors in relation to cumulative cisplatin dose, including audiograms (0.25 to 12 kHz), tests of middle ear function, and tinnitus. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association criteria defined hearing loss severity. The geometric mean of hearing thresholds (0.25 to 12 kHz) summarized overall hearing status consistent with audiometric guidelines. Patients were sorted into quartiles of hearing thresholds of age- and sex-matched controls. Results Increasing cumulative cisplatin dose (median, 400 mg/m2; range, 200 to 800 mg/m2) was significantly related to hearing loss at 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 kHz (P trends, .021 to < .001): every 100 mg/m2 increase resulted in a 3.2-dB impairment in age-adjusted overall hearing threshold (4 to 12 kHz; P < .001). Cumulative cisplatin doses > 300 mg/m2 were associated with greater American Speech-Language-Hearing Association–defined hearing loss severity (odds ratio, 1.59; P = .0066) and worse normative-matched quartiles (odds ratio, 1.33; P = .093) compared with smaller doses. Almost one in five (18%) patients had severe to profound hearing loss. Tinnitus (40% patients) was significantly correlated with reduced hearing at each frequency (P < .001). Noise-induced damage (10% patients) was unaffected by cisplatin dose (P = .59). Hypertension was significantly related (P = .0066) to overall hearing threshold (4 to 12 kHz) in age- and cisplatin dose–adjusted analyses. Middle ear deficits occurred in 22.3% of patients but, as expected, were not related to cytotoxic drug dosage. Conclusion Follow-up of adult-onset cancer survivors given cisplatin should include routine inquiry for hearing status and tinnitus, referral to audiologists

  9. Adult-onset demyelinating neuropathy associated with FBLN5 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Si; Lv, He; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei; Yuan, Yun

    2017-03-23

    Rare forms of autosomal-dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (AD-CMT) may be associated with mutations in Fibulin-5 (FBLN5) as AD-CMT is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we report the first pathological study of an Asian family. The proband was a 46-year-old man with slowly progressive distal numbness and weakness for 12 years. He had a history of diabetes mellitus for 12 years. His mother was 81 years old and had mild polyneuropathy. His 16-year-old daughter was asymptomatic. The nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) and compound muscular action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were moderately to severely reduced in the proband, and moderately reduced in his daughter and mother. A sensory response could not be elicited in the proband and was moderately to severely decreased in the daughter and mother. Nerve ultrasound indicated a general enlargement of the peripheral nerves in the proband, daughter, and mother. A sural nerve biopsy from the proband demonstrated a pronounced depletion of myelinated fibers, thin myelinated fibers, and onion-bulb formations. A reported heterozygous mutation of c.1117C>T in FBLN5 was identified in the proband, mother, and daughter. These findings confirm a novel subtype of AD-CMT 1 due to a mutation in the FBLN5 gene.
.

  10. Compensatory stepping in Parkinson's disease is still a problem after deep brain stimulation randomized to STN or GPi

    PubMed Central

    St George, R. J.; Carlson-Kuhta, P.; King, L. A.; Burchiel, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on balance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not well established. This study examined whether DBS randomized to the subthalamic nucleus (STN; n = 11) or globus pallidus interna (GPi; n = 10) improved compensatory stepping to recover balance after a perturbation. The standing surface translated backward, forcing subjects to take compensatory steps forward. Kinematic and kinetic responses were recorded. PD-DBS subjects were tested off and on their levodopa medication before bilateral DBS surgery and retested 6 mo later off and on DBS, combined with off and on levodopa medication. Responses were compared with PD-control subjects (n = 8) tested over the same timescale and 17 healthy control subjects. Neither DBS nor levodopa improved the stepping response. Compensatory stepping in the best-treated state after surgery (DBS+DOPA) was similar to the best-treated state before surgery (DOPA) for the PD-GPi group and the PD-control group. For the PD-STN group, there were more lateral weight shifts, a delayed foot-off, and a greater number of steps required to recover balance in DBS+DOPA after surgery compared with DOPA before surgery. Within the STN group five subjects who did not fall during the experiment before surgery fell at least once after surgery, whereas the number of falls in the GPi and PD-control groups were unchanged. DBS did not improve the compensatory step response needed to recover from balance perturbations in the GPi group and caused delays in the preparation phase of the step in the STN group. PMID:26108960

  11. Adult-onset multiple acyl CoA dehydrogenation deficiency associated with an abnormal isoenzyme pattern of serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Fuminobu; Baba, Kousuke; Toyooka, Keiko; Liang, Wen-Chen; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamadera, Misaki; Sumi, Hisae; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old male with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). The patient had suffered from exercise intolerance in his hip and thigh muscles for one year. Then, restriction of carbohydrates for a diet made his symptoms rapidly deteriorate. Blood test revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel missense mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase gene (ETFDH), and an abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern: LDH-1 (60.0%) and LDH-2 (26.0%) predominated with abnormally elevated LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (2.3), compared with muscle-derived LDH-5 (4.0%). Oral riboflavin treatment significantly improved his exercise intolerance and the LDH profile: LDH-1 (34.4%), LDH-2 (34.9%), LDH-5 (6.9%) and LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (1.0). The abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern may be one feature of adult-onset MADD selectively affecting type I muscle fibers with relatively high LDH-1 content. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adult-onset acute leukemia and employment in the meat industry: a New Zealand case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bethwaite, P; McLean, D; Kennedy, J; Pearce, N

    2001-09-01

    To assess the risks for adult-onset acute leukemia associated with employment in the New Zealand meat industry. A total of 110 incident leukemia cases identified from referrals to one of six treatment centers between 1989 and 1991 were compared with 199 general population controls. Detailed occupational exposure histories were obtained by interview. There was an elevated risk associated with ever having worked in an abattoir (OR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.2), which appeared confined to those with over 2 years exposure (OR = 4.9, 95% CI 1.5-15.6). The excess risk was confined to abattoir workers having direct contact with animals or animal products (OR = 5.2 95% CI 1.2-22.2). Ever having worked as a butcher was associated with elevated risk (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.1-7.2), confined to those individuals who worked as a butcher in an abattoir (OR = 4.8) or who butchered livestock on farms (OR = 8.2). No increased risk was found for work as a retail/wholesale butcher or meatpacker (OR = 1.2). This study found increased leukemia risks associated with employment in the meat industry. These were confined to abattoir workers with over 2 years employment in the industry, and to persons whose jobs involved contact with animals or animal tissue, implying that biological exposures may be responsible.

  13. Rituximab Treatment for PR3-ANCA-Positive Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis Associated with Adult-Onset Periodic Fever Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hamano, Yoshitomo; Yoshizawa, Hiromichi; Sugase, Taro; Miki, Takuya; Ohtani, Naoko; Hanawa, Shiho; Takeshima, Eri; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Osamu; Takemoto, Fumi; Muto, Shigeaki; Yumura, Wako; Kusano, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old Japanese woman with nephrotic syndrome due to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) Type I diagnosed after a 5-year history of periodic fever syndrome (PFS). Hypocomplementemia and elevation of anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (PR3-ANCA) were observed. HIV, and hepatitis B and C serology were negative. Nephrotic syndrome and periodic fever did not respond to oral steroid and intravenous steroid pulse therapies combined with cyclosporine, dipyridamole, warfarin and losartan. We tried immunotherapy using rituximab, a human-mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen on mature B cells. This therapeutic approach led to improvement of renal function and remission of nephrotic syndrome and hypocomplementemia. However, it did not have a beneficial effect on periodic fever. Suspecting adult-onset hereditary PFS, we analyzed her genetic alteration of MEFV and TNFRSF1A genes. A rare genotype in intron 6 of TNFRSF1A was revealed. The etiological relationship between periodic fever and MPGN is discussed. Rituximab is a hopeful choice of induction therapy for refractory MPGN. PMID:23197963

  14. Adult-onset type 1 diabetes patients display decreased IGRP-specific Tr1 cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Chujo, Daisuke; Nguyen, Thien-Son; Foucat, Emile; Blankenship, Derek; Banchereau, Jacques; Nepom, Gerald T; Chaussabel, Damien; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    The breakdown of immune tolerance against islet antigens causes type 1 diabetes (T1D). The antigens associated with adult-onset T1D (AT1D) remain largely undefined. It is possible that AT1D patients display a unique type of CD4(+) T cells specific for a certain islet antigen. Here we analyzed the cytokine production profiles of CD4(+) helper T (Th) cells that are specific for three islet antigens; GAD65, preproinsulin, and IGRP in patients with AT1D, juvenile-onset T1D (JT1D), and age-, gender- and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched control adults. While IGRP-specific Th cells in AT1D patients were dominantly Th1 cells, IGRP-specific Th cells in control adults and JT1D patients were dominantly Th2 and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Notably, the frequency of IGRP-specific Tr1 cells was significantly lower in AT1D patients than in control adults and JT1D patients. In conclusion, our study suggests that IGRP-specific Th cells play a unique pathogenic role in AT1D.

  15. Adult-onset presentation of a hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria patient without prior history of neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Kamer; Louie, Kristal T; Qu, Yong; Velasquez, Jorge; Zaldivar, Frank; Rioseco-Camacho, Natalia; Camacho, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway caused by mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, ORNT1 (SLC25A15). In general, the majority of patients with HHH syndrome come to medical attention during infancy or early school years with symptoms such as learning disabilities, changes in cognitive development, spasticity, or liver dysfunction. In this report, we describe a 35-year-old male of Indian descent who was diagnosed with HHH syndrome after he presented to the emergency room with gastroenteritis, disorientation, and slurred speech. Molecular analysis revealed that this patient was heterozygous for two ORNT1 mutations, p.[Gly220Arg(+)Arg275X] (c.[658G>A(+)823C>T]) that had been previously reported in homozygous probands who presented during the first year of life. Cellular studies revealed that the ORNT1 p.Gly220Arg mutation was nonfunctional but targeted to the mitochondria. Given that this patient was a successful college graduate on a vegetarian diet without a prior history of learning or neurological impairment, additional factors such as gene redundancy, environmental, and epigenetic factors may have contributed to the delay in onset of presentation and lack of any previous symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an adult-onset HHH syndrome presentation without a prior history of neurological or cognitive deficiency.

  16. A longitudinal study of a family with adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy: Clinical, autonomic and neuropsychological findings.

    PubMed

    Terlizzi, Rossana; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Zanigni, Stefano; Barletta, Giorgio; Capellari, Sabina; Guaraldi, Pietro; Donadio, Vincenzo; Cason, Ernesto; Contin, Manuela; Poda, Roberto; Tonon, Caterina; Sambati, Luisa; Gallassi, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Lodi, Raffaele; Cortelli, Pietro

    2016-02-01

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a rare progressive neurological disorder caused by Lamin B1 duplication (LMNB1). Our aim was to investigate longitudinally the pattern of the autonomic dysfunction and the degree of neuropsychological involvement. Three related ADLD patients and one asymptomatic carrier of LMNB1 duplication underwent a standardized evaluation of autonomic nervous system, including cardiovascular reflexes, pharmacological testing, microneurography, skin biopsy, Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and a complete neuropsychological battery. An early neurogenic orthostatic hypotension was detected in all patients and confirmed by a low rise in noradrenaline levels on Tilt Test. However infusion of noradrenaline resulted in normal blood pressure rise as well as the infusion of clonidine. At the insulin tolerance test the increase in adrenaline resulted pathological in two out three patients. Microneurography failed to detect muscle sympathetic nerve activity bursts. Skin biopsy revealed a poor adrenergic innervation, while cardiac sympathetic nerves were normal. None of ADLD patients showed a global cognitive deficit but a selective impairment in the executive functions. Autonomic disorder in ADLD involves selectively the postganglionic sympathetic system including the sympatho-adrenal response. Cognitive involvement consisting in an early impairment of executive tasks that might precede brain MR abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: clinical clues to a potentially treatable cause of adult-onset hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Lossos, Alexander; Teltsh, Omri; Milman, Tsipi; Meiner, Vardiella; Rozen, Rima; Leclerc, Daniel; Schwahn, Bernd C; Karp, Natalya; Rosenblatt, David S; Watkins, David; Shaag, Avraham; Korman, Stanley H; Heyman, Samuel N; Gal, Aya; Newman, J P; Steiner-Birmanns, Bettina; Abramsky, Oded; Kohn, Yoav

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is a highly heterogeneous group of neurogenetic disorders with pure and complicated clinical phenotypes. No treatment is available for these disorders. We identified 2 unrelated families, each with 2 siblings with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency manifesting a complicated form of adult-onset hereditary spastic paraparesis partially responsive to betaine therapy. Both pairs of siblings presented with a similar combination of progressive spastic paraparesis and polyneuropathy, variably associated with behavioral changes, cognitive impairment, psychosis, seizures, and leukoencephalopathy, beginning between the ages of 29 and 50 years. By the time of diagnosis a decade later, 3 patients were ambulatory and 1 was bedridden. Investigations have revealed severe hyperhomocysteinemia and hypomethioninemia, reduced fibroblast MTHFR enzymatic activity (18%-52% of control participants), and 3 novel pathogenic MTHFR mutations, 2 as compound heterozygotes in one family and 1 as a homozygous mutation in the other family. Treatment with betaine produced a rapid decline of homocysteine by 50% to 70% in all 4 patients and, over 9 to 15 years, improved the conditions of the 3 ambulatory patients. Although severe MTHFR deficiency is a rare cause of complicated spastic paraparesis in adults, it should be considered in select patients because of the potential therapeutic benefit of betaine supplementation.

  18. Molecular basis of adult-onset and chronic GM2 gangliosidoses in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin: substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase.

    PubMed Central

    Paw, B H; Kaback, M M; Neufeld, E F

    1989-01-01

    Chronic and adult-onset GM2 gangliosidoses are neurological disorders caused by marked deficiency of the A isoenzyme of beta-hexosaminidase; they occur in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, though less frequently than classic (infantile) Tay-Sachs disease. Earlier biosynthetic studies had identified a defective alpha-subunit that failed to associate with the beta-subunit. We have now found a guanosine to adenosine transition at the 3' end of exon 7, which causes substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the alpha-subunit [designated 269 (Gly----Ser) substitution]. An RNase protection assay was used to localize the mutation to a segment of mRNA from fibroblasts of a patient with the adult-onset disorder. That segment of mRNA (after reverse transcription) and a corresponding segment of genomic DNA were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The sequence analysis, together with an assay based on the loss of a ScrFI restriction site, showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote who had inherited the 269 (Gly----Ser) mutation from his father and an allelic null mutation from his mother. The 269 (Gly----Ser) mutation, in compound heterozygosity with a presumed null allele, was also found in fetal fibroblasts with an association-defective phenotype and in cells from five patients with chronic GM2 gangliosidosis. It was not found in beta-hexosaminidase A-deficient cells obtained from patients with infantile Tay-Sachs disease nor in cells from individuals who do not have beta-hexosaminidase A deficiency. However, there must be additional mutations with similar consequences, since the 269 (Gly----Ser) substitution was not present in fibroblasts from two patients with juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis even though these had an association-defective alpha-subunit. Images PMID:2522660

  19. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP).

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F; Stanley, E Richard

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/- and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/- mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/- mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/- mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches. Furthermore

  20. Phenotypic characterization of a Csf1r haploinsufficient mouse model of adult-onset leukodystrophy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP)

    PubMed Central

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Gulinello, Maria; Branch, Craig A.; Patil, Madhuvati; Basu, Ranu; Stoddart, Corrina; Mehler, Mark F.; Stanley, E. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) that abrogate the expression of the affected allele or lead to the expression of mutant receptor chains devoid of kinase activity have been identified in both familial and sporadic cases of ALSP. To determine the validity of the Csf1r heterozygous mouse as a model of adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) we performed behavioral, radiologic, histopathologic, ultrastructural and cytokine expression studies of young and old Csf1r+/− and control Csf1r+/+ mice. Six to 8-month old Csf1r+/− mice exhibit cognitive deficits, and by 9-11 months develop sensorimotor deficits and in male mice, depression and anxiety-like behavior. MRIs of one year-old Csf1r+/− mice reveal lateral ventricle enlargement and thinning of the corpus callosum. Ultrastructural analysis of the corpus callosum uncovers dysmyelinated axons as well as neurodegeneration, evidenced by the presence of axonal spheroids. Histopathological examination of 11-week-old mice reveals increased axonal and myelin staining in the cortex, increase of neuronal cell density in layer V and increase of microglial cell densities throughout the brain, suggesting that early developmental changes contribute to disease. By 10-months of age, the neuronal cell density normalizes, oligodendrocyte precursor cells increase in layers II-III and V and microglial densities remain elevated without an increase in astrocytes. Also, the age-dependent increase in CSF-1R+ neurons in cortical layer V is reduced. Moreover, the expression of Csf2, Csf3, Il27 and Il6 family cytokines is increased, consistent with microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate that the inactivation of one Csf1r allele is sufficient to cause an ALSP-like disease in mice. The Csf1r+/− mouse is a model of ALSP that will allow the critical events for disease development to be determined and permit rapid evaluation of therapeutic approaches

  1. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old white man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison’s disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities, and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss, and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of multiple system atrophy. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be

  2. Adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy presenting as multiple system atrophy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Kotaro; Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Lin, Wenlang; Suzuki, Kinuko; Ross, Owen A; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-02-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder and is caused by ABCD1 mutations. A cerebello-brainstem dominant form that mainly involves the cerebellum and brainstem is summarized in a review of the literature, with autopsy-confirmed cases exceedingly rare. We report a 69-year-old White man who was diagnosed with this rare disorder and describe neuropathologic, ultrastructural and genetic analyses. He did not have adrenal insufficiency or a family history of X-ALD or Addison's disease. His initial symptom was temporary loss of eyesight at age 34 years. His major symptoms were chronic and progressive gait disorder, weakness in his lower extremities and spasticity, as well as autonomic failure and cerebellar ataxia suggesting possible multiple system atrophy (MSA). He also had seizures, hearing loss and sensory disturbances. His brain MRI showed no obvious atrophy or significant white matter pathology in cerebrum, brainstem or cerebellum. He died at age 69 years with a diagnosis of MSA. Microscopic analysis showed mild, patchy myelin rarefaction with perivascular clusters of PAS-positive, CD68-positive macrophages in the white matter most prominent in the cerebellum and occipital lobe, but also affecting the optic tract and internal capsule. Electron microscopy of cerebellar white matter showed cleft-like trilamellar cytoplasmic inclusions in macrophages typical of X-ALD, which prompted genetic analysis that revealed a novel ABCD1 mutation, p.R163G. Given the relatively mild pathological findings and long disease duration, it is likely that the observed pathology was the result of a slow and indolent disease process. We described a patient who had sporadic cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD with long clinical course, mild pathological findings, and an ABCD1 p.R163G substitution. We also review a total of 34 cases of adult-onset cerebello-brainstem dominant form of X-ALD. Although rare, X-ALD should be considered in the

  3. Recent trends in the distribution of causative diseases of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jin; Yan, Libo; Du, Lingyao; Liang, Lingbo; Zhou, Qiaoling; Liang, Tao; Bai, Lang; Tang, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Fever of unknown origin is a challenging diagnostic problem and the aim of this research was to analyze trends in the distribution of its causative diseases. This retrospective study makes a comparison between two different clinical series of patients from two different periods: 227 from period 1 (1998-2002) and 602 from period 2 (2008-2012). There were fewer infections (31.72% vs.16.45%) and more miscellaneous causes (5.29% vs. 13.12%) in the period 2 series, whereas no significant differences in autoimmune diseases, malignancies and undiagnosed cases were found. Adult onset Still's disease and lymphoma occupied the largest proportion in autoimmune diseases (75.00%) and malignancies (89.81%), respectively. Interestingly, the autoimmune diseases group, instead of infections, was found to be the leading category of the causative diseases in fever of unknown origin, which is contrary to previous reports. Further, adult onset Still's disease and lymphoma were suggested to be valued more highly in view of the large and rising proportions found in this study. These trends could support the diagnosis and treatment of fever of unknown origin better in the future.

  4. Relative contribution of type 1 and type 2 diabetes loci to the genetic etiology of adult-onset, non-insulin-requiring autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajashree; Chesi, Alessandra; Cousminer, Diana L; Hawa, Mohammad I; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Hodge, Kenyaita M; Guy, Vanessa C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Mauricio, Didac; Schloot, Nanette C; Yderstræde, Knud B; Voight, Benjamin F; Schwartz, Stanley; Boehm, Bernhard O; Leslie, Richard David; Grant, Struan F A

    2017-04-25

    In adulthood, autoimmune diabetes can present as non-insulin-requiring diabetes, termed as 'latent autoimmune diabetes in adults' (LADA). In this study, we investigated established type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) genetic loci in a large cohort of LADA cases to assess where LADA is situated relative to these two well-characterized, classic forms of diabetes. We tested the association of T1D and T2D GWAS-implicated loci in 978 LADA cases and 1057 non-diabetic controls of European ancestry using a linear mixed model. We then compared the associations of T1D and T2D loci between LADA and T1D and T2D cases, respectively. We quantified the difference in genetic risk between each given disease at each locus, and also calculated genetic risk scores to quantify how genetic liability to T1D and T2D distinguished LADA cases from controls. Overall, our results showed that LADA is genetically more similar to T1D, with the exception of an association at the T2D HNF1A locus. Several T1D loci were associated with LADA, including the major histocompatibility complex region, as well as at PTPN22, SH2B3, and INS. Contrary to previous studies, the key T2D risk allele at TCF7L2 (rs7903146-T) had a significantly lower frequency in LADA cases, suggesting that this locus does not play a role in LADA etiology. When constrained on antibody status, the similarity between LADA and T1D became more apparent; however, the HNF1A and TCF7L2 observations persisted. LADA is genetically closer to T1D than T2D, although the genetic load of T1D risk alleles is less than childhood-onset T1D, particularly at the major histocompatibility complex region, potentially accounting for the later disease onset. Our results show that the genetic spectrum of T1D extends into adult-onset diabetes, where it can clinically masquerade as T2D. Furthermore, T2D genetic risk plays a small role in LADA, with a degree of evidence for the HNF1A locus, highlighting the potential for genetic risk scores to

  5. Experiences of racism and the incidence of adult-onset asthma in the Black Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Patricia F; Yu, Jeffrey; O'Connor, George T; Brown, Timothy A; Cozier, Yvette C; Palmer, Julie R; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2014-03-01

    Chronic stress resulting from experiences of racism may increase the incidence of adult-onset asthma through effects on the immune system and the airways. We conducted prospective analyses of the relation of experiences of racism with asthma incidence in the Black Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort of black women in the United States followed since 1995 with mailed biennial questionnaires. Among 38,142 participants followed from 1997 to 2011, 1,068 reported incident asthma. An everyday racism score was created based on five questions asked in 1997 and 2009 about the frequency in daily life of experiences of racism (eg, poor service in stores), and a lifetime racism score was based on questions about racism on the job, in housing, and by police. We used Cox regression models to derive multivariable incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for categories of each racism score in relation to incident asthma. The IRRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.19-1.78) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of the 1997 everyday racism score (P for trend<.0001) and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.18-1.75) for the highest compared with the lowest category of 1997 lifetime racism. Among women who reported the same levels of racism in 1997 and 2009, the IRRs for the highest categories of everyday and lifetime racism were 2.12 (95% CI, 1.55-2.91) and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.20-2.30), respectively. Given the high prevalence of experiences of racism and asthma in black women in the United States, a positive association between racism and asthma is of public health importance.

  6. Experiences of Racism and the Incidence of Adult-Onset Asthma in the Black Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeffrey; O’Connor, George T.; Brown, Timothy A.; Cozier, Yvette C.; Palmer, Julie R.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic stress resulting from experiences of racism may increase the incidence of adult-onset asthma through effects on the immune system and the airways. We conducted prospective analyses of the relation of experiences of racism with asthma incidence in the Black Women’s Health Study, a prospective cohort of black women in the United States followed since 1995 with mailed biennial questionnaires. Methods: Among 38,142 participants followed from 1997 to 2011, 1,068 reported incident asthma. An everyday racism score was created based on five questions asked in 1997 and 2009 about the frequency in daily life of experiences of racism (eg, poor service in stores), and a lifetime racism score was based on questions about racism on the job, in housing, and by police. We used Cox regression models to derive multivariable incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% CIs for categories of each racism score in relation to incident asthma. Results: The IRRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.19-1.78) for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of the 1997 everyday racism score (P for trend <.0001) and 1.44 (95% CI, 1.18-1.75) for the highest compared with the lowest category of 1997 lifetime racism. Among women who reported the same levels of racism in 1997 and 2009, the IRRs for the highest categories of everyday and lifetime racism were 2.12 (95% CI, 1.55-2.91) and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.20-2.30), respectively. Conclusions: Given the high prevalence of experiences of racism and asthma in black women in the United States, a positive association between racism and asthma is of public health importance. PMID:23887828

  7. Diagnostic Criteria for Adult-onset Leukoencephalopathy With Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia Due to CSF1R mutation.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Mizuta, Ikuko; Mizuno, Toshiki; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Tada, Masayoshi; Nozaki, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Onodera, Osamu; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ikeuchi, Takeshi

    2017-09-18

    To establish and validate diagnostic criteria for adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) due to colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) mutation. We developed diagnostic criteria for ALSP based on a recent analysis of the clinical characteristics of ALSP. These criteria provide "probable" and "possible" designations for patients who do not have a genetic diagnosis. To verify its sensitivity and specificity, we retrospectively applied our criteria to 83 ALSP cases who had CSF1R mutations (24 of these were analyzed at our institutions, and the others were identified from the literature), 53 cases who had CSF1R mutation-negative leukoencephalopathies, and 32 cases who had cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) with NOTCH3 mutations. Among the CSF1R mutation-positive cases, 50 cases (60%) were diagnosed as "probable" and 32 (39%) were diagnosed as "possible," leading to a sensitivity of 99% if calculated as a ratio of the combined number of cases who fulfilled "probable" or "possible" to the total number of cases. With regard to specificity, 22 cases (42%) with mutation-negative leukoencephalopathies and 28 (88%) with CADASIL were correctly excluded using these criteria. These diagnostic criteria are very sensitive for diagnosing ALSP with sufficient specificity for differentiating from CADASIL and moderate specificity for other leukoencephalopathies. Our results suggest that these criteria are useful for the clinical diagnosis of ALSP. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Seven years of growth hormone (GH) replacement improves quality of life in hypopituitary patients with adult-onset GH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Elbornsson, Mariam; Horvath, Alexandra; Götherström, Galina; Bengtsson, Bengt-Åke; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Svensson, Johan

    2017-02-01

    Few studies have determined the effects of long-term growth hormone (GH) replacement on quality of life (QoL). This study investigated the effects of 7 years of GH replacement on QoL. A prospective, single-center, open-label study of 95 adults (mean age 52.8 years; 46 men) with adult-onset GH deficiency (GHD). QoL was measured using Quality of Life-Assessment for Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (QoL-AGHDA) and Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB) scores. The GH dose was gradually increased from 0.13 mg/day to 0.42 mg/day. IGF-I SD score increased from -1.49 at baseline to 0.35 at study end. The GH replacement induced sustained improvements in total QoL-AGHDA and PGWB scores. GHD women had a more marked improvement in total QoL-AGHDA score than GHD men after 5 and 7 years. Most of the improvement in QoL was seen during the first year, but there was a small further improvement also after one year as measured using QoL-AGHDA. All QoL-AGHDA dimensions improved, but the improvement in memory and concentration as well as tenseness occurred later than that of other dimensions. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the patients with the lowest baseline QoL had the greatest improvement in QoL. Seven years of GH replacement improved QoL with the most marked improvements in GHD women and in patients with low baseline QoL. Most, but not all, of the improvement in QoL was seen during the first year. Some QoL-AGHDA dimensions (memory and concentration, tenseness) responded at a slower rate than other dimensions. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Metabolic programming effects initiated in the suckling period predisposing for adult-onset obesity cannot be reversed by calorie restriction

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Mahmood, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal rats reared on high-carbohydrate (HC) milk formula developed chronic hyperinsulinemia and adult-onset obesity due to programming of islets and the hypothalamic energy circuitry. In this study, calorie restriction by pair-feeding was imposed on HC male rats (HC/PF) to normalize food intake similar to that of mother-fed (MF) rats from weaning until postnatal day 140. A group of HC/PF rats was switched over to ad libitum feeding (HC/PF/AL) from days 90 to 140. Pair-feeding reduced body weight gains and serum insulin and leptin levels in HC/PF rats compared with HC rats, but these parameters were restored to HC levels in the HC/PF/AL rats after ad libitum feeding. Interestingly, the heightened insulin secretory response of isolated islets from adult HC/PF and HC/PF/ AL rats to glucose, acetylcholine, and oxymetazoline were not significantly different from the responses of islets from HC rats. Similarly, the expression of neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin in the hypothalamus was not significantly different among HC, HC/PF, and HC/PF/AL rats. Expression of the leptin receptor in the hypothalami from the HC, HC/PF, and HC/PF/AL rats mirrored that of serum leptin, whereas suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3) expression remained high in these three groups. The results indicate that, although calorie restriction resulted in reduction in body weight gain and normalized the serum hormonal pattern, the programed predisposition for the hypersecretory capacity of islets and the hypothalamic hyperphagic response in the HC rats could not be permanently overcome by the pair-feeding imposed on HC rats. PMID:23249696

  10. Calprotectin in rheumatic diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Kopeć-Mędrek, Magdalena; Widuchowska, Małgorzata; Kucharz, Eugeniusz J

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin also known as MRP8/14 or S100A8/A9 is a heterodimeric complex of two S100 calcium-binding proteins: myeloid-related protein 8 (MRP-8 or S100A8) and MRP-14 (or S100A9). At present, according to many authors, it is considered that calprotectin MRP8/14 is a potentially more sensitive biomarker of disease activity in rheumatoid disease than conventional inflammatory indices such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and others. A review of the literature on concentration of calprotectin in patients with some rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult-onset Still's disease, systemic vasculitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, ankylosis spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and primary Sjögren's syndrome) is presented.

  11. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    rearrangements, being observed in 6 of 10 PTC cases with ALK rearrangements versus 2 of 15 cases with no ALK rearrangements. The six radiation-exposed cases of PTC harboring both ALK rearrangements and solid/trabecular-like architecture were associated with higher radiation doses and younger ages at the time of the A-bombing and at diagnosis compared to the other 19 PTC with no detectable gene alterations. Conclusion Our findings suggest that ALK rearrangements are involved in the development of radiation-induced adult-onset PTC. PMID:23050789

  12. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer amongst atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-11-01

    6 of 10 PTC cases with ALK rearrangements versus 2 of 15 cases with no ALK rearrangements. The six radiation-exposed cases of PTC harboring both ALK rearrangements and solid/trabecular-like architecture were associated with higher radiation doses and younger ages at the time of the A-bombing and at diagnosis compared to the other 19 PTC with no detectable gene alterations. Our findings suggest that ALK rearrangements are involved in the development of radiation-induced adult-onset PTC.

  13. Diagnosis of muscle diseases presenting with early respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Povitz, Marcus; Gibson, G John; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2015-05-01

    Here we describe a clinical approach and differential diagnosis for chronic muscle diseases which include early respiratory failure as a prominent feature in their presentation (i.e. respiratory failure whilst still ambulant). These patients typically present to neurology or respiratory medicine out-patient clinics and a distinct differential diagnosis of neuromuscular aetiologies should be considered. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myasthenia gravis are the important non-muscle diseases to consider, but once these have been excluded there remains a challenging differential diagnosis of muscle conditions, which will be the focus of this review. The key points in the diagnosis of these disorders are being aware of relevant symptoms, which are initially caused by nocturnal hypoventilation or diaphragmatic weakness; and identifying other features which direct further investigation. Important muscle diseases to identify, because their diagnosis has disease-specific management implications, include adult-onset Pompe disease, inflammatory myopathy, and sporadic adult-onset nemaline myopathy. Cases which are due to metabolic myopathy or muscular dystrophy are important to diagnose because of their implications for genetic counselling. Myopathy from sarcoidosis and colchicine each has a single reported case with this presentation, but should be considered because they are treatable. Disorders which have recently had their genetic aetiologies identified include hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (due to TTN mutations), the FHL1-related syndromes, and myofibrillar myopathy due to BAG3 mutation. Recently described syndromes include oculopharyngodistal muscular dystrophy that awaits genetic characterisation.

  14. Increased Expression of the Large Conductance, Calcium-Activated K+ (BK) Channel in Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Donnelier, Julien; Braun, Samuel T.; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Ahrendt, Eva; Braun, Andrew P.; Velinov, Milen; Braun, Janice E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSPα) is a presynaptic J protein co-chaperone that opposes neurodegeneration. Mutations in CSPα (i.e., Leu115 to Arg substitution or deletion (Δ) of Leu116) cause adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (ANCL), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease. We have previously demonstrated that CSPα limits the expression of large conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels in neurons, which may impact synaptic excitability and neurotransmission. Here we show by western blot analysis that expression of the pore-forming BKα subunit is elevated ~2.5 fold in the post-mortem cortex of a 36-year-old patient with the Leu116∆ CSPα mutation. Moreover, we find that the increase in BKα subunit level is selective for ANCL and not a general feature of neurodegenerative conditions. While reduced levels of CSPα are found in some postmortem cortex specimens from Alzheimer’s disease patients, we find no concomitant increase in BKα subunit expression in Alzheimer’s specimens. Both CSPα monomer and oligomer expression are reduced in synaptosomes prepared from ANCL cortex compared with control. In a cultured neuronal cell model, CSPα oligomers are short lived. The results of this study indicate that the Leu116∆ mutation leads to elevated BKα subunit levels in human cortex and extend our initial work in rodent models demonstrating the modulation of BKα subunit levels by the same CSPα mutation. While the precise sequence of pathogenic events still remains to be elucidated, our findings suggest that dysregulation of BK channels may contribute to neurodegeneration in ANCL. PMID:25905915

  15. 38 CFR 3.309 - Disease subject to presumptive service connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Coccidioidomycosis. Diabetes mellitus. Encephalitis lethargica residuals. Endocarditis. (This term covers all forms... other acneform disease consistent with chloracne Type 2 diabetes (also known as Type II diabetes mellitus or adult-onset diabetes) Hodgkin's disease Chronic lymphocytic leukemia Multiple myeloma...

  16. Impact of birth weight on adult-onset diabetes mellitus in relation to current body mass index: The Japan Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Katanoda, Kota; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Goto, Atsushi; Mizunuma, Hideki; Lee, Jung Su; Hayashi, Kunihiko

    2017-09-01

    Although birth weight is considered as a fetal determinant of the development of adult-onset diabetes mellitus (DM), its public health importance relative to adult body mass index (BMI) remains unclear. We aimed to examine the association between adult-onset DM and birth weight in relation to adult BMI. We conducted a self-administered questionnaire as a baseline survey of the Japanese Nurses' Health Study cohort between 2001 and 2007. Exclusion criteria were applied to the volunteer sample of 49,927 female nurses (age <30 years or unknown, current pregnancy, development of DM before the age of 30 years, unknown core variables), and data from 26,949 female nurses aged 30 years or older were used. The association between history of DM diagnosis and birth weight was analyzed using logistic regression. A linear inverse association was observed between birth weight and DM, after adjustment for age, BMI, and parental history of DM. The odds ratio for developing DM per 100 g increase in birth weight was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-0.96). The association was unchanged when birth weight was converted to percentile for gestational age. In the BMI-stratified analysis, the odds ratio for DM in the <2500 g birth weight group reached 4.75 (95% CI, 1.22-18.44, compared to the reference 3000-3499 g group) among women with normal low BMI (18.5-20.9). Birth weight and its percentile for gestational age were associated with adult-onset DM. Attention should be paid to the risk of DM among women born with low weight, even when their current BMI is normal. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Persistent Negative Symptoms in First-Episode Psychosis: Early Cognitive and Social Functioning Correlates and Differences Between Early and Adult Onset.

    PubMed

    Puig, Olga; Baeza, Immaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Cabrera, Bibiana; Mezquida, Gisela; Bioque, Miquel; Lobo, Antonio; González-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Corripio, Iluminada; Vieta, Eduard; Bobes, Julio; Usall, Judith; Contreras, Fernando; Cuesta, Manuel J; Bernardo, Miquel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Group, The PEPs

    2017-09-12

    To characterize the early cognitive and social functioning characteristics of a sample of first-episode psychosis patients with and without persistent negative symptoms (PNS) and to examine the prevalence and cognitive and functional correlates of PNS in patients with early-onset versus adult-onset first-episode psychosis. Participants were 235 patients with first-episode psychosis (51 early-onset, 184 adult-onset) and 240 healthy controls from a multicenter longitudinal study (recruited between 2009 and 2011). Standard instruments were used to evaluate symptoms, cognition, and social functioning. Diagnoses were determined according to DSM-IV criteria. PNS proxy was derived from clinical assessments (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale) at 2-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Association tests were used to compare the prevalence of PNS in the early-onset versus adult-onset groups. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to examine differences in early cognitive and social functioning (at the 2-month assessment) between patients with and without PNS and between early-onset and adult-onset patients with PNS. Thirty-eight patients (16.2%) met criteria for PNS during the first year. This PNS group showed a selective deficit in executive functions and in global, community, and occupational functioning (P < .05). Having PNS was associated with a diagnosis of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder at the 12-month follow-up. The prevalence of PNS was almost double for those patients with an early-onset (0.25 vs 0.14; OR = 2.18; 95% CI, 1.02-4.64), and this was associated with greater cognitive (P < .05) but not social deficits. There was an early, detectable, social and executive dysfunction associated with PNS in first-episode psychosis and a high risk of having PNS in early-onset first-episode psychosis, which in turn was associated with more widespread cognitive impairment. Specific therapeutic interventions for PNS in early-onset first

  18. Radiation risk of individual multifactorial diseases in offspring of the atomic-bomb survivors: a clinical health study.

    PubMed

    Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Cologne, John B; Hsu, Wan-Ling; Yamada, Michiko; Ohishi, Waka; Hida, Ayumi; Furukawa, Kyoji; Takahashi, Norio; Nakamura, Nori; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Shore, Roy

    2013-06-01

    There is no convincing evidence regarding radiation-induced heritable risks of adult-onset multifactorial diseases in humans, although it is important from the standpoint of protection and management of populations exposed to radiation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether parental exposure to atomic-bomb (A-bomb) radiation led to an increased risk of common polygenic, multifactorial diseases-hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes mellitus, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction or stroke-in the first-generation (F1) offspring of A-bomb survivors. A total of 11,951 F1 offspring of survivors in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, conceived after the bombing, underwent health examinations to assess disease prevalence. We found no evidence that paternal or maternal A-bomb radiation dose, or the sum of their doses, was associated with an increased risk of any multifactorial diseases in either male or female offspring. None of the 18 radiation dose-response slopes, adjusted for other risk factors for the diseases, was statistically significantly elevated. However, the study population is still in mid-life (mean age 48.6 years), and will express much of its multifactorial disease incidence in the future, so ongoing longitudinal follow-up will provide increasingly informative risk estimates regarding hereditary genetic effects for incidence of adult-onset multifactorial disease.

  19. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  20. Adult-onset deficiency in growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I alters oligodendrocyte turnover in the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kun; Forbes, M Elizabeth; Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Sonntag, William E; Riddle, David R

    2009-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) provide trophic support during development and also appear to influence cell structure, function and replacement in the adult brain. Recent studies demonstrated effects of the GH/IGF-I axis on adult neurogenesis, but it is unclear whether the GH/IGF-I axis influences glial turnover in the normal adult brain. In the current study, we used a selective model of adult-onset GH and IGF-I deficiency to evaluate the role of GH and IGF-I in regulating glial proliferation and survival in the adult corpus callosum. GH/IGF-I-deficient dwarf rats of the Lewis strain were made GH/IGF-I replete via twice daily injections of GH starting at postnatal day 28 (P28), approximately the age at which GH pulse amplitude increases in developing rodents. GH/IGF-I deficiency was initiated in adulthood by removing animals from GH treatment. Quantitative analyses revealed that adult-onset GH/IGF-I deficiency decreased cell proliferation in the white matter and decreased the survival of newborn oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that aging-related changes in the GH/IGF-I axis produce deficits in ongoing turnover of oligodendrocytes, which may contribute to aging-related cognitive changes and deficits in remyelination after injury.

  1. A case of adult-onset reducing body myopathy presenting a novel clinical feature, asymmetrical involvement of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shintaro; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Higuchi, Masa-Aki; Tsugawa, Jun; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2014-08-15

    We herein report a 32-year-old woman with adult-onset reducing body myopathy (RBM) who had a mutation in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 gene (FHL1) and showed a marked asymmetrical involvement of sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. At 30 years of age she noticed bilateral foot drop, and over the next two years developed difficulty raising her right arm. At 32 years of age she was admitted to our hospital for a diagnostic evaluation. Neurological examination showed moderate weakness and atrophy of her right sternocleidomastoid muscle, right trapezius muscle, and bilateral upper proximal muscles. There were severe weakness and atrophy of her bilateral tibialis anterior muscles. Her deep tendon reflexes were hypoactive in her upper extremities. Her serum creatine kinase level was mildly increased. Muscle biopsy specimens from the left tibialis anterior muscle revealed marked variation in fiber size, some necrotic or regenerating fibers, and reducing bodies. Gene analysis of FHL1 demonstrated a mutation: a heterozygous missense mutation of c.377G>A (p. C126T) in FHL1. Compared with previous adult-onset RBM cases harboring mutations in FHL1, our case was characterized by asymmetrical atrophy of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles.

  2. [Heart and Steinert's disease].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O

    2011-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (Steinert disease) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by myotonia and multiorgan damage. This latter is the most frequent of the adult-onset muscular dystrophies. Heart involvement is often associated, including cardiomyopathies, atrioventricular block, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  3. Vaginal contraceptives still evolving.

    PubMed

    Pearson, R M

    1986-01-01

    The effort to develop vaginal contraceptives began in the distant past and is still underway today. 1000 years ago, South American Indians inserted into the vagina bark strips impregnated with quinine. In medieval times women used vaginal inserts of cloth soaked in honey or vinegar. Quinine pessaries were introduced into Europe in the late 1800s, and in the early 1900s investigators began to study the effects of various chemicals on sperm motility. Following World War II, surfactant spermicides which disrupt the sperm membrane were developed and marketed. Many of these preparations contained nonoxynol-9. Currently, the D-isomer of propranolol is being examined as a spermicidal contraceptive, and several bacteriocides, e.g., benzalkonium and chlorhexidine, are being developed as spermicides which reduce the penetrability of cervical mucus. Other chemicals being investigated act by inhibiting the acrosome reaction. Advantages of vaginal contraceptives are that they are inexpensive, reversible, and relatively safe and easy to use. Generally they require no medical intervention or supervision. In addition, spermicides may kill or inhibit the growth of organisms responsible for sexually transmitted diseases. Disadvantages of spermicides are that they are generally less effective than many other methods, some interfere with sexual spontaneity, they may cause local irritations, and some women find them messy to use. Recently, concerns were expressed about the possible teratogenic effects of sperimicides. Most of these concerns proved to be unfounded. Given the many new avenues of research, the major disadvantage of sperimicides, i.e., their high failure rates, may be minimized in the near future.

  4. Solar still. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.D.

    1983-07-20

    Passive solar heating was used in a still in which a packed column packed with popped popcorn separates the alcohol and water vapors. The still's performance was not satisfactory, and it is concluded that passive solar heating could have been better used to preheat makeup water for the fermentation process and to maintain proper fermentation temperatures during the winter. (LEW)

  5. Analysis of Mutations in AARS2 in a Series of CSF1R-Negative Patients With Adult-Onset Leukoencephalopathy With Axonal Spheroids and Pigmented Glia.

    PubMed

    Lynch, David S; Zhang, Wei Jia; Lakshmanan, Rahul; Kinsella, Justin A; Uzun, Günes Altiokka; Karbay, Merih; Tüfekçioglu, Zeynep; Hanagasi, Hasmet; Burke, Georgina; Foulds, Nicola; Hammans, Simon R; Bhattacharjee, Anupam; Wilson, Heather; Adams, Matthew; Walker, Mark; Nicoll, James A R; Chataway, Jeremy; Fox, Nick; Davagnanam, Indran; Phadke, Rahul; Houlden, Henry

    2016-12-01

    Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia (ALSP) is a frequent cause of adult-onset leukodystrophy known to be caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the CSF1R (colony-stimulating factor 1) gene. The discovery that CSF1R mutations cause ALSP led to more accurate prognosis and genetic counseling for these patients in addition to increased interest in microglia as a target in neurodegeneration. However, it has been known since the discovery of the CSF1R gene that there are patients with typical clinical and radiologic evidence of ALSP who do not carry pathogenic CSF1R mutations. These patients include those in whom the pathognomonic features of axonal spheroids and pigmented microglia have been found. Achieving a genetic diagnosis in these patients is important to our understanding of this disorder. To genetically characterize a group of patients with typical features of ALSP who do not carry CSF1R mutations. In this case series study, 5 patients from 4 families were identified with clinical, radiologic, or pathologic features of ALSP in whom CSF1R mutations had been excluded previously by sequencing. Data were collected between May 2014 and September 2015 and analyzed between September 2015 and February 2016. Focused exome sequencing was used to identify candidate variants. Family studies, long-range polymerase chain reaction with cloning, and complementary DNA sequencing were used to confirm pathogenicity. Of these 5 patients, 4 were men (80%); mean age at onset of ALSP was 29 years (range, 15-44 years). Biallelic mutations in the alanyl-transfer (t)RNA synthetase 2 (AARS2) gene were found in all 5 patients. Frameshifting and splice site mutations were common, found in 4 of 5 patients, and sequencing of complementary DNA from affected patients confirmed that the variants were loss of function. All patients presented in adulthood with prominent cognitive, neuropsychiatric, and upper motor neuron signs. Magnetic resonance imaging in

  6. Are Patients with Childhood Onset of Insomnia and Depression More Difficult to Treat Than Are Those with Adult Onsets of These Disorders? A Report from the TRIAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Jack D.; Manber, Rachel; Buysse, Daniel J.; Krystal, Andrew D.; Thase, Michael E.; Gehrman, Phillip; Fairholme, Christopher P.; Luther, James; Wisniewski, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine if patients with childhood onsets (CO) of both major depression and insomnia disorder show blunted depression and insomnia treatment responses to concurrent interventions for both disorders compared to those with adult onsets (AO) of both conditions. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of data obtained from a multisite randomized clinical trial designed to test the efficacy of combining a psychological/behavior insomnia therapy with antidepressant medication to enhance depression treatment outcomes in patients with comorbid major depression and insomnia. This study included 27 adults with CO of depression and insomnia and 77 adults with AO of both conditions. They underwent a 16-week treatment including: (1) a standardized two-step pharmacotherapy for depression algorithm, consisting of escitalopram, sertraline, and desvenlafaxine in a prescribed sequence; and (2) either cognitive behavioral insomnia therapy (CBT-I) or a quasi-desensitization control (CTRL) therapy. Main outcome measures were the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-17) and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) completed pre-treatment and every 2 weeks thereafter. Results: The AO and CO groups did not differ significantly in regard to their pre-treatment HRSD-17 and ISI scores. Mixed model analyses that adjusted for the number of insomnia treatment sessions attended showed that the AO group achieved significantly lower, subclinical scores on the HRSD-17 and ISI than did the CO group by the time of study exit. Moreover, a significant group by treatment arm interaction suggested that HRSD-17 scores at study exit remained significantly higher in the CO group receiving the CTRL therapy than was the case for the participants in the CO group receiving CBT-I. Greater proportions of the AO group achieved a priori criteria for remission of insomnia (49.3% vs. 29.2%, p = 0.04) and depression (45.5% vs. 29.6%, p = 0.07) than did those in the CO group

  7. The potential of disease management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Gagnon, Cynthia; Laberge, Luc; Tremblay, Carmen; Côté, Charlotte; Leclerc, Nadine; Mathieu, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular hereditary disorders require long-term multidisciplinary rehabilitation management. Although the need for coordinated healthcare management has long been recognized, most neuromuscular disorders are still lacking clinical guidelines about their long-term management and structured evaluation plan with associated services. One of the most prevalent adult-onset neuromuscular disorders, myotonic dystrophy type 1, generally presents several comorbidities and a variable clinical picture, making management a constant challenge. This article presents a healthcare follow-up plan and proposes a nursing case management within a disease management program as an innovative and promising approach. This disease management program and model consists of eight components including population identification processes, evidence-based practice guidelines, collaborative practice, patient self-management education, and process outcomes evaluation (Disease Management Association of America, 2004). It is believed to have the potential to significantly improve healthcare management for neuromuscular hereditary disorders and will prove useful to nurses delivering and organizing services for this population.

  8. Comparative long-term results of mitral valve repair in adults with chronic rheumatic disease and degenerative disease: is repair for "burnt-out" rheumatic disease still inferior to repair for degenerative disease in the current era?

    PubMed

    Dillon, Jeswant; Yakub, Mohd Azhari; Kong, Pau Kiew; Ramli, Mohd Faizal; Jaffar, Norfazlina; Gaffar, Intan Fariza

    2015-03-01

    Mitral valve repair is perceived to be of limited durability for advanced rheumatic disease in adults. We aim to examine the long-term outcomes of repair for rheumatic disease, identify predictors of durability, and compare with repair for degenerative disease. Rheumatic and degenerative mitral valve repairs in patients aged 40 years or more were prospectively analyzed. The primary outcomes investigated were mortality, freedom from reoperation, and valve failure. Logistic regression analysis was performed to define predictors of poor outcome. Between 1997 and 2011, 253 rheumatic and 148 degenerative mitral valves were repaired. The age of patients in both groups was similar, with a mean of 54.1 ± 8.4 years versus 55.6 ± 7.3 years (P = .49). Freedom from reoperation for rheumatic valves at 5 and 10 years was 98.4%, comparable to 95.3% (P = .12) for degenerative valves. Freedom from valve failure at 5 and 10 years was 91.4% and 81.5% for rheumatic repairs and 82.5% and 75.4% for degenerative repairs, respectively (P = .15). The presence of residual mitral regurgitation greater than 2+ before discharge was the only significant independent predictor of reoperation, whereas residual mitral regurgitation greater than 2+ and leaflet procedures were significant risk factors for valve failure. The durability of rheumatic mitral valve repair in the current era has improved and is comparable to the outstanding durability of repairs for degenerative disease, even in the adult rheumatic population. Modifications of standard repair techniques, adherence to the importance of good leaflet coaptation, and strict quality control with stringent use of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography have all contributed to the improved long-term results. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transient hemiparesis and hemianesthesia in an atypical case of adult-onset clinically mild encephalitis/ encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion associated with adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Makoto; Horiuchi, Shigeto; Okubo, Yoichi; Kakutani, Takuya; Ohe, Motoki; Kondo, Tetsuri

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a previously healthy 24-year-old Japanese woman who developed adult-onset clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) presenting with hemiparesis and hemianesthesia secondary to adenovirus infection. The patient's neurological symptoms and the lesion in the splenium resolved within 17 days without therapy. The radiographic features and clinical course observed in this case were consistent with a diagnosis of MERS; however, the only neurological symptoms were hemiparesis and hemianesthesia. This is the first reported case of MERS involving only hemiparesis and hemianesthesia at onset. This case suggests that a diagnosis of MERS should be suspected in patients with hemiparesis and hemianesthesia, especially when these conditions are preceded by infection.

  10. Clinical profile, morbidity, and outcome of adult-onset generalized pustular psoriasis: analysis of 102 cases seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Choon, Siew Eng; Lai, Nai Ming; Mohammad, Norshaleyna A; Nanu, Nalini M; Tey, Kwee Eng; Chew, Shang Fern

    2014-06-01

    Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is a severe but rare variant of psoriasis. Our objective is to review the clinical profile, comorbidities, and outcome of patients with GPP. A retrospective note review of all patients with adult-onset GPP. A total of 102 patients with adult-onset GPP were diagnosed between 1989 and November 2011, with a female to male ratio of 2 : 1. The mean age at onset of GPP was 40.9 years (range: 21-81 years). Acute GPP was the most common variant seen (95 cases), followed by four localized variants of GPP and three with annular pustular psoriasis. Fever and painful skin were present in 89% of patients, arthritis in 34.7%, and leukocytosis in 78.4%. Common triggers were systemic steroids (45 cases), pregnancy (17 cases), and upper respiratory tract infections (16 cases). A positive family history of psoriasis and GPP was present in 29% and 11%, respectively. Comorbidities included obesity (42.9%), hypertension (25.7%), hyperlipidemia (25.7%), and diabetes mellitus (23.7%). The mean duration of admission and pustular flare for acute GPP was 10.3 days (range: 3-44 days) and 16 days (range: 7-60 days), respectively. Fifty-four patients responded to systemic retinoid, 21 to methotrexate, eight to cyclosporine, and one to adalimumab, but recurrences were common. Our study confirms the poor response of GPP to currently available anti-psoriatic agents, with frequent flare-ups. There is a need for a more effective targeted therapy for this condition. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  11. Adult-onset deficiency of acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 protects mice from diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance[S

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Taylor; Nelson, David W.; Gao, Yu; Huang, Ting-Ni; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang E.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 catalyzes triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, required in intestinal fat absorption. We previously demonstrated that mice without a functional MGAT2-coding gene (Mogat2−/−) exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to obesity induced by excess calories. One critical question raised is whether lacking MGAT2 during early development is required for the metabolic phenotypes in adult mice. In this study, we found that Mogat2−/− pups grew slower than wild-type littermates during the suckling period. To determine whether inactivating MGAT2 in adult mice is sufficient to confer resistance to diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with an inducible Mogat2-inactivating mutation. Mice with adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency (Mogat2AKO) exhibited a transient decrease in food intake like Mogat2−/− mice when fed a high-fat diet and a moderate increase in energy expenditure after acclimatization. They gained less weight than littermate controls, but the difference was smaller than that between wild-type and Mogat2−/− mice. The moderate reduction in weight gain was associated with reduced hepatic TAG and improved glucose tolerance. Similar protective effects were also observed in mice that had gained weight on a high-fat diet before inactivating MGAT2. These findings suggest that adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency mitigates metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding and that MGAT2 modulates early postnatal nutrition and may program metabolism later in life. PMID:25535286

  12. EXAMINATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF SLOW AND DEEP INHALATION OF FP/FM-pMDI FOR THE SMALL-AIRWAYS DYSFUNCTION OF ADULT-ONSET ASTHMA.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shoji

    To date adult-onset asthmatic patients who lack a clear stridor and show prolonged coughs and chest discomfort caused by small-airways dysfunction have increased. We examined the small-airways function of these cases and the effectiveness of slow and deep inhalation of FP/FM-pMDI. 62 adult-onset asthmatic patients who had prolonged coughs and chest discomfort with the middle or high dose of ICS/LABA combination agents under well technique (32 of BUD/FM-DPI group and 30 of FP/SM-pMDI group) were included into this study. ICS/LABAs were switched to FP/FM-pMDI and slow and deep inhalation for 2-3 seconds was carried out thoroughly. The dose of FP/FM-pMDI was reduced depending on the improvement of symptoms. ACT score, respiratory function tests and respiratory resistance were measured after approximately six months from switching (stable condition after switching) and were compared with the values of the same period of the last year (stable condition under the previous ICS/LABA). After switching to FP/FM-pMDI, asthmatic symptoms and plural values of small-airways function were improved in 93.7% (30/32 cases) of BUD/FM-DPI group and in 86.6% (26/30 cases) of FP/SM-pMDI group. Moreover, mean daily inhalation doses were decreased from 5.0 to 4.3 in BUD/FM-DPI group and decreased from 5.7 to 3.7 in FP/SM-pMDI group. Slow and deep inhalation of FP/FM-pMDI is effective in many asthmatic patients who have prolonged small-airways dysfunction. A prospective, multi-centered contrastive study is warranted to confirm the effectiveness of this inhalational method.

  13. Adult-onset deficiency of acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 protects mice from diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Banh, Taylor; Nelson, David W; Gao, Yu; Huang, Ting-Ni; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang E

    2015-02-01

    Acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 catalyzes triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, required in intestinal fat absorption. We previously demonstrated that mice without a functional MGAT2-coding gene (Mogat2(-/-)) exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to obesity induced by excess calories. One critical question raised is whether lacking MGAT2 during early development is required for the metabolic phenotypes in adult mice. In this study, we found that Mogat2(-/-) pups grew slower than wild-type littermates during the suckling period. To determine whether inactivating MGAT2 in adult mice is sufficient to confer resistance to diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with an inducible Mogat2-inactivating mutation. Mice with adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency (Mogat2(AKO)) exhibited a transient decrease in food intake like Mogat2(-/-) mice when fed a high-fat diet and a moderate increase in energy expenditure after acclimatization. They gained less weight than littermate controls, but the difference was smaller than that between wild-type and Mogat2(-/-) mice. The moderate reduction in weight gain was associated with reduced hepatic TAG and improved glucose tolerance. Similar protective effects were also observed in mice that had gained weight on a high-fat diet before inactivating MGAT2. These findings suggest that adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency mitigates metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding and that MGAT2 modulates early postnatal nutrition and may program metabolism later in life. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. A systematic review of the off-label use of biological therapies in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Muñoz, Sandra; Soto, María-José

    2008-11-01

    In 2006, the Study Group on Autoimmune Diseases (GEAS) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine created the BIOGEAS project, a multicenter study devoted to collecting data on the use of biological agents in adult patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD). The information source is a periodic surveillance of reported cases by a MEDLINE search (last update before this writing: December 31, 2007). The analysis included a total of 19 SAD and 6 biological agents. By December 31, 2007, the Registry included 1370 patients with SAD who had been treated with biological agents (562 received infliximab, 463 rituximab, 285 etanercept, 42 anakinra, and 18 adalimumab). SAD included Sjögren syndrome (SS; 215 cases), Wegener granulomatosis (261 cases), sarcoidosis (219 cases), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; 172 cases), Behçet disease (173 cases), adult-onset Still disease (118 cases), cryoglobulinemia (88 cases), and other diseases (80 cases). The higher rate of therapeutic response was found for the use of rituximab in patients with SLE (90%), SS (91%), antiphospholipid syndrome (92%), and cryoglobulinemia (87%); infliximab in sarcoidosis (99%), adult-onset Still disease (90%), and polychondritis (86%); and etanercept in Behçet disease (96%). Results from controlled trials showed lack of efficacy for the use of infliximab in SS and etanercept in SS, Wegener granulomatosis, and sarcoidosis. In addition, an excess of side effects (>50% of reported cases) was observed for the use of infliximab in inflammatory myopathies and sarcoidosis, and for the use of etanercept in polymyositis. Sufficient data are not yet available to evaluate fully the efficacy and safety of adalimumab and anakinra in patients with SAD. In conclusion, current scientific evidence on the use of biological therapies in patients with SAD is mainly based on uncontrolled, observational data. The best results have been observed in the use of rituximab for SS, SLE, and cryoglobulinemia; infliximab for

  15. [Is iodine deficiency still relevant?].

    PubMed

    Gärtner, R

    2007-02-22

    In Germany, iodine deficiency and its consequences is still a problem, although it is of less importance than it was twenty years ago. In accordance with the WHO definition, Germany still belongs among those countries with mild iodine deficiency and too low an intake of iodine. As a result groups at particular risk, such as pregnant and nursing women, must still receive iodine supplementation, since, in the absence of supplemental iodine,the amount of iodine in the mother's milk continues to be below average throughout Germany. Both in private households and in the food industry, the aim is to increase the use of iodized salt to more than go%. This entails no risk of an iodine overdose. The current average daily uptake of iodine of approximately 120 micrograms is responsible neither for the development or progression of an autoimmune disease nor a functional disorder of the thyroid gland.

  16. Adult-onset acral peeling skin syndrome in a non-identical twin: a case report in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Reshmi; Omole, Olufemi B; Rigby, Jonathan; Grayson, Wayne

    2014-12-31

    Acral peeling skin syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in which skin exfoliation is limited to the hands and feet. While it typically manifests from early childhood, in this first reported case from South Africa, the patient did not manifest clinically until the fourth decade of life. A 44-year-old woman of African descent, 1 of a set of non-identical twins, presented with recurrent episodes of skin peeling of the upper and lower limbs. The first episode occurred 4 years prior, followed by perennial skin peeling during the spring seasons. She was not on treatment for any chronic disease and reported no exposure to chemicals or other irritants. The family, including the non-identical twin sister, has no history of skin disorders and the patient's HIV antibody test was negative. At presentation, physical examination revealed ongoing exfoliation with new skin formation on the palms and soles. The mucous membranes and nails were spared. Other systems were normal. Skin biopsy taken from the palms confirmed peeling skin syndrome. The patient was managed with topical aqueous cream and analgesics. She was briefly counseled on the nature and prognosis of the disease, and referred for genetic testing and counseling. On follow-up, she continues to have skin peeling once or twice a year. This first reported case of this rare disease in South Africa contributes to the growing body of literature on the disease and highlights the need for clinicians to be aware of its variable clinical onset.

  17. Encaustic Still Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Len

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used in an advanced high school art class where students used the encaustic painting technique by melting wax and combining various pigments. Explains that the students painted a still-life of flowers in the style of Vincent van Gogh. (CMK)

  18. Is Information Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The term "information" in information science does not share the characteristics of those of a nomenclature: it does not bear a generally accepted definition and it does not serve as the bases and assumptions for research studies. As the data deluge has arrived, is the concept of information still relevant for information…

  19. Teddy Bear Still Lifes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art activity for first-grade students in which the students draw their own still-life pictures, using teddy bears and balls as the subject matter. Explains that the students must include three objects, a line for the table, and overlap the shapes. (CMK)

  20. Books Still Worth Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 10 major articles in this special journal issue deal with literary works designated by individual educators as "still worth reading." The works discussed are (1) "Madeline" by L. Bemelmans; (2) "The Assistant" by B. Malamud; (3) "The Pitfalls for Readers of Fiction" by H. Sample, the first of the pamphlet publications by the National Council…

  1. Books Still Worth Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Alan M., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The 10 major articles in this special journal issue deal with literary works designated by individual educators as "still worth reading." The works discussed are (1) "Madeline" by L. Bemelmans; (2) "The Assistant" by B. Malamud; (3) "The Pitfalls for Readers of Fiction" by H. Sample, the first of the pamphlet publications by the National Council…

  2. Encaustic Still Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Len

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used in an advanced high school art class where students used the encaustic painting technique by melting wax and combining various pigments. Explains that the students painted a still-life of flowers in the style of Vincent van Gogh. (CMK)

  3. Imaging of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek

    2016-06-01

    We review the imaging appearance of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck. Bilateral sialadenitis and dacryoadenitis are seen in Sjögren's syndrome; ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint with sclerosis of the crico-arytenoid joint are reported in rheumatoid arthritis and lupus panniculitis with atypical infection are reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Relapsing polychondritis shows subglottic stenosis, prominent ear and saddle nose; progressive systemic sclerosis shows osteolysis of the mandible, fibrosis of the masseter muscle with calcinosis of the subcutaneous tissue and dermatomyositis/polymyositis shows condylar erosions and autoimmune thyroiditis. Vascular thrombosis is reported in antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome; cervical lymphadenopathy is seen in adult-onset Still's disease, and neuropathy with thyroiditis reported in mixed connective tissue disorder. Imaging is important to detect associated malignancy with connective tissue disorders. Correlation of the imaging findings with demographic data and clinical findings are important for the diagnosis of connective tissue disorders.

  4. A multicentre comparative trial of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult onset epilepsy. Adult EPITEG Collaborative Group.

    PubMed Central

    Richens, A; Davidson, D L; Cartlidge, N E; Easter, D J

    1994-01-01

    The long-term efficacy and safety of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult outpatients with newly diagnosed primary generalised or partial and secondarily generalised seizures were compared in a randomised, open, multicentre study at 22 neurology outpatient clinics. Patients were randomised to oral sodium valproate (Epilim EC enteric coated 200 mg tablets twice daily, n = 149) or oral carbamazepine (100 mg twice daily increasing to 200 mg twice daily in week 2, n = 151) and followed up for three years. If clinically necessary, dosages were regularly increased until seizures were controlled or toxicity developed. Sodium valproate and carbamazepine controlled both primary generalised and partial seizures equally effectively overall. Significantly more patients on sodium valproate than carbamazepine (126/140 (90%) v 105/141 (75%), p = 0.001) remained on randomised treatment for at least six months. Skin rashes occurred significantly more often in carbamazepine recipients than in sodium valproate recipients (11.2% v 1.7%, p < 0.05) and carbamazepine was associated with a higher withdrawal rate because of adverse events (15% v 5% on sodium valproate) in the first six months of treatment. There was no difference between the drugs in the rate of withdrawal because of poor seizure control at any stage, regardless of seizure type. At the end of the three year trial period, over 70% of the available patients were still on randomised treatment or had recently stopped treatment after achieving full seizure control. Sodium valproate and carbamazepine were both associated with a high degree of overall seizure control regardless of seizure type and both have good long-term tolerability in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Recommendations are made for a higher initial dosage regime for sodium valproate in partial seizures. PMID:8006647

  5. Similar L-dopa-stimulated motor activity in mice with adult-onset 6-hydroxydopamine-induced symmetric dopamine denervation and in transcription factor Pitx3 null mice with perinatal-onset symmetric dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Sagot, Ben; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2015-07-30

    The transcription factor Pitx3 null mutant (Pitx3Null) mice have a constitutive perinatal-onset and symmetric bilateral dopamine (DA) loss in the striatum. In these mice l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) induces apparently normal horizontal movements (walking) but also upward movements consisting of the vertical body trunk and waving paws that are absent in normal animals and in animals with the classic unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion-induced DA denervation. Thus, a concern is that the perinatal timing of the DA loss and potential developmental abnormalities in Pitx3Null mice may underlie these upward movements, thus reducing the usefulness as a DA denervation model. Here we show that in normal wild-type (Pitx3WT) mice with adult-onset symmetric, bilateral 6-OHDA-induced DA lesion in the dorsal striatum, l-dopa induces normal horizontal movements and upward movements that are qualitatively identical to those in Pitx3Null mice. Furthermore, after unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the residual DA innervation in the striatum in Pitx3Null mice, l-dopa induces contraversive rotation that is similar to that in Pitx3WT mice with the classic unilateral 6-OHDA lesion. These results indicate that in Pitx3Null mice, the bilateral symmetric DA denervation in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for expressing the l-dopa-induced motor phenotype and the perinatal timing of their DA loss is not a determining factor, providing further evidence that Pitx3Null mice are a convenient and suitable mouse model to study the consequences of DA loss and dopaminergic replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Adult-onset congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by a novel compound heterozygous mutation of the ADAMTS13 gene.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Johannes G; Kemna, Evelien W M; Strunk, Annuska L M; Jobse, Pieter A; Kramer, P A; Dikkeschei, L D; van den Heuvel, L P W J; Fijnheer, Rob; Verdonck, Leo F

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disease, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia, resulting in neurologic and/or renal abnormalities. We report a 49-year-old patient with a history of thrombotic events, renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. Blood analysis demonstrated no ADAMTS13 activity in the absence of antibodies against ADAMTS13. The complete ADAMTS13 gene was sequenced, and two mutations were identified: one mutation on exon 24 (Arg1060Asp), which had previously been described, and a mutation on exon 27 (Met1260IlefsX34), which has not been reported. For these mutations, compound heterozygosity appears to be necessary to cause TTP, as family members of the patient display only one of the mutations and all displayed normal ADAMTS13 activity.

  7. Good syndrome: an adult-onset immunodeficiency remarkable for its high incidence of invasive infections and autoimmune complications.

    PubMed

    Malphettes, Marion; Gérard, Laurence; Galicier, Lionel; Boutboul, David; Asli, Bouchra; Szalat, Raphael; Perlat, Antoinette; Masseau, Agathe; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Le Guenno, Guillaume; Viallard, Jean-François; Bonnotte, Bernard; Thiercelin-Legrand, Marie-Françoise; Sanhes, Laurence; Borie, Raphael; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Fieschi, Claire; Oksenhendler, Eric

    2015-07-15

    Good syndrome (GS) is a rare condition in which thymoma is associated with hypogammaglobulinemia. It is characterized by increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, as well as autoimmunity. Most patients have no circulating B cells. The French DEFicit Immunitaire de l'adulte cohort provides detailed clinical and immunological descriptions of 690 adults with primary hypogammaglobulinemia. Comparisons between patients with GS, those with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), and those with B(-) CVID (circulating B cells <1%) were performed. Twenty-one patients had GS and 440 had CVID, including 39 B(-) CVID, with a median age at diagnosis of 60, 35, and 34 years, respectively. Invasive bacterial infections were observed in 90.5% of GS, 54% of CVID, and 72% of B(-) CVID patients. Eight patients with GS had opportunistic infections, despite normal peripheral CD4(+) T-cell numbers. Autoimmune complications were demonstrated in 76% of GS, 29% of CVID, and 26% of B(-) CVID patients. The spectrum of autoimmunity in GS was uncommon, consisting of oral lichen planus, graft-vs-host disease-like colitis, and pure red cell aplasia, different from the pattern observed in CVID patients. GS patients did not display lymphoid hyperplasia nor lymphoma, unlike those with CVID or B(-) CVID. GS differs notably from CVID and B(-) CVID: very late onset, no familial cases, and absence of lymphoid hyperplasia. The key observation is the very high frequency of invasive bacterial infections in GS, an issue that physicians should be aware of. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Digital Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D.; Yeates, Herbert D.

    1993-01-01

    Digital electronic still camera part of electronic recording, processing, tansmitting, and displaying system. Removable hard-disk drive in camera serves as digital electronic equivalent of photographic film. Images viewed, analyzed, or transmitted quickly. Camera takes images of nearly photographic quality and stores them in digital form. Portable, hand-held, battery-powered unit designed for scientific use. Camera used in conjunction with playback unit also serving as transmitting unit if images sent to remote station. Remote station equipped to store, process, and display images. Digital image data encoded with error-correcting code at playback/transmitting unit for error-free transmission to remote station.

  9. Life's Still Lifes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Harold V.

    The de Bruijn diagram describing those decompositions of the neighborhoods of a one dimensional cellular automaton which conform to predetermined requirements of periodicity and translational symmetry shows how to construct extended configurations satisfying the same requirements. Similar diagrams, formed by stages, describe higher dimensional automata, although they become more laborious to compute with increasing neighborhood size. The procedure is illustrated by computing some still lifes for Conway's game of Life, a widely known two dimensional cellular automaton. This paper is written in September 10, 1988.

  10. Identify changes of brain regional homogeneity in early and later adult onset patients with first-episode depression using resting-state fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuran; Ye, Jing; Dai, Nan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Na; Lu, Jin; Liu, Fang; Lu, Yi; Sun, Xuejin; Cheng, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Objective Previous work exhibited different brain grey matter volume (GMV) changes between patients with early adult onset depression (EOD, age 18–29) and later adult onset depression (LOD, age 30–44) by using 30-year-old as the cut-off age. To identify whether regional homogeneity (ReHo) changes are also different between EOD and LOD by using same cut-off age, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to detect the abnormal ReHo between patients with EOD and LOD in the present study. Methods Resting-state fMRI scans of 58 patients with EOD, 62 patients with LOD, 60 young healthy controls (HC), and 52 old HC were obtained. The ReHo approach was used to analyze the images. Results The ANOVA analysis revealed that the ReHo values in the frontoparietal, occipital, and cerebellar regions were significantly different among the four groups. Relative to patients with LOD, patients with EOD displayed significantly increased ReHo in the left precuneus, and decreased ReHo in the right fusiform. The ReHo values in the left precuneus and the right fusiform had no significant correlation with the score of the depression rating scale or illness duration in both patient subgroups. Compared to young HC, patients with EOD showed significantly increased ReHo in the right frontoparietal regions and the right calcarine. Furthermore, the increased ReHo in the right frontoparietal regions, right insula and left hippocampus, and decreased ReHo in the left inferior occipital gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, left calcarine, and left supplementary motor area were observed in patients with LOD when compared to old HC. Conclusions The ReHo of brain areas that were related to mood regulation was changed in the first-episode, drug-naive adult patients with MDD. Adult patients with EOD and LOD exhibited different ReHo abnormalities relative to each age-matched comparison group, suggesting that depressed adult patients with different age-onset might have different

  11. Identify changes of brain regional homogeneity in early and later adult onset patients with first-episode depression using resting-state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zonglin; Jiang, Linling; Yang, Shuran; Ye, Jing; Dai, Nan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Na; Lu, Jin; Liu, Fang; Lu, Yi; Sun, Xuejin; Cheng, Yuqi; Xu, Xiufeng

    2017-01-01

    Previous work exhibited different brain grey matter volume (GMV) changes between patients with early adult onset depression (EOD, age 18-29) and later adult onset depression (LOD, age 30-44) by using 30-year-old as the cut-off age. To identify whether regional homogeneity (ReHo) changes are also different between EOD and LOD by using same cut-off age, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to detect the abnormal ReHo between patients with EOD and LOD in the present study. Resting-state fMRI scans of 58 patients with EOD, 62 patients with LOD, 60 young healthy controls (HC), and 52 old HC were obtained. The ReHo approach was used to analyze the images. The ANOVA analysis revealed that the ReHo values in the frontoparietal, occipital, and cerebellar regions were significantly different among the four groups. Relative to patients with LOD, patients with EOD displayed significantly increased ReHo in the left precuneus, and decreased ReHo in the right fusiform. The ReHo values in the left precuneus and the right fusiform had no significant correlation with the score of the depression rating scale or illness duration in both patient subgroups. Compared to young HC, patients with EOD showed significantly increased ReHo in the right frontoparietal regions and the right calcarine. Furthermore, the increased ReHo in the right frontoparietal regions, right insula and left hippocampus, and decreased ReHo in the left inferior occipital gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, left calcarine, and left supplementary motor area were observed in patients with LOD when compared to old HC. The ReHo of brain areas that were related to mood regulation was changed in the first-episode, drug-naive adult patients with MDD. Adult patients with EOD and LOD exhibited different ReHo abnormalities relative to each age-matched comparison group, suggesting that depressed adult patients with different age-onset might have different pathological mechanism.

  12. Expression of the the cyclin-kinase inhibitors p21(WAF1) and p27(Kip1) and the p53 tumor suppressor genes in adult-onset laryngeal papillomas.

    PubMed

    Erdamar, Burak; Keles, Nesil; Kaur, Ahmet; Suoglu, Yusufhan; Kiyak, Erkan

    2002-11-01

    Different types of human papilloma virus are known to be closely associated with laryngeal papillomas. On the other hand, the proliferation of epithelial cells is associated with various abnormalities in the mechanisms of cellular regulation. In this study, we detected the expressions of p53, p21 and p27 proteins in adult-onset laryngeal papillomas by immunohistochemical techniques. The objective of this study is to evaluate the expression of these factors in adult-onset laryngeal papillomas and to determine whether such expression is correlated with the existence of dysplastic epithelium covering the papillomas. Eighteen patients with adult-onset papillomas who were surgically treated at the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Istanbul between January 1994 and December 1999 were included in this study. Anti-p21, -p27 and -p53 antibodies were used to perform immunostaining. Positive nuclear staining for p21 was detected in 14 of the 18 (78%) cases, especially in the parabasal layer. Also, in 78% of the cases, weak to strong immunoreactivity was observed for p27. In all cases, negative immunoreactivity was observed for p53 throughout the epithelium except for the basal and parabasal cells. A negative correlation was observed between the existence of dysplastic epithelium and p21 expression (P=0.02). In conclusion, variable p21 and p27 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in our series of 18 cases of adult-onset laryngeal papillomatosis, and a statistically significant inverse correlation was detected between p21 expression and the existence of dysplastic epithelium covering the papillomas. Further prospective studies are warranted to determine the prognostic values of these variables and to evaluate their role in the pathogenesis of adult-onset laryngeal papillomas.

  13. [Why still whooping cough?].

    PubMed

    Guiso, Nicole

    2005-06-30

    Whooping cough is a human respiratory infection, dramatic for newborns and elderly, by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis and parapertussis. Intensive vaccination of children allowed an important decrease of mortality and morbidity. However, generalization of vaccination conducted to a change in the transmission of the disease due to the short duration of vaccinal immunity and the lack of vaccinal or natural boosters. The disease affects now adolescents and adults who contaminate new-borns too young to be vaccinated. For this reason, many countries including France, decided to add vaccine boosters for adolescents and young adults.

  14. A population-based epidemiologic study of adult-onset narcolepsy incidence and associated risk factors, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rachel U; Radin, Jennifer M

    2016-11-15

    An increase in narcolepsy incidence was noted after the novel pandemic influenza of 2009, leading to further interest in risk factors associated with this disease. However, there is limited data on the epidemiology of narcolepsy, particularly in the adult population. Therefore, we sought to examine narcolepsy incidence rates in the United States and describe associated characteristics. We performed a population based epidemiologic study of active duty military personnel. All outpatient clinics in the continental United States providing care for active duty military between 2004 through 2013 were included utilizing existing databases. Narcolepsy was defined in 3 ways: (1) 2 diagnoses of narcolepsy within 6months of each other, one made by a sleep expert; (2) 2 diagnoses by any provider followed by a narcolepsy prescription within 14days of last visit; and (3) procedure code for a sleep study followed by a narcolepsy diagnosis by a sleep expert within 6months. There were 1675 narcolepsy cases. Overall incidence of narcolepsy trended from 14.6 to 27.3 cases per 100,000 person-years, with an increase starting after 2005-2006 and peaking during the 2011-2012 influenza season. Higher frequencies were seen among females, non-Hispanic blacks, and members living in the south. Narcolepsy incidence rates among active duty military members are higher than previously described. The reason for the steady rise of incidence from 2005 to 2006 through 2011-2012 is unknown; however, these findings require further exploration. We detected risk factors associated with the development of narcolepsy which may aid in future study efforts. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates: Still fabulous?

    PubMed

    Możejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Kiewisz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are polyesters accumulated as carbon and energy storage materials under limited growth conditions in the presence of excess carbon sources. They have been developed as biomaterials with unique properties for the past many years being considered as a potential substitute for conventional non-degradable plastics. Due to the increasing concern towards global climate change, depleting petroleum resource and problems with an utilization of a growing number of synthetic plastics, PHAs have gained much more attention from industry and research. These environmentally friendly microbial polymers have great potential in biomedical, agricultural, and industrial applications. However, their production on a large scale is still limited. This paper describes the backgrounds of PHAs and discussed the current state of knowledge on the polyhydroxyalkanoates. Ability of bacteria to convert different carbon sources to PHAs, the opportunities and challenges of their introduction to global market as valuable renewable products have been also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Gulf operations still recovering

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-09-21

    This paper reports that reports of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew were leveling off last week at the U.S. Minerals Management Service as Gulf of Mexico operators pressed ahead with repairs. The hurricane struck South Florida Aug. 4, churned west into the gulf, then swung north and hit the South Louisiana coast Aug. 5. By the close of business Sept. 8 MMS had received damage reports covering 83 pipeline segments and 193 platforms and satellite installations. MMS last week estimated about 500 MMcfd of gas production had been restored in the gulf and 100,000-150,000 b/d of oil. Production still lost as a result of Andrew was estimated at 2-2.5 bcfd of gas and 90,000-120 b/d of oil. MMS estimates Gulf of Mexico wells before the storm were producing about 12.5-13 bcfd of gas and 750,000 b/d of oil.

  17. Biallelic Mutation of ARHGEF18, Involved in the Determination of Epithelial Apicobasal Polarity, Causes Adult-Onset Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Arno, Gavin; Carss, Keren J; Hull, Sarah; Zihni, Ceniz; Robson, Anthony G; Fiorentino, Alessia; Hardcastle, Alison J; Holder, Graham E; Cheetham, Michael E; Plagnol, Vincent; Moore, Anthony T; Raymond, F Lucy; Matter, Karl; Balda, Maria S; Webster, Andrew R

    2017-02-02

    Mutations in more than 250 genes are implicated in inherited retinal dystrophy; the encoded proteins are involved in a broad spectrum of pathways. The presence of unsolved families after highly parallel sequencing strategies suggests that further genes remain to be identified. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing studies employed here in large cohorts of affected individuals revealed biallelic mutations in ARHGEF18 in three such individuals. ARHGEF18 encodes ARHGEF18, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates RHOA, a small GTPase protein that is a key component of tight junctions and adherens junctions. This biological pathway is known to be important for retinal development and function, as mutation of CRB1, encoding another component, causes retinal dystrophy. The retinal structure in individuals with ARHGEF18 mutations resembled that seen in subjects with CRB1 mutations. Five mutations were found on six alleles in the three individuals: c.808A>G (p.Thr270Ala), c.1617+5G>A (p.Asp540Glyfs(∗)63), c.1996C>T (p.Arg666(∗)), c.2632G>T (p.Glu878(∗)), and c.2738_2761del (p.Arg913_Glu920del). Functional tests suggest that each disease genotype might retain some ARHGEF18 activity, such that the phenotype described here is not the consequence of nullizygosity. In particular, the p.Thr270Ala missense variant affects a highly conserved residue in the DBL homology domain, which is required for the interaction and activation of RHOA. Previously, knock-out of Arhgef18 in the medaka fish has been shown to cause larval lethality which is preceded by retinal defects that resemble those seen in zebrafish Crumbs complex knock-outs. The findings described here emphasize the peculiar sensitivity of the retina to perturbations of this pathway, which is highlighted as a target for potential therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-existing spinal intradural ependymal cyst and sacral Tarlov cyst in adult-onset tethered cord syndrome with syringomyelia: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Hamid H.; Khan, Muhammad F.; Enam, Syed Ather; Hashmi, Imtiaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Synchronous spinal intradural ependymal cysts and sacral Tarlov cysts in adult onset tethered cord syndrome are extremely rare. Case Description: A 23-year-old male presented with back pain radiating into both lower extremities, accompanied by acute onset of gait difficulty and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging identified a low lying conus medullaris, syringomyelia with septations extending from T12 to S1, a tethered cord, and a thickened filum terminale with a sacral Tarlov cyst. The patient underwent a L3-4 laminectomy for decompression of syringomyelia and excision/biopsy of a space occupying lesion along with S1-2 laminectomy for cord untethering and Tarlov cyst fenestration. Postoperative histopathology confirmed that the lesion was an ependymal cyst. Clinically, patient showed marked improvement in the neurological status. Conclusion: Simultaneous decompressive laminectomy of L3-4 and S1-2 effectively decompressed the syringomyelia while allowing for excision/biopsy of a space occupying lesion at the former and untethering and Tarlov cyst fenestration at the latter levels. PMID:27843691

  19. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    DOE PAGES

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; ...

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in amore » postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.« less

  20. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgio, E.; Robyr, D.; Spielmann, M.; Ferrero, E.; Di Gregorio, E.; Imperiale, D.; Vaula, G.; Stamoulis, G.; Santoni, F.; Atzori, C.; Gasparini, L.; Ferrera, D.; Canale, C.; Guipponi, M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Brussino, A.; Brusco, A.

    2015-02-20

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (~660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. Finally, this second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  1. Immunoglobulin G antibodies against indoor dampness-related microbes and adult-onset asthma: a population-based incident case–control study

    PubMed Central

    JAAKKOLA, M S; LAITINEN, S; PIIPARI, R; UITTI, J; NORDMAN, H; HAAPALA, A-M; JAAKKOLA, J J K

    2002-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against microbes related to indoor dampness problems have been used as potential biomarkers of fungal exposure in clinical investigations. There is limited information on their relation to asthma. We conducted a population-based incident case–control study to assess the risk of asthma in relation to specific IgG antibodies to eight dampness-related microbes: Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Fusarium oxysporum, Sporobolomyces salmonicolor, Stachybotrys chartarum, Streptomyces albus and Trichoderma citrinoviride. We recruited systematically all new cases of asthma during a 2·5-year study period and randomly selected controls from a source population of adults 21–63 years of age living in the Pirkanmaa Hospital District, South Finland. The clinically diagnosed case series consisted of 521 adults with newly diagnosed asthma and the control series of 932 controls selected randomly from the source population. IgG antibodies were analysed with ELISA. An increased risk of developing asthma in adulthood was significantly related to IgG antibodies to T. citrinoviride, but not to the other moulds. There was no evidence of a dose–response relation between the IgG antibody level and the risk of asthma. T. citrinoviride may play a role in the aetiology of adult-onset asthma or serve as an indicator of other causal factors. PMID:12100029

  2. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD).

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpression and myelin degeneration. This second route to LMNB1 overexpression and ADLD is a new example of the relevance of regulatory landscape modifications in determining Mendelian phenotypes.

  3. Co-existing spinal intradural ependymal cyst and sacral Tarlov cyst in adult-onset tethered cord syndrome with syringomyelia: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rai, Hamid H; Khan, Muhammad F; Enam, Syed Ather; Hashmi, Imtiaz

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous spinal intradural ependymal cysts and sacral Tarlov cysts in adult onset tethered cord syndrome are extremely rare. A 23-year-old male presented with back pain radiating into both lower extremities, accompanied by acute onset of gait difficulty and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging identified a low lying conus medullaris, syringomyelia with septations extending from T12 to S1, a tethered cord, and a thickened filum terminale with a sacral Tarlov cyst. The patient underwent a L3-4 laminectomy for decompression of syringomyelia and excision/biopsy of a space occupying lesion along with S1-2 laminectomy for cord untethering and Tarlov cyst fenestration. Postoperative histopathology confirmed that the lesion was an ependymal cyst. Clinically, patient showed marked improvement in the neurological status. Simultaneous decompressive laminectomy of L3-4 and S1-2 effectively decompressed the syringomyelia while allowing for excision/biopsy of a space occupying lesion at the former and untethering and Tarlov cyst fenestration at the latter levels.

  4. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Health-Related Quality of Life Instrument for Individuals with Adult-Onset Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Stika, Carren J.; Hays, Ron D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Self-reports of “hearing handicap” are available, but a comprehensive measure of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for individuals with adult-onset hearing loss (AOHL) does not exist. Our objective was to develop and evaluate a multidimensional HRQOL instrument for individuals with AOHL. Design The Impact of Hearing Loss Inventory Tool (IHEAR-IT) was developed using results of focus groups, a literature review, Advisory Expert Panel input, and cognitive interviews. Study Sample The 73-item field-test instrument was completed by 409 adults (22-91 years old) with varying degrees of AOHL and from different areas of the US. Results Multitrait scaling analysis supported four multi-item scales and five individual items. Internal consistency reliabilities ranged from 0.93 to 0.96 for the scales. Construct validity was supported by correlations between the IHEAR-IT scales and scores on the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Version 2.0 (SF-36v2) Mental Composite Summary (r’s = 0.32 – 0.64) and the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly/Adults (HHIE/HHIA) (r’s > −0.70). Conclusions The field test provide initial support for the reliability and construct validity of the IHEAR-IT for evaluating HRQOL of individuals with AOHL. Further research is needed to evaluate the responsiveness to change of the IHEAR-IT scales and identify items for a short-form. PMID:27104754

  5. A large genomic deletion leads to enhancer adoption by the lamin B1 gene: a second path to autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD)

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Elisa; Robyr, Daniel; Spielmann, Malte; Ferrero, Enza; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Imperiale, Daniele; Vaula, Giovanna; Stamoulis, Georgios; Santoni, Federico; Atzori, Cristiana; Gasparini, Laura; Ferrera, Denise; Canale, Claudio; Guipponi, Michel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Brussino, Alessandro; Brusco, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements with duplication of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene underlie autosomal dominant adult-onset demyelinating leukodystrophy (ADLD), a rare neurological disorder in which overexpression of LMNB1 causes progressive central nervous system demyelination. However, we previously reported an ADLD family (ADLD-1-TO) without evidence of duplication or other mutation in LMNB1 despite linkage to the LMNB1 locus and lamin B1 overexpression. By custom array-CGH, we further investigated this family and report here that patients carry a large (∼660 kb) heterozygous deletion that begins 66 kb upstream of the LMNB1 promoter. Lamin B1 overexpression was confirmed in further ADLD-1-TO tissues and in a postmortem brain sample, where lamin B1 was increased in the frontal lobe. Through parallel studies, we investigated both loss of genetic material and chromosomal rearrangement as possible causes of LMNB1 overexpression, and found that ADLD-1-TO plausibly results from an enhancer adoption mechanism. The deletion eliminates a genome topological domain boundary, allowing normally forbidden interactions between at least three forebrain-directed enhancers and the LMNB1 promoter, in line with the observed mainly cerebral localization of lamin B1 overexpressi