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Sample records for adults adult treatment

  1. [Orthodontic treatment for adults].

    PubMed

    Kuitert, R B

    2000-04-01

    The number of adults undergoing orthodontic treatment has increased strongly and the average age that adult patients undergo orthodontic treatment increased steadily although 3/4 is still younger than 27 years. In adults the facial skeletal pattern can only be changed in a very confined way, consequently in case of an abnormal skeletal pattern one has to choose between a combined orthodontic-surgical approach (which is the case in 18% of the patients) and a compromised orthodontic treatment, if necessary combined with other disciplines. It is still controversial whether tooth movement in adults is slower and more difficult than in adolescents. The same holds true for the risk for loss of periodontal support, for root resorption, for gnathologic problems and for relapse. As related to these variables there appears to be a large individual variation. Many adults show one or more problems in their dentition that may influence their orthodontic treatment. About 60% of the adult patients need a multidisciplinary approach. The development of implantology and of bone regeneration and bone grafting has lead to more combined treatments. The risks of such complex treatment plans are generally larger than those for more simple kinds of treatment. A very careful treatment planning and good communication between the different specialists is essential. Moreover the treatment plan with all its (dis)advantages has to be extensively discussed with the patient.

  2. Compulsory Medical Treatment of Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riga, Peter J.

    1976-01-01

    The compulsory medical treatment of adults is discussed with regard to the legal authority relevant to the problem. Attention is directed toward the "right to die" issue, the public interest and individual freedom of conscious or religion, and the courts' dealing with the freedom of the individual to control his own body. (LBH)

  3. Treatment of epilepsy in adults.

    PubMed

    Burakgazi, Evren; French, Jacqueline A

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder in adults and requires treatment with antiepileptic medication. While the majority of patients with epilepsy can be treated with medication, about one third will fail on medical treatment. Therefore, other treatment options such as surgery, devices, and the ketogenic diet are other options to consider, in addition to medical treatment. The treatment of epilepsy requires many other factors to be taken into consideration, and these include, but are not limited to, age, gender, coexistent medical conditions, and the use of concomitant medications. The goal of treatment is to provide optimal seizure control while using the least possible number of medications, particularly for young females at reproductive age or the elderly who may suffer from other medical diseases and receive other concomitant medications. Certain conditions may co-exist with epilepsy, such as migraine, mood disorder, and memory disturbances, therefore the decision to choose the most appropriate medication for epilepsy patients should also involve treatment of these conditions. Here, we review current clinical practice in epilepsy and focus on the most common problems and conditions that clinicians face on a daily basis to treat adult patients with epilepsy. Side effect profiles, spectrum of efficacy and optimal choices per predominant type of seizures are summarized and can be used for educational purposes.

  4. Treatment Options for Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Primary Liver Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  8. Atomoxetine Treatment for ADHD: Younger Adults Compared with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durell, Todd; Adler, Lenard; Wilens, Timothy; Paczkowski, Martin; Schuh, Kory

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Atomoxetine is a nonstimulant medication for treating child, adolescent, and adult ADHD. This meta-analysis compared the effects in younger and older adults. Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Data from patients aged 18-25 years were compared with data from…

  9. Handbook of Comparative Treatments for Adult Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Troy; Janzen, Henry L.

    1994-01-01

    Describes and evaluates text providing background, conceptual understanding, and treatment options for major adult disorders. Strengths include comprehensiveness, treatment comparisons, and a process emphasis. Weaknesses center on biases toward psychoanalytic, behavioral, and pharmacological treatments while neglecting cognitive and "cutting edge"…

  10. Treatment of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults.

    PubMed

    La Rosée, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) has been developed primarily in pediatric centers, where familial HLH (FHL) is the leading cause of HLH in newborns and toddlers. The Histiocyte Society Study Group for HLH developed the HLH-94 and HLH-2004 treatment protocols, and these are frequently also used by centers treating HLH in adults (aHLH). These protocols contain etoposide, dexamethasone, and cyclosporine A; these agents all have strong activity against proliferation of cytotoxic T/NK-cells and macrophages, as well as inhibitory activity against the cytokine storm that induces, and maintains HLH. In children with predominantly hereditary disease, the HLH-94 protocol can be regarded as a "one size fits all" algorithm. HLH in adults is a much more heterogeneous syndrome requiring a more individualized approach depending on the underlying trigger, disease severity and course, as well as genetic background. Additionally, treatment in adults usually needs to be modified in the face of the preceding disease history and comorbidities. Interdisciplinary patient care with rheumatologists, gastroenterologists, neurologists, pediatricians, the transplant team, and pathologists is a prerequisite to successful treatment. The preferred approach should reflect a disease- and risk-adapted treatment that includes rigorous supportive care with continuous reassessment of sequential therapeutic measures. It should be recognized that the algorithm of HLH treatment in adults is based more on expert opinion than on extensive scientific evidence.

  11. Treatment of periodontal disease in older adults.

    PubMed

    Renvert, Stefan; Persson, G Rutger

    2016-10-01

    Within the next 40 years the number of older adults worldwide will more than double. This will impact periodontal treatment needs and presents a challenge to health-care providers and governments worldwide, as severe periodontitis has been reported to be the sixth most prevalent medical condition in the world. Older adults (≥ 80 years of age) who receive regular dental care retain more teeth than those who do not receive such care, but routine general dental care for these individuals is not sufficient to prevent the progression of periodontitis with the same degree of success as in younger individuals. There is a paucity of data on the efficacy of different periodontal therapies for older individuals. However, considering the higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions seen in older adults, it cannot be assumed that periodontal therapy will yield the same degree of success seen in younger individuals. Furthermore, medications can influence the status of the periodontium and the delivery of periodontal care. As an example, anticoagulant drugs are common among older patients and may be a contraindication to certain treatments. Newer anticoagulants will, however, facilitate surgical intervention in older patients. Furthermore, prescription medications taken for chronic conditions, such as osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases, can affect the periodontium in a variety of ways. In summary, consideration of socio-economic factors, general health status and multiple-drug therapies will, in the future, be an important part of the management of periodontitis in older adults.

  12. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in adults: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Larroche, Claire

    2012-07-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis occurring as a primary or acquired disorder is a condition of chaotic and uncontrolled immune system stimulation. Cytotoxic cells and macrophages cause multiorgan damage, hemophagocytosis, and severe systemic inflammation. Clinical manifestations include a fever, organ enlargement, and weight loss. Laboratory tests show bicytopenia or pancytopenia, cytolysis and cholestasis, serum ferritin elevation, and clotting disorders. The reference standard for the diagnosis remains the presence in histological specimens of hemophagocytic macrophages, which may be lacking early in the disease, leading to diagnostic challenges. Inherited forms produce symptoms in early childhood and are fatal in the absence of specific treatment. In adults, the clinical spectrum ranges from mild and self-limited hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis to rapidly fatal multiorgan failure. Many questions remain unresolved regarding the diagnosis and treatment in adults. This update is an attempt at providing answers.

  13. Surgical treatments on adult tethered cord syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kong, Xiangyi; Li, Zhimin; Wang, Tianyu; Li, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate effects of surgical treatment on adult tethered cord syndrome (TCS). A retrospective analysis of 82 adult patients (17 male cases, 82% and 24 female cases, 59%) with TCS treated by surgery was conducted between March, 2005 and December, 2015, with an average age of 31.6 years and average disease course of 6.7 years. All the 82 cases of patients received nerve electrophysiology monitoring assisted microsurgery. After surgery, all patients were followed up for an average of 2.5 years. Surgical effects were evaluated according to Hoffman grading system. As this is just a retrospective study that does not involve any interventions, ethical approval was not necessary according to the rules of the hospital. All patients were followed up, no death occurred. According to Hoffman grading system, the neurologic symptoms were improved in 22 patients (27%), stabilized in 60 patients (73%). Of 10 cases with lipoma tethered spinal cord, corresponding symptoms were improved in 2 cases. Of 32 cases with tethered spinal cord caused by dermoid cyst and epidermoid cyst, the symptoms were improved in 6 cases. Of 40 cases without occupying lesions of tethered spinal cord, the symptoms were improved in 14 cases. Besides, there was no deteriorated case. Surgical treatment on adult patients with TCS can improve the neurologic deficits which are associated with the course of disease, early treatment has much better curative effect. PMID:27861396

  14. European consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD: The European Network Adult ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most common psychiatric disorders of childhood that persists into adulthood in the majority of cases. The evidence on persistence poses several difficulties for adult psychiatry considering the lack of expertise for diagnostic assessment, limited treatment options and patient facilities across Europe. Methods The European Network Adult ADHD, founded in 2003, aims to increase awareness of this disorder and improve knowledge and patient care for adults with ADHD across Europe. This Consensus Statement is one of the actions taken by the European Network Adult ADHD in order to support the clinician with research evidence and clinical experience from 18 European countries in which ADHD in adults is recognised and treated. Results Besides information on the genetics and neurobiology of ADHD, three major questions are addressed in this statement: (1) What is the clinical picture of ADHD in adults? (2) How can ADHD in adults be properly diagnosed? (3) How should ADHD in adults be effectively treated? Conclusions ADHD often presents as an impairing lifelong condition in adults, yet it is currently underdiagnosed and treated in many European countries, leading to ineffective treatment and higher costs of illness. Expertise in diagnostic assessment and treatment of ADHD in adults must increase in psychiatry. Instruments for screening and diagnosis of ADHD in adults are available and appropriate treatments exist, although more research is needed in this age group. PMID:20815868

  15. Steroid treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2014-06-01

    Topical steroid therapy has been used to treat eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) for more than 15 years. We review the treatment trials of topical steroid therapy in adult patients with EoE. Currently, there is no commercially available preparation designed to deliver the steroid to the esophagus. Current regimens consist of swallowing steroid preparations designed for inhalation treatment for asthma. In the short term, steroids are associated with an approximately 15% to 25% incidence of asymptomatic esophageal candidiasis, but otherwise appear to be well tolerated.

  16. Phenylketonuria: treatment in adolescence and adult life.

    PubMed

    Brenton, D P; Tarn, A C; Cabrera-Abreu, J C; Lilburn, M

    1996-07-01

    In our clinic the decision on whether to continue with dietary treatment of phenylketonuria or not is left to each adolescent and adult patient after the advantages and disadvantages, as discussed in this paper, of continuing diet have been presented to them. As a result 61 of 132 patients have stopped diet or declined to restart and only 4 of them have phenylalanine values below 1000 mumol/l. Seventy-one patients have remained on diet or started again with phenylalanine values below 1000 mumol/l in 58 of them. This series of 132 excludes women who returned to diet to conceive.

  17. Dietary treatment of severe malnutrition in adults.

    PubMed

    Collins, S; Myatt, M; Golden, B

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two diets, differing primarily in protein content, on the nutritional rehabilitation of severely malnourished adults. The study took place in the Concern Worldwide Adult Therapeutic Feeding Centre in Baidoa, the town at the epicenter of the 1992 famine in Somalia. The response to treatment in 573 patients admitted to the center between November 1992 and March 1993 was studied. Mortality, appetite, rates of edema loss, and weight gain in 2 groups of patients receiving either a higher-protein (16.4% of energy from protein) or lower-protein (8.5% of energy from protein) diet were compared. Among edematous patients, the use of the lower-protein diet during the initial phase of treatment was associated with a threefold decrease in mortality (P < 0.05) and accelerated resolution of edema (P < 0.05). Among marasmic patients, no differences in mortality or rate of weight gain were observed. The large reduction in mortality associated with the use of the lower-protein diet in edematous patients appeared to be due to the lower amount of dietary protein. However, differences in the 2 diets other than or in addition to the protein content may have contributed. Notwithstanding, the data obtained suggest strongly that severely malnourished adults, particularly those with edema, recover more successfully with a diet of lower protein content than usually recommended. The lower-protein diet used in this study was much cheaper and more easily obtained than the conventional higher-protein diets in Baidoa.

  18. Polymyositis - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash is a sign of a similar condition, dermatomyositis . Common symptoms include: Muscle weakness in the shoulders ... in the treatment of refractory adult and juvenile dermatomyositis and adult polymyositis: a randomized, placebo-phase trial. ...

  19. Treatment options for osteoarthritis: considerations for older adults.

    PubMed

    Seed, Sheila M; Dunican, Kaelen C; Lynch, Ann M

    2011-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of disability among older adults in the United States. Treatment options such as acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the most widely used agents to manage mild-to-moderate pain. Treatment with tramadol or opioids is usually reserved for severe pain associated with OA. These agents do not come without risk, especially for older adults. Patient-specific parameters and comorbid conditions must be considered when evaluating treatment options for older adults. This article reviews pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches to the management of OA in older adults.

  20. Condylomata acuminata treatment in adults and children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Michalska, I.; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Chmielewski, J.

    1995-03-01

    Nd:YAG laser therapy was applied in 43 adults and 7 children with condylomata acuminata. The dosages of radiation and the procedures depended upon the extent of the lesions. A complete clearing occurred in 94% of the cases, and in 6% there were relapses. The procedure should be performed in children under general anesthesia, and in adults under local anesthesia since radiation with Nd:YAG laser is rather painful. The healing was uneventful, with no scarring, and the results appear to be better than obtained with cryotherapy which gives 80.8% of complete clearing.

  1. MRI in treatment of adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Henson, John W; Gaviani, Paola; Gonzalez, R Gilberto

    2005-03-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas of the adult cerebral hemispheres are unique among tumours in human beings in the extent to which their imaging features are related to histopathological characteristics and clinical behaviour. However, understanding is still restricted about the value of imaging features in the measurement of response and of progression in these tumours. The present approach used in clinical trials, which consists of an anatomical measurement of the enhancing tumour on MRI, has many problems, and might not be acceptable as a surrogate endpoint for survival in patients with glioblastoma who are enrolled in clinical trials. Dynamic imaging techniques, such as capillary permeability mapping, are being used in studies of new drugs that target specific molecular features of gliomas; however, the validity of these techniques has not been elucidated. Diffusion imaging can be valuable for fibre-tract mapping to assist surgical planning and might become useful in measuring early response to treatment in densely cellular tumours. Functional imaging techniques can be used to localise motor, sensory, and language-control areas before surgery. Intraoperative MRI has produced improvements in the extent of tumour resection, and molecular imaging is another technique on the horizon, which could come to have a role in clinical trials in the near future. Thus, as a rapidly expanding sphere of investigation, brain-tumour imaging is producing great excitement. The aim of these new techniques is to aid the identification of more effective treatments.

  2. Modafinil treatment of amphetamine abuse in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Mann, N; Bitsios, P

    2009-06-01

    Substance abuse is a frequent co-morbid condition of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment with conventional psychostimulants in adult ADHD with co-morbid stimulant abuse may be problematic. In this study, we report the case of a patient with adult ADHD with co-morbid amphetamine abuse who was treated successfully with the non-stimulant alertness-promoting drug modafinil. The drug resolved both the inattention/hyperactivity symptoms as well as the amphetamine abuse. Modafinil may be a suitable candidate treatment for adults with ADHD and stimulant abuse.

  3. Treatment of adult female acne: a new challenge.

    PubMed

    Dréno, B

    2015-06-01

    Acne is affecting an increasing number of adult females and so can no longer be considered as a disease of adolescence. The disease has a greater negative impact on the quality of life of adult females than their younger counterparts. Adult female acne may persist from adolescence or may have its first occurrence once adulthood has been reached. The clinical presentation and pathogenesis of adult female acne may be somewhat different to that of adolescent acne and this may require a different treatment approach. Genetic and hormonal factors are thought to play key roles in the pathogenesis of adult female acne and the disease is characterized by a chronic evolution with frequent relapses requiring long-term maintenance therapy. Fixed-dose retinoid/antimicrobial combinations may be of interest for the treatment of adult female acne given that subgroup analysis of clinical trials has indicated that they are effective against both inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions in these patients. These treatments may also be of interest, given the chronic course of the disease in adult females, the high likelihood of the presence of antibiotic-resistant P. acnes and the poor adherence of patients to other long-term therapies. Oral hormonal treatment or isotretinoin may be required in patients with severe acne or disease that is refractory to other treatments. Additional clinical studies of acne treatments specifically conducted in adult female patients are required to increase the evidence base on which future treatment recommendations can be based.

  4. Adults seeking orthodontic treatment: expectations, periodontal and TMD issues.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L; Luther, F

    2015-02-16

    The growth in adult orthodontics presents new challenges to both the general dental practitioner and the orthodontist. Although many of the main objectives of orthodontic treatment are similar for adults, young adults and children, adult patients frequently bring significant challenges in several areas not often seen in the younger patient group. In areas such as planning realistic treatment outcomes, it is paramount that the patient's expectations are identified, respected and managed where appropriate. The adult patient's dental health often dictates deviation from the ideal treatment plan and periodontal problems are a common example. Based on current evidence, this paper presents an overview of some of the difficulties in the management of these issues, as well as highlighting developments with regard to pain conditions and their relevance to orthodontic treatment and its effects on temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) management.

  5. Adult bowel intussusception: presentation, location, etiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    LIANOS, G.; XEROPOTAMOS, N.; BALI, C.; BALTOGIANNIS, G.; IGNATIADOU, E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Bowel intussusception is rare in adults but common in children. Almost 90% of adult intussusceptions are secondary to a pathologic condition and the clinical picture can be very aspecific and challenging. In this review we discuss the symptoms, location, etiology, characteristics, diagnostic methods and treatment strategies of this rare and enigmatic clinical entity in adults. We have to highlight the high index of suspicion that is necessary for the operating surgeon, when dealing with acute, subacute or chronic abdominal pain in adults, because any misinterpretation may result in unfavorable outcomes. PMID:24629817

  6. Research Forum on Psychological Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Margaret; Safren, Steven A.; Solanto, Mary V.; Hechtman, Lily; Rostain, Anthony L.; Ramsay, J. Russell; Murray, Candice

    2008-01-01

    Background: A literature search found five empirical studies of psychological treatment for adults with ADHD, out of 1,419 articles on ADHD in adults. Practice guidelines to date all recommend multimodal intervention, given that a significant number of patients cannot tolerate, do not respond to, or fail to reach optimal outcomes with medication…

  7. Functional Outcomes in the Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Lenard A.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Levine, Louise R.; Ramsey, Janet L.; Tamura, Roy; Kelsey, Douglas; Ball, Susan G.; Allen, Albert J.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with significant functional impairment in adults. The present study examined functional outcomes following 6-month double-blind treatment with either atomoxetine or placebo. Method: Patients were 410 adults (58.5% male) with "DSM-IV"--defined ADHD. They were randomly assigned to receive either atomoxetine 40 mg/day to…

  8. Treatment issues for children with epilepsy transitioning to adult care.

    PubMed

    Nabbout, Rima; Camfield, Carol S; Andrade, Danielle M; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Chiron, Catherine; Cramer, Joyce A; French, Jacqueline A; Kossoff, Eric; Mula, Marco; Camfield, Peter R

    2017-02-07

    This is the third of three papers that summarize the second symposium on Transition in Epilepsies held in Paris in June 2016. This paper focuses on treatment issues that arise during the course of childhood epilepsy and make the process of transition to adult care more complicated. Some AEDs used during childhood, such as stiripentol, vigabatrin, and cannabidiol, are unfamiliar to adult epilepsy specialists. In addition, new drugs are being developed for treatment of specific childhood onset epilepsy syndromes and have no indication yet for adults. The ketogenic diet may be effective during childhood but is difficult to continue in adult care. Regional adult epilepsy diet clinics could be helpful. Polytherapy is common for patients transitioning to adult care. Although these complex AED regimes are difficult, they are often possible to simplify. AEDs used in childhood may need to be reconsidered in adulthood. Rescue medications to stop prolonged seizures and clusters of seizures are in wide home use in children and can be continued in adulthood. Adherence/compliance is notoriously difficult for adolescents, but there are simple clinical approaches that should be helpful. Mental health issues including depression and anxiety are not always diagnosed and treated in children and young adults even though effective treatments are available. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and aggressive behavior disorders may interfere with transition and successful adulthood but these can be treated. For the majority, the adult social outcome of children with epilepsy is unsatisfactory with few proven interventions. The interface between pediatric and adult care for children with epilepsy is becoming increasingly complicated with a need for more comprehensive transition programs and adult epileptologists who are knowledgeable about special treatments that benefit this group of patients.

  9. Cognitive-behavioral treatment of food neophobia in adults.

    PubMed

    Marcontell, Deborah K; Laster, Alison E; Johnson, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Food neophobia is an eating disturbance defined as the fear of trying new foods. In its extreme, the disorder can lead to malnutrition, limited social functioning, and psychological difficulties. Successful treatment of food neophobia in children has been reported, but if those children are not provided with treatment, it stands to reason that the disorder may follow them into adulthood. To date, adult cases have not been described in the literature and the prevalence in adults is unknown. Our paper will review the methods used to treat children with the disorder then delineate how the procedures were modified for an adult population, giving two case examples.

  10. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

    2015-01-01

    This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet. PMID:25830872

  11. [Endocrine consequences in young adult survivors of childhood cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Leroy, C; Cortet-Rudelli, C; Desailloud, R

    2015-10-01

    Endocrine complications (particularly gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary and metabolic) of childhood cancer treatments are common in young adults. Gonadal damage may be the result of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Fertility preservation must be systematically proposed before initiation of gonadotoxic treatment if only the child is eligible. Hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency is common after brain or total-body irradiation, the somatotropic axis is the most sensitive to irradiation. Pituitary deficiency screening must be repeated since this endocrine consequence can occur many years after treatment. Hormone replacement must be prudent particularly in case of treatment with growth hormone or steroids. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular damage resulting from cancer treatments contribute to the increase of morbidity and mortality in this population and should be screened routinely even if the patient is asymptomatic. The multidisciplinary management of these adults must be organized and the role of the endocrinologist is now well established.

  12. Treatment of specific phobia in adults.

    PubMed

    Choy, Yujuan; Fyer, Abby J; Lipsitz, Josh D

    2007-04-01

    This is a comprehensive review of treatment studies in specific phobia. Acute and long-term efficacy studies of in vivo exposure, virtual reality, cognitive therapy and other treatments from 1960 to 2005 were retrieved from computer search engines. Although specific phobia is a chronic illness and animal extinction studies suggest that relapse is a common phenomenon, little is known about long-term outcome. Treatment gains are generally maintained for one year, but longer follow-up studies are needed to better understand and prevent relapse. Acutely, the treatments are not equally effective among the phobia subtypes. Most phobias respond robustly to in vivo exposure, but it is associated with high dropout rates and low treatment acceptance. Response to systematic desensitization is more moderate. A few studies suggest that virtual reality may be effective in flying and height phobia, but this needs to be substantiated by more controlled trials. Cognitive therapy is most helpful in claustrophobia, and blood-injury phobia is uniquely responsive to applied tension. The limited data on medication have not been promising with the exception of adjunctive D-clycoserine. Despite the acute benefits of in vivo exposure, greater attention should be paid to improve treatment acceptance and retention, and additional controlled studies of more acceptable treatments are needed.

  13. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Gregory W; Kravitz, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable option for older children as well. But what about young adults? Can the skeletal and dental changes seen in expansion/facemask therapy in children and adolescents be demonstrated in this age group as well, possibly eliminating the need for orthodontic dental camouflage treatment or orthognathic surgery? A case report is presented of an adult class III malocclusion with a Class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Treatment was with nonextraction, comprehensive edgewise mechanics with slow maxillary expansion with a bonded expander and protraction facemask.

  14. Treatment of Adult Primary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the distal air spaces and terminal bronchi, which may lead to impaired gas exchange. This accumulation of surfactant is due to decreased clearance by the alveolar macrophages. Its primary, most common form, is currently considered an autoimmune disease. Better knowledge of the causes of PAP have led to the emergence of alternatives to whole lung lavage, although this is still considered the treatment of choice. Most studies are case series, often with limited patient numbers, so the level of evidence is low. Since the severity of presentation and clinical course are variable, not all patients will require treatment. Due to the low level of evidence, some objective criteria based on expert opinion have been arbitrarily proposed in an attempt to define in which patients it is best to initiate treatment.

  15. Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Ribera, Jordi; Genescà, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts and the results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA). After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALL in the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority of pediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies in young adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewed emphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with event-free survival rates of 60–65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that the unfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescents with ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensive chemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which are more frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like), deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents have been translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of these patients in recent years. PMID:25045460

  16. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma Survival Improved With Treatment on Multimodality Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit Kurshan; Wexler, Leonard H.; Singer, Samuel; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric sarcoma rarely occurring in adults. For unknown reasons, adults with RMS have worse outcomes than do children. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from all patients who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1990 and 2011 with RMS diagnosed at age 16 or older. One hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Ten were excluded for lack of adequate data. Results: The median age was 28 years. The histologic diagnoses were as follows: embryonal 54%, alveolar 33%, pleomorphic 12%, and not otherwise specified 2%. The tumor site was unfavorable in 67% of patients. Thirty-three patients (24%) were at low risk, 61 (44%) at intermediate risk, and 44 (32%) at high risk. Forty-six percent were treated on or according to a prospective RMS protocol. The 5-year rate of overall survival (OS) was 45% for patients with nonmetastatic disease. The failure rates at 5 years for patients with nonmetastatic disease were 34% for local failure and 42% for distant failure. Among patients with nonmetastatic disease (n=94), significant factors associated with OS were histologic diagnosis, site, risk group, age, and protocol treatment. On multivariate analysis, risk group and protocol treatment were significant after adjustment for age. The 5-year OS was 54% for protocol patients versus 36% for nonprotocol patients. Conclusions: Survival in adult patients with nonmetastatic disease was significantly improved for those treated on RMS protocols, most of which are now open to adults.

  17. Adult heavy and low users of dental services: treatment provided.

    PubMed

    Nihtilä, Annamari; Widström, Eeva; Elonheimo, Outi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment provided to adult heavy and low users of dental services in the Finnish Public Dental Service (PDS) and to analyse changes in patients' oral health status. We assigned all adults who attended the PDS in Espoo in 2004 to a group of heavy users (n = 3,173) if they had made six or more dental visits and to a comparison group of low users (n = 22,820), if they had made three or fewer dental visits. Data were obtained from the patient register of the PDS. A sample of 320 patients was randomly selected from each group. Baseline information (year 2004) on age, sex, number and types of visits, oral health status and treatment provided was collected from treatment records. Both groups were followed-up for five years. Restorative treatment measures dominated the heavy and low users'treatments; 88.8% of heavy users and 79.6% low users had received restorations during the five-year period. Fixed prosthetic treatments were provided to just 2% of the heavy users and 0.8% of the low users. Emergency visits were more common for heavy users (74.8%) than for low users (21.6%) (p < 0.001). Fewer than half of the heavy (46.1%) or low (46.5%) users were examined twice. Typical for heavy use of oral health services was a cycle of repetitive repair or replacement of restorations, often as emergency treatment, a lack of proper examinations and preventive care; crown therapy was seldom used. Immediately after the major dental care reform in Finland, the PDS in Espoo had problems providing good quality dental care for the new adult patients. Older patients with lower social class background were not accustomed to regular dental care and the PDS did not actively propose proper comprehensive regular care for adults.

  18. A meal preparation treatment protocol for adults with brain injury.

    PubMed

    Neistadt, M E

    1994-05-01

    Adults with acquired brain injury often demonstrate dysfunction in meal preparation due to deficits in component cognitive-perceptual skills. Although occupational therapy for these clients routinely includes meal preparation training, there are no protocols in the occupational therapy literature to help structure that activity to address clients' cognitive-perceptual deficits. This paper describes a meal preparation treatment protocol based on cognitive-perceptual information processing theory that has been pilot tested in a treatment outcome study with adult men with traumatic or anoxic acquired brain injury. In that study, the group of 23 subjects treated with this meal preparation protocol showed significant improvement in their meal preparation skill, as measured by the Rabideau Kitchen Evaluation-Revised (RKE-R), a test of meal preparation skill, and in their cognitive-perceptual skill, as measured by the WAIS-R Block Design Test. The treatment protocol includes descriptions of the structure, grading, and cuing methods for light meal preparation activities.

  19. Adult chronic sleepwalking and its treatment based on polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, Christian; Kirisoglu, Ceyda; Bao, Gang; Arias, Viola; Chan, Allison; Li, Kasey K

    2005-05-01

    Adult sleepwalking affects 2.5% of the general population and may lead to serious injuries. Fifty young adults with chronic sleepwalking were studied prospectively. Clinical evaluation, questionnaires from patients and bed partners, and polysomnography were obtained on all subjects in comparison with 50 age-matched controls. Subjects were examined for the presence of psychiatric anxiety, depression and any other associated sleep disorder. Isolated sleepwalking or sleepwalking with psychiatric disorders was treated with medication. All other patients with other sleep disorders were treated only for their associated problem. Prospective follow-up lasted 12 months after establishment of the most appropriate treatment. Patients with only sleepwalking, treated with benzodiazepines, dropped out of follow-up testing and reported persistence of sleepwalking, as did patients with psychiatric-related treatment. Chronic sleepwalkers frequently presented with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). All these patients were treated only for their SDB, using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). All nasal CPAP-compliant patients had control of sleepwalking at all stages of follow-up. Non-compliant nasal CPAP patients had persistence of sleepwalking. They were offered surgical treatment for SDB. Those successfully treated with surgery also had complete resolution of sleepwalking. Successful treatment of SDB, which is frequently associated with chronic sleepwalking, controlled the syndrome in young adults.

  20. Atomoxetine: a novel treatment for child and adult ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Ledbetter, Marcialee

    2006-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common chronic condition with childhood onset that can continue into adulthood. Medication is a fundamental element in the management of this disorder. Atomoxetine is the newest nonstimulant medication approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of ADHD. It is the only nonstimulant medication approved by the FDA for treatment of adult ADHD. Atomoxetine is a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that selectively inhibits the presynaptic norepinephrine transporter. A growing body of literature supports the use of atomoxetine both in children and adults with ADHD. This paper summarizes information from the literature about atomoxetine, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical trials, dosing, and side-effects. PMID:19412494

  1. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Spasticity in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Moeini-Naghani, Iman; Hashemi-Zonouz, Taraneh; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    Spasticity is a frequent symptom in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral or spinal trauma, and cerebral palsy that affects and disables a large number of adults and children. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology and nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments of spasticity with emphasis on the role of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The world literature is reviewed on double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials reporting safety and efficacy of BoNT treatment in adult spasticity and spasticity of children with cerebral palsy. The evidence for efficacy is presented from recommendations of the Assessment and Therapeutics subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. A technical section describes the techniques and recommended doses of BoNTs in spasticity.

  2. Group treatment of adult male inpatients abused as children.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, L Y

    1994-10-01

    Recent research indicates that childhood abuse experiences characterize a large subset of psychiatric inpatients. This paper presents a time-limited pilot group developed for adult male abuse survivors in an inpatient setting using: (1) techniques adapted from the existing literature on treatment of abuse survivors; and (2) approaches deriving from the interface of theory and current manifestations of distress. The eclectic therapeutic approach incorporated psychoeducational, cognitive, behavioral, and art therapy techniques presented below in a session-by-session format.

  3. Current pharmacotherapeutic concepts for the treatment of obesity in adults.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Evgeny; Kirch, Wilhelm; Schindler, Christoph

    2009-02-01

    Obesity is one of the greatest public health challenges of the twenty-first century. The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that in 2005 approximately 1.6 billion adults were overweight and at least 400 million adults were obese. The prevalence of obesity is still continuing to increase dramatically. Overweight and obese people carry a higher risk for a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral occlusive artery disease. Weight loss is considered to be the initial step which helps to prevent or to control the clinical consequences of obesity. In a great number of patients who are not able to reduce weight by means of non-pharmacological measures, drug therapy can assist in reaching the weight management targets. Drug treatment should only be considered as part of a systematic weight management program including dietary and lifestyle changes. This review summarizes current pharmacotherapeutic concepts for the treatment of obesity in adults focusing on efficacy and safety of anti-obesity drugs.

  4. Delay Discounting in Adults Receiving Treatment for Marijuana Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica N.; Petry, Nancy M.; LaPaglia, Donna M.; Reynolds, Brady; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Delay discounting is an index of impulsive decision-making and reflects an individual’s preference for smaller immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards. Multiple studies have indicated comparatively high rates of discounting among tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, and other types of drug users, but few studies have examined discounting among marijuana users. This report is a secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial that randomized adults with marijuana dependence to receive one of four treatments that involved contingency management (CM) and cognitive–behavioral therapy interventions. Delay discounting was assessed with the Experiential Discounting Task (Reynolds & Schiffbauer, 2004) at pretreatment in 93 participants and at 12 weeks posttreatment in 61 participants. Results indicated that higher pretreatment delay discounting (i.e., more impulsive decision-making) significantly correlated with lower readiness to change marijuana use (r = − 0.22, p = .03) and greater number of days of cigarette use (r = .21, p = .04). Pretreatment discounting was not associated with any marijuana treatment outcomes. CM treatment significantly interacted with time to predict change in delay discounting from pre- to posttreatment; participants who received CM did not change their discounting over time, whereas those who did not receive CM significantly increased their discounting from pre- to posttreatment. In this sample of court-referred young adults receiving treatment for marijuana dependence, delay discounting was not strongly related to treatment outcomes, but there was some evidence that CM may protect against time-related increases in discounting. PMID:23245197

  5. Selecting initial treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Stahl, Maximilian; Zeidan, Amer M; Gore, Steven D

    2016-10-08

    More than half of the patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are older than 60years. The treatment outcomes in this group remain poor with a median overall survival of <1year. Selecting initial treatment for these patients involves an assessment of 'fitness' for induction chemotherapy. This is done based on patient and disease-related characteristics which help to estimate treatment-related mortality and chance of complete remission with induction chemotherapy. If the risk of treatment-related mortality is high and/or the likelihood of a patient achieving a complete remission is low, lower-intensity treatment (low-dose cytarabine, decitabine and azacitidine) should be discussed. As outcomes in both groups of patients remain poor, enrolment into clinical trials of novel agents with varying mechanisms of action should be considered for all older adults with AML. Novel agents in Phase III development include CPX-351, guadecitabine (SGI-110), quizartinib, crenolanib, sapacitabine, vosaroxin and volasertib.

  6. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  7. Addiction Treatment Experience among a Cohort of Street-Involved Youths and Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Jellena; Marshall, Brandon D. L.; Kerr, Thomas; Lai, Calvin; Wood, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the accessibility and potential barriers to addiction treatment among street youths and young adults. We sought to examine the prevalence and correlates of enrollment in addiction treatment among a cohort of street-involved youths and young adults in Vancouver, Canada. Street-involved youths and young adults who use…

  8. Surgical treatment of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Taussky, Philipp; Couldwell, William T

    2014-01-01

    Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a rare disorder that may require neurosurgical expertise for definitive management; however, surgical management of FD in adult patients is uncommon. Although other therapies have been shown to slow progression, the only definitive cure for adult craniofacial FD is complete resection with subsequent reconstruction. The authors review the biological, epidemiologic, clinical, genetic, and radiographic characteristics of adult FD, with an emphasis on surgical management of FD. They present a small series of three adult patients with complex FD that highlights the surgical complexity required in some adult patients with FD. Because of the complex nature of these adult polyostotic craniofacial cases, the authors used neurosurgical techniques specific to the different surgical indications, including a transsphenoidal approach for resection of sphenoidal sinus FD, a transmaxillary approach to decompress the maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve with widening of the foramen rotundum, and complete calvarial craniectomy with cranioplasty reconstruction. These cases exemplify the diverse range of skull base techniques required in the spectrum of surgical management of adult FD and demonstrate that novel variations on standard neurosurgical approaches to the skull base can provide successful outcomes with minimal complications in adults with complex craniofacial FD.

  9. Development of a New Psychosocial Treatment for Adult ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solanto, Mary V.; Marks, David J.; Mitchell, Katherine J.; Wasserstein, Jeanette; Kofman, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a new manualized group Meta-Cognitive Therapy (MCT) for adults with ADHD that extends the principles and practices of cognitive-behavioral therapy to the development of executive self-management skills. Method: Thirty adults diagnosed with ADHD completed an 8- or 12-week…

  10. Emerging from Depression: Treatment of Adolescent Depression Using the Major Treatment Models of Adult Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kathleen M.

    Noting that adolescents who commit suicide are often clinically depressed, this paper examines various approaches in the treatment of depression. Major treatment models of adult depression, which can be directly applied to the treatment of the depressed adolescent, are described. Major treatment models and selected research studies are reviewed in…

  11. Systematic review of the impact of adult drug treatment courts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Randall T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. correctional system is overburdened by individuals suffering from substance use disorders. These illnesses also exact a heavy toll in individual and public health and well-being. Effective methods for reducing the negative impact of substance use disorders comprise critical concerns for policy makers. Drug court treatment programs (DTCs) are present in over 1800 county, tribal, and territorial jurisdictions in the United States, as an alternative to incarceration for offenders with substance use disorders. This review article summarizes available descriptive information on representative drug treatment court populations, summarizes observational studies of drug court participants, and specifically reviews available experimental effectiveness literature on drug treatment courts. The review concludes by examining limitations of the current literature, challenges to conducting research in drug court samples, and potential future directions for research on drug treatment court interventions. Review of non-experimental and quasi-experimental literature regarding the impact of drug treatment courts point toward benefit vs. traditional adjudication in averting future criminal behavior and in reducing future substance use, at least in the short term. Randomized effectiveness studies of drug treatment courts are scant (three identified in the literature on U.S. adult drug courts), and methodological issues arise in combining their findings. These randomized trials failed to demonstrate consistent effect upon re-arrest rates for drug-involved offenders participating in drug treatment court vs. typical adjudication. The two studies examining reconviction and reincarceration, however, demonstrated reductions for the drug treatment court group vs. those typically adjudicated. PMID:20478542

  12. Tuberculosis case burden and treatment outcomes in children, adults and older adults, Vanuatu, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Tagaro, M; Harries, A D; Kool, B; Ram, S; Viney, K; Marais, B; Tarivonda, L

    2014-06-21

    Contexte : Les cinq centres DOTS du Vanuatu.Objectifs : Déterminer le fardeau de la tuberculose (TB) à travers les classes d'âge, le profil de la maladie et les résultats du traitement des patients enregistré entre 2007 et 2011.Schema : Etude de cohorte rétrospective impliquant des registres de TB et des cartes de traitement.Resultats : Sur 588 patients enregistrés, 142 (24%) étaient des enfants (âgés de 0–14 ans), 327 étaient des adultes (âgés de 15–54 ans) et 119 des adultes plus âgés (âgés de ⩾55 ans, subdivisés en 55–64 et ⩾65 ans). Parmi eux, 568 étaient des nouveaux patients, et 13 avaient déjà été traités ; pour 7 d'entre eux, le statut était inconnu. Comparés aux adultes, les enfants avec une TB nouvelle avaient une plus grande prévalence de TB extra pulmonaire (75% contre 34% ; OR 5,7 ; IC95% 3,6–9,0) et une prévalence plus faible de TB pulmonaire frottis positif (11% contre 45% ; OR 0,15 ; IC95% 0,3–0,3). Les adultes âgés de ⩾55 ans avaient une prévalence plus élevée de TB pulmonaire à frottis négatif (38% contre 21% ; OR 2,4 ; IC95% 1,5–3,8). Le succès du traitement de la TB a été de 83% pour l'ensemble du groupe, mais seulement de 67% pour les patients âgés de ⩾65 ans avec un taux de létalité de 18%.Conclusion : Les enfants et les adultes plus âgés constituent 45% du fardeau de la TB au Vanuatu. Les différences constatées en termes de profil de la maladie et de résultats thérapeutiques moins bons chez les adultes âgés ont des implications en matière de politique et de pratiques.

  13. Treatment for Adults (with Cleft Lip and Palate)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, hearing, dentistry, speech, oral surgery, nursing, and psychology among others. You can obtain the names of ... of the cleft team, particularly the psychologist and social worker. Interaction with other adults with clefts, through ...

  14. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Fashner, Julia; Ericson, Kevin; Werner, Sarah

    2012-07-15

    The common cold, or upper respiratory tract infection, is one of the leading reasons for physician visits. Generally caused by viruses, the common cold is treated symptomatically. Antibiotics are not effective in children or adults. In children, there is a potential for harm and no benefits with over-the-counter cough and cold medications; therefore, they should not be used in children younger than four years. Other commonly used medications, such as inhaled corticosteroids, oral prednisolone, and Echinacea, also are ineffective in children. Products that improve symptoms in children include vapor rub, zinc sulfate, Pelargonium sidoides (geranium) extract, and buckwheat honey. Prophylactic probiotics, zinc sulfate, nasal saline irrigation, and the herbal preparation Chizukit reduce the incidence of colds in children. For adults, antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, codeine, nasal saline irrigation, Echinacea angustifolia preparations, and steam inhalation are ineffective at relieving cold symptoms. Pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, inhaled ipratropium, and zinc (acetate or gluconate) modestly reduce the severity and duration of symptoms for adults. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and some herbal preparations, including Echinacea purpurea, improve symptoms in adults. Prophylactic use of garlic may decrease the frequency of colds in adults, but has no effect on duration of symptoms. Hand hygiene reduces the spread of viruses that cause cold illnesses. Prophylactic vitamin C modestly reduces cold symptom duration in adults and children.

  15. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  16. Characteristics of Abuse that Influence When Adults Molested as Children Seek Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen A.

    This study explored the relationship between characteristics of abuse and time before seeking treatment for adults molested as children. Those who sought early treatment were called early presenters; those who sought treatment later in life were called late presenters. Data were collected from intake interviews of 364 adults molested as children.…

  17. HIV, antiretroviral treatment, hypertension, and stroke in Malawian adults

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Connor, Myles D.; Mzinganjira, Henry; Kampondeni, Sam; Choko, Augustine; Hopkins, Mark; Emsley, Hedley C.A.; Bryer, Alan; Faragher, Brian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Allain, Theresa J.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate HIV, its treatment, and hypertension as stroke risk factors in Malawian adults. Methods: We performed a case-control study of 222 adults with acute stroke, confirmed by MRI in 86%, and 503 population controls, frequency-matched for age, sex, and place of residence, using Global Positioning System for random selection. Multivariate logistic regression models were used for case-control comparisons. Results: HIV infection (population attributable fraction [PAF] 15%) and hypertension (PAF 46%) were strongly linked to stroke. HIV was the predominant risk factor for young stroke (≤45 years), with a prevalence of 67% and an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) (95% confidence interval) of 5.57 (2.43–12.8) (PAF 42%). There was an increased risk of a stroke in patients with untreated HIV infection (aOR 4.48 [2.44–8.24], p < 0.001), but the highest risk was in the first 6 months after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) (aOR 15.6 [4.21–46.6], p < 0.001); this group had a lower median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (92 vs 375 cells/mm3, p = 0.004). In older participants (HIV prevalence 17%), HIV was associated with stroke, but with a lower PAF than hypertension (5% vs 68%). There was no interaction between HIV and hypertension on stroke risk. Conclusions: In a population with high HIV prevalence, where stroke incidence is increasing, we have shown that HIV is an important risk factor. Early ART use in immunosuppressed patients poses an additional and potentially treatable stroke risk. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome may be contributing to the disease mechanisms. PMID:26683649

  18. Clinical gender differences among adult pathological gamblers seeking treatment.

    PubMed

    Echeburúa, Enrique; González-Ortega, Itxaso; de Corral, Paz; Polo-López, Rocío

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the gender-related differences in demographics, gambling measures, psychological functioning, and motivation for therapy in an outpatient sample of pathological gamblers seeking treatment. Participants in this multisite study included 103 adult outpatients (51 women and 52 men) meeting current DSM-IV-TR criteria for PG. Logistic regression was used to examine if gender was related together to categorical and continuous independent variables. Female gamblers were older than men and more likely to be divorced or widowed and to have a lower annual income. Women became more dependent on bingo and men on slot machines. Gambling motivation and the course of illness for both sexes were also different. Female gamblers were more anxious and with a poorer self-esteem than male gamblers and more affected by depressive symptoms; in turn, men were more impulsive and higher sensation seekers than women and more affected by drug/alcohol abuse. The 68.6% of female gamblers reported being victims of intimate partner violence. There were no gender differences about the motivation for treatment. Future research should examine gambling behaviors and psychological functioning and suggest treatment approaches to address specific goals according to these gender-related differences.

  19. CPR: Adult

    MedlinePlus

    Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Adult (2:03) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course ...

  20. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone.

  1. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone. PMID:25429246

  2. Invisalign technique in the treatment of adults with pre-restorative concerns.

    PubMed

    Mampieri, Gianluca; Giancotti, Aldo

    2013-10-20

    The Invisalign method is gaining an increasing interest as an alternative treatment option in adult patient in multidisciplinary complex cases to simplify the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to show the importance of planning a multidisciplinary approach to respond at the esthetic requests of adult patients and to treat complex cases with high predictability.

  3. Invisalign technique in the treatment of adults with pre-restorative concerns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Invisalign method is gaining an increasing interest as an alternative treatment option in adult patient in multidisciplinary complex cases to simplify the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to show the importance of planning a multidisciplinary approach to respond at the esthetic requests of adult patients and to treat complex cases with high predictability. PMID:24325954

  4. A Model for Group Treatment of Adults Molested as Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Shirley; McBride, Martha C.

    It has been estimated that 85% of all women seeking therapy are adults molested as children (AMACs). Group counseling with AMACs is recommended, with groups having homogeneity in terms of presenting problems and heterogeneity in group members' ability to deal with their sexual abuse. Groups should be closed, meet once or twice a week for 2-hour…

  5. Adult treatment with removal of all four permanent canines.

    PubMed

    Freeman, R S

    1994-11-01

    The permanent canines-especially in the maxillary arch-have always been considered of prime importance, even before the "cuspid protection" hypothesis became well known to most orthodontists in the 1960s. In the adult case presented, periodontal considerations and other factors led to the unconventional (and likely controversial) extraction of all four canines.

  6. Adult Patent Ductus Arteriosus: Treatment with a Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, J.J. Urbaneja, A.; Gonzalez, N.; Martinez, J.L.

    2008-03-15

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a short patent ductus arteriosus and aneurysmal pulmonary arteries who was treated by placement of a stent-graft. The technique proved simple and safe. Further research is required to improve the design of stent-grafts and their release system for use of this technique in adult patients with this disorder.

  7. Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil S.; Brown, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk…

  8. Rituximab in the Treatment of Refractory Adult and Juvenile Dermatomyositis and Adult Polymyositis: A Randomized, Placebo-phase Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oddis, Chester V.; Reed, Ann M.; Aggarwal, Rohit; Rider, Lisa G.; Ascherman, Dana P.; Levesque, Marc C.; Barohn, Richard J.; Feldman, Brian M.; Harris-Love, Michael O.; Koontz, Diane C.; Fertig, Noreen; Kelley, Stephanie S.; Pryber, Sherrie L.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rockette, Howard E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of rituximab in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-phase, trial of adult and pediatric myositis. Methods Adults with refractory polymyositis and adults and children with refractory dermatomyositis were enrolled. Entry criteria included muscle weakness and ≥2 additional abnormal core set measures (CSM) for adults. JDM patients required ≥ 3 abnormal CSM with or without muscle weakness. Patients were randomized to either ‘rituximab early’ or ‘rituximab late’ and glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive therapy were allowed at entry. The primary endpoint compared the time to achieve the preliminary International Myositis Assessment and Clinical Studies Group definition of improvement (DOI) between the 2 groups. The secondary endpoints were time to achieve ≥20% improvement in muscle strength, and the proportion of early and late rituximab patients achieving DOI at week 8. Results Among 200 randomized patients (76 PM/76 DM/48 JDM), 195 showed no difference in the time to DOI between the rituximab late (n=102) and rituximab early (n=93) groups (p=0.74, log rank) with a median time to DOI of 20.2 weeks and 20.0 weeks respectively. The secondary endpoints also did not significantly differ between the two treatment groups. However, 161 (83%) of randomized patients met the DOI and individual CSM improved in both groups throughout the 44-week trial. Conclusion Although there were no significant differences in the two treatment arms for the primary and secondary endpoints, 83% of refractory adult and juvenile myositis patients met the DOI. The role of B cell depleting therapies in myositis warrants further study with consideration for a different trial design. PMID:23124935

  9. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  10. Adult Orbital Xanthogranulomatous Disease: A Review with Emphasis on Etiology, Systemic Associations, Diagnostic Tools, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kerstetter, Justin; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Adult orbital xanthogranulomatous diseases are rare entities and encompass a group of disorders with varying manifestations that are poorly understood. Taken as a group, there are non-Langerhans histiocytic disorders (type II) that are diagnosed histologically by the presence of foamy histiocytes, Touton giant cells, and varying degrees of fibrosis. Based on the accompanying systemic associations, there are 4 main categories of adult xanthogranulomatous disease: adult-onset xanthogranuloma, adult-onset asthma and periocular xanthogranuloma, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, and Erdheim-Chester disease. Herein, we discuss the etiopathogenesis, systemic associations, methods of diagnosis, and treatment options for these disorders.

  11. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric = 0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826

  12. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  13. Depression Treatment Non-adherence and its Psychosocial Predictors: Differences between Young and Older Adults?

    PubMed

    Stein-Shvachman, Ifat; Karpas, Dikla Segel; Werner, Perla

    2013-09-20

    Depression is a common disease among young and older adults. Although it can be treated, non-adherence is very common among individuals of different ages. The aim of the present paper is to review and summarize research findings regarding depression among young and older adults, with a special focus on the phenomenon of treatment non-adherence among young and older adults with depression. The first section of the review focuses on describing the characteristics of depression in young and older adults. The second section focuses on treatment non-adherence of young and older adults, the prevalence of this phenomenon, and its consequences. The third section focuses on several factors (illness beliefs, treatment beliefs, self-stigma, and self-esteem) that were identified as having a significant association with treatment non-adherence of individuals with depression, with special attention focused on age differences. Results of the review of the literature reveal that research in the area of depression treatment non-adherence and its predictors among young and older adults has received, to date, very minor and limited attention. Thus, there is a need to expand the current body of knowledge and promote future interventions geared towards the unique characteristics of depression among young and older adults, in order to increase their treatment adherence.

  14. Treatment of paediatric APL: how does the therapeutic approach differ from adults?

    PubMed

    Kutny, Matthew A; Gregory, John; Feusner, James H

    2014-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in children and adolescents shares many features with APL in adults. There are important distinctions, however, between these age groups in the presentation, complications and treatment outcomes. Paediatric patients are more likely to present with high risk features including elevated WBC count or microgranular variant (M3v). Yet the early death rate is lower in paediatric patients compared to adult patients. Overall outcomes such as CR, OS and EFS appear similar in paediatric and adult patients treated on similar regimens except that very young children may have a higher risk of relapse. While contemporary studies have clearly demonstrated improved survival in adults receiving ATO therapy, currently there is more limited data on the role of ATO in paediatric patients. Here we highlight the similarities and important distinctions between paediatric and adult APL while reviewing available data on treatment of paediatric APL.

  15. Neurocognitive predictors of treatment response to randomized treatment in adults with tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Amitai; Hallion, Lauren S; Reese, Hannah E; Woods, Douglas W; Peterson, Alan; Walkup, John T; Piacentini, John; Scahill, Lawrence; Deckersbach, Thilo; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2017-03-06

    Tourette's disorder (TS) and chronic tic disorder (CTD) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by involuntary vocal and motor tics. Consequently, TS/CTD have been conceptualized as disorders of cognitive and motor inhibitory control. However, most neurocognitive studies have found comparable or superior inhibitory capacity among individuals with TS/CTD relative to healthy controls. These findings have led to the hypothesis that individuals with TS/CTD develop increased inhibitory control due to the constant need to inhibit tics. However, the role of cognitive control in TS/CTD is not yet understood, particularly in adults. To examine the role of inhibitory control in TS/CTD, the present study investigated this association by assessing the relationship between inhibitory control and treatment response in a large sample of adults with TS/CTD. As part of a large randomized trial comparing behavior therapy versus supportive psychotherapy for TS/CTD, a battery of tests, including tests of inhibitory control was administered to 122 adults with TS/CTD at baseline. We assessed the association between neuropsychological test performance and change in symptom severity, as well as compared the performance of treatment responders and non-responders as defined by the Clinical Global Impression Scale. Results indicated that change in symptoms, and treatment response were not associated with neuropsychological performance on tests of inhibitory control, intellectual ability, or motor function, regardless of type of treatment. The finding that significant change in symptom severity of TS/CTD patients is not associated with impairment or change in inhibitory control regardless of treatment type suggests that inhibitory control may not be a clinically relevant facet of these disorders in adults.

  16. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  17. Gender Dysphoria in Adults.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Lawrence, Anne A; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-01-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD), a term that denotes persistent discomfort with one's biologic sex or assigned gender, replaced the diagnosis of gender identity disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 2013. Subtypes of GD in adults, defined by sexual orientation and age of onset, have been described; these display different developmental trajectories and prognoses. Prevalence studies conclude that fewer than 1 in 10,000 adult natal males and 1 in 30,000 adult natal females experience GD, but such estimates vary widely. GD in adults is associated with an elevated prevalence of comorbid psychopathology, especially mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicidality. Causal mechanisms in GD are incompletely understood, but genetic, neurodevelopmental, and psychosocial factors probably all contribute. Treatment of GD in adults, although largely standardized, is likely to evolve in response to the increasing diversity of persons seeking treatment, demands for greater client autonomy, and improved understanding of the benefits and limitations of current treatment modalities.

  18. Surgical treatment for permanent dislocation of the patella in adults.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mitsuaki; Saegusa, Yasuhiro; Kashiwagi, Naoya; Seto, Yoichi

    2011-12-06

    Permanent dislocation of the patella in adults is a rare condition that presents with complete irreducible lateral dislocation of the patella, combined with secondary changes, such as valgus deformity and leg-length discrepancy. Because these secondary changes cannot heal spontaneously after skeletal maturation if left untreated, the patients frequently possess pathology not limited to the knee joint and extending to the whole lower extremity, such as malalignment or leg-length discrepancy, that can develop into osteoarthritis of the knee. However, to our knowledge, few surgeons advocate the significance of correcting the malalignment in treating adult patients. We treated a 34-year-old woman with permanent dislocation of the patella in a 2-stage surgery, consisting of first-stage correction of valgus deformity and limb shortening using a Ilizarov external fixator and second-stage realignment of the dislocated patella over the trochlea. A follow-up examination conducted 3 years after the second operation revealed plantigrade gait with normal alignment of the lower extremity without limping and medial thrust. The patella was tracking centrally in the patellofemoral groove. Radiographs showed a neutral mechanical axis of the lower extremity, no evidence of patellar subluxation, and no deteriorating osteoarthritic changes at the tibiofemoral joint. This case highlights the importance of correcting secondary changes, such as valgus deformity and leg-length discrepancy, to reduce the risk of future osteoarthrosis and postoperative dislocation, especially when these deformities are substantial.

  19. Current concepts in severe adult tracheobronchomalacia: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Daniel H; Wilson, Jennifer L; Parikh, Mihir; Majid, Adnan; Gangadharan, Sidhu P

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) in patients with respiratory complaints, though its true incidence in the adult population remains unknown. Most of these patients have an acquired form of severe diffuse TBM of unclear etiology. The mainstays of diagnosis are dynamic (inspiratory and expiratory) airway computed tomography (CT) scan and dynamic flexible bronchoscopy with forced expiratory maneuvers. While the prevailing definition of TBM is 50% reduction in cross-sectional area, a high proportion of healthy volunteers meet this threshold, thus this threshold fails to identify patients that might benefit from intervention. Therefore, we consider complete or near-complete collapse (>90% reduction in cross-sectional area) of the airway to be severe enough to warrant potential intervention. Surgical central airway stabilization by posterior mesh splinting (tracheobronchoplasty) effectively corrects malacic airways and has been shown to lead to significant improvement in symptoms, health-related quality of life, as well as functional and exercise capacity in carefully selected adults with severe diffuse TBM. A short-term stent trial clarifies a patient's candidacy for surgical intervention. Coordination of care between experienced interventional pulmonologists, radiologists, and thoracic surgeons is essential for optimal outcomes.

  20. Current concepts in severe adult tracheobronchomalacia: evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Daniel H.; Wilson, Jennifer L.; Parikh, Mihir; Majid, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) in patients with respiratory complaints, though its true incidence in the adult population remains unknown. Most of these patients have an acquired form of severe diffuse TBM of unclear etiology. The mainstays of diagnosis are dynamic (inspiratory and expiratory) airway computed tomography (CT) scan and dynamic flexible bronchoscopy with forced expiratory maneuvers. While the prevailing definition of TBM is 50% reduction in cross-sectional area, a high proportion of healthy volunteers meet this threshold, thus this threshold fails to identify patients that might benefit from intervention. Therefore, we consider complete or near-complete collapse (>90% reduction in cross-sectional area) of the airway to be severe enough to warrant potential intervention. Surgical central airway stabilization by posterior mesh splinting (tracheobronchoplasty) effectively corrects malacic airways and has been shown to lead to significant improvement in symptoms, health-related quality of life, as well as functional and exercise capacity in carefully selected adults with severe diffuse TBM. A short-term stent trial clarifies a patient’s candidacy for surgical intervention. Coordination of care between experienced interventional pulmonologists, radiologists, and thoracic surgeons is essential for optimal outcomes. PMID:28203438

  1. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  3. Interventional and surgical treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Koyak, Zeliha; de Groot, Joris R; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2010-12-01

    Arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, mortality and hospital admission in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). The etiology of arrhythmias in this population is often multifactorial and includes electrical disturbances as part of the underlying defect, surgical intervention or hemodynamic abnormalities. Despite the numerous existing arrhythmia management tools including drug therapy, pacing and ablation, management of arrhythmias in adults with CHD remains difficult and challenging. Owing to improvement in mapping and ablation techniques, ablation and arrhythmia surgery are being performed more frequently in adults with CHD. However, there is little information on the long-term results of these treatment strategies. The purpose of this article is therefore to review the available data on nonpharmacological treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in adult patients with CHD and to give an overview of the available data on the early and late outcomes of these treatment strategies.

  4. Use of Tobacco Cessation Treatments Among Young Adult Smokers: 2005 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Susan J.; Sporer, Amy K.; Pugach, Oksana; Campbell, Richard T.; Emery, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We compared use of smoking cessation treatments and factors associated with treatment use among young adult smokers and other adult smokers. Methods. We used data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey core and cancer control supplement. The sample consisted of 6511 current smokers, of whom 759 were aged 18–24 years. Our analyses were weighted to account for differential sampling probabilities and nonresponse rates. We compared continuous measures using the t test; logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios and confidence intervals. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify correlates of treatment use. Results. Behavioral treatment use was infrequent among all smokers (4%–5%). Young adult smokers were less likely than other smokers to use pharmacotherapy (18% vs 32%). Correlates of pharmacotherapy use for young adult smokers were receiving advice from a health care provider, heavier smoking, and higher educational attainment. Compared with other smokers, young adult smokers were less likely to have received advice to quit from a health care provider (49% vs 60%). Conclusions. Evidence-based tobacco cessation treatments are underused by young adult smokers. PMID:17600243

  5. Surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Monreal

    2005-12-01

    We carried out a retrospective review of 32 consecutive patients (30 adults and two children) with total or partial lesions of the brachial plexus who had surgical repair using nerve grafting, neurotisation, and neurolysis between January 1991 and December 2003. The outcome measures of muscular strength were correlated with the type of lesion, age, preoperative time, length and number of grafts, and time to reinnervation of the biceps. The function of the upper limb was also evaluated. There was a significant correlation between muscular strength after surgical repair and both the preoperative time and the length of the nerve graft. There was also a significant correlation between muscular strength and the number of grafts. Muscular strength was better when the neurolysis was done before six months. When neurosurgical repair and reconstructive procedures were performed, the function of the upper limb was improved.

  6. CILIA FORMATION IN THE ADULT CAT BRAIN AFTER PARGYLINE TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Milhaud, Monique; Pappas, George D.

    1968-01-01

    The brains of four adult cats treated with pargyline (a nonhydrazide monoaminoxidase inhibitor) were examined at both the light and electron microscopic levels. Formation of typical mature cilia with the 9 + 2 pattern was observed in neural cells in the following areas: habenula nuclei, interpeduncular nuclei, hippocampus, mammillary bodies, thalamus, and caudate nucleus. The most marked ciliation occurs in the habenula nuclei. In general, glial cells greatly predominate in the formation of cilia. It is not clear whether ciliation in the central nervous system is the direct result of pargyline or if it occurs indirectly as a result of inhibition of monoaminoxidase. These findings are compared with the serotonin effect on ciliation in the embryogenesis of lower forms. It is suggested that pharmacological stimulation of centriolar reproduction without subsequent mitosis may lead to ciliary formation. PMID:11905194

  7. Efficacy of the Modifying Phonation Intervals (MPI) Stuttering Treatment Program With Adults Who Stutter

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Janis C.; Bothe, Anne K.; Wang, Yuedong; Kilgo, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study compared a new adult stuttering treatment program (Modifying Phonation Intervals, or MPI) with the standard of care for reducing stuttered speech in adults (prolonged speech). Method Twenty-seven adults who stutter were assigned to either MPI or prolonged speech treatment, both of which used similar infrastructures. Speech and related variables were assessed in 3 within-clinic and 3 beyond-clinic speaking situations for participants who successfully completed all treatment phases. Results At transfer, maintenance, and follow-up, the speech of 14 participants who successfully completed treatment was similar to that of normally fluent adults. Successful participants also showed increased self-identification as a “normal speaker,” decreased self-identification as a “stutterer,” reduced short intervals of phonation, and some increased use of longer duration phonation intervals. Eleven successful participants received the MPI treatment, and 3 received the prolonged speech treatment. Conclusions Outcomes for successful participants were very similar for the 2 treatments. The much larger proportion of successful participants in the MPI group, however, combined with the predictive value of specific changes in PI durations suggest that MPI treatment was relatively more effective at assisting clients to identify and change the specific speech behaviors that are associated with successful treatment of stuttered speech in adults. PMID:25633470

  8. Adult Development and Learning of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    This summary of adult development covers a wide range of authors. Adult development is one way of understanding how the internal and external changes in our lives have an impact on learning. Of particular importance in this work are the developmental issues of older adults. I present various theories of adult development such as linear and…

  9. Older Adults and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA ... are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders » Older Adults In this Section Underage ...

  10. Older Adults and Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... find more information? Reprints Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... depression need treatment to feel better. Types of Depression There are several types of depression. The most ...

  11. How Do Attitudes toward Mental Health Treatment Vary by Age, Gender, and Ethnicity/Race in Young Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Jodi M.; Alegria, Margarita; Prihoda, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates attitudes toward seeking mental health treatment in a national epidemiological sample. Young adults reported the most negative attitudes, as compared to older adults. Males reported more negative attitudes, as compared to females, a consistent finding in young adults. The gender difference was not consistent in Latinos…

  12. Early treatment with metformin induces resistance against tumor growth in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Trombini, Amanda B; Franco, Claudinéia Cs; Miranda, Rosiane A; de Oliveira, Júlio C; Barella, Luiz F; Prates, Kelly V; de Souza, Aline A; Pavanello, Audrei; Malta, Ananda; Almeida, Douglas L; Tófolo, Laize P; Rigo, Kesia P; Ribeiro, Tatiane As; Fabricio, Gabriel S; de Sant'Anna, Juliane R; Castro-Prado, Marialba Aa; de Souza, Helenir Medri; de Morais, Hely; Mathias, Paulo Cf

    2015-01-01

    It is known that antidiabetic drug metformin, which is used worldwide, has anti-cancer effects and can be used to prevent cancer growth. We tested the hypothesis that tumor cell growth can be inhibited by early treatment with metformin. For this purpose, adult rats chronically treated with metformin in adolescence or in adulthood were inoculated with Walker 256 carcinoma cells. Adult rats that were treated with metformin during adolescence presented inhibition of tumor growth, and animals that were treated during adult life did not demonstrate any changes in tumor growth. Although we do not have data to disclose a molecular mechanism to the preventive metformin effect, we present, for the first time, results showing that cancer growth in adult life is dependent on early life intervention, thus supporting a new therapeutic prevention for cancer.

  13. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28-37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found that AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility.

  14. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28–37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility. PMID:24275185

  15. Preparing Educators of Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Stanley M.; And Others

    Model programs are described for two areas of adult education--the preparation of adult educators and the training conducted by adult educators. In Chapter One, Phyllis Caldwell reviews the literature concerning the preservice training of adult educators, concentrating on the competencies of adult education administrators and teachers. In Chapter…

  16. Treatment of Human-Caused Trauma: Attrition in the Adult Outcomes Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica; Ivanoff, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Attrition or dropout is the failure of a participant to complete, comply, or the prematurely discontinuation or discharge from treatment, resulting in lost data and affecting outcomes. This review of 10 years of adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment outcome literature specific to Criterion A events of human origin examines how…

  17. Substance Abuse among Older Adults. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Paddy; Davis, Carolyn; Howard, Deborah L.; Kimbrough, Phyllis; Nelson, Anne; Paul, Michelle; Shuman, Deborah; Brooks, Margaret K.; Dogoloff, Mary Lou; Vitzthum, Virginia; Hayws, Elizabeth

    As alcohol and other drug disorders become acknowledged as major problems, the need increases for current information on the scope of the problem and appropriate treatment. This TIP serves to educate treatment providers with information about older adults who, in general, are more likely to hide their substance abuse, less likely to seek…

  18. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, J Russell

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to “get by” before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians’ practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD. PMID:28184164

  19. Current Treatment Practices for Children and Adults with Trichotillomania: Consensus among Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flessner, Christopher A.; Penzel, Fred; Keuthen, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Very little is known regarding the efficacy of pharmacological and psychosocial treatments for children and adults with trichotillomania (TTM). Given this dearth of information, the present investigation sought to examine the treatment practices of members of the nationally recognized Trichotillomania Learning Center-Scientific Advisory Board…

  20. Treatment Efficacy: Cognitive-Communicative Disorders Resulting from Traumatic Brain Injury in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Carl A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses adults with brain injuries and resulting cognitive communicative disorders. The incidence of brain injuries, the effects of cognitive-communication disorders, the role of the speech-language pathologist, the benefits of treatment, and the effects of different treatments are discussed. Charts are included that summarize…

  1. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  2. Clinical assessment and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults.

    PubMed

    Asherson, Philip

    2005-07-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common childhood disorder that frequently persists into adulthood, with significant levels of inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive behavior. Impairments associated with adult ADHD include distress from the symptoms, impaired ability to function in work and academic settings, and problems sustaining stable relationships. The disorder is commonly associated with volatile moods, antisocial behavior, and drug and alcohol misuse. There is an increased risk of developing comorbid anxiety, depression, personality disorders, and drug and alcohol dependence. Despite the proven effectiveness of drugs such as methylphenidate, dexamphetamine and atomoxetine, few cases of ADHD are recognized and treated in the UK. The reasons for this are unclear, since most psychiatrists working with children and adolescents are aware that ADHD commonly persists into adult life and they also see the disorder affecting parents of children with ADHD. Issues of transition from the care of child to adult psychiatry and the need to refer adult relatives of children with ADHD to suitable psychiatric services are a major concern. Furthermore, many cases of adult ADHD go unrecognized or are seen by mental health teams that are not familiar with the subtleties of the adult presentation. As a result, misdiagnosis and treatment for conditions such as atypical depression, mixed affective disorder, cyclothymia, and borderline and unstable emotional personality disorders is not uncommon. There is therefore a requirement for further training in this area. This review will describe the common clinical presentation and provide guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults. Any psychiatrically trained physician using standard psychiatric assessment procedures can perform clinical evaluations for adult ADHD. As with other psychiatric disorders in adulthood, ADHD has its own characteristic onset, course and psychopathology. Symptoms of ADHD are

  3. The relationship between child maltreatment and substance abuse treatment outcomes among emerging adults and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Smith, Douglas C; Smith, Jane Ellen; Godley, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adulthood is the period of greatest risk for problematic substance use. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between a broad measure of child maltreatment and several key outcomes for a large clinical sample of emerging adults (n = 858) and adolescents (n = 2,697). The secondary aim was to examine the extent to which the relationship between child maltreatment and treatment outcomes differed between emerging adults and adolescents. Multilevel latent growth curve analyses revealed emerging adults and adolescents who experienced child maltreatment reported significantly greater reductions over time on several treatment outcomes (e.g., substance use, substance-related problems, and emotional problems). Overall, analyses did not support differential relationships between child maltreatment and changes over time in these substance use disorder treatment outcomes for emerging adults and adolescents. The one exception was that although emerging adults with child maltreatment did reduce their HIV risk over time, their improvements were not as great as were the improvements in HIV risk reported by adolescents who had experienced child maltreatment.

  4. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  5. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  6. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Adult Day Care Adult Day Care Centers are designed to provide care and ... adults who need assistance or supervision during the day. Programs offer relief to family members and caregivers, ...

  7. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  8. Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Adult and Pediatric Gliomas: Toward Personalized Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Harry R.; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that both adult and pediatric glial tumor entities represent collections of neoplastic lesions, each with individual pathological molecular events and treatment responses. In this review, we discuss the current prognostic biomarkers validated for clinical use or with future clinical validity for gliomas. Accurate prognostication is crucial for managing patients as treatments may be associated with high morbidity and the benefits of high risk interventions must be judged by the treating clinicians. We also review biomarkers with predictive validity, which may become clinically relevant with the development of targeted therapies for adult and pediatric gliomas. PMID:24716189

  9. A Combined Treatment Approach for Adults with ADHD--Results of an Open Study of 43 Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostain, Anthony L.; Ramsay, J. Russell

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Increasing numbers of adults are seeking treatment for ADHD. Pharmacotherapy is well established as the first line treatment for adult ADHD, although medications alone may be insufficient treatment for the myriad problems experienced by these patients. Few studies have examined the clinical outcomes of a combination of pharmacotherapy…

  10. Radiation Treatment for Ewing Family of Tumors in Adults: University of Florida Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Wenyin; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Morris, Christopher G.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, Parker C.; Zlotecki, Robert A.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult patients with Ewing family of tumors treated with radiation at University of Florida. Methods and Materials: Clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of 47 patients older than 18 years with Ewing family of tumors treated with combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy from 1970 to 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis was stratified by age older or younger than 30 years. Patients with metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis were excluded from the study. Results: The 29 men and 18 women had a median age of 24 years. Thirty-three patients were 18-30 years old and 14 patients were older than 30 years. Median follow-up of living patients was 8.2 years. The 5-year overall survival rate for all patients was 43% (p = 0.8523). The 5-year local control rate for all patients was 75% (p = 0.9326). The 5-year rate of freedom from distant metastasis for all patients was 45% (p = 0.5471). There were no significant differences in 5-year overall survival, local control, and freedom from distant metastasis rates; patterns of distant failure; or toxicity profiles between older adult patients and younger adult patients. Conclusions: We found that the natural history and treatment outcomes of the Ewing family of tumors were consistently similar in adults (young and old) and children. Thus, aggressive combined modality approaches should be considered for adult patients.

  11. Bypass surgery versus medical treatment for symptomatic moyamoya disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Kwan-Sung; Rha, Hyoung Kyun; Huh, Pil-Woo; Yang, Ji-Ho; Park, Ik Seong; Ahn, Jae-Geun; Sung, Jae Hoon; Han, Young-Min

    2016-11-11

    OBJECTIVE In this study the authors evaluated whether extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery can prevent stroke occurrence and decrease mortality in adult patients with symptomatic moyamoya disease (MMD). METHODS The medical records of 249 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic MMD that was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography between 2002 and 2011 at 8 institutions were retrospectively reviewed. The study outcomes of stroke recurrence as a primary event and death during the 6-year follow-up and perioperative complications within 30 days as secondary events were compared between the bypass and medical treatment groups. RESULTS The bypass group comprised 158 (63.5%) patients, and the medical treatment group comprised 91 (36.5%) patients. For 249 adult patients with MMD, bypass surgery showed an HR of 0.48 (95% CI 0.27-0.86, p = 0.014) for stroke recurrence calculated by Cox regression analysis. However, for the 153 patients with ischemic MMD, the HR of bypass surgery for stroke recurrence was 1.07 (95% CI 0.43-2.66, p = 0.887). For the 96 patients with hemorrhagic MMD, the multivariable adjusted HR of bypass surgery for stroke recurrence was 0.18 (95% CI 0.06-0.49, p = 0.001). For the treatment modality, indirect bypass and direct bypass (or combined bypass) did not show any significant difference for stroke recurrence, perioperative stroke, or mortality (log rank; p = 0.524, p = 0.828, and p = 0.616, respectively). CONCLUSIONS During the treatment of symptomatic MMD in adults, bypass surgery reduces stroke recurrence for the hemorrhagic type, but it does not do so for the ischemic type. The best choice of bypass methods in adult patients with MMD is uncertain. In adult ischemic MMD, a prospective randomized study to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of bypass surgery to prevent recurrent stroke is necessary.

  12. Meta-analysis of psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder in adult survivors of childhood abuse.

    PubMed

    Ehring, Thomas; Welboren, Renate; Morina, Nexhmedin; Wicherts, Jelte M; Freitag, Janina; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2014-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly prevalent in adult survivors of childhood sexual and/or physical abuse. However, intervention studies focusing on this group of patients are underrepresented in earlier meta-analyses on the efficacy of PTSD treatments. The current meta-analysis exclusively focused on studies evaluating the efficacy of psychological interventions for PTSD in adult survivors of childhood abuse. Sixteen randomized controlled trials meeting inclusion criteria could be identified that were subdivided into trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), non-trauma-focused CBT, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and other treatments (interpersonal, emotion-focused). Results showed that psychological interventions are efficacious for PTSD in adult survivors of childhood abuse, with an aggregated uncontrolled effect size of g=1.24 (pre- vs. post-treatment), and aggregated controlled effect sizes of g=0.72 (post-treatment, comparison to waitlist control conditions) and g=0.50 (post-treatment, comparison with TAU/placebo control conditions), respectively. Effect sizes remained stable at follow-up. As the heterogeneity between studies was large, we examined the influence of two a priori specified moderator variables on treatment efficacy. Results showed that trauma-focused treatments were more efficacious than non-trauma-focused interventions, and that treatments including individual sessions yielded larger effect sizes than pure group treatments. As a whole, the findings are in line with earlier meta-analyses showing that the best effects can be achieved with individual trauma-focused treatments.

  13. Increased Antiviral Treatment Among Hospitalized Children and Adults With Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Appiah, Grace D; Chaves, Sandra S; Kirley, Pam D; Miller, Lisa; Meek, James; Anderson, Evan; Oni, Oluwakemi; Ryan, Patricia; Eckel, Seth; Lynfield, Ruth; Bargsten, Marisa; Zansky, Shelley M; Bennett, Nancy; Lung, Krista; McDonald-Hamm, Christie; Thomas, Ann; Brady, Diane; Lindegren, Mary L; Schaffner, William; Hill, Mary; Garg, Shikha; Fry, Alicia M; Campbell, Angela P

    2017-02-01

    (See the Editorial Commentary by Martin on pages 368-9.)Using population-based surveillance data, we analyzed antiviral treatment among hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Treatment increased after the influenza A(H1N1) 2009 pandemic from 72% in 2010-2011 to 89% in 2014-2015 (P < .001). Overall, treatment was higher in adults (86%) than in children (72%); only 56% of cases received antivirals on the day of admission.

  14. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  15. Spinal rehabilitative exercise or manual treatment for the prevention of tension-type headache in adults.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Brent; Brønfort, Gert; Haas, Mitchell; Schmitt, John; Evans, Roni L; Levin, Morris; Westrom, Kristine; Goldsmith, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the short- and long-term effects of manual treatment and spinal rehabilitative exercise for the prevention of tension-type headache in adults.

  16. Operantly based treatment procedure for stair avoidance by a severely mentally retarded adult.

    PubMed

    Burgio, L D; Willis, K; Burgio, K L

    1986-11-01

    The use of contingent social and edible reinforcement and physical guidance-without desensitization-in the treatment of stair avoidance behavior by a severely mentally retarded adult was tested. Results indicate that this operantly based procedure was effective in increasing stair use, both ascent and descent, in staircases containing 5 and 11 stairs.

  17. Measuring Perceived Barriers to Healthful Eating in Obese, Treatment-Seeking Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Ericka M.; Jeffery, Robert W.; Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Flood, Andrew P.; Jaeb, Melanie A.; Laqua, Patricia S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To characterize perceived barriers to healthful eating in a sample of obese, treatment-seeking adults and to examine whether changes in barriers are associated with energy intake and body weight. Design: Observational study based on findings from a randomized, controlled behavioral weight-loss trial. Participants: Participants were 113…

  18. A Preliminary Investigation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Treatment for Marijuana Dependence in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.; Shoenberger, Deacon; Hayes, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, 3 adults who met criteria for marijuana dependence were treated using an abbreviated version of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). The treatment was delivered in eight weekly 90-min individual sessions. The effects of the intervention were assessed using a nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design.…

  19. A Scoping Review of Treatments for Older Adults with Substance Use Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowbray, Orion; Quinn, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify effective treatment services for older, substance-using adults, an examination of the evidence associated with interventions for this group is presented. Methods: Using explicit, validated criteria to identify effective interventions, 22 publications were included in a review and were subject to a critical appraisal of…

  20. Diagnosis and Fluoxetine Treatment of Compulsive Behavior Disorder of Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodfish, James W.; Madison, James T.

    1993-01-01

    Ten adults with compulsive behavior disorder and six comparison subjects, all with mental retardation, were treated using the medication fluoxetine. Seven of the 10 experimental subjects responded favorably to fluoxetine treatment; none of the comparison subjects responded favorably to the medication. There appeared to be a relation between…

  1. Dose Response Effects of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate Treatment in Adults with ADHD: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kollins, Scott H.; Glatt, Stephen J.; Goodman, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore dose-response effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) treatment for ADHD. Method: This was a 4-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, forced-dose titration study in adult participants, aged 18 to 55 years, meeting "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.)…

  2. Treatment Implications for Young Adult Users of MDMA (3,4-Methylenedyoxymethamphetamine)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Brian J.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.

    2006-01-01

    Young adults' 3,4-methylenedyoxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use is a national public health concern. Although research on the epidemiology of MDMA use has increased, inquiry into intervention and treatment is needed. The authors examine results from an epidemiological investigation from a clinical perspective and provide suggestions for clinicians…

  3. Anterior Cingulate Volumetric Alterations in Treatment-Naive Adults with ADHD: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makris, Nikos; Seidman, Larry J.; Valera, Eve M.; Biederman, Joseph; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Kennedy, David N.; Caviness, Verne S., Jr.; Bush, George; Crum, Katherine; Brown, Ariel B.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We sought to examine preliminary results of brain alterations in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in treatment-naive adults with ADHD. The ACC is a central brain node for the integration of cognitive control and allocation of attention, affect and drive. Thus its anatomical alteration may give rise to impulsivity, hyperactivity and…

  4. Psychosocial Treatments for Major Depression and Dysthymia in Older Adults: A Review of the Research Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zalaquett, Carlos P.; Stens, Andrea N.

    2006-01-01

    Older adults represent a growing segment of the population with the highest suicide rate and an increasing need of counseling services for major depression and dysthymia. The present study examined the literature with the purpose of identifying research addressing psychosocial treatments of depression in later life. A summary of treatments…

  5. Outdoor Behavioral Health Care: Client and Treatment Characteristics Effects on Young Adult Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Sean D.; Stroud, Daniel; Hoag, Matthew J.; Combs, Katie M.

    2016-01-01

    A lack of clarity exists regarding how different clients respond to outdoor behavioral health care (OBH). In this study, specific client and treatment characteristics were assessed for 186 young adults completing an OBH therapeutic wilderness program. Clinical outcomes were measured with the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Hierarchical linear modeling…

  6. The Effectiveness of Group Treatment for Female Adult Incest Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Donalee; Reyes, Sonia; Brown, Brienne; Gonzenbach, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Very few clinicians receive training in the treatment of sexual abuse, yet during their careers many will encounter victims of sexual abuse. This article discusses the incidence of child sexual abuse, defines incest, and discusses treatment options. A review of group treatment is explored, with results being documented providing support for the…

  7. Back pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed.

  8. Discitis in an adult following acupuncture treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Peter S Y; Hsu, William

    2004-06-01

    Recent papers, including a review conducted by van Tulder et al., have suggested that there is paucity of information as to the efficacy of acupuncture treatment. However, there has been a significant increase in the use of acupuncture therapy for treatment of various ailments, including lower back pain. Chiropractors, along with other health care professionals, are using acupuncture as an adjunct to their main therapeutic intervention as demonstrated by a recent survey by the Canadian Chiropractic Protective Association (CCPA). However, like many other interventions, including NSAIDs and spinal manipulations, signs of side effects should be monitored when acupuncture treatments are considered. Recent papers have noted such complications as pneumothorax and hepatitis following acupuncture treatments. A case is presented in which a patient, who received previous acupuncture treatments, presented to a chiropractic clinic complaining of low back and leg pain. Early recognition of potential complications after acupuncture treatment may minimize significant impairments and disability.

  9. Binge drinking, poor mental health, and adherence to treatment among California adults with asthma.

    PubMed

    Haskard, Kelly B; Banta, Jim E; Williams, Summer L; Haviland, Mark G; DiMatteo, M Robin; Przekop, Peter; Werner, Leonard S; Anderson, Donald L

    2008-06-01

    Binge drinking and poor mental health may affect adherence to treatment for individuals with asthma. The purposes were to (a) examine the relationship of self-reported binge drinking and mental health to adherence to daily asthma control medications and (b) identify other demographic and health-related factors associated with asthma control medication adherence. Secondary analyses of 2003 adult California Health Interview Survey data were undertaken, and these analyses identified 3.2 million California adults who had been told by a physician they had asthma. Of these, approximately 1.7 million were symptomatic. Binge drinking significantly predicted medication nonadherence among California adults with symptomatic asthma (OR = .63, 95% CI = .45-.89), whereas poor mental health did not. Other predictors of nonadherence (odds ratios < 1, p < .05) included being overweight, younger age, having some college education, being a current smoker, and having no usual source of medical care. Predictors of adherence (odds ratios > 1, p < .05) were older age, more frequent asthma symptoms, more ER visits, more missed work days, being African American, and being a non-citizen. Intervention efforts could be directed toward improving medication adherence among adult asthma patients who engage in risky health behaviors such as binge drinking. Also at risk for medication nonadherence and therefore good targets for asthma control medication management interventions are adults who are overweight, younger (18-44 age range), have some college education, and no usual source of medical care.

  10. Psychotherapy in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: implications for treatment and research.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a risk factor for co-occurring psychiatric disorders and negative psychosocial consequences in adulthood. Previous trials of psychotherapeutic programs for adult ADHD were based on cognitive behavioral psychotherapeutic approaches and showed significant effects. Targets of psychotherapeutic interventions include not only coping with the core symptoms and associated problems such as depression and anxiety, but also probable consequences such as low self-esteem. Improvements in ADHD symptomatology and associated symptoms have been reported after psychotherapeutic treatment. The support of other participants is strongly regarded as helpful by patients in group therapy. This manuscript provides an overview of psychotherapy approaches and results of studies evaluating programs developed to treat adults with ADHD. Finally, the specific requirements of psychotherapy for adult ADHD as well as further research questions will be discussed.

  11. Awake at 4 AM: treatment of insomnia with early morning awakenings among older adults.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Lavinia; Martin, Jennifer L

    2010-11-01

    Insomnia is a common problem among older adults. In particular, older adults experience insomnia coupled with early morning awakenings due to an interaction between age-related changes in circadian rhythm timing coupled with behavior changes that contribute to sustained poor sleep. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), at times coupled with circadian interventions (e.g., timed light exposure), are likely to be most successful in optimizing sleep quality. In delivering CBT-I to older adults, modifications are sometimes necessary to accommodate for medical problems, lifestyle, social factors, and patient preferences. Addition of circadian interventions can ameliorate the negative effects of inappropriately timed sleep as well. These treatment methods can be highly effective and benefits can be long-standing. A case example is used to illustrate these points.

  12. Delirium and hospitalized older adults: a review of nonpharmacologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Eric

    2010-04-01

    Delirium is a common and debilitating disorder that affects primarily the elderly in acute care settings. This column reviews the assessment, etiology, complications, and nonpharmacologic treatment of delirium.

  13. Treatment or Accommodation for Adults with Challenging Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the difficulties some individuals with developmental disabilities have in responding to behavioral treatment and suggests an alternative to traditional behavioral treatment programs. It describes the use of the accommodation approach in which an individual's environment is rearranged to prevent or lower the occurrence of…

  14. Modern treatment of adult short bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Efsen, E; Jeppesen, P B

    2011-12-01

    By definition, intestinal failure prevails when oral compensation is no longer feasible and parenteral support is necessary to maintain nutritional equilibrium. In the past, conventional treatment has mainly focused on "making the most of what the short bowel syndrome patient still had" by optimizing remnant intestinal function through dietary interventions, antidiarrheals and antisecretory agents. However, modern treatment options are in the near horizon, and the increased understanding of the mediators for intestinal adaptation will lead to the expansion of the limited treatment armamentarium in short bowel syndrome patients with intestinal failure. The clinical meaningfulness and implications of the observed effects of growth hormone, glutamine, glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) and the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 degradation resistant analog, teduglutide, is presented in this review and balanced against treatment related adverse events and possible unfavourable effects of long-term, possibly lifelong, treatments.

  15. Immediate and delayed treatment seeking among adult sexual assault victims.

    PubMed

    Millar, Golden; Stermac, Lana; Addison, Mary

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature which seeks to better understand the needs of sexual assault victims presenting for specialized treatment. This study explored aspects of immediate and delayed treatment seeking among 1118 women who presented for treatment to a specialized sexual assault care centre within a large urban hospital. Variables related to demographic and assault-specific characteristics were examined for association with immediate (within 12 hours) or delayed (after 12 hours) treatment seeking. Results indicate the severity of the attack prompted women to seek treatment earlier and that women who were assaulted by a known perpetrator were more likely to delay seeking assistance. Findings are conceptualized under the rubric of sociological and feminist frameworks with suggestions for additional research.

  16. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  17. Adult onset retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Pan, Utsab; Khetan, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor of childhood presenting usually before 5 years of age. RB in adults older than 20 years is extremely rare. A literature search using PubMed/PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases revealed only 45 cases till date. Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of such reports, indicating heightened level of suspicion among ophthalmologists. Compared to its pediatric counterpart, adult onset RB poses unique challenges in diagnosis and treatment. This article summarizes available literature on adult onset RB and its clinical and pathologic profile, genetics, association with retinocytoma, diagnostics, treatment, and outcomes. PMID:27609158

  18. [Compliance with tuberculosis treatment in adults in Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    Ferrer, X; Kirschbaum, A; Toro, J; Jadue, J; Muñoz, M; Espinoza, A

    1991-11-01

    A prospective study was conducted to estimate the current magnitude of adherence to short-course tuberculosis treatment, the degree of abandonment, the characteristics of treatment dropouts, and the causes of this abandonment. The study group was made up of tuberculosis patients over the age of 15 who received care at the Western and Southern Health Services of the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile, between 1 October 1987 and 31 January 1988. The percentage abandoning treatment, calculated by the life table method, was 11.5. The profile of patients who dropped out of treatment was as follows: male, under 45 years of age, single, low level of education, no steady work, homeless, and alcoholic. In addition, an opinion survey on the variables associated with abandonment was conducted and it was concluded that the main ones were alcoholism and intolerance to tuberculosis drugs. Awareness of this profile makes it possible to take measures to prevent patients from abandoning treatment, as well as to educate and even hospitalize at the start of treatment those tuberculous patients exhibiting such a profile.

  19. Subjective-objective sleep discrepancy among older adults: associations with insomnia diagnosis and insomnia treatment.

    PubMed

    Kay, Daniel B; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Monk, Timothy H

    2015-02-01

    Discrepancy between subjective and objective measures of sleep is associated with insomnia and increasing age. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia improves sleep quality and decreases subjective-objective sleep discrepancy. This study describes differences between older adults with insomnia and controls in sleep discrepancy, and tests the hypothesis that reduced sleep discrepancy following cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia correlates with the magnitude of symptom improvement reported by older adults with insomnia. Participants were 63 adults >60 years of age with insomnia, and 51 controls. At baseline, participants completed sleep diaries for 7 days while wearing wrist actigraphs. After receiving cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia, insomnia patients repeated this sleep assessment. Sleep discrepancy variables were calculated by subtracting actigraphic sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset from respective self-reported estimates, pre- and post-treatment. Mean level and night-to-night variability in sleep discrepancy were investigated. Baseline sleep discrepancies were compared between groups. Pre-post-treatment changes in Insomnia Severity Index score and sleep discrepancy variables were investigated within older adults with insomnia. Sleep discrepancy was significantly greater and more variable across nights in older adults with insomnia than controls, P ≤ 0.001 for all. Treatment with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia was associated with significant reduction in the Insomnia Severity Index score that correlated with changes in mean level and night-to-night variability in wake after sleep onset discrepancy, P < 0.001 for all. Study of sleep discrepancy patterns may guide more targeted treatments for late-life insomnia.

  20. Evidence-Based Treatments for Adults with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Gooriah, Rubesh; Nimeri, Randa; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2015-01-01

    Migraine, a significantly disabling condition, is treated with acute and preventive medications. However, some individuals are refractory to standard treatments. Although there is a host of alternative management options available, these are not always backed by strong evidence. In fact, most of the drugs used in migraine were initially designed for other purposes. Whilst effective, the benefits from these medications are modest, reflecting the need for newer and migraine-specific therapeutic agents. In recent years, we have witnessed the emergence of novel treatments, of which noninvasive neuromodulation appears to be the most attractive given its ease of use and excellent tolerability profile. This paper reviews the evidence behind the available treatments for migraine. PMID:26839703

  1. Combined Periodontal, Orthodontic, and Prosthetic Treatment in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sabatoski, Claudio Vinicius; Bueno, Regis Claret; Reyes Pacheco, Ariel Adriano; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man had a significant loss of bone and supporting tissues with pathologic migration of several teeth and several missing teeth. He was treated with an interdisciplinary therapeutic protocol that included nonsurgical periodontal therapy based on strict control of supragingival plaque, subgingival periodontal therapy, orthodontic and endodontic treatment, and replacement of restorations. The orthodontic therapy was performed in a severely reduced bone support and the presence of pathological tooth migration after periodontal disease control. The interdisciplinary treatment protocol was the key to achieve a significant improvement in his facial and dental esthetics, masticatory function, and quality of life. PMID:26587295

  2. Script Training Treatment for Adults with Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youmans, Gina; Youmans, Scott R.; Hancock, Adrienne B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes of script training for individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) and mild anomic aphasia were investigated. Script training is a functional treatment that has been successful for individuals with aphasia but has not been applied to individuals with AOS. Principles of motor learning were incorporated into training to promote…

  3. Effect of radio frequency treatments on cowpea weevil adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried pulses (chickpeas, lentils and dried peas) are valuable export commodities in the US Pacific Northwest. Postharvest infestation by stored product insect pests such as the cowpea weevil may cause importing countries to require phytosanitary treatments before shipment. Typically, chemical fumiga...

  4. EVIDENCE-BASED TREATMENT PRACTICES FOR DRUG-INVOLVED ADULTS IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Taxman, Faye S.; Henderson, Craig E.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the extent and organizational correlates of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in correctional facilities and community-based substance abuse treatment programs that manage drug-involved adult offenders. METHODS Correctional administrators and treatment program directors affiliated with a national sample of 384 criminal justice and community-based programs providing substance abuse treatment to adult offenders in the United States were surveyed in 2004. Correctional administrators reported the availability of up to 13 specified EBPs and treatment directors up to 15. The sum total of EBPs indicates their extent. Linear models regress the extent of EBPs on variables measuring structure and leadership, culture and climate, administrator attitudes and network connectedness of the organization. RESULTS Most programs offer fewer than 60% of the specified EBPs to drug-involved offenders. In multiple regression models, offender treatment programs that provided more EBPs were community-based, accredited, and network-connected; with a performance-oriented, non-punitive culture, more training resources; and leadership with a background in human services, a high regard for the value of substance abuse treatment and an understanding of EBPs. CONCLUSIONS The use of EBPs among facility- and community-based programs that serve drug-involved adult offenders has room for improvement. Initiatives to disseminate EBPs might target these institutional and environmental domains, but further research is needed to determine whether such organization interventions can promote the uptake of EBPs. PMID:17383551

  5. Interdisciplinary treatment of an adult patient with old extraction sites.

    PubMed

    Taner, Tülin Ugur; Germec, Derya; Er, Nuray; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim

    2006-11-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary treatment of a 31-year-old female patient showing a protrusive profile, maxillary constriction, mandibular crowding, a Class III canine relationship complicated with multiple missing teeth, old atrophic extraction sites, and periodontal defects. The lower dental arch irregularity was eliminated by air-rotor stripping (ARS). The upper extraction site was opened for prosthetic rehabilitation, whereas closure of the lower extraction space was preferred. The narrow alveolar crest of the atrophic bone was augmented with the use of autogenous bone, beta-tricalcium phosphate (Cerasorb), and autogenous platelet-rich plasma. A functional and esthetic occlusion in an improved facial profile was established at the end of orthodontic treatment combined with ARS technique, surgery, and prosthodontics.

  6. Safety Profile of Nifurtimox and Treatment Interruption for Chronic Chagas Disease in Colombian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Mario Javier; Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Álvarez, Carlos Arturo; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Nifurtimox (NFX) is one of the approved drugs used to treat Chagas disease. Safety profile studies and models on risk factors for treatment interruption in adults are scarce in Latin America. This study evaluated retrospectively the medical records of adult Chagas disease patients treated with NFX between 2007 and 2012 in Bogotá, Colombia. An accelerated failure time model was used, and associations were expressed as time ratio (TR). In total, 76 adult patients with NFX were included: 60 (79.0%) completed 60 days of treatment, 61 (80.3%) presented adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and 16 (21.0%) required treatment interruption. The predominant symptoms were epigastric pain (23.7%), nauseas (18.4%), sleep disturbances (18.4%), loss of appetite (17.1%), and temporary loss of memory (15.2%). ADRs were classified as mild (64.5%), moderate (30.4%), and severe (5.1%). Time of treatment was significantly longer when presenting ≤ 3 ADRs (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.04–3.03), presence of non-severe ADRs (TR: 6.52; 95% CI: 3.24–13.1), doses of NFX ≤ 8 mg/kg/day (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 0.90–3.49), and age < 48 years (TR: 1.57; 95% CI: 0.90–2.74). Treatment with NFX in adults caused a high frequency of ADRs, but most of the cases were mild and did not require treatment interruption. Severity and number of ADRs were the main predictors for treatment interruption. PMID:26392162

  7. ADHD symptoms in non-treatment seeking young adults: relationship with other forms of impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Leppink, Eric W.; Niaz, Faiza; Redden, Sarah A.; Grant, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has been associated with various manifestations of impulsivity in adults, including elevated rates of other impulsive disorders, substance use, questionnaire-based impulsivity scores, and inhibitory dysregulation on neurocognitive tests. The relationship between ADHD and all these other forms of impulsivity have yet to be explored within the context of a single comprehensive study. Methods 423 young adults, who gambled ≥5 times in the preceding year, were recruited using media advertisements and undertook detailed assessment including structured psychiatric interview, questionnaires, and neurocognitive tests. Participants with ADHD symptoms were identified using the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Screener (ASRS-V1.1) and were compared to controls using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Results ADHD symptoms were found in 20.3% of the sample, but only 7.3% of these subjects had ever received a formal diagnosis. ADHD symptoms were associated with significantly lower quality of life, lower self-esteem, higher emotional dysregulation, higher impulsivity-compulsivity questionnaire scores, more problematic internet use, greater occurrence of psychiatric disorders, and impaired stop-signal reaction times. Of these variables, stop-signal reaction times and Barratt attentional impulsiveness were the strongest predictors of group classification. Conclusions ADHD symptoms are common and under-diagnosed in young adults who gamble, and are most strongly linked with certain other types of impulsivity (questionnaire- and cognitive-based measures) and with emotional dysregulation, suggesting that these are each important considerations in understanding the pathophysiology of the disorder, but also potential treatment targets. It is necessary to question whether treatment for adult ADHD could be enhanced by considering self-esteem, emotional reactivity, and impaired inhibitory control as specific treatment targets

  8. Asenapine in the Treatment of Older Adults with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Dines, Philipp; Fuentes-Casiano, Edna; Athey, Melanie; Cassidy, Kristin A.; Sams, Johnny; Clegg, Kathleen; Locala, Joseph; Stagno, Susan; Tatsuoka, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Objective In spite of growing numbers of elderly there are few treatment studies on late-life bipolar disorder (BD). This was a 12-week prospective, open-label trial to assess efficacy and tolerability of adjunct asenapine in non-demented elderly (≥60 years) with sub-optimal previous response to BD treatments. Methods Asenapine was initiated at 5 mg/day and titrated as tolerated. Effects on global psychopathology were measured with Clinical Global Impression, Bipolar version (CGI-BP) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Mood polarity severity was measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Other outcomes included the WHO-Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II). Results Fifteen individuals were enrolled (mean age 68.6, SD 6.12), 53% female, 73% Caucasian, 13% African-American, 7% Asian). There were 4/15 (27%) individuals who prematurely terminated study while 11/15 (73%) completed study. There were significant improvements from baseline on BPRS (P<.05), on CGI overall (P<.01), and on CGI mania (P<.05) and depression (P<.01) sub-scales. Mean dose of asenapine was 11.2 (SD 6.2) mg/day. The most common reported side effects were gastrointestinal discomfort (n=5, 33%), restlessness (n=2, 13%), tremors (n=2, 13%), cognitive difficulties (n=2, 13%), and sluggishness (n=2, 13%). Conclusions Elders with BD had global improvements on asenapine. Most reported adverse effects were mild and transient, but adverse effects prompted drug discontinuation in just over one-quarter of patients. While risks vs. benefits in older people must always be carefully considered, asenapine may be a treatment consideration for some non-demented geriatric BD patients. PMID:25335125

  9. Need for Prophylactic Treatment in Adult Haemophilia A Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Berthold; Richter, Heinrich; Pollmann, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background and Methods A single centre study including 52 German patients aged ≥16 years with severe haemophilia A was performed to compare the amount of clotting factor and outcome between on-demand therapy (26 patients) and continuous prophylaxis (26 patients) over 1 year. Results Prophylaxis reduced the number of bleeds significantly. Compared to on-demand treatment (20.5 ± 3.0 bleeds/year/patient), under prophylaxis 7.8 ± 1.3 bleeds/year/patient were observed. Joint bleeds were reduced from 12.2 ± 1.5 to 4.7 ± 1.0/year/ patient. In the on-demand group 38% of the patients suffered from more than 2 bleeds/month, whereas in the prophylaxis group no patient was found with more than 2 bleeds/month. Mean annual factor VIII (FVIII) consumption increased from 767 ± 110 IU/kg body weight under on-demand treatment to 2,841 ± 341 IU/kg body weight under continuous prophylaxis, displaying a nearly fourfold increase in FVIII consumption. Furthermore, prophylaxis implies a more than four-fold increase in treatment days which escalated from a mean weekly injection rate of 0.56 ± 0.08 FVIII injections/week when bleeds were treated on demand to 2.52 ± 0.30 FVIII injections/week during prophylaxis. Conclusion Even though the results reflect a benefit also for prophylactically treated patients regarding their bleeding frequency, one has to take into account a substantial increase of the costs for coagulation concentrates when all patients with severe haemophilia A switch to continuous prophylaxis. PMID:20877667

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome in adults: symptoms, treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Rhian

    2017-02-22

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex functional bowel disorder. It can be difficult to treat because of its presentation with multiple symptoms and aggravating factors. GPs and gastroenterologists regularly see patients return for advice on symptom management. IBS is often misdiagnosed, and is not always managed effectively, despite the guidance available to clinicians. This article aims to inform readers about the symptoms and sub-classifications of IBS and the range of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments available, to enable nurses to understand and manage symptoms of the condition in this group of patients.

  11. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension among Saudi Adult Population: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdalla A.; Al-Hamdan, Nasser A.; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.; Abdalla, Abdelshakour M.; Abbas, Mostafa A. F.; Abuzaid, Lamiaa Z.

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed at estimating prevalence, awareness, treatment, control, and predictors of hypertension among Saudi adult population. Multistage stratified sampling was used to select 4758 adult participants. Three blood pressure measurements using an automatic sphygmomanometer, sociodemographics, and antihypertensive modalities were obtained. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 25.5%. Only 44.7% of hypertensives were aware, 71.8% of them received pharmacotherapy, and only 37.0% were controlled. Awareness was significantly associated with gender, age, geographical location, occupation, and comorbidity. Applying drug treatment was significantly more among older patients, but control was significantly higher among younger patients and patients with higher level of physical activity. Significant predictors of hypertension included male gender, urbanization, low education, low physical activity, obesity, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion prevalence is high, but awareness, treatment, and control levels are low indicating a need to develop a national program for prevention, early detection, and control of hypertension. PMID:21912737

  12. Treatment of congenital heart disease: risk-reducing measures in young adults.

    PubMed

    van der Bom, Teun; Luijendijk, Paul; Bouma, Berto J; Koolbergen, Dave R; de Groot, Joris R; Mulder, Barbara J M; Mulder, Barbara B J

    2011-03-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease form a new and relatively young population, since surgical treatment of heart defects became available three to four decades ago. Owing to improved survival this population is steadily growing in number and age. Little is known regarding long-term survival; however, late complications occur frequently. During adulthood, almost half of the patients have one or more complication, such as endocarditis, stroke, systemic or pulmonary hypertension, aortic aneurysm or dissection and arrhythmias. Heart failure and sudden cardiac death are the main causes of death. Treatment of adults with congenital heart disease is aimed at the reduction of symptoms, but also at minimizing the risk and severity of late complications. In this article the most recent advances in the treatment of congenital heart disease will be discussed. The main focus of the article will be on pharmacological, interventional and surgical interventions that reduce the risk of heart failure, arrhythmias, vascular complications, pulmonary hypertension and endocarditis.

  13. [Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders: diagnosis and pharmacological treatment].

    PubMed

    Paslakis, G; Schredl, M; Alm, B; Sobanski, E

    2013-08-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterised by inattention and/or hyperactivity and impulsivity and is a frequent psychiatric disorder with childhood onset. In addition to core symptoms, patients often experience associated symptoms like emotional dysregulation or low self-esteem and suffer from comorbid disorders, particularly depressive episodes, substance abuse, anxiety or sleep disorders. It is recommended to include associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders in the diagnostic set-up and in the treatment plan. Comorbid psychiatric disorders should be addressed with disorder-specific therapies while associated symptoms also often improve with treatment of the ADHD core symptoms. The most impairing psychiatric disorder should be treated first. This review presents recommendations for differential diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD with associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders with respect to internationally published guidelines, clinical trials and expert opinions.

  14. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  15. Individualized treatment for iron deficiency anemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, Michael; Horne, McDonald K.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common disorders affecting mankind, and iron deficiency anemia continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. It is especially common among women of childbearing age due to pregnancy and menstrual blood loss. Additional patient groups include those with other sources of blood loss, malnutrition or gut malabsorption. Iron deficiency anemia remains quite prevalent despite the widespread ability to diagnose the disease and availability of medicinal iron preparations. Therefore, new approaches are needed to effectively manage these patient populations. In this review, the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia are discussed with emphasis placed upon consideration of patient specific features. It is proposed that all patients participate in their own care by helping their physician to identify a tolerable daily iron dose, formulation, and schedule. Dosing cycles are recommended for iron replacement based upon the tolerated daily dose and the total iron deficit. Each cycle consists of 5000mg of oral elemental iron ingested over at least one month with appropriate follow-up. This approach should assist physicians and their patients with the implementation of individualized treatment strategies for patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:18954837

  16. Memantine improves buprenorphine/naloxone treatment for opioid dependent young adults

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Gerardo; DiGirolamo, Gregory; Romero-Gonzalez, Mauricio; Smelson, David; Ziedonis, Douglas; Kolodziej, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioid use disorders are considered a serious public health problem among young adults. Current treatment is limited to long-term opioid substitution therapy, with high relapse rates after discontinuation. This study evaluated the co-administration of memantine to brief buprenorphine pharmacotherapy as a treatment alternative. Methods 13-week double-blind placebo-controlled trial evaluating 80 young adult opioid dependent participants treated with buprenorphine/naloxone 16-4 mg/day and randomized to memantine (15mg or 30mg) or placebo. Primary outcomes were a change in the weekly mean proportion of opioid use, and cumulative abstinence rates after rapid buprenorphine discontinuation on week 9. Results Treatment retention was not significantly different between groups. The memantine 30mg group was significantly less likely to relapse and to use opioids after buprenorphine discontinuation. Among participants abstinent on week 8, those in the memantine 30mg group (81.9%) were significantly less likely to relapse after buprenorphine was discontinued compared to the placebo group (30%) (p < 0.025). Also, the memantine 30mg group had significantly reduced opioid use (mean = 0, SEM ± 0.00) compared to the placebo group (mean = 0.33, SEM ± 0.35; p < 0.004) during the last 2 weeks of study participation. Conclusions Memantine 30mg significantly improved short-term treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone for opioid dependent young adults by reducing relapse and opioid use after buprenorphine discontinuation. Combined short-term treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone may be an effective alternative treatment to long-term methadone or buprenorphine maintenance in young adults. PMID:26454835

  17. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  18. Comprehensive orthodontic treatment of adult patient with cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable.

  19. Comprehensive Orthodontic Treatment of Adult Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Leiva Villagra, Noemí; Muñoz Domon, Miguel; Véliz Méndez, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present full orthodontic treatment of an operated cleft lip adult patient. Case Report. An 18-year-old patient consulted for severe crowded teeth. He comes from a poor family. At that time he already had four operations (velum, palate, lip, and myringotomy). Treatment included maxillary expansion, tooth extraction, and fixed orthodontic, as well as kinesiology and speech therapy treatment. A multidisciplinary approach allowed us to achieve successfully an excellent result for this patient and gave him a harmonic smile and an optimal function without orthognathic surgery. Two years after treatment, occlusion remains stable. PMID:25544903

  20. Gingival recession and adult orthodontics: a clinical evidence-based treatment proposal.

    PubMed

    Dersot, Jean-Marc

    2012-03-01

    The presence of a gingival recession prior to orthodontic treatment is a real problem. Patients are concerned about losing their teeth but may also complain of their unpleasant appearance or root sensitivity in the exposed area. The orthodontist is not sure whether orthodontic treatment can be performed or whether the tooth movement will not aggravate the recession and whether periodontal surgery needs to be done before or after orthodontic treatment. The aim of this paper is to present recent data from the literature and several clinical situations in adults in order to submit a treatment sequence and clarify the role of different periodontal plastic surgery root coverage procedures.

  1. Treatment of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Adults: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Gitto, S.; Vitale, G.; Villa, E.; Andreone, P.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis has become one of the most common liver-related health problems. This condition has been linked to an unhealthy diet and weight gain, but it can also be observed in nonobese people. The standard of care is represented by the lifestyle intervention. However, because this approach has several limitations, such as a lack of compliance, the use of many drugs has been proposed. The first-line pharmacological choices are vitamin E and pioglitazone, both showing a positive effect on transaminases, fat accumulation, and inflammation. Nevertheless, vitamin E has no proven effect on fibrosis and on long-term morbidity and mortality and pioglitazone has a negative impact on weight. Other drugs have been studied such as metformin, ursodeoxycholic acid, statins, pentoxiphylline, and orlistat with only partially positive results. Among the emerging treatments, telmisartan is particularly interesting as it seems to have an impact on insulin resistance, liver steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. However, the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis is highly complex and is determined by different parallel hits; indeed, the association of different drugs that act on various levels has been suggested. In conclusion, lifestyle intervention should be optimised and the associations of different drugs should be tested in large studies with long-term outcomes. PMID:25866507

  2. Esophageal dilation: simple and effective treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis and esophageal rings and narrowing.

    PubMed

    Bohm, M; Richter, J E; Kelsen, S; Thomas, R

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this article is to present the results of the long-term treatment with esophageal dilation of a consecutive series of adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE in adults is a disease of middle aged white males, with recurrent food impactions and dysphagia. The exact treatment of EoE is unknown due to the uncertainty of the pathogenesis. Currently, the long-term follow-up of adult EoE patients is limited. Sixteen consecutive adult patients (12 males/4 females between ages 27 and 58 years) with EoE underwent a detailed history and baseline upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (EGD) with multiple esophageal biopsies. Thirteen had esophageal dilation. Fifteen were on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. After dilation, one patient was treated with a restrictive diet. One patient took prn fluticasone. Most of the patients had allergy testing for food and aeroallergens. Follow-up evaluation with similar testing was on average 22 months (range: 12-40 months). Six patients were not available for follow-up. None of the remaining 10 patients had a food impaction; one required further esophageal dilation. Only two patients had intermittent dysphagia. The average dysphagia score decreased from 2.1 to 0.3 (P < 0.002). The average number of eosinophils at follow-up was not significantly different from baseline (120 eosinophils/HPF proximally and 165 eosinophils/HPF distally (P= 0.75). The gross endoscopy findings were unchanged in all patients except one who normalized. A total of 62% and 75% of patients had positive tests for aeroallergens and food allergens, respectively. Over an average of two years, esophageal dilation provided excellent symptomatic relief among 10 adult EoE patients despite no improvement in the mucosal eosinophilia or gross endoscopic appearance.

  3. Morphine treatment during juvenile isolation increases social activity and opioid peptides release in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Van den Berg, C L; Kitchen, I; Gerrits, M A; Spruijt, B M; Van Ree, J M

    1999-05-29

    The consequences of juvenile isolation and morphine treatment on general activity, social activity and endogenous opioid release during a social interaction test were investigated in the adult rat. Rats were either isolated or socially housed during weeks 4 and 5 of age and treated daily during this isolation period subcutaneously with either saline or morphine. Directly after a social interaction test at 10 weeks of age, rats were injected with [3H]-diprenorphine and subsequently prepared for in vivo autoradiography. The autoradiographic technique was used to visualise neuroanatomical changes in opioid receptor occupancy, probably reflecting changes in opioid peptide release, as a result of social activity. Juvenile isolation increased general activity during the social interaction test, an effect which was accompanied by a reduction of opioid receptor occupancy in many brain areas, suggesting an increased opioid peptide release as a consequence of socially-induced general activity. Morphine treatment in isolated rats caused an increase in adult social activity and enhanced opioid peptide release in some cortical regions and the ventral tegmental area as compared to saline treated rats. Both social activity and opioid receptor occupancy were unaffected by morphine treatment in non-isolated rats. The present study underscores the role of opioid systems in adult social behaviors as a consequence of juvenile isolation. The results suggest a relationship between social activity and opioid peptide release during social contact. Increased social activity seems to be accompanied by elevated opioid peptide release in distinct brain areas after morphine treatment during juvenile isolation.

  4. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis is enhanced by chronic eszopiclone treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Methippara, Melvi; Bashir, Tariq; Suntsova, Natalia; Szymusiak, Ron; McGinty, Dennis

    2010-09-01

    The adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) exhibits cell proliferation and neurogenesis throughout life. We examined the effects of daily administration of eszopiclone (Esz), a commonly used hypnotic drug and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist, compared with vehicle, on DG cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and on sleep-wake patterns. Esz was administered during the usual sleep period of rats, to mimic typical use in humans. Esz treatment for 7 days did not affect the rate of cell proliferation, as measured by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunostaining. However, twice-daily Esz administration for 2 weeks increased survival of newborn cells by 46%. Most surviving cells exhibited a neuronal phenotype, identified as BrdU-neuronal nuclei (NeuN) double-labeling. NeuN is a marker of neurons. Non-rapid eye movement sleep was increased on day 1, but not on days 7 or 14 of Esz administration. Delta electroencephalogram activity was increased on days 1 and 7 of treatment, but not on day 14. There is evidence that enhancement of DG neurogenesis is a critical component of the effects of antidepressant treatments of major depressive disorder (MDD). Adult-born DG cells are responsive to GABAergic stimulation, which promotes cell maturation. The present study suggests that Esz, presumably acting as a GABA agonist, has pro-neurogenic effects in the adult DG. This result is consistent with evidence that Esz enhances the antidepressant treatment response of patients with MDD with insomnia.

  5. Regional brain activity change predicts responsiveness to treatment for stuttering in adults.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Roger J; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Janis C; Bothe, Anne K; Grafton, Scott T

    2013-12-01

    Developmental stuttering is known to be associated with aberrant brain activity, but there is no evidence that this knowledge has benefited stuttering treatment. This study investigated whether brain activity could predict progress during stuttering treatment for 21 dextral adults who stutter (AWS). They received one of two treatment programs that included periodic H2(15)O PET scanning (during oral reading, monologue, and eyes-closed rest conditions). All participants successfully completed an initial treatment phase and then entered a phase designed to transfer treatment gains; 9/21 failed to complete this latter phase. The 12 pass and 9 fail participants were similar on speech and neural system variables before treatment, and similar in speech performance after the initial phase of their treatment. At the end of the initial treatment phase, however, decreased activation within a single region, L. putamen, in all 3 scanning conditions was highly predictive of successful treatment progress.

  6. Dehydration in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hayley J

    2015-09-01

    Dehydration affects 20% to 30% of older adults. It has a greater negative outcome in this population than in younger adults and increases mortality, morbidity, and disability. Dehydration is often caused by water deprivation in older adults, although excess water loss may also be a cause. Traditional markers for dehydration do not take into consideration many of the physiological differences present in older adults. Clinical assessment of dehydration in older adults poses different findings, yet is not always diagnostic. Treatment of dehydration should focus on prevention and early diagnosis before it negatively effects health and gives rise to comorbidities. The current article discusses what has most thoroughly been studied; the best strategies and assessment tools for evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of dehydration in older adults; and what needs to be researched further. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(9), 8-13.].

  7. Successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Satoshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Yokouchi, Yukako; Kamiichi, Hideo; Kiriu, Nobuaki; Koike, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    Intussusception is a rare condition in adults, representing only 1% of all bowel obstructions. In adult cases, operative explorations are recommended to treat the bowel obstruction and to diagnose underlying diseases. The objective of the current case report was to describe the successful treatment of ileocolic intussusception with air enema reduction in an adult patient. A previously healthy 21-year-old woman had a 20-hour history of colicky abdominal pain and vomiting and was diagnosed as having idiopathic ileocolic intussusception by abdominal computed tomography. We treated the patient with air enema reduction under fluoroscopic guidance instead of an operative procedure. She received oxygen and intravenous midazolam to provide some degree of pain relief. Air was carefully pumped manually into the rectum, and the air pressure was monitored with a manometer. Because of air leakage from the rectum through the void to the outside the body, we continued to provide air to maintain the air pressure between 40 and 60 mm Hg. Three minutes after initiation of the air enema, when the patient experienced increasing abdominal pain and vomiting, the pressure was temporarily increased to greater than 100 mm Hg, and the air reached the terminal ileum. We considered the reduction successful and confirmed it with an abdominal ultrasound examination. We believe that air enema reduction is effective for treating idiopathic intussusception within 24 hours of symptom onset in young, previously healthy adult patients.

  8. Acute Methotrexate Ingestions in Adults: A Report of Serious Clinical Effects and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bebarta, Vikhyat S.; Hensley, Matthew D.; Borys, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Limited reported data have reports effects after acute ingestion of methotrexate. Treatment recommendations do not differentiate between exposure routes. Our objective was to determine the frequency of significant toxicity effects and use of therapy after methotrexate ingestion in adults. Methods. We performed a retrospective study on adult cases reported to 6 poison centers over 6 years (2000–2005) which exceed 180,000 exposures/year. Variables collected included demographics, dosages ingested, coingestions, clinical effects, and therapies with outcomes. Results. Sixty-three patients examined over the 6-year period met inclusion criteria. No patient in the series received dialysis or died. The mean dose ingested for all patients was 24 mg (range 2.5–100 mg) and the mean dose for suicidal ingestions was 47.5 mg (12.5–100 mg). The most common clinical effects were abdominal pain, oral irritation, throat irritation, nausea, dizziness, and headache. Nine patients received folinic acid and 3 patients received sodium bicarbonate. No patient developed renal failure, bone marrow suppression, seizure, or coma. No patient died or received dialysis. Conclusion. In our series of patients from 6 poison centers over six years, 63 cases of acute adult methotrexate ingestions were reported. Methotrexate toxicity from ingestion in adults was uncommon and rarely toxic. PMID:24829573

  9. Periodontal treatment needs among Saudi Arabian adults and their relationship to the use of the Miswak.

    PubMed

    al-Khateeb, T L; O'Mullane, D M; Whelton, H; Sulaiman, M I

    1991-12-01

    The main aims of this study were, first, to estimate the need for periodontal care among adult residents of Saudi Arabia using the community periodontal index of treatment need (CPITN) and, second, to quantify the relationship between the frequency of using the 'Miswak' and the need for periodontal care. The Miswak is a stick made from the roots of the Arak tree (Salvadora persica) and is used for oral hygiene purposes by many cultures. A total sample of 480 adults aged 35 to 44 years and 65 years and older from the cities of Mecca and Jeddah was included in the study. The findings indicate that the level of need for periodontal care in the sample chosen is low when compared with the findings of similar studies undertaken in other countries. The frequent use of the 'Miswak' was associated with a lower need for treatment.

  10. The safety of azithromycin in the treatment of adults with community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Treadway, Glenda; Pontani, Dennis; Reisman, Arlene

    2002-03-01

    The comparative safety of azithromycin was assessed in adult patients (> or =12 years) with community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Of 3229 patients evaluated, 1616 received azithromycin 500 mg once daily for 3 days and 1613 received standard regimens of amoxycillin, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid, cefaclor, clarithromycin, or roxithromycin. A similar incidence of treatment-related adverse events occurred with azithromycin (10.3%) and comparators (11.5%). Significantly fewer patients were withdrawn from azithromycin than comparator treatment (0.4 versus 2.1%; P=0.0001). Most adverse events were mild/moderate in intensity and affected the gastrointestinal system. Azithromycin was as well tolerated as other antibiotics commonly used for bacterial infections in adults.

  11. Procedures for identifying evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults.

    PubMed

    Yon, Adriana; Scogin, Forrest

    2007-03-01

    The authors describe the methods used to identify evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults in this contribution to the special section. Coding teams were assembled to review the literature on several problems relevant to mental health and aging. These teams used the manual developed by the Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology (Division 12) of the American Psychological Association that provided definitions of key constructs used in coding. The authors provide an overview of the process followed by the review teams and of some of the issues that emerged to illustrate the steps involved in the coding procedure. Identifying evidence-based treatments is a fundamental aspect of promoting evidence-based practice with older adults; such practice is advocated by most health care disciplines, including psychology.

  12. Fecal incontinence in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Syed H

    2007-11-01

    Fecal incontinence is an underreported and underappreciated problem in older adults. Although fecal incontinence is more common in women than in men, this difference narrows with aging. Risk factors that lead to the development of fecal incontinence include dementia, physical disability, and fecal impaction. Treatment options include medical or conservative therapy for older adults who have mild incontinence, and surgical options can be explored in selected older adults if surgical expertise is available.

  13. Clueless? Adult Mysteries with Young Adult Appeal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, John; Morrison, Joanna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a list of adult mystery titles for young adult readers. Includes first titles in a series (for reading in order); new and lesser-known mystery authors' works are the focus. Annotations include plot summary. The rest of each annotation is for professional use (includes date and name of award bestowed). (AEF)

  14. Young Adult Literature for Young Adult Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Sam D.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that young adult literature can play a significant role in the emotional and mental health of an adolescent as well as help young males become more literate. Offers a 19-item annotated list of young adult novels with male protagonists, sorted by themes: nature and adventure stories, sports stories, genre stories, historical stories, and…

  15. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44 ± 13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4 ± 2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4 ± 3.1 days (range 7–16 days). WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 19.4 months (range 13–66 months) no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94 ± 5.6 points (range 91–100) at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:27800188

  16. Methylphenidate treatment increases Na(+), K (+)-ATPase activity in the cerebrum of young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Emilene B S; Matté, Cristiane; Ferreira, Andréa G K; Gomes, Karin M; Comim, Clarissa M; Mattos, Cristiane; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L; Wyse, Angela T S

    2009-12-01

    Methylphenidate is a central nervous system stimulant used for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Na(+), K(+)-ATPase is a membrane-bound enzyme necessary to maintain neuronal excitability. Considering that methylphenidate effects on central nervous system metabolism are poorly known and that Na(+), K(+)-ATPase is essential to normal brain function, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of this drug on Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in the cerebrum of young and adult rats. For acute administration, a single injection of methylphenidate (1.0, 2.0, or 10.0 mg/Kg) or saline was given to rats on postnatal day 25 or postnatal day 60, in the young and adult groups, respectively. For chronic administration, methylphenidate (1.0, 2.0, or 10.0 mg/Kg) or saline injections were given to young rats starting at postnatal day 25 once daily for 28 days. In adult rats, the same regimen was performed starting at postnatal day 60. Our results showed that acute methylphenidate administration increased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and striatum of young and adult rats. In young rats, chronic administration of methylphenidate also enhanced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, but not in striatum. When tested in adult rats, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity was increased in all cerebral structures studied. The present findings suggest that increased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity may be associated with neuronal excitability caused by methylphenidate.

  17. Are Adult Patients More Tolerant of Treatment Risks Than Parents of Juvenile Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F. Reed; Özdemir, Semra; Mansfield, Carol; Hass, Steven; Siegel, Corey A.; Sands, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding patient-specific differences in risk tolerance for new treatments that offer improved efficacy can assist in making difficult regulatory and clinical decisions for new treatments that offer both the potential for greater effectiveness in relieving disease symptoms, but also risks of disabling or fatal side effects. The aim of this study is to elicit benefit-risk trade-off preferences for hypothetical treatments with varying efficacy and risk levels using a stated-choice (SC) survey. We derive estimates of “maximum acceptable risk” (MAR) that can help decisionmakers identify welfare-enhancing alternatives. In the case of children, parent caregivers are responsible for treatment decisions and their risk tolerance may be quite different than adult patients' own tolerance for treatment-related risks. We estimated and compared the willingness of Crohn's disease (CD) patients and parents of juvenile CD patients to accept serious adverse event (SAE) risks in exchange for symptom relief. The analyzed data were from 345 patients over the age of 18 and 150 parents of children under the age of 18. The estimation results provide strong evidence that adult patients and parents of juvenile patients are willing to accept tradeoffs between treatment efficacy and risks of SAEs. Parents of juvenile CD patients are about as risk tolerant for their children as adult CD patients are for themselves for improved treatment efficacy. SC surveys provide a systematic method for eliciting preferences for benefit-risk tradeoffs. Understanding patients' own risk perceptions and their willingness to accept risks in return for treatment benefits can help inform risk management decision making. PMID:18826414

  18. Depression in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred; Onedera, Jill D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to address selected aspects of depression in older adults. Specifically, symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in older adults are reviewed.

  19. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  20. Adult Education Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Clyde W.

    1975-01-01

    Summarized are speeches dealing with adult education's stiff-necked adherence to middle-class values; the need for upgraded management skills; and a report of a study of adult education in area vocational schools in Georgia. (Author/AJ)

  1. Adult Education in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harry; And Others

    Folk high schools, study circles, labor market training, union education, and municipal adult schools are the major providers of adult education in Sweden. For the most part, these programs are financed by the government and are tuition free. Folk high schools, which are the oldest type, were founded to provide young adults with a general civic…

  2. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  3. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  4. Urbanization and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, W. Fisher

    1974-01-01

    The impact of urbanization, the main tasks facing the adult educator in an urban context, identifying the casualties of urbanization, recognizing and dealing with social deprivation, and the various agencies involved in adult education are relevant considerations for adult educators. (MW)

  5. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  6. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  7. Adult Education in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirmayer, Paul, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains 13 articles that reflect the development of adult education in Israel during recent years. The material relates to the principal areas with which the Division of Adult Education deals: formal and nonformal education for adults, language and cultural absorption of new immigrants, and training of facilitators for parental…

  8. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  9. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  10. Adult Competency Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of abstracts of 120 current Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) federally supported projects being conducted in 34 States and the District of Columbia, this project profile was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are currently…

  11. Adult Competency Education Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Occupational and Adult Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Adult Education.

    A compilation of brief descriptions of 20 current resources for Adult Performance Level (APL) and Adult Competency Education (ACE) programs, this guide was developed for adult and secondary education administrators, teachers, and program developers who are beginning or are already involved with APL/ACE programs. Each citation contains information…

  12. Adult Academy Volunteer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cora, Marie T., Ed.; Wood, Nicole R., Ed.

    This handbook was written specifically for volunteer tutors but is appropriate for teachers, student interns, coordinators, and others working with Adult Basic Education (ABE) and English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) adult learners. It presents an overview of adult and non-traditional education models, some principles of reading and writing, a…

  13. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  14. Young Adult Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boegen, Anne, Ed.

    Designed to offer guidelines, ideas and help to those who provide library service to young adults, this manual includes information about the provision of young adult (YA) services in six sections. The first section, which addresses planning and administration, includes a definition of a young adult and a checklist for determining community needs…

  15. Adult Educators' Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned…

  16. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  17. Internalized weight stigma and its ideological correlates among weight loss treatment seeking adults.

    PubMed

    Carels, R A; Young, K M; Wott, C B; Harper, J; Gumble, A; Hobbs, M Wagner; Clayton, A M

    2009-01-01

    There are significant economic and psychological costs associated with the negative weight-based social stigma that exists in American society. This pervasive anti-fat bias has been strongly internalized among the overweight/obese. While the etiology of weight stigma is complex, research suggests that it is often greater among individuals who embrace certain etiological views of obesity or ideological views of the world. This investigation examined 1) the level of internalized weight stigma among overweight/obese treatment seeking adults, and 2) the association between internalized weight stigma and perceived weight controllability and ideological beliefs about the world ('just world beliefs', Protestant work ethic). Forty-six overweight or obese adults (BMI >or=27 kg/m2) participating in an 18- week behavioral weight loss program completed implicit (Implicit Associations Test) and explicit (Obese Person's Trait Survey) measures of weight stigma. Participants also completed two measures of ideological beliefs about the world ("Just World Beliefs", Protestant Ethic Scale) and one measure of beliefs about weight controllability (Beliefs about Obese Persons). Significant implicit and explicit weight bias was observed. Greater weight stigma was consistently associated with greater endorsement of just world beliefs, Protestant ethic beliefs and beliefs about weight controllability. Results suggest that the overweight/obese treatment seeking adults have internalized the negative weight-based social stigma that exists in American society. Internalized weight stigma may be greater among those holding specific etiological and ideological beliefs about weight and the world.

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF MONTEGGIA LESION IN ADULTS: SERIES OF 44 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Roberto; Barquet, Antonio; Fresco, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the epidemiology, treatment and outcome of a series of adult patients with Monteggia lesion treated in Uruguayan institutions. Methods: This is a retrospective article, we retrospectively identified from two Uruguayan institutions 44 adult patients with Monteggia lesion and analyzed their characteristics including Bado classification, associated injuries, treatment modality and outcome (Morrey score). Results: Using Bado classification, 23 cases (52%) were type II, 12 (27%) type I, seven (16%) type IV and two cases (5%) type III. Associated lesions were radial head fractures, found in 15 patients, coronoid ipsilateral fractures in seven patients, and neurological injuries in four. Radial head dislocation was reduced in 93% of the cases with closed maneuvers. Ulna fractures underwent open reduction and internal fixation in all 30 cases using 3.5 mm DCP plates. Complications after surgery occurred in 21 cases. Revision surgery was done in 15 cases. Outcomes after primary and revision surgery were good or excellent in 37 cases. Conclusions: In our series we observed that Monteggia lesion in adults is a serious injury with a high number of complications that often require revision surgeries. Level of Evidence IV, Retrospective Study, Case Series. PMID:26997915

  19. [Internet-based approaches in prevention and treatment of depressive symptoms in adolescents and young adults ].

    PubMed

    Berking, Matthias; Ebert, David D; Lehr, Dirk; Riper, Heleen; Sieland, Bernhard; Wiencke, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological findings indicate that up to 18.5 % of the German adolescents suffer from depressive symptoms and that younger adults display the highest risk for relevant symptoms of depression (9.9 %) within the German adult population. Internet-based interventions have been shown to be useful for preventing and treating depression and are more easily disseminated in internet-savvy generations. Available programs are usually based on principles of cognitive behavioural therapy. They differ significantly with regard to target groups, structure, content, degree of guidance provided by online-coaches and evidence for their efficacy. Whereas some studies could not prove the use of the trainings there are others that show large effect sizes (up to d = 0.84) for the reduction of depressive symptoms. In Germany there are some online counseling programs for children and adolescents in (acute) crises available. However, at this point no structured intervention program for the treatment of depression exists.

  20. Differential diagnosis and treatment planning for the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R G; Sinclair, P M; Goates, L J

    1986-02-01

    Increasing numbers of adult patients are seeking orthodontic care and some, despite significant skeletal malocclusions, elect not to have combined orthodontic-surgical treatment. The purpose of this article is to outline some of the diagnostic and therapeutic principles that can be used in the adult nonsurgical orthodontic patient. The importance of realistic goal setting in the face of compromised occlusions is emphasized. Diagnosis should include evaluation of all three dimensions and recognize the limitations of therapy in each dimension for the nongrowing patient. Periodontal considerations, extraction decisions, and retention regimens are of vital importance to the achievement and maintenance of an optimum result. Clinical records will demonstrate four commonly seen problems and their resolution.

  1. Evaluation of organ doses in brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer using mathematical reference Indian adult phantom.

    PubMed

    Biju, K

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying organ dose to healthy organs during radiotherapy is essential to estimate the radiation risk. Dose factors are generated by simulating radiation transport through an anthropomorphic mathematical phantom representing a reference Indian adult using the Monte Carlo method. The mean organ dose factors (in mGy min(-1) GBq(-1)) are obtained considering the microselectron (192)Ir source and BEBIG (60)Co sources in the uterus of a reference Indian adult female phantom. The present study provides the factors for mean absorbed dose to organs applicable to the Indian female patient population undergoing brachytherapy treatment of uterus cancer. This study also includes a comparison of the dimension of organs in the phantom model with measured values of organs in the various investigated patients.

  2. Acne treatment patterns, expectations, and satisfaction among adult females of different races/ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Rendon, Marta I; Rodriguez, David A; Kawata, Ariane K; Degboe, Arnold N; Wilcox, Teresa K; Burk, Caroline T; Daniels, Selena R; Roberts, Wendy E

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited data are available on acne treatment patterns, expectations, and satisfaction in the adult female subpopulation, particularly among different racial and ethnic groups. Objective Describe acne treatment patterns and expectations in adult females of different racial/ethnic groups and analyze and explore their potential effects on medication compliance and treatment satisfaction. Methods A cross-sectional, Web-based survey was administered to US females (25–45 years) with facial acne (≥25 visible lesions). Data collected included sociodemographics, self-reported clinical characteristics, acne treatment use, and treatment expectations and satisfaction. Results Three hundred twelve subjects completed the survey (mean age, 35.3±5.9 years), comprising black (30.8%), Hispanic (17.6%), Asian/other (17.3%), and white (34.3%). More than half of the subjects in each racial group recently used an acne treatment or procedure (black, 63.5%; Hispanic, 54.5%; Asian/other, 66.7%; white, 66.4%). Treatment use was predominantly over-the-counter (OTC) (47.4%) versus prescription medications (16.6%). OTC use was highest in white subjects (black, 42.7%; Hispanic, 34.5%; Asian/other, 44.4%; white, 59.8%; P<0.05). The most frequently used OTC treatments in all racial/ethnic groups were salicylic acid (SA) (34.3%) and benzoyl peroxide (BP) (32.1%). Overall, compliance with acne medications was highest in white versus black (57.0±32.4 vs 42.7±33.5 days, P>0.05), Hispanic (57.0±32.4 vs 43.2±32.9 days, P>0.05), and Asian/other (57.0±32.4 vs 46.9±37.2 days, P>0.05) subjects. Most subjects expected OTC (73.7%) and prescription (74.7%) treatments to work quickly. Fewer than half of the subjects were satisfied with OTC treatment (BP, 47.0%; SA, 43.0%), often due to skin dryness (BP, 26.3%; SA, 44.3%) and flakiness (BP, 12.3%; SA, 31.1%). No statistically significant differences were observed among racial/ethnic groups in their level of satisfaction with OTC or

  3. “Life Still Isn't Fair”: Parental Differential Treatment of Young Adult Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Alexander C.; Whiteman, Shawn D.; Fingerman, Karen L.; Birditt, Kira S.

    2014-01-01

    Parental differential treatment has been linked to individual well-being and sibling relationship quality in childhood, adolescence, and middle adulthood, but has not been examined in young adulthood. Data were collected from 151 pairs of young adult siblings (N = 302, Mean age = 23.90, SD = 5.02). Two siblings in each family reported on treatment from mothers and fathers, depressive symptoms, and sibling relationship quality. Using multi-level modeling, analyses examined the role of favoritism and the magnitude of differential treatment from both mothers and fathers. Offspring who reported receiving less support relative to their sibling (i.e., less favored) reported more depressive symptoms. Greater amounts of differential treatment were associated with less sibling intimacy. Several associations, however, varied by parent gender, sibling gender composition, and the magnitude of differential treatment. Results suggest that favoritism and magnitude of differential treatment from both mothers and fathers are salient in young adulthood. PMID:24833808

  4. Neurobiologically informed treatment for adults with anorexia nervosa: a novel approach to a chronic disorder.

    PubMed

    Knatz, Stephanie; Wierenga, Christina E; Murray, Stuart B; Hill, Laura; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and debilitating disorder with significant medical and psychological sequelae. To date, there are no effective treatments for adults, resulting in high rates of chronicity, morbidity, and mortality. Recent advances in brain imaging research have led to an improved understanding of etiology and specific neurobiological mechanisms underlying symptoms. Despite this, there are no treatments focused on targeting symptoms using this empirically supported mechanistic understanding of the illness. Updated treatment approaches focused on targeting neurobiological mechanisms underlying core AN symptomatology are necessary to improve treatment out-comes for this population. Neurobiologically Enhanced With Family Eating Disorder Trait Response Treatment (NEW FED TR) is a neurobiologically informed treatment targeting key temperament constructs associated with the illness through the delivery of psychoeducation and skills training to patients and nominated carers.

  5. Improvement of Eye Alignment in Adult Strabismic Monkeys by Sustained IGF-1 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McLoon, Linda K.; Christiansen, Stephen P.; Ghose, Geoffrey M.; Das, Vallabh E.; Mustari, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to determine if continuous application of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) could improve eye alignment of adult strabismic nonhuman primates and to assess possible mechanisms of effect. Methods A continuous release pellet of IGF-1 was placed on one medial rectus muscle in two adult nonhuman primates (M1, M2) rendered exotropic by the alternating monocular occlusion method during the first months of life. Eye alignment and eye movements were recorded for 3 months, after which M1 was euthanized, and the lateral and medial rectus muscles were removed for morphometric analysis of fiber size, nerve, and neuromuscular density. Results Monkey 1 showed a 40% reduction in strabismus angle, a reduction of exotropia of approximately 11° to 14° after 3 months. Monkey 2 showed a 15% improvement, with a reduction of its exotropia by approximately 3°. The treated medial rectus muscle of M1 showed increased mean myofiber cross-sectional areas. Increases in myofiber size also were seen in the contralateral medial rectus and lateral rectus muscles. Similarly, nerve density increased in the contralateral medial rectus and yoked lateral rectus. Conclusions This study demonstrates that in adult nonhuman primates with a sensory-induced exotropia in infancy, continuous IGF-1 treatment improves eye alignment, resulting in muscle fiber enlargement and altered innervational density that includes the untreated muscles. This supports the view that there is sufficient plasticity in the adult ocular motor system to allow continuous IGF-1 treatment over months to produce improvement in eye alignment in early-onset strabismus. PMID:27820875

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS adult patients].

    PubMed

    Lasso B, Martín

    2011-10-01

    The following guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections (OI) in adult HIV/AIDS patients represent the first approach to standardize the management of this patient group in Chile. The guidelines are based on scientific evidence. They intend to serve as a practical and easy-to-use tool for physicians during the process of selecting appropriate diagnostic tests and effective treatments for their patients. They also include the local experience in Chile related to OI in HIV/AIDS patients. Regular up-dates to include new scientific knowledge are proposed.

  7. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ... Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder ...

  8. Different Yet Similar: Examining race and ethnicity in treatment-seeking adults with binge eating disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lydecker, Janet A.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined racial/ethnic differences in demographic variables and the clinical presentation of treatment-seeking adults with binge eating disorder (BED) who participated in treatment research at a medical-school based program. Method Participants were 775 (n=195 men, n=560 women) treatment-seeking adults with DSM-IV-defined BED who self-identified as Black (n=121), Hispanic (n=54), or White (n=580). Doctoral-level research-clinicians assessed participants for BED and for eating-disorder psychopathology using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID) and the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) interview, and measured height and weight. Participants also completed established self-report measures. Results Black participants had a greater proportion of women than White participants and White participants had higher education than Black and Hispanic participants. Black participants had higher body mass index (BMI) and reported more frequent binge-eating episodes than White participants but eating-disorder psychopathology (EDE scales and global severity) did not significantly differ across racial/ethnic groups. Black participants had lower depression than Hispanic and White participants. These differences in clinical presentation remained unchanged after adjusting for age, education, sex, and BMI. White participants had younger ages of onset for dieting, binge eating, and obesity, but not BED, than Black and Hispanic participants. Conclusions There are some racial/ethnic differences in the developmental trajectories and clinical presentation of treatment-seeking adults with BED that remain unchanged after adjusting for demographic differences. Black participants presented for treatment with higher BMI and binge-eating frequency than White participants and with lower depression than White/Hispanic groups but associated eating-disorder psychopathology levels were similar across racial/ethnic groups. PMID:26348841

  9. Diarrhoea in adults (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An estimated 4.6 billion cases of diarrhoea occurred worldwide in 2004, resulting in 2.2 million deaths. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for acute diarrhoea in adults living in resource-rich countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults from resource-rich countries travelling to resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute mild-to-moderate diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? What are the effects of treatments for acute severe diarrhoea in adults living in resource-poor countries? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 72 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, antimotility agents, antisecretory agents, bismuth subsalicylate, diet, intravenous rehydration, nasogastric tube rehydration, oral rehydration solutions (amino acid oral rehydration solution, bicarbonate oral rehydration solution, reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution, rice-based oral rehydration solution, standard oral rehydration solution), vitamin A supplementation, and zinc supplementation. PMID:21718555

  10. Clinical issues in the treatment of anxiety and depression in older adults with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pachana, Nancy A; Egan, Sarah J; Laidlaw, Ken; Dissanayaka, Nadeeka; Byrne, Gerard J; Brockman, Simone; Marsh, Rodney; Starkstein, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    A significant proportion of persons affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) are over age 65 years. Mental health issues are often less a focus of treatment in this population than physical manifestations of the illness. Anxiety or depression alone, as well as comorbid depression and anxiety, are underrecognized in patients with PD and are associated with deleterious effects on physical and interpersonal functioning, negatively impacting quality of life and well-being. We offer a brief overview of salient clinical points with respect to assessment and treatment approaches to enhance efficacy of the treatment of mental health symptoms in older adults with PD. Cognitive behavior therapy involves the patient learning to overcome behavioral avoidance associated with anxiety and challenge unhelpful negative cognitions. It is suggested that cognitive behavior therapy is an effective approach to treatment of anxiety and depression in PD and should be offered as a treatment to patients.

  11. Multidisciplinary Treatments, Patient Characteristics, Context of Care, and Adverse Incidents in Older, Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shever, Leah L.; Titler, Marita G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contribute to adverse incidents by creating a model that included patient characteristics, clinical conditions, nursing unit context of care variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing treatments. Data were abstracted from electronic, administrative, and clinical data repositories. The sample included older adults hospitalized during a four-year period at one, academic medical facility in the Midwestern United States who were at risk for falling. Relational databases were built and a multistep, statistical model building analytic process was used. Total registered nurse (RN) hours per patient day (HPPD) and HPPDs dropping below the nursing unit average were significant explanatory variables for experiencing an adverse incident. The number of medical and pharmaceutical treatments that a patient received during hospitalization as well as many specific nursing treatments (e.g., restraint use, neurological monitoring) were also contributors to experiencing an adverse incident. PMID:22530112

  12. A meta-analytic review of adult cognitive-behavioral treatment outcome across the anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J; Price, Esther C

    2007-06-01

    The efficacy of cognitive behavioral treatments (CBT) for anxiety in adults has been supported by multiple meta-analyses. However, most have focused on only 1 diagnosis, thereby disallowing diagnostic comparisons. This study examined the efficacy of CBT across the anxiety disorders. One hundred eight trials of CBT for an anxiety disorder met study criteria. Cognitive therapy and exposure therapy alone, in combination, or combined with relaxation training, were efficacious across the anxiety disorders, with no differential efficacy for any treatment components for any specific diagnoses. However, when comparing across diagnoses, outcomes for generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder were superior to those for social anxiety disorder, but no other differences emerged. CBT effects were superior to those for no-treatment and expectancy control treatments, although tentative evidence suggested equal effects of CBT when compared with relaxation-only treatments.

  13. Systematic review of the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments for adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Broadstock, Marita; Doughty, Carolyn; Eggleston, Matt

    2007-07-01

    The variable expression of autism over the lifespan is likely to lead to different symptoms and support requirements, and to distinct responses to pharmacotherapy treatment, in older patients compared to children. This systematic review considers the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment in managing autism spectrum disorder in adolescents and adults. Following a comprehensive search of literature published in English from 1980, methodological criteria were applied to identify studies designed to reliably assess treatment effectiveness. Only five double-blind, randomized controlled trials were eligible for appraisal. All had small sample sizes (mean = 30) and brief treatment duration of no more than 12 weeks. The paucity of trials and their methodological limitations means that there is only preliminary evidence about the short-term effectiveness of a few drug treatments for this age group. There was also a lack of reliable data reported on drug safety profiles. Methodological challenges and directions for future research are discussed.

  14. Improved reading measures in adults with dyslexia following transcranial direct current stimulation treatment.

    PubMed

    Heth, Inbahl; Lavidor, Michal

    2015-04-01

    To better understand the contribution of the dorsal system to word reading, we explored transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) effects when adults with developmental dyslexia received active stimulation over the visual extrastriate area MT/V5, which is dominated by magnocellular input. Stimulation was administered in 5 sessions spread over two weeks, and reading speed and accuracy as well as reading fluency were assessed before, immediately after, and a week after the end of the treatment. A control group of adults with developmental dyslexia matched for age, gender, reading level, vocabulary and block-design WAIS-III sub-tests and reading level was exposed to the same protocol but with sham stimulation. The results revealed that active, but not sham stimulation, significantly improved reading speed and fluency. This finding suggests that the dorsal stream may play a role in efficient retrieval from the orthographic input lexicon in the lexical route. It also underscores the potential of tDCS as an intervention tool for improving reading speed, at least in adults with developmental dyslexia.

  15. Sleep In Older Adults: Normative Changes, Sleep Disorders, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    1 Synopsis Sleep disorders are common in older adults: Approximately 5% of older adults meet criteria for clinically significant insomnia disorders and 20% for sleep apnea syndromes. When considering insomnia symptoms, it is important to distinguish age-appropriate changes in sleep from clinically significant insomnia, with the latter distinguished by the presence of significant daytime symptoms such as fatigue. Evaluation with a sleep diary and screening for comorbid conditions, especially mood disorders, is essential. Non-pharmacologic therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, can be highly effective and have sustained benefit. A broad range of pharmacologic therapies are also available but can have unwanted psychomotor effects. If left untreated, insomnia can be associated with increased risk of depression and significant impairments in quality of life. In regards to sleep apnea, a high index of suspicion is crucial for effective diagnosis because symptoms commonly noted in younger patients, such as obesity or loud snoring, may not be present in older patients. Diagnosis and management is fairly similar across age groups, except that a more nuanced approach to weight loss is warranted in older adults. The increasing use of home-based portable polysomnography and auto-titrating positive-airway pressure therapy can reduce barriers to treatment. PMID:25037297

  16. Early life permethrin insecticide treatment leads to heart damage in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Vadhana, M S Dhivya; Carloni, Manuel; Nasuti, Cinzia; Fedeli, Donatella; Gabbianelli, Rosita

    2011-09-01

    Early life environmental exposure to xenobiotics could represent a critical period for the onset of permanent alterations in the structure and function of different organs. Cardiovascular diseases can be related to various factors including environmental toxicants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of early life permethrin treatment (1/50 LD(50), from 6th to 21st day of life) on heart of adult rats. Increased DNA damage, decreased heart cell membrane fluidity, increased cholesterol content, protein and lipid oxidation were measured in heart cells from adult rats treated with permethrin during the neonatal period with respect to control rats. Moreover, the same group showed higher levels of cholesterol, IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, rat-Rantes and IL-10 cytokines and decreased albumin content in plasma. Lower cholesterol levels and perturbation in the phospholipid lateral diffusion together with decreased GSH levels and increased GPx activity were measured in heart mitochondria of the treated group. Our findings support the evidence that the neonatal period has a critical role in the development of heart disease in adulthood. We hypothesize that the alterations observed in adult rats could depend on epigenetic changes that occurred during this period which influence gene expression throughout the rat's life, leading to alterations of certain parameters related to cardiac function.

  17. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  18. Health Values and Treatment Goals of Older, Multimorbid Adults Facing Life-Threatening Illness

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Aanand D.; Martin, Lindsey A.; Moye, Jennifer; Karel, Michele J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify a taxonomy of health-related values that frame goals of care of older, multimorbid adults who recently faced cancer diagnosis and treatment. DESIGN Qualitative analysis of data from a longitudinal cohort study of multimorbid cancer survivors. SETTING Cancer registries from regional Department of Veterans Affairs networks in New England and southeast Texas. PARTICIPANTS Multimorbid adults who completed interviews 12 months after diagnosis of head and neck, colorectal, gastric, or esophageal cancer and after cancer treatment (N = 146). MEASUREMENTS An interdisciplinary team conducted thematic analyses of participants’ intuitive responses to two questions: Now that you have had cancer and may face ongoing decisions about medical care in the future, what would you want your family, friends, and doctors to know about you, in terms of what is most important to you in your life? If your cancer were to recur, is there anything you’d want to be sure your loved ones knew about you and your goals of care? RESULTS Analysis revealed five distinct health-related values that guide how multimorbid cancer survivors conceptualize specific health care goals and medical decisions: self-sufficiency, life enjoyment, connectedness and legacy, balancing quality and length of life, and engagement in care. Participants typically endorsed more than one value as important. CONCLUSION Older multimorbid adults who recently faced life-threatening cancer endorsed a multidimensional taxonomy of health-related values. These health-related values guide how they frame their goals for care and treatment preferences. Eliciting individuals’ sense of their values during clinical encounters may improve their experiences with health care and more effectively align treatments with goals of care. PMID:27000335

  19. A dichoptic custom-made action video game as a treatment for adult amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Vedamurthy, Indu; Nahum, Mor; Huang, Samuel J.; Zheng, Frank; Bayliss, Jessica; Bavelier, Daphne; Levi, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have employed different experimental approaches to enhance visual function in adults with amblyopia including perceptual learning, videogame play, and dichoptic training. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel dichoptic action videogame combining all three approaches. This experimental intervention was compared to a conventional, yet unstudied method of supervised occlusion while watching movies. Adults with unilateral amblyopia were assigned to either playing the dichoptic action game (n = 23; ‘game’ group), or to watching movies monocularly while the fellow eye was patched (n = 15; ‘movies’ group) for a total of 40 h. Following training, visual acuity (VA) improved on average by ≈0.14 logMAR (≈27%) in the game group, with improvements noted in both anisometropic and strabismic patients. This improvement is similar to that described after perceptual learning, video game play or dichoptic training. Surprisingly, patients with anisometropic amblyopia in the movies group showed similar improvement, revealing a greater impact of supervised occlusion in adults than typically thought. Stereoacuity, reading speed, and contrast sensitivity improved more for game group participants compared with movies group participants. Most improvements were largely retained following a 2-month no-contact period. This novel video game, which combines action gaming, perceptual learning and dichoptic presentation, results in VA improvements equivalent to those previously documented with each of these techniques alone. Interestingly, however, our game intervention led to greater improvement than control training in a variety of visual functions, thus suggesting that this approach has promise for the treatment of adult amblyopia. PMID:25917239

  20. Autologous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Adult Stem Cells for the Treatment of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Ricardo João; Bueno, Ronaldo Rocha Loures; Galvão, Paulo Bezerra de Araújo; Zanis Neto, José; Souza, Juliano Mendes; Guérios, Ênio Eduardo; Senegaglia, Alexandra Cristina; Brofman, Paulo Roberto; Pasquini, Ricardo; da Cunha, Claudio Leinig Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Background Morbimortality in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy is high, even under optimal medical treatment. Autologous infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells has shown promising preliminary results in these patients. Objective Determine the effectiveness of autologous transplantation of bone marrow adult stem cells on systolic and diastolic left ventricular function, and on the degree of mitral regurgitation in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Methods We administered 4,54 x 108 ± 0,89 x 108 bone marrow adult stem cells into the coronary arteries of 24 patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Changes in functional class, systolic and diastolic left ventricular function and degree of mitral regurgitation were assessed after 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Results During follow-up, six patients (25%) improved functional class and eight (33.3%) kept stable. Left ventricular ejection fraction improved 8.9%, 9.7% e 13.6%, after 3, 6 and 12 months (p = 0.024; 0.017 and 0.018), respectively. There were no significant changes neither in diastolic left ventricular function nor in mitral regurgitation degree. A combined cardiac resynchronization and implantable cardioversion defibrillation was implanted in two patients (8.3%). Four patients (16.6%) had sudden death and four patients died due to terminal cardiac failure. Average survival of these eight patients was 2.6 years. Conclusion Intracoronary infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells was associated with an improvement or stabilization of functional class and an improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction, suggesting the efficacy of this intervention. There were no significant changes neither in left ventricular diastolic function nor in the degree of mitral regurgitation. PMID:25590932

  1. Psychological treatments for adults with posttraumatic stress disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Karen; Jonas, Daniel E; Forneris, Catherine A; Wines, Candi; Sonis, Jeffrey; Middleton, Jennifer Cook; Feltner, Cynthia; Brownley, Kimberly A; Olmsted, Kristine Rae; Greenblatt, Amy; Weil, Amy; Gaynes, Bradley N

    2016-02-01

    Numerous guidelines have been developed over the past decade regarding treatments for Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, given differences in guideline recommendations, some uncertainty exists regarding the selection of effective PTSD therapies. The current manuscript assessed the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and adverse effects of psychological treatments for adults with PTSD. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, PILOTS, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Web of Science. Two reviewers independently selected trials. Two reviewers assessed risk of bias and graded strength of evidence (SOE). We included 64 trials; patients generally had severe PTSD. Evidence supports efficacy of exposure therapy (high SOE) including the manualized version Prolonged Exposure (PE); cognitive therapy (CT), cognitive processing therapy (CPT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-mixed therapies (moderate SOE); eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) and narrative exposure therapy (low-moderate SOE). Effect sizes for reducing PTSD symptoms were large (e.g., Cohen's d ~-1.0 or more compared with controls). Numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were <4 to achieve loss of PTSD diagnosis for exposure therapy, CPT, CT, CBT-mixed, and EMDR. Several psychological treatments are effective for adults with PTSD. Head-to-head evidence was insufficient to determine these treatments' comparative effectiveness, and data regarding adverse events was absent from most studies.

  2. Effects of chronic treatment with methylphenidate on oxidative stress and inflammation in hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Shabab, Behnaz

    2016-04-21

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a central stimulant, prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The long-term behavioral consequences of MPH treatment are unknown. In this study, the oxidative stress and neuroinflammation induced by various doses of MPH were investigated. Forty adult male rats were divided into 5 groups; and treated with different doses of MPH for 21 days. Twenty four hours after drug treatment, Open Field Test (OFT) was performed in all animals. At the end of the study, blood cortisol level (BCL) was measured and hippocampus was isolated and oxidative stress and inflammation parameters and histological changes were analyzed. Chronic MPH at all doses decreased central square entries, number of rearing, ambulation distance and time spent in central square in OFT. BCL increased in doses 10 and 20mg/kg of MPH. Furthermore, MPH in all doses markedly increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized glutathione (GSSG) level, Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNF-α) in isolated hippocampus. MPH (10 and 20mg/kg) treated groups had decreased mitochondrial reduced glutathione (GSH) content, and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRx) activities. 10 and 20mg/kg of MPH change cell density and morphology of cells in Dentate Gyrus (DG) and CA1 areas of hippocampus. Chronic treatment with high doses of MPH can cause oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in hippocampus of adult rats.

  3. Growth hormone treatment in growth hormone-deficient adults. II. Effects on exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, R C; Salomon, F; Wiles, C M; Hesp, R; Sönksen, P H

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment in adults with GH deficiency increases lean body mass and thigh muscle cross-sectional area. The functional significance of this was examined by incremental cycle ergometry in 24 GH-deficient adults treated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial with recombinant DNA human GH (rhGH) for 6 mo (0.07 U/kg body wt daily). Compared with placebo, the rhGH group increased mean maximal O2 uptake (VO2max) (+406 +/- 71 vs. +133 +/- 84 ml/min; P = 0.016) and maximal power output (+24.6 +/- 4.3 vs. +9.7 +/- 4.8 W; P = 0.047), without differences in maximal heart rate or ventilation. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s, vital capacity, and corrected CO gas transfer were within normal limits and did not change with treatment. Mean predicted VO2max, based on height and age, increased from 78.9 to 96.0% in the rhGH group (compared with 78.5 and 85.0% for placebo; P = 0.036). The anaerobic ventilatory threshold increased in the rhGH group (+159 +/- 39 vs. +1 +/- 51 ml/min; P = 0.02). The improvement in VO2max was noted when expressed per kilogram body weight but not lean body mass or thigh muscle area. We conclude that rhGH treatment in adults with GH deficiency improves and normalizes maximal exercise performance and improves submaximal exercise performance and that these changes are related to increases in lean body mass and muscle mass. Improved cardiac output may also contribute to the effect of rhGH on exercise performance.

  4. Synergy of Omeprazole and Praziquantel In Vitro Treatment against Schistosoma mansoni Adult Worms

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Leticia; Venancio, Thiago M.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Miyasato, Patrícia A.; Rofatto, Henrique K.; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Nakano, Eliana; Oliveira, Guilherme; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment and morbidity control of schistosomiasis relies on a single drug, praziquantel (PZQ), and the selection of resistant worms under repeated treatment is a concern. Therefore, there is a pressing need to understand the molecular effects of PZQ on schistosomes and to investigate alternative or synergistic drugs against schistosomiasis. Methodology We used a custom-designed Schistosoma mansoni expression microarray to explore the effects of sublethal doses of PZQ on large-scale gene expression of adult paired males and females and unpaired mature females. We also assessed the efficacy of PZQ, omeprazole (OMP) or their combination against S. mansoni adult worms with a survival in vitro assay. Principal Findings We identified sets of genes that were affected by PZQ in paired and unpaired mature females, however with opposite gene expression patterns (up-regulated in paired and down-regulated in unpaired mature females), indicating that PZQ effects are heavily influenced by the mating status. We also identified genes that were similarly affected by PZQ in males and females. Functional analyses of gene interaction networks were performed with parasite genes that were differentially expressed upon PZQ treatment, searching for proteins encoded by these genes whose human homologs are targets of different drugs used for other diseases. Based on these results, OMP, a widely prescribed proton pump inhibitor known to target the ATP1A2 gene product, was chosen and tested. Sublethal doses of PZQ combined with OMP significantly increased worm mortality in vitro when compared with PZQ or OMP alone, thus evidencing a synergistic effect. Conclusions Functional analysis of gene interaction networks is an important approach that can point to possible novel synergistic drug candidates. We demonstrated the potential of this strategy by showing that PZQ in combination with OMP displayed increased efficiency against S. mansoni adult worms in vitro when compared with

  5. Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke Urinary Incontinence Related Documents PDF Choosing Wisely: Diabetes Tests and Treatments Download Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ...

  6. Aligning Mental Health Treatments with the Developmental Stage and Needs of Late Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Skehan, Brian; Davis, Maryann

    2017-04-01

    Transitional age youth (TAY) are in a discrete developmental stage, different from both adolescents and mature adults. Serious mental illness can result in their delayed psychosocial development and morbidity. Systemic, provider, and individual barriers result in poor access to care for these youth, potentially impeding their transition to mature adulthood. Current strategies for TAY treatment include patient centered care, vocational and educational support, and shared decision making. There is a paucity of evidence-based practices to effectively treat this population or provide practice guidelines. The research required to do so should be a priority.

  7. Adult Onset Still's Disease: A Review on Diagnostic Workup and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gopalarathinam, Rajesh; Orlowsky, Eric; Kesavalu, Ramesh; Yelaminchili, Sreeteja

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a rare systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology and pathogenesis that presents in 5 to 10% of patients as fever of unknown origin (FUO) accompanied by systemic manifestations. We report an interesting case of a 33-year-old African-American male who presented with one-month duration of FUO along with skin rash, sore throat, and arthralgia. After extensive workup, potential differential diagnoses were ruled out and the patient was diagnosed with AOSD based on the Yamaguchi criteria. The case history, incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, differential diagnoses, diagnostic workup, treatment modalities, and prognosis of AOSD are discussed in this case report. PMID:27042373

  8. Successful Treatment of Chromobacterium violaceum Sepsis in a South Indian Adult.

    PubMed

    Madi, Deepak R; Vidyalakshmi, K; Ramapuram, John; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-11-01

    Infection due to Chromobacterium violaceum is rare. Diagnosis may be delayed since Chromobacterium sepsis may mimic melioidosis, especially in melioidosis-endemic areas. Management of Chromobacterium infection is challenging given the propensity of this pathogen to cause visceral abscesses, drug resistance, and relapse. Mortality rates are high despite treatment. We report a case of C. violaceum septicemia in an immunocompetent adult from south India, who was successfully treated with combination antibiotic therapy. Physicians in tropical and subtropical regions must be aware of C. violaceum infection as it can mimic melioidosis.

  9. Effects of combined nicotine and fluoxetine treatment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Faillace, M P; Zwiller, J; Bernabeu, R O

    2015-08-06

    Adult neurogenesis occurs in mammals within the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subarea. It is known to be induced by antidepressant treatment and reduced in response to nicotine administration. We checked here whether the antidepressant fluoxetine would inverse the decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis caused by nicotine. It is shown that repeated, but not a single injection of rats with fluoxetine was able to abolish the decrease in adult dentate cell proliferation produced by nicotine treatment. We measured the expression of several biochemical parameters known to be associated with neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Both drugs increased the expression of p75 neurotrophin receptor, which promotes proliferation and early maturation of dentate gyrus cells. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, we also gave both drugs in a context in which their rewarding properties could be measured. Fluoxetine produced a significant but less robust CPP than nicotine. A single injection of fluoxetine was found to reduce nicotine-induced CPP. Moreover, the rewarding properties of nicotine were completely abolished in response to repeated fluoxetine injections. Expression of nicotine-induced CPP was accompanied by an increase of phospho-CREB (cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein) and HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2) expression in the nucleus accumbens. The data suggest that fluoxetine reward, as opposed to nicotine reward, depends on dentate gyrus neurogenesis. Since fluoxetine was able to disrupt the association between nicotine and the environment, this antidepressant may be tested as a treatment for nicotine addiction using cue exposure therapy.

  10. Depression, Depression Treatment, and Insulin Sensitivity in Adults at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Julie; Allen, Nancy A.; Swalley, Leah M.; Melkus, Gail D.; Whittemore, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Aims To compare insulin sensitivity (Si) in adults at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) who were categorized as non-depressed, treated for depression and untreated depression after controlling for PA (PA). Methods Baseline data was analyzed from individuals enrolled in a diabetes prevention program (n=56). Si was calculated using the whole body insulin sensitivity method. The Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD) was used to assess depressive symptoms and depressed cases were identified using a cutoff of ≥16. Depression treatment was identified using a self-report form validated by medical chart review. The PA subscale of the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile was used to determine PA levels. Results One third of participants had elevated depressive symptoms; 19% were taking antidepressant medication. Mean Si was 3.0 (±1.9). In ANOVA, depressed individuals (M=1.79±0.91) showed significantly lower Si than non-depressed individuals (M=3.39±1.78). However, individuals taking antidepressant medications had Si similar to non-depressed individuals (M=3.10±1.86: p=.63). In ANCOVA this association remained after controlling for PA. Conclusions These data suggest that in adults at high risk for T2DM, depression treatment may improve insulin resistance observed in depression. Healthcare practitioners are encouraged to screen, treat, or refer their patients with depression for treatment. PMID:19720419

  11. Successful Medical Treatment of Adult Nesidioblastosis With Pasireotide over 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Schwetz, Verena; Horvath, Karl; Kump, Patrizia; Lackner, Carolin; Perren, Aurel; Forrer, Flavio; Pieber, Thomas R.; Treiber, Gerlies; Sourij, Harald; Mader, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nesidioblastosis is a rare cause of endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in adults. Diagnosis is often challenging and therapeutic options are scarce. In 2009, a 46-year-old female patient presented with recurrent severe hypoglycemia and immediate recovery after glucose ingestion. Although 72-h-fasting test was positive, various imaging technologies (sonography, computed tomography, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, dopamine receptor positron emission tomography [DOPA-PET]) were negative. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed a lesion in the pancreatic corpus, whereas selective arterial calcium stimulation test, portal venous sampling and GLP-1-receptor scintigraphy were indicative of a lesion in the pancreatic tail, which was surgically removed. The histopathologic examination revealed beta cell hyperplasia and microadenomas expressing glucagon. After surgery, the patient was free of symptoms for 6 months, after which hypoglycemic episodes recurred. After unsuccessful treatment with corticosteroids and somatostatin analogs, treatment with pasireotide, a novel somatostatin analog with high affinity to somatostatin receptor 5 and a possible side effect of hyperglycemia, was initiated (0.6 mg BID). To date, our patient has been free of severe hypoglycemic episodes ever since. Yearly repeated imaging procedures have shown no abnormities over the last 3 years. We report for the first time that pasireotide was successfully used in the treatment of adult nesidioblastosis. PMID:27057885

  12. MDMA-assisted therapy: A new treatment model for social anxiety in autistic adults.

    PubMed

    Danforth, Alicia L; Struble, Christopher M; Yazar-Klosinski, Berra; Grob, Charles S

    2016-01-04

    The first study of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-assisted therapy for the treatment of social anxiety in autistic adults commenced in the spring of 2014. The search for psychotherapeutic options for autistic individuals is imperative considering the lack of effective conventional treatments for mental health diagnoses that are common in this population. Serious Adverse Events (SAEs) involving the administration of MDMA in clinical trials have been rare and non-life threatening. To date, MDMA has been administered to over 1133 individuals for research purposes without the occurrence of unexpected drug-related SAEs that require expedited reporting per FDA regulations. Now that safety parameters for limited use of MDMA in clinical settings have been established, a case can be made to further develop MDMA-assisted therapeutic interventions that could support autistic adults in increasing social adaptability among the typically developing population. As in the case with classic hallucinogens and other psychedelic drugs, MDMA catalyzes shifts toward openness and introspection that do not require ongoing administration to achieve lasting benefits. This infrequent dosing mitigates adverse event frequency and improves the risk/benefit ratio of MDMA, which may provide a significant advantage over medications that require daily dosing. Consequently, clinicians could employ new treatment models for social anxiety or similar types of distress administering MDMA on one to several occasions within the context of a supportive and integrative psychotherapy protocol.

  13. Dental prosthetic status and treatment needs of adult population in Jizan, Saudi Arabia: A survey report

    PubMed Central

    Peeran, Syed Ali; Al Sanabani, Fuad; AL-Makramani, Bandar M. A.; Elamin, Elfatih Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate and compare the dental prosthetic status and treatment needs of adult population in Jizan, Saudi Arabia, in relation to the age. Materials and Methods: A total of 1779 people aged 35–74 years from 4 survey areas (Hay al matar, Mahata khams, Dara ut tawhid, and Suq ad dakhili) selected through convenient sampling, around Jizan University, were surveyed, using the WHO survey criteria, 1997. Statistical Analysis: Number and percentages were calculated, and univariate analysis was performed using Chi-square test at 5% level of significance. Results: Different forms of prosthesis were present among patients in the upper (19.9%) and lower (19%) arches, respectively. Prosthetic treatment need was recognized in subjects, 56.4% for the upper and 57.2% for the lower arches, respectively. The prosthetic status and treatment needs differed statistically with respect to age. Conclusion: More than half of the surveyed adult populations were in need of some or the other forms of prosthesis. This study provides data for an oral health-care provider program for Jizan. PMID:28042258

  14. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Koprivnikar, Jamie; McCloskey, James; Faderl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug. PMID:28331334

  15. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koprivnikar, Jamie; McCloskey, James; Faderl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug.

  16. Prosthetic aspects in adult osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yoichiro; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Tomita, Yoko; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Osteopetrosis (OP) is a rare condition characterized by skeletal sclerosis caused by dysfunctional osteoclasts. Though many reports have described severe infantile-malignant autosomal recessive OP, few have described the prosthetic management of adult OP. This report discusses the prosthetic treatment of adult OP. Although prosthodontists should try to reconstruct occlusal function as much as possible, a conservative prosthodontic approach may be a reasonable and recommended treatment option for minimizing the risk of further osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis.

  17. Screening for Hepatitis C Infections in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening: (1) Adults at high risk for ... C Virus Infection in Adults Potential Benefits and Harms of Screening and Treatment The Task Force reviewed ...

  18. Stages of Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  19. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  20. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  1. Temporal profiles of synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult mouse hippocampus with methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Joong-Sun; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2012-07-25

    Methotrexate, which is used to treat many malignancies and autoimmune diseases, affects brain functions including hippocampal-dependent memory function. However, the precise mechanisms underlying methotrexate-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. To evaluate temporal changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals, the expression and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cAMP responsive element-binding protein, glutamate receptor 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were examined in the hippocampi of adult C57BL/6 mice after methotrexate (40 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Western blot analysis showed biphasic changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult hippocampi following methotrexate treatment. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and glutamate receptor 1 were acutely activated during the early phase (1 day post-injection), while extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and cAMP responsive element-binding protein activation showed biphasic increases during the early (1 day post-injection) and late phases (7-14 days post-injection). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased significantly during the late phase (7-14 days post-injection). Therefore, methotrexate treatment affects synaptic plasticity-related signals in the adult mouse hippocampus, suggesting that changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals may be associated with neuronal survival and plasticity-related cellular remodeling.

  2. Clinical issues: music therapy in an adult cancer inpatient treatment setting.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Clare

    2006-01-01

    The adult oncology inpatient music therapy program at Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, which is Australia's only hospital solely dedicated to cancer treatment, research and care, is described. Patients' treatment requirements and often changing conditions compel music therapist to be flexible in their approach, offering both pre-planned treatment sessions and spontaneous sessions in open ward contexts. Patients and families who wish to engage im music therapy choose from various music therapy methods, including live song choice, music imagery and relaxation, therapeutic music lessons, and improvisation. Complex variables inevitable in such human relationship therapies necessitate that, alongside randomized controlled trials, research methods are grounded in the social sciences to meaningfully substantiate, and further advance, oncologic music therapy.

  3. [Fatal cerebral oedema during the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis in an adult male].

    PubMed

    Dekker, T J A; Janson, J A; Hoorn, E J; Sijpkens, Y W J

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is relatively common, but the optimal treatment of this condition is still controversial. Cerebral oedema is a rare, but potentially fatal complication. We present the case of an adult patient who presented with de novo diabetic ketoacidosis that was complicated by cerebral oedema during treatment. In this article we discuss factors that may have played a role in the development of this complication. A prolonged hyperosmolar state in diabetic ketoacidosis may increase the risk of cerebral oedema as a result of cerebral compensatory mechanisms. In this group of patients, liberal doses of insulin, fluids and bicarbonate may lead to a decrease in the effective serum osmolarity which can lead to water shifts in the cerebrum. We suggest several adjustments to current treatment guidelines for patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who have undergone a prolonged period of hyperosmolar derangement, with the aim of decreasing the risk of cerebral oedema.

  4. Integrating Art into Group Treatment for Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Carol-Lynne J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research supports the use of exposure-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and integrated treatments show potential for enhanced symptom reduction. This pilot study developed a manualized group treatment integrating art interventions with exposure, grounding, and narrative therapy for five adults with PTSD who were…

  5. Atorvastatin Treatment Does Not Alter Pulse Wave Velocity in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D.; Taylor, Beth A.; Capizzi, Jeffrey A.; Grimaldi, Adam S.; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Both statins and regular physical activity (PA) reduce arterial stiffness. The present post hoc analysis examined if arterial stiffness was improved with high-dose atorvastatin treatment in healthy adults and whether PA levels magnified this response. We utilized data from a double-blind, random-assignment clinical trial investigating the effects of atorvastatin 80 mg/d for 6 mo on skeletal muscle symptoms. Methods. Central and peripheral arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured and PA levels assessed at baseline and 6 mo in subjects randomized to atorvastatin (n = 21, 9 men) or placebo (n = 29, 16 men). Results. Baseline participant characteristics, PWV, and PA levels were not different between treatments. Central (means ± SD; 8.7 ± 2.6 to 9.0 ± 2.5 m/sec) and peripheral PWV (9.9 ± 1.3 to 9.8 ± 1.6 m/sec) were unchanged from baseline following atorvastatin treatment (time × drug interaction: P ≥ 0.13). Similarly, PA levels were unaffected by time or treatment. In sex and age adjusted models, baseline levels of PA were not related to changes in PWV with atorvastatin treatment. Conclusion. These data indicate that high-dose atorvastatin treatment for 6 mo does not influence arterial stiffness in healthy adults. Participation in habitual PA did not magnify the vascular effects of statin therapy. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00609063. PMID:27351006

  6. What are the needs of adolescents and young adults after a cancer treatment? A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Galán, S; de la Vega, R; Tomé Pires, C; Racine, M; Solé, E; Jensen, M P; Miró, J

    2017-03-01

    Advances in the early detection of cancer and the development of more effective treatments have resulted in a larger number of adolescents and young adults (AYAs), becoming cancer survivors. However, knowledge regarding their needs and if those needs are adequately addressed remains limited. The aims of this study were to: (1) better understand the needs of AYAs after cancer treatment; (2) analyse the importance of those needs; (3) determine which needs are not adequately addressed; and (4) test the hypothesis that AYA cancer survivors have different needs than adult survivors. Twenty-nine health oncology professionals, 17 AYA survivors and 12 relatives of AYA survivors participated in the Delphi study. The needs identified could be classified into six categories, and all were rated as highly important by all participants. The category perceived as least adequately addressed across the three groups was 'Counselling and psychological support.' The findings provide important new information regarding the needs of AYA cancer survivors that can inform the development of interventions to improve the quality of life of these individuals.

  7. Tiotropium in the add-on treatment of asthma in adults: clinical trial evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Vogelberg, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease, and its treatment is frequently challenging despite detailed national and international guidelines. While basic anti-inflammatory therapy usually consists of inhaled corticosteroids in doses adapted to the asthma severity, add-on treatment with bronchodilators is essential in more severe asthma. Only recently, the long-acting anticholinergic tiotropium was introduced into the GINA guidelines. This review reports on the studies that have been performed with tiotropium in adult asthmatic patients. Following early proof-of-concept studies, several studies with tiotropium as an add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), with or without a long-acting beta agonist (LABA), demonstrated convincing clinical benefit for patients. Important lung function parameters and quality of life scores significantly improved shortly after onset of the add-on therapy with tiotropium, and some studies even demonstrated non-inferiority against salmeterol. All studies reported an excellent safety profile of tiotropium. The still growing body of tiotropium studies, both in adults and children, will help to identify the position of tiotropium in future asthma guidelines and might also indicate which patients benefit most from an add-on therapy with tiotropium.

  8. Ramelteon for the treatment of insomnia in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Akira; Honda, Michitaka; Hayashino, Yasuaki

    2014-04-01

    Ramelteon is the first selective melatonin receptor agonist and currently is approved in the United States and Japan for the treatment of insomnia. Our meta-analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of ramelteon for the treatment of insomnia in adults. We included both published and unpublished data from randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of ramelteon in adults with insomnia in the analysis. Our primary outcomes were sleep quality, subjective sleep latency (sSL), and subjective total sleep time (sTST). Secondary outcomes included latency to persistent sleep (LPS), total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), proportion of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), subjective WASO, number of nighttime awakenings (NAW), subjective NAW, and adverse events. Thirteen trials involving 5812 patients with insomnia or insomnia symptoms with a mean study duration of 38 days were pooled. Ramelteon was associated with reduced sSL (weighted mean difference [WMD], -4.30 min [95% confidence interval {CI}, -7.01 to -1.58]) and improved sleep quality (standardized mean differences, -0.074 [95% CI, -0.13 to -0.02]) but was not associated with increased sTST. Ramelteon also was associated with improvement in LPS, SE, and TST. The only significant adverse event was somnolence. Short-term use of ramelteon was associated with improvement in some sleep parameters in patients with insomnia, but its clinical impact is small. Long-term trials are needed before solid conclusions can be established.

  9. Mercaptopurine Treatment in an Adult Man with Orbital and Intracranial Rosai-Dorfman Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnao, Valentina; Riolo, Marianna; Savettieri, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rosai-Dorfmann disease (RDD) is a rare, idiopathic non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, affecting children and young adults, that commonly presents as painless, massive cervical lymphadenopathy with fever, weight loss, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Cervical lymphadenopathy and extranodal involvement are the main presentations. On the contrary, ophthalmic involvement and localisation in the central nervous system are rare. Case Report. An old man was admitted to our hospital for first seizure. Brain imaging studies revealed on the left an extra-axial thickening of the dura mater with enhancement and perilesional oedema, infiltrating the sphenoorbital fissure and an isointense mass with enhancement in the orbital region with dislocation of the optic nerve. Pathological and immunohistochemistry examination of the bioptical specimen was consistent with a diagnosis of RDD. Treatment with levetiracetam and steroids was started obtaining only remission of seizures. Because of the patient refusal of the surgical debulking, therapy with mercaptopurine was started, stopping disease progression. Conclusion. So far, very few cases of extranodal RDD with multiple CNS lesions involving the orbital region have been described. Our case is significant because it is the first case in which the efficacy of mercaptopurine treatment has been documented in an adult patient with isolated ocular and intracranial RDD. PMID:27840753

  10. Azelaic acid in the treatment of acne in adult females: case reports.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Diez, E; Hofmann, M A; Bravo, B; Malgazhdarova, G; Katkhanova, O A; Yutskovskaya, Y

    2014-01-01

    Acne, one of the most common skin problems in dermatological practice, is a condition that affects not only adolescents but also adults. While approximately 80% of cases occurring in adulthood are persistent from teenage years, around 20% are described as 'late-onset' disease, appearing for the first time in adulthood. The disease can be triggered by hormonal changes (including a change from one contraceptive to another), or it can be induced by certain nonhormonal medications, emotional stress, and various underlying diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. In many cases acne becomes a chronic skin condition with undulating activity, including improvement and relapse phases, and is often experienced as a major psychological burden. It is, therefore, even more important to provide an effective as well as a safe and tolerable treatment. The spectrum of topical acne treatments has expanded substantially in recent years and various topical medications are available, ranging from azelaic acid, antibiotics, retinoids and benzoyl peroxide to several fixed combinations of these active compounds. The following case collection illustrates how 15% azelaic acid gel, as a well-established monotherapy, can be successfully employed to treat mild-to-moderate forms of adult female acne.

  11. Long-Term Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence in HIV-Infected Adolescents and Adults in Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Inzaule, Seth C.; Hamers, Raph L.; Kityo, Cissy; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Roura, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term success of HIV antiretroviral therapy requires near-perfect adherence, maintained throughout one’s lifetime. However, perceptions towards ART and patterns of adherence may change during the life course. We assessed challenges to long-term adherence in adolescents and adults in three regional HIV treatment centers in Uganda. Methods We conducted 24 in-depth interviews and 2 focus group discussions with a total of 33 health-care providers and expert clients (HIV patients on long-term ART who assist with adherence support of fellow patients). Interview topics included experiences with patients on long-term treatment with either declining adherence or persistent poor adherence. Transcribed texts were coded and analyzed based on the social-ecological framework highlighting differences and commonalities between adolescents and adults. Results The overarching themes in adolescents were unstructured treatment holidays, delays in disclosure of HIV status by caretakers, stigma, which was mainly experienced in boarding schools, and diminishing or lack of clinical support. In particular, there was minimal support for early and gradual disclosure for caretakers to the infected children, diminishing clinical support for young adults during transition to adult-based care and declining peer-to-peer support group activities. The predominating theme in adults was challenges with treatment access among temporary economic migrants. Common themes to adults and adolescents were challenges with disclosure in intimate relationships, treatment related factors including side effects, supply of single tablets in place of fixed-dose combined drugs, supply of drug brands with unfavorable taste and missed opportunities for counseling due to shortage of staff. Conclusion Adherence counseling and support should be adapted differently for adolescents and adults and to the emerging life course challenges in long-term treated patients. Programs should also address constraints

  12. Loracarbef versus penicillin VK in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in adults.

    PubMed

    McCarty, J; Hernon, Y; Linn, L; Therasse, D G; Molina, A; Bleile, N

    1992-01-01

    Loracarbef, a member of a unique class of beta-lactam compounds (carbacephems), has excellent chemical and beta-lactamase stability, as well as documented clinical effectiveness against a broad spectrum of bacteria. Ten-day treatment regimens of loracarbef (200-mg capsule BID or 15 mg/kg/day suspension) and penicillin VK (250-mg capsule QID or 20 mg/kg/day suspension) were compared in the treatment of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis and tonsillitis. Adults (greater than or equal to 12 years of age) were administered loracarbef (n = 58) or penicillin (n = 58) in a double-blind, randomized, parallel study of clinical and bacteriologic response to treatment. Favorable clinical responses among qualified (evaluable) patients in the loracarbef-treated group (46/47; 97.9%) were similar to those for evaluable patients in the penicillin-treated group (43/43; 100%). Forty-one of 47 (87.2%) of the evaluable loracarbef-treated patients and 100% (43/43) of the evaluable penicillin-treated patients had negative posttherapy throat cultures for GABHS. Thirty-nine evaluable patients in each treatment group were assessed 28 to 35 days after completion of therapy: 2.6% of patients in each group experienced relapse of symptoms; and 7.7% of loracarbef-treated patients had positive cultures, compared to 12.8% of penicillin-treated patients. Two (1.9%) loracarbef-treated patients with rashes and one (0.9%) penicillin-treated patient with diarrhea withdrew from the study due to these adverse events. Diarrhea, the most frequently occurring adverse event during therapy in the loracarbef group, was reported by 8.6% of the loracarbef group and by 5.2% of the penicillin group. These data support the conclusion that loracarbef is comparable in safety and efficacy to penicillin VK for the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in adults.

  13. Treatment manuals and the advancement of psychoanalytic knowledge: The Treatment Manual of the Tavistock Adult Depression Study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David

    2015-06-01

    This paper has two aims: first, it seeks to understand the absence of treatment manuals in psychoanalysis. Secondly, it summarizes the treatment manual of the Tavistock Adult Depression Study, which describes the form of psychoanalytic psychotherapy whose effectiveness has been evaluated both in the Tavistock Adult Depression Study (TADS); and in the German Die Langzeittherapie bei chronischen Depressionen (LAC) Studie. Throughout the history of psychoanalysis, opinions about treatment manuals, empirical research and their antecedents have been deeply divided. After tracing the often polarized unfolding of these matters, the paper proposes that emotional and cognitive difficulties as well as scientific ones underpin their persistence. It is suggested that greater familiarity with them may lead to better combinations of outcome research and psychoanalysis: for example, the Tavistock manual seeks to match one account of the objects, aims, values, spirit and methods of psychoanalysis (as well as of connected forms of psychoanalytic psychotherapy); and also to meet what is required of treatment manuals by random allocation controlled trials. It has been a crucial element in the above studies of the outcome of long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapies with chronically depressed patients. After describing the Tavistock Manual, the paper concludes suggesting that, if appropriately constructed, treatment manuals can make a contribution to the advancement of specifically psychoanalytic knowledge.

  14. Treatment of Severe Adult Traumatic Brain Injury Using Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Charles S; Hetz, Robert A; Liao, George P; Aertker, Benjamin M; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Juranek, Jenifer; Savitz, Sean I; Jackson, Margaret L; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna M; Triolo, Fabio; Dash, Pramod K; Pedroza, Claudia; Lee, Dean A; Worth, Laura; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Choi, Huimahn A; Holcomb, John B; Kitagawa, Ryan S

    2017-04-01

    Preclinical studies using bone marrow derived cells to treat traumatic brain injury have demonstrated efficacy in terms of blood-brain barrier preservation, neurogenesis, and functional outcomes. Phase 1 clinical trials using bone marrow mononuclear cells infused intravenously in children with severe traumatic brain injury demonstrated safety and potentially a central nervous system structural preservation treatment effect. This study sought to confirm the safety, logistic feasibility, and potential treatment effect size of structural preservation/inflammatory biomarker mitigation in adults to guide Phase 2 clinical trial design. Adults with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale 5-8) and without signs of irreversible brain injury were evaluated for entry into the trial. A dose escalation format was performed in 25 patients: 5 controls, followed 5 patients in each dosing cohort (6, 9, 12 ×10(6) cells/kg body weight), then 5 more controls. Bone marrow harvest, cell processing to isolate the mononuclear fraction, and re-infusion occurred within 48 hours after injury. Patients were monitored for harvest-related hemodynamic changes, infusional toxicity, and adverse events. Outcome measures included magnetic resonance imaging-based measurements of supratentorial and corpus callosal volumes as well as diffusion tensor imaging-based measurements of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of the corpus callosum and the corticospinal tract at the level of the brainstem at 1 month and 6 months postinjury. Functional and neurocognitive outcomes were measured and correlated with imaging data. Inflammatory cytokine arrays were measured in the plasma pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 1 and 6 month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events. There was a mild pulmonary toxicity of the highest dose that was not clinically significant. Despite the treatment group having greater injury severity, there was structural preservation of critical regions of interest

  15. Development of quality indicators for antimicrobial treatment in adults with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes in patients with sepsis are better if initial empirical antimicrobial use is appropriate. Several studies have shown that adherence to guidelines dictating appropriate antimicrobial use positively influences clinical outcome, shortens length of hospital stay and contributes to the containment of antibiotic resistance. Quality indicators (QIs) can be systematically developed from these guidelines to define and measure appropriate antimicrobial use. We describe the development of a concise set of QIs to assess the appropriateness of antimicrobial use in adult patients with sepsis on a general medical ward or Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods A RAND-modified, five step Delphi procedure was used. A multidisciplinary panel of 14 experts appraised and prioritized 40 key recommendations from within the Dutch national guideline on antimicrobial use for adult hospitalized patients with sepsis (http://www.swab.nl/guidelines). A procedure to select QIs relevant to clinical outcome, antimicrobial resistance and costs was performed using two rounds of questionnaires with a face-to-face consensus meeting between the rounds over a period of three months. Results The procedure resulted in the selection of a final set of five QIs, namely: obtain cultures; prescribe empirical antimicrobial therapy according to the national guideline; start intravenous drug therapy; start antimicrobial treatment within one hour; and streamline antimicrobial therapy. Conclusion This systematic, stepwise method, which combined evidence and expert opinion, led to a concise and therefore feasible set of QIs for optimal antimicrobial use in hospitalized adult patients with sepsis. The next step will entail subjecting these quality indicators to an applicability test for their clinimetric properties and ultimately, using these QIs in quality-improvement projects. This information is crucial for antimicrobial stewardship teams to help set priorities and to focus improvement. PMID

  16. Differential Behavioral and Neurobiological Effects of Chronic Corticosterone Treatment in Adolescent and Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jitao; Xie, Xiaomeng; Li, Youhong; Liu, Xiao; Liao, Xuemei; Su, Yun-Ai; Si, Tianmei

    2017-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period with ongoing maturational processes in stress-sensitive systems. While adolescent individuals show heightened stress-induced hormonal responses compared to adults, it is unclear whether and how the behavioral and neurobiological consequences of chronic stress would differ between the two age groups. Here we address this issue by examining the effects of chronic exposure to the stress hormone, corticosterone (CORT), in both adolescent and adult animals. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were injected intraperitoneally with CORT (40 mg/kg) or vehicle for 21 days during adolescence (post-natal day (PND) 29–49) or adulthood (PND 71–91) and then subjected to behavioral testing or sacrifice for western blot analyses. Despite of similar physical and neuroendocrine effects in both age groups, chronic CORT treatment produced a series of behavioral and neurobiological effects with striking age differences. While CORT-treated adult animals exhibited decreased sucrose preference, increased anxiety levels and cognitive impairment, CORT-treated adolescent animals demonstrated increased sucrose preference, decreased anxiety levels, and increased sensorimotor gating functions. These differential behavioral alterations were accompanied by opposite changes in the two age groups in the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the phosphorylation of the obligatory subunit of the NMDA receptor, GluN1, and PSD-95 in rat hippocampus. These results suggest that prolonged glucocorticoid exposure during adolescence produces different behavioral and neurobiological effects from those in adulthood, which may be due to the complex interaction between glucocorticoids and the ongoing neurodevelopmental processes during this period. PMID:28210212

  17. Long-term treatment with responsive brain stimulation in adults with refractory partial seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Gregory K.; Mizrahi, Eli M.; Goldman, Alica; King-Stephens, David; Nair, Dileep; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Jobst, Barbara; Gross, Robert E.; Shields, Donald C.; Barkley, Gregory; Salanova, Vicenta; Olejniczak, Piotr; Cole, Andrew; Cash, Sydney S.; Noe, Katherine; Wharen, Robert; Worrell, Gregory; Murro, Anthony M.; Edwards, Jonathan; Duchowny, Michael; Spencer, David; Smith, Michael; Geller, Eric; Gwinn, Ryder; Skidmore, Christopher; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Berg, Michel; Heck, Christianne; Van Ness, Paul; Fountain, Nathan; Rutecki, Paul; Massey, Andrew; O'Donovan, Cormac; Labar, Douglas; Duckrow, Robert B.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Courtney, Tracy; Sun, Felice T.; Seale, Cairn G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The long-term efficacy and safety of responsive direct neurostimulation was assessed in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures. Methods: All participants were treated with a cranially implanted responsive neurostimulator that delivers stimulation to 1 or 2 seizure foci via chronically implanted electrodes when specific electrocorticographic patterns are detected (RNS System). Participants had completed a 2-year primarily open-label safety study (n = 65) or a 2-year randomized blinded controlled safety and efficacy study (n = 191); 230 participants transitioned into an ongoing 7-year study to assess safety and efficacy. Results: The average participant was 34 (±11.4) years old with epilepsy for 19.6 (±11.4) years. The median preimplant frequency of disabling partial or generalized tonic-clonic seizures was 10.2 seizures a month. The median percent seizure reduction in the randomized blinded controlled trial was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years (p < 0.0001, generalized estimating equation) and ranged from 48% to 66% over postimplant years 3 through 6 in the long-term study. Improvements in quality of life were maintained (p < 0.05). The most common serious device-related adverse events over the mean 5.4 years of follow-up were implant site infection (9.0%) involving soft tissue and neurostimulator explantation (4.7%). Conclusions: The RNS System is the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator. Acute and sustained efficacy and safety were demonstrated in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures arising from 1 or 2 foci over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. This experience supports the RNS System as a treatment option for refractory partial seizures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures, responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces seizures and improves quality of life over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. PMID:25616485

  18. Fenofibrate treatment in two adults with Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Serif; Dursun, Mehmet; Canoruç, Fikri; Kidir, Veysel; Beştaş, Remzi

    2006-03-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type II is a rare familial disorder of bilirubin conjugation with consecutive life-long unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. In the presence of severe hyperbilirubinemia, a fetus or an adult is at risk for neurological defects in this syndrome. This paper is the first report emphasizing details about this disorder in two patients from Turkey. The diagnosis was made on the basis of history and laboratory findings excluding other causes of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Phenobarbital loading test and C bile analysis also supported the diagnosis. There was a study in the literature in which treatment with chlofibrate had been recommended in this syndrome. Based on the results of that study, we administered fenofibrate treatment to our patients for one month and analyzed serum bilirubin levels before and after this procedure. No improvement in bilirubin levels was observed in either case.

  19. Interdisciplinary treatment of a periodontally compromised adult patient with multiple missing posterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sachin; Gupta, Sumita; Chugh, Vinay K; Jain, Eety; Valiathan, Ashima; Nanda, Ravindra

    2014-02-01

    This article reports the comprehensive, interdisciplinary treatment of a 50-year-old periodontally compromised adult patient with multiple missing posterior teeth. After initial periodontal treatment, the maxillary first molars and right central incisor were intruded orthodontically. Miniscrews were used to intrude the maxillary first molars by 3 mm. The mandibular arch was restored with a tooth-supported overdenture. Root coverage of the maxillary right central incisor was performed using Alloderm (Biohorizons, Birmingham, Ala). At the end of the interdisciplinary therapy, the results were esthetically pleasing, with the patient's oral functions restored to the optimum. The emphasis of this report is to highlight the importance of integrating various specialties such as periodontics, orthodontics, endodontics, and restorative dentistry toward a common goal of improving the patient's oral health, function, and esthetics.

  20. [All-Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Children and Adults].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Bykova, S V; Sabel'nikova, E A; Maev, I V; Baranov, A A; Bakulin, I G; Krums, L M; Bel'mer, S V; Borovik, T E; Zakharova, I N; Dmitrieva, Yu A; Roslavtseva, E A; Kornienko, E A; Khavkin, A I; Potapov, A S; Revnova, M O; Mukhina, Yu G; Shcherbakov, P L; Fedorov, E D; Belousova, E A; Khalif, I L; Khomeriki, S G; Rotin, D L; Vorob'eva, N G; Pivnik, A V; Gudkova, R B; Chernin, V V; Vokhmyanina, N V; Pukhlikova, T V; Degtyarev, D A; Damulin, I V; Mkrtumyan, A M; Dzhulai, G S; Tetruashvili, N K; Baranovsky, A Yu; Nazarenko, L I; Kharitonov, A G; Loranskaya, I D; Saifutdinov, R G; Livzan, M A; Abramov, D A; Osipenko, M F; Oreshko, L V; Tkachenko, E I; Sitkin, S I; Efremov, L I

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the All-Russian consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children and adults, which has been elaborated by leading experts, such as gastroenterologists and pediatricians of Russia on the basis of the existing Russian and international guidelines. The consensus approved at the 42nd Annual Scientific Session of the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology on Principles of Evidence-Based Medicine into Clinical Practice (March 2-3, 2016). The consensus is intended for practitioners engaged in the management and treatment of patients with celiac disease. Evidence for the main provisions of the consensus was sought in electronic databases. In making recommendations, the main source was the publications included in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PubMed. The search depth was 10 years. Recommendations in the preliminary version were reviewed by independent experts. Voting was done by the Delphic polling system.

  1. Replication and expansion of "Best Practice Guide for the Treatment of Nightmare Disorder in Adults".

    PubMed

    Cranston, Christopher C; Davis, Joanne L; Rhudy, Jamie L; Favorite, Todd K

    2011-10-15

    The August 2010 issue of Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (Vol. 6, No. 4) included an article suggesting treatment recommendations for adult nightmare disorder. Although we appreciate the work by the authors, we were left with three basic concerns about the methodology utilized and results found. First, works providing evidence for some of the treatments were not reported in the original article. Second, search methodology in the original article was not used consistently at updated time points. Third, the original article only utilized results obtained from PubMed and did not consider other databases. The current study sought to replicate the methodology and compare findings as well as expand by equalizing search methodology across updated time points. The present study expands the original efforts further by conducting article searches again on PsycINFO. Consequent changes to evidence levels and recommendations are discussed.

  2. Cyproterone acetate in the treatment of acne vulgaris in adult females.

    PubMed

    Hansted, B; Reymann, F

    1982-02-01

    22 adult females with therapy-resistant acne vulgaris were treated for 12 months with Diane, a drug containing cyproterone acetate and ethinylestradiol. Treatment was withdrawn in 7 patients because of side-effects of lack of of effect. In the remaining 15 patients, the treatment had extremely promising results, from 70 to 90% improvement of the acne. In a remarkably high number of patients, the androgen production, measured by the urinary excretion of fractional 17-ketosteroids, was elevated. None of these patients had signs of endocrinological diseases, in particular no cases of hirsutism of Stein-Leventhal syndrome were found. The current concept of the course of acne is that the conversion in the skin of testosterone to dehydrotestosterone is increased. The finding of an elevated urinary excretion of androgenic substances in this group of acne patients indicates that the pathogenesis is far more complicated.

  3. Adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cutts, S; Talboys, R; Paspula, C; Prempeh, E M; Fanous, R; Ail, D

    2017-01-01

    Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has now been described as a sequela to such diverse conditions as burns, amniotic fluid embolism, acute pancreatitis, trauma, sepsis and damage as a result of elective surgery in general. Patients with ARDS require immediate intubation, with the average patient now being ventilated for between 8 and 11 days. While the acute management of ARDS is conducted by the critical care team, almost any surgical patient can be affected by the condition and we believe that it is important that a broader spectrum of hospital doctors gain an understanding of the nature of the pathology and its current treatment.

  4. A Behavioral Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury-Associated Visual Dysfunction Based on Adult Cortical Plasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    amblyopic adults (Polat, 2008, Polat, Ma‐ Naim , Belkin & Sagi, 2004). We were  the first to show plasticity in adults with a visual deficit that was...Ma‐ Naim , T., Belkin, M., & Sagi, D. (2004). Improving vision in adult amblyopia by  perceptual learning. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 101 (17), 6692

  5. A Behavioral Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury-associated Visual Dysfunction Based on Adult Cortical Plasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    in amblyopic adults (Polat, 2008, Polat, Ma‐ Naim , Belkin & Sagi, 2004). We were  the first to show plasticity in adults with a visual deficit that...visual functions. Vision Res,   13    Polat, U., Ma‐ Naim , T., Belkin, M., & Sagi, D. (2004). Improving vision in adult amblyopia by  perceptual learning

  6. Superoxide production after acute and chronic treatment with methylphenidate in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Karin M; Inácio, Cecília G; Valvassori, Samira S; Réus, Gislaine Z; Boeck, Carina R; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2009-11-06

    The prescription of methylphenidate (MPH) has dramatically increased in this decade for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) treatment. The action mechanism of MPH is not completely understood and studies have been demonstrated that MPH can lead to neurochemical adaptations. Superoxide radical anion is not very reactive per se. However, severe species derived from superoxide radical anion mediate most of its toxicity. In this study, the superoxide level in submitochondrial particles was evaluated in response to treatment with MPH in the age-dependent manner in rats. MPH was administrated acutely or chronically at doses of 1, 2 or 10 mg/kg i.p. The results showed that the acute administration of MPH in all doses in young rats increased the production of superoxide in the cerebellum and only in the high dose (10mg/kg) in the hippocampus, while chronic treatment had no effect. However, acute treatment in adult rats had no effect on production of superoxide, but chronic treatment decreased the production of superoxide in the cerebellum at the lower doses. Our data suggest that the MPH treatment can influence on production of superoxide in some brain areas, but this effect depends on age of animals and treatment regime with MPH.

  7. Adolescent and young adult heroin patients: drug use and success in methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Scott; Melia, Dorothy; Khuri, Elizabeth; Lin, Amy; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the impact of methadone maintenance treatment on an inclusive group of adolescent and young adult opiate-dependent patients, ages 15-23, admitted over a 6-year period, during their first year in the program. Retention in treatment was the primary outcome variable, and at 12 months, 48% were still in treatment. The findings were: (a) a stepwise discriminant function analysis revealed that patients who consistently used heroin were at a greater risk of leaving treatment within the first 12 months; (b) the use of cocaine was an indicator of higher levels of heroin use in those who reached the one-year mark; (c) among patients who stayed in treatment for one year, there was a significant reduction in heroin use, a trend toward a reduction in cocaine use, and no significant impact on benzodiazepine use; and (d) the group that stayed in treatment was slightly younger than the group that left before the first year ended. There were no gender or ethnic differences between the two groups. Suggestions for interventions that might improve treatment outcome are presented.

  8. Buried Penis: Evaluation of Outcomes in Children and Adults, Modification of a Unified Treatment Algorithm, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    King, I. C. C.; Tahir, A.; Ramanathan, C.; Siddiqui, H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Buried penis is a difficult condition to manage in children and adults and conveys significant physical and psychological morbidity. Surgery is often declined due to morbid obesity, forcing patients to live in disharmony for years until the desired weight reduction is achieved. No single operative technique fits all. We present our experience and surgical approach resulting in an improved algorithm unifying the treatment of adults and children. Methods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients treated for buried penis between 2011 and 2012. All patients underwent penile degloving and basal anchoring. Penile shaft coverage was achieved with skin grafts. Suprapubic lipectomies were performed on adult patients. Results. Nine patients were identified: four children and five obese adults. Average postoperative stay was three days for children and five for adults. Three adults were readmitted with superficial wound problems. One child had minor skin breakdown. All patients were pleased with their outcomes. Conclusion. Buried penis is a complex condition, and treatment should be offered by services able to deal with all aspects of reconstruction. Obesity in itself should not delay surgical intervention. Local and regional awareness is essential to manage expectations in these challenging patients aspiring to both aesthetic and functional outcomes. PMID:24490087

  9. Loracarbef versus penicillin VK in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in an adult population.

    PubMed

    McCarty, J

    1992-06-22

    Loracarbef, a member of the carbacephem class of beta-lactam antibiotics, is a potent anti-bacterial agent. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial to assess the efficacy and safety of loracarbef in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis, 107 adult patients were treated with loracarbef (200 mg capsules twice a day or 15 mg/kg/day suspension) and 111 patients were treated with penicillin VK (250 mg capsules four times a day or 20 mg/kg/day suspension) for 10 days. In the loracarbef treatment group, 96.6% of the evaluable patients had a favorable clinical response 3-5 days after therapy, a result that compared favorably with the 93.9% response rate achieved in the penicillin group. The clinical failure/relapse rates were 3.4% for loracarbef-treated patients and 6.1% for patients receiving penicillin. Bacteriologic response data approximated the clinical results, with a successful response in 89.9% of the loracarbef-treated patients and 91.5% of the penicillin recipients. Two (1.9%) loracarbef-treated patients with rash and one (0.9%) penicillin-treated patient with diarrhea discontinued the study early because of these adverse events. The incidence of adverse events was comparable in the two treatment groups except for increased cough, which was reported by 3.7% of the loracarbef-treated patients and none of the penicillin recipients. These data support the conclusion that loracarbef is comparable to penicillin VK in the treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis and tonsillitis in adults.

  10. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  11. Young Adult Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Bookmark, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Eight articles in this Spring 1985 issue of The Bookmark focus on young adult library services. In addition to these thematic articles, an introduction and three reports are presented. The issue contains: (1) "In Perspective" (E. J. Josey); (2) "Young Adult Literature in the 1980's--Awesome!" (Ellin Chu); (3) "Young Adult…

  12. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  13. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  14. Adult Tech Prep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaad, Donna

    For over 2 years, Blak Hawk College (Illinois) has provided high school equivalency (GED) candidates and recipients, older returning students, and underprepared high school graduates with a Tech Prep curriculum to give them the skills to make the transition from adult basic education to college or work. The Adult Tech Prep (ATP) core curriculum…

  15. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  16. Adult Learning and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    As individuals and societies try to respond to fundamental economic and social transformation, the field of adult learning and education is rapidly getting increased attention and new topics for research on adult learning have emerged. This collection of articles from the International Encyclopedia of Education 3e offers practitioners and…

  17. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  18. Adult Literacy in Zanzibar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saadat, Ahmed H.

    The philosophy behind adult literacy in Zanzibar is that adult literacy is a process whereby the illiterate is empowered to become aware of his or her potential. Literacy activities emphasize a relation to work, sometimes known as functional literacy. Specific objectives of literacy programs are to improve living conditions, impart self-reliant…

  19. Adult Vocational Trajectory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverin-Simard, Danielle

    1990-01-01

    Proposes a "spatial-temporal" model conceiving adult vocational development as a complex and constant readjustment in always changing perception of personal space-time, based on interviews of 786 adults. Presents two propositions of this model: the continuous alternation between states of instability and interaction of influences.…

  20. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  1. Alternative Programming for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Thomas A.; Frey, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Council for Adult and Experiential Learning is currently cataloguing alternative programming features that are most effective with adult students in a best practices inventory organized around a framework of high-level descriptive principles of effectiveness. This chapter identifies a few interesting features from a quick survey of this…

  2. Adult Education and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinzen, Heribert, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document contains 19 papers on adult education and development worldwide. The following papers are included: "Editorial" (Heribert Hinzen); "Lifelong Learning in Europe: Moving towards EFA (Dakar Framework for Action on Education for All) Goals and the CONFINTEA V Agenda" (Sofia Conference on Adult Education);…

  3. Adult Education in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Radu

    2006-01-01

    Ever since the first ideas of national independence appeared in Finland, adult education has played an essential role in shaping the destiny of the Finns. With a history of almost 130 years, during which it has continuously increased in quality and quantity, the Finnish adult education system has ensured that Finland stays among the most…

  4. Financing of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, David

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 EFA Global Monitoring Report recognises adult literacy as the most neglected of the EFA goals. It is neglected most obviously in respect of the financial allocations made by governments and donors. This shortage of financing creates a dangerous situation in which adult educators seek to convince politicians to invest, based on false…

  5. Normalisation of frontal theta activity following methylphenidate treatment in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Skirrow, Caroline; McLoughlin, Grainne; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with cognitive performance and functional brain changes that are sensitive to task conditions, indicating a role for dynamic impairments rather than stable cognitive deficits. Prominent hypotheses consistent with this observation are a failure to optimise brain arousal or activation states. Here we investigate cortical activation during different conditions. Using a sample of 41 non-comorbid adults with ADHD and 48 controls, we examine quantitative EEG activity during a resting state, a cued continuous performance test with flankers (CPT-OX) and the sustained attention to response task (SART). We further investigate the effects of methylphenidate in a subsample of 21 ADHD cases. Control participants showed a task-related increase in theta activity when engaged in cognitive tasks, primarily in frontal and parietal regions, which was absent in participants with ADHD. Treatment with methylphenidate resulted in normalisation of the resting state to task activation pattern. These findings suggest that ADHD in adults is associated with insufficient allocation of neuronal resources required for normal cortical activation commensurate with task demands. Further work is required to clarify the causal role of the deficit in cortical activation and provide a clearer understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  6. Long-term stability of adolescent versus adult surgery for treatment of mandibular deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Proffit, William R.; Phillips, Ceib; Turvey, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    In mandibular deficient patients, mandibular growth is not expected after the adolescent growth spurt, so mandibular advancement surgery is often carried out at 13 years. To test if the long-term stability for younger patients is similar to that for adult patients, the authors compared cephalometric changes from 1 year postsurgery (when changes due to the surgery should be completed) to 5 year follow up. 32 patients who had early mandibular advancement with or without simultaneous maxillary surgery (aged up to 16 for girls and 18 for boys), and 52 patients with similar surgery at older ages were studied. Beyond 1 year postsurgery, the younger patients showed significantly greater change in the horizontal and vertical position of points B and pogonion, the horizontal (but not vertical) position of gonion, and mandibular plane angle. 50% of younger patients had 2–4 mm backward movement of Pg and another 25% had >4 mm. 15% of older patients had 2–4 mm change and none had >4 mm. Long-term changes in younger patients who had 2-jaw surgery were greater than for mandibular advancement only. Changes in younger groups were greater than for adult groups. Satisfaction with treatment and perception of problems were similar for both groups. PMID:20181460

  7. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: definition, prevalence, beta-cell function, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Gunnar; Gottsäter, Anders; Bakhtadze, Ekaterine; Berger, Bo; Sundkvist, Göran

    2005-12-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder in which, despite the presence of islet antibodies at diagnosis of diabetes, the progression of autoimmune beta-cell failure is slow. LADA patients are therefore not insulin requiring, at least during the first 6 months after diagnosis of diabetes. Among patients with phenotypic type 2 diabetes, LADA occurs in 10% of individuals older than 35 years and in 25% below that age. Prospective studies of beta-cell function show that LADA patients with multiple islet antibodies develop beta-cell failure within 5 years, whereas those with only GAD antibodies (GADAs) or only islet cell antibodies (ICAs) mostly develop beta-cell failure after 5 years. Even though it may take up to 12 years until beta-cell failure occurs in some patients, impairments in the beta-cell response to intravenous glucose and glucagon can be detected at diagnosis of diabetes. Consequently, LADA is not a latent disease; therefore, autoimmune diabetes in adults with slowly progressive beta-cell failure might be a more adequate concept. In agreement with proved impaired beta-cell function at diagnosis of diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice.

  8. Antenatal Glucocorticoid Treatment Induces Adaptations in Adult Midbrain Dopamine Neurons, which Underpin Sexually Dimorphic Behavioral Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Virdee, Kanwar; McArthur, Simon; Brischoux, Frédéric; Caprioli, Daniele; Ungless, Mark A; Robbins, Trevor W; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Gillies, Glenda E

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that antenatal glucocorticoid treatment (AGT, gestational days 16–19) altered the size and organization of the adult rat midbrain dopaminergic (DA) populations. Here we investigated the consequences of these AGT-induced cytoarchitectural disturbances on indices of DA function in adult rats. We show that in adulthood, enrichment of striatal DA fiber density paralleled AGT-induced increases in the numbers of midbrain DA neurons, which retained normal basal electrophysiological properties. This was co-incident with changes in (i) striatal D2-type receptor levels (increased, both sexes); (ii) D1-type receptor levels (males decreased; females increased); (iii) DA transporter levels (males increased; females decreased) in striatal regions; and (iv) amphetamine-induced mesolimbic DA release (males increased; females decreased). However, despite these profound, sexually dimorphic changes in markers of DA neurotransmission, in-utero glucocorticoid overexposure had a modest or no effect on a range of conditioned and unconditioned appetitive behaviors known to depend on mesolimbic DA activity. These findings provide empirical evidence for enduring AGT-induced adaptive mechanisms within the midbrain DA circuitry, which preserve some, but not all, functions, thereby casting further light on the vulnerability of these systems to environmental perturbations. Furthermore, they demonstrate these effects are achieved by different, often opponent, adaptive mechanisms in males and females, with translational implications for sex biases commonly found in midbrain DA-associated disorders. PMID:23929547

  9. Food addiction in adults seeking weight loss treatment. Implications for psychosocial health and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, Jacob M; Hinman, Nova; Koball, Afton; Hoffmann, Debra A; Carels, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined food addiction symptomology and its relationship to eating pathology and psychological distress among adults seeking weight loss treatment. A primary interest was an examination of the relationship between food addiction symptoms and short-term weight loss. Adults beginning a behavioral weight loss program (N=57) were given the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) as well as measures of psychological distress, disordered eating, weight bias, and weight-focused attitudes. Weight loss was measured after 7 weeks. Severity of food addiction was related to increased depression, emotional eating, binge eating, anti-fat attitudes, internalized weight bias, body shame, and low eating self-efficacy, but not body satisfaction. Increased food addiction symptomology was also related to less weight lost at 7 weeks. Findings suggest that individuals attempting to lose weight while combating symptoms of food addiction may be especially prone to eating-related pathologies, internalized weight bias, and body shame. Importantly, findings provide evidence that food addiction may undermine efforts to lose weight. The pathology associated with addiction (e.g., tolerance, withdrawal) could make the adoption of more healthful eating habits especially difficult.

  10. Treatment of Adults with Anterior Mandibular Teeth Crowding: Reliability of Little's Irregularity Index

    PubMed Central

    Antoszewska-Smith, J.; Bohater, M.; Kawala, M.

    2017-01-01

    The attempt of this article was to assess reliability of Little's Irregularity Index (LII) as for stability of the treatment outcomes in adults with crowded mandibular incisors. LII was measured on a digital cast prior to an orthodontic treatment (T1) of the 302 patients thus allowing us to establish the treatment plan, which called for (a) expansion (group 1), interproximal stripping (group 2), or extraction of one of the mandibular incisors. LII was measured after debonding (T2) and a year after retention (T3). Treatment resulted in significant reduction of LII values after treatment, in T1-T2 period in all groups. As for T2-T3 period it brought significant but clinically irrelevant relapse that occurred in groups 1 and 2; group 3 presented with insignificant improvement of occlusion. Conclusively, 30 years after introducing LII it has been a reliable parameter that allows selection of optimal treatment methods, provided that the appropriate ranges of values displaying dentoalveolar discrepancy are obeyed, namely, (1) up to 3 mm: expansion, (2) from 3 to 5 mm: interproximal enamel reduction, and (3) above 5 mm: extraction. PMID:28265286

  11. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): Practical strategies for pharmacological and somatic treatment in adults.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Naomi A; Reghunandanan, Samar; Simpson, Helen B; Phillips, Katharine A; Richter, Margaret A; Matthews, Keith; Stein, Dan J; Sareen, Jitender; Brown, Angus; Sookman, Debbie

    2015-05-30

    This narrative review gathers together a range of international experts to critically appraise the existing trial-based evidence relating to the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacotherapy for obsessive compulsive disorder in adults. We discuss the diagnostic evaluation and clinical characteristics followed by treatment options suitable for the clinician working from primary through to specialist psychiatric care. Robust data supports the effectiveness of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and clomipramine in the short-term and the longer-term treatment and for relapse prevention. Owing to better tolerability, SSRIs are acknowledged as the first-line pharmacological treatment of choice. For those patients for whom first line treatments have been ineffective, evidence supports the use of adjunctive antipsychotic medication, and some evidence supports the use of high-dose SSRIs. Novel compounds are also the subject of active investigation. Neurosurgical treatments, including ablative lesion neurosurgery and deep brain stimulation, are reserved for severely symptomatic individuals who have not experienced sustained response to both pharmacological and cognitive behavior therapies.

  12. Olanzapine treatment of adolescent rats alters adult reward behaviour and nucleus accumbens function.

    PubMed

    Vinish, Monika; Elnabawi, Ahmed; Milstein, Jean A; Burke, Jesse S; Kallevang, Jonathan K; Turek, Kevin C; Lansink, Carien S; Merchenthaler, Istvan; Bailey, Aileen M; Kolb, Bryan; Cheer, Joseph F; Frost, Douglas O

    2013-08-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are increasingly used in children and adolescents to treat a variety of psychiatric disorders. However, little is known about the long-term effects of early life antipsychotic drug (APD) treatment. Most APDs are potent antagonists or partial agonists of dopamine (DA) D₂ receptors; atypical APDs also have multiple serotonergic activities. DA and serotonin regulate many neurodevelopmental processes. Thus, early life APD treatment can, potentially, perturb these processes, causing long-term behavioural and neurobiological sequelae. We treated adolescent, male rats with olanzapine (Ola) on post-natal days 28-49, under dosing conditions that approximate those employed therapeutically in humans. As adults, they exhibited enhanced conditioned place preference for amphetamine, as compared to vehicle-treated rats. In the nucleus accumbens core, DA D₁ receptor binding was reduced, D₂ binding was increased and DA release evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area was reduced. Thus, adolescent Ola treatment enduringly alters a key behavioural response to rewarding stimuli and modifies DAergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. The persistence of these changes suggests that even limited periods of early life Ola treatment may induce enduring changes in other reward-related behaviours and in behavioural and neurobiological responses to therapeutic and illicit psychotropic drugs. These results underscore the importance of improved understanding of the enduring sequelae of paediatric APD treatment as a basis for weighing the benefits and risks of adolescent APD therapy, especially prophylactic treatment in high-risk, asymptomatic patients.

  13. The adult scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Aebi, Max

    2005-12-01

    Adult scoliosis is defined as a spinal deformity in a skeletally mature patient with a Cobb angle of more than 10 degrees in the coronal plain. Adult scoliosis can be separated into four major groups: Type 1: Primary degenerative scoliosis, mostly on the basis of a disc and/or facet joint arthritis, affecting those structures asymmetrically with predominantly back pain symptoms, often accompanied either by signs of spinal stenosis (central as well as lateral stenosis) or without. These curves are often classified as "de novo" scoliosis. Type 2: Idiopathic adolescent scoliosis of the thoracic and/or lumbar spine which progresses in adult life and is usually combined with secondary degeneration and/or imbalance. Some patients had either no surgical treatment or a surgical correction and fusion in adolescence in either the thoracic or thoracolumbar spine. Those patients may develop secondary degeneration and progression of the adjacent curve; in this case those curves belong to the type 3a. Type 3: Secondary adult curves: (a) In the context of an oblique pelvis, for instance, due to a leg length discrepancy or hip pathology or as a secondary curve in idiopathic, neuromuscular and congenital scoliosis, or asymmetrical anomalies at the lumbosacral junction; (b) In the context of a metabolic bone disease (mostly osteoporosis) combined with asymmetric arthritic disease and/or vertebral fractures. Sometimes it is difficult to decide, what exactly the primary cause of the curve was, once it has significantly progressed. However, once an asymmetric load or degeneration occurs, the pathomorphology and pathomechanism in adult scoliosis predominantly located in the lumbar or thoracolumbar spine is quite predictable. Asymmetric degeneration leads to increased asymmetric load and therefore to a progression of the degeneration and deformity, as either scoliosis and/or kyphosis. The progression of a curve is further supported by osteoporosis, particularly in post-menopausal female

  14. Vestibular rehabilitation of older adults with dizziness.

    PubMed

    Alrwaily, Muhammad; Whitney, Susan L

    2011-04-01

    The role of rehabilitation for treatment of older adults with dizziness and balance disorders is reviewed. Theories related to functional recovery from peripheral and central vestibular disorders are presented. Suggestions on which older adults might benefit from vestibular rehabilitation therapy are presented. Promising innovative rehabilitation strategies and technologies that might enhance recovery of the older adult with balance dysfunction are discussed.

  15. Adult Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ADHD symptoms may not be as clear as ADHD symptoms in children. In adults, hyperactivity may decrease, but struggles with ... similar to treatment for childhood ADHD, though some ADHD medications approved for children are not approved for adult use. Adult ADHD ...

  16. Impact of dissociation and interpersonal functioning on inpatient treatment for early sexually abused adults

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Ellen K. K.; Langeland, Willie; Heir, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the possible predictors of treatment outcome in early chronically sexually abused adults. The current study aimed to investigate what impact initial levels of dissociation and pre-treatment negative change in interpersonal functioning have on treatment response after 3 months of first-phase trauma inpatient treatment as well as after a period of 1 year the patients returned to their usual lives. Methods The sample comprised 48 inpatients with childhood sexual abuse histories and mixed trauma-related disorders who were examined at discharge and prospectively followed up for a period of 1 year under naturalistic conditions. Outcome variables were general psychiatric symptoms and interpersonal problems as measured with the Symptom Check List-Revised (SCL-R) and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP) Circumplex. Results The central findings were that pathological dissociation and deterioration in interpersonal functioning prior to admittance predicted general psychiatric symptom levels and interpersonal problems at the end of treatment and at 1-year follow-up. Pathological dissociation, involving memory and identity problems, alone predicted negative outcome at the end of treatment. The findings at 1-year follow-up indicate that it is not pathological dissociation in isolation that affects outcomes, but rather the interaction between dissociation and change in interpersonal functioning prior to treatment. Conclusion These findings indicate the need of addressing dissociation and interpersonal problems in treatment planning and favor an integrated treatment approach for complex trauma patients. Future research should investigate whether and how this leads to better outcome, including long-term maintenance of gains after the end of treatment. PMID:24386549

  17. Human metapneumovirus in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Lenneke E M; Thijsen, Steven F T; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A

    2013-01-08

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination.

  18. Human Metapneumovirus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Lenneke E. M.; Thijsen, Steven F. T.; van Elden, Leontine; Heemstra, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a relative newly described virus. It was first isolated in 2001 and currently appears to be one of the most significant and common human viral infections. Retrospective serologic studies demonstrated the presence of HMPV antibodies in humans more than 50 years earlier. Although the virus was primarily known as causative agent of respiratory tract infections in children, HMPV is an important cause of respiratory infections in adults as well. Almost all children are infected by HMPV below the age of five; the repeated infections throughout life indicate transient immunity. HMPV infections usually are mild and self-limiting, but in the frail elderly and the immunocompromised patients, the clinical course can be complicated. Since culturing the virus is relatively difficult, diagnosis is mostly based on a nucleic acid amplification test, such as reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. To date, no vaccine is available and treatment is supportive. However, ongoing research shows encouraging results. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature concerning HMPV infections in adults, and discuss recent development in treatment and vaccination. PMID:23299785

  19. Psychological treatments for mental disorders in adults: A review of the evidence of leading international organizations.

    PubMed

    Moriana, Juan Antonio; Gálvez-Lara, Mario; Corpas, Jorge

    2017-03-29

    Most mental health services throughout the world currently regard evidence-based psychological treatments as best practice for the treatment of mental disorders. The aim of this study was to analyze evidence-based treatments drawn from RCTs, reviews, meta-analyses, guides, and lists provided by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), Division 12 (Clinical Psychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA), Cochrane and the Australian Psychological Society (APS) in relation to mental disorders in adults. A total of 135 treatments were analyzed for 23 mental disorders and compared to determine the level of agreement among the organizations. The results indicate that, in most cases, there is little agreement among organizations and that there are several discrepancies within certain disorders. These results require reflection on the meaning attributed to evidence-based practice with regard to psychological treatments. The possible reasons for these differences are discussed. Based on these findings, proposals to unify the criteria that reconcile the realities of clinical practice with a scientific perspective were analyzed.

  20. The Treatment of Adult Bipolar Disorder with Aripiprazole: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-04-07

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by exacerbations of opposite mood polarity, ranging from manic to major depressive episodes. In the current nosological system of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - 5(th) edition (DSM-5), it is conceptualized as a spectrum disorder consisting of bipolar disorder type I, bipolar disorder type II, cyclothymic disorder, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Treatment of all phases of this disorder is primarily with mood stabilizers, but many patients either show resistance to the conventional mood stabilizing medications or are intolerant to their side-effects. In this setting, second-generation antipsychotics have gained prominence as many bipolar subjects who are otherwise treatment refractory show response to these agents. Aripiprazole is a novel antipsychotic initially approved for the treatment of schizophrenia but soon found to be effective in bipolar disorder. This drug is well studied, as randomized controlled trials have been conducted in various phases of bipolar disorders. Aripiprazole exhibits the pharmacodynamic properties of partial agonism, functional selectivity, and serotonin-dopamine activity modulation - the new exemplars in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders. It is the first among a new series of psychotropic medications, which now also include brexpiprazole and cariprazine. The current review summarizes the data from controlled trials regarding the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in adult bipolar patients. On the basis of this evidence, aripiprazole is found to be efficacious in the treatment and prophylaxis of manic and mixed episodes but has no effectiveness in acute and recurrent bipolar depression.

  1. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of low-pressure hydrocephalus in adults

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kimberly A.; Deibert, Christopher P.; Choi, Phillip A.; Gardner, Paul A.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Engh, Johnathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of low-pressure hydrocephalus (LPH) may require prolonged external ventricular drainage (EVD) at sub-zero pressures to reverse ventriculomegaly. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) has been used in the treatment of noncommunicating hydrocephalus; however, indications for ETV are expanding. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of LPH as defined by the Pang and Altschuler criteria who underwent sub-zero drainage treatment over an 8-year period were included. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on whether or not ETV was employed during their treatment. Time from EVD placement to internalization of shunt was recorded for both groups; time from ETV to placement of shunt was recorded for the patients undergoing ETV. Results: Sixteen adult patients with LPH were managed with sub-zero drainage method. Ten (62.5%) patients did not undergo ETV and the average time from first ventriculostomy to shunting was 73 days (range 14–257 days). Six (37.5%) patients underwent ETV during the course of their treatment; average time from initial ventriculostomy to shunt was 114 days (range 0–236 days) (P = 0.16). Time from development of LPH to ETV ranged from 28 days to 6.5 months. In the ETV group, of the 4 patients who underwent shunting, the average time to shunting following ETV was 15.25 days. Conclusions: ETV can be used successfully in the management of refractory LPH to decrease the duration of EVD. PMID:27069743

  2. Personality Pathology and Mental Health Treatment Seeking in a Community Sample of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Sampling issues are extremely important in studies of psychopathology, especially with regard to the investigation of personality disorders (PDs). Many studies rely on clinical samples while others have focused on representative samples of community residents. Do people who qualify for a PD diagnosis seek and receive mental health services with greater (or possibly reduced) frequency compared to others in the community? Do community-based studies of PDs include people who have been treated? Analyses presented here examine connections between personality pathology and various aspects of treatment seeking in a representative sample of 1,630 middle-aged adults who completed a semi-structured diagnostic interview (SIDP-IV). Results demonstrate a disorder specific effect. Antisocial, borderline, avoidant, and dependent PDs are associated with increased levels of seeking treatment. Four PDs are associated with greater length of treatment. After accounting for lifetime presence of major depression and alcohol dependence, borderline, avoidant, and dependent pathology remained associated with increased treatment seeking. These findings point to several conclusions, including: 1) community samples do include a substantial proportion of people who have received various kinds of mental health services, 2) the association between personality pathology and mental health treatment seeking is not fully explained by comorbid depression and alcohol dependence. PMID:24343963

  3. Best Practice Guide for the Treatment of Nightmare Disorder in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Zak, Rochelle S.; Auerbach, Sanford H.; Casey, Kenneth R.; Chowdhuri, Susmita; Karippot, Anoop; Maganti, Rama K.; Ramar, Kannan; Kristo, David A.; Bista, Sabin R.; Lamm, Carin I.; Morgenthaler, Timothy I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of Recommendations: Prazosin is recommended for treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)-associated nightmares. Level A Image Rehearsal Therapy (IRT) is recommended for treatment of nightmare disorder. Level A Systematic Desensitization and Progressive Deep Muscle Relaxation training are suggested for treatment of idiopathic nightmares. Level B Venlafaxine is not suggested for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares. Level B Clonidine may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares. Level C The following medications may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares, but the data are low grade and sparse: trazodone, atypical antipsychotic medications, topiramate, low dose cortisol, fluvoxamine, triazolam and nitrazepam, phenelzine, gabapentin, cyproheptadine, and tricyclic antidepressants. Nefazodone is not recommended as first line therapy for nightmare disorder because of the increased risk of hepatotoxicity. Level C The following behavioral therapies may be considered for treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares based on low-grade evidence: Exposure, Relaxation, and Rescripting Therapy (ERRT); Sleep Dynamic Therapy; Hypnosis; Eye-Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR); and the Testimony Method. Level C The following behavioral therapies may be considered for treatment of nightmare disorder based on low-grade evidence: Lucid Dreaming Therapy and Self-Exposure Therapy. Level C No recommendation is made regarding clonazepam and individual psychotherapy because of sparse data. Citation: Aurora RN; Zak RS; Auerbach SH; Casey KR; Chowduri S; Krippot A; Maganti RK; Ramar K; Kristo DA; Bista SR; Lamm CI; Morgenthaler TI. Best practice guide for the treatment of nightmare disorder in adults. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(4):389-401. PMID:20726290

  4. Heart failure treatment in adults with congenital heart disease: where do we stand in 2014?

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Valente, Anne Marie

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in adults with repaired congenital heart disease (CHD). However there is currently little evidence to guide treatment strategies in this growing group of patients. Unlike the majority of HF, which is usually caused by LV systolic or diastolic dysfunction, CHD-HF is more often a consequence of RV disease, valve dysfunction, shunting or pulmonary hypertension. It is therefore not appropriate to extrapolate from the acquired HF literature and apply it to this heterogeneous population of CHD patients. Additionally, patients with CHD have been excluded from most large trials of medical or device therapy of HF, which has resulted in small retrospective and underpowered studies in the CHD population. This article critically reviews the current knowledge about CHD-HF, paying particular attention to medical therapy in different CHD populations, cardiac resynchronisation therapy and implantable cardiac defibrillators, and the challenges of heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support in CHD patients.

  5. [Candidemia and invasive candidiasis in the adult: clinical forms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Cervera, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Invasive candidiasis is progressively increasing in frequency as a complication of the hospitalised adult patient. The availability of new antifungal drugs with lower toxicity and high efficacy has increased the complexity of managing of these infections. In parallel, the costs of the treatment of invasive fungal infections have considerably increased. Finding of a balance between the best benefit for the patient with the less costs is, nowadays, one of the main objectives of the current recommendations for the management of invasive candidiasis. In this review, the recommendations for the management of candidemia and other forms of invasive candidiasis (esophagitis, peritonitis, ocular, cardiovascular and osteoarticular candidiasis, central nervous system and urinary tract candidiasis, and chronic disseminated candidiasis) are analysed.

  6. Coarctation of the aorta in adults: what is the best treatment? Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Daraban, AM; Lorber, A; Deleanu, D; Amzulescu, MS; Zara, C; Popescu, BA; Ginghina, C

    2011-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital cardiac malformation that can go undiagnosed until old age with only hypertension as a marker of its presence because clinical signs can be subtle and overlooked if a complete physical exam is not performed. We report the case of a 45 year–old women, diagnosed with severe coarctation of the aorta just distal to the left subclavian artery, with poststenotic dilatation of the descending aorta and difficult control of blood pressure values. The patient was successfully treated interventionally, by balloon angioplasty with deployment of a covered stent. We review here the different methods employed for the treatment of coarctation of the aorta in adults, including surgical or percutaneous balloon angioplasty with or without stent placement, underlying their complications and the factors that influence the choice of the best coarctation repair method. PMID:21776305

  7. Isoniazid preventive treatment among child contacts of adults with smear-positive tuberculosis in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Sillah, A.; Togun, T.; Kandeh, S.; Cole, F.; Jallow, A.; Able-Thomas, A.; Hoelscher, M.; Heinrich, N.; Hill, P. C.; Kampmann, B.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Greater Banjul area of The Gambia. Objectives: To evaluate uptake, adherence and completion of treatment among tuberculosis (TB) exposed children in The Gambia when isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT) is delivered at home Design: Child (age <5 years) contacts of adults with smear-positive TB were prospectively enrolled. Following symptom screening, tuberculin skin testing and clinical evaluation where indicated, those without disease were placed on daily isoniazid, provided monthly at home. Adherence was assessed by pill counts and IsoScreen™ urine test. Results: Of 404 contacts aged <5 years, 368 (91.1%) were offered IPT. Of the 328 (89.4%) for whom consent was received and who commenced IPT, 18 (5.5%) dropped out and 310 (94.5%) remained on IPT to the end of the 6-month regimen. Altogether, 255/328 children (77.7%, 95%CI 73.2–82.2) completed all 6 months, with good adherence. The IsoScreen test was positive in 85.3% (435/510) of all tests among those defined as having good adherence by pill count and in 16% (8/50) of those defined as having poor adherence (P < 0.001). A cascade of care analysis showed an overall completion rate with good adherence of 61% for all child contacts. Conclusion: Home-delivered IPT among child contacts of adults with smear-positive TB in The Gambia achieved verifiable high uptake and adherence rates. System rather than patient factors are likely to determine the success of IPT at national level. PMID:28123958

  8. Isoniazid preventive treatment among child contacts of adults with smear-positive tuberculosis in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Egere, U; Sillah, A; Togun, T; Kandeh, S; Cole, F; Jallow, A; Able-Thomas, A; Hoelscher, M; Heinrich, N; Hill, P C; Kampmann, B

    2016-12-21

    Setting: Greater Banjul area of The Gambia. Objectives: To evaluate uptake, adherence and completion of treatment among tuberculosis (TB) exposed children in The Gambia when isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT) is delivered at home Design: Child (age <5 years) contacts of adults with smear-positive TB were prospectively enrolled. Following symptom screening, tuberculin skin testing and clinical evaluation where indicated, those without disease were placed on daily isoniazid, provided monthly at home. Adherence was assessed by pill counts and IsoScreen(™) urine test. Results: Of 404 contacts aged <5 years, 368 (91.1%) were offered IPT. Of the 328 (89.4%) for whom consent was received and who commenced IPT, 18 (5.5%) dropped out and 310 (94.5%) remained on IPT to the end of the 6-month regimen. Altogether, 255/328 children (77.7%, 95%CI 73.2-82.2) completed all 6 months, with good adherence. The IsoScreen test was positive in 85.3% (435/510) of all tests among those defined as having good adherence by pill count and in 16% (8/50) of those defined as having poor adherence (P < 0.001). A cascade of care analysis showed an overall completion rate with good adherence of 61% for all child contacts. Conclusion: Home-delivered IPT among child contacts of adults with smear-positive TB in The Gambia achieved verifiable high uptake and adherence rates. System rather than patient factors are likely to determine the success of IPT at national level.

  9. Behavioural treatment strategies improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Burgess, E; Hassmén, P; Welvaert, M; Pumpa, K L

    2017-04-01

    Poor adherence to lifestyle intervention remains a key factor hindering treatment effectiveness and health outcomes for adults with obesity. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine if behavioural treatment strategies (e.g. goal setting, motivational interviewing, relapse prevention, cognitive restructuring etc.) improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity. Randomized controlled trials that investigated the use of behavioural treatment strategies in obesity management were identified by systematically reviewing the literature within Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science from their inception to August 2016. This meta-analysis shows that behavioural treatment interventions have a significant positive effect on session attendance (percentage) and physical activity (total min/week) in adults with obesity (M = 17.63 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.77, 24.50), z =5.0337, P < 0.0001 and M = 105.98 (95% CI = 58.64, 153.32), z =4.3878, P < 0.0001, respectively). This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials provides evidence that behavioural treatment strategies improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity. These strategies should be routinely incorporated into lifestyle intervention, obesity management and weight loss programmes with the aim of improving engagement and adherence. If adherence were improved, treatment effectiveness, health outcomes and the ultimate burden of chronic disease could also be improved.

  10. Assessment and treatment of insomnia in adult patients with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2015-06-01

    Insomnia in patients with alcohol dependence has increasingly become a target of treatment due to its prevalence, persistence, and associations with relapse and suicidal thoughts, as well as randomized controlled studies demonstrating efficacy with behavior therapies and non-addictive medications. This article focuses on assessing and treating insomnia that persists despite 4 or more weeks of sobriety in alcohol-dependent adults. Selecting among the various options for treatment follows a comprehensive assessment of insomnia and its multifactorial causes. In addition to chronic, heavy alcohol consumption and its effects on sleep regulatory systems, contributing factors include premorbid insomnia; co-occurring medical, psychiatric, and other sleep disorders; use of other substances and medications; stress; environmental factors; and inadequate sleep hygiene. The assessment makes use of history, rating scales, and sleep diaries as well as physical, mental status, and laboratory examinations to rule out these factors. Polysomnography is indicated when another sleep disorder is suspected, such as sleep apnea or periodic limb movement disorder, or when insomnia is resistant to treatment. Sobriety remains a necessary, first-line treatment for insomnia, and most patients will have some improvement. If insomnia-specific treatment is needed, then brief behavioral therapies are the treatment of choice, because they have shown long-lasting benefit without worsening of drinking outcomes. Medications work faster, but they generally work only as long as they are taken. Melatonin agonists; sedating antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics; and benzodiazepine receptor agonists each have their benefits and risks, which must be weighed and monitored to optimize outcomes. Some relapse prevention medications may also have sleep-promoting activity. Although it is assumed that treatment for insomnia will help prevent relapse, this has not been firmly established. Therefore

  11. Efficacy of Propolis on the Denture Stomatitis Treatment in Older Adults: A Multicentric Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Gisela de M. S.; Lia, Erica N.; Berretta, Andresa A.; Nascimento, Andresa P.; Torres, Elina C.; Buszinski, Andrei F. M.; de Campos, Tatiana A.; Martins, Vicente de P.

    2017-01-01

    Our hypothesis tested the efficacy and safety of a mucoadhesive oral gel formulation of Brazilian propolis extract compared to miconazole oral gel for the treatment of denture stomatitis due to Candida spp. infection in older adults. Forty patients were randomly allocated in a noninferiority clinical trial into two groups. The control group (MIC) received 20 mg/g miconazole oral gel and the study group (PROP) received mucoadhesive formulation containing standardized extract of 2% (20 mg/g) propolis (EPP-AF®) during 14 days. Patients were examined on days 1, 7, and 14. The Newton's score was used to classify the severity of denture stomatitis. The colony forming unity count (CFU/mL) was quantified and identified (CHROMagar Candida®) before and after the treatment. Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. Both treatments reduced Newton's score (P < 0.0001), indicating a clinical improvement of the symptoms of candidiasis with a clinical cure rate of 70%. The microbiological cure with significant reduction in fungal burden on T14 was 70% in the miconazole group and 25% in the EPP-AF group. The EPP-AF appears to be noninferior to miconazole considering the clinical cure rate and could be recommended as an alternative treatment in older patients.

  12. Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy as treatment for lower lacrimal pathway obstructions in adults: Review article

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Grigori; Tuomilehto, Henri; Kaarniranta, Kai; Seppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Obstruction of the lacrimal pathway is manifested by epiphora, infection, and blurred vision as well as ocular and facial pain. Conservative treatments only achieve temporary relief of symptoms, thus surgery is the treatment of choice. Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is recognized as the most suitable treatment for patients with obstructions of the lacrimal system at the level of the sac or in the nasolacrimal duct. The aim of this operation is to create a bypass between the lacrimal sac and the nasal cavity. During the past 2 decades, advances in rigid endoscopic equipment and other instruments have made it possible to obtain more information about the anatomic landmarks of the nasolacrimal system, which led to the development of less-invasive and safer endoscopic techniques. However, many parts of the treatment process related to endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (EN-DCR) still remain controversial. This article reviews the published literature about the technical issues associated with the success of EN-DCR, and clarifies the pros and cons of different pre- and postoperative procedures in adults with lower lacrimal pathway obstructions. PMID:25860166

  13. Treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impact of hemophilia on young adults (aged 18-30 years) with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Witkop, Michelle; Guelcher, Christine; Forsyth, Angela; Hawk, Sarah; Curtis, Randall; Kelley, Laureen; Frick, Neil; Rice, Michelle; Rosu, Gabriela; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    The Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) initiative assessed psychosocial issues reported by people with moderate to severe hemophilia and was led by a multidisciplinary international advisory board. This analysis reports data from young adult respondents (aged 18-30 years), including both US and overall global (including US respondents) results, and investigates treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impacts of hemophilia on relationships. More young adults in HERO received prophylaxis than on-demand treatment, although a majority reported not using factor products exactly as prescribed, and 50% of global respondents and 26% of US respondents reported issues with access to factor replacement therapy in the previous 5 years. Many young adults with hemophilia reported comorbidities, including bone/skeletal arthritis, chronic pain, and viral infections, and nearly half of young adults reported anxiety/depression. Most reported pain interference with daily activities in the past 4 weeks, although a majority reported participating in lower-risk activities and approximately half in intermediate-risk activities. Most young adults were very or quite satisfied with the support of partners/spouses, family, and friends, although roughly one-third reported that hemophilia affected their ability to develop close relationships with a partner. A majority of young adults reported that hemophilia has had a negative impact on employment, and 62% of global respondents and 78% of US respondents were employed at least part-time. Together these data highlight the psychosocial issues experienced by young adults with hemophilia and suggest that increased focus on these issues may improve comprehensive care during the transition to adulthood.

  14. Initiation of Addiction Treatment and Access to Services: Young Adults' Accounts of Their Help-Seeking Experiences.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vincent; Bertrand, Karine; Flores-Aranda, Jorge; Acier, Didier; Brunelle, Natacha; Landry, Michel; Brochu, Serge

    2016-12-04

    Substance addiction in young adults is particularly problematic. Yet, much remain at stake in understanding the specifics of this population's access to services. The objective of this study is to explore young adults' initiation of substance misuse treatment. Our study sample was composed of 35 individuals aged 18 to 30 with problematic psychoactive substance use who have been identified in criminal courts, hospital emergency departments, and Health and Social Services Centers in Québec (Canada). A thematic analysis was performed on the 62 semi-structured interviews conducted with participants. Three components emerged. First, personal elements-expectations, individual motivations, perceptions of use, and capacity to control it-influence initiation of substance misuse treatment. Second, family and peers have noticeable influences. Finally, system characteristics and prior care experiences also shape the process. Consideration should be given to tailor interventions that can reach young adults and encourage them to initiate appropriate care.

  15. Influence of Criminal Justice Involvement and Psychiatric Diagnoses on Treatment Costs Among Adults With Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Allison G; Swanson, Jeffrey W; Lin, Hsiuju; Easter, Michele M; Frisman, Linda K; Swartz, Marvin S

    2015-09-01

    The impact of criminal justice involvement and clinical characteristics on the cost of public treatment services for adults with serious mental illnesses is unknown. The authors examined differential effects of justice involvement on behavioral health treatment costs by primary psychiatric diagnosis (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) and also by substance use diagnosis among 25,133 adult clients of Connecticut's public behavioral health system in fiscal years 2006 and 2007. Justice-involved adults with schizophrenia had the highest costs, strongly driven by forensic hospitalizations. Addressing the cross-system burdens of forensic hospitalizations may be a sensible starting point in the effort to reduce costs in both the public behavioral health and justice systems.

  16. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  17. Economic evaluation of Sinfrontal in the treatment of acute maxillary sinusitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Kneis, Kyra C; Gandjour, Afschin

    2009-01-01

    Sinfrontal, a complex homeopathic medication, is popular in Germany for the treatment of ear, nose and throat and respiratory tract infections. Unlike many other homeopathic or herbal medications, the efficacy and safety of Sinfrontal has been demonstrated in a number of clinical studies of patients with sinusitis. To assess the cost effectiveness of Sinfrontal versus placebo in the treatment of adults with acute maxillary sinusitis (AMS) in Germany. A secondary objective was to assess the cost effectiveness of Sinfrontal versus standard treatment with antibacterials. Sinfrontal was compared with placebo in a cost-utility analysis based on data from a randomized controlled clinical trial over 3 weeks (Sinfrontal group: n = 57; placebo group: n = 56). Trial data were analysed from a societal perspective; resource use was valued with German unit costs for 2005. In a secondary analysis, the longer-term cost utility of Sinfrontal versus placebo was estimated over a total of 11 weeks based on an 8-week post-treatment observational phase. In addition, the cost effectiveness of Sinfrontal versus antibacterials was determined based on an indirect comparison of placebo-controlled trials. Sinfrontal led to incremental savings of euro 275 (95% CI 433, 103) per patient compared with placebo over 22 days, essentially due to the markedly reduced absenteeism from work (7.83 vs 12.9 workdays). Incremental utility amounted to 0.0087 QALYs (95% CI 0.0052, 0.0123), or 3.2 quality-adjusted life-days (QALDs). Bootstrapping showed that these findings were significant, with Sinfrontal being dominant in 99.9% of simulations. The results were robust to a number of sensitivity analyses. In the secondary analysis, Sinfrontal led to incremental cost savings of euro 511 and utility gains of 0.015 QALYs or 5.4 QALDs compared with placebo. Compared with antibacterials, Sinfrontal had a significantly higher cure rate (11% vs 59%; p < 0.001) at similar or lower costs. The results of this economic

  18. HIV treatment optimism and its predictors among young adults in southern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Sara; Dovel, Kathryn; Conroy, Amy; Namadingo, Hazel

    2013-08-01

    This study measures HIV treatment optimism and its predictors in a representative sample of young adults in southern Malawi. In 2010, 1275 women and 470 men between the ages of 16 and 26 were asked about their exposure to people on antiretroviral therapy (ART), sexual risk behavior, HIV status, and beliefs about ART. We used confirmatory factor analysis to develop a 4-item scale of the belief that HIV is a less serious health threat due to ART (reduced-severity optimism) and used a single measure to capture belief in the reduced infectivity of HIV due to ART (reduced-susceptibility optimism). Overall, respondents reported low levels of HIV treatment optimism. Being female and using ART were the largest predictors of both types of treatment optimism. We found a nonlinear relationship between exposure to people on ART and reduced-severity optimism. People who knew someone on ART but did not discuss it with them had lower levels of reduced-severity optimism than people who did not know anyone on ART and people who regularly discussed treatment with someone on ART. In multivariate regression models, HIV treatment optimism was positively associated with all measures of sexual risk behavior among men, but negatively associated with unprotected sex with a nonprimary partner among women. Our findings suggest that the spread of ART in Malawi has not led to widespread HIV treatment optimism. This may reflect the relatively recent spread of ART, the generalized nature of the HIV epidemic, or the fact that access to ART is complicated by structural limitations that delay treatment and limited availability of second-line medicines.

  19. NUTRITIONAL THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORROSIVE INTOXICATION IN ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Chibishev, Andon; Markoski, Velo; Smokovski, Ivica; Shikole, Emilija; Stevcevska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute intoxications with corrosive substances can cause severe chemical injuries of the upper gastrointestinal tract, most often located in the mouth, pharynx, esophagus, stomach and duodenum. If a patient survives the acute phase of intoxication, regenerative response may result in esophageal and/or gastric stenosis, and increased risk of esophageal and gastric cancer. Such intoxication may be fatal due to perforation or tracheal necrosis. Enteral nutrition is a nutritional method when nutritional substances are administered through specially designed tubing placed through the nose or percutaneously, directly into the GIT. Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the methods of artificial nutrition in patients with acute corrosive intoxications and the importance of nutritional support in the treatment of these intoxications. Discussion: Nutrition in the treatment of acute corrosive intoxications is one of the most important therapeutic processes that largely contribute to faster recovery of the post-corrosive injuries of upper GIT, stabilization of biologic, immunologic and metabolic parameters, and reduction of length of stay in hospital Aim of the treatment of acute corrosive intoxications is to prevent perforation and progressive fibrosis, and esophageal and gastric stenosis. There are different and often conflicting positions, on the conservative treatment of acute corrosive intoxications in adults. Such treatment mainly consists of anti-secretory treatment, antibiotics and intensive hyper-alimentation, aiming to prevent late post-corrosive intoxications. Conclusion: It is considered that nutritional support plays a major role in maintenance of metabolic processes and prevention of severe metabolic complications that could additionally aggravate the condition and impair the treatment. PMID:27047272

  20. Short- and long-term treatment with modafinil differentially affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brandt, M D; Ellwardt, E; Storch, A

    2014-10-10

    The generation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the adult brain has been demonstrated in many species including humans and is suggested to have functional relevance for learning and memory. The wake promoting drug modafinil has popularly been categorized as a so-called neuroenhancer due to its positive effects on cognition. We here show that short- and long-term treatment with modafinil differentially effects hippocampal neurogenesis. We used different thymidine analogs (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), chlorodeoxyuridine (CldU), iododeoxyuridine (IdU)) and labeling protocols to investigate distinct regulative events during hippocampal neurogenesis, namely cell proliferation and survival. Eight-week-old mice that were treated with modafinil (64mg/kg, i.p.) every 24h for 4days show increased proliferation in the dentate gyrus indicated by BrdU-labeling and more newborn granule cells 3weeks after treatment. Short-term treatment for 4days also enhanced the number of postmitotic calretinin-expressing progenitor cells that were labeled with BrdU 1week prior to treatment indicating an increased survival of new born immature granule cells. Interestingly, long-term treatment for 14days resulted in an increased number of newborn Prox1(+) granule cells, but we could not detect an additive effect of the prolonged treatment on proliferation and survival of newborn cells. Moreover, daily administration for 14days did not influence the number of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus. Together, modafinil has an acute impact on precursor cell proliferation as well as survival but loses this ability during longer treatment durations.

  1. Adult Acute Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, K.; Wells, D. G.; Clink, H. McD.; Kay, H. E. M.; Powles, R.; McElwain, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL). The periodic acid-Schiff stain was of little value in differentiating the 3 groups. The treatment response in each group was different: 94% of patients with ALL (16/17) achieved complete remission with prednisone, vincristine and other drugs in standard use in childhood ALL; 59% of patients with AML (27/46) achieved complete remission with cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin (22 patients), or 6-thioguanine and cyclophosphamide (2 patients), 6-thioguanine, cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin (1 patient), and cytosine and Adriamycin (1 patient); only 2 out of 14 patients (14%) with acute undifferentiated leukaemia achieved complete remission using cytosine and daunorubicin after an initial trial of prednisone and vincristine had failed. Prednisone and vincristine would seem to be of no value in acute undifferentiated leukaemia. It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as “adult acute leukaemia” and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen. The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4141625

  2. Reducing TV watching during adult obesity treatment: two pilot randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Raynor, Hollie A; Steeves, Elizabeth Anderson; Bassett, David R; Thompson, Dixie L; Gorin, Amy A; Bond, Dale S

    2013-12-01

    The more time adults spend being sedentary, the greater the risk of obesity. The effect of reducing television (TV) watching, a prominent sedentary behavior, on weight loss has not been tested in an adult standard behavioral obesity intervention, and the mechanisms by which reducing TV watching influences energy balance behaviors are not well understood. Two, 8-week, pilot, randomized controlled trials were conducted examining the effect of a reduced TV watching prescription on energy balance behaviors and weight loss within an adult standard behavioral obesity intervention. In the first study, participants (n=24) were randomized into one of two conditions: (a) reduce energy intake and increase moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (INCREASE PA); or (b) reduce energy intake and decrease TV watching (DECREASE TV). As findings from the first pilot study did not show an increase in MVPA in the DECREASE TV group, the second study was designed to examine the effect of adding a reduced TV prescription to a standard intervention to optimize outcomes. In Pilot Study 2, participants (n=28) were randomized to INCREASE PA or to INCREASE PA+DECREASE TV. Outcomes included objectively measured TV watching and MVPA, self-reported light physical activity (LPA-Pilot Study 2 only), self-reported dietary intake while watching TV, and weight. Conditions with TV watching prescriptions significantly reduced TV watching. Both studies showed medium to large effect sizes for conditions with TV watching prescriptions to show greater reductions in dietary intake while watching TV. Pilot Study 1 found a trend for an increase in MVPA in INCREASE PA and Pilot Study 2 found significant increases in MVPA in both conditions. Pilot Study 2 found a significant increase in LPA in the INCREASE PA+DECREASE TV. Results indicate adding a TV watching prescription to a standard obesity intervention did not enhance increases in MVPA, but may assist with reducing dietary intake while TV watching and

  3. Intensive Treatment and Severe Hypoglycemia Among Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Rozalina G.; Lipska, Kasia J.; Yao, Xiaoxi; Ross, Joseph S.; Montori, Victor M.; Shah, Nilay D.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Intensive glucose-lowering treatment among patients with non–insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Objectives To estimate the prevalence of intensive treatment and the association between intensive treatment, clinical complexity, and incidence of severe hypoglycemia among adults with type 2 diabetes who are not using insulin. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective analysis of administrative, pharmacy, and laboratory data from the OptumLabs Data Warehouse from January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2013. The study included nonpregnant adults 18 years or older with type 2 diabetes who achieved and maintained a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% without use of insulin and had no episodes of severe hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia in the prior 12 months. Main Outcomes and Measures Risk-adjusted probability of intensive treatment and incident severe hypoglycemia, stratified by patient clinical complexity. Intensive treatment was defined as use of more glucose-lowering medications than recommended by practice guidelines at specific index HbA1c levels. Severe hypoglycemia was ascertained by ambulatory, emergency department, and hospital claims for hypoglycemia during the 2 years after the index HbA1c test. Patients were categorized as having high vs low clinical complexity if they were 75 years or older, had dementia or end-stage renal disease, or had 3 or more serious chronic conditions. Results Of 31 542 eligible patients (median age, 58 years; interquartile range, 51–65 years; 15 483 women [49.1%]; 18 188 white [57.7%]), 3910 (12.4%) had clinical complexity. The risk-adjusted probability of intensive treatment was 25.7% (95% CI, 25.1%–26.2%) in patients with low clinical complexity and 20.8% (95% CI, 19.4%–22.2%) in patients with high clinical complexity. In patients with low clinical complexity, the risk-adjusted probability of severe hypoglycemia during the subsequent 2 years was 1.02% (95% CI, 0

  4. Mosquito, adult (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This illustration shows an adult southern house mosquito. This mosquito feeds on blood and is the carrier of many diseases, such as encephalitis, West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and others. ( ...

  5. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003204.htm Speech impairment (adult) To use the sharing features on ... 2017, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  6. Motivation and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, J.

    1974-01-01

    The paper examines the role of adult education and the contribution it can make to the solution of current problems in developing countries, particularly the problems of economic under-development and over-population. (Author/AG)

  7. Motivation and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. Rodney

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews theories of human motivation: Lewin's force field analysis, Skinner's operant reinforcement theory, and Maslow's hierarchy of needs. He then extracts the implications of these theories for adult learning. SK)

  8. Young Adult Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Connie C.

    1987-01-01

    Considers the similarities between science fiction writing and young adult literature, and points out that several well-known authors, such as Robert Heinlein and Jane Yolen, write in both genres. (NKA)

  9. ERP Correlates of Proactive and Reactive Cognitive Control in Treatment-Naïve Adult ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Endestad, Tor; Aasen, Ida Emilia S.; Kropotov, Juri; Knight, Robert Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether treatment naïve adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD; n = 33; 19 female) differed from healthy controls (n = 31; 17 female) in behavioral performance, event-related potential (ERP) indices of preparatory attention (CueP3 and late CNV), and reactive response control (Go P3, NoGo N2, and NoGo P3) derived from a visual cued Go/NoGo task. On several critical measures, Cue P3, late CNV, and NoGo N2, there were no significant differences between the groups. This indicated normal preparatory processes and conflict monitoring in ADHD patients. However, the patients had attenuated Go P3 and NoGoP3 amplitudes relative to controls, suggesting reduced allocation of attentional resources to processes involved in response control. The patients also had a higher rate of Go signal omission errors, but no other performance decrements compared with controls. Reduced Go P3 and NoGo P3 amplitudes were associated with poorer task performance, particularly in the ADHD group. Notably, the ERPs were not associated with self-reported mood or anxiety. The results provide electrophysiological evidence for reduced effortful engagement of attentional resources to both Go and NoGo signals when reactive response control is needed. The absence of group differences in ERP components indexing proactive control points to impairments in specific aspects of cognitive processes in an untreated adult ADHD cohort. The associations between ERPs and task performance provided additional support for the altered electrophysiological responses. PMID:27448275

  10. Surgical Treatment for Adult Spinal Deformity: Projected Cost Effectiveness at 5-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Terran, Jamie; McHugh, Brian J.; Fischer, Charla R.; Lonner, Baron; Warren, Daniel; Glassman, Steven; Bridwell, Keith; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Background In the United States, expenditures related to spine care are estimated to account for $86 billion annually. Policy makers have set a cost-effectiveness benchmark of less than $100,000/quality adjusted life year (QALY), forcing surgeons to defend their choices economically. This study projects the cost/QALY for surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity at 5-year follow-up based on 2-year cost- and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data. Methods In a review of 541 patients with adult spinal deformity, the patients who underwent revision or were likely to undergo revision were identified and cost of surgery was doubled to account for the second procedure; all other patients maintained the cost of the initial surgery. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was modeled by revision status based on literature findings. Total surgical cost was based on Medicare reimbursement. Chi square and student t tests were utilized to compare cost-effective and non–cost-effective patients. Results The average cost/QALY at 5-year follow-up was $120,311.73. A total of 40.7% of patients fell under the threshold of a cost/QALY <$100,000. Cost-effective patients had higher baseline ODI scores (45% vs 34% [P=0.001]), lower baseline total Scoliosis Research Society scores (2.89 vs 3.00 [P=0.04]), and shorter fusions (8.23 vs 9.87 [P=0.0001]). Conclusion We found 40.7% of patients to be below the threshold of cost effectiveness. Factors associated with reaching the threshold <$100,000/QALY were greater preoperative disability, diagnosis of idiopathic scoliosis, poor preoperative HRQOL scores, and fewer fusion levels. PMID:24688328

  11. Vitamin D for the treatment of chronic painful conditions in adults

    PubMed Central

    Straube, Sebastian; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is produced in the skin after sun-light exposure and can also be obtained through food. Vitamin D deficiency has recently been linked with a range of diseases including chronic pain. Observational and circumstantial evidence suggests that there may be a role for vitamin D deficiency in the aetiology of chronic pain conditions. Objectives To assess the efficacy and adverse events of vitamin D supplementation in chronic painful conditions. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to September 2009. This was supplemented by searching the reference lists of retrieved articles, textbooks and reviews. Selection criteria Studies were included if they were randomised double blind trials of vitamin D supplementation compared with placebo or with active comparators for the treatment of chronic pain conditions in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently selected the studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality, and extracted data. Pooled analysis was not undertaken due to paucity and heterogeneity of data. Main results Four studies, with a total of 294 participants, were included. The studies were heterogeneous with regard to study quality, the chronic painful conditions that were investigated, and the outcome measures reported. Only one study reported a beneficial effect, the others found no benefit of vitamin D over placebo in treating chronic pain. Authors’ conclusions The evidence base for the use of vitamin D for chronic pain in adults is poor at present. This is due to low quality and insufficient randomised controlled trials in this area of research. PMID:20091647

  12. The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of donepezil for the treatment of young adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Sommer, Barbara R; Handen, Benjamin L; Seltzer, Benjamin; Capone, George T; Spiridigliozzi, Gail A; Heller, James H; Richardson, Sharon; McRae, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the efficacy and safety of donepezil in young adults with Down syndrome (DS) but no evidence of Alzheimer disease (AD). A 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a 12-week, open-label extension was conducted. The intervention consisted of donepezil (5-10 mg/day) in young adults (aged 18-35 years) with DS, but no AD. The primary measure was the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) test and secondary measures were the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test for Children, and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Third Edition. At baseline, 123 subjects were randomly assigned treatment with donepezil or placebo. During the double-blind phase, SIB scores improved significantly from baseline in both groups, with no significant between-group differences. During the open-label phase, SIB scores in the original donepezil group remained stable; the original placebo group showed an improvement similar to that seen in the double-blind phase. VABS scores improved for donepezil, but not placebo, during the double-blind phase (observed cases, P = 0.03; last observation carried forward, P = 0.07). Post hoc responder analyses were significant for donepezil using three of five response definitions (P < or = 0.045). Adverse event rates were comparable to AD studies. In this first large-scale, multicenter trial of a pharmacological agent for DS, donepezil appears safe. Efficacy interpretation was limited for the primary measure due to apparent learning/practice and ceiling effects. Outcomes in post hoc analyses suggested efficacy in some, but not all subjects, consistent with phenotypic variability of DS. Additional studies are required to confirm potential benefits of donepezil in this population.

  13. Short-Term Treatment with Bisphenol-A Leads to Metabolic Abnormalities in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Thiago M.; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Vieira, Elaine; Amaral, Maria Esmeria C.; Cederroth, Christopher R.; Nef, Serge; Quesada, Ivan; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Nadal, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most widespread endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) used as the base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. Although evidence points to consider exposure to BPA as a risk factor for insulin resistance, its actions on whole body metabolism and on insulin-sensitive tissues are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of low doses of BPA in insulin-sensitive peripheral tissues and whole body metabolism in adult mice. Adult mice were treated with subcutaneous injection of 100 µg/kg BPA or vehicle for 8 days. Whole body energy homeostasis was assessed with in vivo indirect calorimetry. Insulin signaling assays were conducted by western blot analysis. Mice treated with BPA were insulin resistant and had increased glucose-stimulated insulin release. BPA-treated mice had decreased food intake, lower body temperature and locomotor activity compared to control. In skeletal muscle, insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor β subunit was impaired in BPA-treated mice. This impairment was associated with a reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the Thr308 residue. Both skeletal muscle and liver displayed an upregulation of IRS-1 protein by BPA. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was also impaired in the skeletal muscle from BPA-treated mice. In the liver, BPA effects were of lesser intensity with decreased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor β subunit. In conclusion, short-term treatment with low doses of BPA slows down whole body energy metabolism and disrupts insulin signaling in peripheral tissues. Thus, our findings support the notion that BPA can be considered a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22470480

  14. Neonatal DSP-4 treatment modifies GABAergic neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Aleksandra; Nowak, Przemyslaw; Brus, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) is a noradrenergic neurotoxin which selectively damages noradrenergic projections originating from the locus coeruleus (LC). DSP-4 treatment of rats on the first and third days after birth produces a long-lasting lesion of noradrenergic neurons in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In DSP-4-lesioned rats, studied as adults, we observed a decrease in norepinephrine content, with no significant change in the levels of dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). There is now a well established interaction between noradrenergic and GABAergic systems, whereby the noradrenergic system is involved in the regulation of basal GABA release, while GABAergic neurons simultaneously exert tonic inhibitory regulation of LC norepinephrine neurons. We examined GABAergic neurotransmission in the norepinephrine-denervated PFC for a better appreciation of the interaction between these two systems. Treatment with the GABA transaminase inhibitor vigabatrine (VGB) increased the GABA level of PFC (tissue content) in both intact and lesioned groups. Additionally, VGB increased extracellular GABA concentration in the PFC in both control and DSP-4-lesioned animals, but the elevation of GABA was 2-fold higher in DSP-4 lesioned rats. These findings indicate that neonatal DSP-4 treatment increases GABAergic neurotransmission in the PFC of rats in adulthood, perhaps by decreasing reactivity of central GABA(A) receptors.

  15. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  16. Prevalence of malocclusion traits and orthodontic treatment in a Finnish adult population.

    PubMed

    Krooks, Laura; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Kanavakis, Georgios; Lähdesmäki, Raija

    2016-07-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of malocclusion traits and the extent of orthodontic treatment in a Finnish adult population. Materials and methods The study population comprised subjects (n = 1964) from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 living in the city of Oulu and within 100 km of it. A clinical oral and dental examination with registration of occlusion was carried out in 2012 in connection with a 46-year follow-up survey. Data on previous orthodontic treatment were collected based on a questionnaire. Results In the clinical examination, 39.5% of the subjects had at least one malocclusion trait. The most common malocclusion traits were lateral crossbite (17.9%), overbite ≥ 6 mm (11.7%) and overjet ≥ 6 mm (9.7%). Crossbite on the left premolars, negative overjet and increased overbite were found more frequently in men. The prevalence of malocclusion traits was at the same level in treated and untreated groups. Overall, 18.6% of the subjects had undergone orthodontic treatment. Women showed a significantly higher prevalence of orthodontic treatment. Conclusions The most common malocclusion trait in the present study was lateral crossbite. Significant male dominance in the prevalence of malocclusion was observed, which has not been reported earlier in Finland. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion traits was more common among females in Northern Finland. This study indicates that orthodontic treatment provided in childhood was, on average, adequate in reducing malocclusion traits to the level observed in the general population.

  17. Adult educators' core competences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  18. Severe sepsis in older adults.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Reba; Callen, Bonnie; Brown, Mary Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis may be underrecognized in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review special considerations related to early detection of severe sepsis in older adults. Normal organ changes attributed to aging may delay early detection of sepsis at the time when interventions have the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. Systems are reviewed for changes. For example, the cardiovascular system may have a limited or absent compensatory response to inflammation after an infectious insult, and the febrile response and recruitment of white blood cells may be blunted because of immunosenescence in aging. Three of the 4 hallmark responses (temperature, heart rate, and white blood cell count) to systemic inflammation may be diminished in older adults as compared with younger adults. It is important to consider that older adults may not always manifest the typical systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Atypical signs such as confusion, decreased appetite, and unsteady gait may occur before sepsis related organ failure. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and a comparison of organ failure criteria were reviewed. Mortality rates in sepsis and severe sepsis remain high and are often complicated by multiple organ failures. As the numbers of older adults increase, early identification and prompt treatment is crucial in improving patient outcomes.

  19. Involved site radiation therapy for the treatment of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Portlock, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy technology has permitted the development of new treatment planning techniques. Involved field, involved node, and involved site radiotherapy fields are discussed and compared. Indications for and implications of combined modality therapy are examined, particularly as pertinent to the adolescent and young adult population. PMID:26767184

  20. Treatment of Chronic Breath-Holding in an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; Martens, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a clinical case study surrounding the behavioral assessment and operant treatment of, an adult with severe mental retardation who engaged in chronic breath-holding. In this clinical case, previous neurological and medical testing had ruled out biological bases for the individual's breath-holding. A functional behavioral assessment…

  1. Transitional Support for Adults with Severe Mental Illness: Critical Time Intervention and Its Roots in Assertive Community Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Professional social workers and other mental health providers have for many years been involved in delivering treatment and support services focused on the needs of adults with severe mental illnesses living in the community. While some models have evolved largely through practice experience, others have developed through research paradigms in…

  2. No effect of bicarbonate treatment on insulin sensitivity and glucose control in non-diabetic older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic mild metabolic acidosis is common among older adults, and limited evidence suggests that it may contribute to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. This analysis was conducted to determine whether bicarbonate supplementation, an alkalinizing treatment, improves insulin sensitivity or gluco...

  3. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Crossover Comparison of MK-0929 and Placebo in the Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivkin, Anna; Alexander, Robert C.; Knighton, Jennifer; Hutson, Pete H.; Wang, Xiaojing J.; Snavely, Duane B.; Rosah, Thomas; Watt, Alan P.; Reimherr, Fred W.; Adler, Lenard A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Preclinical models, receptor localization, and genetic linkage data support the role of D4 receptors in the etiology of ADHD. This proof-of-concept study was designed to evaluate MK-0929, a selective D4 receptor antagonist as treatment for adult ADHD. Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted…

  4. Use of the Internet to Obtain Drugs without a Prescription Among Treatment-involved Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Clements, Nicolle; Flynn, Anna B; Falco, Mathea; McLellan, A Thomas; Arria, Amelia M

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical use of prescription drugs is common and poses risks such as injury, overdose, and development of abuse and dependence. Internet pharmacies offer prescription drugs without a prescription, creating a source of illicit drugs accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. We examined this issue in a convenience sample of 1,860 adolescents and young adults from 24 residential and outpatient treatment programs. Few individuals obtained drugs from the Internet (n = 26, 2.3%). Pain relievers were the most frequently purchased type of drug. The majority of adolescents and young adult online purchasers made the purchases from their own or a friend's house.

  5. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  6. Perspectives from older adults receiving cancer treatment about the cancer-related information they receive

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Margaret I.; McAndrew, Alison; Harth, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cancer patients have reported that information plays a significant role in their capacity to cope with cancer and manage the consequences of treatment. This study was undertaken to identify the importance older adults receiving cancer treatment assign to selected types of cancer-related information, their satisfaction with the cancer-related information they received, and the barriers to effective information provision for this age group. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases with separate samples. Six hundred and eighty-four older cancer patients receiving treatment completed a standardized survey and 39 completed a semi-structured interview to gather perspectives about cancer-related information. Data were analyzed for 65-79 years and 80+ year groups. Results: Information topics about their medical condition, treatment options, and side effects of treatment were rated as most important by the older cancer patients. Women assigned a higher importance ratings than men to information overall (t = 4.8, P < 0.01). Although participants were generally satisfied with the information, they received many described challenges they experienced in communicating with health care professionals because of the medical language and fast pace of speaking used by the professionals. Conclusions: The older cancer patients in this study endorsed the same topics of cancer-related information as most important as has been reported in studies for other age groups. However, this older group recommended that, during their interactions with older individuals, health care professionals use fewer medical words, speak at a slower pace, and provide written information in addition to the actual conversation. PMID:27981110

  7. The Treatment of Adult Bipolar Disorder with Aripiprazole: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by exacerbations of opposite mood polarity, ranging from manic to major depressive episodes. In the current nosological system of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – 5th edition (DSM-5), it is conceptualized as a spectrum disorder consisting of bipolar disorder type I, bipolar disorder type II, cyclothymic disorder, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Treatment of all phases of this disorder is primarily with mood stabilizers, but many patients either show resistance to the conventional mood stabilizing medications or are intolerant to their side-effects. In this setting, second-generation antipsychotics have gained prominence as many bipolar subjects who are otherwise treatment refractory show response to these agents. Aripiprazole is a novel antipsychotic initially approved for the treatment of schizophrenia but soon found to be effective in bipolar disorder. This drug is well studied, as randomized controlled trials have been conducted in various phases of bipolar disorders. Aripiprazole exhibits the pharmacodynamic properties of partial agonism, functional selectivity, and serotonin-dopamine activity modulation – the new exemplars in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders. It is the first among a new series of psychotropic medications, which now also include brexpiprazole and cariprazine. The current review summarizes the data from controlled trials regarding the efficacy and safety of aripiprazole in adult bipolar patients. On the basis of this evidence, aripiprazole is found to be efficacious in the treatment and prophylaxis of manic and mixed episodes but has no effectiveness in acute and recurrent bipolar depression. PMID:27190727

  8. Quantifying treatment delays in adolescents and young adults with cancer at McGill University

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Stavrides-Eid, M.; Baig, A.; Cardoso, M.; Rho, Y.S.; Shams, W.M.; Mamo, A.; Kavan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since the end of the 1980s, the magnitude of survival prolongation or mortality reduction has not been the same for adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer as for their older and younger counterparts. Precise reasons for those observations are unknown, but the differences have been attributed in part to delays in diagnosis and treatment. In 2003 at the Jewish General Hospital, we developed the first Canadian multidisciplinary aya oncology clinic to better serve this unique patient population. The aim of the present study was to develop an approach to quantify diagnosis delays in our aya patients and to study survival in relation to the observed delay. Methods: In a retrospective chart review, we collected information about delays, treatment efficacy, and obstacles to treatment for patients seen at our aya clinic. Results: From symptom onset, median time to first health care contact was longer for girls and young women (62 days) than for boys and young men (6 days). Median time from symptom onset to treatment was 173 days; time from first health care contact to diagnosis was the largest contributor to that duration. Delays in diagnosis were shorter for patients who initially presented to the emergency room, but compared with patients whose first health contact was of another type, patients presenting to the emergency room were 3 times more likely to die from their disease. Conclusions: Delays in diagnosis are frequently reported in ayas with cancer, but the duration of the delay was unrelated to survival in our sample. Application of this approach to larger prospective samples is warranted to better understand the relation between treatment delay and survival in ayas—and in other cancer patient groups. PMID:26715885

  9. Adult Brtl/+ Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Demonstrates Anabolic Response to Sclerostin Antibody Treatment with Increased Bone Mass and Strength

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P.; White, Logan E.; Salemi, Joseph D.; Ominsky, Michael S.; Caird, Michelle S.; Marini, Joan C.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable collagen-related bone dysplasia, characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk. Although OI fracture risk is greatest before puberty, adults with OI remain at risk of fracture. Anti-resorptive bisphosphonates are commonly used to treat adult OI, but have shown mixed efficacy. New treatments which consistently improve bone mass throughout the skeleton may improve patient outcomes. Neutralizing antibodies to sclerostin (Scl-Ab) are a novel anabolic therapy that have shown efficacy in preclinical studies by stimulating bone formation via the canonical wnt signaling pathway. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Scl-Ab in an adult 6 mo old Brtl/+ model of OI that harbors a typical heterozygous OI-causing Gly>Cys substitution on Col1a1. Methods 6mo old WT and Brtl/+ mice were treated with Scl-Ab (25mg/kg, 2x/week) or Veh for 5 weeks. OCN and TRACP5b serum assays, dynamic histomorphometry, microCT and mechanical testing were performed. Results Adult Brtl/+ mice demonstrated a strong anabolic response to Scl-Ab with increased serum osteocalcin and bone formation rate. This anabolic response led to improved trabecular and cortical bone mass in the femur. Mechanical testing revealed Scl-Ab increased Brtl/+ femoral stiffness and strength. Conclusion Scl-Ab was successfully anabolic in an adult Brtl/+ model of OI. PMID:24803333

  10. The State of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Ted

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author looks at the state of adult education in Ireland. He is suggesting that the state here means both the condition in which one now finds adult education and the role of the Irish State in adult education. He briefly outlines some recent developments in adult education, makes some critical comments on the state of adult…

  11. The ABC's of Adult Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrig, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy, it is estimated that 93 million adults in the United States have basic or below basic literacy skills. Those individuals found most lacking in literacy skills were adults living in poverty, adults lacking a high school diploma, seniors and the elderly aged 65 and older, the more than one…

  12. Designing an Adult Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Margaret

    Intended for planners of adult education curriculums, this literature review explains the concepts involved in designing an adult education program, provides information about the roles of the people involved in the adult education process, cites some program planning models, and applies the program planning principles to an Adult Basic Education…

  13. The Adult Learner: Four Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Topics concerning the adult learner that are relevant to institutional researchers are addressed in four articles: marketing, predicting success for adult students, enrollment projection, and follow-up studies of adult learners. In "Institutional Research in Support of Marketing the Adult Student," Lydia Jurand notes the importance of…

  14. Rich Environments for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentham, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Unaware of the messages a bare adult learning environment sends and its effect on adult learners, a trainer attends an intensive Reggio Emilia course and learns that the physical environment is the "third teacher"--for adults as well as for children. Using principles of Reggio, she offers suggestions for enhancing adult learning spaces and…

  15. Clinical features and diagnosis of adult atopic keratoconjunctivitis and the effect of treatment with sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, J L

    1981-01-01

    This study describes 17 cases of atopic keratoconjunctivitis in adults. In 8 cases the clinical appearances were nonspecific and sufficiently different from vernal keratoconjunctivitis to make diagnosis difficult. These atypical cases often showed a fine papillary conjunctival reaction on the upper tarsus, subconjunctival scarring, and in 1 case severe symblepharon. Corneal features included corneal microcysts, peripheral vascularisation, and various patterns of punctate epithelial keratitis. It was therefore important to establish the atopic status of the patient. A personal or family history of other atopic disease was elicited in every case, and the diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of raised serum IgE level. Uncontrolled clinical assessment suggested that 10 out of 15 patients experienced improvement in symptoms with the use of 2% sodium cromoglycate eyedrops 4 times a day. A subsequent double-masked cross-over trial comparing the same treatment with a matched placebo preparation indicated that 6 out of 9 patients preferred sodium cromoglycate while 1 preferred the placebo. Two patients noted no difference. Cases showing nonspecific or atypical clinical features responded to treatment just as frequently as did cases of typical vernal keratoconjunctivitis. Images PMID:6788069

  16. Fracture-dislocation of the humeral condyles in adults: results of surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Bentounsi, Abdelhakim

    2015-09-01

    Fracture-dislocation of the humeral condyle is exceptional in adults. The purpose was to analyze the results of surgical treatment by open reduction and internal fixation without ligamentous repair. There were six men with an average age of 31 years. According to the AO classification, five fractures were classified as AO type B1 and one as B2. Dislocation was reduced in emergency before osteosynthesis. Postoperatively, the joint was held immobile with a brace for 25.40 days. Five patients were reviewed after a mean follow-up of 52.96 months. The median arc of flexion/extension was 104.80° and 157.8° for pronation-supination. All elbows were stable and all fractures were consolidated. Two elbows were painful. The results were satisfactory in five patients. The elbow stability can be ensured only by the synthesis of bone structures. Surgical treatment should restore exact anatomy between the condyle and trochlea. This protocol may provide a joint stability and satisfactory results.

  17. Substance abuse treatment utilization among adults living with HIV/AIDS and alcohol or drug problems.

    PubMed

    Orwat, John; Saitz, Richard; Tompkins, Christopher P; Cheng, Debbie M; Dentato, Michael P; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2011-10-01

    This is a prospective cohort study to identify factors associated with receipt of substance abuse treatment (SAT) among adults with alcohol problems and HIV/AIDS. Data from the HIV Longitudinal Interrelationships of Viruses and Ethanol study were analyzed. Generalized estimating equation logistic regression models were fit to identify factors associated with any service utilization. An alcohol dependence diagnosis had a negative association with SAT (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.19-0.67), as did identifying sexual orientation other than heterosexual (AOR = 0.46, CI = 0.29-0.72) and having social supports that use alcohol/drugs (AOR = 0.62, CI = 0.45-0.83). Positive associations with SAT include presence of hepatitis C antibody (AOR = 3.37, CI = 2.24-5.06), physical or sexual abuse (AOR = 2.12, CI = 1.22-3.69), social supports that help with sobriety (AOR = 1.92, CI = 1.28-2.87), homelessness (AOR = 2.40, CI = 1.60-3.62), drug dependence diagnosis (AOR = 2.64, CI = 1.88-3.70), and clinically important depressive symptoms (AOR = 1.52, CI = 1.08-2.15). While reassuring that factors indicating need for SAT among people with HIV and alcohol problems (e.g., drug dependence) are associated with receipt, nonneed factors (e.g., sexual orientation, age) that should not decrease likelihood of receipt of treatment were identified.

  18. Treatment and restoration of adult dentoalveolar trauma: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Penarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Penarrocha-Diago, María; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Adult dentoalveolar trauma most often occurs in the context of sports activities and traffic accidents. Coronal fractures are the most common type of lesion, followed by tooth luxation. We present the case of a 25-year-old woman who suffered alveolar bone damage and coronal fractures of the upper incisors, with extrusive luxation of the right central incisor, as the result of a fall. On the first visit, manual reduction of the buccal plate was carried out under local anesthesia, with repositioning of the right central incisor and splinting to the neighboring teeth. Composites were used to restore the coronal fractures. After one month, both upper central incisors and the right lateral incisor were subjected to endodontic treatment. Internal bleaching of the right lateral incisor was also carried out, due to pigmentation secondary to pulp necrosis. At follow-up 5 months later, the alveolar bone fracture was seen to have healed. Definitive anterior restorative treatment with porcelain veneers was therefore carried out. After two years the patient remains asymptomatic and in good dental condition. Key words:Dental trauma, extrusive luxation, dento-alveolar fracture, esthetic restoration. PMID:27957283

  19. Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence: Knowledge and Experiences among Adolescents and Young Adults in Soweto, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Celokuhle; Laher, Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) management of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is particularly pertinent to sub-Saharan Africa, where the pediatric HIV burden is marked. Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence is a major challenge for AYAs. This qualitative study explored knowledge and experiences of adherence amongst AYAs attending treatment at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit (PHRU), Soweto, South Africa. Four focus group discussions (FGDs) and eight in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with HIV-infected 15–25-year-old ART recipients. Transcripts were coded thematically. Participants (n = 26) were aged median 18.5 years, 59.1% female and 69.2% virally suppressed <400 cp/ml. Three main themes emerged during FGDs and IDIs: (i) correct knowledge about how to be adherent, benefits, and nonadherence consequences, (ii) social, personal, and medication-related barriers to adherence, and (iii) reminder, concealment, and motivational strategies to optimize adherence. Interventions to improve AYA adherence could focus on practical strategies, including status disclosure and medication concealment.

  20. Treatment of a giant congenital melanocytic nevus in the adult: review of the current management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Su, Jeannie J; Chang, Daniel K; Mailey, Brian; Gosman, Amanda

    2015-05-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMNs) create cosmetic disfigurements and pose risk for malignant transformation. Adult GCMN cases are uncommon because most families opt for surgical treatment during childhood. We review the current literature on GCMN and present an interesting case of an adult with a GCMN encompassing the entire back with painful nodules exhibiting gross involvement of his back musculature, without pathologic evidence of malignancy. Surgical management was deferred in childhood because of parental desires to allow the patient to make his own decision, and treatment in adulthood was pursued on the basis of the significant impairment of the patient's quality of life and self-esteem due to the massive size and deforming nature of the nevus. The treatment strategy used for this young adult male patient involved a massive en bloc excision of the GCMN with partial resection of the latissimus dorsi, followed by a 5-week staged reconstructive process using dermal regenerative matrices and split-thickness skin grafting. Because of the shift in GCMN management from early surgical management to more conservative management, we may see an increase in adult cases of GCMN. Thus, it is critical to better understand the controversy surrounding early versus delayed management of GCMN.

  1. Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Peacock, Elizabeth; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Bryans, Roland; Danis, Normand; Furlan, Andrea; Marcoux, Henri; Potter, Brock; Ruegg, Rick; Gross Stein, Janice; White, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized. OPTIONS Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. OUTCOMES The primary outcomes considered were improved (reduced and less intrusive) pain and improved (increased and easier) ranges of motion (ROM) of the adult cervical spine. EVIDENCE An “extraction” team recorded evidence from articles found by literature search teams using 4 separate literature searches, and rated it using a Table adapted from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. The searches were 1) Treatment; August, 2003, using MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, MANTIS, ICL, The Cochrane Library (includes CENTRAL), and EBSCO, identified 182 articles. 2) Risk management (adverse events); October, 2004, identified 230 articles and 2 texts. 3) Risk management (dissection); September, 2003, identified 79 articles. 4) Treatment update; a repeat of the treatment search for articles published between September, 2003 and November, 2004 inclusive identified 121 articles. VALUES To enable the search of the literature, the authors (Guidelines Development Committee [GDC]) regarded chiropractic treatment as including elements of “conservative” care in the search strategies, but not in the consideration of the range of chiropractic practice. Also, knowledge based only on clinical experience was considered less valid and reliable than good-caliber evidence, but where the caliber of the relevant evidence was low or it was non-existent, unpublished clinical experience was considered to be equivalent to

  2. Biofeedback for treatment of awake and sleep bruxism in adults: systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bruxism is a disorder of jaw-muscle activity characterised by repetitive clenching or grinding of the teeth which results in discomfort and damage to dentition. The two clinical manifestations of the condition (sleep and awake bruxism) are thought to have unrelated aetiologies but are palliated using similar techniques. The lack of a definitive treatment has prompted renewed interest in biofeedback, a behaviour change method that uses electronic detection to provide a stimulus whenever bruxism occurs. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of research into biofeedback for bruxism; to assess the efficacy and acceptability of biofeedback therapy in management of awake bruxism and, separately, sleep bruxism in adults; and to compare findings between the two variants. Methods A systematic review of published literature examining biofeedback as an intervention directed at controlling primary bruxism in adults. We will search electronic databases and the grey literature using a predefined search strategy to identify randomised and non-randomised studies, technical reports and patents. Searches will not be restricted by language or date and will be expanded through contact with authors and experts, and by following up reference lists and citations. Two authors, working independently, will conduct screening of search results, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment and a third will resolve any disagreements. The primary outcomes of acceptability and effectiveness will be assessed using only randomised studies, segregated by bruxism subtype. A meta-analysis of these data will be conducted only if pre-defined conditions for quality and heterogeneity are met, otherwise the data will be summarized in narrative form. Data from non-randomised studies will be used to augment a narrative synthesis of the state of technical developments and any safety-related issues. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013006880

  3. Prescription use disorders in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kalapatapu, Raj K; Sullivan, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    The number of older adults needing substance abuse treatment is projected to rise significantly in the next few decades. This paper will focus on the epidemic of prescription use disorders in older adults. Particular vulnerabilities of older adults to addiction will be considered. Specifically, the prevalence and patterns of use of opioids, stimulants, and benzodiazepines will be explored, including the effects of these substances on morbidity and mortality. Treatment intervention strategies will be briefly discussed, and areas for future research are suggested.

  4. Franklian psychotherapy with adults molested as children.

    PubMed

    Lantz, J; Lantz, J

    1992-12-01

    A Franklian approach to treatment with adults who were molested as children recognizes that the trauma client's experiences of trauma and terror as a child can be transformed to discover real meaning potentials in the adult's daily life. In this paper the authors present a five-stage treatment approach based upon the Logotherapy concepts of Viktor Frankl which they have found to be helpful with adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Case material is presented to illustrate the described intervention approach.

  5. Adult-onset Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Amrinder Jit

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset atopic dermatitis is still an under recognized condition as there are only few studies regarding this entity. As compared to childhood onset atopic dermatitis, clinical features of adult onset atopic dermatitis are still not categorized. Adult atopic dermatitis can present for the first time in adult age with atypical morphology or may progress from childhood onset. This article reviews the characteristic clinical features of adult atopic dermatitis, associated risk factors and management. PMID:27904186

  6. Adding chemo after radiation treatment improves survival for adults with a type of brain tumor

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain tumor, who received chemotherapy following completion of radiation therapy lived longer than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to long-term follow-up results from a NIH-supported random

  7. Prevalence, Associated Factors and Treatment of Sleep Problems in Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Wouw, E.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    In people with intellectual disability (ID), impaired sleep is common. Life expectancy has increased in this group, and it is known that in general population sleep deteriorates with aging. Therefore the aims of this systematic review were to examine how sleep problems are defined in research among adults and older people with ID, and to collect…

  8. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood and Anxiety for Adults in Treatment for Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurer, Mattye; van der Vennet, Renée

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether art production or viewing and sorting art reproductions would be more effective in reducing negative mood and anxiety for 28 adults with substance use disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups and completed pre- and posttest measures of negative mood and anxiety The hypothesis that art…

  9. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  10. Antimicrobial treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in noncatheterized adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dull, Ryan B; Friedman, Stacey K; Risoldi, Zara M; Rice, Eric C; Starlin, Richard C; Destache, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a common clinical finding characterized by the presence of bacteria in the urine of an individual without signs or symptoms suggestive of urinary tract infection. Despite available guidelines on the diagnosis and management of ASB, it is often managed inappropriately. We performed a systematic review of clinical trials evaluating antimicrobial therapy for ASB, identified translational barriers to evidence-based practice, and we offer strategies to optimize antimicrobial use for ASB. We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health databases, and the Cochrane Library. Randomized controlled trials, cohort trials, case-control studies, and meta-analyses published in the English language were included in this review if they addressed treatment of ASB with at least one antimicrobial agent in nonpregnant adults. Articles were excluded if they evaluated patients with indwelling urinary catheters or were not clinical trials. Of the 304 articles identified from the search, 287 were excluded; thus 17 articles met the inclusion criteria. Although treatment of ASB with antimicrobial therapy may improve short-term microbiologic outcomes, the clinical significance is diminished because the effect is not sustained, there is no measurable improvement in morbidity or mortality, and some data indicate that therapy is deleterious. Several translational barriers that preclude adoption of evidence-based practice are identified. Treatment guidelines may not achieve their desired effect and underscore the need for additional methods to translate clinical trial data into practice. Clinical pharmacists are a core member of the antimicrobial stewardship team and in an important position to participate in initiatives that promote appropriate antimicrobial use. We suggest a multifaceted approach consisting of education and frequent routine prospective audits with feedback

  11. Antidiabetic-drug combination treatment for glucose intolerance in adult female rats treated acutely with olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Boyda, Heidi N; Procyshyn, Ric M; Asiri, Yahya; Wu, Claire; Wang, Cathy K; Lo, Ryan; Pang, Catherine C Y; Honer, William G; Barr, Alasdair M

    2014-01-03

    Second generation antipsychotic drugs are routinely used as treatment for psychotic disorders. Many of these compounds, including olanzapine, cause metabolic side-effects such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Individual antidiabetic drugs can help control elevated glucose levels in patients treated with antipsychotics, but the effects of combining antidiabetics, which routinely occurs with Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, have never been studied. Presently, we compared the effects of the three different antidiabetics metformin (500mg/kg, p.o.), rosiglitazone (30mg/kg, p.o.) and glyburide (10mg/kg, p.o.) on metabolic dysregulation in adult female rats treated acutely with olanzapine. In addition, dual combinations of each of these antidiabetics were compared head-to-head against each other and the individual drugs. The animals received two daily treatments with antidiabetics and were then treated acutely with olanzapine (10mg/kg, i.p.). Fasting glucose and insulin levels were measured, followed by a 2h glucose tolerance test. Olanzapine caused a large and highly significant glucose intolerance compared to vehicle treated rats. Rosiglitazone decreased glucose levels non-significantly, while both metformin and glyburide significantly decreased glucose levels compared to olanzapine-only treated animals. For antidiabetic dual-drug combinations, the rosiglitazone-metformin group showed an unexpected increase in glucose levels compared to all of the single antidiabetic drugs. However, both the metformin-glyburide and rosiglitazone-glyburide groups showed significantly greater reductions in glucose levels following olanzapine than with single drug treatment alone for metformin or rosiglitazone, bringing glucose levels down to values equivalent to vehicle-only treated animals. These findings indicate that further study of antidiabetic dual-drug combinations in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs is warranted.

  12. Cancer treatment, symptom monitoring, and self-care in adults: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Phoebe Dauz; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Ducey, Kathleen; Badura, Jody; Boltz, Kristin D; Olberding, Karmen; Wingate, Anita; Williams, Arthur R

    2006-01-01

    A descriptive study was conducted on self-reported symptoms and self-care by 37 adults receiving chemotherapy primarily for leukemia, lymphomas, or breast cancer or radiation therapy for head and neck or lung cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist and demographic and interview forms on self-care for identified symptoms were used. Severe symptoms on the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist subscales fatigue, eating, nausea, pain, numbness in fingers/toes, hair loss, and constipation were reported by patients on chemotherapy. Those on radiation therapy reported severe symptoms on the eating, fatigue, skin changes, oropharynx, and constipation subscales.Self-care strategies were in the following categories, using complementary medicine as framework: diet/nutrition/lifestyle change (eg, use of nutritional supplements; modifications of food and of eating habits; naps, sleep, and rest); mind/body control (eg, relaxation methods, prayer, music, attending granddaughter's sports events); biologic treatments (vitamins); herbal treatments (green mint tea); and ethnomedicine (lime juice and garlic). The first category was predominantly used by patients in both treatment types. Medications were prescribed also to help control symptoms (eg, pain and nausea). Symptom monitoring and self-care for symptoms identified may be facilitated by the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist; based on reported symptom severity, care providers may prioritize interventions. A larger study needs to be done on (a) the use of the Therapy-Related Symptom Checklist as a clinical tool to assess symptoms that oncology patients experience during therapy; (b) whether care providers, based on patient-reported symptom severity, can prioritize interventions--and how this influences the efficiency of care; (c) the self-care strategies used by patients on chemotherapy or radiation therapy or both; and (d) how useful these strategies are in alleviating symptoms.

  13. Does Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Treatment in Adolescence Alter Adult Quality of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Płaszewski, Maciej; Cieśliński, Igor; Kowalski, Paweł; Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Nowobilski, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Health-related quality of life in adults, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific exercise program, was not previously studied. Design. Cross-sectional study, with retrospective data collection. Material and Methods. Homogenous groups of 68 persons (43 women) aged 30.10 (25–39) years, with mild or moderate scoliosis, and 76 (38 women) able-bodied persons, aged 30.11 (24–38) years, who 16.5 (12–26) years earlier had completed scoliosis-specific exercise or observation regimes, participated. Their respiratory characteristics did not differ from predicted values. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and pain scale (VAS) were applied. Results. The transformed WHOQOL-BREF scores ranged from 54.6 ± 11.19 in the physical domain in the mild scoliotic subgroup to 77.1 ± 16.05 in the social domain in the able-bodied subgroup. The ODQ values did not generally exceed 5.3 ± 7.53. Inter- and intragroup differences were nonsignificant. Age, marital status, education, and gender were significantly associated with the ODQ scores. Significant association between the ODQ and WHOQOL-BREF social relationships domain scores with the participation in exercise treatment was found. Conclusions. Participants with the history of exercise treatment generally did not differ significantly from their peers who were only under observation. This study cannot conclude that scoliosis-specific exercise treatment in adolescence alters quality of life in adulthood. PMID:25436225

  14. Recommended Patient-Reported Core Set of Symptoms to Measure in Adult Cancer Treatment Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sandra A.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Basch, Ethan; Cella, David; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Minasian, Lori M.; Denicoff, Andrea M.; O’Mara, Ann M.; Fisch, Michael J.; Chauhan, Cynthia; Aaronson, Neil K.; Coens, Corneel; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Cancer Institute’s Symptom Management and Health-Related Quality of Life Steering Committee held a clinical trials planning meeting (September 2011) to identify a core symptom set to be assessed across oncology trials for the purposes of better understanding treatment efficacy and toxicity and to facilitate cross-study comparisons. We report the results of an evidence-synthesis and consensus-building effort that culminated in recommendations for core symptoms to be measured in adult cancer clinical trials that include a patient-reported outcome (PRO). Methods We used a data-driven, consensus-building process. A panel of experts, including patient representatives, conducted a systematic review of the literature (2001–2011) and analyzed six large datasets. Results were reviewed at a multistakeholder meeting, and a final set was derived emphasizing symptom prevalence across diverse cancer populations, impact on health outcomes and quality of life, and attribution to either disease or anticancer treatment. Results We recommend that a core set of 12 symptoms—specifically fatigue, insomnia, pain, anorexia (appetite loss), dyspnea, cognitive problems, anxiety (includes worry), nausea, depression (includes sadness), sensory neuropathy, constipation, and diarrhea—be considered for inclusion in clinical trials where a PRO is measured. Inclusion of symptoms and other patient-reported endpoints should be well justified, hypothesis driven, and meaningful to patients. Conclusions This core set will promote consistent assessment of common and clinically relevant disease- and treatment-related symptoms across cancer trials. As such, it provides a foundation to support data harmonization and continued efforts to enhance measurement of patient-centered outcomes in cancer clinical trials and observational studies. PMID:25006191

  15. Assessment of metabolic flexibility of old and adult mice using three noninvasive, indirect calorimetry-based treatments.

    PubMed

    Duivenvoorde, Loes P M; van Schothorst, Evert M; Swarts, Hans J M; Keijer, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    Indirect calorimetry (InCa) can potentially be used to noninvasively assess metabolic and age-related flexibility. To assess the use of InCa for this purpose, we tested the sensitivity and response stability over time of three InCa-based treatments in old versus adult mice. Diurnal patterns of respiratory exchange ratio were followed for 24 hours under standard conditions (Treatment 1), but the results were not stable between test periods. As a challenge, fasted mice received glucose to test switch-effectiveness from fat to glucose oxidation (Treatment 2). No differences between groups were observed, although old mice showed higher adiposity and lower white adipose tissue (WAT) mitochondrial density, indicative of age-impaired metabolic health. Lastly, adaptation to a challenge of oxygen restriction (OxR, 14.5% O2) was assessed as a novel approach (Treatment 3). This treatment stably detected significant differences: old mice did not maintain reduced oxygen consumption under OxR during both test periods, whereas adult mice did. Further biochemical and gene expression analyses showed that OxR affected glucose and lactate homeostasis in liver and WAT of adult mice, supporting the observed differences in oxygen consumption. In conclusion, InCa analysis of the response to OxR in mice is a sensitive and reproducible treatment to noninvasively measure age-impaired metabolic health.

  16. [Review of psychopharmacological treatments in adolescents and adults with autistic disorders].

    PubMed

    Baghdadli, A; Gonnier, V; Aussilloux, C

    2002-01-01

    Autism is an early developmental disorder. It leads to severe and durable disturbances. Given this problem, no treatment can be excluded a priori. Thus, many approaches are used to deal with autistic disorders. In France, pharmacological treatments are, for instance, largely and mostly used in adults. In the USA, these treatments concern 50% of persons with autism of any age. Nevertheless, they are rarely based on controlled studies. At the present, however, prescriptions and expected effects appear to be hard to localize. Furthermore, only few controlled studies validate their use. Aim - We offer a review of studies about medical treatments used in adolescents and adults with autism. They are classified in 3 categories: the first (category I) includes drugs used for their neurochemical effects focusing on autistic signs. The second (category II) covers drugs used for treatment of behavioural disorders frequently associated with autism. The third (category III) corresponds to a wide range of drugs or vitamins for wich only few case studies exist reporting irregular positive effects. The main hypothesis of this review is that autism involves a dysfunction of the neuromediation systems. This hypothesis opens new perspectives in the research of medical treatments in autism by focusing on molecules, which are supposed to have an effect on neuromediation systems. Method - Our review is based on studies, which have been published during the past twenty years. For many studies, data are limited to adolescents and adults. So we expanded our review to data available in children. The data bases that we have used are medline and psyclit. Keywords have been chosen according to: pharmacological considerations (psychotropic, psychoactive drugs, psychopharmacology) and clinical symptoms (autism, automutilations, aggressive behavior, and hyperactivity). Hypothesis of a dysfunction in the neuromediation systems in autism - Many studies exist about biochemical abnormalities in

  17. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    PubMed

    Emonet, Stéphane; Harbarth, Stephan; van Delden, Christian

    2011-04-27

    Urinary tract infections are commonly seen by general practitioners. Quinolones are frequently prescribed in this setting. The emergence of resistance to these antibiotics has led to new guidelines for the management of uncomplicated UTI, based on the use of fosfomycin and furadantine. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment of urinary tract infections in adults.

  18. Neurocognitive Deficits Associated with Antisocial Personality Disorder in Non-treatment-seeking Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Samuel R; Derbyshire, Katie L; Leppink, Eric W; Grant, Jon E

    2016-06-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is a relatively common problem, but the neuropsychological profile of affected individuals has seldom been studied outside of criminal justice recruitment settings. Non-treatment-seeking young adults (18-29 years) were recruited from the general community by media advertisements. Participants with ASPD (n = 17), free from substance use disorders, were compared with matched controls (n = 229) using objective computerized neuropsychological tasks tapping a range of cognitive domains. Compared with controls, individuals with ASPD showed significantly elevated pathological gambling symptoms, previous illegal acts, unemployment, greater nicotine consumption, and relative impairments in response inhibition (Stop-Signal Task) and decision-making (less risk adjustment, Cambridge Gamble Task). General response speed, set-shifting, working memory, and executive planning were intact. ASPD was also associated with higher impulsivity and venturesomeness on the Eysenck Questionnaire. These findings implicate impaired inhibitory control and decision-making in the pathophysiology of ASPD, even in milder manifestations of the disorder. Future work should explore the neural correlates of these impairments and use longitudinal designs to examine the temporal relationship between these deficits, antisocial behavior, and functional impairment.

  19. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness

    PubMed Central

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung. PMID:24520532

  20. [Nutritional implications on treatment and recovery of adult patients with chronic diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Dichi, I; Papini-Berto, S J; Dichi, J B; Di Lello, A; Victória, C R; Burini, R C

    1991-01-01

    The nutritional assessment by 24 hour-dietary recall, anthropometry and blood-components measurements was undertaken in 23 adult patients, 17 males and 6 females suffering of chronic diarrhea from pancreatitis (30%), inflammatory bowel disease (22%), short intestine syndrome (9%) and unknown diarrhea (35%). The nutritional assessment was done at the entry and repeated at the discharge of the hospitalization that averaged 35 days, during which the patients received specific medical treatment along with obstipating diets. The hospitalization resulted in overall improvement of the patients either clinically by reducing their defecation rate or nutritionally by increasing their protein-energy intake and the values of anthropometry and blood components (albumin, free-tryptophan and lymphocytes). When the patients where divided into two groups based on their fecal-fat output one could note the better nutritional response of the group showing steatorrhea than the non-steatorrhea group, with the serum albumin and the arm-muscle circumference being discriminatory between groups. However even in the better recovered patients the indicative values of a satisfactory nutritional status were not accomplished. Thus, these data suggest that besides the overall nutritional improvement seen in the studied chronic diarrhea patients the full-nutrition recovering would demand either or both a longer hospitalization and/or an early-aggressive nutritional support.

  1. Adverse Late and Long-Term Treatment Effects in Adult Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, Kara

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become the standard of care for many malignant and nonmalignant hematologic diseases that don't respond to traditional therapy. There are two types: autologous transplantation (auto-HSCT), in which an individual's stem cells are collected, stored, and infused back into that person; and allogeneic transplantation (allo-HSCT), in which healthy donor stem cells are infused into a recipient whose bone marrow has been damaged or destroyed. There have been numerous advancements in this field, leading to marked increases in the number of transplants performed annually. This article--the first of several on cancer survivorship--focuses on the care of adult allo-HSCT survivors because of the greater complexity of their posttransplant course. The author summarizes potential adverse late and long-term treatment-related effects, with special focus on the evaluation and management of several cardiovascular disease risk factors that can occur either independently or concurrently as part of the metabolic syndrome. These risk factors are potentially modifiable with appropriate nursing interventions and lifestyle modifications.

  2. Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood brain tumors: Life after treatment in their own words

    PubMed Central

    Hobbie, Wendy L.; Ogle, Sue; Reilly, Maureen; Barakat, Lamia; Lucas, Matthew S.; Ginsberg, Jill P.; Fisher, Michael J.; Volpe, Ellen M.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date there are few studies that examine the perspectives of older survivors of childhood brain tumors who are living with their families in terms of their sense of self and their role in their families. Objective To describe how adolescent and young adult survivors (AYA) of childhood brain tumors describe their HRQOL, that is their physical, emotional, and social functioning. Methods This qualitative descriptive study included a purposive sample of 41 AYA survivors of a childhood brain tumor who live with their families. Home interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. Directed content analytic techniques were used to analyze data using HRQOL as a framework. Results This group of brain tumor survivors described their everyday lives in terms of their physical health, neurocognitive functioning, emotional health, social functioning, and self-care abilities. Overall, survivors struggle for normalcy in the face of changed functioning due to their cancer and the (late) effects of their treatment. Conclusions Neurocognitive issues seemed most compelling in the narratives. The importance of families went beyond the resources, structure, and support for functioning. Their families provided the recognition that they were important beings and their existence mattered to someone. Implications for Practice The value and complexity of care coordination was highlighted by the multifaceted needs of the survivors. Advocacy for appropriate and timely educational, vocational, and social support is critical as part of comprehensive cancer survivorship care. PMID:25950583

  3. No effect of bicarbonate treatment on insulin sensitivity and glucose control in non-diabetic older adults

    PubMed Central

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mild metabolic acidosis is common among older adults, and limited evidence suggests that it may contribute to insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. This analysis was conducted to determine whether bicarbonate supplementation, an alkalinizing treatment, improves insulin sensitivity or glucose control in non-diabetic older adults. Fasting blood glucose and insulin were measured in stored samples from subjects who had completed a 3-month clinical trial of bicarbonate supplementation to improve indicators of bone and muscle health. One hundred and fifty three ambulatory, non-diabetic adults aged 50 years and older were studied. Subjects were randomized to one of two bicarbonate groups (67.5 mmol/day of potassium bicarbonate or sodium bicarbonate) or to one of two no-bicarbonate groups (67.5 mmol/day of placebo or potassium chloride). Subjects remained on treatment throughout the 3-month study. The primary outcome measures were changes in fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin and HOMA-IR, an index of insulin resistance. Bicarbonate supplementation reduced net acid excretion (adjusted mean ± SEM for the change in NAE/creatinine, mmol/mmol, was 0.23 ± 0.22 in the no-bicarbonate group compared with −3.53 ± 0.22 in the bicarbonate group, P<0.001) but had no effect on fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin, or HOMA-IR. In conclusion, bicarbonate supplementation does not appear to improve insulin sensitivity or glucose control in non-diabetic older adults. PMID:21046483

  4. Partner Disclosure and Early CD4 Response among HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment in Nairobi Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, T. Tony; Yatich, Nelly; Ngomoa, Richard; McGrath, Christine J.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Sakr, Samah R.; Langat, Agnes; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Chung, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disclosure of HIV serostatus can have significant benefits for people living with HIV/AIDS. However, there is limited data on whether partner disclosure influences ART treatment response. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of newly diagnosed, ART-naïve HIV-infected adults (>18 years) who enrolled at the Coptic Hope Center in Nairobi, Kenya between January 1st 2009 and July 1st 2011 and initiated ART within 3 months. Analysis was restricted to adults who reported to have either disclosed or not disclosed their HIV status to their partner. Analysis of CD4 response at 6 and 12 months post-ART was stratified by age group. Results Among 615 adults newly initiating ART with partner disclosure data and 12 month follow-up, mean age was 38 years and 52% were male; 76% reported that they had disclosed their HIV-status to their partner. Those who disclosed were significantly younger and more likely to be married/cohabitating than non-disclosers. At baseline, median CD4 counts were similar between disclosure groups. Among younger adults (< 38 years) those who disclosed had higher CD4 recovery than those who did not at 6 months post- ART (mean difference = 31, 95% CI 3 to 58 p = 0.03) but not at 12 months (mean difference = 17, 95% CI -19 to 52, p = 0.4). Among older adults (≥ 38years) there was no observed difference in CD4 recovery at 6 or 12 months between disclosure groups. Conclusion Among younger adults, disclosure of HIV status to partners may be associated with CD4 recovery following ART. PMID:27711164

  5. Perceived dental treatment need among older Tanzanian adults – a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Åstrøm, Anne N; Kida, Irene A

    2007-01-01

    Background Need perceptions for dental care play a key role as to whether people in general will seek dental care. The aim was to assess the prevalence of perceived need of problem based dental care, dental check-ups and any type of dental care. Guided by the conceptual model of Wilson and Cleary, the relationship of perceived need for dental care with socio-demographic characteristics, clinically defined dental problems and self-reported oral health outcomes was investigated. Partial prosthetic treatment need was estimated using a socio-dental approach. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Pwani region and in Dar es Salaam in 2004/2005. Information from interviews and clinical examination became available for 511 urban and 520 rural adults (mean age 62.9 yr). Results 51.7% (95% CI 46.2, 57.0) urban and 62.5 % (95% CI 53.1, 70.9) rural inhabitants confirmed need for dental check-up, 42.9% (95% CI 36.9, 48.9) urban and 52.7% (95% CI 44.5, 60.6) rural subjects confirmed need for problem oriented care and 38.4% (95% CI 32.4, 44.6) urban versus 49.6% (95% CI 41.8, 57.4) rural residents reported need for any type of dental care. Binary and ordinal multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that adults who reported bad oral health and broken teeth were more likely to perceive need for dental care across the three outcome measures than their counterparts. Socio-demographic factors and clinically defined problems had less impact. Based on a normative and an integrated socio-dental approach respectively 39.5% and 4.7% were in need for partial dentures. Conclusion About half of the participants confirmed need for problem oriented care, dental check-ups and any type of dental care. Need perceptions were influenced by perceived oral health, clinically assessed oral problems and socio-demographic characteristics. Need estimates for partial denture was higher when based on clinical examination alone compared to an integrative socio-dental approach. PMID:17625014

  6. Electroporation of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Madhusudhana; Rambabu, K Murali; Rao, S Harinarayana

    2008-01-01

    We generated transient transgenic zebrafish by applying electrical pulses subsequent to injection of DNA into muscle tissue of 3-6-month old adult zebrafish. Electroporation parameters, such as number of pulses, voltage, and amount of plasmid DNA, were optimized and found that 6 pulses of 40 V/cm at 15 mug/fish increased the luciferase expression by 10-fold compared with those in controls. By measuring the expression of luciferase, in vivo by electroporation in adult zebrafish and in vitro using fish cell line (Xiphophorus xiphidium A2 cells), the strength of three promoters (CMV, human EF-1alpha, and Xenopus EF-1alpha) was compared. Subsequent to electroporation after injecting DNA in the mid region of zebrafish, expression of green fluorescent protein was found far away from the site of injection in the head and the tail sections. Thus, electroporation in adult zebrafish provides a rapid way of testing the behavior of gene sequences in the whole organism.

  7. Histopathological Changes in Third-Instar and Adult Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) After in vitro Heat Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Corrales, Lorena; Caro-Corrales, Jose; Valdez-Ortiz, Angel; Lopez-Valenzuela, Jose; Lopez-Moreno, Hector; Coronado-Velazquez, Daniel; Hernandez-Ortiz, Emilio; Rendon-Maldonado, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae), is one of the most harmful pests of mango causing direct damage by oviposition on the fruit pulp. Mango for export is subjected to hydrothermal treatment as a quarantine method for the control of this pest, but exposure to heat for long periods of time reduces considerably the quality and shelf-life of treated fruit. The aim of this work was to study morphological changes of third-instar larvae and adults of A. ludens after in vitro exposure to high temperature at sublethal times. A heating block system was used to expose larvae at 46.1°C for 19.6 and 12.9 min, producing 94.6 and 70% mortality, respectively. Treated larvae were processed for optical microscopy. A fraction of surviving treated larvae was separated into containers with artificial diet to allow development into adults. Adult sexual organs were dissected and processed for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Results showed that 94.6% of the treated larvae died at 46.1°C for 19.6 min and none of the surviving larvae eclosed to adulthood, as they developed as malformed puparia. For the in vitro treatment at 46.1°C during 12.9 min, 70% of the treated larvae died and only 3.75% reached the adult stage, but ultrastructural damage in the male testes and in the female ovaries was observed. Additionally, 11.1% of the adult flies from the in vitro treatment also showed wing malformation and were incapable of flying. The analysis showed that surviving flies were unable to reproduce. PMID:25797796

  8. Histopathological changes in third-instar and adult Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) after in vitro heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Caro-Corrales, Lorena; Caro-Corrales, Jose; Valdez-Ortiz, Angel; Lopez-Valenzuela, Jose; Lopez-Moreno, Hector; Coronado-Velazquez, Daniel; Hernandez-Ortiz, Emilio; Rendon-Maldonado, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae), is one of the most harmful pests of mango causing direct damage by oviposition on the fruit pulp. Mango for export is subjected to hydrothermal treatment as a quarantine method for the control of this pest, but exposure to heat for long periods of time reduces considerably the quality and shelf-life of treated fruit. The aim of this work was to study morphological changes of third-instar larvae and adults of A. ludens after in vitro exposure to high temperature at sublethal times. A heating block system was used to expose larvae at 46.1°C for 19.6 and 12.9 min, producing 94.6 and 70% mortality, respectively. Treated larvae were processed for optical microscopy. A fraction of surviving treated larvae was separated into containers with artificial diet to allow development into adults. Adult sexual organs were dissected and processed for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Results showed that 94.6% of the treated larvae died at 46.1°C for 19.6 min and none of the surviving larvae eclosed to adulthood, as they developed as malformed puparia. For the in vitro treatment at 46.1°C during 12.9 min, 70% of the treated larvae died and only 3.75% reached the adult stage, but ultrastructural damage in the male testes and in the female ovaries was observed. Additionally, 11.1% of the adult flies from the in vitro treatment also showed wing malformation and were incapable of flying. The analysis showed that surviving flies were unable to reproduce.

  9. Management of Colorectal Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment for colorectal cancer should not be based on age alone. Pooled analyses from clinical trials show that fit older adults are able to tolerate treatment well with similar efficacy as younger adults. When an older adult is considered for treatment, the clinical encounter must evaluate for deficits in physical and cognitive function, and assess comorbidities, medications, and the degree of social support, all which have may affect tolerance of treatment. Based on the degree of fitness of the patient, multiple alternatives to aggressive treatment regimens and strategies exist to minimize toxicity and preserve quality of life during treatment.

  10. Substance Abuse Treatment For Adults in the Criminal Justice System. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Catalina; Dinsmore, Janet; Gilbert, J. Max; Kornblum, Annette; Latham, Joyce; Oliff, Helen; Paisner, Susan; Sutton, David

    2005-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) provides guidelines for counselors and criminal justice personnel who treat offenders with substance use disorders. TIPs are best-practice guidelines that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts in the…

  11. Adult Neurogenesis and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that adult neurogenesis, the production of new neurons in adulthood, may play a role in psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Medications and other treatments for mental disorders often promote the proliferation of new neurons; the time course for maturation and integration of new neurons in circuitry parallels the delayed efficacy of psychiatric therapies; adverse and beneficial experiences similarly affect development of mental illness and neurogenesis; and ablation of new neurons in adulthood alters the behavioral impact of drugs in animal models. At present, the links between adult neurogenesis and depression seem stronger than those suggesting a relationship between new neurons and anxiety or schizophrenia. Yet, even in the case of depression there is currently no direct evidence for a causative role. This article reviews the data relating adult neurogenesis to mental illness and discusses where research needs to head in the future. PMID:25178407

  12. Purpose in Life Predicts Treatment Outcome Among Adult Cocaine Abusers in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rosemarie A.; MacKinnon, Selene; Johnson, Jennifer; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2010-01-01

    A sense of purpose in life has been positively associated with mental health and well-being and has been negatively associated with alcohol use in correlational and longitudinal studies, but has not been studied as a predictor of cocaine treatment outcome. This study examined pre-treatment purpose in life as a predictor of response to a 30-day residential substance use treatment program among 154 participants with cocaine dependence. Purpose in life was unrelated to cocaine or alcohol use during the 6 months pretreatment. After controlling for age, baseline use, and depressive symptoms, purpose in life significantly (p < .01) predicted relapse to any use of cocaine and to alcohol, and the number of days cocaine or alcohol was used in the six months after treatment. Findings suggest that increasing purpose in life may be an important aspect of treatment among cocaine dependent patients. PMID:21129893

  13. [Adult oligosymptomatic coeliac disease].

    PubMed

    Cabral Rodríguez, R; Arrieta Blanco, F J; Vicente Sánchez, F; Cordobés Martín, F J; Moreno Caballero, B

    2004-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a chronic pathology of the small intestine. The pathogenic mechanism is caused by gluten intolerance. This disease present a characteristic and unspecific injury that causes nutrients and vitamins malabsorption. In adults is an underdiagnosed entity due to atypical forms. To make a premature diagnosis is basic because gluten-free diet prevent the complications after long-term like the intestinal T lymphoma and other digestives malignancies, and decrease the mortality of these patients. We present a case of adult oligosymptomatic coeliac disease in a patient with iron deficiency anaemia and vaginal bleeding. We study the clinic-nutrition and the alterations evolution of the patient.

  14. Changing medical students' attitudes toward older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants met for four 2-hour sessions at local art museums to create and discuss art. Three hundred and twenty-eight individuals (112 treatment group, 96 comparison, 120 older adults) in eight cities participated in the program and evaluation. Participants completed pre-and postsurveys that captured their attitude toward older adults, perception of commonality with older adults, and career plans. Findings suggest that medical students' attitudes toward old adults were positive at pretest. However, Vital Visionary students became more positive in their attitudes toward older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .60, and they felt they had more in common with older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .64. The program did not influence their career plans (p = .35). Findings from this demonstration project suggest that socializing medical students with healthy older adults through art programs can foster positive attitudes and enhance their sense of commonality with older adults.

  15. Adolescent methylphenidate treatment differentially alters adult impulsivity and hyperactivity in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat model of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Somkuwar, S S; Kantak, K M; Bardo, M T; Dwoskin, L P

    2016-02-01

    Impulsivity and hyperactivity are two facets of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Impulsivity is expressed as reduced response inhibition capacity, an executive control mechanism that prevents premature execution of an intermittently reinforced behavior. During methylphenidate treatment, impulsivity and hyperactivity are decreased in adolescents with ADHD, but there is little information concerning levels of impulsivity and hyperactivity in adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment is discontinued. The current study evaluated impulsivity, hyperactivity as well as cocaine sensitization during adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment was discontinued in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR) model of ADHD. Treatments consisted of oral methylphenidate (1.5mg/kg) or water vehicle provided Monday-Friday from postnatal days 28-55. During adulthood, impulsivity was measured in SHR and control strains (Wistar Kyoto and Wistar rats) using differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedules. Locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization were measured using the open-field assay. Adult SHR exhibited decreased efficiency of reinforcement under the DRL30 schedule and greater levels of locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization compared to control strains. Compared to vehicle, methylphenidate treatment during adolescence reduced hyperactivity in adult SHR, maintained the lower efficiency of reinforcement, and increased burst responding under DRL30. Cocaine sensitization was not altered following adolescent methylphenidate in adult SHR. In conclusion, adolescent treatment with methylphenidate followed by discontinuation in adulthood had a positive benefit by reducing hyperactivity in adult SHR rats; however, increased burst responding under DRL compared to SHR given vehicle, i.e., elevated impulsivity, constituted an adverse consequence associated with increased risk for cocaine abuse liability.

  16. Adolescent methylphenidate treatment differentially alters adult impulsivity and hyperactivity in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat model of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Somkuwar, S.S.; Kantak, K.M.; Bardo, M.T.; Dwoskin, L.P.

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity and hyperactivity are two facets of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Impulsivity is expressed as reduced response inhibition capacity, an executive control mechanism that prevents premature execution of an intermittently reinforced behavior. During methylphenidate treatment, impulsivity and hyperactivity are decreased in adolescents with ADHD, but there is little information concerning levels of impulsivity and hyperactivity in adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment is discontinued. The current study evaluated impulsivity, hyperactivity as well as cocaine sensitization during adulthood after adolescent methylphenidate treatment was discontinued in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR) model of ADHD. Treatments consisted of oral methylphenidate (1.5 mg/kg) or water vehicle provided Monday-Friday from postnatal day 28–55. During adulthood, impulsivity was measured in SHR and control strains (Wistar Kyoto and Wistar rats) using differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedules. Locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization were measured using the open-field assay. Adult SHR exhibited decreased efficiency of reinforcement under the DRL30 schedule and greater levels of locomotor activity and cocaine sensitization compared to control strains. Compared to vehicle, methylphenidate treatment during adolescence reduced hyperactivity in adult SHR, maintained the lower efficiency of reinforcement, and increased burst responding under DRL30. Cocaine sensitization was not altered following adolescent methylphenidate in adult SHR. In conclusion, adolescent treatment with methylphenidate followed by discontinuation in adulthood had a positive benefit by reducing hyperactivity in adult SHR rats; however, increased burst responding under DRL compared to SHR given vehicle, i.e., elevated impulsivity, constituting an adverse consequence associated with increased risk for cocaine abuse liability. PMID:26657171

  17. [Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in adults: Treatment (Part 2 of 2)].

    PubMed

    Mearin, F; Ciriza, C; Mínguez, M; Rey, E; Mascort, J J; Peña, E; Cañones, P; Júdez, J

    2017-02-23

    In this Clinical practice guide we examine the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult patients with constipation and abdominal discomfort, at the confluence of the spectrum of irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation. Both fall within the framework of functional intestinal disorders and have major personal, health and social impact, altering the quality of life of the patients affected. The former is a subtype of irritable bowel syndrome in which constipation and altered bowel habit predominate, often along with recurring abdominal pain, bloating and abdominal distension. Constipation is characterised by infrequent or hard-to-pass bowel movements, often accompanied by straining during defecation or the sensation of incomplete evacuation. There is no underlying organic cause in the majority of cases; it being considered a functional bowel disorder. There are many clinical and pathophysiological similarities between the two conditions, the constipation responds in a similar way to commonly used drugs, the fundamental difference being the presence or absence of pain, but not in an "all or nothing" way. The severity of these disorders depends not only on the intensity of the intestinal symptoms but also on other biopsychosocial factors: association of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, degree of involvement, forms of perception and behaviour. Functional bowel disorders are diagnosed using the Rome criteria. This Clinical practice guide adapts to the Rome IV criteria published at the end of May 2016. The first part (96, 97, 98) examined the conceptual and pathophysiological aspects, alarm criteria, diagnostic test and referral criteria between Primary Care and Gastroenterology. This second part reviews all the available treatment alternatives (exercise, fluid ingestion, diet with soluble fibre-rich foods, fibre supplements, other dietary components, osmotic or stimulating laxatives, probiotics, antibiotics, spasmolytics, peppermint

  18. Typologies of Prescription Opioid Use in a Large Sample of Adults Assessed for Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Traci C.; Black, Ryan; Grimes Serrano, Jill M.; Budman, Simon H.; Butler, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    Background As a population, non-medical prescription opioid users are not well-defined. We aimed to derive and describe typologies of prescription opioid use and nonmedical use using latent class analysis in an adult population being assessed for substance abuse treatment. Methods Latent class analysis was applied to data from 26,314 unique respondents, aged 18-70, self-reporting past month use of a prescription opioid out of a total of 138,928 cases (18.9%) collected by the Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version (ASI-MV®), a national database for near real-time prescription opioid abuse surveillance. Data were obtained from November 2005 through December 2009. Substance abuse treatment, criminal justice, and public assistance programs in the United States submitted data to the ASI-MV database (n = 538). Six indicators of the latent classes derived from responses to the ASI-MV, a version of the ASI modified to collect prescription opioid abuse and chronic pain experience. The latent class analysis included respondent home ZIP code random effects to account for nesting of respondents within ZIP code. Results A four-class adjusted latent class model fit best and defined clinically interpretable and relevant subgroups: Use as prescribed, Prescribed misusers, Medically healthy abusers, and Illicit users. Classes varied on key variables, including race/ethnicity, gender, concurrent substance abuse, duration of prescription opioid abuse, mental health problems, and ASI composite scores. Three of the four classes (81% of respondents) exhibited high potential risk for fatal opioid overdose; 18.4% exhibited risk factors for blood-borne infections. Conclusions Multiple and distinct profiles of prescription opioid use were detected, suggesting a range of use typologies at differing risk for adverse events. Results may help clinicians and policy makers better focus overdose and blood-borne infection prevention efforts and intervention strategies for prescription

  19. [Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in adults: Treatment (Part 2 of 2)].

    PubMed

    Mearin, F; Ciriza, C; Mínguez, M; Rey, E; Mascort, J J; Peña, E; Cañones, P; Júdez, J

    2017-03-01

    In this Clinical practice guide we examine the diagnostic and therapeutic management of adult patients with constipation and abdominal discomfort, at the confluence of the spectrum of irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation. Both fall within the framework of functional intestinal disorders and have major personal, health and social impact, altering the quality of life of the patients affected. The former is a subtype of irritable bowel syndrome in which constipation and altered bowel habit predominate, often along with recurring abdominal pain, bloating and abdominal distension. Constipation is characterised by infrequent or hard-to-pass bowel movements, often accompanied by straining during defecation or the sensation of incomplete evacuation. There is no underlying organic cause in the majority of cases; it being considered a functional bowel disorder. There are many clinical and pathophysiological similarities between the two conditions, the constipation responds in a similar way to commonly used drugs, the fundamental difference being the presence or absence of pain, but not in an "all or nothing" way. The severity of these disorders depends not only on the intensity of the intestinal symptoms but also on other biopsychosocial factors: association of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, degree of involvement, forms of perception and behaviour. Functional bowel disorders are diagnosed using the Rome criteria. This Clinical practice guide adapts to the Rome IV criteria published at the end of May 2016. The first part (96, 97, 98) examined the conceptual and pathophysiological aspects, alarm criteria, diagnostic test and referral criteria between Primary Care and Gastroenterology. This second part reviews all the available treatment alternatives (exercise, fluid ingestion, diet with soluble fibre-rich foods, fibre supplements, other dietary components, osmotic or stimulating laxatives, probiotics, antibiotics, spasmolytics, peppermint

  20. Digestibility and metabolizable energy of raw soybeans manufactured with different processing treatments and fed to adult dogs and puppies.

    PubMed

    Félix, A P; Zanatta, C P; Brito, C B M; Sá Fortes, C M L; Oliveira, S G; Maiorka, A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), ME, and fecal characteristics of adult dogs and puppies fed raw soybeans (RSB) and their by-products. Six treatments were evaluated: 1 reference diet (REF), based on a maize-poultry by-product meal, and 5 extruded diets containing 70% of the ingredients of the REF diet and 30% of a soybean processed product [defatted soybean meal (DSM), micronized soybeans (MSB), soybean meal (SBM), RSB, or toasted soybeans (TSB)]. Six adult dogs (5.8 yr old) and 6 puppies (5.1 mo old) were used in a study with a double Latin square design (6 × 6). Urease was reduced in all diets after extrusion, but trypsin inhibitor was reduced only in the diets containing SBM, DSM, and RSB. The ATTD of CP in DSM, SBM, MSB, TSB, and RSB were 85.1%, 85.2%, 88.4%, 84.7%, and 78.9%, respectively, for adult dogs. Soybean meal and DSM had the lowest ATTD of acid-hydrolyzed fat (AHF; 84.3% for both ingredients in adult dogs). The ATTD of DM and AHF in DSM and AHF in all soybean products were greater in puppies than adult dogs (P < 0.05). The ME content was greatest in MSB (21.39 MJ/kg) and least in DSM (15.23 MJ/kg). The feces of dogs fed soybean products were softer and had a lower pH (average of 5.91 vs. 6.05 for adult dogs fed soybean products and REF diets, respectively) and ammonia content (average of 3.82 vs. 4.32 g/kg for adult dogs fed soybean products and REF diets, respectively), except those fed RSB, which had similar fecal pH and ammonia values, compared with those fed the REF diet. Soybean products are good protein sources for both adult and growing dogs, provided they are heat treated before diet extrusion.

  1. Craniopharyngioma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zoicas, Flavius; Schöfl, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are slow growing benign tumors of the sellar and parasellar region with an overall incidence rate of approximately 1.3 per million. During adulthood there is a peak incidence between 40 and 44 years. There are two histopathological types, the adamantinomatous and the papillary type. The later type occurs almost exclusively in adult patients. The presenting symptoms develop over years and display a wide spectrum comprising visual, endocrine, hypothalamic, neurological, and neuropsychological manifestations. Currently, the main treatment option consists in surgical excision followed by radiation therapy in case of residual tumor. Whether gross total or partial resection should be preferred has to be balanced on an individual basis considering the extent of the tumor (e.g., hypothalamic invasion). Although the overall long-term survival is good it is often associated with substantial morbidity. Preexisting disorders are often permanent or even exacerbated by treatment. Endocrine disturbances need careful replacement and metabolic sequelae should be effectively treated. Regular follow-up by a multidisciplinary team is a prerequisite for optimal outcome of these patients. PMID:22654868

  2. Diagnosis and office-based treatment of urinary incontinence in adults. Part two: treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jimbo, Masahito; Heidelbaugh, Joel J.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem in both men and women. In this review article we address treatment of the various forms of incontinence with conservative treatments, medical therapy, devices and surgery. The US Preventive Services Task Force, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and PubMed were reviewed for articles focusing on urinary incontinence. Conservative therapy with education, fluid and food management, weight loss, timed voiding and pelvic floor physical therapy are all simple office-based treatments for incontinence. Medical therapy for incontinence currently is only available for urgency incontinence in the form of anticholinergic medication. Condom catheters, penile clamps, urethral inserts and pessaries can be helpful in specific situations. Surgical therapies vary depending on the type of incontinence, but are typically offered if conservative measures fail. PMID:23904858

  3. [Pathophysiology, subtypes, and treatments of adult-onset Still's disease: An update].

    PubMed

    Gerfaud-Valentin, M; Sève, P; Hot, A; Broussolle, C; Jamilloux, Y

    2015-05-01

    Adult-onset Still's disease is a rare and difficult to diagnose multisystemic disorder considered as a multigenic autoinflammatory syndrome. Its immunopathogenesis seems to be at the crossroads between inflammasomopathies and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, the most severe manifestation of the disease. According to recent insights in the pathophysiology and thanks to cohort studies and therapeutic trials, two phenotypes of adult-onset Still's disease may be distinguished: a systemic pattern, initially highly symptomatic and with a higher risk to exhibit life-threatening complications such as reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, where interleukin-1 blockade seems to be very effective, a chronic articular pattern, more indolent with arthritis in the foreground and less severe systemic manifestations, which would threat functional outcome and where interleukin-6 blockade seems to be more effective. This review focuses on these data.

  4. Childhood separation anxiety and the pathogenesis and treatment of adult anxiety.

    PubMed

    Milrod, Barbara; Markowitz, John C; Gerber, Andrew J; Cyranowski, Jill; Altemus, Margaret; Shapiro, Theodore; Hofer, Myron; Glatt, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Clinically significant separation anxiety disorder in childhood leads to adult panic disorder and other anxiety disorders. The prevailing pathophysiological model of anxiety disorders, which emphasizes extinction deficits of fear-conditioned responses, does not fully consider the role of separation anxiety. Pathological early childhood attachments have far-reaching consequences for the later adult ability to experience and internalize positive relationships in order to develop mental capacities for self-soothing, anxiety tolerance, affect modulation, and individuation. Initially identified in attachment research, the phenomenon of separation anxiety is supported by animal model, neuroimaging, and genetic studies. A role of oxytocin is postulated. Adults, inured to their anxiety, often do not identify separation anxiety as problematic, but those who develop anxiety and mood disorders respond more poorly to both pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. This poorer response may reflect patients' difficulty in forming and maintaining attachments, including therapeutic relationships. Psychotherapies that focus on relationships and separation anxiety may benefit patients with separation anxiety by using the dyadic therapist-patient relationship to recapture and better understand important elements of earlier pathological parent-child relationships.

  5. Recommendations and guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Fabry nephropathy in adults.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Oliveira, João P; Wanner, Christoph; Brenner, Barry M; Waldek, Stephen; Warnock, David G

    2008-06-01

    Progressive loss of kidney function complicates Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder that arises from deficiency of alpha-galactosidase activity. Heterozygous females with Fabry disease can be as severely affected as hemizygous males, who have the classic form of the disease. Enzyme-replacement therapy with recombinant human alpha-galactosidase clears the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide from kidney cells, and can stabilize renal function in adults with mild to moderate Fabry nephropathy. However, adults with more advanced nephropathy and overt proteinuria do not respond as well. For these patients, antiproteinuric therapy given in conjunction with enzyme-replacement therapy might prevent further decline in kidney function. In this Review, we propose guidelines and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of Fabry nephropathy in adults, based on published data and on the consensus of opinion of participants in the 7(th) International Fabry Nephropathy Roundtable in 2007. These organ-specific guidelines could be easier to implement than general guidelines, provided they are used in the context of an overall multisystem care approach.

  6. Adult non-cardiac ECMO for the treatment of ARDS--the Mississippi experience.

    PubMed

    Frei, Lonnie W

    2013-07-01

    The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) has become a center for ECMO (Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation), providing this service to patients requiring this life-saving modality. UMMC is the only ECMO center in the state. Prior to the cases presented, ECMO use at UMMC has been limited to neonates and the pediatric patient population as well as by the cardiothoracic service for patients with cardiac failure or inability to wean from bypass. The use of ECMO for non-cardiac support in the adult population has been limited in the past, but recent reports in the literature and experience elsewhere has proven the viability of the technology. This is a retrospective report of the first three adult non-cardiac cases employing ECMO for ARDS (Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome) in Mississippi. We achieved 100% survival in a disease process which reportedly carries a mortality ranging from 20-50%. A brief review of ECMO and its use in this population is also presented.

  7. Adult Learning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adults Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Campaigning Alliance for Lifelong Learning is to lobby parliament for the restoration of the 1.5 million adult learning places lost over the past two years. The campaign has attracted supporters from an astonishingly wide range of backgrounds. In this article, Gordon Marsden, Caroline Biggins, Beth Walker, Mike Chaney, Peter Davies, Sian…

  8. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  9. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  10. Older Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jeffrey

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for area senior citizens, De Anza College has established an older adult education program which combines adaptive physical education with holistic health care principles to instruct students in relaxation, nutrition, and physical activity. Classes are held in convalescent hospitals, retirement homes,…

  11. Adult Education in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerio da Educacao e Cultura, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

    The status and goals of adult education programs in Brazil are discussed in this report. Supplemental systems such as the Brazilian Literacy Movement (Mobral) and their results are described and evaluated. Charts detailing the evolution of literacy are shown and priorities in education are suggested. The progress of other educational entities is…

  12. Adult Basic Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet, aimed at adult basic education students, pinpoints and summarizes a few common spelling rules to help make spelling easier, and includes a component on using the dictionary. In the text, each rule is presented with many examples. Exercises follow each spelling rule, allowing students the opportunity to apply the rule to specific…

  13. Police and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Vic

    The literature on adult education for police is reviewed and criticized. Among the publications that have been influential in debating the need for police education are Charles B. Saunder's "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" (1976), which endorses the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement's recommendations regarding the vital…

  14. Dance for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Dance programs for older adults that encourage exercise and socializing are described in six articles. Program guidelines of the American Alliance Committee on Aging are explained, and other articles emphasize a movement education approach that may involve intergenerational contact. A dance program held in a worship setting is also discussed. (PP)

  15. Migration and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  16. How Do Adults Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan; Illeris, Knud

    2003-01-01

    This dialog between Alan Rogers and Knud Illeris debates arguments Rogers made in a previous article about the differences between adult and child learning. Rogers emphasizes differences in teacher-learner relationships. Illeris believes the differences result from different motivations for learning. (SK)

  17. Encyclopedia of Adult Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert, Ed.

    This encyclopedia contains 106 articles on adult development that were written by more than 75 specialists in such diverse fields as anthropology, communication, education, health sciences, history, and psychology. In a guide to related topics that is presented at the beginning of the encyclopedia, the 106 articles are grouped under the following…

  18. Sinusitis in adults - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000563.htm Sinusitis in adults - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your sinuses are chambers in ... They are filled with air. Sinusitis is an infection of these chambers, which causes ...

  19. Helping Adults to Spell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorhouse, Catherine

    This book presents a range of strategies for adult literacy tutors and offers a wealth of practical advice on teaching spelling within the context of writing. Chapters 1-3 offer basic information on talking with the student about spelling, finding out how the student spells and helping the student to see himself/herself as a "good" speller, and…

  20. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  1. Profiles of Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Library, Springfield.

    Since January 1986, when the Illinois Secretary of State Literacy Grant Program began funding a wide variety of adult literacy programs, more than 30,000 students have sought help with reading. They have been matched with 25,000 tutors who have provided more than 2 million hours of volunteer instruction. The profiles in this booklet are stories of…

  2. Adult Literacy Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.; Draper, James A., Ed.

    This book, intended to serve as a professional reference work, proposes to define the field of Adult Basic Education in its evolution, its contribution to professional education, and the principal problems and issues. The volume contains the following treatises: "Definitions and Evolution of the Concepts" (Thomas); "Selected…

  3. Depression - older adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... slowly than in younger adults. To better manage depression at home: Exercise regularly, if the provider says it is OK. Surround yourself with caring, positive people and do fun activities. ... signs of depression, and know how to react if these occur. ...

  4. TRENDS IN ADULT READING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLER, JUSTIN H.

    TRENDS EVIDENT IN ADULT READING DURING THE 1960'S IN THE AREAS OF ADMINISTRATION, PROGRAMS, TEACHING, TECHNIQUES, RESEARCH PROJECTS, AND METHODS OF PROMOTION OF READING PROGRAMS ARE DISCUSSED. TWO INSTANCES OF COMMERCIAL EXPLOITATION BASED ON INTENSE AND OFTEN FALLACIOUS ADVERTISING AND ON PUBLIC IGNORANCE ARE CITED. A POSITIVE TREND IN THE AREA…

  5. Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children Newly Diagnosed: Older Adults Related Topics on AIDS.gov Aging with HIV/AIDS National HIV/AIDS ... an Emerging Challenge Last revised: 07/10/2015 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  6. Nonaqueous, mini-dose glucagon for treatment of mild hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes: A dose-seeking study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate mini-dose glucagon in adults with type 1 diabetes using a stable, liquid, ready-to-use preparation, twelve adults with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin pumps received subcutaneous doses of 75, 150, and 300 ug of nonaqueous glucagon. Plasma glucose, glucagon, and insulin c...

  7. Cannabis Withdrawal, Posttreatment Abstinence, and Days to First Cannabis Use Among Emerging Adults in Substance Use Treatment: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jordan P.; Smith, Douglas C.; Morphew, Jason W.; Lei, Xinrong; Zhang, Saijun

    2015-01-01

    Very little prospective research investigates how cannabis withdrawal is associated with treatment outcomes, and this work has not used the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) thresholds for cannabis withdrawal. The sample included 110 emerging adults entering outpatient substance use treatment who were heavy cannabis users with no other drug use and limited alcohol use. We used survival analyses to predict days to first use of cannabis and logistic regression to predict whether participants were abstinent and living in the community at 3 months. Those meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal were more likely to return to use sooner than those not meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal. However, the presence of cannabis withdrawal was not a significant predictor of 3-month abstinence. Emerging adults with DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal may have difficulty initiating abstinence in the days following their intake assessment, implying the need for strategies to mitigate their more rapid return to cannabis use. PMID:26877548

  8. Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Outcomes for Emerging Adults in Non-College Settings: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jordan P; Smith, Douglas C; Briley, Daniel A

    2017-03-20

    Emerging adults have the highest prevalence rate of alcohol and drug use and represent a large proportion of treatment admissions in the United States. Those who do not attend college experience higher rates of use and may not have similar advantages as those attending college. A systematic review included studies investigating prevention and treatment outcomes among emerging adults in non-college settings. We included studies reporting an average age between 18 and 25 conducted outside of college settings. We extracted data for experimental effects (experimental group compared to control), and contrasted treatments with active and no intervention controls. We also examined several moderators. Fifty studies were meta-analyzed, including 32 prevention and 18 treatment studies. Overall, our experimental weighted mean effect size was d = .17 for both prevention and treatment studies. Comparisons across treatment types typically yielded nonsignificant results. Across prevention and treatment studies, smaller effects existed for studies delivering personalized feedback interventions. For treatment studies only, the percent of students included in the sample was a significant moderator. Overall effects were similar to current meta-analyses on college drinking. However, personalized feedback may be a less effective prevention strategy in non-college settings, and the field should prioritize increasing the effectiveness of treatments targeting non-college students. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Utah Adult Education Services. Adult Education Report 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    Major purposes for the preparation of this report on public school adult education in Utah were: to provide the public with a description of achievements, trends, and needs, and with meaningful cost accounting information; to make comparisons and analyses of adult education by program, school district, and year; and to provide the adult education…

  10. What is Young Adult Literature? (Young Adult Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Chris, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Outlines some of the many confusions about young adult literature. Sheds some light on what young adult literature is (defining it as all genres of literature published since 1967 that are written for and marketed to young adults). Discusses briefly how it can be used in schools. Offers a list of the author's 20 favorite books for teenagers. (SR)

  11. Teaching Nontraditional Adult Students: Adult Learning Theories in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    As the USA experiences rapid growth of nontraditional adult students in higher education, educators and institutions will increasingly need to look beyond the traditional youth-centric educational models to better address adult learning needs. To date, no research has been conducted examining the learning experiences of adult students enrolled in…

  12. A cluster analysis of tic symptoms in children and adults with Tourette syndrome: clinical correlates and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Joseph F; Nyirabahizi, Epiphanie; Kircanski, Katharina; Piacentini, John; Peterson, Alan L; Woods, Douglas W; Wilhelm, Sabine; Walkup, John T; Scahill, Lawrence

    2013-12-30

    Cluster analytic methods have examined the symptom presentation of chronic tic disorders (CTDs), with limited agreement across studies. The present study investigated patterns, clinical correlates, and treatment outcome of tic symptoms. 239 youth and adults with CTDs completed a battery of assessments at baseline to determine diagnoses, tic severity, and clinical characteristics. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) or psychoeducation and supportive therapy (PST). A cluster analysis was conducted on the baseline Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) symptom checklist to identify the constellations of tic symptoms. Four tic clusters were identified: Impulse Control and Complex Phonic Tics; Complex Motor Tics; Simple Head Motor/Vocal Tics; and Primarily Simple Motor Tics. Frequencies of tic symptoms showed few differences across youth and adults. Tic clusters had small associations with clinical characteristics and showed no associations to the presence of coexisting psychiatric conditions. Cluster membership scores did not predict treatment response to CBIT or tic severity reductions. Tic symptoms distinctly cluster with little difference across youth and adults, or coexisting conditions. This study, which is the first to examine tic clusters and response to treatment, suggested that tic symptom profiles respond equally well to CBIT. Clinical trials.gov. identifiers: NCT00218777; NCT00231985.

  13. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  14. Adult Education for Social Mobilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echeverria, Luis

    1981-01-01

    Suggests some ideas that could stimulate and be incentives for defining programs of adult education in the future. These involve changing priorities, developing a framework which allows adult education programs to be established, and managing decision-making processes. (CT)

  15. College-Age & Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... Age & Young Adults College Addiction Studies Programs Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ...

  16. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  17. Alcohol Use and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alcohol Use and Older Adults Alcohol and Aging Adults of any age can have ... Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) What Is Alcohol? Alcohol, also known as ethanol, is a chemical ...

  18. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccination Recommendations Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... critical for people with health conditions such as liver disease. If you have chronic liver disease, talk ...

  19. Enhancing Older Adults' Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigates older adults' reading comprehension skills through syntactic measures and measures of sentence content. Analyzes the apparent reading difficulties of older adults. Provides guidelines for the preparation of prose materials for older readers. (HB)

  20. Methylphenidate treatment leads to abnormalities on krebs cycle enzymes in the brain of young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Scaini, Giselli; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O S; Jeremias, Isabela C; Mello-Santos, Lis Mairá; Freitas, Karolina V; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown a relationship between energy metabolism and methylphenidate (MPH); however, there are no studies evaluating the effects of MPH in Krebs cycle. So, we investigated if MPH treatment could alter the activity of citrate synthase (CS), malate dehydrogenase (MD), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ID) in the brain of young and adult Wistar rats. Our results showed that MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced CS in the striatum and prefrontal cortex (PF), with MPH at all doses in the cerebellum and hippocampus after chronic treatment in young rats. In adult rats the CS was reduced in the cerebellum after acute treatment with MPH at all doses, and after chronic treatment in the PF and cerebellum with MPH (10 mg/kg), and in the hippocampus with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg). The ID decreased in the hippocampus and striatum with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg), and in the cortex (10 mg/kg) after acute treatment in young rats. In adult rats acute treatment with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced ID in the cerebellum, and with MPH (10 mg/kg) in the cortex; chronic treatment with MPH (10 mg/kg) decreased ID in the PF; with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) in the cerebellum, and with MPH at all doses in the hippocampus. The MD did not alter. In conclusion, our results suggest that MPH can alter enzymes of Krebs cycle in brain areas involved with circuits related with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; however, such effects depend on age of animal and treatment regime.

  1. ASAM Patient Placement Criteria treatment levels: do they correspond to care actually received by homeless substance abusing adults?

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Freyder, Paul J; Gibbon, Jeanette L; Hanusa, Barbara J; Seltzer, Debora; Fine, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    We report findings from a community-based two-city survey of homeless adults comparing the level of substance abuse treatment assigned to them using the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria with care actually received during the previous 12 months. Overall 531 adults were surveyed with 382 meeting DSM-IIIR criteria of being in need of treatment or having a demand for treatment. Of those with a treatment need, 1.5% met criteria for outpatient care, 40.3% intensive outpatient/partial hospitalization care, 29.8% medically monitored care and 28.8% managed care levels. In contrast, of those receiving treatment (50.5%, 162 persons), almost all care received by this cohort was either inpatient or residential based (83.6%). Unsheltered homeless persons and those without insurance were significantly more likely to report not receiving needed treatment. Lack of treatment availability or capacity, expense, and changing one's mind while on a wait list were the most commonly cited reasons for no treatment.

  2. Catastrophic events and older adults.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Elizabeth; Dyer, Carmel B

    2010-12-01

    policy development, serve on rescue teams, perform patient assessments, and deliver care. Nurses are crucial to well-planned and executed programs for catastrophic events that affect older adults. Also, all health care providers involved must be aware of the physical and psychological ramifications of disaster relief. The health and resilience of disaster-relief teams depend on paying attention to signs and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and seeking appropriate treatment should it occur.

  3. A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study of a Single-Session Psychoeducation Treatment for Urban, Culturally Diverse, Trauma-Exposed Adults.

    PubMed

    Ghafoori, Bita; Fisher, Dennis; Korosteleva, Olga; Hong, Madelyn

    2016-06-01

    This randomized pilot study aimed to determine whether a single session of psychoeducation improved mental health outcomes, attitudes toward treatment, and service engagement among urban, impoverished, culturally diverse, trauma-exposed adults. Sixty-seven individuals were randomly assigned to a single-session psychoeducation treatment or a delayed treatment comparison control group. The control group was found to be superior to the treatment group at posttest with respect to symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and occupational and family disability. At follow-up, all participants had completed the psychoeducation treatment, and a mixed-effects model indicated significant improvements over time in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression, somatization, and attitudes toward treatment. Ninety-eight percent of the participants reported the psychoeducation was helpful at follow-up. Participants also reported a 19.1% increase in mental health service utilization at follow-up compared with baseline. Implications for treatment and future research are discussed.

  4. Orthodontic Camouflage Treatment in an Adult Patient with a Class II, Division 1 Malocclusion – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Naragond, Appasaheb; Kenganal, Smitha; Sagarkar, Roshan; Sugaradday

    2013-01-01

    Since so many decades, various treatment modalities have been presented for the treatment for the class II, div 1 malocclusions. In recent times, we have seen enormously increasing numbers of young adults who desire the shortest, cost effective and a non surgical correction of Class II malocclusions and they accept dental camouflage as a treatment option to mask the skeletal discrepancy. This case report presents one such case of a 22 year old non-growing female who had a skeletal Class II, division 1 malocclusion with an orthognathic maxilla, a retrognathic mandible, a negative VTO and an overjet of 12mm, who did not want a surgical treatment. We considered the camouflage treatment by extracting the upper first premolars. Following the treatment, a satisfactory result was achieved with an ideal, static and a functional occlusion, facial profile, smile and lip competence and stability of the treatment results. PMID:23543878

  5. Different Teams, Same Conclusions? A Systematic Review of Existing Clinical Guidelines for the Assessment and Treatment of Tinnitus in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Thomas E.; Haider, Haula F.; Kikidis, Dimitris; Lapira, Alec; Mazurek, Birgit; Norena, Arnaud; Rabau, Sarah; Lardinois, Rachelle; Cederroth, Christopher R.; Edvall, Niklas K.; Brueggemann, Petra G.; Rosing, Susanne N.; Kapandais, Anestis; Lungaard, Dorte; Hoare, Derek J.; Cima, Rilana F. F

    2017-01-01

    Background: Though clinical guidelines for assessment and treatment of chronic subjective tinnitus do exist, a comprehensive review of those guidelines has not been performed. The objective of this review was to identify current clinical guidelines, and compare their recommendations for the assessment and treatment of subjective tinnitus in adults. Method: We systematically searched a range of sources for clinical guidelines (as defined by the Institute of Medicine, United States) for the assessment and/or treatment of subjective tinnitus in adults. No restrictions on language or year of publication were applied to guidelines. Results: Clinical guidelines from Denmark, Germany, Sweden, The Netherlands, and the United States were included in the review. There was a high level of consistency across the guidelines with regard to recommendations for audiometric assessment, physical examination, use of a validated questionnaire(s) to assess tinnitus related distress, and referral to a psychologist when required. Cognitive behavioral treatment for tinnitus related distress, use of hearing aids in instances of hearing loss and recommendations against the use of medicines were consistent across the included guidelines. Differences between the guidelines centered on the use of imaging in assessment procedures and sound therapy as a form of treatment for tinnitus distress respectively. Conclusion: Given the level of commonality across tinnitus guidelines from different countries the development of a European guideline for the assessment and treatment of subjective tinnitus in adults seems feasible. This guideline would have the potential to benefit the large number of clinicians in countries where clinical guidelines do not yet exist, and would support standardization of treatment for patients across Europe. PMID:28275357

  6. A Comprehensive Comparison of the Efficacy and Tolerability of Racecadotril with Other Treatments of Acute Diarrhea in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Wolfgang; Andresen, Viola; Eberlin, Marion; Mueck, Tobias; Layer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril is a guideline-recommended treatment to alleviate symptoms of acute diarrhea. A systematic review of randomized studies was performed comparing efficacy and safety of treatment with racecadotril to that with placebo or active treatments in adults. In five double-blind studies, racecadotril and placebo had comparable tolerability, but racecadotril was more effective. This was consistent across multiple efficacy parameters including duration of diarrhea, number of diarrheic stools, abdominal pain, and meteorism; it was also consistent across countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. In six randomized studies in outpatients comparing racecadotril to loperamide, resolution of symptoms occurred with similar speed and efficacy; however, racecadotril treatment was associated with less rebound constipation and less abdominal discomfort. The seventh comparative study performed in geriatric nursing home residents reported a superior efficacy of racecadotril. In direct comparison with Saccharomyces boulardii treatment, racecadotril exhibited similar tolerability but was more efficacious. One study compared racecadotril to octreotide in patients with acute diarrhea requiring hospitalization, rehydration, and antibiotic treatment; in this cohort, octreotide was more efficacious than racecadotril. In conclusion, in adults with acute diarrhea, racecadotril is more efficacious than placebo or S. boulardii, similarly efficacious as loperamide and, in patients with moderate to severe disease as add-on to antibiotics, less than octreotide. The tolerability of racecadotril is similar to that of placebo or S. boulardii and better than that of loperamide, particularly with regard to risk of rebound constipation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that racecadotril is a suitable treatment to alleviate symptoms of acute diarrhea in adults. PMID:27790616

  7. Different Teams, Same Conclusions? A Systematic Review of Existing Clinical Guidelines for the Assessment and Treatment of Tinnitus in Adults.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Thomas E; Haider, Haula F; Kikidis, Dimitris; Lapira, Alec; Mazurek, Birgit; Norena, Arnaud; Rabau, Sarah; Lardinois, Rachelle; Cederroth, Christopher R; Edvall, Niklas K; Brueggemann, Petra G; Rosing, Susanne N; Kapandais, Anestis; Lungaard, Dorte; Hoare, Derek J; Cima, Rilana F F

    2017-01-01

    Background: Though clinical guidelines for assessment and treatment of chronic subjective tinnitus do exist, a comprehensive review of those guidelines has not been performed. The objective of this review was to identify current clinical guidelines, and compare their recommendations for the assessment and treatment of subjective tinnitus in adults. Method: We systematically searched a range of sources for clinical guidelines (as defined by the Institute of Medicine, United States) for the assessment and/or treatment of subjective tinnitus in adults. No restrictions on language or year of publication were applied to guidelines. Results: Clinical guidelines from Denmark, Germany, Sweden, The Netherlands, and the United States were included in the review. There was a high level of consistency across the guidelines with regard to recommendations for audiometric assessment, physical examination, use of a validated questionnaire(s) to assess tinnitus related distress, and referral to a psychologist when required. Cognitive behavioral treatment for tinnitus related distress, use of hearing aids in instances of hearing loss and recommendations against the use of medicines were consistent across the included guidelines. Differences between the guidelines centered on the use of imaging in assessment procedures and sound therapy as a form of treatment for tinnitus distress respectively. Conclusion: Given the level of commonality across tinnitus guidelines from different countries the development of a European guideline for the assessment and treatment of subjective tinnitus in adults seems feasible. This guideline would have the potential to benefit the large number of clinicians in countries where clinical guidelines do not yet exist, and would support standardization of treatment for patients across Europe.

  8. Social facilitation maintenance treatment for adults with obesity: study protocol for a randomised-controlled feasibility study (SFM study)

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The long-term success of non-surgical weight loss treatment in adults with obesity is limited by substantial relapse, and only a few evidence-based weight loss maintenance treatments exist. This clinical trial investigates the feasibility and efficacy of a social facilitation maintenance programme for weight loss maintenance, tailored to meet the needs of obese adults who have undergone a lifestyle weight loss intervention. Methods and analysis In a single-centre, open feasibility trial, 72 adults currently or previously obese or overweight who have undergone a lifestyle weight loss intervention are centrally randomised to 4 months of social facilitation maintenance treatment or treatment as a usual control condition. In 16 outpatient group sessions, the social facilitation maintenance treatment, based on a socioecological model and on evidence supporting social facilitation as a key process in maintaining weight loss, focuses on promoting interpersonal relationships to build up a healthy lifestyle for long-term weight loss maintenance. Primary outcome is the amount of weight regain at 6-month follow-up, compared with pre-treatment weight, derived from measured body weight. Secondary outcomes address feasibility, including recruitment, attrition, assessment non-completion, compliance and patients' programme evaluation; and in comparison with pre-weight loss maintenance, social and interpersonal functioning, eating behaviour and physical activity, psychological and physical symptoms, body composition and risk of comorbidity, and quality of life at post-treatment and follow-up assessments. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethical Committee at the University of Leipzig (165-13-15072013). The study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications. Trial registration number DRKS00005182. PMID:27580827

  9. Adult Development and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, James M.

    Little attention has been given to how adults develop through their lifetimes and what roles their workplace environments play in that development. Research and theory regarding adult psychosocial development have confirmed the developmental life-cycle phases of adulthood. These are: leaving the family (ages 16-22), getting into the adult world…

  10. Facilitating Creativity in Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity in education research has received increasing attention, although the major focus of this research has been on children. Despite pleas by several adult educators for promoting creativity, very few studies have focused on adult learners, leaving to it to be explored what approaches are useful for adult educators to facilitate creativity…

  11. Adult Learning. ARIS Information Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Languages and Literacy Inst. of Australia, Melbourne. Adult Education Resource and Information Service.

    This information sheet provides a summary of general observations regarding adult learners. Adults from different walks of life may seek out learning at different times in their lives, for different reasons, and for vastly different purposes. Adult learning groups may include students of different ages, cultures, and educational and socioeconomic…

  12. Assessment Tools for Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shefrin, Carol; Shafer, Dehra; Forlizzi, Lori

    The Assessment Tools for Adult Education project was designed to provide training and support to staff of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Adult Basic and Literacy Education (ABLE) funded programs to help them use assessment tools and procedures to document the learning gains of the adult students they serve. The following candidate assessment…

  13. The Politics of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Roy

    1974-01-01

    All educational levels have been attacked by politicians and haunted by suspicion, and adult education has drawn more than its share. Interest groups have had a large effect on adult education. The construction of a theoretical model of the politics of adult education is suggested. (DS)

  14. Adult Multiple Intelligences and Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Meg Ryback

    In the Adult Multiple Intelligences (AMI) study, 10 teachers of adults from the northeastern region of the United States explored for 18 months the ways that multiple intelligences (MI) theory could support instruction and assessment in various adult learning contexts. The results of this research were published in a book by Julie Viens called MI…

  15. New Thrusts in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Robert M.

    The Associate Commissioner of the Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education is responsible for two broad and important programs, career education and broader and better services in adult education. Career education is a lifelong educational process beginning in kindergarten and extending through adult and continuing education. Career…

  16. Adult Education and Development, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adult Education and Development, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The publication is a half-yearly journal for adult education in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Issue 42 includes the following: "Adult Education for Self-Reliance in Community Health Education Programmes" (Kweka); "Promoting Good Nutrition" (Mangvwat); "Incorporating Health-Improvement Activities in Adult Education…

  17. Adult Learning and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium on adult learning and human resource development consists of three presentations. "Adult Learning Principles and Concepts in the Workplace: Implications for Training in HRD" (Margot B. Weinstein) reports on findings from interviews with restaurant employees who reported that training practices using adult learning…

  18. Adult Education through World Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassara, Beverly Benner, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers about development/delivery of adult education through the efforts of multinational and bilateral government donors and the International Council for Adult Education (ICAE): "Preface" (Beverly Benner Cassara); "Introduction: Adult Education and Democracy" (Francisco Vio Grossi);…

  19. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) 2016 Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Benicio N.; Ismail, Zahinoor; Jaworska, Natalia; Steiner, Meir; Lieshout, Ryan J. Van; Kennedy, Sidney H.; Lam, Raymond W.; Milev, Roumen V.; Parikh, Sagar V.; Ravindran, Arun V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) conducted a revision of the 2009 guidelines by updating the evidence and recommendations. The scope of the 2016 guidelines remains the management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults, with a target audience of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals. Methods: Using the question-answer format, we conducted a systematic literature search focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Evidence was graded using CANMAT-defined criteria for level of evidence. Recommendations for lines of treatment were based on the quality of evidence and clinical expert consensus. This section on “Special Populations” is the sixth of six guidelines articles. Results: Recent studies inform the treatment of MDD in children and adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women, women in perimenopause or menopause, and the elderly. Evidence for efficacy of treatments in these populations is more limited than for the general adult population, however, and risks of treatment in these groups are often poorly studied and reported. Conclusions: Despite the limited evidence base, extant data and clinical experience suggest that each of these special populations can benefit from the systematic application of treatment guidelines for treatment of MDD. PMID:27486149

  20. Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS). Diagnosis and treatment of adults in general practice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jens Georg

    2014-02-01

    relevant diagnose will be based on use of CRP alone, as the test can be made easily and fast while the patient is in the clinic compared to the use of ESR. The disease is over-diagnosed in general practice. In only 53% of patients, who the GP suspected of having acute sinusitis, was there detected pus or mucopus at the sinus puncture, furthermore the patients' statements that they had had sinusitis was significantly negatively associated with current acute maxillary sinusitis. Almost all patients are prescribed topical treatment to the nose in the form of vasoconstrictor, and 50-70% also antibiotics. The most common bacteria that can be isolated are S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. For many years the first drug of choice has been penicillin V, and treatment with penicillin V has followed Scandinavian recommendations. However, the resistance patterns in respect of H. influenzae have changed over the years and if the dominant flora is H. influenzae, then oral penicillin is not sufficient anymore, and should be replaced by amoxicillin with or without clavulanate. It is reported that the MIC of penicillin V is too high, such that oral dosage cannot provide sufficiently high concentrations. However, in daily clinical practice the doctor does not have the possibility to decide whether the infection is caused by either S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae, unless a sinus puncture is performed and it is not considered as a standard procedure. The recommended treatment is therefore starting with penicillin V, and at treatment failure switching to amoxicillin with or without clavulanate. It is well known that URTI's can exacerbate a chronic pulmonary disease - like asthma - in allergic patients, but this influence is also demonstrated as described in article 6 where ARS in adults without any sign of chronic lung disease or allergy is accompanied by a temporary reduction lung function. Future research should focus on the use of CRP in general practice, analysing cost-effectiveness of the

  1. A Behavioral Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury-Associated Visual Dysfunction Based on Adult Cortical Plasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    balance between neuronal excitation or inhibition (He, Hodos & Quinlan, 2006,  Maya  Vetencourt, Sale, Viegi, Baroncelli, De Pasquale, O’Leary, Castren...adult visual cortex. J Neurosci, 26 (11), 2951‐2955.  Maya  Vetencourt, J.F., Sale, A., Viegi, A., Baroncelli, L., De Pasquale, R., O’Leary, O.F

  2. Chronic pregabalin treatment decreases excitability of dentate gyrus and accelerates maturation of adult-born granule cells.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Augusto Abel; Coll, Lucia; Schinder, Alejandro F; Uchitel, Osvaldo Daniel; Piriz, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    Pregabalin (PGB) is extensively prescribed to treat neurological and neuropsychiatrical conditions such as neuropathic pain, anxiety disorders, and epilepsy. Although PGB is known to bind selectively to the α2δ subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, there is little understanding about how it exerts its therapeutic effects. In this article, we analyzed the effects of an in vivo chronic treatment with PGB over the physiology of dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGCs) using ex vivo electrophysiological and morphological analysis in adult mice. We found that PGB decreases neuronal excitability of DGGCs. In addition, PGB accelerates maturation of adult-born DGGCs, an effect that would modify dentate gyrus plasticity. Together, these findings suggest that PGB reduces activity in the dentate gyrus and modulates overall network plasticity, which might contribute to its therapeutic effects. Cover Image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13783.

  3. Time-dependent enhancement of hippocampus-dependent memory after treatment with memantine: Implications for enhanced hippocampal adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Rie; Kim, Ryang; Namba, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Uchino, Shigeo; Kida, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been suggested to play modulatory roles in learning and memory. Importantly, previous studies have shown that newborn neurons in the adult hippocampus are integrated into the dentate gyrus circuit and are recruited more efficiently into the hippocampal memory trace of mice when they become 3 weeks old. Interestingly, a single high-dose treatment with the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine (MEM) has been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis dramatically by promoting cell proliferation. In the present study, to understand the impact of increased adult neurogenesis on memory performance, we examined the effects of a single treatment of MEM on hippocampus-dependent memory in mice. Interestingly, mice treated with MEM showed an improvement of hippocampus-dependent spatial and social recognition memories when they were trained and tested at 3-6 weeks, but not at 3 days or 4 months, after treatment with MEM. Importantly, we observed a significant positive correlation between the scores for spatial memory (probe trial in the Morris water maze task) and the number of young mature neurons (3 weeks old) in MEM-treated mice, but not saline-treated mice. We also observed that the young mature neurons generated by treatment with MEM were recruited into the trace of spatial memory similarly to those generated through endogenous neurogenesis. Taken together, our observations suggest that treatment with MEM temporally improves hippocampus-dependent memory formation and that the newborn neurons increased by treatment with MEM contribute to this improvement when they become 3 weeks old.

  4. Assessing the WHO 50% Prevalence Threshold in School-Aged Children as Indication for Treatment of Urogenital Schistosomiasis in Adults in Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Darin S.; King, Jonathan D.; Eigege, Abel; Umaru, John; Adamani, William; Alphonsus, Kal; Sambo, Yohanna; Miri, Emmanual S.; Goshit, Danjuma; Ogah, Gladys; Richards, Frank O.

    2013-01-01

    Preventive chemotherapy with praziquantel is recommended in adults by the World Health Organization when prevalence of schistosomiasis in school-aged children (SAC) is ≥ 50%. This study ascertained the value of this threshold in predicting prevalence and intensity of Schistosoma hematobium (SH) infection in adults in central Nigeria. We evaluated urogenital schistosomiasis prevalence in 1,164 adults: 659 adults in 12 communities where mean hematuria among SAC in 2008 was 26.6% and 505 adults in 7 communities where the mean hematuria among SAC in 2008 was 70.4%. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups of adults in prevalence of hematuria, prevalence of SH eggs, or intensity of infections. We conclude that, in this setting, the SAC threshold is not useful for treatment decisions in adults. Given the increased risk of subtle morbidity or urogenital schistosomiasis as a risk factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), more liberal treatment of adults with praziquantel is warranted. PMID:23382170

  5. The effectiveness of art therapy in the treatment of traumatized adults: a systematic review on art therapy and trauma.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Karin Alice; de Niet, Gerrit J; Knipscheer, Jeroen W; Kleber, Rolf J; Hutschemaekers, Giel J M

    2015-04-01

    Art therapy has often been applied in the treatment of traumatized adults, and good results in clinical practice have been reported. However, although art therapy experts underline these benefits, the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment has not been established by systematic review. The aim of this systematic review is to identify and evaluate empirical evidence of the effectiveness of art therapy for trauma treatment. As a result of the systematic review, six controlled, comparative studies on art therapy for trauma in adult patients were found. In half of the included studies, a significant decrease in psychological trauma symptoms was found in the treatment groups, and one study reported a significant decrease in depression. Although there are limitations in the number of included studies, the number of participants, the heterogeneity of included studies, and their methodological quality, the results contribute to insight into the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment and form an evidence base for the urgent need for further research on art therapy and trauma treatment.

  6. Efficacy and safety of growth hormone treatment in adults with growth hormone deficiency: a systematic review of studies on morbidity.

    PubMed

    van Bunderen, Christa C; van Varsseveld, Nadège C; Erfurth, Eva Marie; Ket, Johannes C F; Drent, Madeleine L

    2014-07-01

    Due to the positive effects demonstrated in randomized clinical trials on cardiovascular surrogate markers and bone metabolism, a positive effect of growth hormone (GH) treatment on clinically relevant end-points seems feasible. In this review, we discuss the long-term efficacy and safety of GH treatment in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) with emphasis on morbidity: fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke, fractures, fatal and nonfatal malignancies and recurrences, and diabetes mellitus. A positive effect of GH treatment on CVD and fracture risk could be concluded, but study design limitations have to be considered. Stroke and secondary brain tumours remained more prevalent. However, other contributing factors have to be taken into account. Regrowth and recurrences of (peri)pituitary tumours were not increased in patients with GH treatment compared to similar patients without GH treatment. All fatal and nonfatal malignancies were not more prevalent in GH-treated adults compared to the general population. However, follow-up time is still relatively short. The studies on diabetes are difficult to interpret, and more evidence is awaited. In clinical practice, a more individualized assessment seems appropriate, taking into consideration the underlying diagnosis of GHD, other treatment regimens, metabolic profile and the additional beneficial effects of GH set against the possible risks. Large and thoroughly conducted observational studies are needed and seem the only feasible way to inform the ongoing debate on health care costs, drug safety and clinical outcomes.

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Adults with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problem More adults with disabilities need to get physical activity. Adults with disabilities who get no physical activity ... Adults with disabilities are more likely to get physical activity if doctors recommend it. Only 44% of adults ...

  8. An Undergraduate Course in Adult Development: When the Virtual Adult Is an Adult

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    An aspect of an undergraduate psychology course on adult development was the preparation of case records on adults who consented to be studied. Participants (1) developed their abilities to observe and accurately record adult behavior across a variety of ages and contexts; (2) withheld judgments about behavior when evidence was lacking; (3)…

  9. Economic analysis of surgical treatment of hip fracture in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Loures, Fabiano Bolpato; Chaoubah, Alfredo; de Oliveira, Valdeci Manoel; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Campos, Estela Márcia de Saraiva; de Paiva, Elenir Pereira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the incremental cost-utility ratio for the surgical treatment of hip fracture in older patients. METHODS This was a retrospective cohort study of a systematic sample of patients who underwent surgery for hip fracture at a central hospital of a macro-region in the state of Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011. A decision tree creation was analyzed considering the direct medical costs. The study followed the healthcare provider’s perspective and had a one-year time horizon. Effectiveness was measured by the time elapsed between trauma and surgery after dividing the patients into early and late surgery groups. The utility was obtained in a cross-sectional and indirect manner using the EuroQOL 5 Dimensions generic questionnaire transformed into cardinal numbers using the national regulations established by the Center for the Development and Regional Planning of the State of Minas Gerais. The sample included 110 patients, 27 of whom were allocated in the early surgery group and 83 in the late surgery group. The groups were stratified by age, gender, type of fracture, type of surgery, and anesthetic risk. RESULTS The direct medical cost presented a statistically significant increase among patients in the late surgery group (p < 0.005), mainly because of ward costs (p < 0.001). In-hospital mortality was higher in the late surgery group (7.4% versus 16.9%). The decision tree demonstrated the dominance of the early surgery strategy over the late surgery strategy: R$9,854.34 (USD4,387.17) versus R$26,754.56 (USD11,911.03) per quality-adjusted life year. The sensitivity test with extreme values proved the robustness of the results. CONCLUSIONS After controlling for confounding variables, the strategy of early surgery for hip fracture in the older adults was proven to be dominant, because it presented a lower cost and better results than late surgery. PMID:25741654

  10. Scoping review report: obesity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Decaria, J E; Sharp, C; Petrella, R J

    2012-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for early death, heart disease and stroke, disability and several other comorbidities. Although there is concern about the potential burden on health-care services with the aging demographic and the increasing trend of obesity prevalence in older adults, evidence on which to base management strategies is conflicting for various reasons. The analytic framework for this review is based on a scoping review methodology, and was conducted to examine what is known about the diagnosis, treatment and management of obesity in older adults. A total of 492 relevant research articles were identified using PubMed, Scirus, EBSCO, Clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Reviews and Google Scholar. The findings of this review indicate that the current WHO (World Health Organization)-recommended body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio obesity thresholds for the general adult population may not be appropriate for older adults. Alternatively, weight change or physical fitness may be more useful measures of mortality and health risk in obese older adults. Furthermore, although obesity in older adults is associated with several disorders that increase functional disability, epidemiological evidence suggests that obesity is protective against mortality in seniors. Consequently, the trend toward increasing prevalence of obesity in older adults will lead to an increase in unhealthy life years and health-care costs. The findings from this review also suggest that treatment strategies for obese older adults should focus on maintaining body weight and improving physical fitness and function rather than weight loss, and that a combination of aerobic and resistance exercise appears to be the most effective strategy. In conclusion, this review demonstrates the need for more research to clarify the definition of obesity in older adults, to establish criteria for evaluating when to treat older adults for obesity, and to develop effective

  11. Drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy: a critical review of adult guideline recommendations.

    PubMed

    Al Khaja, Khalid A J; Sequeira, Reginald P; Alkhaja, Alwaleed K; Damanhori, Awatif H H

    2014-03-01

    This review evaluates the guideline recommendations for the management of hypertension in pregnancy as presented by 25 national/international guidelines developed for the management of arterial hypertension in adults. There is a general consensus that oral α-methyldopa and parenteral labetalol are the drugs of choice for nonsevere and severe hypertension in pregnancy, respectively. Long-acting nifedipine is recommended by various guidelines as an alternative for first-line and second-line therapy in nonsevere and severe hypertension. The safety of β-blockers, atenolol in particular, in early and late stages of pregnancy is unresolved; their use is contraindicated according to several guidelines. Diuretic-associated harmful effects on maternal and fetal outcomes are controversial: their use is discouraged in pregnancy. It is important to develop specific guidelines for treating hypertension in special groups such as adult females of childbearing age and sexually active female adolescents to minimize the risk of adverse effects of drugs on the fetus. In several guidelines, the antihypertensive classes, recommended drug(s), intended drug formulation, and route of administration are not explicit. These omissions should be addressed in future guideline revisions in order to enhance the guidelines' utility and credibility in clinical practice.

  12. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T.; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P.; Madalena, Kathryn M.; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A.; Deans, Robert J.; Mays, Robert W.; Busch, Sarah A.; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  13. Anticholinergics in the treatment of children and adults with acute asthma: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, G; Castro-Rodriguez, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Current guidelines recommend the use of a combination of inhaled ß2 agonists and anticholinergics, particularly for patients with acute severe or life threatening asthma in the emergency setting. However, this statement is based on a relatively small number of randomised controlled trials and related systematic reviews. A review was undertaken to incorporate the more recent evidence available about the effectiveness of treatment with a combination of ß2 agonists and anticholinergics compared with ß2 agonists alone in the treatment of acute asthma. Methods: A search was conducted of all randomised controlled trials published before April 2005. Results: Data from 32 randomised controlled trials (n = 3611 subjects) showed significant reductions in hospital admissions in both children (RR = 0.73; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85, p = 0.0001) and adults (RR = 0.68; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.86, p = 0.002) treated with inhaled anticholinergic agents. Combined treatment also produced a significant increase in spirometric parameters 60–120 minutes after the last treatment in both children (SMD = –0.54; 95% CI –0.28 to –0.81, p = 0.0001) and adults (SMD = –0.36; 95% CI –0.23 to –0.49, p = 0.00001). Conclusions: This review strongly suggests that the addition of multiple doses of inhaled ipratropium bromide to ß2 agonists is indicated as the standard treatment in children, adolescents, and adults with moderate to severe exacerbations of asthma in the emergency setting. PMID:16055613

  14. The Relationship Between Non-Medical Use of Prescription Opioids and Sex Work Among Adults in Residential Substance Use Treatment.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Alexis K; Ilgen, Mark A; Bonar, Erin E; Price, Amanda; Bohnert, Amy S B

    2016-05-01

    High rates of substance use (e.g., alcohol, cocaine, heroin) have been documented among individuals who engage in sex work (SW), and adults seeking substance use disorder (SUD) treatment frequently report prior engagement in SW. Non-medical use of prescription opioids (NMUPO) has increased over the last decade, but little is known about the relationship between NMUPO with sex exchange. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of recent SW among patients at a large residential SUD treatment center and examine the association between NMUPO and SW. Approximately 14% of 588 adults reported involvement in SW in the month prior to treatment. NMUPO was more common among those with a history of SW (95% of sex workers vs. 74% of non-sex-workers), and this association remained statistically significant after controlling for demographic factors, other substance use and psychiatric symptom severity (odds ratio=3.38). SW is relatively common among patients in residential SUD treatment, and is associated with greater psychiatric severity and more extensive substance use, including alarming rates of NMUPO. Addiction treatment for individuals involved in SW may benefit from the addition of content related to NMUPO.

  15. Effects of juvenile isolation and morphine treatment on social interactions and opioid receptors in adult rats: behavioural and autoradiographic studies.

    PubMed

    Van den Berg, C L; Van Ree, J M; Spruijt, B M; Kitchen, I

    1999-09-01

    The consequences of juvenile isolation and morphine treatment during the isolation period on (social) behaviour and mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in adulthood were investigated by using a social interaction test and in vitro autoradiography in rats. Juvenile isolation reduced social exploration in adults. Morphine treatment counteracted this reduction in isolated rats, but decreased social exploration in nonisolated rats. Self-grooming and nonsocial exploration were enhanced after juvenile isolation. Morphine treatment had no effect on self-grooming, but suppressed nonsocial exploration in isolated rats. With respect to the opioid receptors, juvenile isolation resulted in regiospecific increases in mu-binding sites with a 58% increase in the basolateral amygdala and a 33% increase in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis. Morphine treatment in isolated rats reversed this upregulation in both areas. The number of delta-binding sites did not differ between the experimental groups. A general upregulation of kappa-binding sites was observed after juvenile isolation, predominantly in the cortical regions, the hippocampus and the substantia nigra. Morphine treatment did not affect the upregulation of kappa-receptors. The results show that juvenile isolation during the play period causes long-term effects on social and nonsocial behaviours and on the number of mu- and kappa- but not delta-opioid receptors in distinct brain areas. The number of mu-receptors in the basolateral amygdala appears to be negatively correlated with the amount of social exploration in adult rats.

  16. The Effect of a Unilateral Orchiectomy before Gonadotoxic Treatment on the Contralateral Testis in Adult and Prepubertal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rombaut, Charlotte; Faes, Katrien; Goossens, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have shown that the removal of one testis leads to a compensatory mechanism in the contralateral one, but this was species and age dependent. The aim of this study was to check whether this compensation would still occur after the combination of a unilateral orchiectomy and gonadotoxic treatment, since this resembles the clinical situation of patients who have to undergo highly toxic cancer treatment and therefore choose to cryopreserve a testicular biopsy for fertility restoration purposes. Materials & Methods Sprague Dawley rats underwent either unilateral orchiectomy, gonadotoxic busulfan treatment, the combination of both or served as fertile control. A comparison of the compensatory effects was made between adult and prepubertal treated rats. Mating experiments were performed, testosterone levels were followed-up, testicular weight was recorded and histology was analysed. Results Adult treated rats were able to restore fertility spontaneously in all treatment groups. On the other hand, 30% of the rats that underwent a unilateral orchiectomy and gonadotoxic treatment at prepubertal age showed hampered spermatogenesis, low testosterone levels, decreased testicular weights and were not able to reproduce. Conclusion This study emphasizes the need of fertility preservation strategies in prepubertal patients before gonadotoxic interventions. PMID:27768736

  17. Targeted therapeutics in treatment of children and young adults with solid tumors: an expert survey and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Grunewald, T G P; Greulich, N; Kontny, U; Frühwald, M; Rutkowski, S; Kordes, U; Scheurlen, W; Schmidt, W; Stachel, D; Metzler, M; Mittler, U; Graf, N; Benesch, M; Burdach, S

    2012-04-01

    Although prognosis of children with solid tumors is steadily improving, long-term survival is not achievable in all patients, especially in patients with recurrent or refractory disease. Despite the increasing number of targeted therapeutics (TT), only very few TT have been introduced into clinical protocols. Accordingly, clinical experience concerning the efficacy and safety of these drugs is limited. This may possibly discourage oncologists from administering TT to children.We performed a comprehensive review of the literature to identify TT that may be considered for treatment of children and young adults with solid tumors. Moreover, we interviewed an expert panel of the Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology (GPOH) using questionnaires in a modified Delphi process in order to describe the experts' experiences in the use of these TT.Among 30 TT identified to be possibly useful in children and young adults, imatinib, bevacizumab and rapamycin were most widely used. These drugs were reported as having mostly little to no severe adverse events and seem to induce at least partial responses in a subset of patients. In addition, our study confirms and expands the present knowledge about adverse events and the potential efficacy of 5 other commonly used TT in this population.This information may be useful for oncologists when administering these TT to children and young adults with solid tumors. Controlled clinical trials are urgently needed to test their safety and efficacy.

  18. Care of Older Adults: Role of Primary Care Physicians in the Treatment of Cataracts and Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marra, Kyle V; Wagley, Sushant; Kuperwaser, Mark C; Campo, Rafael; Arroyo, Jorge G

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to facilitate optimal management of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing information on indications, risk factors, referral guidelines, and treatments and to describe techniques to maximize quality of life (QOL) for people with irreversible vision loss. A review of PubMed and other online databases was performed for peer-reviewed English-language articles from 1980 through August 2012 on visual impairment in elderly adults. Search terms included vision loss, visual impairment, blind, low vision, QOL combined with age-related, elderly, and aging. Articles were selected that discussed vision loss in elderly adults, effects of vision impairment on QOL, and care strategies to manage vision loss in older adults. The ability of primary care physicians (PCPs) to identify early signs of cataracts and AMD in individuals at risk of vision loss is critical to early diagnosis and management of these common age-related eye diseases. PCPs can help preserve vision by issuing aptly timed referrals and encouraging behavioral modifications that reduce risk factors. With knowledge of referral guidelines for soliciting low-vision rehabilitation services, visual aids, and community support resources, PCPs can considerably increase the QOL of individuals with uncorrectable vision loss. By offering appropriately timed referrals, promoting behavioral modifications, and allocating low-vision care resources, PCPs may play a critical role in preserving visual health and enhancing the QOL for the elderly population.

  19. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-04

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice.

  20. Postnatal day 7 ethanol treatment causes persistent reductions in adult mouse brain volume and cortical neurons with sex specific effects on neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leon G; Oguz, Ipek; Lee, Joohwi; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T

    2012-09-01

    Ethanol treatment on postnatal day seven (P7) causes robust brain cell death and is a model of late gestational alcohol exposure (Ikonomidou et al., 2000). To investigate the long-term effects of P7 ethanol treatment on adult brain, mice received either two doses of saline or ethanol on P7 (2.5 g/kg, s.c., 2 h apart) and were assessed as adults (P82) for brain volume (using postmortem MRI) and cellular architecture (using immunohistochemistry). Adult mice that received P7 ethanol had reduced MRI total brain volume (4%) with multiple brain regions being reduced in both males and females. Immunohistochemistry indicated reduced frontal cortical parvalbumin immunoreactive (PV + IR) interneurons (18-33%) and reduced Cux1+IR layer II pyramidal neurons (15%) in both sexes. Interestingly, markers of adult hippocampal neurogenesis differed between sexes, with only ethanol treated males showing increased doublecortin and Ki67 expression (52 and 57% respectively) in the dentate gyrus, consistent with increased neurogenesis compared to controls. These findings suggest that P7 ethanol treatment causes persistent reductions in adult brain volume and frontal cortical neurons in both males and females. Increased adult neurogenesis in males, but not females, is consistent with differential adaptive responses to P7 ethanol toxicity between the sexes. One day of ethanol exposure, e.g. P7, causes persistent adult brain dysmorphology.

  1. Upper Airway Changes after Orthodontic Extraction Treatment in Adults: A Preliminary Study using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjing; Chen, Gui; Li, Weiran; Xu, Tianmin; Gao, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Objective Whether the orthodontic treatment with premolar extraction and maximum anchorage in adults will lead to a narrowed upper airway remains under debated. The study aims to investigate the airway changes after orthodontic extraction treatment in adult patients with Class II and hyperdivergent skeletal malocclusion. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 18 adults with Class II and hyperdivergent skeletal malocclusion (5 males and 13 females, 24.1 ± 3.8 years of age, BMI 20.33 ± 1.77 kg/m2). And 18 untreated controls were matched 1:1 with the treated patients for age, sex, BMI, and skeletal pattern. CBCT images before and after treatment were obtained. DOLPHIN 11.7 software was used to reconstruct and measure the airway size, hyoid position, and craniofacial structures. Changes in the airway and craniofacial parameters from pre to post treatment were assessed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Mann-Whitney U test was used in comparisons of the airway parameters between the treated patients and the untreated controls. Significant level was set at 0.05. Results The upper and lower incisors retracted 7.87 mm and 6.10 mm based on the measurement of U1-VRL and L1-VRL (P < 0.01), while the positions of the upper and lower molars (U6-VRL, and L6-VRL) remained stable. Volume, height, and cross-sectional area of the airway were not significantly changed after treatment, while the sagittal dimensions of SPP-SPPW, U-MPW, PAS, and V-LPW were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), and the morphology of the cross sections passing through SPP-SPPW, U-MPW, PAS, and V-LPW became anteroposteriorly compressed (P <0.001). No significant differences in the airway volume, height, and cross-sectional area were found between the treated patients and untreated controls. Conclusions The airway changes after orthodontic treatment with premolar extraction and maximum anchorage in adults are mainly morphological changes with anteroposterior dimension compressed in airway cross

  2. Biologic treatment response among adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register

    PubMed Central

    McErlane, Flora; Foster, Helen E.; Davies, Rebecca; Lunt, Mark; Watson, Kath D.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To describe the use of and response to biologic therapies commenced in adults with JIA. Methods. Patients with arthritis onset <16 years were identified from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register for rheumatoid arthritis (BSRBR-RA) and stratified into ILAR JIA subtypes. Patterns of biologic use and treatment persistence were explored, with disability levels (HAQ) and remission rates [28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)] evaluated at 6 and 12 months. Results. Arthritis with an onset of <16 years was confirmed in 225 patients and the ILAR subtype was determined in 154 (68%). Only 58 (26%) patients had a diagnosis of JIA recorded in the BSRBR-RA. The median age at biologic commencement was 31 years [interquartile range (IQR) 23–39] and 76% were female. The biologic therapies were etanercept (49%), infliximab (28%), adalimumab (22%) and anakinra (1%). Fifty per cent of patients received more than one biologic during follow-up (2 agents, n = 64; ≥3 agents, n = 49). Treatment persistence at 1 year was 78% (95% CI 71%, 82%), falling to 42% (95% CI 34%, 49%) at 5 years. Both the HAQ and DAS28 improved significantly at 6 months, with 21% and 28% of patients in remission (DAS28 < 2.6) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Conclusion. This study describes patterns and identifies outcomes of biologic use in a national cohort of adults with JIA. With no national guidance currently available in this area, the choice of first biologic was inconsistent, although treatment outcomes were good. These data confirm that biologic therapies are an important treatment option in adults with active JIA in adulthood. PMID:23873820

  3. Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morone, Natalia E; Greco, Carol M; Weiner, Debra K

    2008-02-01

    The objectives of this pilot study were to assess the feasibility of recruitment and adherence to an eight-session mindfulness meditation program for community-dwelling older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and to develop initial estimates of treatment effects. It was designed as a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Participants were 37 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older with CLBP of moderate intensity occurring daily or almost every day. Participants were randomized to an 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program or to a wait-list control group. Baseline, 8-week and 3-month follow-up measures of pain, physical function, and quality of life were assessed. Eighty-nine older adults were screened and 37 found to be eligible and randomized within a 6-month period. The mean age of the sample was 74.9 years, 21/37 (57%) of participants were female and 33/37 (89%) were white. At the end of the intervention 30/37 (81%) participants completed 8-week assessments. Average class attendance of the intervention arm was 6.7 out of 8. They meditated an average of 4.3 days a week and the average minutes per day was 31.6. Compared to the control group, the intervention group displayed significant improvement in the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire Total Score and Activities Engagement subscale (P=.008, P=.004) and SF-36 Physical Function (P=.03). An 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program is feasible for older adults with CLBP. The program may lead to improvement in pain acceptance and physical function.

  4. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome in adults

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Mathieu; Devilliers, Hervé; Perard, Laurent; Groh, Matthieu; Nefti, Habdelamid; Dussol, Bertrand; Trad, Salim; Touré, Fatouma; Abad, Sébastien; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frimat, Luc; Torner, Stéphane; Seidowsky, Alexandre; Massy, Ziad André; Saadoun, David; Rieu, Virginie; Schoindre, Yoland; Heron, Emmanuel; Frouget, Thierry; Lionet, Arnaud; Glowacki, François; Arnaud, Laurent; Mousson, Christiane; Besancenot, Jean-François; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Bielefeld, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) syndrome is a rare disease, defined by the association of idiopathic acute TINU. The aim of our work was to determine the characteristics of adult TINU syndrome in France, and to assess factors (including treatment) influencing medium-term prognosis. We conducted a nationwide study including 20 French hospitals. Clinical, laboratory, and renal histopathologic data of 41 biopsy-proven TINU syndromes were retrospectively collected. The patients were diagnosed between January 1, 1999 and December 1, 2015. Twenty-five females and 16 males were included (F/M ratio: 1.6:1). The median age at disease onset was 46.8 years (range 16.8–77.4) with a median serum creatinine level at 207 μmol/L (range 100–1687) and a median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 27 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (range 2–73). Twenty-nine patients (71%) had a bilateral anterior uveitis and 24 (59%) had deterioration in general health at presentation. Moderate proteinuria was found in 32 patients (78%) (median proteinuria 0.52 g/24 h; range 0.10–2.10), aseptic leukocyturia in 25/36 patients (70%). The evaluation of renal biopsies revealed 41 patients (100%) with an acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, 19/39 patients (49%) with light to moderate fibrosis and 5 patients (12%) with an acute tubular necrosis. Thirty-six patients (88%) were treated with oral corticosteroids. After 1 year of follow-up, the median eGFR was 76 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (range 17–119) and 32% of the patients suffered from moderate to severe chronic kidney disease. Serum creatinine (P < 0.001, r = −0.54), serum bicarbonate and phosphate levels (respectively, P = 0.01, r = 0.53; and P = 0.04, r = 0.46), and age (P = 0.03, r = −0.37) at the 1st symptoms were associated with eGFR after 1 year. During the 1st year 40% of patients had uveitis relapses. The use of oral corticosteroids was not associated with a better kidney function but was associated

  5. The Relationship Between Early Maladaptive Schemas, Depression, and Generalized Anxiety among Adults Seeking Residential Treatment for Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, Joanna; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that early maladaptive schemas (EMS) play an important role in substance use, depression, and anxiety. However, few studies have examined the role of EMS within the context of all three concurrently. The goal of this study was to determine the role of EMS in predicting symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) among adults in residential treatment for substance dependence. We used pre-existing patient records of adults diagnosed with a substance use disorder from a residential substance use treatment facility (N=122). The EMS domains of disconnection and rejection and impaired limits were associated with symptoms of MDD and the domain of impaired autonomy and performance was associated with symptoms of GAD, even after controlling for age, gender, years of education, alcohol use, drug use, and symptoms of MDD (when predicting GAD) and GAD (when predicting MDD). Findings suggest that EMS may play an important role in comorbid mental health problems among men and women in residential substance use treatment. Continued treatment outcome research is needed to examine whether modification of EMS results in improved mental health and substance use outcomes.

  6. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Interventions for the Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults.

    PubMed

    Raynor, Hollie A; Champagne, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that successful treatment of overweight and obesity in adults requires adoption and maintenance of lifestyle behaviors contributing to both dietary intake and physical activity. These behaviors are influenced by many factors; therefore, interventions incorporating more than one level of the socioecological model and addressing several key factors in each level may be more successful than interventions targeting any one level and factor alone. Registered dietitian nutritionists, as part of a multidisciplinary team, need to be current and skilled in weight management to effectively assist and lead efforts that can reduce the obesity epidemic. Using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Evidence Analysis Process and Evidence Analysis Library, this position paper presents the current data and recommendations for the treatment of overweight and obesity in adults. Evidence on intrapersonal influences, such as dietary approaches, lifestyle intervention, pharmacotherapy, and surgery, is provided. Factors related to treatment, such as intensity of treatment and technology, are reviewed. Community-level interventions that strengthen existing community assets and capacity and public policy to create environments that support healthy energy balance behaviors are also discussed.

  7. Supplementary guanfacine hydrochloride as a treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in adults: A double blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Max E; Saal, Jaime; Young, Benjamin; Young, Joel L

    2016-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of an extended release guanfacine hydrochloride supplement relative to a placebo supplement in adults (19-62) with ADHD and a sub-optimal response to a stimulant-only treatment program. The study's primary outcome measures were the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression - Severity. Twenty-six adults who met criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and sub-optimal functioning were randomly assigned to supplement their existing psychostimulant treatment regimen with either a titrated dose (1-6mg) of extended release guanfacine hydrochloride or a matching placebo for a 10-week trial. The data were analyzed with standard mixed model analysis of variance procedures, and participants in both the investigational agent group and the placebo group showed statistically significant improvement in their symptoms and functioning over the course of the trial. The treatments did not differ in terms of their efficacy, safety, or tolerability. Although these results do suggest that both treatments were associated with clinical improvement, the possible impacts of socially desirable responding and regression to the mean on these results are discussed.

  8. Management of adult choledochal cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C S; Sawyers, J L; Reynolds, V H

    1981-01-01

    A review of the English literature reveals a total of 1,337 patients with choledochal cysts. Improved diagnostic techniques to visualize the biliary system are demonstrating an increasing number of unsuspected choledochal cysts in adult patients. Either choledochal cysts remain clinically silent until adulthood or may develop in later life. Experience is reported with adult patients having type I, II, III, and IV choledochal cysts. Type I cysts are preferably managed by excision but cyst anatomy may necessitate choledochoenteric drainage. Type II cysts are treated by excision except for those located within the pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. These are best managed by transduodenal cystoduodenostomy. The type III cyst (choledochocele) should be excised carefully, identifying and preserving the common bile and pancreatic ducts. Type IV cysts include a combination of any one of the first three types of cyst plus the presence of intrahepatic cyst or cysts. Treatment of these cysts is dictated by the type and location of the extrahepatic cyst. Since choledochal cysts are being recognized with increased frequency in adults, surgeons need to be aware of the diagnostic and treatment modalities available for each type of biliary cyst. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:7235770

  9. Factor structure of the Emotional Eating Scale in overweight and obese adults seeking treatment

    PubMed Central

    Goldbacher, E.M.; Grunwald, H.E.; LaGrotte, C.A.; Klotz, A.A.; Oliver, T.L.; Musliner, K.L.; VanderVeur, S.S.; Foster, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factor structure and anthropometric correlates of the Emotional Eating Scale in overweight and obese adults presenting for weight loss. Participants were 217 men and women with a mean body-mass index of 33.1 (±3.4) kg/m2. Results indicated a four factor structure: depression, anger, anxiety, and somatic arousal. These factors demonstrated strong internal consistency, and together accounted for approximately 60% of the total variance. Women had significantly higher depression and total scores than did men. There were no significant correlations between the Emotional Eating Scale scores and anthropometric measures. This work begins to add to the literature base regarding the applicability of the original design of the Emotional Eating Scale for samples consisting of men and African Americans. PMID:22510311

  10. Ultrastructural and functional effects of lead poisoning on adult canine myocardium: assessment of thiamin treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of lead (Pb) poisoning on the adult canine myocardium were assessed quantitatively using stereological techniques, functional testing, and blood analyses as well as qualitatively by morphological investigation. Relative measurements using stereological techniques compared the volume fractions of cellular components of the three groups. Blood was analyzed for lead, hemoglobin, hematocrit, total erythrocytes, total leukocytes, thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity (ALAD), and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP). The major finding of the stereological analysis was the statistically significant increase of 3.2% in myofilament volume in the Pb treated group and the significant decrease in mitochondrial volume in both the Pb treated and Pb + B/sub 1/ treated groups. A statistically significant decrease in the mitochondria/myofilament volume ratio was found in the Pb treated, but no Pb + B/sub 1/ treated group. This may indicate either a protective effect of thiamin on mitochondria or a reduced compensatory need of the myocyte to increase myofilament volume.

  11. Extreme lateral interbody fusion for the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Adam M; Michael, Keith W; Chapman, Todd M; Jennings, Jason M; Hubbard, Elizabeth W; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2013-11-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) is a minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracolumbar spine. Though the procedure is rapidly increasing in popularity, limited data is available regarding its use in deformity surgery. We aimed to evaluate radiographic correction using XLIF in adults with degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Thirty consecutive patients were followed for an average of 14.3 months. Interbody fusion was completed using the XLIF technique with supplemental posterior instrumentation. Plain radiographs were obtained on all patients preoperatively, postoperatively, and at most recent follow-up. Plain radiographic measurements of coronal Cobb angle, apical vertebral translation, segmental lordosis, global lordosis, disc height, neuroforaminal height and neuroforaminal width were made at each time point. CT scans were obtained for all patients 1 year after surgery to evaluate for fusion. There was significant improvement in multiple radiographic parameters from preoperative to postoperative. Cobb angle corrected 72.3%, apical vertebral translation corrected 59.7%, neuroforaminal height increased 80.3%, neuroforaminal width increased 7.4%, and disc height increased 116.7%. Segmental lordosis at L4-L5 increased 14.1% and global lordosis increased 11.5%. There was no significant loss of correction from postoperative to most recent follow-up. There was an 11.8% pseudoarthrosis rate at levels treated with XLIF. Complications included lateral incisional hernia (n=1), rupture of anterior longitudinal ligament (n=2), wound breakdown (n=2), cardiac instability (n=1), pedicle fracture (n=1), and nonunion requiring revision (n=1). XLIF significantly improves coronal plane deformity in patients with adult degenerative scoliosis. XLIF has the ability to correct sagittal plane deformity, although it is most effective at lower lumbar levels.

  12. [Residual states in 30 percent of adult patients with Bell's palsy. Early treatment with cortisone improves the healing process].

    PubMed

    Berg, Thomas; Stjernquist-Desatnik, Anna; Kanerva, Mervi; Hultcrantz, Malou; Engström, Mats; Jonsson, Lars

    2015-01-06

    Bell's palsy is an acute unilateral weakness or paralysis of the face of unknown cause. The incidence of the disease is 30 individuals per 100,000 per year. It is a diagnosis of exclusion and other known causes for acute peripheral facial palsy must be ruled out. The prognosis is overall favorable and about 70% of the patients recover completely within 6 months without treatment. Recent randomized controlled Bell's palsy trials have shown that treatment with corticosteroids shortens time to recovery and improves recovery rates while antiviral treatment alone is not more effective than placebo. The combination of corticosteroids and antivirals has not been proven more effective than corticosteroids alone. We present an update of Bell's palsy in adults with focus on diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of these patients.

  13. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  15. Adult hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, L A; Valdivia, T; Nuttall, F Q

    1991-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance was diagnosed in a 69-year-old man on the basis of his medical history and the response to an intravenous fructose tolerance test. Three men of the same age as our patient were used as control subjects. Since the severity may vary and affected individuals self-impose fructose and sucrose restriction, they are essentially symptom free. The diagnosis can only be suspected by taking a careful dietary history. The prevalence of this condition in adults is unknown. It is rare but is likely to be more common than data in the literature would indicate.

  16. Immigration and adult transitions.

    PubMed

    Rumbaut, Rubén G; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Rubén Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage counterparts, including blacks and whites. The authors document the demographic changes in the United States over the past forty years and describe the ways in which generation and national origin shape the experiences of these newcomers as they become adults. Rumbaut and Komaie point out that immigrant groups experience gaps in social, economic, and legal status that are even greater than the gaps between native whites and blacks. By far the most-educated (Indians) and the least-educated (Mexicans) groups in the United States today are first-generation immigrants, as are the groups with the lowest poverty rate (Filipinos) and the highest poverty rate (Dominicans). These social and economic divides reflect three very different ways immigrants enter the country: through regular immigration channels, without legal authorization, or as state-sponsored refugees. For many ethnic groups, significant progress takes place from the first to the second generation. But, say the authors, for millions of young immigrants, a lack of legal permanent residency status blocks their prospects for social mobility. Having an undocumented status has become all the more consequential with the failure of Congress to pass comprehensive federal immigration reforms. In the coming two decades, as the U.S. native-parentage labor force continues to shrink, immigrants and their children are expected to account for most of the growth of the nation's labor force, with the fastest-growing occupations requiring college degrees. Rumbaut and Komaie stress that one key to the nation's future will be how it incorporates young adults of immigrant origin in its

  17. [Hearing loss in adults].

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Adrien A; Frachet, Bruno; Van De Water, Tom R; Eter, Elias

    2009-05-20

    The management of hearing loss in adults depends of etiology and its severity. It can be as simple as treating an external otitis, removing an impacted cerumen or a more complex one such as a surgery for otosclerosis. The hearing loss is managed mainly by new advances in hearing aids technology and implantable hearing devices which include BAHA, middle ear implant and cochlear implants. The research is focused on developing new molecules for intracochlear drug therapy to treat noise induced hearing loss, drug ototoxicity as well as hearing loss related to cochlear implant insertion trauma. Antioxidant molecules, molecules against apoptosis are at this time the most promising molecules than need further investigations.

  18. Impact of fixed orthodontic appliance or clear-aligner on daily performance, in adult patients with moderate need for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feiou; Yao, Linjie; Bhikoo, Chandradev; Guo, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of wearing fixed orthodontic appliance (FOA) or clear-aligner, on daily performance in adult patients. Methods The Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) index was assessed in 152 adults aged 25–35 years at baseline (T0), 6 months after bonding (T1), and 12 months after bonding (T2). Participants were randomly divided into two groups: CA group (participants treated with clear-aligner) and a control group (FOA group; participants treated with FOA). Baseline malocclusion severity was assessed using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Results There were no significant differences in sociodemographic variables and OIDP scores at baseline between the two groups. Significant changes in OIDP total and subscale scores were observed while wearing FOA: OIDP total score and subscale scores of eating, cleaning teeth, smiling, and social relation at T1 and T2 were significantly higher than at baseline (P<0.05 or P<0.01). However, only OIDP total score was significantly increased at T1 compared to the baseline in the CA group. OIDP total score and subscale scores of eating, cleaning teeth, smiling, and social relation were significantly higher in patients wearing FOA than in patients wearing clear-aligner at T1 and T2 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion Patients wearing clear-aligner have fewer impacts on daily life than those wearing FOA during treatment, and have no significant changes in OIPD subscale scores at 12 months. FOA therapy significantly impacts daily performance in adult patients during treatment. PMID:27616881

  19. Adults with Prader-Willi syndrome have weaker bones: effect of treatment with GH and sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Silvia; Grugni, Graziano; Gatti, Davide; Spinozzi, Emiliano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Adami, Silvano; Fanolla, Antonio; Radetti, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    Obesity has been considered to have a protective effect against the risk of fractures in adults. However, a high frequency of fracture is described in obese adults with Prader-Willi syndrome. To evaluate bone geometry, density and strength in a group of adult obese patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and to examine the modulating effect on bone of treatment with growth hormone (GH) and sex steroids. This was a cross-sectional study performed in 41 (17 males, 24 females) obese subjects with genetically confirmed PWS, aged 29.4 ± 8.6 years. Forty-six healthy subjects (22 males and 24 females) served as controls. Digitalized X-rays were evaluated at the level of the 2nd metacarpal bone to assess bone geometry, i.e. cross-sectional area (CSA), cortical area (CA), medullary area (MA), metacarpal index (MI) and bone strength evaluated as bending breaking resistance index (BBRI). DEXA was also used to evaluate body composition and bone mineral density (total body, lumbar spine and femoral neck). PWS subjects, after adjusting for height and bone size, had a reduced CSA, CA and BBRI, while bone density was not different. GH treatment had a positive effect and sex steroids a negative effect on bone size and strength. PWS subjects showed a reduced bone size at the metacarpus leading to a reduced strength, while bone density was appropriate for size. GH treatment improves bone geometry but not bone density. Bone strength was significantly reduced in PWS patients who did not receive GH and had been treated with sex steroids.

  20. Deficient social and play behavior in juvenile and adult rats after neonatal cortical lesion: effects of chronic pubertal cannabinoid treatment.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Miriam; Koch, Michael

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of neonatal excitotoxic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) on social play, social behavior unrelated to play, and self-grooming in juvenile and adult rats. We additionally examined the behavioral effects of chronic pubertal treatment with the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) in order to test the hypothesis that early lesions render the brain vulnerable to cannabinoid intake in later life. Neonatal mPFC lesions and pubertal WIN treatment disrupted social play, social behavior, and self-grooming in juvenile and adult rats. Additionally, we observed more social play behaviors during light cycle in WIN-treated than in vehicle-treated rats. Notably, the combination of surgery and WIN treatment disrupted social behavior in lesioned and sham-lesioned rats. The present data indicate that the mPFC is important for adequate juvenile response selection in the context of social play and might be involved in the development of adult social and nonsocial behavior. Moreover, our data add further evidence for an involvement of the cannabinoid system in anxiety and social behavior. Additive effects of neonatal surgery-induced stress or cortical lesions in combination with pubertal cannabinoid administration are also shown. The disturbances of social and nonsocial behavior in rats are comparable to symptoms of early frontal cortex damage, as well as neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, such as schizophrenia and autism. Therefore, we propose the combination of neonatal cortical lesions with chronic cannabinoid administration during puberty as an animal model for studying neuronal mechanisms of impaired social functioning in neuropsychiatric disorders.