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Sample records for adults initiating art

  1. A Comparison of Adults' Responses to Collage versus Drawing in an Initial Art-Making Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Teresa; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this systematic comparison of collage and drawing was to contribute to the sparse body of literature on the way individuals might respond to two materials commonly used in art therapy. Eight graduate and undergraduate university students who identified as non-artists completed two tasks, one using drawing materials and one using…

  2. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  3. Early Mortality in Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amita; Nadkarni, Girish; Yang, Wei-Teng; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Gupte, Nikhil; Bisson, Gregory P.; Hosseinipour, Mina; Gummadi, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed observational studies of early mortality post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America, as defined by the World Bank, to summarize what is known. Methods and Findings Studies published in English between January 1996 and December 2010 were searched in Medline and EMBASE. Three independent reviewers examined studies of mortality within one year post-ART. An article was included if the study was conducted in a LMIC, participants were initiating ART in a non-clinical trial setting and were ≥15 years. Fifty studies were included; 38 (76%) from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), 5 (10%) from Asia, 2 (4%) from the Americas, and 5 (10%) were multi-regional. Median follow-up time and pre-ART CD4 cell count ranged from 3–55 months and 11–192 cells/mm3, respectively. Loss-to-follow-up, reported in 40 (80%) studies, ranged from 0.3%–27%. Overall, SSA had the highest pooled 12-month mortality probability of 0.17 (95% CI 0.11–0.24) versus 0.11 (95% CI 0.10–0.13) for Asia, and 0.07 (95% CI 0.007–0.20) for the Americas. Of 14 (28%) studies reporting cause-specific mortality, tuberculosis (TB) (5%–44%), wasting (5%–53%), advanced HIV (20%–37%), and chronic diarrhea (10%–25%) were most common. Independent factors associated with early mortality in 30 (60%) studies included: low baseline CD4 cell count, male sex, advanced World Health Organization clinical stage, low body mass index, anemia, age greater than 40 years, and pre-ART quantitative HIV RNA. Conclusions Significant heterogeneity in outcomes and in methods of reporting outcomes exist among published studies evaluating mortality in the first year after ART initiation in LMIC. Early mortality rates are highest in SSA, and opportunistic illnesses such as TB and wasting syndrome are the most common reported causes of death. Strategies addressing modifiable risk factors associated with early

  4. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  5. The Spoken Word as Arts-Based Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriweather, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Arts-based adult education has been embraced by a growing number of adult educators. These educators have explored its potential in the workplace, in the community and in academia. This article contributes to this work by exploring the Spoken Word, an art form located within the genre of poetry, and its potential as a tool of arts-based adult…

  6. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART. PMID:26346333

  7. Arts Teachers' Perceptions and Attitudes on Arts Integration While Participating in a Statewide Arts Integration Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Brittany Nixon; Robinson, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes of the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program (BTSALP) arts specialists on arts integration. BTSALP arts specialists (N = 50) throughout the state of Utah responded to a 20-item survey. Results indicated that a majority of BTSALP arts specialists believe that arts…

  8. Cover Art, Consumerism, and YA [Young Adult] Reading Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kies, Cosette

    Cover art has long been used as a marketing device for books, particularly with books aimed at young adults (YAs) aged 12 to 18. An examination of some of the teen thrillers published by novelist Lois Duncan since the 1970s yields several discoveries about changes in cover art that come with various editions. Many covers have been resigned to…

  9. State-of-the-Art in Open Courseware Initiatives Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vladoiu, Monica

    2011-01-01

    We survey here the state-of-the-art in open courseware initiatives worldwide. First, the MIT OpenCourseWare project is overviewed, as it has been the real starting point of the OCW movement. Usually, open courseware refers to a free and open digital publication of high quality university level educational materials that are organized as courses,…

  10. Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Irma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can…

  11. Predictive and prognostic properties of TB-LAM among HIV-positive patients initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    d'Elia, Alexander; Evans, Denise; McNamara, Lynne; Berhanu, Rebecca; Sanne, Ian; Lönnermark, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    While the diagnostic properties of the TB LAM urine assay (LAM) have been well-described, little is known about its predictive and prognostic properties at ART initiation in a routine clinic setting. We describe the predictive and prognostic properties of LAM in HIV-positive patients initiating ART at an urban hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Retrospective study of HIV-positive adults (>18 years) who initiated standard first-line ART between February 2012 and April 2013 and had a LAM test at initiation. In HIV-positive patients with no known TB at ART initiation, we assessed the sensitivity, specificity and positive/negative likelihood ratios of LAM to predict incident TB within 6 months of ART initiation. In addition, in patients with a TB diagnosis and on TB treatment <3 months at ART initiation, we measured the CD4 response at 6 months on ART. Of the 274 patients without TB at ART initiation, 65% were female with median CD4 count of 213 cells/mm3. Among the 14 (5.1%) patients who developed active TB, none were urine LAM +ve at baseline. LAM had poor sensitivity (0.0% 95% CI 0.00-23.2) to predict incident TB within 6 months of initiation. We analyzed 22 patients with a confirmed TB diagnosis at initiation separately. Of these, LAM +ve patients (27%) showed lower CD4 gains compared to LAM negative patients (median increase 103 vs 199 cells/mm3; p = 0.08). LAM has limited value for accurately predicting incident TB in patients with higher CD4 counts after ART initiation. LAM may help identify TB/HIV co-infected patients at ART initiation who respond more slowly to treatment and require targeted interventions to improve treatment outcomes. Larger studies with longer patient follow-up are needed. PMID:26600904

  12. Learning with the Arts: What Opportunities Are There for Work-Related Adult Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Claire; Verenikina, Irina; Brown, Ian

    2010-01-01

    What can arts-based learning offer to adult, work-related education? A study was undertaken that explored the benefits of learning with the arts for professional development of an adult learner in Australia. The individual experiences of nine adults who participated in arts-based workshops to build work-related skills were examined using the…

  13. Leading Online Learning Initiatives in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olesen-Tracey, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Adult learners often face barriers to participation in traditional classroom instruction. As technology access grows and adults naturally incorporate technology into their daily lives, adult education programs are finding innovative ways to blend technology with instruction through quality online learning opportunities. This article highlights the…

  14. Beyond Traditional Art Education: Transformative Lifelong Learning in Community-Based Settings with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Pamela Harris; La Porte, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Quality community-based art education programs for older adults over the age of 50 should exploit the broad range of interests and cognitive abilities of participants by utilizing adult education theory, brain research, and the best practices of adult art education programs. We consider a developing paradigm on the cognitive abilities of the…

  15. Three Initiatives for Community-Based Art Education Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Maria; Chang, EunJung; Song, Borim

    2013-01-01

    Art educators should be concerned with teaching their students to make critical connections between the classroom and the outside world. One effective way to make these critical connections is to provide students with the opportunity to engage in community-based art endeavors. In this article, three university art educators discuss engaging…

  16. Research proposal: evaluation of ART in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Zanata, Régia Luzia

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) is to reduce the indication of tooth extraction by means of a low-cost technique. Considering the difficulties of Brazilian public services to meet the demand of care of the low-income population, with lack of care to the adult population, which usually receives only emergency care, the aim of this study is to assess the performance of high-viscosity glass ionomer cements accomplished by the modified atraumatic restorative treatment in one- and multiple-surface cavities, compared to the conventional restorative approach. It will be analyzed the clinical performance of the materials; cost (material and human resources); patient satisfaction with the treatment received; and preventive effect of treatment. PMID:19089083

  17. Artist-Driven Initiatives for Art Education: What We Can Learn from Street Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daichendt, G. James

    2013-01-01

    The economic state of California is representative of the larger financial health of the United States. The budget cuts and the faltering status of art education in public schools has contrasted much of the rhetoric and statistics for art education and employment in the visual arts. Yet, contemporaneously, California has also witnessed the largest…

  18. Truth without Facts. Selected Papers from the First Three International Conferences on Adult Education and the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Willem, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Values in the Arts and Education" (Jones); "Conditions of Art Confrontations" (Wijdenes, Haanstra); "Arts, Aesthetics and Values in Adult Education" (Greene); "Arts for All" (Milton); "Importance of Culture as Mirrored in the Arts" (Debra); "Arthur Lismer, Canada's Artist/Adult Educator" (Barer-Stein); "Cultural…

  19. Culture and Antiracisms in Adult Education: An Exploration of the Contributions of Arts-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly, practices of collective arts-based learning are being used by adult educators and community organizations as creative and participatory ways to respond to contemporary social or environmental issues. Investigating the potential contributions of arts-based learning to cross-cultural and antiracisms adult education was the aim of this…

  20. Using Photography and Art in Concept Mapping Research with Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams Carawan, Lena; Nalavany, Blace

    2010-01-01

    Reflexive photography for individual interviews and the use of art with focus groups provides a valuable method for exploring the psychosocial issues encountered by adults with dyslexia. Reflexive photography and art is particularly appropriate when interviewing adults with dyslexia who may have difficulty expressing and focusing on what they want…

  1. The Use of Art in the Teaching Practice for Developing Communication Skills in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Niki; Fragoulis, Iosif

    2012-01-01

    The use of Art for educational reasons has been recently developing in Greece both in formal education and in Adult Education. Relevant theoretical texts and studies, (Dewey, 1934. Gardner, 1990. Perkins, 1994) pin point that training through the Arts can contribute to an integrated learning, since through systematic observation of works of art,…

  2. The Crosstown initiative: art, community, and placemaking in Memphis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Pate, Sarah; Ranson, Anna

    2015-03-01

    This case study examines an arts organization at the center of an urban neighborhood revitalization effort and its contributions to creative placemaking and inclusive community building. The study documents innovative arts practices and explores their meaning for a local context, an understudied city in the Mid-South region of the United States. It builds on the research team's ongoing work as teachers, students, and scholars in partnership with the arts organization. It includes systematic participant observation, interviews with stakeholders, and a review of historical and contemporary media coverage. We found that the organization and its practices provided a rich context for exploring an expanded sense of community including bridging social capital and place-based frameworks. Analysis suggests that the organization's intentional arts based practices bring multiple understandings of community and art into meaningful dialogue through the generation of creative and social friction. These practices illustrate one context-specific strategy addressing the tensions in a community-diversity dialectic (Townley et al. in Am J Commun Psychol 47:69-85, 2011). PMID:25420585

  3. Adult Basic Literacy "Initiatives" in Ethiopia: Change and Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenea, Ambissa

    2014-01-01

    The major purpose of the study was to look into change and continuity in the policy and practices of adult basic literacy initiatives in Ethiopia and to deduce lessons that can be drawn from the experiences for the future of adult basic literacy program in the country and elsewhere. Data was obtained through critical review of documents on the…

  4. Employability and the Liberal Arts: A Career Readiness Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    When discussing the role of higher education as it applies to students, responses often devolve into two opposing camps: one for people who advocate for and defend the role of liberal arts education as basic to the preservation of democracy and freedom, and the other for people who care about the connection between what students learn in…

  5. Home-based Art Therapy for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezaki, Shinya; Bloomgarden, Joan

    2000-01-01

    Addresses art therapy for homebound people, giving special attention to the set of needs for this environment; the desired personality traits of the in-home therapist; the structure of the therapeutic relationship; and appropriate art therapy goals. Presents two case studies of home-bound art therapy which demonstrate the complexities and…

  6. City Beats: A Creative Community Partnership Initiative at ArtPlay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanneret, Neryl; Brown, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The City of Melbourne's ArtPlay is open to children and young people aged 3-13 years, and provides a wide range of artist-led programs that serve a broad community within and outside the municipality. Its sister facility, Signal, caters for young people 13-22 years. An Australia Council of the Arts funded Creative Community Partnership Initiative,…

  7. Integrating the Humanities into a Liberal Arts Course on Adult Development and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a freshman liberal arts honors course on adult development and aging. Contains suggestions for selecting and using readings, films, music, and television shows. Provides examples of how to make connections between these materials and the scientific literature. (DSK)

  8. Some Effects of Parental Injunctions on the Visual Art Education of Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Nancy H.

    1975-01-01

    Article sought the sources and manifestations of parent interference with children's artistic development and described some educational techniques that the teacher of art at the adult level can use to cope with blocks to artistic development. (Author/RK)

  9. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  10. A Guide To Setting Up a Creative Art Experiences Program for Older Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Jane E.

    This guide is intended to help agencies serving older adults with mental retardation and other developmental disabilities in setting up a relatively inexpensive creative art program. The first section presents a rationale for creative art experiences for this population and then provides specific information on program development, including…

  11. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  12. The Power of Adult Learning in Fine Arts: Drawing upon Personal Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzelski-Konikowski, Izabella

    2011-01-01

    The utility of definitions and descriptions applied to adult learning can be effectively measured only by direct application to a specific field of learning, in this case, fine arts. Based on the author's 12 years of experience as an art educator, the article provides a conceptual framework for those who are at the beginning of their pedagogical…

  13. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood and Anxiety for Adults in Treatment for Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurer, Mattye; van der Vennet, Renée

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether art production or viewing and sorting art reproductions would be more effective in reducing negative mood and anxiety for 28 adults with substance use disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups and completed pre- and posttest measures of negative mood and anxiety The hypothesis that art…

  14. Arts and Humanities in Adult and Continuing Education. Trends and Issues Alerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Trends and issues related to arts and humanities in adult and continuing education can be categorized in three ways: ways of knowing, informal sites of learning, and cultural pluralism. The arts and humanities are vehicles for critical reflection, and they present paths to the individual construction of knowledge that are intuitive, relational,…

  15. Factors That Affect Initial Enrollment of Working Adult, Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adrignola, Matt Nolan

    2010-01-01

    What factors lead working adults to initially enroll in graduate programs? Is the undergraduate degree no longer enough to sustain a rewarding career? Little is known as to why this segment of graduate students are building careers and pursuing advanced degrees simultaneously. Traditional institutions of higher learning have primarily focused on…

  16. Initial College Attendance of Low-Income Young Adults. Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Higher Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    More than 2.3 million low-income young adults began postsecondary education in 2008. Where these students initially enroll is of greater consequence than it is to their economically better-off peers because the likelihood of completing college for students from low-income backgrounds depends strongly on where they start their studies. This brief…

  17. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance among Ethnically Diverse Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Amanda Alders

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of art therapy on the cognitive performance of a multisite, ethnically diverse sample ("N" = 91) of older adults. Participants were recruited from several U.S. facilities that included a community center, a retirement center, an adult daycare, an assisted living facility, and a skilled nursing facility.…

  18. Contemporary Adult Education Philosophies and Practices in Art Galleries and Museums in Canada and the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.; Bell, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Public art galleries and museums have been mandated to become more relevant and useful to the lived experiences of the broad communities they claim to serve. Adult education has long been part of the work of these institutions, although historically the relationship has been uneasy, and they seldom feature in the adult education literature. To…

  19. Freirean Literacy and the Liberal Arts: Empowering the Returning Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivisonno, Ann

    The "problem-posing" education model of Paulo Freire takes as its departure point the life experience of the learner, rather than the teacher's knowledge. Ursuline College (Cleveland, Ohio) created several courses for returning adult students that were based on Freire's ideas. One course called "Humanities Focus on Life" is for adults who are new…

  20. Artful Witnessing of the Story: Loss in Aging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Peggy; Bradley, Loretta J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examine the concepts of ego integrity, life review, and narrative reconstruction as cornerstones of theory that inform counseling practice with aging adults. Contemporary theories of grief reconciliation are proposed as useful models for understanding and creatively addressing the needs of adults who are 60 years and older.

  1. Participatory arts for older adults: a review of benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Noice, Tony; Noice, Helga; Kramer, Arthur F

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the scientific literature on the enhancement of healthy aging in older adults through active participation in the arts. Methodologies and conclusions are described for studies of dance, expressive writing, music (singing and instrumental), theatre arts, and visual arts including documentation of mental/physical improvements in memory, creativity, problem solving, everyday competence, reaction time, balance/gait, and quality of life. In addition to these gains in measures of successful aging, the article also provides (in a Supplementary Appendix) some selected examples of arts engagement for remedial purposes. Finally, it offers suggestions for expanding inquiry into this underinvestigated corner of aging research. PMID:24336875

  2. Participatory Arts for Older Adults: A Review of Benefits and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Noice, Tony; Noice, Helga; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the scientific literature on the enhancement of healthy aging in older adults through active participation in the arts. Methodologies and conclusions are described for studies of dance, expressive writing, music (singing and instrumental), theatre arts, and visual arts including documentation of mental/physical improvements in memory, creativity, problem solving, everyday competence, reaction time, balance/gait, and quality of life. In addition to these gains in measures of successful aging, the article also provides (in a Supplementary Appendix) some selected examples of arts engagement for remedial purposes. Finally, it offers suggestions for expanding inquiry into this underinvestigated corner of aging research. PMID:24336875

  3. Gender Differences and Psychosocial Factors Associated with Quality of Life Among ART Initiators in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quynh T; Hoffman, Susie; Nash, Denis; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Tymejczyk, Olga A; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Melaku, Zenebe; Kulkarni, Sarah G; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya

    2016-08-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome to assess among persons living with HIV/AIDS, but few studies have been conducted in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined HRQoL among 1180 ART-initiating adults from six clinics in Ethiopia in 2012-2013, and compared the correlates of two subscale scores between women and men. Women scored significantly higher than men on both overall function (8.4 points higher) and life satisfaction (6.3 points higher). In multivariable models, psychological distress, low CD4+ count, unemployment, and food insecurity were associated with lower quality of life scores among women and men. Men whose last sexual encounter occurred 3 months to 1 year from the interview date had lower overall function and life satisfaction scores. Men between the ages of 30-39 had lower overall function scores. Protestant women and women in the low-middle social support category had lower life satisfaction scores. Assessment of HRQoL over time will help inform HIV care and treatment practices to ensure favorable patient outcomes. PMID:27091027

  4. Heroes and Holidays: The Status of Diversity Initiatives at Liberal Arts College Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Studies about diversity initiatives in academic libraries have primarily focused on large research libraries. But what kinds of diversity work occur at smaller libraries? This study examines the status of diversity initiatives, especially those aimed at students, at national liberal arts college libraries. Results from a survey of library…

  5. Writing and Reading with Art: Adult Literacy, Transformation, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Nair Rios; Goncalves, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Especially in a time of economic and social crisis, besides poverty and social segregation, immigrants face an additional difficulty to get integrated in a new society: lack of oral and written knowledge of the language of the country they are now living in. This paper describes an on-going research project--Writing and Reading with Art (WRAP)…

  6. beta-Catenin initiates tooth neogenesis in adult rodent incisors.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Dangaria, S; Andl, T; Zhang, Y; Wright, A C; Damek-Poprawa, M; Piccolo, S; Nagy, A; Taketo, M M; Diekwisch, T G H; Akintoye, S O; Millar, S E

    2010-09-01

    beta-Catenin signaling is required for embryonic tooth morphogenesis and promotes continuous tooth development when activated in embryos. To determine whether activation of this pathway in the adult oral cavity could promote tooth development, we induced mutation of epithelial beta-catenin to a stabilized form in adult mice. This caused increased proliferation of the incisor tooth cervical loop, outpouching of incisor epithelium, abnormal morphology of the epithelial-mesenchymal junction, and enhanced expression of genes associated with embryonic tooth development. Ectopic dental-like structures were formed from the incisor region following implantation into immunodeficient mice. Thus, forced activation of beta-catenin signaling can initiate an embryonic-like program of tooth development in adult rodent incisor teeth. PMID:20530729

  7. β-catenin Initiates Tooth Neogenesis in Adult Rodent Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, F.; Dangaria, S.; Andl, T.; Zhang, Y.; Wright, A.C.; Damek-Poprawa, M.; Piccolo, S.; Nagy, A.; Taketo, M.M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Akintoye, S.O.; Millar, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    β-catenin signaling is required for embryonic tooth morphogenesis and promotes continuous tooth development when activated in embryos. To determine whether activation of this pathway in the adult oral cavity could promote tooth development, we induced mutation of epithelial β-catenin to a stabilized form in adult mice. This caused increased proliferation of the incisor tooth cervical loop, outpouching of incisor epithelium, abnormal morphology of the epithelial-mesenchymal junction, and enhanced expression of genes associated with embryonic tooth development. Ectopic dental-like structures were formed from the incisor region following implantation into immunodeficient mice. Thus, forced activation of β-catenin signaling can initiate an embryonic-like program of tooth development in adult rodent incisor teeth. PMID:20530729

  8. Healthcare intensity at initiation of chronic dialysis among older adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Susan P Y; Kreuter, William; O'Hare, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the circumstances under which older adults initiate chronic dialysis and subsequent outcomes. Using national registry data, we conducted a retrospective analysis of 416,657 Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥67 years who initiated chronic dialysis between January 1995 and December 2008. Our goal was to define the relationship between health care intensity around the time of dialysis initiation and subsequent survival and patterns of hospitalization, use of intensive procedures (mechanical ventilation, feeding tube placement, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation), and discontinuation of dialysis before death. We found that most patients (64.5%) initiated dialysis in the hospital, including 36.6% who were hospitalized for ≥2 weeks and 7.4% who underwent one or more intensive procedures. Compared with patients who initiated dialysis in the outpatient setting, those who received the highest intensity of care at dialysis initiation (those hospitalized ≥2 weeks and receiving at least one intensive procedure) had a shorter median survival (0.7 versus 2.1 years; P<0.001), spent a greater percentage of remaining follow-up time in the hospital (median, 22.9% versus 3.1%; P<0.001), were more likely to undergo subsequent intensive procedures (44.9% versus 26.0%; adjusted hazard ratio, 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.27 to 2.39), and were less likely to have discontinued dialysis before death (19.1% versus 26.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.72). In conclusion, most older adults initiate chronic dialysis in the hospital. Those who have a prolonged hospital stay and receive other forms of life support around the time of dialysis initiation have limited survival and more intensive patterns of subsequent healthcare utilization. PMID:24262795

  9. Socrates in Adult Basic Education Or The Art of Questioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taschow, Horst G.

    In a study of the way adult basic education (ABE) students answer different kinds of questions about what they read, 221 students were asked to read ten passages during a ten-week period and to answer ten questions about each passage immediately after reading it. Each set of questions included three dealing with facts, three dealing with word…

  10. Interventions to improve or facilitate linkage to or retention in pre-ART (HIV) care and initiation of ART in low- and middle-income settings – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Govindasamy, Darshini; Meghij, Jamilah; Negussi, Eyerusalem Kebede; Baggaley, Rachel Clare; Ford, Nathan; Kranzer, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Several approaches have been taken to reduce pre-antiretroviral therapy (ART) losses between HIV testing and ART initiation in low- and middle-income countries, but a systematic assessment of the evidence has not yet been undertaken. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the potential for interventions to improve or facilitate linkage to or retention in pre-ART care and initiation of ART in low- and middle-income settings. Methods An electronic search was conducted on Medline, Embase, Global Health, Web of Science and conference databases to identify studies describing interventions aimed at improving linkage to or retention in pre-ART care or initiation of ART. Additional searches were conducted to identify on-going trials on this topic, and experts in the field were contacted. An assessment of the risk of bias was conducted. Interventions were categorized according to key domains in the existing literature. Results A total of 11,129 potentially relevant citations were identified, of which 24 were eligible for inclusion, with the majority (n=21) from sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, 15 on-going trials were identified. The most common interventions described under key domains included: health system interventions (i.e. integration in the setting of antenatal care); patient convenience and accessibility (i.e. point-of-care CD4 count (POC) testing with immediate results, home-based ART initiation); behaviour interventions and peer support (i.e. improved communication, patient referral and education) and incentives (i.e. food support). Several interventions showed favourable outcomes: integration of care and peer supporters increased enrolment into HIV care, medical incentives increased pre-ART retention, POC CD4 testing and food incentives increased completion of ART eligibility screening and ART initiation. Most studies focused on the general adult patient population or pregnant women. The majority of published studies were observational cohort

  11. Initial management of adults with idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    George, J N

    2002-03-01

    Since idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in adults is usually a chronic condition with few spontaneous remissions, the goal of treatment is not cure, but to maintain a hemostatically safe platelet level. The indication for treatment should be based not merely on platelet counts, but also clinical indices of bleeding. Although most patients show good initial response to prednisone, the side effects of steroids limit this treatment. Currently, long-term management usually involves splenectomy. Since splenectomy has surgical risks and may also predispose the patient to sepsis, a clinical trial using anti-D (WinRho-SDR) has been performed to determine whether this treatment can safely delay or avoid the need for surgery. The use of WinRho may also reveal the occurrence of spontaneous remissions, a previously unrecognized subgroup of adults with chronic ITP. PMID:11913992

  12. The Effects of Adult Literacy and Demographics on Eighth Grade Mathematics and Language Arts Literacy Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David V.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of environmental conditions of adult literacy and demographics prevalent during infancy and early childhood on mathematics and language arts literacy scores on eighth grade achievement tests. This study collected published scores for eighth grade math and language literacy from public schools…

  13. Language Arts. Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada Univ., Las Vegas. Coll. of Education.

    This document is one of ten curriculum guides developed by the Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma (CBAHSD) Project. This curriculum guide on language arts is divided into six topics. The topics included are Dictionary Usage, Vocabulary, Speech, Poetry, Writing, and Literature Analysis. Competency statements and performance…

  14. Young Adult Literature, Race, Arts, & Confidence: At-Risk Students Building Critical Literacy with Lester's "Othello."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Angela Beumer; Ciancio, Stacey

    2003-01-01

    Advocates three ways of engaging students with literature to develop critical literacy: incorporating young adult literature, responding through the arts, and addressing issues and themes (even the controversial ones). Argues that accessible literature, thought-provoking artistic methods, and genuine, higher-level questions encourage in-depth…

  15. The Lure of Non-Credit Studio Art Classes for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Gina C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation and satisfaction of adult learners who participated in non-credit studio art classes. Leisure motivation has been researched by educators, philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists (Candy, 1991; Brookfield, 2005: Dewey, 1980; Knowles, 1998; Maslow, 1970; Rogers, 1961, Stebbins,…

  16. Institute of Study for Older Adults, Liberal Arts Program: Annual Report, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Nancy

    The Liberal Arts Program described in this report is the largest and most stable of the projects of the Institute of Study for Older Adults (ISOA) at New York City Technical College. The report deals with the program's activities and emphases during 1979-80. After introductory material on the ISOA's growth, activities, funding, and outreach model,…

  17. From Amateur to Framauteur: Art Development of Adolescents and Young Adults within an Interest-Based Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manifold, Marjorie Cohee

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the art developmental progression of adolescents and young adults within the cultural context of an interest-based community is described; the role of narrative and sociocultural community to the art development of adolescents and young adults is highlighted. Artistic development begins in response to an aesthetic phenomenon, is…

  18. In Quest of Walter Smith: The Past, Present, and Future Impact of Visual Art in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Meredith Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Walter Smith is a relatively unknown historical figure in the art world, but he is essential to defining adult education's past. present. and future in the area of visual art. His artistic endeavors in America sparked facets of the way art education is practiced today. However, along the way we have lost the tenets of social change which he sought…

  19. Martial Art Training and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter; Douris, Christopher; Balder, Nicole; LaCasse, Michael; Rand, Amir; Tarapore, Freya; Zhuchkan, Aleskey; Handrakis, John

    2015-09-29

    Cognitive performance includes the processes of attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning, which typically declines with aging. Previous research has demonstrated that aerobic and resistance exercise improves cognitive performance immediately following exercise. However, there is limited research examining the effect that a cognitively complex exercise such as martial art training has on these cognitive processes. Our study compared the acute effects of 2 types of martial art training to aerobic exercise on cognitive performance in middle-aged adults. We utilized a repeated measures design with the order of the 3 exercise conditions randomly assigned and counterbalanced. Ten recreational middle-aged martial artists (mean age = 53.5 ± 8.6 years) participated in 3 treatment conditions: a typical martial art class, an atypical martial art class, and a one-hour walk at a self-selected speed. Cognitive performance was assessed by the Stroop Color and Word test. While all 3 exercise conditions improved attention and processing speed, only the 2 martial art conditions improved the highest order of cognitive performance, executive function. The effect of the 2 martial art conditions on executive function was not different. The improvement in executive function may be due to the increased cortical demand required by the more complex, coordinated motor tasks of martial art exercise compared to the more repetitive actions of walking. PMID:26672872

  20. Self-Regulation, Metacognition and Child- and Adult-Initiated Activity: Does It Matter Who Initiates the Task?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Debate about the balance between child- and adult-initiated activities in early childhood settings is long standing. This article reports a study of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a London state school, on the influences of child- and adult-initiated activities on children's self-regulation and metacognition. Whilst both contexts were supportive,…

  1. Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arviso, Kathern; And Others

    Designed as a helpful guide and "how-to-do-it" outline for those on the Navajo Reservation who work with children, this guide is arranged to offer quick reference and simple projects requiring the minimum of materials. The projects are designed to meet the Navajo child's art needs based on the belief that the art program of the elementary school…

  2. Connecting Socially Isolated Older Rural Adults with Older Volunteers through Expressive Arts.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ann; Skinner, Mark W; Wilkinson, Fay; Reid, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Employing a participatory arts-based research approach, we examined an innovative program from rural Ontario, Canada, designed to address social isolation among older people. Older socially isolated adults were matched to trained volunteers, where in dyads, the eight pairs created expressive art in their home setting over the course of 10 home visits. With thematic and narrative inquiry, we analysed the experiences and perceptions of the program leader, older participants, and older volunteers via their artistic creations, weekly logs, evaluations, and field notes. The findings reveal a successful intervention that positively influenced the well-being of older adult participants and older volunteers, especially in regards to relationships, personal development, and creating meaning as well as extending the intervention's impact beyond the program's duration. We also discuss opportunities for similar programs to inform policy and enable positive community-based health and social service responses to rural social isolation. PMID:26934547

  3. The use of arts and crafts in the rehabilitation of the adult burn patient.

    PubMed

    Sanford, S L; Cash, S H; Nelson, C

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into one small aspect of occupational therapy: the use of arts and crafts in the rehabilitation of the adult burn patient. While burn care literature is plentiful, that related specifically to occupational therapy treatment of burn patients is scarce. A survey was mailed to occupational therapists in 165 burn units across the United States. Responses to survey questions indicate that a majority of respondents (73%%) do not use arts and crafts in the rehabilitation of adult burn patients, while 26%% do use these modalities. Those respondents who do use arts and crafts stated that they use leatherwork, painting, and woodworking most frequently. Therapists who do not use arts and crafts indicated that their primary reasons for not doing so were the acutely ill status of the patients and wound drainage/sterility issues. The entire scope of occupational therapy treatment of burn patients deserves greater attention as it is a challenging and rapidly-evolving area of practice. PMID:23947587

  4. Arts Education Quality Rubric and the "ArtsCounts" Initiative. IESP Policy Brief No. 01-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Education and Social Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In 1975, New York City found itself on the verge of bankruptcy, and newly-elected Mayor Abraham Beame was forced to enact massive cuts in the city's budget. Some of the hardest hit programs were arts education classes in the public schools--funding for programs in visual arts, dance, music and theater were slashed from the Board of Education's…

  5. More than Meets the Eye: Adult Education for Critical Consciousness in Luis Camnitzer's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana Carlina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness through the conceptual art of Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework grounding this research was critical public pedagogy, influenced by both critical theory and Stuart Hall's systems of representation (1997). This framework…

  6. Promoting Student Engagement and Creativity by Infusing Art across the Curriculum: The Arts Integration Initiative at Oklahoma City University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Christopher E. Garrett describes a faculty learning community program at Oklahoma City University that focused on improving teaching and learning through integrating the arts in a variety of disciplines, some of which may surprise you. (Contains 9 notes.)

  7. An Investigation of the Guidance Counselling Needs of Adults with Dyslexia in the Adult Educational Guidance Initiative (AEGI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elftorp, Petra; Hearne, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The experiences of adult learners with dyslexia is an under-researched area in Ireland at present. This article will discuss the findings from phase one of a mixed methods research study, which is investigating the guidance counselling needs of clients with dyslexia within the Adult Education Guidance Initiative (AEGI). The research is underpinned…

  8. My Space- a collaboration between Arts & Science to create a suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Niamh, , Dr.; McSweeney, Clair; Smith, Niall, , Dr.; O'Neill, Stephanie; Foley, Cathy; Crawley, Joanna; Phelan, Ronan; Colley, Dan; Henderson, Clare; Conroy, Lorraine

    2015-04-01

    A suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives, entitled 'MySpace' was created, to promote the importance of Earth science and Space exploration, to ignite curiosity and discover new and engaging platforms for science in the Arts & in STEM Education, and to increase awareness of careers in Ireland's Space and Earth Science industries. Site visits to research centres in Ireland & abroad, interviews with scientists, engineers, and former astronauts were conducted over a 6 month period. A suite of performance pieces emerged from this development phase, based on Dr. Shaw's personal documented journey and the dissemination of her research. These included: 1. 'To Space'- A live multimedia theatre performance aimed at the general public & young adult. Initially presented as a 'Work In Progress' event at The Festival of Curiosity, the full theatre show 'To Space' premiered at Science Gallery, Dublin as part of Tiger Dublin Fringe Arts Festival. Response to the piece was very strong, indicated by audience response, box office sales and theatre reviews in national press and online. A national and international tour is in place for 2015. To Space was performed a total of 10 times and was seen by 680 audiences. 2. An adapted piece for 13-17 year old students -'ToSpace for Secondary Schools'- to increase awareness of Ireland's involvement in Space Exploration & to encourage school leavers to dream big. This show toured nationally as part of World Space week and Science week events in conjunction with ESERO Ireland, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory, Cork, Armagh Planetarium & Dunsink Observatory. It was performed 12 times and was seen by 570 students. 3. 'My Place in Space', created for families from the very old (60 +) to the very young (3yrs +), this highly interactive workshop highlighted the appeal of science through the wonders of our planet and its place in Space. Presented at Festival of Curiosity, the Mallow Science Fair and at Science week 2014, this

  9. Neurological Response to cART vs. cART plus Integrase Inhibitor and CCR5 Antagonist Initiated during Acute HIV

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor G.; Spudich, Serena S.; Sailasuta, Napapon; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Fletcher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene D. M. B.; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Allen, Isabel E.; Adams, Collin L.; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Slike, Bonnie M.; Hellmuth, Joanna M.; Kim, Jerome H.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare central nervous system (CNS) outcomes in participants treated during acute HIV infection with standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) vs. cART plus integrase inhibitor and CCR5 antagonist (cART+). Design 24-week randomized open-label prospective evaluation. Method Participants were evaluated then randomized to initiate cART (efavirenz, tenofovir, and either emtricitabine or lamivudine) vs. cART+ (cART plus raltegravir and maraviroc) during acute HIV and re-evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks. We examined plasma and CSF cytokines, HIV RNA levels, neurological and neuropsychological findings, and brain MRS across groups and compared to healthy controls. Results At baseline, 62 participants were in Fiebig stages I-V. Randomized groups were similar for mean age (27 vs. 25, p = 0.137), gender (each 94% male), plasma log10 HIV RNA (5.4 vs. 5.6, p = 0.382), CSF log10 HIV RNA (2.35 vs. 3.31, p = 0.561), and estimated duration of HIV (18 vs. 17 days, p = 0.546). Randomized arms did not differ at 24 weeks by any CNS outcome. Combining arms, all measures concurrent with antiretroviral treatment improved, for example, neuropsychological testing (mean NPZ-4 of -0.408 vs. 0.245, p<0.001) and inflammatory markers by MRS (e.g. mean frontal white matter (FWM) choline of 2.92 vs. 2.84, p = 0.045) at baseline and week 24, respectively. Plasma neopterin (p<0.001) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (p = 0.007) remained elevated in participants compared to controls but no statistically significant differences were seen in CSF cytokines compared to controls, despite individual variability among the HIV-infected group. Conclusions A 24-week course of cART+ improved CNS related outcomes, but was not associated with measurable differences compared to standard cART. PMID:26555069

  10. Stavudine Toxicity in Adult Longer-Term ART Patients in Blantyre, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Mallewa, Jane; Kaunda, Symon; Chagoma, Newton; Njalale, Yassin; Kampira, Elizabeth; Mukaka, Mavuto; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stavudine is an effective and inexpensive antiretroviral drug, but no longer recommended by WHO for first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings due to toxicity concerns. Because of the high cost of alternative drugs, it has not been feasible to replace stavudine in most adults in the Malawi ART programme. We aimed to provide policy makers with a detailed picture of stavudine toxicities in Malawians on longer-term ART, in order to facilitate prioritization of stavudine replacement among other measures to improve the quality of ART programmes. Methods Prospective cohort of Malawian adults who had just completed one year of stavudine containing ART in an urban clinic, studying peripheral neuropathy, lipodystrophy, diabetes mellitus, high lactate syndromes, pancreatitis and dyslipidemia during 12 months follow up. Stavudine dosage was 30 mg irrespective of weight. Cox regression was used to determine associations with incident toxicities. Results 253 patients were enrolled, median age 36 years, 62.5% females. Prevalence rates (95%-confidence interval) of toxicities after one year on stavudine were: peripheral neuropathy 21.3% (16.5–26.9), lipodystrophy 14.7% (2.4–8.1), high lactate syndromes 0.0% (0–1.4), diabetes mellitus 0.8% (0–2.8), pancreatitis 0.0% (0–1.5). Incidence rates per 100 person-years (95%-confidence interval) during the second year on stavudine were: peripheral neuropathy 19.8 (14.3–26.6), lipodystrophy 11.4 (7.5–16.3), high lactate syndromes 2.1 (0.7–4.9), diabetes mellitus 0.4 (0.0–1.4), pancreatitis 0.0 (0.0–0.2). Prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia increased from 12.1% to 21.1% and from 29.5% to 37.6% respectively between 12 and 24 months. 5.5% stopped stavudine, 1.3% died and 4.0% defaulted during follow up. Higher age was an independent risk factor for incident peripheral neuropathy and lipodystrophy. Conclusion Stavudine associated toxicities continued to accumulate during

  11. Initiation of ART during Early Acute HIV Infection Preserves Mucosal Th17 Function and Reverses HIV-Related Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Deleage, Claire; Sereti, Irini; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Estes, Jacob D.; Sandler, Netanya G.; Sukhumvittaya, Suchada; Marovich, Mary; Jongrakthaitae, Surat; Akapirat, Siriwat; Fletscher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene; Dewar, Robin; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Chomchey, Nitiya; Douek, Daniel C.; O′Connell, Robert J.; Ngauy, Viseth; Robb, Merlin L.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Michael, Nelson L.; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H.; de Souza, Mark S.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART) correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI) subjects (Fiebig (F) stage I-V) with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation. PMID:25503054

  12. Backbones versus core agents in initial ART regimens: one game, two players.

    PubMed

    Llibre, Josep M; Walmsley, Sharon; Gatell, Josep M

    2016-04-01

    The advances seen in ART during the last 30 years have been outstanding. Treatment has evolved from the initial use of single agents as monotherapy. The ability to use HIV RNA as a surrogate marker for clinical outcomes allowed the more rapid evaluation of new therapies. This led to the understanding that triple-drug regimens, including a core agent (an NNRTI or a boosted PI) and two NRTIs, are optimal. These combinations have demonstrated continued improvements in their efficacy and toxicity as initial therapy. However, the need for pharmacokinetic boosting, with potential drug-drug interactions, or residual issues of efficacy or toxicity have persisted for some agents. Most recently, integrase strand transfer inhibitors, particularly dolutegravir, have shown unparalleled safety and efficacy and are currently the core agents of choice. Regimens that included only core agents or only backbone agents have not been as successful as combined therapy in antiretroviral-naive patients. It appears that at least one NRTI is needed for optimal performance and lamivudine and emtricitabine may be the ideal candidates. Several studies are ongoing of agents with longer dosing intervals, lower cost and new NRTI-saving strategies to address unmet needs. PMID:26747092

  13. Trends in and correlates of CD4+ cell count at antiretroviral therapy initiation after changes in national ART guidelines in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Mutimura, Eugene; Addison, Diane; Anastos, Kathryn; Hoover, Donald; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Karenzie, Ben; Izimukwiye, Isabelle; Mutesa, Leo; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Nashi, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the advanced stages of HIV infection remains a major challenge in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to better understand barriers and enablers to timely ART initiation in Rwanda where ART coverage is high and national ART eligibility guidelines first expanded in 2007–2008. Methods Using data on 6326 patients (≥15 years) at five Rwandan clinics, we assessed trends and correlates of CD4+ cell count at ART initiation and the proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease (CD4+ <200 cells/µl or WHO stage IV). Results Out of 6326 patients, 4486 enrolling in HIV care initiated ART with median CD4+ cell count of 211 cells/µl [interquartile range: 131–300]. Median CD4+ cell counts at ART initiation increased from 183 cells/µl in 2007 to 293 cells/µl in 2011–2012, and the proportion with advanced HIV disease decreased from 66.2 to 29.4%. Factors associated with a higher odds of advanced HIV disease at ART initiation were male sex [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3–2.1] and older age (AOR46–55+ vs. <25 = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2–4.3). Among those initiating ART more than 1 year after enrollment in care, those who had a gap in care of 12 or more months prior to ART initiation had higher odds of advanced HIV disease (AOR = 5.2; 95% CI: 1.2–21.1). Conclusion Marked improvements in the median CD4+ cell count at ART initiation and proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease were observed following the expansion of ART eligibility criteria in Rwanda. However, sex disparities in late treatment initiation persisted through 2011–2012, and appeared to be driven by later diagnosis and/or delayed linkage to care among men. PMID:25562492

  14. Drawing the Line on Minority Languages Equity and Linguistic Diversity in the Boston Adult Literacy Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmar, Tomas Mario

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical/graphics schema used to analyze statistical data from an adult literacy initiative identifies gaps attributable to an implicit strategy of containment that differs from the intent of Lau v Nichols in elementary-secondary education. A moral equivalent of Lau is needed to achieve equity in linguistic diversity in adult literacy.…

  15. The New York City Adult Literacy Initiative. Final Report 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Assistance Center, New York, NY.

    The New York City Adult Literacy Initiative served 54,568 adults in sponsored classes in fiscal 1990-91. The program is administered through six agencies, including the public schools, City University of New York, a community development agency, and three public library systems. The Literacy Assistance Center was established to provide technical…

  16. Michigan Adult Literacy Initiative. A Five Year Plan To Reduce Illiteracy in Michigan by 50%.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    In response to the problem of adult literacy, the Michigan State Board of Education initiated a program to reduce the functional illiteracy rate among adults in the state significantly. This is to be accomplished by: (1) raising the level of awareness of the scope of illiteracy problems in the state; (2) developing comprehensive literacy programs…

  17. The Intersection of Black Lives Matter and Adult Education: One Community College Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brian; Schwartz, Joni

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is a call to action for adult educators to critically engage the Black Lives Matter Movement through pedagogy, community engagement and scholarly activism. It explores the intersection of the Black Lives Matter movement and adult education by highlighting the response of one community college initiative.

  18. Age at Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation Predicts Immune Recovery, Death, and Loss to Follow-Up Among HIV-Infected Adults in Urban Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jessica; Mwale, Jonas; Marx, Melissa A.; Goma, Fastone M.; Mulenga, Lloyd B.; Stringer, Jeffrey S.A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Chi, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed the association of age at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation with CD4+ T cell count recovery, death, and loss to follow-up (LTFU) among HIV-infected adults in Zambia. We compared baseline characteristics of patients by sex and age at ART initiation [categorized as 16–29 years, 30–39 years, 40–49 years, 50–59 years, and 60 years and older]. We used the medication possession ratio to assess adherence and analysis of covariance to measure the adjusted change in CD4+ T cell count during ART. Using Cox proportional hazard regression, we examined the association of age with death and LTFU. In a secondary analysis, we repeated models with age as a continuous variable. Among 92,130 HIV-infected adults who initiated ART, the median age was 34 years and 6,281 (6.8%) were aged ≥50 years. Compared with 16–29 year olds, 40–49 year olds (–46 cells/mm3), 50–59 year olds (–53 cells/mm3), and 60+ year olds (–60 cells/mm3) had reduced CD4+ T cell gains during ART. The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) for death was increased for individuals aged ≥40 years (AHR 1.25 for 40–49 year olds, 1.56 for 50–59 year olds, and 2.97 for 60+ year olds). Adherence and retention in care were poorest among 16–29 year olds but similar in other groups. As a continuous variable, a 5-year increase in age predicted reduced CD4+ T cell count recovery and increased risk of death. Increased age at ART initiation was associated with poorer clinical outcomes, while age <30 years was associated with a higher likelihood of being lost to follow-up. HIV treatment guidelines should consider age-specific recommendations. PMID:24998881

  19. An Arts Intervention for Older Adults Living in Subsidized Retirement Homes

    PubMed Central

    Noice, Helga; Noice, Tony

    2009-01-01

    A theatrically-based intervention was given to 122 older adults who took acting lessons twice a week for 4 weeks. The training consisted of multi-modal activities (cognitive-affective-physiological) typically employed in college acting classes. Comparison groups consisted of no-treatment controls and participants instructed in a different performing art, singing. Assessment of effectiveness was performed using a battery of 11 cognitive/affective test measures that included word recall, prose comprehension/recall, word generation, digit-span ability, and problem-solving. It was found that the acting group improved significantly from pretest to posttest over both other groups. Digit-span was the only measure that failed to improve. No aspects of the intervention supplied specific training or practice on the test measures. Previous versions of the intervention with community-dwelling adults had produced similar findings but the current participants were older, less well-educated, and lived in subsidized, primarily low-income, retirement homes. PMID:18686051

  20. Circulating HIV DNA Correlates With Neurocognitive Impairment in Older HIV-infected Adults on Suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Michelli Faria de; Murrel, Ben; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Vargas, Milenka; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Older HIV-infected adults have a higher risk of neurocognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the associations between levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood, soluble markers of inflammation and cellular trafficking in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive functioning among 18 younger (22–40 years) and 26 older (50–71 years) HIV-infected subjects, who were administered a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Older HIV-infected individuals presented higher levels of inflammation in CSF and blood compared to younger individuals, but no difference was observed in HIV DNA levels. Among older participants, higher HIV DNA levels were significantly associated with more severe neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.005), particularly in the Executive Functions domain (p = 0.004). No association was observed between HIV DNA and neurocognition among younger individuals. Despite significantly increased inflammation observed in the older group, none of the inflammatory markers were associated with neurocognitive impairment among older HIV+ individuals (p > 0.05). Our study supports the involvement of peripheral HIV DNA reservoir in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive disorder during suppressive ART. Correlates of neurocognitive impairment might differ between younger and older adults, suggesting that future treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders likely need to be tailored based on age. PMID:26603568

  1. Integrating Art into Group Treatment for Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Carol-Lynne J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research supports the use of exposure-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and integrated treatments show potential for enhanced symptom reduction. This pilot study developed a manualized group treatment integrating art interventions with exposure, grounding, and narrative therapy for five adults with PTSD who were…

  2. Adult Education for Social and Environmental Change in Contemporary Public Art Galleries and Museums in Canada, Scotland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, pubic art galleries and museums have a well-deserved reputation for elitism, colonialism and exclusion and they are, therefore, frequently omitted from the discourse of adult education. However, the escalating social, cultural and ecological problems of this new century have placed pressure on these public institutions to change and…

  3. Assessing the health and development of ART-conceived young adults: A study of feasibility, parent recall, and acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jane RW; Hammarberg, Karin; Baker, HW Gordon; McBain, John C

    2008-01-01

    Background Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) to treat infertility have been available for nearly three decades. There have been a number of systematic comparisons of the health and development of ART-conceived with spontaneously-conceived (SC) children. Data are equivocal, some finding no differences and others that there are more health and developmental problems in the ART group. It is agreed that perinatal mortality and morbidity are worse after assisted than spontaneous conception and the impact of the hormonally altered intrauterine environment on puberty and later fertility of offspring are unknown. To date however, there has been no investigation of the health and development of ART-conceived young adults, including from the world's few prospective cohorts of ART conceived children. Obtaining these data requires contact to be made with people at least twenty years after discharge from the treating service. Given the ethical difficulties of approaching families to participate in research up to two decades after cessation of treatment, the aim of this exploratory qualitative investigation was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of approaching mothers treated for infertility prior to 1988, and their recall of the health and development of their ART-conceived young adult children. Methods Mothers treated for infertility at the Royal Women's Hospital Reproductive Biology Unit in Melbourne, Australia prior to 1988 were approached by a senior clinician and invited to participate in individual semi-structured interviews which could include their partners and/or young adult children if they wished. Recruitment continued until theoretic saturation had been reached. Results Ten mothers, two of their husbands and five young adults participated in interviews, and the health and development of 15 ART-conceived young adults were described. The experience of conception, pregnancy, birth and the health and development of the children were recalled vividly and

  4. Do Liberal Arts Colleges Make Students More Liberal? Some Initial Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Jana M.; Weeden, Dustin D.; Pascarella, Ernest T.; Blaich, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The effect of attending college on students' political ideology has been a controversial topic for many decades. In this study, we explored the relationship between attending a liberal arts college and students' political views. Compared to their counterparts at other 4-year institutions, liberal arts college students began postsecondary education…

  5. Health and development of ART conceived young adults: a study protocol for the follow-up of a cohort

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) continues to increase, yet little is known of the longer term health of ART conceived offspring. There are some adverse birth outcomes associated with ART conception but the subsequent developmental trajectory is unclear. Undertaking research in this area is challenging due the sensitive nature of the topic and the time elapsed since birth of the ART conceived young adults. The aim of this report is to describe a research protocol, including design and ethical considerations, used to compare the physical and psychosocial health outcomes of ART conceived young adults aged 18-28 years, with their spontaneously conceived peers. Design This is a retrospective cohort study of mothers who conceived with ART in Victoria, Australia and gave birth to a singleton child between 1982 and 1992. A current address for each mother was located and a letter of invitation to participate in the study was sent by registered mail. Participation involved completing a telephone interview about her young adult offspring’s health and development from birth to the present. Mothers were also asked for consent for the researcher to contact their son/daughter to invite them to complete a structured telephone interview about their physical and psychosocial health. A comparison group of women living in Victoria, Australia, who had given birth to a spontaneously conceived singleton child between 1982 and 1992 was recruited from the general population using random digit dialling. Data were collected from them and their young adult offspring in the same way. Regression analyses were used to evaluate relationships between ART exposure and health status, including birth defects, chronic health conditions, hospital admissions, growth and sexual development. Psychosocial wellbeing, parental relationships and educational achievement were also assessed. Factors associated with the age of disclosure of ART conception were explored with the ART

  6. Paired Conversations of Adult Museum Visitors in Front of Works of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyein

    2011-01-01

    Works of art have been referred to as a good source of fuel for the engagement of art museum visitors, thus art museum education researchers and practitioners have sought to create opportunities active social interactions between visitors related to the art they view in museums. However, research investigating different ways to encourage active…

  7. Later cART Initiation in Migrant Men from Sub-Saharan Africa without Advanced HIV Disease in France

    PubMed Central

    de Monteynard, Laure-Amélie; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; de Truchis, Pierre; Grabar, Sophie; Launay, Odile; Meynard, Jean-Luc; Khuong-Josses, Marie-Aude; Gilquin, Jacques; Rey, David; Simon, Anne; Pavie, Juliette; Mahamat, Aba; Matheron, Sophie; Costagliola, Dominique; Abgrall, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the time from entry into care for HIV infection until combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation between migrants and non migrants in France, excluding late access to care. Methods Antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals newly enrolled in the FHDH cohort between 2002–2010, with CD4 cell counts >200/μL and no previous or current AIDS events were included. In three baseline CD4 cell count strata (200–349, 350-499, ≥500/μL), we examined the crude time until cART initiation within three years after enrolment according to geographic origin, and multivariable hazard ratios according to geographic origin, gender and HIV-transmission group, with adjustment for baseline age, enrolment period, region of care, plasma viral load, and HBV/HBC coinfection. Results Among 13338 individuals, 9605 (72.1%) were French natives (FRA), 2873 (21.4%) were migrants from sub-Saharan Africa/non-French West Indies (SSA/NFW), and 860 (6.5%) were migrants from other countries. Kaplan-Meier probabilities of cART initiation were significantly lower in SSA/NFW than in FRA individuals throughout the study period, regardless of the baseline CD4 stratum. After adjustment, the likelihood of cART initiation was respectively 15% (95%CI, 1–28) and 20% (95%CI, 2–38) lower in SSA/NFW men than in FRA men who had sex with men (MSM) in the 350-499 and ≥500 CD4 strata, while no difference was observed between other migrant groups and FRA MSM. Conclusion SSA/NFW migrant men living in France with CD4 >350/μL at entry into care are more likely to begin cART later than FRA MSM, despite free access to treatment. Administrative delays in obtaining healthcare coverage do not appear to be responsible. PMID:25734445

  8. Helping Adults Succeed in Postsecondary Education: A Policy Framework. Kentucky Adult Learner Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    To become more economically competitive and reap the benefits of postsecondary educational levels, Kentucky has set a very ambitious goal to double the number of bachelor's degree holders by 2020. Clearly, increasing the college-going rate of working-age adults is an important strategy in the state's efforts to produce more degree holders. The…

  9. [Adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enhui; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingfei

    2015-09-01

    Adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory disease characterized by spiking fevers, arthritis/ arthralgias, typical salmon-colored bumpy rash, pharyngalgia, myalgia and possible involvement of visceral organs. The diagnosis is exclusively based on clinical symptoms, according to the criteria, after the exclusion of well-known infectious, neoplastic, or other autoimmune/autoinflammatory disorders. This report includes one case of adult onset Still's disease with the initial symptom of pharyngalgia. PMID:26647549

  10. Optimal time for initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected, treatment-naive children aged 2 to 5 years old

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Nandi; Davies, Mary-Ann; Penazzato, Martina; Muhe, Lulu M; Egger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) comprising three antiretroviral medications from at least two classes of drugs is the current standard treatment for HIV infection in adults and children. Current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for antiretroviral therapy recommend early treatment regardless of immunologic thresholds or the clinical condition for all infants (less than one years of age) and children under the age of two years. For children aged two to five years current WHO guidelines recommend (based on low quality evidence) that clinical and immunological thresholds be used to identify those who need to start cART (advanced clinical stage or CD4 counts ≤ 750 cells/mm3 or per cent CD4 ≤ 25%). This Cochrane review will inform the current available evidence regarding the optimal time for treatment initiation in children aged two to five years with the goal of informing the revision of WHO 2013 recommendations on when to initiate cART in children. Objectives To assess the evidence for the optimal time to initiate cART in treatment-naive, HIV-infected children aged 2 to 5 years. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the AEGIS conference database, specific relevant conferences, www.clinicaltrials.gov, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform and reference lists of articles. The date of the most recent search was 30 September 2012. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared immediate with deferred initiation of cART, and prospective cohort studies which followed children from enrolment to start of cART and on cART. Data collection and analysis Two review authors considered studies for inclusion in the review, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted data on the primary outcome of death from all causes and several secondary outcomes, including incidence of CDC category C and B clinical events and

  11. Across the Learning Divide: Adults Learning in the Arts and Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Shiela; Sargant, Naomi

    Learning about the arts and crafts gives individuals the means to examine themselves and their relationship with the world around them, whether through being an appreciative audience or their own creative practice. The arts and crafts are themselves industries creating jobs both in arts forms and in their support. People want and are entitled to…

  12. Queer Choreographies of Care: A Guided Tour of an Arts and Social Welfare Initiative in Manchester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a guided tour of the Men's Room, an arts and social welfare project that works with young men with experiences of homelessness, sex work and the criminal justice system. Focusing on three "dwelling moments" that capture how the project occupies space and time, the article describes how a queer spatial practice supports the…

  13. Martial Arts and Socially Vulnerable Youth. An Analysis of Flemish Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theeboom, Marc; De Knop, Paul; Wylleman, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Notwithstanding the lack of empirical support for its positive socio-psychological effects, numerous educators and welfare workers make use of martial arts in their work with socially vulnerable youth. Using qualitative methodology, the aims, approaches and personal experiences were analysed of teachers and co-ordinators involved in specific…

  14. Switzerland: Adult Education--State of the Art and Development Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western European Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Examines the state of adult education in Switzerland. Contends that the army is the country's largest adult education institution. Delineates future goals of adult education, assessing the increase in new technologies and their impact on adult education. Concludes with a discussion of educational leaves for workers. (RW)

  15. Postural adjustment errors during lateral step initiation in older and younger adults

    PubMed Central

    Sparto, Patrick J.; Fuhrman, Susan I.; Redfern, Mark S.; Perera, Subashan; Jennings, J. Richard; Furman, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to examine age differences and varying levels of step response inhibition on the performance of a voluntary lateral step initiation task. Seventy older adults (70 – 94 y) and twenty younger adults (21 – 58 y) performed visually-cued step initiation conditions based on direction and spatial location of arrows, ranging from a simple choice reaction time task to a perceptual inhibition task that included incongruous cues about which direction to step (e.g. a left pointing arrow appearing on the right side of a monitor). Evidence of postural adjustment errors and step latencies were recorded from vertical ground reaction forces exerted by the stepping leg. Compared with younger adults, older adults demonstrated greater variability in step behavior, generated more postural adjustment errors during conditions requiring inhibition, and had greater step initiation latencies that increased more than younger adults as the inhibition requirements of the condition became greater. Step task performance was related to clinical balance test performance more than executive function task performance. PMID:25595953

  16. Late Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Is Associated with Long-Term Persistence of Systemic Inflammation and Metabolic Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, Mathilde; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Meyer, Laurence; Capeau, Jacqueline; Fellahi, Soraya; Gérard, Laurence; May, Thierry; Simon, Anne; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV-induced immunodeficiency is associated with metabolic abnormalities and systemic inflammation. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on restoration of insulin sensitivity, markers of immune activation and inflammation. Methods Immunological, metabolic and inflammatory status was assessed at antiretroviral therapy initiation and three years later in 208 patients from the ANRS-COPANA cohort. Patients were compared according to their pre-ART CD4+ cell count (group 1: ≤ 200/mm3, n = 66 vs. group 2: > 200/mm3, n = 142). Results Median CD4+ cell count increased in both groups after 3 years of successful ART but remained significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 (404 vs 572 cells/mm3). Triglyceride and insulin levels were higher or tended to be higher in group 1 than in group 2 at ART initiation (median: 1.32 vs 0.97 mmol/l, p = 0.04 and 7.6 vs 6.8 IU, p = 0.09, respectively) and remained higher after three years of ART (1.42 vs 1.16 mmol/L, p = 0.0009 and 8.9 vs 7.2 IU, p = 0.01). After adjustment for individual characteristics and antiretroviral therapy regimens (protease inhibitor (PI), zidovudine), insulin levels remained significantly higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count. Baseline IL-6, sCD14 and sTNFR2 levels were higher in group 1 than in group 2. Most biomarkers of immune activation/inflammation declined during ART, but IL-6 and hsCRP levels remained higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count than in the other patients (median are respectively 1.4 vs 1.1 pg/ml, p = 0.03 and 2.1 vs 1.3 mg/ml, p = 0.07). Conclusion After three years of successful ART, low pretreatment CD4+ T cell count remained associated with elevated insulin, triglyceride, IL-6 and hsCRP levels. These persistent metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities could contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. PMID:26636578

  17. Bridging the digital divide in older adults: a study from an initiative to inform older adults about new technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Damnée, Souad; Kerhervé, Hélène; Ware, Caitlin; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In a society where technology progresses at an exponential rate, older adults are often unaware of the existence of different kinds of information and communication technologies (ICTs). To bridge the gap, we launched a 2-year project, during which we conducted focus groups (FGs) with demonstrations of ICTs, allowing older adults to try them out and to share their opinions. This study aimed at investigating how participants perceived this kind of initiative and how they reacted to different kinds of ICTs. Patients and methods In total, 14 FGs were conducted with community-dwelling older adults, with a frequency of two FGs on the same topic once per trimester. Twenty-three older adults (four men and 19 women) attended at least one FG but only nearly half of them were regular attendants (ten participating in at least five sessions). Age of participants ranged from 63 years to 88 years, with a mean of 77.1 years. All of them had completed secondary education. The analyses of the data were performed according to inductive thematic analysis. Results Four overarching themes emerged from the analysis. The first concerned participants’ motivation for and assessment of the project. The second theme identified the underlying factors of the “digital divide” between the younger and the older generations. The third theme concerned the factors of technology adoption among older adults. The fourth one identified participants’ attitudes toward assistive ICTs, designed specifically for older adults (“gerontechnologies”). Discussions and conclusion This project encouraging older adults to be informed about different kinds of ICTs was positively rated. With regard to ICTs, participants perceived a digital divide. The underlying factors are generation/cohort effects, cognitive and physical decline related to aging, and negative attitudes toward technologies. However, more and more older adults adopt different kinds of ICTs in order to fit in with the society

  18. Older adults' evaluations of middle-aged children's attempts to initiate discussion of care needs.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Craig; Fisher, Carla L; Pitts, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    We explored how older adults evaluated the strategies used by an adult child to initiate discussion of future care needs, and subsequently, whether these judgments affected older adults' willingness to engage in discussions about eldercare if approached in a similar fashion by one of their own children. One hundred and thirty older adults were randomly assigned to read one of four scripts depicting efforts by a middle-aged daughter to raise the topic of future care needs with her mother by implementing a variety of facework behaviors. Scripts manipulated the degree to which the daughter conveyed respect for her mother's desires for autonomy (negative face) and connection (positive face). The daughter's facework significantly predicted older parents' evaluation of her as supportive, which in turn predicted their willingness to discuss future care needs with one of their own children if they were to approach the conversation in a similar way. PMID:24156501

  19. Digital Curation: A Framework to Enhance Adolescent and Adult Literacy Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Sue Ann; Deschaine, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Digital curation provides a way to transcend traditional academic fields of study and create instructional materials available to support adolescent and adult literacy initiatives. The instructional capabilities that Web 2.0 tools offer provide curators with the ability to reach audiences in a way that has not been possible in the past. The…

  20. Adult Education in Local Environmental Initiatives for Ecological and Cultural Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodhouse, Janice Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation examines the phenomenon of how communities can effect change in policy and practice to support greater ecological and cultural sustainability. The general purpose of this research is to examine selected local initiatives for ecological and cultural sustainability to better understand the role of adult education in those efforts.…

  1. Adult Education and the Cornish Miner: A Study in Victorian Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, Patrick

    1974-01-01

    This study will accordingly examine the general background of adult education provision, before considering such initiatives of the Victorian period as were concerned more directly with the science of mining,and will seek to place Cornish developments within a national framework. (Author)

  2. Time to ART Initiation among Patients Treated for Rifampicin-Resistant Tuberculosis in Khayelitsha, South Africa: Impact on Mortality and Treatment Success

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Johnny Flippie; Khogali, Mohammed; Mohr, Erika; Cox, Vivian; Moyo, Sizulu; Edginton, Mary; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Meintjes, Graeme; Hughes, Jennifer; De Azevedo, Virginia; van Cutsem, Gilles; Cox, Helen Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Setting Khayelitsha, South Africa, with high burdens of rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (RR-TB) and HIV co-infection. Objective To describe time to antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation among HIV-infected RR-TB patients initiating RR-TB treatment and to assess the association between time to ART initiation and treatment outcomes. Design A retrospective cohort study of patients with RR-TB and HIV co-infection not on ART at RR-TB treatment initiation. Results Of the 696 RR-TB and HIV-infected patients initiated on RR-TB treatment between 2009 and 2013, 303 (44%) were not on ART when RR-TB treatment was initiated. The median CD4 cell count was 126 cells/mm3. Overall 257 (85%) patients started ART during RR-TB treatment, 33 (11%) within 2 weeks, 152 (50%) between 2–8 weeks and 72 (24%) after 8 weeks. Of the 46 (15%) who never started ART, 10 (21%) died or stopped RR-TB treatment within 4 weeks and 16 (37%) had at least 4 months of RR-TB treatment. Treatment success and mortality during treatment did not vary by time to ART initiation: treatment success was 41%, 43%, and 50% among patients who started ART within 2 weeks, between 2–8 weeks, and after 8 weeks (p = 0.62), while mortality was 21%, 13% and 15% respectively (p = 0.57). Mortality was associated with never receiving ART (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 6.0, CI 2.1–18.1), CD4 count ≤100 (aHR 2.1, CI 1.0–4.5), and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) with second-line resistance (aHR 2.5, CI 1.1–5.4). Conclusions Despite wide variation in time to ART initiation among RR-TB patients, no differences in mortality or treatment success were observed. However, a significant proportion of patients did not initiate ART despite receiving >4 months of RR-TB treatment. Programmatic priorities should focus on ensuring all patients with RR-TB/HIV co-infection initiate ART regardless of CD4 count, with special attention for patients with CD4 counts ≤ 100 to initiate ART as soon as possible after RR

  3. Survival and determinants of mortality in adult HIV/Aids patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Somali Region, Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Damtew, Bereket; Mengistie, Bezatu; Alemayehu, Tadesse

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown high initial mortality in Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) programs from resource-limited settings. However, there is dearth of evidence on treatment outcomes and associated determinant factors in public hospitals. Therefore, the objective of this study is to assess survival and identify predictors of death in adult HIV-infected patients initiating ART at a public hospital in Eastern Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing baseline and follow-up records of patients who started ART between December 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011 at Kharamara hospital. Time to death was the main outcome measure. Kaplan-Meier models were used to estimate mortality and Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of mortality. Results A total of 784 patients (58.4% females) were followed for a median of 60 months. There were 87 (11.1%) deaths yielding an overall mortality rate of 5.15/100 PYO (95% CI: 4.73-6.37). The estimated mortality was 8.4%, 9.8%, 11.3%, 12.7% and 14.1% at 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months respectively. The independent predictors of death were single marital status (AHR: 2.31; 95%CI: 1.18-4.50), a bedridden functional status (AHR: 5.91; 95%CI: 2.87-12.16), advanced WHO stage (AHR: 7.36; 95%CI: 3.17-17.12), BMI < 18.5 Kg/m2 (AHR: 2.20; 95%CI: 1.18-4.09), CD4 count < 50 cells/µL (AHR: 2.70; 95%CI: 1.26-5.80), severe anemia (AHR: 4.57; 95%CI: 2.30-9.10), and TB co-infection (AHR: 2.30; 95%CI: 1.28-4.11). Conclusion Improved survival was observed in patients taking ART in Somali region of Ethiopia. The risk for death was higher in patients with advanced WHO stage, low CD4 count, low Hgb, low BMI, and concomitant TB infection. Intensive case management is recommended for patients with the prognostic factors. Optimal immunologic and weight recoveries in the first 6 months suggest increased effort to retain patients in care at this period. PMID:26889319

  4. The Black Arts Movement and African American Young Adult Literature: An Evaluation of Narrative Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Laretta

    2005-01-01

    In this article I question whether or not African American young adult literature serves as a primer for, and a version of, African American adult literature. Using the Black Aesthetic as my literary theory and the Coretta Scott King Award as the young adult canon, I note that while the content of adolescent literature is consistent with the…

  5. Task Force Report. State of the Art of Adult Education: CONFINTEA Follow Up. [and] Workshop Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes task force recommendations on the role of the International Council for Adult Education in monitoring achievement of adult education objectives, qualitative and quantitative indicators, and diverse data collection methods. Eleven workshop reports discuss progress on adult education policy advocacy, documentation, health care reform,…

  6. Promoting Well-Being and Gerotranscendence in an Art Therapy Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Raquel Chapin

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a community art therapy program that was designed to promote health and well-being in old age. Observations of diverse participant interactions in the nondirective therapy studio over the course of 6 years revealed the benefits of art making and how it may influence well-being during the process of advancing age. Program…

  7. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance of Hispanic/Latino Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alders, Amanda; Levine-Madori, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot study investigating the efficacy of art therapy to enhance cognitive performance in a sample of 24 elderly Hispanic/Latino members of a community center who participated in a weekly structured thematic therapeutic arts program. A 12-week, quasi-experimental, pretest/posttest, nonrandomized, controlled…

  8. Effects of Art Therapy on Distress Levels of Adults with Cancer: A Proxy Pretest Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glinzak, Leara

    2016-01-01

    This study identified decreased distress after art therapy in a proxy pretest study with a convenience sample of 73 patients being treated for cancer. Art therapy outcomes from 4 settings (oncology unit, infusion clinic, individual sessions, and open studio) were measured via the self-report Distress Thermometer, which was collected as part of an…

  9. Art therapy: Using the creative process for healing and hope among African American older adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Carol M; Sullivan-Marx, Eileen M

    2006-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the field of art therapy and the potential it can offer to address the emotional needs of the frail elderly. Two case studies are discussed, and examples of artwork are provided. The case studies and artwork were created under the guidance of an art therapist at a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) site in an urban African American community. This article explores how art making addresses the specific developmental tasks of the elderly in a culturally competent manner. Included are practical considerations in the choice of art media and directives for working with elderly clients, as well as resources for further information on the use of art in therapy. PMID:17045130

  10. Rheumatologic manifestations of human parvovirus B19 infection in adults. Initial two-year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Naides, S J; Scharosch, L L; Foto, F; Howard, E J

    1990-09-01

    During 1987 and 1988, we identified 9 adults at the Medical and Rheumatology Services of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics who had a clinical diagnosis of fifth disease; 8 of the 9 had symptoms of joint involvement. Another 12 adults with serologic positivity for anti-parvovirus B19 IgM antibody presented with polyarthralgia/polyarthritis. Patients were usually found to be seronegative for rheumatoid factor, and none developed nodules or erosive disease. Many patients with chronic disease met criteria for a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. A diagnosis of parvovirus B19 infection should be considered during the initial visit of patients with polyarthralgia/polyarthritis. PMID:2169746

  11. Initiating Patients on ART at CD4 Counts above 200 is Associated with Improved Treatment Outcomes in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P; Sanne, Ian M; Conradie, Francesca; Zeinecker, Jennifer; Orrell, Catherine; Ive, Prudence; Rassool, Mohammed; Dehlinger, Marjorie; van der Horst, Charles; McIntyre, James; Wood, Robin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To compare treatment outcomes by starting CD4 counts using data from the CIPRA-South Africa trial. Design Observational cohort study. Methods Patients presenting to primary care clinics with CD4 cell counts <350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either doctor- or nurse-managed HIV care and followed for at least two years after ART initiation. Clinical and laboratory outcomes were compared by baseline CD4 count. Results 812 patients were followed for a median of 27.5 months and 36% initiated with a CD4 count >200. While 10% of patients failed virologically (VF), the risk was nearly double among those with a CD4 ≤200 vs. >200 (12.2% vs. 6.8%). 21 deaths occurred, with a five-fold increased risk for the low CD4 group (3.7% vs. 0.7%). After adjustment, those with a CD4 count ≤200 had twice the risk of death/VF (HR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1–3.3) and twice the risk of incident tuberculosis (HR: 1.90; 95% CI: 0.89–4.04) as those >200. Those with either a CD4 ≤200 (HR 2.1; 1.2–3.8) or a WHO IV condition (HR 2.9; 0.93–8.8) alone had a two to three-fold increased risk of death/VF vs. those with neither, but those with both conditions had a 4-fold increased risk (HR 3.9; 95% CI: 1.9–8.1). We observed some increased loss to follow-up among those initiating <200 (HR 0.79; 95% CI: 0.50–1.25). Conclusions Patients initiating ART with higher CD4 counts had reduced mortality, tuberculosis and less virologic failure than those initiated at lower CD4 counts. Our data support increasing CD4 count eligibility criteria for ART initiation. PMID:20613459

  12. Body piercing and tattoos: a survey on young adults' knowledge of the risks and practices in body art

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The practice of tattooing and piercing has expanded in western society. In order to verify young adults' knowledge of the risk and practices related to body art, an investigation was conducted among freshmen of the University of Bari in the region of Apulia, Italy. Methods The study was carried out in the Academic Year 2009-2010 through an anonymous self-administered written questionnaire distributed to 1.656 freshmen enrolled in 17 Degree Courses. Results Of the 1.598 students included in the analysis, 78.3% believe it is risky to undergo piercing/tattoo practices. AIDS was indicated as a possible infection by 60.3% of freshmen, hepatitis C by 38.2%, tetanus by 34.3% and hepatitis B by 33.7% of the sample. 28.1% of freshmen were not aware that there are also non-infectious complications. 29% of the sample had at least one piercing or tattoo (this percentage does not include earlobe piercing in women). Of those with body art, the decision to undergo body art was made autonomously in 57.9% of the participants. 56.3% of freshmen undergoing body art had taken less than a month to decide. With regard to the reasons that led the sample to undergo body art, 28.4% were unable to explain it, 23.8% answered to improve their aesthetic aspect, 18.4% to distinguish themselves from others, 12.3% for fashion; 17.1% for other reasons. 25.4% of the sample declared that they had a piercing (79.8% female vs 20.2% male; ratio M/F 1:4.0). The average age for a first piercing was 15.3 years (range 10-27; SD ± 2.9). 9.6% of the sample declared that they have a tattoo (69.9% female vs 30.1% male; ratio M/F 1:2.3). The average age for a first tattoo was 17.5 years (range 10-26, SD ± 2.4). Conclusions Most of the freshmen knew about AIDS-related risks but not other potential risks. Body art is fairly common among young adults (especially women). The decision is often not shared with the family and is undertaken mostly without a specific reason or for the improvement of

  13. CD4+ cell count recovery in naïve patients initiating cART, who achieved and maintained plasma HIV-RNA suppression

    PubMed Central

    Costagliola, Dominique; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Ghosn, Jade; Delaugerre, Constance; Pialoux, Gilles; Cuzin, Lise; Launay, Odile; Ménard, Amélie; de Truchis, Pierre; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Weiss, Laurence; Delfraissy, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A key objective of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is to reach and maintain high CD4 cell counts to provide long-term protection against AIDS-defining opportunistic infections and malignancies, as well as other comorbidities. However, a high proportion of patients present late for care. Our objective was to assess CD4 cell count recovery up to seven years in naïve patients initiating cART with at least three drugs in usual clinical care. Methods From the French Hospital Database on HIV, we selected naïve individuals initiating cART from 2000 with at least two years of follow-up. Participants were further required to have achieved viral load suppression by six months after initiating cART and were censored in case of virological failure. We calculated the proportion of patients (Kaplan-Meier estimates) who achieved CD4 recovery to >500/mm3 according to baseline CD4 cell count. Results A total of 15,025 patients were analyzed with a median follow-up on ART of 65.5 months (IQR: 42.3–96.0). At cART initiation, the median age was 38.6 years (IQR: 32.2–46.0), 9734 (64.8%) were men, median CD4 cell count was 239 (IQR: 130–336) and 2668 (17.8%) had a prior AIDS event. Results are presented in the Table 1. Conclusions This study shows that CD4 cell counts continue to increase seven years after cART initiation, whatever the baseline CD4 cell count. Failing to achieve CD4 recovery with continuous viral load suppression is rare for naïve patients initiating cART in routine clinical practice, but takes substantially longer in patients who initiate antiretroviral therapy at low CD4 cell counts. PMID:25393990

  14. Evaluation of COSMO-ART in the Framework of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Lea; Brunner, Dominik; Im, Ulas; Galmarini, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) coordinated by the EC-JRC and US-EPA, promotes since 2008 research on regional air quality model evaluation across the atmospheric modelling communities of Europe and North America. AQMEII has now reached its Phase 2 that is dedicated to the evaluation of on-line coupled chemistry-meteorology models as opposed to Phase 1 where only off-line models were considered. At European level, AQMEII collaborates with the COST Action "European framework for on-line integrated air quality and meteorology modelling" (EuMetChem). All European groups participating in AQMEII performed simulations over the same spatial domain (Europe at a resolution of about 20 km) and using the same simulation strategy (e.g. no nudging allowed) and the same input data as much as possible. The initial and boundary conditions (IC/BC) were shared between all groups. Emissions were provided by the TNO-MACC database for anthropogenic emissions and the FMI database for biomass burning emissions. Chemical IC/BC data were taken from IFS-MOZART output, and meteorological IC/BC from the ECWMF global model. Evaluation data sets were collected by the Joint Research Center (JRC) and include measurements from surface in situ networks (AirBase and EMEP), vertical profiles from ozone sondes and aircraft (MOZAIC), and remote sensing (AERONET, satellites). Since Phase 2 focuses on on-line coupled models, a special effort is devoted to the detailed speciation of particulate matter components, with the goal of studying feedback processes. For the AQMEII exercise, COSMO-ART has been run with 40 levels of vertical resolution, and a chemical scheme that includes the SCAV module of Knote and Brunner (ACP 2013) for wet-phase chemistry and the SOA treatment according to VBS (volatility basis set) approach (Athanasopoulou et al., ACP 2013). The COSMO-ART evaluation shows that, next to a good performance in the meteorology, the gas phase chemistry is well

  15. Neuropsychological Sex Differences Associated with Age of Initiated Use Among Young Adult Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Natania A.; Schuster, Randi Melissa; Mermelstein, Robin J.; Gonzalez, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Earlier initiation of cannabis use is associated with poorer neuropsychological functioning across several domains. Given well-documented sex differences in neuromaturation during adolescence, initiation of cannabis use during this time may affect neuropsychological functioning differently for males and females. Method In the current study, we examined sex differences in the relationship between age of initiated cannabis use and neuropsychological performance after controlling for amount of lifetime cannabis use in 44 male and 25 female young adult cannabis users. Results We found that an earlier age of initiated use was related to poorer episodic memory, especially immediate recall, in females, but not in males. On the other hand, we found that, surprisingly, an earlier age of initiated use was associated with better decision-making overall. However, exploratory analyses found sex-specific factors associated with decision-making and age of initiated use, specifically that ADHD symptoms in females may drive the relationship between an earlier age of initiated use and better decision-making. Further, an earlier age of initiated use was associated with less education, a lower IQ, and fewer years of mother’s education for females, but more lifetime cannabis use for males. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest there are sex-differences in the associations between age of initiated cannabis use and neuropsychological functioning. The current study provides preliminary evidence that males and females may have different neuropsychological vulnerabilities that place them at risk for initiating cannabis use and continued cannabis use, highlighting the importance of examining the impact of cannabis on neuropsychological functioning separately for males and females. PMID:25832823

  16. Parafoveal preprocessing of word initial trigrams during reading in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Ascensión; Blythe, Hazel I; Liversedge, Simon P

    2016-03-01

    Although previous research has shown that letter position information for the first letter of a parafoveal word is encoded less flexibly than internal word beginning letters (Johnson, Perea & Rayner, 2007; White et al., 2008), it is not clear how positional encoding operates over the initial trigram in English. This experiment explored the preprocessing of letter identity and position information of a parafoveal word's initial trigram by adults and children using the boundary paradigm during normal sentence reading. Seven previews were generated: Identity (captain); transposed letter and substituted letter nonwords in Positions 1 and 2 (acptain-imptain); 1 and 3 (pactain-gartain), and 2 and 3 (cpatain-cgotain). Results showed a transposed letter effect (TLE) in Position 13 for gaze duration in the pretarget word; and TLE in Positions 12 and 23 but not in Position 13 in the target word for both adults and children. These findings suggest that children, similar to adults, extract letter identity and position information flexibly using a spatial coding mechanism; supporting isolated word recognition models such as SOLAR (Davis, 1999, 2010) and SERIOL (Whitney, 2001) models. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26348198

  17. A "Neogeographical Education"? The Geospatial Web, GIS and Digital Art in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadimitriou, Fivos

    2010-01-01

    Neogeography provides a link between the science of geography and digital art. The carriers of this link are geospatial technologies (global navigational satellite systems such as the global positioning system, Geographical Information System [GIS] and satellite imagery) along with ubiquitous information and communication technologies (such as…

  18. Great Ideas Wasted on the Young?--Liberal Arts Should be Saved for Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundle, James U.

    1975-01-01

    We should reduce the work week to 25 hours and people should normally join the work force at age 16, and from that time on everyone should have the opportunity to work half-time (at a living salary) and to go to school half-time. This will revitalize the liberal arts. (DC)

  19. Applying the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) to Adults in an Asian Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nan, Joshua Kin-man; Hinz, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment is the foundation for conceptualizing effective interventions. Due to their nonverbal nature, art therapy assessments have an advantage over traditional verbal assessments in some populations and potentially across cultures. This pilot study provides preliminary reliability data to support the cross-cultural use of the Formal Elements…

  20. Movie Smoking and Youth Initiation: Parsing Smoking Imagery and Other Adult Content

    PubMed Central

    Farrelly, Matthew C.; Kamyab, Kian; Nonnemaker, James; Crankshaw, Erik; Allen, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To isolate the independent influence of exposure to smoking and other adult content in the movies on youth smoking uptake. Methods We used discrete time survival analysis to quantify the influence of exposure to smoking and other adult content in the movies on transitioning from (1) closed to open to smoking; (2) never to ever trying smoking; and (3) never to ever hitting, slapping, or shoving someone on two or more occasions in the past 30 days. The latter is a comparative outcome, hypothesized to have no correlation with exposure to smoking in the movies. Results Assessed separately, both exposure to smoking imagery and exposure to adult content were associated with increased likelihood of youth becoming open to smoking (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04–1.15 and OR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.04–1.17) and having tried smoking (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.00–1.12 and OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.00–1.13). Both measures were also separately associated with aggressive behavior (OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04–1.14 and OR = 1.09, 95% CI: 1.04–1.15). A very high correlation between the two measures (0.995, p<0.000) prevented an assessment of their independent effects on smoking initiation. Conclusion Although exposure to smoking in the movies is correlated with smoking susceptibility and initiation, the high correlation between exposure to smoking in the movies and other adult content suggests that more research is needed to disentangle their independent influence on smoking. PMID:23251654

  1. Impact on ART initiation of point-of-care CD4 testing at HIV diagnosis among HIV-positive youth in Khayelitsha, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Gabriela EM; Wilkinson, Lynne; Conradie, Karien; Isaakidis, Petros; Harries, Anthony D; Edginton, Mary E; De Azevedo, Virginia; van Cutsem, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite the rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in developing countries, pre-treatment losses from care remain a challenge to improving access to treatment. Youth and adolescents have been identified as a particularly vulnerable group, at greater risk of loss from both pre-ART and ART care. Point-of-care (POC) CD4 testing has shown promising results in improving linkage to ART care. In Khayelitsha township, South Africa, POC CD4 testing was implemented at a clinic designated for youth aged 12–25 years. We assessed whether there was an associated reduction in attrition between HIV testing, assessment for eligibility and ART initiation. Methods A before-and-after observational study was conducted using routinely collected data. These were collected on patients from May 2010 to April 2011 (Group A) when baseline CD4 count testing was performed in a laboratory and results were returned to the clinic within two weeks. Same-day POC CD4 testing was implemented in June 2011, and data were collected on patients from August 2011 to July 2012 (Group B). Results A total of 272 and 304 youth tested HIV-positive in Group A and Group B, respectively. Group B patients were twice as likely to have their ART eligibility assessed compared to Group A patients: 275 (90%) vs. 183 (67%) [relative risk (RR)=2.4, 95% CI: 1.8–3.4, p<0.0001]. More patients in World Health Organization (WHO) Stage 1 disease (85% vs. 69%), with CD4 counts≥350 cells/µL (58% vs. 35%) and more males (13% vs. 7%) were detected in Group B. The proportion of eligible patients who initiated ART was 50% and 44% (p=0.6) in Groups B and A, respectively; and 50% and 43% (p=0.5) when restricted to patients with baseline CD4 count≤250 cells/µL. Time between HIV-testing and ART initiation was reduced from 36 to 28 days (p=0.6). Discussion POC CD4 testing significantly improved assessment for ART eligibility. The improvement in the proportion initiating ART and the reduction in

  2. The Impacts of State Health Reform Initiatives on Adults in New York and Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Long, Sharon K; Stockley, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effects of health reform efforts in two large states—New York and Massachusetts. Data Sources/Study Setting National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data from 1999 to 2008. Study Design We take advantage of the “natural experiments” that occurred in New York and Massachusetts to compare health insurance coverage and health care access and use for adults before and after the implementation of the health policy changes. To control for underlying trends not related to the reform initiatives, we subtract changes in the outcomes over the same time period for comparison groups of adults who were not affected by the policy changes using a differences-in-differences framework. The analyses are conducted using multiple comparison groups and different time periods as a check on the robustness of the findings. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Nonelderly adults ages 19–64 in the NHIS. Principal Findings We find evidence of the success of the initiatives in New York and Massachusetts at expanding insurance coverage, with the greatest gains reported by the initiative that was broadest in scope—the Massachusetts push toward universal coverage. There is no evidence of improvements in access to care in New York, reflecting the small gains in coverage under that state's reform effort and the narrow focus of the initiative. In contrast, there were significant gains in access to care in Massachusetts, where the impact on insurance coverage was greater and a more comprehensive set of reforms were implemented to improve access to a full array of health care services. The estimated gains in coverage and access to care reported here for Massachusetts were achieved in the early period under health reform, before the state's reform initiative was fully implemented. Conclusions Comprehensive reform initiatives are more successful at addressing gaps in coverage and access to care than are narrower efforts, highlighting the potential gains under national

  3. The Milwaukee Inventory for the Dimensions of Adult Skin Picking (MIDAS): initial development and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Walther, Michael R; Flessner, Christopher A; Conelea, Christine A; Woods, Douglas W

    2009-03-01

    This article describes the development and initial psychometric properties of the Milwaukee Inventory for the Dimensions of Adult Skin picking (MIDAS), a measure designed to assess "automatic" and "focused" skin picking. Data were collected from 92 participants who completed an anonymous internet-based survey. Results of an exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution. Factors 1 ("focused" picking scale) and 2 ("automatic" picking scale) each consisted of 6 items, and preliminary data demonstrated adequate internal consistency, good construct validity, and good discriminant validity. The MIDAS provides researchers with a reliable and valid assessment of "automatic" and "focused" skin picking. PMID:18725154

  4. The Problem of Late ART initiation in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Transient Aspect of Scale-up or a Long-term Phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Lahuerta, Maria; Ue, Frances; Hoffman, Susie; Elul, Batya; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Wu, Yingfeng; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Remien, Robert H.; Sadr, Wafaa El; Nash, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to scale-up HIV care and treatment have been successful at initiating large numbers of patients onto antiretroviral therapy (ART), although persistent challenges remain to optimizing scale-up effectiveness in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings. Among the most important are very high rates of ART initiation in the advanced stages of HIV disease, which in turn drive morbidity, mortality, and onward transmission of HIV. With a focus on sub-Saharan Africa, this review article presents a conceptual framework for a broader discussion of the persistent problem of late ART initiation, including a need for more focus on the upstream precursors (late HIV diagnosis and late enrollment into HIV care) and their determinants. Without additional research and identification of multilevel interventions that successfully promote earlier initiation of ART, the problem of late ART initiation will persist, significantly undermining the long-term impact of HIV care scale-up on reducing mortality and controlling the HIV epidemic. PMID:23377739

  5. (Re)Training Adults for New Office and Business Technologies. State-of-the-Art Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Bryna Shore

    This paper addresses the extent to which retraining and training programs are available for employed and unemployed adults. First, demographic and economic shifts and projections into the next century are discussed as the context for needed training. Second, the promise and positive impacts of new technologies in office and business settings are…

  6. Estimating the Impact of Earlier ART Initiation and Increased Testing Coverage on HIV Transmission among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Mexico using a Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Vega, Yanink; del Rio, Carlos; Dias Lima, Viviane; Lopez-Cervantes, Malaquias; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Colchero, M. Arantxa; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the impact of late ART initiation on HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Mexico. Methods An HIV transmission model was built to estimate the number of infections transmitted by HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM-HIV+) MSM-HIV+ in the short and long term. Sexual risk behavior data were estimated from a nationwide study of MSM. CD4+ counts at ART initiation from a representative national cohort were used to estimate time since infection. Number of MSM-HIV+ on treatment and suppressed were estimated from surveillance and government reports. Status quo scenario (SQ), and scenarios of early ART initiation and increased HIV testing were modeled. Results We estimated 14239 new HIV infections per year from MSM-HIV+ in Mexico. In SQ, MSM take an average 7.4 years since infection to initiate treatment with a median CD4+ count of 148 cells/mm3(25th-75th percentiles 52–266). In SQ, 68% of MSM-HIV+ are not aware of their HIV status and transmit 78% of new infections. Increasing the CD4+ count at ART initiation to 350 cells/mm3 shortened the time since infection to 2.8 years. Increasing HIV testing to cover 80% of undiagnosed MSM resulted in a reduction of 70% in new infections in 20 years. Initiating ART at 500 cells/mm3 and increasing HIV testing the reduction would be of 75% in 20 years. Conclusion A substantial number of new HIV infections in Mexico are transmitted by undiagnosed and untreated MSM-HIV+. An aggressive increase in HIV testing coverage and initiating ART at a CD4 count of 500 cells/mm3 in this population would significantly benefit individuals and decrease the number of new HIV infections in Mexico. PMID:26302044

  7. A Review and Critique of the 2008 United States "National Report on the Development and State of the Art of Adult Learning and Education" (ALE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert J.; Daigle, Elizabeth Anne; Graybeal, Lesley; Walker, Wayland; Avalon, Christian; Fowler, Nan; Massey, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    This study is a review and a critique of the 2008 U.S. "National Report on the Development and State of the Art of Adult Learning and Education" (ALE) prepared by the U.S. Commission for UNESCO and the U.S. Department of Education as a preparatory document for CONFINTEA VI, the 6th International Conference on Adult Education. The study focuses on…

  8. PALLIATIVE CARE FOR OLDER ADULTS: STATE OF THE ART IN LEBANON.

    PubMed

    Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Saab, Mohammad; Hajjar, Ramzi

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care (PC) for older adults constitutes an important human rights challenge and a major public health care priority due to the aging of the population and the lack of health care services addressing the needs of the older people. In Lebanon, the surge in the number of older people with complex needs is unmatched by any increase in the services offered to them. PC in Lebanon is still under- developed and is subject to a number of challenges. These challenges are alarming and must be overcome through introducing health care providers to basic PC principles as recommended by the National Committee for Pain Relief and Palliative Care (NCPRPC). PMID:27169163

  9. An Augmented SMS Intervention to Improve Access to Antenatal CD4 Testing and ART Initiation in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Bennett, Kara; Hughes, Michael D.; Veres, Adrian; John, Oaitse; Pradhananga, Rosina; Boyer, Matthew; Brown, Carolyn; Sakyi, Bright; van Widenfelt, Erik; Keapoletswe, Koona; Mine, Madisa; Moyo, Sikhulile; Asmelash, Aida; Siedner, Mark; Mmalane, Mompati; Shapiro, Roger L.; Lockman, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    Background Less than one-third of HIV-infected pregnant women eligible for combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) globally initiate treatment prior to delivery, with lack of access to timely CD4 results being a principal barrier. We evaluated the effectiveness of an SMS-based intervention to improve access to timely antenatal ART. Methods We conducted a stepped-wedge cluster randomized trial of a low-cost programmatic intervention in 20 antenatal clinics in Gaborone, Botswana. From July 2011-April 2012, 2 clinics were randomly selected every 4 weeks to receive an ongoing clinic-based educational intervention to improve CD4 collection and to receive CD4 results via an automated SMS platform with active patient tracing. CD4 testing before 26 weeks gestation and ART initiation before 30 weeks gestation were assessed. Results Three-hundred-sixty-six ART-naïve women were included, 189 registering for antenatal care under Intervention and 177 under Usual Care periods. Of CD4-eligible women, 100 (59.2%) women under Intervention and 79 (50.6%) women under Usual Care completed CD4 phlebotomy before 26 weeks gestation, adjusted odds ratio (aOR, adjusted for time that a clinic initiated Intervention) 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI]0.47–1.63, P = 0.67). The SMS-based platform reduced time to clinic receipt of CD4 test result from median of 16 to 6 days (P<0.001), was appreciated by clinic staff, and was associated with reduced operational cost. However, rates of ART initiation remained low, with 56 (36.4%) women registering under Intervention versus 37 (24.2%) women under Usual Care initiating ART prior to 30 weeks gestation, aOR 1.06 (95%CI 0.53–2.13, P = 0.87). Conclusions The augmented SMS-based intervention delivered CD4 results more rapidly and efficiently, and this type of SMS-based results delivery platform may be useful for a variety of tests and settings. However, the intervention did not appear to improve access to timely antenatal CD4 testing or ART

  10. Predictors and Timing of ATT Initiation among HIV-TB Patients at ART Centers of Karnataka, India: Two Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Suresh; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Rewari, Bharat Bhushan

    2015-01-01

    Background In India, TB and HIV co-infection remains as a serious public health problem. From 2006 onwards, the intensified TB-HIV collaborative activities are being jointly implemented by National AIDS Control Programme (NACP) and Revised National TB Control programme (RNTCP) at high HIV burden states. Objectives To determine (a) the predictors of outcome among a cohort of HIV-TB co-infected patients after two years after initiation of ART treatment. (b) prognostic significance of time difference between the initiation of ATT and ART in HIV-TB co-infected patients. Methods Patients registered at sixteen ART centres in Karnataka, from October through December 2009 formed the study cohort and were followed till December 2011. Results A total of 604 HIV-TB patients were registered. Follow-up (a) at the end of one year had shown 63.6% (377)patients with unfavorable TB treatment outcomes (b) at the end of second year, 55.6% (336)patients were alive on ART treatment. The variables male, smear negative TB, CD4 count less than 50cells per cumm and unfavorable TB outcome were significantly associated with unfavorable ART treatment outcome. Conclusions The programmes need to review the existing strategies and strengthen HIV-TB collaborative activities for timely treatment initiation with intensive monitoring of HIV-TB patients on treatment. PMID:26394397

  11. Low Proportions of CD28− CD8+ T cells Expressing CD57 Can Be Reversed by Early ART Initiation and Predict Mortality in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sulggi A.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Jain, Vivek; Huang, Yong; Epling, Lorrie; Van Natta, Mark; Meinert, Curtis L.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; McCune, Joseph M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Lederman, Michael M.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Hunt, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Unlike cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and aging, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) decreases the proportion of CD28−CD8+ T cells expressing CD57. Whether this abnormality predicts mortality in treated HIV infection and can be reversed by early antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains unknown. Methods. We sampled recently HIV-infected individuals (<6 months) and HIV-uninfected controls and compared longitudinal changes in the proportion of CD28−CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 between those who initiated ART early (<6 months) vs later (≥2 years). We also assessed the relationship between this phenotype and mortality in a nested case-control study of ART-suppressed chronically infected individuals. Results. Compared to HIV-uninfected controls (n = 15), individuals who were recently infected with HIV had lower proportions of CD28−CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 (P < .001), and these proportions increased during ART. The early ART group (n = 33) achieved normal levels, whereas the later ART group (n = 30) continued to have lower levels than HIV-uninfected controls (P = .02). Among 141 ART-suppressed participants in the SOCA study, those in the lowest quartile of CD28−CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 had 5-fold higher odds of mortality than those in the highest quartile (95% CI, 1.6–15.9, P = .007). Conclusions. Abnormally low proportions of CD28−CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 predict increased mortality during treated HIV infection and may be reversed with early ART initiation. PMID:24585893

  12. A Systematic Review of Individual and Contextual Factors Affecting ART Initiation, Adherence, and Retention for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Ian; Plummer, Mary L.; Konopka, Sarah N.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite progress reducing maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain high, accounting, for example, for up to 24 percent of all pregnancy-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in improving outcomes among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women, yet rates of initiation, adherence, and retention remain low. This systematic literature review synthesized evidence about individual and contextual factors affecting ART use among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), intervention (ART), and outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. Individual and contextual enablers and barriers to ART use were extracted and organized thematically within a framework of individual, interpersonal, community, and structural categories. Results Thirty-four studies were included in the review. Individual-level factors included both those within and outside a woman’s awareness and control (e.g., commitment to child’s health or age). Individual-level barriers included poor understanding of HIV, ART, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and difficulty managing practical demands of ART. At an interpersonal level, disclosure to a spouse and spousal involvement in treatment were associated with improved initiation, adherence, and retention. Fear of negative consequences was a barrier to disclosure. At a community level, stigma was a major barrier. Key structural barriers and enablers were related to health system use and engagement, including access to services and health worker attitudes. Conclusions To be successful, programs seeking to expand access to and continued use of ART by integrating maternal health and HIV services must identify and address the relevant barriers and enablers in

  13. API consensus guidelines for use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (API-ART guidelines). Endorsed by the AIDS Society of India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S B; Pujari, S N; Joshi, S R; Patel, A K

    2006-01-01

    With rational use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been transformed into a chronic manageable illness like diabetes and hypertension. These guidelines provide information on state of art, evidence based approach for use of ART in Indian context. When to initiate ART? Antiretroviral therapy is indicated for all symptomatic HIV infected persons regardless of CD4 counts and plasma viral load (PVL) levels. In asymptomatic patients, ART should be offered when the CD4 counts < 200/mm3 and should be considered in patients with CD4 counts between 200-250/mm3. Therapy is not recommended for patients with CD4 count more than 350/ mm3. Involvement of patient in all treatment decisions and assessing readiness is critical before initiating ART. What to start with? A non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based regimen is recommended for antiretroviral naïve patients. The choice between nevirapine and efavirenz is based on differences in adverse events profiles; cost and availability of convenient fixed dose combinations and need for concomitant use of rifampicin. A backbone of 2-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is combined with the NNRTI. Various combinations and ART strategies not to be used in clinical practice has been enlisted. How to follow up? Recommendations have been made for baseline evaluation and monitoring of patients on ART. These include guidelines on laboratory and clinical evaluation. A plasma viral load at 6 months after initiation of first-line ART is strongly recommended. Yearly estimation of lipid profile has been recommended. How to identify and manage ART failure? The guidelines recognize the issue of identifying ART failure late if only CD4 counts are used for monitoring. In the absence of resistance testing various second-line regimens have been enlisted. A boosted protease inhibitor based regimen is recommended in this situation to be combined with 2-NRTIs. Special

  14. Radiation doses in adult computed tomography practice in Serbia: initial results.

    PubMed

    Arandjic, Danijela; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Hadnadjev, Darka; Stojanovic, Sanja; Bozovic, Predrag; Ceklic, Sandra; Lazarevic, Djordje

    2014-11-01

    This work presents initial data on radiation doses in adult computed tomography (CT) in Serbia. Data were collected in terms of CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) values for head, chest and abdomen examination. The range of CTDIvol values was found to be 53-98, 11-34 and 8.5-227 mGy whereas for DLP was 803-1066, 350-845 and 1066-3078 mGy cm(-1) for head, chest and abdomen examination, respectively. Except for abdomen on one CT unit, all estimated values were in line with the reported data. This work also presents simple method on how to reduce radiation doses when scanning head. Using axial (step-and-shot) instead of helical mode and decreasing tube current-time product leads to significant dose reduction. CTDIvol was decreased by 20 % whereas DLP was reduced for a factor 2. PMID:25063787

  15. Short Communication: Population-Based Surveillance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Cameroonian Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy According to the World Health Organization Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Désiré; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Akonie, Haniel Ze; Kouanfack, Charles; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Colizzi, Vittorio; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Ndjolo, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    With ongoing earlier enrollment on and rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cameroon, there are increasing risks of transmitted HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at population levels. We, therefore, evaluated the threshold of HIVDR in a population initiating ART, to inform on the effectiveness of first-line regimens, considering HIV-1 diversity, plasma viral load (PVL), and CD4-based disease progression. A total of 53 adults [median (interquartile range, IQR) CD4: 162 cell/mm(3) (48-284); median (IQR) PVL: 5.34 log10 RNA (4.17-6.42) copies/ml] initiating ART in 2014 at the Yaoundé Central Hospital were enrolled for HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase sequencing. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were interpreted using the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) list versus the Stanford HIVdb algorithm version 7.0. Level of DRMs was low (3.77%) versus moderate (7.55%), respectively, following the WHO list (T69D, K103N) versus Stanford HIVdb (T69D, A98G, K103N, K238T), respectively. Prevailing clade was CRF02_AG (71.70%). Based on Stanford HIVdb, a slightly higher proportion of patients with DRMs were found among ones infected with CRF02_AG than in those non-CRF02_AG infected (7.89% vs. 6.67%, p = 1.000), with lower PVL (7.69% <5.5 vs. 0% ≥5.5 log10 RNA copies/ml, p = .488) and with higher CD4 counts (9.52% CD4 ≥200 vs. 3.33% CD4 <200 cells/mm(3), p = .749). Thresholds of DRMs suggest that standard first-line regimens currently used in Cameroon may remain effective at population levels, despite scale-up of ART in the country, pending adherence, and closed virological monitoring. With an intent-to-diagnose approach, the discrepant levels of DRMs support using Stanford HIVdb to evaluate initial ART, while revising the WHO list for surveillance. PMID:26602836

  16. The role of community centre-based arts, leisure and social activities in promoting adult well-being and healthy lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mat; Kimberlee, Richard; Deave, Toity; Evans, Simon

    2013-05-01

    Developed countries are experiencing high levels of mental and physical illness associated with long term health conditions, unhealthy lifestyles and an ageing population. Given the limited capacity of the formal health care sector to address these public health issues, attention is turning to the role of agencies active in civil society. This paper sought to evaluate the associations between participation in community centre activities, the psycho-social wellbeing and health related behaviours. This was based on an evaluation of the South West Well-being programme involving ten organisations delivering leisure, exercise, cooking, befriending, arts and crafts activities. The evaluation consisted of a before-and-after study with 687 adults. The results showed positive changes in self-reported general health, mental health, personal and social well-being. Positive changes were associated with diet and physical activity. Some activities were different in their outcomes-especially in cases where group activities were combined with one-to-one support. The results suggest that community centre activities of this nature offer benefits that are generically supportive of health behaviour changes. Such initiatives can perform an important role in supporting the health improvement objectives of formal health care services. For commissioners and partner agencies, accessibility and participation are attractive features that are particularly pertinent to the current public health context. PMID:23665850

  17. The Role of Community Centre-based Arts, Leisure and Social Activities in Promoting Adult Well-being and Healthy Lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mat; Kimberlee, Richard; Deave, Toity; Evans, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Developed countries are experiencing high levels of mental and physical illness associated with long term health conditions, unhealthy lifestyles and an ageing population. Given the limited capacity of the formal health care sector to address these public health issues, attention is turning to the role of agencies active in civil society. This paper sought to evaluate the associations between participation in community centre activities, the psycho-social wellbeing and health related behaviours. This was based on an evaluation of the South West Well-being programme involving ten organisations delivering leisure, exercise, cooking, befriending, arts and crafts activities. The evaluation consisted of a before-and-after study with 687 adults. The results showed positive changes in self-reported general health, mental health, personal and social well-being. Positive changes were associated with diet and physical activity. Some activities were different in their outcomes—especially in cases where group activities were combined with one-to-one support. The results suggest that community centre activities of this nature offer benefits that are generically supportive of health behaviour changes. Such initiatives can perform an important role in supporting the health improvement objectives of formal health care services. For commissioners and partner agencies, accessibility and participation are attractive features that are particularly pertinent to the current public health context. PMID:23665850

  18. Use of the Initial Teaching Alphabet in English as a Second Language. Classes for Spanish Speaking Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Byrl Elmer

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of the initial teaching alphabet (ITA) would have a beneficial effect upon English language learning when used with adult Spanish speaking students. The study consisted of five randomly selected English as a Second Language classes in the Los Angeles City Unified School District divided…

  19. A comparison of internal and external lipids of nondiapausing and diapause initiation phase adult Colorado potato beetles, Leptinotarsa decemlineata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, reared under diapause inducing conditions will emerge from the soil as an adult and enter the diapause initiation phase, a period where metabolic reserves are stockpiled before the beetles enter the nonfeeding diapause maintenance phase. Interna...

  20. Initial Treatment Patterns in Younger Adult Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in California

    PubMed Central

    Semrad, Alison M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Chen, Yingjia; Cress, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Background: Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is among the most common malignancies in the adolescent and young adult (age 15–39 years) population, and its incidence is rising. Younger age (<45 years) is an important prognostic indicator and is incorporated into the TNM classification system. This study hypothesized that this would result in distinct treatment patterns for younger and older patients. Methods: Using the California Cancer Registry, 24,362 patients with DTC from 2004 to 2011 were identified, and they were divided into younger (<45 years) and older (≥45 years) cohorts. Demographic and clinical variables were tabulated and then compared using chi-square tests. Treatment variables included total or near total thyroidectomy, other types of thyroid surgery, and the administration of radioiodine as part of the initial treatment. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of treatment administered. Results: Younger patients were more likely to be Hispanic (32.5% vs. 21.2%) and female (82.7% vs. 74.7%), and to have papillary carcinoma (92.9% vs. 90.9%) and lymph node involvement (32.8% vs. 19.7%; p<0.0001). On multivariable analysis, younger patients (OR 1.20 [CI 1.11–1.30]), higher T-stage tumors, higher socioeconomic status (SES), and papillary carcinoma were predictors of undergoing total thyroidectomy versus less than total thyroid surgery. After adjustment, predictors of radioiodine administration included younger age (OR 1.12 [CI 1.05–1.18]), higher SES, total thyroidectomy, higher T stage, and lymph node positivity. Conclusions: Younger patients with DTC in California are more likely to be female and Hispanic with papillary histology. After adjustment for disease and demographic characteristics, younger patients are more likely to undergo total thyroidectomy as their initial surgery and are more likely to receive radioiodine. Given their excellent prognosis and the potential for adverse sequelae from initial

  1. Dysfunctional phenotypes of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are comparable in patients initiating ART during early or chronic HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Amu, Sylvie; Lantto Graham, Rebecka; Bekele, Yonas; Nasi, Aikaterini; Bengtsson, Carina; Rethi, Bence; Sorial, Sam; Meini, Genny; Zazzi, Maurizio; Hejdeman, Bo; Chiodi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is becoming a common clinical practice according to current guidelines recommending treatment to all HIV-1-infected patients. However, it is not known whether ART initiated during the early phase of infection prevents the establishment of abnormal phenotypic features previously reported in CD4+ and CD8+T cells during chronic HIV-1 infection. In this cross-sectional study, blood specimens were obtained from 17 HIV-1-infected patients who began ART treatment shortly after infection (early ART [EA]), 17 age-matched HIV-1-infected patients who started ART during chronic phase of infection (late ART [LA]), and 25 age-matched non-HIV-1-infected controls. At collection of specimens, patients in EA and LA groups had received ART for comparable periods of time. Total HIV-1 DNA was measured in white blood cells by quantitative PCR. The concentration of 9 inflammatory parameters and 1 marker of fibrosis, including sCD14 and β-2 microglobulin, was measured in plasma. Furthermore, expression of markers of abnormal immune activation (human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related [HLA-DR] and CD38), exhaustion (programmed death 1, CD28, CD57) and terminal differentiation (CD127) was measured on CD4+ and CD8+T cells. T-cell proliferation was measured through Ki67 expression. The copies of total HIV-1 DNA in blood were significantly lower (P = 0.009) in EA compared with that in LA group. Only the expression of HLA-DR on naïve CD4+ T cells distinguished EA from LA, whereas expression of 3 surface markers distinguished T-cell populations of HIV-1-infected patients from controls. These included HLA-DR distinguishing CD4+ T cells from EA compared with controls, and also CD38 and CD127 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively, distinguishing both groups of patients from controls. The sCD14 levels were significantly higher in EA patients, and β-2 microglobulin levels were higher in LA group compared with that in controls. Our

  2. Dysfunctional phenotypes of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are comparable in patients initiating ART during early or chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Amu, Sylvie; Lantto Graham, Rebecka; Bekele, Yonas; Nasi, Aikaterini; Bengtsson, Carina; Rethi, Bence; Sorial, Sam; Meini, Genny; Zazzi, Maurizio; Hejdeman, Bo; Chiodi, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is becoming a common clinical practice according to current guidelines recommending treatment to all HIV-1-infected patients. However, it is not known whether ART initiated during the early phase of infection prevents the establishment of abnormal phenotypic features previously reported in CD4+ and CD8+T cells during chronic HIV-1 infection. In this cross-sectional study, blood specimens were obtained from 17 HIV-1-infected patients who began ART treatment shortly after infection (early ART [EA]), 17 age-matched HIV-1-infected patients who started ART during chronic phase of infection (late ART [LA]), and 25 age-matched non-HIV-1-infected controls. At collection of specimens, patients in EA and LA groups had received ART for comparable periods of time. Total HIV-1 DNA was measured in white blood cells by quantitative PCR. The concentration of 9 inflammatory parameters and 1 marker of fibrosis, including sCD14 and β-2 microglobulin, was measured in plasma. Furthermore, expression of markers of abnormal immune activation (human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related [HLA-DR] and CD38), exhaustion (programmed death 1, CD28, CD57) and terminal differentiation (CD127) was measured on CD4+ and CD8+T cells. T-cell proliferation was measured through Ki67 expression. The copies of total HIV-1 DNA in blood were significantly lower (P = 0.009) in EA compared with that in LA group. Only the expression of HLA-DR on naïve CD4+ T cells distinguished EA from LA, whereas expression of 3 surface markers distinguished T-cell populations of HIV-1-infected patients from controls. These included HLA-DR distinguishing CD4+ T cells from EA compared with controls, and also CD38 and CD127 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively, distinguishing both groups of patients from controls. The sCD14 levels were significantly higher in EA patients, and β-2 microglobulin levels were higher in LA group compared with that in controls. Our results

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Changes in Adiponectin and Endothelial Function in HIV-Infected Adults After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Stein, James H.; Cotter, Bruno R.; Murdock, Deborah G.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Dube, Michael P.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Haas, David W.; Torriani, Francesca J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Studies in persons of European descent have suggested that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups influence antiretroviral therapy (ART) toxicity. We explored associations between mtDNA variants and changes in endothelial function and biomarkers among non-Hispanic white, ART-naive subjects starting ART. A5152s was a substudy of A5142, a randomized trial of initial class-sparing ART regimens that included efavirenz or lopinavir/ritonavir with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), or both without NRTIs. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and cardiovascular biomarker assessments were performed at baseline and at weeks 4 and 24. Ten haplogroup-defining mtDNA polymorphisms were determined. FMD and biomarker changes from baseline to week 24 by mtDNA variant were assessed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Thirty-nine non-Hispanic white participants had DNA and 24-week data. The nonsynonymous m.10398A>G mtDNA polymorphism (N=8) was associated with higher median baseline adiponectin (5.0 vs. 4.2 μg/ml; p=0.003), greater absolute (−1.9 vs. −0.2 μg/ml) and relative (−33% vs. −3%) adiponectin decreases (p<0.001 for both), and lower week 24 brachial artery FMD (3.6% vs. 5.4%; p=0.04). Individual mtDNA haplogroups, including haplogroups H (N=13) and U (N=6), were not associated with adiponectin or FMD changes. In this small pilot study, adiponectin and brachial artery FMD on ART differed in non-Hispanic whites with a nonsynonymous mtDNA variant associated with several human diseases. These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that mtDNA variation influences metabolic ART effects. Validation studies in larger populations and in different racial/ethnic groups that include m.10398G carriers are needed. PMID:23944767

  4. Into the Curriculum. Art: Making Snowmen; Health: It's Flu Season!; Language Arts/Technology: Choices; Reading/Language Arts: Getting To Know Young Adult Authors; Science: It's All in the Weather; Social Studies: Middle Ages Daily Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amato, Laura; Small, Esther

    2003-01-01

    Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with special curriculum units in art, health, language arts, technology, reading, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each…

  5. POC CD4 Testing Improves Linkage to HIV Care and Timeliness of ART Initiation in a Public Health Approach: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vojnov, Lara; Markby, Jessica; Boeke, Caroline; Harris, Lindsay; Ford, Nathan; Peter, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Background CD4 cell count is an important test in HIV programs for baseline risk assessment, monitoring of ART where viral load is not available, and, in many settings, antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation decisions. However, access to CD4 testing is limited, in part due to the centralized conventional laboratory network. Point of care (POC) CD4 testing has the potential to address some of the challenges of centralized CD4 testing and delays in delivery of timely testing and ART initiation. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the extent to which POC improves linkages to HIV care and timeliness of ART initiation. Methods We searched two databases and four conference sites between January 2005 and April 2015 for studies reporting test turnaround times, proportion of results returned, and retention associated with the use of point-of-care CD4. Random effects models were used to estimate pooled risk ratios, pooled proportions, and 95% confidence intervals. Results We identified 30 eligible studies, most of which were completed in Africa. Test turnaround times were reduced with the use of POC CD4. The time from HIV diagnosis to CD4 test was reduced from 10.5 days with conventional laboratory-based testing to 0.1 days with POC CD4 testing. Retention along several steps of the treatment initiation cascade was significantly higher with POC CD4 testing, notably from HIV testing to CD4 testing, receipt of results, and pre-CD4 test retention (all p<0.001). Furthermore, retention between CD4 testing and ART initiation increased with POC CD4 testing compared to conventional laboratory-based testing (p = 0.01). We also carried out a non-systematic review of the literature observing that POC CD4 increased the projected life expectancy, was cost-effective, and acceptable. Conclusions POC CD4 technologies reduce the time and increase patient retention along the testing and treatment cascade compared to conventional laboratory-based testing. POC CD4 is

  6. African American Young Adult Smoking Initiation: Identifying Intervention Points and Prevention Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Marshall K.; Mansker, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background: African Americans have one of the lowest smoking rates as teens yet have one of the highest smoking rates as adults. Approximately 40% of African Americans who have ever smoked started smoking between the ages of 18 and 21. Purpose: This study aimed to identify why African American young adults began smoking in young adulthood and what…

  7. Site-specific differences in T cell frequencies and phenotypes in the blood and gut of HIV-uninfected and ART-treated HIV+ adults.

    PubMed

    Yukl, Steven A; Shergill, Amandeep K; Girling, Valerie; Li, Qingsheng; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Haase, Ashley; Havlir, Diane V; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy. PMID:25811360

  8. Delay in cART Initiation Results in Persistent Immune Dysregulation and Poor Recovery of T-Cell Phenotype Despite a Decade of Successful HIV Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ndumbi, Patricia; Falutz, Julian; Pant Pai, Nitika; Tsoukas, Christos M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Successful combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) increases levels of CD4+ T-cells, however this increase may not accurately reflect long-term immune recovery since T-cell dysregulation and loss of T-cell homeostasis often persist. We therefore assessed the impact of a decade of effective cART on immune regulation, T-cell homeostasis, and overall T-cell phenotype. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 288 HIV+ cART-naïve patients initiating therapy. We identified 86 individuals who received cART for at least a decade, of which 44 consistently maintained undetectable plasma HIV-RNA levels throughout therapy. At baseline, participants were classified into three groups according to pre-treatment CD4+ T-cell counts: Group I (CD4<200 cells/mm3); Group II (CD4: 200–350 cells/mm3); Group III (CD4>350 cells/mm3). Outcomes of interest were: (1) CD4+ T-cell count restoration (CD4>532 cells/mm3); (2) normalization of CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio (1.2–3.3); (3) maintenance of CD3+ T-cell homeostasis (CD3: 65%–85% of peripheral lymphocytes); (4) normalization of the complete T-cell phenotype (TCP). Results Despite a decade of sustained successful cART, complete T-cell phenotype normalization only occurred in 16% of patients, most of whom had initiated therapy at high CD4+ T-cell counts (>350 cells/mm3). The TCP parameter that was the least restored among patients was the CD4:CD8 T-cell ratio. Conclusions Failure to normalize the complete T-cell phenotype was most apparent in patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ T-cell count <200 cells/mm3. The impact of this impaired T-cell phenotype on life-long immune function and potential comorbidities remains to be elucidated. PMID:24710051

  9. Attitudes of Adult Learners toward the Board of Governors Bachelor of Arts Degree Program at Chicago State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson-Davenport, Michael A.

    A study was conducted to determine the attitudes of adult learners toward the Board of Governors (BOG) bachelor's degree program at Chicago State University. The study also examined characteristics and types of adult learners, availability and kinds of services adult learners want, relevance of coursework, biases from campus officials toward…

  10. Exploring Science in the Studio: NSF-Funded Initiatives to Increase Scientific Literacy in Undergraduate Art and Design Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The project Exploring Science in the Studio at California College of the Arts (CCA), one of the oldest and most influential art and design schools in the country, pursues ways to enable undergraduate students to become scientifically literate problem-solvers in a variety of careers and to give content and context to their creative practices. The two main branches of this National Science Foundation-funded project are a series of courses called Science in the Studio (SitS) and the design of the Mobile Units for Science Exploration (MUSE) system, which allow instructors to bring science equipment directly into the studios. Ongoing since 2010, each fall semester a series of interdisciplinary SitS courses are offered in the college's principal areas of study (architecture, design, fine arts, humanities and sciences, and diversity studies) thematically linked by Earth and environmental science topics such as water, waste, and sustainability. Each course receives funding to embed guest scientists from other colleges and universities, industry, or agriculture directly into the studio courses. These scientists worked in tandem with the studio faculty and gave lectures, led field trips, conducted studio visits, and advised the students' creative endeavors, culminating in an annual SitS exhibition of student work. The MUSE system, of fillable carts and a storage and display unit, was designed by undergraduate students in a Furniture studio who explored, experimented, and researched various ways science materials and equipment are stored, collected, and displayed, for use in the current and future science and studio curricula at CCA. Sustainable practices and "smart design" underpinned all of the work completed in the studio. The materials selected for the new Science Collection at CCA include environmental monitoring equipment and test kits, a weather station, a stream table, a rock and fossil collection, and a vertebrate skull collection. The SitS courses and MUSE system

  11. Comparison of adherence and persistence among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus initiating saxagliptin or linagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Amanda M; Sheehan, John J; Davis, Brian M; Smith, David M

    2016-01-01

    Background Adherence and persistence to antidiabetes medications are important to control blood glucose levels among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Objectives The objective of this study was to compare adherence and persistence over a 12-month period between patients initiating saxagliptin and patients initiating linagliptin, two dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare Supplemental claims databases. Patients with T2D initiating saxagliptin or linagliptin between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2013, were selected. Patients were required to be at least 18 years old and have 12 months of continuous enrollment prior to and following initiation. Adherence and persistence to initiated medication were measured over the 12 months after initiation using outpatient pharmacy claims. Patients were considered adherent if the proportion of days covered was ≥0.80. Patients were considered nonpersistent (or to have discontinued) if there was a gap of >60 days without initiated medication on hand. Multivariable logistic regression and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were fit to compare adherence and persistence, respectively, between the two cohorts. Results There were 21,599 saxagliptin initiators (mean age 55 years; 53% male) and 5,786 linagliptin initiators (mean age 57 years; 54% male) included in the study sample. Over the 12-month follow-up, 46% of saxagliptin initiators and 42% of linagliptin initiators were considered adherent and 47% of saxagliptin initiators and 51% of linagliptin initiators discontinued their initiated medication. After controlling for patient characteristics, saxagliptin initiation was associated with significantly greater odds of being adherent (adjusted odds ratio =1.212, 95% CI 1.140–1.289) and significantly lower hazards of discontinuation (adjusted hazard ratio =0.887, 95% CI 0.850–0.926) compared with linagliptin initiation

  12. Beneficial Effects of cART Initiated during Primary and Chronic HIV-1 Infection on Immunoglobulin-Expression of Memory B-Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Pensieroso, Simone; Tolazzi, Monica; Chiappetta, Stefania; Nozza, Silvia; Lazzarin, Adriano; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Introduction During HIV-1 infection the B-cell compartment undergoes profound changes towards terminal differentiation, which are only partially restored by antiretroviral therapy (cART). Materials and Methods To investigate the impact of infection as early as during primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) we assessed distribution of B-cell subsets in 19 PHI and 25 chronic HIV-1-infected (CHI) individuals before and during 48 weeks of cART as compared to healthy controls (n = 23). We also analysed Immunoglobulin-expression of memory B-cell subsets to identify alterations in Immunoglobulin-maturation. Results Determination of B-cell subsets at baseline showed that total and Naive B-cells were decreased whereas Activated Memory (AM), Tissue-like Memory (TLM) B-cells and Plasma cells were increased in both PHI and CHI patients. After 4 weeks of cART total B-cells increased, while AM, TLM B-cells and Plasma cells decreased, although without reaching normal levels in either group of individuals. This trend was maintained until week 48, though only total B-cells normalized in both PHI and CHI. Resting Memory (RM) B-cells were preserved since baseline. This subset remained stable in CHI, while was expanded by an early initiation of cART during PHI. Untreated CHI patients showed IgM-overexpression at the expenses of switched (IgM-IgD-) phenotypes of the memory subsets. Interestingly, in PHI patients a significant alteration of Immunoglobulin-expression was evident at BL in TLM cells, and after 4 weeks, despite treatment, in AM and RM subsets. After 48 weeks of therapy, Immunoglobulin-expression of AM and RM almost normalized, but remained perturbed in TLM cells in both groups. Conclusions In conclusion, aberrant activated and exhausted B-cell phenotypes rose already during PHI, while most of the alterations in Ig-expression seen in CHI appeared later, despite 4 weeks of effective cART. After 48 weeks of cART B-cell subsets distribution improved although without full normalization

  13. Vowel Confusion Patterns in Adults during Initial 4 Years of Implant Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaalimaa, Taina T.; Sorri, Martti J.; Laitakari, Jaakko; Sivonen, Ville; Muhli, Arto

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated adult cochlear implant users' (n == 39) vowel recognition and confusions by an open-set syllable test during 4 years of implant use, in a prospective repeated-measures design. Subjects' responses were coded for phoneme errors and estimated by the generalized mixed model. Improvement in overall vowel recognition was highest…

  14. Young Adults in the Workplace: A Multisite Initiative of Substance Use Prevention Programs. RTI Press Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Jeremy W., Ed.; Galvin, Deborah M., Ed.; Cluff, Laurie A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Although higher rates of substance use among young adults aged 16 to 24 are well-established (OAS, 2010), existing workplace substance use prevention and early intervention programs primarily target older workers. These data suggest that workplaces need substance abuse prevention and early intervention programs that are proven to be efficacious…

  15. The Development of an Internet Simulation for Adults into a Widening Access Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Nina; Saunders, Danny

    2001-01-01

    Adapted from a simulation for adults, a British project engaged 12-14 year-olds in producing school newspapers using Internet sources. Outcomes included exposure to information/communications technology, improved computer and communication skills, experience with teamwork, slight improvements in writing and spelling, and increased cooperation…

  16. Nutritional manipulation of adult female Orius pumilio (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) enhances initial predatory performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial shipments of Orius insidiosus Say (Hemiptera:Anthocoridae) commonly include water and protein, the latter typically supplied by eggs from a moth such as Ephestia kuehniella Zeller. To determine whether alternative dietary conditions for young adult females might improve predation, O. in...

  17. Sustainability of Foundation-Funded Grant Programs beyond Initial Funding: A Multicase Study at Selective Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, Deborah Chang

    2010-01-01

    College and university leaders must remain responsive to their environments by promoting institutional innovation and change. External grant-funders, such as foundations, view themselves as initiators of change. Foundations can provide the necessary tools to jump start innovation within colleges and universities. However, despite the best…

  18. Can pricing deter adolescents and young adults from starting to drink: An analysis of the effect of alcohol taxation on drinking initiation among Thai adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Sornpaisarn, Bundit; Shield, Kevin D; Cohen, Joanna E; Schwartz, Robert; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between alcohol taxation changes and drinking initiation among adolescents and young adults (collectively "youth") in Thailand (a middle-income country). Using a survey panel, this study undertook an age-period-cohort analysis using four large-scale national cross-sectional surveys of alcohol consumption performed in Thailand in 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2011 (n=87,176 Thai youth, 15-24 years of age) to test the hypothesis that changes in the inflation-adjusted alcohol taxation rates are associated with drinking initiation. Regression analyses were used to examine the association between inflation-adjusted taxation increases and the prevalence of lifetime drinkers. After adjusting for potential confounders, clear cohort and age effects were observed. Furthermore, a 10% increase of the inflation-adjusted taxation rate of the total alcohol market was significantly associated with a 4.3% reduction in the prevalence of lifetime drinking among Thai youth. In conclusion, tax rate changes in Thailand from 2001 to 2011 were associated with drinking initiation among youth. Accordingly, increases in taxation may prevent drinking initiation among youth in countries with a high prevalence of abstainers and may reduce the harms caused by alcohol. PMID:26079927

  19. Busulfan in infants to adult hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: A population pharmacokinetic model for initial and Bayesian dose personalization

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Jeannine S.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Baker, K. Scott; Gamis, Alan S.; Holford, Nicholas H.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Personalizing intravenous (IV) busulfan doses to a target plasma concentration at steady state (Css) is an essential component of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We sought to develop a population pharmacokinetic model to predict IV busulfan doses over a wide age spectrum (0.1 – 66 years) that accounts for differences in age and body size. Experimental design A population pharmacokinetic model based on normal fat mass and maturation based on post-menstrual age was built from 12,380 busulfan concentration-time points obtained after IV busulfan administration in 1,610 HCT recipients. Subsequently, simulation results of the initial dose necessary to achieve a target Css with this model were compared with pediatric-only models. Results A two-compartment model with first-order elimination best fit the data. The population busulfan clearance was 12.4 L/h for an adult male with 62kg normal fat mass (equivalent to 70kg total body weight). Busulfan clearance, scaled to body size – specifically normal fat mass, is predicted to be 95% of the adult clearance at 2.5 years post-natal age. With a target Css of 770 ng/mL, a higher proportion of initial doses achieved the therapeutic window with this age- and size-dependent model (72%) compared to dosing recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (57%) or the European Medicines Agency (70%). Conclusion This is the first population pharmacokinetic model developed to predict initial IV busulfan doses and personalize to a target Css over a wide age spectrum, ranging from infants to adults. PMID:24218510

  20. The Effect of Smoke-Free Air Law in Bars on Smoking Initiation and Relapse among Teenagers and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ce

    2015-01-01

    Background: Existing evidence has shown that most smoking uptake and escalation occurs while smokers are teenagers or young adults. Effective policies that reduce smoking uptake and escalation will play an important role in curbing cigarette smoking. This study aims to investigate the effect of smoke-free air (SFA) laws in bars on smoking initiation/relapse while controlling for other confounders. Methods: The national longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) from 1997–2009 was linked to state-level scores for the strength of SFA laws in order to carry out the analysis. Results and Conclusion: We find that SFA laws in bars with exemptions significantly reduce (p ≤ 0.01) the probability of smoking initiation (one-puff, daily, and heavy smoking initiation). The 100% SFA law in bars without exemption significantly deters smoking relapse from abstinence into daily smoking (p ≤ 0.05) or relapse from abstinence into heavy smoking (p ≤ 0.01) among people age 21 or older. The reduction of one-puff and daily smoking initiation is larger among ages 20 or younger than ages 21 or older, while the reduction in relapse does not differ by whether respondents reach the drinking age. Results also indicate that higher cigarette taxes significantly reduce daily smoking initiation and relapse into nondaily and light smoking. PMID:25584419

  1. Possible macrophage activation syndrome following initiation of adalimumab in a patient with adult-onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Souabni, Leila; Dridi, Leila; Ben Abdelghani, Kawther; Kassab, Selma; Chekili, Selma; Laater, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) has been rarely reported in the course of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) and in the majority of cases, it was triggered by an infection. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first case of MAS occurring after adalimumab treatment initiation and not triggered by an infection. A 26-yearold woman with classical features of AOSD developed persistent fever, severe bicytopenia associated with extreme hyperferritinemia, hyponatremia and abnormal liver function tow months after the initiation of adalimumab treatment. The diagnosis of MAS was made without histological proof. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy and her condition improved. During the disease course, extensive studies could not identify any viral infection or other known underlying etiology for the reactive MAS. The adalimumab was incriminated in this complication. Currently, the patient is in remission on tocilizumab and low-dose prednisolone. PMID:25018831

  2. Fasting Plasma Glucose as Initial Screening for Diabetes and Prediabetes in Irish Adults: The Diabetes Mellitus and Vascular Health Initiative (DMVhi)

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, Margaret; Kinsley, Brendan T.; Jackson, Abaigeal D.; Walsh, Cathal; O’Grady, Tony; Nolan, John J.; Gaffney, Peter; Boran, Gerard; Kelleher, Cecily; Carr, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes has a long pre clinical asymptomatic phase. Early detection may delay or arrest disease progression. The Diabetes Mellitus and Vascular health initiative (DMVhi) was initiated as a prospective longitudinal cohort study on the prevalence of undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, diabetes risk and cardiovascular risk in a cohort of Irish adults aged 45-75 years. Research Design and Methods Members of the largest Irish private health insurance provider aged 45 to 75 years were invited to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria: already diagnosed with diabetes or taking oral hypoglycaemic agents. Participants completed a detailed medical questionnaire, had weight, height, waist and hip circumference and blood pressure measured. Fasting blood samples were taken for fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Those with FPG in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) range had a 75gm oral glucose tolerance test performed. Results 122,531 subjects were invited to participate. 29,144 (24%) completed the study. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 1.8%, of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) was 7.1% and of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) was 2.9%. Dysglycaemia increased among those aged 45-54, 55-64 and 65-75 years in both males (10.6%, 18.5%, 21.7% respectively) and females (4.3%, 8.6%, 10.9% respectively). Undiagnosed T2D, IFG and IGT were all associated with gender, age, blood pressure, BMI, abdominal obesity, family history of diabetes and triglyceride levels. Using FPG as initial screening may underestimate the prevalence of T2D in the study population. Conclusions This study is the largest screening study for diabetes and prediabetes in the Irish population. Follow up of this cohort will provide data on progression to diabetes and on cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:25874867

  3. Engaging older adults in burn prevention education: results of a community-based urban initiative.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Nicole E; Sessler, Kelly A; Baggott, Kaitlin; Laverde, Louisa; Rabbitts, Angela; Yurt, Roger W

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to educate New York City seniors aged 60 years and older about fire safety and burn prevention through the use of a community-based, culturally sensitive delivery platform. The ultimate goal is to reduce burn injury morbidity and mortality among this at-risk population. Programming was developed and provided to older adults attending community-based senior centers. Topics included etiology of injury, factors contributing to burn injuries, methods of prevention, emergency preparedness, and home safety. Attendees completed a postpresentation survey. Of the 234 senior centers invited to participate in the program, 64 (27%) centers requested presentations, and all received the educational programming, reaching 2196 seniors. An additional 2590 seniors received education during community-based health fairs. A majority reported learning new information, found the presentation helpful, and intended to apply this knowledge to daily routines. Data confirm that many opportunities exist to deliver culturally sensitive burn prevention programming to the older adult population of this large metropolitan area in settings that are part of their daily lives. A majority of respondents welcomed the information, perceived it as helpful, and reported that they were likely to integrate the information into their lives. PMID:22561308

  4. Correlates of smoking initiation among young adults in Ukraine: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, Tatiana I; Krasovsky, Konstantin S; Semenova, Daria S

    2007-01-01

    Background Aim: To estimate the impact of smoking restrictions in homes and schools, and tobacco advertising and information on smoking initiation by young people in Ukraine. Methods Data of 609 young people aged 15–29 was taken from the national representative survey conducted in June 2005. Outcome measures: The reported age of cigarette initiation was used to characterize the start of smoking experimentation, and the reported age of daily smoking initiation was considered to be a characteristic of established smoking. Analysis: survival analysis Cox proportional hazard regression models were used. Results Age of smoking initiation was reported by 87% of young men and 61% of young women, the beginning of daily smoking by 71% and 33% respectively. Being frequently exposed to second-hand smoke and having no household smoking restrictions was associated with a higher risk of earlier smoking initiation both for men and women. For women, this risk was associated with age, HR = 0.95, (95% CI 0.91–0.98), that is, younger girls were more likely to smoke their first cigarette earlier in their lifetime. Those women had a higher risk of early smoking initiation who reported to receive tobacco-related information from magazines, HR = 1.40 (1.01–1.92), and outdoor tobacco advertising, HR = 1.99 (1.45–2.75). With both men and women, the risk of establishing daily smoking was higher in those with lower levels of tobacco-related knowledge and less household smoking restrictions. For women, the risk was higher in those who live in larger cities HR = 1.77 (1.10–2.86), and who received information about tobacco smoking from colleagues or friends HR = 1.83 (1.13–2.95). Conclusion Encouraging people to eliminate their homes of tobacco smoke and tobacco advertising bans can be effective measures in preventing the initiation of smoking among young people. Young female smoking initiation is of special concern in Ukraine, since they are more responsive to tobacco marketing and

  5. Delayed Initiation of the Pharyngeal Swallow: Normal Variability in Adult Swallows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Harris, Bonnie; Brodsky, Martin B.; Michel, Yvonne; Lee, Fu-Shing; Walters, Bobby

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine bolus head timing and location relations with the onset of hyoid movement at the initiation of the pharyngeal swallow and at the onset of swallow-related apnea. Method: Bolus head timing and location and the timing of swallow-related apnea were recorded from frame-by-frame analyses of…

  6. Universal Intervention Effects on Substance Use among Young Adults Mediated by Delayed Adolescent Substance Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoth, Richard; Trudeau, Linda; Guyll, Max; Shin, Chungyeol; Redmond, Cleve

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine whether delayed substance initiation during adolescence, achieved through universal family-focused interventions conducted in middle school, can reduce problematic substance use during young adulthood. Sixth-grade students enrolled in 33 rural midwestern schools and their families were randomly assigned to 3…

  7. Parafoveal Preprocessing of Word Initial Trigrams during Reading in Adults and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagán, Ascensión; Blythe, Hazel I.; Liversedge, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Although previous research has shown that letter position information for the first letter of a parafoveal word is encoded less flexibly than internal word beginning letters (Johnson, Perea & Rayner, 2007; White et al., 2008), it is not clear how positional encoding operates over the initial trigram in English. This experiment explored the…

  8. Integrating Assessment and Evaluation Into Partnership Initiatives: Lessons From the Community Partnerships for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Nancy; Thomas, M Lori

    2015-08-01

    Communities nationwide have formed cross-sector partnerships to face the needs of an aging population, particularly for the purpose of improving long-term supportive service systems. Research is limited on how evaluation strategies are incorporated into partnership work, especially in the field of aging. This retrospective qualitative study reviewed administrative and key informant interview data to examine how 15 community partnerships (CPs) within the Community Partnerships for Older Adults (CPFOA) national program incorporated evaluation into their work. The four overarching lessons drawn from our inquiry suggest that effective CPs: (a) incorporate both formative and summative methods into evaluation, (b) use and develop the knowledge and skills of its members, (c) support flexible and creative evaluation methods and strategies, and (d) use internal and external resources to support evaluation efforts, particularly with nontraditional partners. There is a need for continued research to capture the methodological complexity of partnership evaluation. PMID:24652885

  9. Development of the teneral adult Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae): time to initiate and completely bore out of maple wood.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, V; Keena, M A

    2013-02-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) is an introduced invasive pest with the potential to devastate hardwood forests in North America. Using artificial pupal chambers, we documented the time required by teneral adults at three temperatures (20, 25, and 30 °C), 60-80% RH, and a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h to initiate boring after eclosion and subsequently bore completely through a 7-mm (range, 3-11 mm) layer of Norway maple wood (Acer platanoides L.). In total, 218 laboratory-reared pupae from the Chicago, IL, or Inner Mongolia, China, populations were used in the study. Females (1.54 ± 0.03 g) weighed significantly more than males (1.12 ± 0.03 g), but the average weights of the beetles emerging in each temperature did not differ. Adult weight was positively correlated with exit hole diameter (diameter [mm] = 2.2 * weight [g] + 7.9). The rate at which beetles bored through the wood (136, 178, and 168 mm(3)/d at 20, 25 and 30 °C, respectively) significantly differed between temperatures but did not differ with beetle weight. Temperature had a significant effect on the time it took adults to initiate boring (7, 5, and 4 d at 20, 25, and 30 °C, respectively) and subsequently to complete boring to emerge (5, 4, and 4 d at 20, 25, and 30 °C, respectively). This suggests that beetles require more than a week to progress from eclosion to emergence in wood, even at summer temperatures. This information on A. glabripennis basic biology is critical for developing phenology models that are used to time exclusion and eradication methodologies. PMID:23339780

  10. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group thymic initiative: a state-of-the-art study of thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Detterbeck, Frank; Korst, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Thymic malignancies are relatively rare tumors. A general lack of knowledge, misconceptions about benignancy, confusion about the definition of terms, and variability in reporting of outcomes have further hampered progress in these diseases. The International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group has emerged to counter these challenges and has brought together a worldwide multidisciplinary community determined to improve outcomes for these patients. Although the organization is young (initiated in 2010), major early accomplishments have created a foundation and infrastructure for scientific research. These include consensus definitions of terms, an unprecedented global database, development of practical clinical resources and, together with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, development of proposals for the first formal stage classification of these malignant tumors. Many articles have been published or are under way, and a second phase of projects building on the early success is proceeding. The greatest accomplishment of the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group lies in the establishment of an open culture of collaboration and the engagement of a broad group of individuals united by a common mission. It is a testament to what can be achieved, despite ongoing and inherent challenges, by determination and a collective effort. PMID:25837546

  11. When, where and how to initiate hypothermia after adult cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Taccone, F S; Donadello, K; Beumier, M; Scolletta, S

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutich hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve neurological outcome and survival after witnessed cardiac arrest (CA) that is due to ventricular fibrillation. Although TH is widely used following witnessed CA as well as all forms of initial rhythm, the mortality rate after CA remains unacceptably high, and additional study is needed to understand when and how to implement hypothermia in the post-resuscitation phase. Experimental studies have emphasized the importance of initiating cooling soon after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or even during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Clinical studies have shown that pre-hospital induction of hypothermia is feasible and has no major adverse events-even when used intra-arrest-and may provide some additional benefits compared to delayed in-hospital cooling. Thus, hypothermia use should not be limited to the Intensive Care Unit but can be initiated in the field/ambulance or in the Emergency Department, then continued after hospital admission- even during specific procedures such as coronary angiography-as part of the global management of CA patients. Various methods (both non-invasive and invasive) are available to achieve and maintain the target temperature; however, only some of these methods-which include cold fluids, ice packs, iced pads and helmet and trans-nasal cooling- are easily deployed in the pre-hospital setting. PMID:21878875

  12. Correlates of human papillomavirus vaccine series completion among young adult female initiators

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Laz, Tabassum H; McGrath, Christine; Berenson, Abbey B

    2014-01-01

    Incomplete human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is a public health concern. The objective of this study was to examine the correlates of vaccine series completion among 18–26 year old US women using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data. Using BRFSS data collected during 2008–2010, we conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis to examine the correlates of HPV vaccine completion among HPV vaccine initiators. Among 656 women (18–26 years old) who initiated the HPV vaccine, the overall weighted vaccine series completion rate was 60.7%. It was 32.9%, 65.3%, and 69.9% in 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively. Black and Hispanic women were less likely to complete the series compared with white women. Higher income, having a college degree and completion of the study in a more recent year were associated with higher completion rates. Thus, the reasons for HPV series non-completion may be multifactorial. Interventions targeting 18–26 year old female vaccine initiators with low income and education, and minority backgrounds may improve HPV vaccine series completion. PMID:25424919

  13. Exercise Is Medicine Initiative: Physical Activity as a Vital Sign and Prescription in Adult Rehabilitation Practice.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Rachel E

    2016-09-01

    To support rehabilitation health care professionals' efforts to increase physical activity levels among their outpatient rehabilitation and postdischarge patients, we review the Exercise is Medicine (EIM) initiative. The EIM initiative was launched in 2007 jointly by the American College of Sports Medicine and American Medical Association. Three principles underlie the EIM initiative. First, physical activity should be monitored as a vital sign; second, physical activity is an effective medical modality and should be prescribed; and third, success of their vision requires top down and bottom up efforts by 3 key stakeholder groups: health care providers, exercise professionals, and the community. The target weekly physical activity level is 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, as established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization. Persons falling below the weekly target physical activity level should be prescribed physical activity and/or referred to an exercise professional for implementation support. Selection of an exercise professional for referral is based on the patient's risk stratification and need to participate in clinically supervised physical activity. PMID:27470321

  14. Hyponatremia after initiation and rechallenge with trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole in an older adult

    PubMed Central

    Huntsberry, Ashley M; Linnebur, Sunny A; Vejar, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a case report of a patient experiencing hyponatremia from trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP–SMX) upon initial use and subsequent rechallenge. Summary An 82-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status thought to be due to complicated cystitis and was treated with TMP–SMX 160 mg/800 mg orally twice daily for 7 days. Her basic metabolic panel prior to initiation of TMP–SMX was within normal limits, with the exception of her serum sodium of 132 mmol/L (range 133–145 mmol/L). The day after completing her 7-day course of TMP–SMX therapy the patient was evaluated by her primary care provider and another basic metabolic panel revealed a reduction in the serum sodium to 121 mmol/L. The patient’s serum sodium concentrations increased to baseline 7 days after completion of the TMP–SMX therapy, and remained normal until she was treated in the emergency department several months later for another presumed urinary tract infection. She was again started on TMP–SMX therapy empirically, and within several days her serum sodium concentrations decreased from 138 mmol/L to a low of 129 mmol/L. The TMP–SMX therapy was discontinued upon negative urine culture results and her serum sodium increased to 134 mmol/L upon discharge. Based upon the Naranjo probability scale score of 9, TMP–SMX was the probable cause of the patient’s hyponatremia. Conclusion Our patient developed hyponatremia from TMP–SMX therapy upon initial use and rechallenge. Although hyponatremia appears to be rare with TMP–SMX therapy, providers should be aware of this potentially life-threatening adverse event. PMID:26170649

  15. Relationship between frequent knee pain, obesity, and gait speed in older adults: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad M

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee pain (KP) causes gait difficulties in older adults and is associated with slow gait speed (GS). Obesity has negative effects on health. GS is an important indicator of health, well-being, and mean life span in older adults and is a strong predictor of future disability and mortality. The relationship between frequent KP, obesity, and GS in older adults remains unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed at examining the relationship between baseline frequent KP and obesity status on GS over time. We hypothesized that frequent KP, obesity, or both would be associated with decreased GS over time. Methods The data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were used for this 6-year longitudinal cohort study. We studied 3,118 adults aged between 45 years and 79 years. We grouped the participants into the following four categories according to KP frequency and obesity status at baseline: 1) no KP and nonobese, 2) frequent KP and nonobese, 3) no KP and obese, and 4) frequent KP and obese. GS measurements were based on a 20 m walking test timed using a stopwatch; testing was performed at baseline and over a 6-year follow-up period. Walk pace (m/sec) was calculated as the average pace over two trials conducted at clinic visits. General linear mixed models were used to examine the relationships between frequent KP, obesity, and GS. Results After adjusting for all covariates, at baseline, all the nonobese group with frequent KP (β=−0.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.07 to −0.04), the obese group with no KP (β=−0.07, 95% CI: −0.1 to −0.04), and the obese group with frequent KP (β=−0.08, 95% CI: −0.1 to −0.05) exhibited decreased GS compared with the nonobese and no KP group. However, the associations between frequent KP, obesity, and GS over time were not statistically significant. Conclusion Frequent KP alone, obesity alone, and the combination of frequent KP and obesity were all associated with decreased GS in older adults. These

  16. Art for Libraries' Sake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Mark-Elliot

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates the benefits of an aggressive library program of regularly scheduled and professionally curated art exhibitions and related events. Describes the Visual Arts Program at the Pacific Beach branch library (San Diego). A sidebar by Debra Wilcox Johnson discusses libraries' development of cultural programming for adults. (AEF)

  17. Gerontology and the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jean Ellen, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research on the place of the arts in programs for the elderly. In nine articles deals with characteristics and attitudes of adult students in art and music, dance therapy, and creativity. Discusses the aging advocacy movement and suggests it can be useful to program planners and gerontologists. (JAC)

  18. PLANNING THE ART ROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POPOLIZIO, VINCENT J.; AND OTHERS

    FACILITIES FOR CARRYING OUT AN ART PROGRAM MUST BE DESIGNED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS IN SCHOOL AND THOSE ENROLLED IN ADULT PROGRAMS. PROVISIONS MUST BE INCLUDED FOR PAINTING AND DRAWING, THE GRAPHIC ARTS, GENERAL CRAFTS, MODELING, SCHULPTURING, PHOTOGRAPHY, SERIGRAPHY, AND MECHANICAL DRAWING. WORK CENTERS AND TRAFFIC FLOW NEED CAREFUL…

  19. Adolescent Sexual Debut and Initiation into New-Type Drug Use among a Sample of Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yingying; He, Na; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    We examined the association between adolescent sexual debut and age at new-type drug initiation among a sample of young adult new-type drug users. A total of 276 participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in Shanghai, China. The analyses were restricted to a total of 201 participants aged between 18 and 30 years. The average age at sexual debut and age at first new-type drug use were 18.8 and 20.9 years, respectively. About 94% of participants reported having sexual experience (n=188); of those, 137 (72.9%) had sexual debut before they first used new-type drugs, while 32 (17.0%) initiated both events at the same age. After adjustment for age, income, education, and sexual orientation, adolescent sexual debut was independently associated with younger age at new-type drug initiation. Adolescent sexual debut is associated with early onset of new-type drug use. Our findings underscore the importance of implementing sex-education programs for adolescents in schools in China. PMID:26098832

  20. Beetle and plant density as cues initiating dispersal in two species of adult predaceous diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Yee, Donald A; Taylor, Stacy; Vamosi, Steven M

    2009-05-01

    Dispersal can influence population dynamics, species distributions, and community assembly, but few studies have attempted to determine the factors that affect dispersal of insects in natural populations. Consequently, little is known about how proximate factors affect the dispersal behavior of individuals or populations, or how an organism's behavior may change in light of such factors. Adult predaceous diving beetles are active dispersers and are important predators in isolated aquatic habitats. We conducted interrelated studies to determine how several factors affected dispersal in two common pond-inhabiting species in southern Alberta, Canada: Graphoderus occidentalis and Rhantus sericans. Specifically, we (1) experimentally tested the effect of plant and beetle densities on dispersal probabilities in ponds; (2) surveyed ponds and determined the relationships among beetle densities and plant densities and water depth; and (3) conducted laboratory trials to determine how beetle behavior changed in response to variation in plant densities, conspecific densities, food, and water depth. Our field experiment determined that both species exhibited density dependence, with higher beetle densities leading to higher dispersal probabilities. Low plant density also appeared to increase beetle dispersal. Consistent with our experimental results, densities of R. sericans in ponds were significantly related to plant density and varied also with water depth; G. occidentalis densities did not vary with either factor. In the laboratory, behavior varied with plant density only for R. sericans, which swam at low density but were sedentary at high density. Both species responded to depth, with high beetle densities eliciting beetles to spend more time in deeper water. The presence of food caused opposite responses for G. occidentalis between experiments. Behavioral changes in response to patch-level heterogeneity likely influence dispersal in natural populations and are expected

  1. Prevention of respiratory tract infections with bacterial lysate OM-85 bronchomunal in children and adults: a state of the art.

    PubMed

    De Benedetto, Fernando; Sevieri, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and also represent a cause of death in some parts of the world. The treatment of RTIs implies a continuous search for stronger therapies and represents an economical burden for health services and society. In this context the prevention of infections is absolutely required. The use of bacterial lysates as immuno-modulators to boost immunological response is widely debated. Aim of this review is to summarize the main clinical studies on the effect of the bacterial lysate OM-85 in treating RTIs in susceptible subjects - namely children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-affected adults. Results from clinical trials and recent systematic reviews are reported.The results show that mean number of RTIs decreases upon treatment with OM-85, as measured by frequency of exacerbations or number of antibiotic courses. Data from systematic reviews indicated that OM-85 is particularly beneficial in children at high risk of RTIs. In COPD-affected adults, clinical studies showed that treatment with OM-85 reduced exacerbations, although systematic reviews did not legitimate the protective effect of OM-85 toward COPD as significant.The use of OM-85 could be efficacious in reducing exacerbation frequency of RTIs in children and adults at risk. However further high-quality studies are needed to better explain the mechanism of action and confirm the beneficial results of OM85. PMID:23692890

  2. Prevention of respiratory tract infections with bacterial lysate OM-85 bronchomunal in children and adults: a state of the art

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and also represent a cause of death in some parts of the world. The treatment of RTIs implies a continuous search for stronger therapies and represents an economical burden for health services and society. In this context the prevention of infections is absolutely required. The use of bacterial lysates as immuno-modulators to boost immunological response is widely debated. Aim of this review is to summarize the main clinical studies on the effect of the bacterial lysate OM-85 in treating RTIs in susceptible subjects - namely children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-affected adults. Results from clinical trials and recent systematic reviews are reported. The results show that mean number of RTIs decreases upon treatment with OM-85, as measured by frequency of exacerbations or number of antibiotic courses. Data from systematic reviews indicated that OM-85 is particularly beneficial in children at high risk of RTIs. In COPD-affected adults, clinical studies showed that treatment with OM-85 reduced exacerbations, although systematic reviews did not legitimate the protective effect of OM-85 toward COPD as significant. The use of OM-85 could be efficacious in reducing exacerbation frequency of RTIs in children and adults at risk. However further high-quality studies are needed to better explain the mechanism of action and confirm the beneficial results of OM85. PMID:23692890

  3. HMO membership, copayment, and initiation of care for cancer: a study of working adults.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, H P

    1987-01-01

    This study compares diagnosis and commencement of treatment for cancer among persons with fully financed fee-for-service coverage, persons with copaid fee-for-service coverage, and persons in an HMO (health maintenance organization). A total of 242 subjects actively employed at the time of their diagnosis were interviewed, typically within six months of beginning cancer treatment. After sex, age, income, education, residence (urban vs rural), and disease site and stage had been controlled, those who made copayments were found to have waited an average of 1.25 months longer (95 per cent confidence limit (cl) +/- .88) between initial suspicion of illness and obtaining a definitive diagnosis than those with full insurance coverage. Time from diagnosis until the beginning of treatment averaged .83 months longer (95 per cent cl +/- .41) for HMO members than those in fee-for-service. These relations were strongest in income categories equal to or exceeding $20,000 per year. PMID:3826465

  4. Multidimensional Measurement Within Adult Protective Services: Design and Initial Testing of the Tool for Risk, Interventions, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfeld, David H.; Henderson, Linda B.; Snider, Marcy A.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development, field utility, reliability, and validity of the multidimensional Tool for Risk, Interventions, and Outcomes (TRIO) for use in Adult Protective Services (APS). The TRIO is designed to facilitate consistent APS practice and collect data related to multiple dimensions of typical interactions with APS clients, including the investigation and assessment of risks, the provision of APS interventions, and associated health and safety outcomes. Initial tests of the TRIO indicated high field utility, social worker “relevance and buy-in,” and inter-rater reliability. TRIO concurrent validity was demonstrated via appropriate patterns of TRIO item differentiation based on the type of observed confirmed abuse or neglect; and predictive validity was demonstrated by prediction of the risk of actual APS recurrence. The TRIO is a promising new tool that can help meet the challenges of providing and documenting effective APS practices and identifying those at high risk for future APS recurrence. PMID:24848994

  5. Evaluation of Initial Telomere Length and Changes after Transplantation in Adult Double-Unit Cord Blood Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Ashbridge, Beth; Zehir, Ahmet; Lubin, Marissa; Barker, Juliet N; Moore, Malcolm A S

    2015-07-01

    Cord blood (CB) leukocytes have inherent telomere length (TL) variation, and CB hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can maintain high telomerase levels preventing telomere attrition in vitro. We evaluated TL changes in 13 adult double-unit CB transplant (CBT) recipients. In the 26 units, we observed a marked variation in CB TL at thaw (median, 9.99 kilobases [kb]; range, 6.85 to 13.5). All 13 patients engrafted. Of 11 engrafting with 1 unit, there was no correlation between unit dominance and TL (mean dominant unit TL, 8.84 kb ± 1.76; mean nonengrafting unit TL, 10.3 kb ± 1.81; P = .77). Serial measurements of TL up to 1 year after CBT demonstrated an overall mean 3.04 kb ± .16 TL decrease with only 1 patient exhibiting telomere maintenance. In summary, initial TL does not predict CB unit dominance. Moreover, our analysis suggests neonatal hematopoiesis makes a transition to an HSC characterized by changes in average TL and potentially low telomerase asymmetric cell division in adult CBT recipients. Further investigation of alterations in telomere length and its clinical implications after transplantation of this observation are indicated. PMID:25865647

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life Dynamics of HIV-positive South African Women up to ART Initiation: Evidence from the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Andrew; Garrett, Nigel; Werner, Lise; Burns, Jonathan K.; Mpanza, Lindiwe; Mlisana, Koleka; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Karim, Salim S. Abdool

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the long-term dynamics in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among HIV-positive persons from acute infection. From 2004, 160 women were enrolled into the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection study at two sites in the province of KwaZulu-Natal and underwent 3–6 monthly HRQoL assessments using the functional assessment of HIV infection (FAHI) instrument. Overall and 5 sub-scale FAHI scores [physical well-being (PWB), emotional well-being (EWB), functional and global well-being (FGWB), social well-being (SWB) and cognitive functioning (CF)] were calculated up to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and scores at enrollment were compared to the acute, early and established infection phases. Mixed-effects regression models adjusting for behavioral and clinical factors were applied to assess HRQoL trends and the proportion of women meeting minimally important differences was calculated. Our analyses revealed that overall/sub-scale scores improved over time, except from PWB and CF. A higher educational status, contraceptive use and a higher BMI were the strongest predictors of higher overall/sub-scale FAHI scores. CD4 count and HIV viral load were strongly associated with PWB and CF, but not overall FAHI and other sub-scales. Women newly diagnosed with acute HIV infection face profound HRQoL challenges. While early ART delivery may be important for PWB and CF, factors such as education, contraception provision and good nutritional status should be promoted to maximize HRQoL in HIV positive individuals. PMID:24368630

  7. Health-related quality of life dynamics of HIV-positive South African women up to ART initiation: evidence from the CAPRISA 002 acute infection cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Garrett, Nigel; Werner, Lise; Burns, Jonathan K; Mpanza, Lindiwe; Mlisana, Koleka; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2014-06-01

    Few studies have investigated the long-term dynamics in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among HIV-positive persons from acute infection. From 2004, 160 women were enrolled into the CAPRISA 002 Acute Infection study at two sites in the province of KwaZulu-Natal and underwent 3-6 monthly HRQoL assessments using the functional assessment of HIV infection (FAHI) instrument. Overall and 5 sub-scale FAHI scores [physical well-being (PWB), emotional well-being (EWB), functional and global well-being (FGWB), social well-being (SWB) and cognitive functioning (CF)] were calculated up to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and scores at enrollment were compared to the acute, early and established infection phases. Mixed-effects regression models adjusting for behavioral and clinical factors were applied to assess HRQoL trends and the proportion of women meeting minimally important differences was calculated. Our analyses revealed that overall/sub-scale scores improved over time, except from PWB and CF. A higher educational status, contraceptive use and a higher BMI were the strongest predictors of higher overall/sub-scale FAHI scores. CD4 count and HIV viral load were strongly associated with PWB and CF, but not overall FAHI and other sub-scales. Women newly diagnosed with acute HIV infection face profound HRQoL challenges. While early ART delivery may be important for PWB and CF, factors such as education, contraception provision and good nutritional status should be promoted to maximize HRQoL in HIV positive individuals. PMID:24368630

  8. An Enquiry into Primary Student Teachers' Confidence, Feelings and Attitudes towards Teaching Arts and Crafts in Finland and Malta during Initial Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatt, Isabelle; Karppinen, Seija

    2014-01-01

    Arts and crafts are connected with a variety of emotions, and the prospect of teaching these subjects could be a source of other emotions, not necessarily positive. This study explores the feelings and attitudes of student teachers towards arts and crafts prior to any training within their degree course and examines any changes that occur…

  9. Rates and cost of hospitalisation before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in urban and rural settings in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Brennan, Alana T; Fox, Matthew P; Modisenyane, Tebogo; Tshabangu, Nkeko; Mohapi, Lerato; Rosen, Sydney; Martinson, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have compared hospitalisations before and after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in the same patients. We analysed the cost of hospitalisations among 3,906 adult patients in two South African hospitals, 30% of whom initiated ART. Hospitalisations were 50% and 40% more frequent and 1.5 and 2.6 times more costly at a CD4 cell count <100 cells/mm3 when compared to 200–350 cells/mm3 in the pre-ART and ART period, respectively. Mean inpatient cost per patient year was USD 117 (95% confidence interval, CI, 85–158) for patients on ART and USD 72 (95% CI, 56–89) for pre-ART patients. Raising ART eligibility thresholds could avoid the high cost of hospitalisation before and immediately after ART initiation. PMID:23187948

  10. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  11. The Saudi Initiative for Asthma - 2016 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alhaider, Sami A.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Al Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Yousef, Abdullah A.; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an updated guideline for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have guidelines that are up to date, simple to understand and easy to use by nonasthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. SINA approach is mainly based on symptom control and assessment of risk as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. The new SINA guidelines include updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of asthma control in the management of asthma in adults and children, inclusion of a new medication appendix, and keeping consistency on the management at different age groups. The section on asthma in children is rewritten and expanded where the approach is stratified based on the age. The guidelines are constructed based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There is also an emphasis on patient–doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. PMID:26933455

  12. Brief Report: Is Cognitive Rehabilitation Needed in Verbal Adults with Autism? Insights from Initial Enrollment in a Trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Bahorik, Amber L.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Greenwald, Deborah P.; Litschge, Maralee Y.; Mazefsky, Carla A.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation is an emerging set of potentially effective interventions for the treatment of autism spectrum disorder, yet the applicability of these approaches for "high functioning" adults who have normative levels of intelligence remains unexplored. This study examined the initial cognitive performance characteristics of 40…

  13. Experience Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda

    This Arkansas art education curriculum guide for grades 1 to 6 covers basic concepts, vocabulary, activities, and evaluation for each grade. The basic concepts to be taught throughout these grades include line, shape, color, space, drawing, painting, printing, art history, and art careers. Specific art techniques and types of arts are introduced…

  14. Adults' Orientation of Children--And Children's Initiative to Pitch In--To Everyday Adult Activities in a Tsotsil Maya Community.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines how 2-year-old children attempt to actively participate in adult work in a Mayan community in Chiapas, Mexico, and how adults contribute and accommodate to the contributions. As children enter into activities and adults orient and reorient the activity to direct the children, teaching from expert to novice is generated by children's agency in co-participatory interactions. The chapter enriches the LOPI model by focusing on the structure of participation and communication, social and community organization, and the evaluation that occurs in the activity itself. PMID:26955925

  15. The National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence: An Evolution of a Nursing Initiative to Improve Care of Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Harden, J Taylor; Watman, Rachael A

    2015-06-01

    The mission of the John A. Hartford Foundation is to improve the health of older Americans. This mission has been realized throughout the evolution of the National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence-an international collaboration between Schools of Nursing and Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing-whose goal is to support research, education, and practice to provide better nursing care for our aging society. The National Hartford Center is the focus of this supplement and an example of the Foundation's grant-making to prepare the nursing workforce to be competent to care for our aging society. This article traces the innovative origin and inception of the National Hartford Center, first as the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) Initiative in 2000 under the leadership of two groundbreaking scholars in nursing and aging sciences: Claire M. Fagin, PhD, RN, and Patricia G. Archbold, DNSc. We continue through to today's leadership and culminate by describing the Center's influence on the gerontological nursing workforce and clinical practice; the paper also includes a brief introduction to the articles, highlighting advances in gerontological nursing science. With funding from the John A. Hartford Foundation, The Atlantic Philanthropies, The Mayday Fund, and a number of creative public and nonprofit partnerships, the National Hartford Center celebrates two decades and its greatest asset-the nearly 300 gerontological nursing leaders, including Archbold nursing pre-docs, Fagin nursing post-docs, and expert faculty, along with its Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence across the country. We trace the transition of BAGNC to the membership-based National Hartford Center and its move to The Gerontological Society of America to become a self-sustaining, autonomous unit. Current needs, challenges, lessons learned, and strategies of the National Hartford Center are examined within the context of sustainability

  16. Predictors of long-term weight loss in adults with modest initial weight loss, by sex and race.

    PubMed

    Svetkey, Laura P; Ard, Jamy D; Stevens, Victor J; Loria, Catherine M; Young, Deb Y; Hollis, Jack F; Appel, Lawrence J; Brantley, Phillip J; Kennedy, Betty M; Kumanyika, Shiriki K; Batch, Bryan C; Corsino, Leonor; Lien, Lillian F; Vollmer, William M

    2012-09-01

    Effective weight management interventions could reduce race-sex disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet little is known about factors associated with successful weight loss maintenance in race-sex subgroups. In the Weight Loss Maintenance trial (WLM), overweight/obese (BMI 25-45 kg/m(2)) adults who lost ≥4 kg in a 6-month behavioral weight loss intervention (phase I) were randomized into one of three 30-month maintenance interventions (phase II). To investigate predictors in subgroups, randomized groups were combined for this analysis. Of 1,685 phase I participants, 1,032 (61%) entered phase II, including 12% black men (BM), 26% black women (BW), 25% white men (WM), and 37% white women (WW). Weight change over the 36-month study ranged from -2.3% (95% confidence interval = -3.1 to -1.5%) in BW to -4.5% (95% confidence interval = -5.7 to -4.0%) in WM, the result of differential weight loss during phase I. Within race, men lost significantly more weight than women, but within sex group, weight loss did not differ significantly between races. Although participants regained weight during phase II, regain did not differ by race-sex group, and mean weight at the end of the study was significantly lower than phase I entry weight for each subgroup. In regression models, phase I weight loss predicted overall 36-month weight loss in all race-sex groups. Healthy dietary pattern at entry, improvement in dietary pattern, or both were predictive in three of four race-sex groups. Few other variables other than initial weight loss and dietary pattern were predictive. Future research should identify additional modifiable influences on long-term maintenance after a modest weight loss. PMID:21527896

  17. Regional Resource Initiative. A Blueprint for Sharing Resources and Expertise in Adult Education and Literacy across State Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. Center for Literacy Studies.

    The Arizona Adult Literacy and Technology Resource Center and the University of Tennessee's Center for Literacy Studies undertook a collaborative project to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of regional sharing of resources and expertise in field of adult education and literacy education. The project's goals were as follows: involve a…

  18. No Single Measure. A Survey of Australian Adult Literacy. Summary Report. A National Policy on Languages Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickert, Rosie

    A survey of the literacy proficiency of 1,500 Australian adults indicates that: (1) people who demonstrate some proficiency with using printed material should not be classified as illiterate; (2) appropriate rating scales should be developed for assessing adults' literacy skills; (3) more detailed analysis of the characteristics of those who…

  19. Iowa CASAS Pilot Project Reports: An Initial Evaluation of CASAS Effectiveness in Iowa's Adult Basic Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Mary L.

    In fall 1992, the Iowa Department of Education began pilot tests of the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS), an assessment system evaluating reading, math, and problem solving in a life skills context for adult remedial programs. This document provides reports from the nine community colleges that served as test sites, describing…

  20. Gourdeous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a gourd art project for her art club. Prior to students actually working on the gourds, the author and her art volunteer did a joint demonstration on the process students would go through to create their project. The volunteer brought in and explained her gourd art and shared information about the drying and…

  1. Initial Evaluations of Mainstream Personality Tests for Use with Visually Impaired Adults in Vocational Assessment and Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Juliet

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R adult and EPQ-R short form), the 16PF5, and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator for use with adults with visual impairments. Results found only the EPQ-R short form can be used by participants using low vision aids, closed-circuit television, or an optical character reader.…

  2. Art Education/Art Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The special issue presents 13 articles dealing with art education and art therapy for special groups. Included are the following titles and authors: "Art Education for Special Groups: The Emotionally Disturbed" (E. Ulman); "You Are The Early Warning System" (C. Stember); "School Art Therapist Rationale for DPI Certification" (V. Minar); "Art…

  3. Predictors of Late HIV Diagnosis among Adult People Living with HIV/AIDS Who Undertake an Initial CD4 T Cell Evaluation, Northern Ethiopia: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Melkamu Bedimo; Beyene, Habtamu Bedimo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Early HIV testing and timely initiation of ART is critical for the improved quality of life of PLWHIV. Having identified a higher rates of Late HIV diagnosis, this study was aimed to determine Determinants of late diagnosis of HIV among adult HIV patients in Bahir Dar, Northern Ethiopia. Methods A case control study was conducted between January 2010 to December 2011 at Bahir Dar Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital. The study subjects consisted of 267 cases and 267 controls. Cases were adult people living with HIV/AIDS whose initial CD4 T cell count was < 200/μl of blood. Controls were those with a CD4 T cell count of greater than 200/ μl. Trained staff nurses were involved in data collection using a semi-structured questionnaire. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics and Binary logistic regression were performed. Results Subjects who hold a certificate and above (AOR = 0.26; 95% CI = 0.13. 0.54), being initiated by friends, families and other socials to undertake HIV testing (AOR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.29, 1.48), who reported a medium and high knowledge score about HIV/AIDS and who undertake HIV testing while visiting a clinic for ANC (AOR = 0.40; 95% CI = 0.19, 0.83) were less likely to be diagnosed late. Subjects who undertake HIV testing due to providers’ initiation (AOR = 1.70; 95%CI = 1.08, 2.68), who reported a medium internalized stigma (AOR = 4.94; 95% CI = 3.13, 7.80) and who reported a high internalized stigma score towards HIV/AIDS (AOR = 16.64; 95% CI = 8.29, 33.4) had a high odds of being diagnosed late compared to their counterparts. Conclusion Internalized stigma, low knowledge level about HIV/AIDS, not to have attended formal education and failure to undertake HIV testing by own initiation were significant determinant factors associated with Late HIV diagnosis. Education about HIV/AIDS, promotion of general education, and encouraging people to motivate their social mates to undertake HIV testing are

  4. Language Arts - Spanish Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Magdalena; Sones, Mary

    This publication presents three suggested language arts curriculum units. They represent a cross-section of materials that have been developed to deal with the learning problems of students with special language difficulties. Originally developed for grades 7-12, these units may be adapted for use in adult education or at other grade levels. They…

  5. Art. Program Planning, Primary, Junior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York Borough Board of Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    Over 20 ideas for planning art programs for grades 1 through 6 are included in this planning guide. Introductory comments stress the individuality of children and caution art teachers not to judge by adult standards and not to direct lessons step-by-step or show how things should be drawn. Outdoor sketching is recommended as a way to develop…

  6. Initial Impressions of Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Case Managers about Community-Based Telehealth Kiosks

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Karen L.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Mecca, Laurel Person; Garlock, Laurie A.; Schulz, Richard; Dick, Andrew W.; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Community-based (multi-user) telehealth interventions may be beneficial for older adults, but there is little research regarding community-based telehealth. We used a qualitative descriptive approach to examine the acceptability and perceived value of community-based telehealth kiosks with regard to current health self-management practices of community-dwelling older adults as a first step in feasibility assessment. Participants included residents (n=6) and community agency case managers (n=3) of a HUD-subsidized senior apartment building. Both positive impressions and concerns of each group are presented. Findings helped guide the plans for future telehealth kiosk implementation and training. PMID:20509594

  7. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Takarinda, K. C.; Owiti, P.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Mugurungi, O.; Buruwe, L.; Reid, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: A non-governmental organisation-supported clinic offering health services including antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To compare ART retention between younger (age 10–14 years) vs. older (age 15–19 years) adolescents and younger (age 20–29 years) vs. older (age ⩾30 years) adults and determine adolescent- and adult-specific attrition-associated factors among those initiated on ART between 2010 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 110 (7%) adolescents and 1484 (93%) adults included in the study, no differences in retention were observed between younger vs. older adolescents at 6, 12 and 24 months. More younger adolescents were initiated with body mass index <16 kg/m2 compared with older adolescents (64% vs. 47%; P = 0.04). There were more females (74% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) and fewer patients initiating ART with CD4 count ⩽350 cells/mm3 (77% vs. 81%, P = 0.007) among younger vs. older adults. Younger adults demonstrated more attrition than older adults at all time-points. No attrition risk factors were observed among adolescents. Attrition-associated factors among adults included being younger, having a lower CD4 count and advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease at initiation, and initiation on a stavudine-based regimen. Conclusion: Younger adults demonstrated greater attrition and may require more attention. We were unable to demonstrate differences in attrition among younger vs. older adolescents. Loss to follow-up was the main reason for attrition across all age groups. Overall, earlier presentation for ART care appears important for improved ART retention among adults. PMID:27358802

  8. Safe Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Though most art materials are safe for children (and labelled accordingly), parents and teachers should follow recommended safety guidelines, such as those presented in this article, when choosing, using, and storing children's art materials. (SM)

  9. Car Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses car art and its appeal to boys and girls. Describes the popularity of customizing cars, focusing on this as a future career for students. Includes a list of project ideas that focuses on car art. (CMK)

  10. Black Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baraka, Amiri

    1987-01-01

    Discusses black art as not only an expression of black life but as revolutionary art. It must be collective, functional, and committing. It must also be anti-racist, anti-capitalist, and anti-imperialist. (LHW)

  11. Re-Learning the Traditional Art of Inuit Grass Basket-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Cindy

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an adult learning project to revitalise the traditional Inuit art of weaving grass baskets. The participants involved in the project, all older women who speak an indigenous first language (Inuktitut) and who have limited experience with formal education, largely on their own initiative, undertook the process of successfully…

  12. The Kuder Skills Assessment-College and Adult Version: Development and Initial Validation in a College Business Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottinghaus, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces the Kuder Skills Assessment-College and Adult version (KSA-CA; Rottinghaus, 2006), a new measure incorporating advances in the measurement of self-efficacy across 16 basic occupational domains (e.g., finance, information technology) and the six Kuder Clusters. Similar to the original development sample, all scales of the…

  13. 75 FR 82397 - Medicaid Program: Initial Core Set of Health Quality Measures for Medicaid-Eligible Adults

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... adults, as required by section 2701 of the Affordable Care Act, for voluntary use by State programs administered under title XIX of the Social Security Act (the Act), health insurance issuers and managed care... signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act) (Pub. L. 111-...

  14. Executive Functioning Differences between Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Autistic Spectrum Disorder in Initiation, Planning and Strategy Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramham, Jessica; Ambery, Fiona; Young, Susan; Morris, Robin; Russell, Ailsa; Xenitidis, Kiriakos; Asherson, Philip; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Executive functioning deficits characterize the neuropsychological profiles of the childhood neurodevelopmental disorders of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). This study sought to determine whether similar impairments exist in adults with ADHD (N = 53) and ASD (N = 45) in comparison with a…

  15. Brief Report: The Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults (SRS-A)-- Initial Results in a German Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a tool for quantitative autism assessment in children and adolescents. The SRS-A addresses social responsiveness in adulthood. Reliability and validity using the German adaptation of the SRS-A was examined in 20 adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), 62 with other mental disorders (CLIN) and 163…

  16. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  17. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  18. Art Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Advocating that Canadian art programs should use and model environmentally safe practices, the articles in this journal focus on issues of safe practices in art education. Articles are: (1) "What is WHMIS?"; (2) "Safety Precautions for Specific Art Processes"; (3) "Toxic Substances"; (4) "Using Clay, Glazes, and Kilns Safely in the Classroom"…

  19. 77 FR 286 - Medicaid Program: Initial Core Set of Health Care Quality Measures for Medicaid-Eligible Adults

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Medicaid Program: Initial Core Set of Health Care Quality...: This final notice announces the initial core set of health care quality measures for Medicaid-eligible... administered under title XIX of the Social Security Act, health insurance issuers and managed care...

  20. Attitudes of older adults toward shooter video games: An initial study to select an acceptable game for training visual processing.

    PubMed

    McKay, Sandra M; Maki, Brian E

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based 'Useful Field of View' (UFOV) training program has been shown to be effective in improving visual processing in older adults. Studies of young adults have shown that playing video games can have similar benefits; however, these studies involved realistic and violent 'first-person shooter' (FPS) games. The willingness of older adults to play such games has not been established. OBJECTIVES: To determine the degree to which older adults would accept playing a realistic, violent FPS-game, compared to video games not involving realistic depiction of violence. METHODS: Sixteen older adults (ages 64-77) viewed and rated video-clip demonstrations of the UFOV program and three video-game genres (realistic-FPS, cartoon-FPS, fixed-shooter), and were then given an opportunity to try them out (30 minutes per game) and rate various features. RESULTS: The results supported a hypothesis that the participants would be less willing to play the realistic-FPS game in comparison to the less violent alternatives (p's<0.02). After viewing the video-clip demonstrations, 10 of 16 participants indicated they would be unwilling to try out the realistic-FPS game. Of the six who were willing, three did not enjoy the experience and were not interested in playing again. In contrast, all 12 subjects who were willing to try the cartoon-FPS game reported that they enjoyed it and would be willing to play again. A high proportion also tried and enjoyed the UFOV training (15/16) and the fixed-shooter game (12/15). DISCUSSION: A realistic, violent FPS video game is unlikely to be an appropriate choice for older adults. Cartoon-FPS and fixed-shooter games are more viable options. Although most subjects also enjoyed UFOV training, a video-game approach has a number of potential advantages (for instance, 'addictive' properties, low cost, self-administration at home). We therefore conclude that non-violent cartoon-FPS and fixed-shooter video games warrant further investigation as an

  1. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  2. Increasing HIV-1 pretreatment drug resistance among antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating treatment between 2006 and 2014 in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael H; Silverman, Rachel; Beck, Ingrid A; Yatich, Nelly; Dross, Sandra; McKernan-Mullin, Jennifer; Bii, Stephen; Tapia, Kenneth; Stern, Joshua; Chohan, Bhavna; Sakr, Samah R; Kiarie, James N; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2016-06-19

    Antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya were tested for HIV-1 drug resistance at codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, M184V, and K65R using an oligonucleotide ligation assay. Prevalence of pretreatment drug resistance increased from 3.89% in 2006 to 10.93% in 2014 (P < 0.001), and 95% of those with resistance had at least one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation. Resistance to tenofovir (K65R) was found in 2014 but not in 2006. PMID:27058353

  3. Adult murine prostate basal and luminal cells are self-sustained lineages that can both serve as targets for prostate cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nahyun; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Ittmann, Michael; Xin, Li

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prostate epithelial lineage hierarchy and the cellular origin for prostate cancer remain inadequately defined. Using a lineage tracing approach, we show that adult rodent prostate basal and luminal cells are independently self-sustained in vivo. Disrupting the tumor suppressor Pten in either lineage led to prostate cancer initiation. However, the cellular composition and onset dynamics of the resulting tumors are distinctive. Prostate luminal cells are more responsive to Pten null-induced mitogenic signaling. In contrast, basal cells are resistant to direct transformation. Instead, loss of Pten activity induces the capability of basal cells to differentiate into transformation-competent luminal cells. Our study suggests that deregulation of epithelial differentiation is a critical step for the initiation of prostate cancers of basal cell origin. PMID:22340597

  4. Youth, Caregiver, and Staff Perspectives on an Initiative to Promote Success of Emerging Adults with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Stein, Kathleen F; Connors, Elizabeth H; Chambers, Kerri L; Thomas, Charmaine L; Stephan, Sharon H

    2014-07-01

    Transitioning to adulthood is more challenging for youth with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) as compared to youth with other disability types and typically-developing peers. Outcomes for emerging adults with EBD as a group are particularly concerning in the domains of unemployment, educational dropout rates, and interactions with the judicial system including incarceration, early parenting, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health problems, and suicide. The current study presents qualitative program evaluation data for one of seven grantee states awarded 5-year cooperative agreements by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to build developmentally-appropriate and effective youth-guided local systems of care for transition age youth, ages 16-25 years, to promote positive transition outcomes. Findings, obtained from focus groups of 25 participating transition age youth, caregivers, staff, and supervisors, include strategies for maintaining and expanding on the strengths of program, as well as for improving specific program areas. Also, consistent with the goals of the program, this process provided an opportunity for the youth and caregivers to voice their opinions and perspectives regarding their services. Implications for research and practice on effectively serving the unique needs of young adults experiencing EBD and their families in areas such as navigating special education, providing emotional and behavioral supports, and leveraging interagency collaboration are discussed. PMID:25005428

  5. Perceived Utility of the RE-AIM Framework for Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Initiatives for Older Adults: A Case Study from the U.S. Evidence-Based Disease Prevention Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ory, Marcia G; Altpeter, Mary; Belza, Basia; Helduser, Janet; Zhang, Chen; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination and implementation (D&I) frameworks are increasingly being promoted in public health research. However, less is known about their uptake in the field, especially for diverse sets of programs. Limited questionnaires exist to assess the ways that frameworks can be utilized in program planning and evaluation. We present a case study from the United States that describes the implementation of the RE-AIM framework by state aging services providers and public health partners and a questionnaire that can be used to assess the utility of such frameworks in practice. An online questionnaire was developed to capture community perspectives about the utility of the RE-AIM framework. Distributed to project leads in 27 funded states in an evidence-based disease prevention initiative for older adults, 40 key stakeholders responded representing a 100% state-participation rate among the 27 funded states. Findings suggest that there is perceived utility in using the RE-AIM framework when evaluating grand-scale initiatives for older adults. The RE-AIM framework was seen as useful for planning, implementation, and evaluation with relevance for evaluators, providers, community leaders, and policy makers. Yet, the uptake was not universal, and some respondents reported difficulties in use, especially adopting the framework as a whole. This questionnaire can serve as the basis to assess ways the RE-AIM framework can be utilized by practitioners in state-wide D&I efforts. Maximal benefit can be derived from examining the assessment of RE-AIM-related knowledge and confidence as part of a continual quality assurance process. We recommend such an assessment be performed before the implementation of new funding initiatives and throughout their course to assess RE-AIM uptake and to identify areas for technical assistance. PMID:25964897

  6. Perceived Utility of the RE-AIM Framework for Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Initiatives for Older Adults: A Case Study from the U.S. Evidence-Based Disease Prevention Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Marcia G.; Altpeter, Mary; Belza, Basia; Helduser, Janet; Zhang, Chen; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination and implementation (D&I) frameworks are increasingly being promoted in public health research. However, less is known about their uptake in the field, especially for diverse sets of programs. Limited questionnaires exist to assess the ways that frameworks can be utilized in program planning and evaluation. We present a case study from the United States that describes the implementation of the RE-AIM framework by state aging services providers and public health partners and a questionnaire that can be used to assess the utility of such frameworks in practice. An online questionnaire was developed to capture community perspectives about the utility of the RE-AIM framework. Distributed to project leads in 27 funded states in an evidence-based disease prevention initiative for older adults, 40 key stakeholders responded representing a 100% state-participation rate among the 27 funded states. Findings suggest that there is perceived utility in using the RE-AIM framework when evaluating grand-scale initiatives for older adults. The RE-AIM framework was seen as useful for planning, implementation, and evaluation with relevance for evaluators, providers, community leaders, and policy makers. Yet, the uptake was not universal, and some respondents reported difficulties in use, especially adopting the framework as a whole. This questionnaire can serve as the basis to assess ways the RE-AIM framework can be utilized by practitioners in state-wide D&I efforts. Maximal benefit can be derived from examining the assessment of RE-AIM-related knowledge and confidence as part of a continual quality assurance process. We recommend such an assessment be performed before the implementation of new funding initiatives and throughout their course to assess RE-AIM uptake and to identify areas for technical assistance. PMID:25964897

  7. Characteristics and Outcomes among Older HIV-Positive Adults Enrolled in HIV Programs in Four Sub-Saharan African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Eduardo, Eduard; Lamb, Matthew R.; Kandula, Sasi; Howard, Andrea; Mugisha, Veronicah; Kimanga, Davies; Kilama, Bonita; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Elul, Batya

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information exists on adults ≥50 years receiving HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa. Methodology Using routinely-collected longitudinal patient-level data among 391,111 adults ≥15 years enrolling in HIV care from January 2005–December 2010 and 184,689 initiating ART, we compared characteristics and outcomes between older (≥50 years) and younger adults at 199 clinics in Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, and Tanzania. We calculated proportions over time of newly enrolled and active adults receiving HIV care and initiating ART who were ≥50 years; cumulative incidence of loss to follow-up (LTF) and recorded death one year after enrollment and ART initiation, and CD4+ response following ART initiation. Findings From 2005–2010, the percentage of adults ≥50 years newly enrolled in HIV care remained stable at 10%, while the percentage of adults ≥50 years newly initiating ART (10% [2005]-12% [2010]), active in follow-up (10% [2005]-14% (2010]), and active on ART (10% [2005]-16% [2010]) significantly increased. One year after enrollment, older patients had significantly lower incidence of LTF (33.1% vs. 32.6%[40–49 years], 40.5%[25–39 years], and 56.3%[15–24 years]; p-value<0.0001), but significantly higher incidence of recorded death (6.0% vs. 5.0% [40–49 years], 4.1% [25–39 years], and 2.8% [15–24 years]; p-valve<0.0001). LTF was lower after vs. before ART initiation for all ages, with older adults experiencing less LTF than younger adults. Among 85,763 ART patients with baseline and follow-up CD4+ counts, adjusted average 12-month CD4+ response for older adults was 20.6 cells/mm3 lower than for adults 25–39 years of age (95% CI: 17.1–24.1). Conclusions The proportion of patients who are ≥50 years has increased over time and been driven by aging of the existing patient population. Older patients experienced less LTF, higher recorded mortality and less robust CD4+ response after ART initiation. Increased programmatic attention on

  8. Initial Study of Pre-Service Teachers' Comments on a Reality-Based, Urban-Student Video Streamed within an Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Eileen A.

    2009-01-01

    The Master of Arts in Teaching program at Empire State College, an alternative teacher certification program focused on bringing career-changing adults to high-needs schools, has an important need in its initial pre-service year. These adult students must be prepared to move into complex, high-needs schools without student teaching and often with…

  9. Brief Report: the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults (SRS-A): initial results in a German cohort.

    PubMed

    Bölte, Sven

    2012-09-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a tool for quantitative autism assessment in children and adolescents. The SRS-A addresses social responsiveness in adulthood. Reliability and validity using the German adaptation of the SRS-A was examined in 20 adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), 62 with other mental disorders (CLIN) and 163 typically developing (TD) participants. Cronbach's alpha ranged from .71 (TD) to .89 (ASD). A SRS-A total score of 67 had a sensitivity of .85, and a specificity of .83 for ASD versus CLIN/TD. Correlations with established autism scales (ADOS, AQ, SCQ) were moderate to high (r = .25-.83). Results provide adequate preliminary support for the application of the SRS-A. PMID:22183423

  10. Initial Usability and Feasibility Evaluation of a Personal Health Record-Based Self-Management System for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Barbara; Lucero, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic personal health record-based (ePHR-based) self-management systems can improve patient engagement and have an impact on health outcomes. In order to realize the benefits of these systems, there is a need to develop and evaluate heath information technology from the same theoretical underpinnings. Methods: Using an innovative usability approach based in human-centered distributed information design (HCDID), we tested an ePHR-based falls-prevention self-management system—Self-Assessment via a Personal Health Record (i.e., SAPHeR)—designed using HCDID principles in a laboratory. And we later evaluated SAPHeR’s use by community-dwelling older adults at home. Results: The innovative approach used in this study supported the analysis of four components: tasks, users, representations, and functions. Tasks were easily learned and features such as text-associated images facilitated task completion. Task performance times were slow, however user satisfaction was high. Nearly seven out of every ten features desired by design participants were evaluated in our usability testing of the SAPHeR system. The in vivo evaluation suggests that older adults could improve their confidence in performing indoor and outdoor activities after using the SAPHeR system. Discussion/Conclusion: We have applied an innovative consumer-usability evaluation. Our approach addresses the limitations of other usability testing methods that do not utilize consistent theoretically based methods for designing and testing technology. We have successfully demonstrated the utility of testing consumer technology use across multiple components (i.e., task, user, representational, functional) to evaluate the usefulness, usability, and satisfaction of an ePHR-based self-management system. PMID:26290889

  11. Initial validation of a web-based self-administered neuropsychological test battery for older adults and seniors

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Tor Ivar; Haferstrom, Elise Christina D.; Brunner, Jan F.; Lehn, Hanne; Håberg, Asta Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized neuropsychological tests are effective in assessing different cognitive domains, but are often limited by the need of proprietary hardware and technical staff. Web-based tests can be more accessible and flexible. We aimed to investigate validity, effects of computer familiarity, education, and age, and the feasibility of a new web-based self-administered neuropsychological test battery (Memoro) in older adults and seniors. Method: A total of 62 (37 female) participants (mean age 60.7 years) completed the Memoro web-based neuropsychological test battery and a traditional battery composed of similar tests intended to measure the same cognitive constructs. Participants were assessed on computer familiarity and how they experienced the two batteries. To properly test the factor structure of Memoro, an additional factor analysis in 218 individuals from the HUNT population was performed. Results: Comparing Memoro to traditional tests, we observed good concurrent validity (r = .49–.63). The performance on the traditional and Memoro test battery was consistent, but differences in raw scores were observed with higher scores on verbal memory and lower in spatial memory in Memoro. Factor analysis indicated two factors: verbal and spatial memory. There were no correlations between test performance and computer familiarity after adjustment for age or age and education. Subjects reported that they preferred web-based testing as it allowed them to set their own pace, and they did not feel scrutinized by an administrator. Conclusions: Memoro showed good concurrent validity compared to neuropsychological tests measuring similar cognitive constructs. Based on the current results, Memoro appears to be a tool that can be used to assess cognitive function in older and senior adults. Further work is necessary to ascertain its validity and reliability. PMID:26009791

  12. The Multicenter Pediatric and Adult Congenital EP Quality (MAP-IT) Initiative-rationale and design: report from the pediatric and congenital electrophysiology society's MAP-IT taskforce.

    PubMed

    Seslar, Stephen P; Kugler, John; Batra, Anjan S; Collins, Kathryn K; Crosson, Jane; Dubin, Anne M; Etheridge, Susan; Kanter, Ronald; Papez, Andrew; Radbill, Andrew E; Serwer, Gerald A; Tanel, Ronn E; Tsao, Sabrina; Webster, Gregory; Saarel, Elizabeth V

    2013-01-01

    Multicenter clinical registries are increasingly recognized as valuable tools for establishing benchmarks, facilitating patient-centered quality improvement and research. In 2010, the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society convened a taskforce of its members to design, construct, and implement a clinical registry known as the Multicenter Pediatric and Adult Congenital EP Quality (MAP-IT) Initiative. The present aim of the MAP-IT Initiative is to create an infrastructure by which we can measurably improve patient-centered outcomes and reduce complications associated with electrophysiology studies and catheter ablation in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients. The purpose of this writing is to report the progress to date from three of the four subcommittees of the MAP-IT taskforce. Specifically, we present our initial set of key data elements and definitions, recommended database table structure, and considerations regarding wide-scale implementation of the registry. Development of a risk/complexity score for use in the MAP-IT registry is presented in a separate companion manuscript. It is our intent that these manuscripts will serve to introduce the electrophysiology and pediatric cardiology community to the MAP-IT initiative and provide a rationale for its design and recommended implementation strategy. PMID:23663492

  13. April Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Ideas for spring arts activities include a whimsical play about royal dragons, a skit on an April fool, and a song. Instructions for making brightly colored birds from boxes, a happy day hat, decorated eggs, and other art projects are given. (PP)

  14. Art Smart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Gerard, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    As evidenced by countless studies, time spent engaging in the arts has lasting effects on children of all ages, not only instilling in them a sense of creativity and innovation, but also providing them the skills needed to compete in a global economy. In May 2011, the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities released "Reinvesting in…

  15. Art Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Though people may like different types of music, everyone likes music. In middle school, music and art are of key importance for students to express and define what kind of person they are. In this article, the author presents an art project where students are asked to create their own guitars. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  16. Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Richard J.; Fleming, Mary Ann

    Educational goals and objectives, student activities, and visual aids are included in this guide to a three-dimensional design unit that combines creative art and industrial arts skills. Course goals include challenging students' creative skills, encouraging student interaction and successful group work, and providing an atmosphere of fun and…

  17. Indigenous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Linda Lomahaftewa, a noted painter, has taught at much bigger places than the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). But Lomahaftewa, who is Hopi-Choctaw, and others on the faculty of IAIA are intensely devoted to the mission of this small but unique school. IAIA--the nation's only four-year fine arts institution devoted to American Indian and…

  18. Beyond Attendance: A Multi-Modal Understanding of Arts Participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak-Leonard, Jennifer L.; Brown, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    First conducted in 1982, the National Endowment for the Arts' (NEA's) Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) serves as the longest-standing resource for studying U.S. adult levels of arts attendance, personal arts creation and performance, and arts participation through electronic media. The environment in which arts organizations…

  19. Aging and the Arts Online: Lessons Learned From Course Development and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    With the recent move toward competency-based gerontology education, incorporating humanities and arts will be necessary for accreditation. This article describes the pedagogical approaches and lessons learned during 5 years of development and implementation of an asynchronous online course in Aging and the Arts. Fifty graduate and undergraduate students participated in the course over five semesters. Discipline diversity increased subsequent to designation as a fine arts general education course. Students expressed appreciation for multimedia resources, an initial fear of creating a wiki, and online redundancy was reduced through increased community engagement that also augmented application in real-world settings. The visual nature of arts and aging lends itself to a compelling and interactive online course experience that can be adapted to synchronous, hybrid, and face-to-face formats. Opportunities for community engaged learning will increase as art programs for older adults become more prevalent. PMID:27050643

  20. One World, Many Cultures. Papers from the International Conference on Adult Education and the Arts (4th, St. Andrews, Scotland, July 10-14, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David, Ed.; McConnell, Bridget, Ed.; Normie, Gerald, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Bridget McConnell); "Introduction" (David J. Jones); opening addresses by George Robertson MP, Shadow Scottish Secretary, and by Charlie McConnell, Executive Director, Scottish Community Education Council; and speech by Christine Hamilton, Deputy Director, Scottish Arts Council; "Keynote Speech:…

  1. Covering the Bases with Young Adult Literature: Implementing John H. Ritter's "Choosing Up Sides" and "Over the Wall" as Touchstone Texts in a Middle School Language Arts Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Patricia K.

    2000-01-01

    Supports ideas for implementing John H. Ritter's "Choosing Up Sides" and "Over the Wall" as touchstone texts in a middle school language arts program. Discusses these two novels and the use and power of metaphors. Reveals literary connections made by young adolescent readers and writers strengthening overall comprehension, synthesis and analysis…

  2. Resting and Initial Beta Amplitudes Predict Learning Ability in Beta/Theta Ratio Neurofeedback Training in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Wenya; Wan, Feng; Vai, Mang I; Da Rosa, Agostinho C.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofeedback (NF) training has been proved beneficial in cognitive and behavioral performance improvement in healthy individuals. Unfortunately, the NF learning ability shows large individual difference and in a number of NF studies there are even some non-learners who cannot successfully self-regulate their brain activity by NF. This study aimed to find out the neurophysiological predictor of the learning ability in up-regulating beta-1 (15–18 Hz)/theta (4–7 Hz) ratio (BTR) training in healthy young adults. Eighteen volunteers finished five training sessions in successive 5 days. We found that low beta (12–15 Hz) amplitude in a 1-min eyes-open resting baseline measured before training and the beta-1 amplitude in the first training block with 4.5-min duration could predict the BTR learning ability across sessions. The results provide a low cost, convenient and easy way to predict the learning ability in up-regulating BTR training, and would be helpful in avoiding potential frustration and adjusting training protocol for the participants with poor learning ability. PMID:26732846

  3. Application of the PEN-3 Model to Tobacco Initiation, Use, and Cessation Among American Indian and Alaska Native Adults.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Trinidad, Susan B; Avey, Jaedon P; Robinson, Renee F

    2016-07-01

    American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) communities confront some of the highest rates of tobacco use and its sequelae. As part of a formative research project investigating stakeholder understandings, preferences, and needs surrounding the use of pharmacogenetics toward tobacco cessation treatment, we sought to characterize sociocultural issues related to tobacco use and cessation. We used the PEN-3 cultural model to frame the research question and analysis of stakeholder interviews with 20 AI/AN patients, 12 health care providers, and 9 tribal leaders. Our study found high knowledge levels of the negative health effects of tobacco use; however, most patient participants ascribed negative health effects only to regular, heavy tobacco use and not to light use, which is more common in the population. The majority of patient participants did not endorse use of tobacco cessation treatment despite evidence of efficacy among AI/AN adults. Health promotion messaging to target low-tobacco consuming AI/AN people is needed. Additionally, messaging to promote tobacco cessation treatment using successful AI/AN former tobacco users to improve community perception of tobacco cessation treatment is recommended. PMID:27178836

  4. Family-Friendly Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Patterson; Garcia, Maria

    2004-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the Denver Art Museum initiated efforts to make the museum a destination for families. From 1997 to 2001, with a generous grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts, these efforts came to fruition. From the moment they walk through the doors, families' needs are anticipated. For example, they can pick up a welcoming brochure, Free…

  5. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  6. Artful Biology Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Megan

    2005-01-01

    While teaching science in an alternative arts high school, the author continuously addresses the challenge of welcoming creative, right-brained students into the world of systematic inquiry. Busily mixing paint colors, choreographing futuristic dances, performing comedic theater, and practicing the banjo, the students rarely initiate authentic…

  7. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  8. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  9. Art Competition Encourages Student Dreams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartel, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    In 1971, members of the Naples Art Association (NAA) in Naples, Florida, initiated a scholarship program designed to encourage local young artists to realize their dreams of becoming professionals in the visual arts. Since then, awards have been given annually by the NAA to Collier County high-school students in conjunction with an exhibition of…

  10. Comparison between reference values for FVC, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC ratio in White adults in Brazil and those suggested by the Global Lung Function Initiative 2012*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro; Duarte, Andrezza Araujo Oliveira; Gimenez, Andrea; Soares, Maria Raquel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the spirometry values predicted by the 2012 Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) equations, which are recommended for international use, in comparison with those obtained for a sample of White adults used for the establishment of reference equations for spirometry in Brazil. METHODS: The sample comprised 270 and 373 healthy males and females, respectively. The mean differences between the values found in this sample and the predicted values calculated from the GLI equations for FVC, FEV1, and VEF1/FVC, as well as their lower limits, were compared by paired t-test. The predicted values by each pair of equations were compared in various combinations of age and height. RESULTS: For the males in our study sample, the values obtained for all of the variables studied were significantly higher than those predicted by the GLI equations (p < 0.01 for all). These differences become more evident in subjects who were shorter in stature and older. For the females in our study sample, only the lower limit of the FEV1/FVC ratio was significantly higher than that predicted by the GLI equation. CONCLUSIONS: The predicted values suggested by the GLI equations for White adults were significantly lower than those used as reference values for males in Brazil. For both genders, the lower limit of the FEV1/FVC ratio is significantly lower than that predicted by the GLI equations. PMID:25210962

  11. Can smoking initiation contexts predict how adult Aboriginal smokers assess their smoking risks? A cross-sectional study using the ‘Smoking Risk Assessment Target’

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Gillian Sandra; Watt, Kerrianne; West, Robert; Cadet-James, Yvonne; Clough, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Smoking prevalence is slow to reduce among Indigenous Australians of reproductive age. We analysed the relationships between age of smoking initiation, recalled initiation influences and self-assessment of smoking risks in Aboriginal smokers. Design, setting and participants A community-based cross-sectional survey of Aboriginal smokers aged 18–45 years (N=121; 58 men) was undertaken, using single-item measures. The Smoking Risk Assessment Target (SRAT) as the primary outcome measure enabled self-assessment of smoking risks from 12 options, recategorised into 3 groups. Participants recalled influences on their smoking initiation. Multinomial logistic regression modelling included age, gender, strength of urges to smoke, age at initiation (regular uptake) and statistically significant initiation influences on χ2 tests (‘to be cool’, alcohol and cannabis). Results Frequent initiation influences included friends (74%; SD 0.44), family (57%; SD 0.5) and alcohol (40%; SD 0.49). 54% (n=65) of smokers had the highest risk perception on the SRAT, selected by those who cared about the smoking risks and intended to quit soon. On multivariate analyses, compared with the highest level of SRAT, male gender, lower age of uptake and strong urges to smoke were significantly associated with the lowest level of SRAT, selected by those who refuted risks or thought they could not quit. Lower age of uptake and alcohol were associated with mid-level of SRAT, selected by those who cared about smoking risks, but did not consider quitting as a priority. Conclusions Characteristics of smoking initiation in youth may have far-reaching associations with how smoking risks are assessed by adults of reproductive age, and their intentions to quit smoking. Becoming a regular smoker at under the age of 16 years, and influences of alcohol on smoking uptake, were inversely associated with high-level assessment of smoking risks and intention to quit in regional Aboriginal smokers

  12. Arizona Adult Education Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Adult education standards are the cornerstone for quality teaching, quality learning, and quality lives. The Arizona Adult Education Standards Initiative (Standards Initiative) represents a proactive effort by Arizona's adult education community to ensure rigor and consistency in program content and student outcomes for adult learners throughout…

  13. The Saudi initiative for asthma – 2012 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alhaider, Sami A.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Al-Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Al Dabbagh, Maha M.; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S.

    2012-01-01

    This an updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have updated guidelines, which are simple to understand and easy to use by non-asthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. This new version includes updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of Asthma Control Test in the management of asthma, and a new section on “difficult-to-treat asthma.” Further, the section on asthma in children was re-written to cover different aspects in this age group. The SINA panel is a group of Saudi experts with well-respected academic backgrounds and experience in the field of asthma. The guidelines are formatted based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There was an emphasis on patient–doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. The approach adopted by the SINA group is mainly based on disease control as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. PMID:23189095

  14. The Saudi initiative for asthma - 2012 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S; Alhaider, Sami A; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S; Al-Ghobain, Mohammed O; Idrees, Majdy M; Zeitouni, Mohammed O; Al-Harbi, Adel S; Al Dabbagh, Maha M; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S

    2012-10-01

    This an updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have updated guidelines, which are simple to understand and easy to use by non-asthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. This new version includes updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of Asthma Control Test in the management of asthma, and a new section on "difficult-to-treat asthma." Further, the section on asthma in children was re-written to cover different aspects in this age group. The SINA panel is a group of Saudi experts with well-respected academic backgrounds and experience in the field of asthma. The guidelines are formatted based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There was an emphasis on patient-doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. The approach adopted by the SINA group is mainly based on disease control as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. PMID:23189095

  15. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  16. Factors associated with initiation of antiretroviral therapy in the advanced stages of HIV infection in six Ethiopian HIV clinics, 2012 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Denis; Tymejczyk, Olga; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Hoffman, Susie; Yigzaw, Muluneh; Elul, Batya; Remien, Robert H; Lahuerta, Maria; Daba, Shalo; El Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most HIV-positive persons in sub-Saharan Africa initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced infection (late ART initiation). Intervening on the drivers of late ART initiation is a critical step towards achieving the full potential of HIV treatment scale-up. This study aimed to identify modifiable factors associated with late ART initiation in Ethiopia. Methods From 2012 to 2013, Ethiopian adults (n=1180) were interviewed within two weeks of ART initiation. Interview data were merged with HIV care histories to assess correlates of late ART initiation (CD4+ count <150 cells/µL or World Health Organization Stage IV). Results The median CD4 count at enrolment in HIV care was 263 cells/µL (interquartile range (IQR): 140 to 390) and 212 cells/µL (IQR: 119 to 288) at ART initiation. Overall, 31.2% of participants initiated ART late, of whom 85.1% already had advanced HIV disease at enrolment. Factors associated with higher odds of late ART initiation included male sex (vs. non-pregnant females; adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.02; 95% CI: 1.50 to 2.73), high levels of psychological distress (vs. low/none, aOR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.34 to 2.87), perceived communication barriers with providers (aOR: 2.42, 95% CI: 1.24 to 4.75), diagnosis via provider initiated testing (vs. voluntary counselling and testing, aOR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.07 to 2.04), tuberculosis (TB) treatment prior to ART initiation (aOR: 2.16, 95% CI: 1.43 to 3.25) and a gap in care of six months or more prior to ART initiation (aOR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.10 to 3.72). Testing because of partner illness/death (aOR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.95) was associated with lower odds of late ART initiation. Conclusions Programmatic initiatives promoting earlier diagnosis, engagement in pre-ART care, and integration of TB and HIV treatments may facilitate earlier ART initiation. Men and those experiencing psychological distress may also benefit from targeted support prior to ART initiation. PMID:27113335

  17. Art & Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmulsky, Lucinda

    2009-01-01

    In July 2004, The National Endowment for the Arts released the results of a survey entitled "Reading at Risk." The survey covered a 20-year period from 1982 to 2002 and documented a dramatic decline in the reading of literary works by all age groups during that period. The steepest decline of 28 percent was found among the youngest age group of…

  18. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  19. Chicken Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  20. Nature's Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Vicki; And Others

    Over 60 art activities, designed to enhance environmental awareness and incorporate environmental concepts, are outlined in this document. A sample of the activities presented are: decorated notepaper and cards with feathers or weeds; wall plaques of prairie plants; methods of flower preservation; water plant prints; construction of dolls,…

  1. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  2. Spanish Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Anne; Wilson, Mary Ellen

    1995-01-01

    Provides instructional strategies and materials designed to introduce students to Spanish art. Includes four lesson plans with student objectives, background information, and step-by-step instructional procedures. Also includes four full-page color reproductions of paintings by Murillo, Picasso, El Greco, and de Goya. (CFR)

  3. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Paul L.

    Capitalizing on the resources available in an urban city block, this resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents a resource list and objectives and activities relative to teaching language arts (reading, English, listening, speaking, and writing). The resource list is comprised of approximately 150 physical facilities (e.g.,…

  4. Art Education for Children in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The articles in this volume reflect a resolution passed by the International Society for Education Through Art (INSEA) World Council to provide children with opportunities to work in the arts so that the healing process that the arts can foster can be initiated. The lead article in this issue, "Heart Goes towards the Sun: Work with Children…

  5. Initial dosimetric experience with mega voltage computed tomography detectors and estimation of pre and post-repair dosimetric parameters of a first Helical Hi-Art II tomotherapy machine in India.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Master, Zubin; Dhote, Dipak S; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2009-04-01

    A Helical Tomotherapy (HT) Hi-Art II (TomoTherapy, Inc., Madison, WI, USA) has been one of the important innovations to help deliver IMRT with image guidance. On-board, mega voltage computed tomography (MVCT) detectors are used for imaging and dosimetric purpose. The two objectives of this study are: (i) To estimate the dosimetric and general capability (TomoImage registration, reconstruction, contrast and spatial resolution, artifacts-free image and dose in TomoImage) of on-board MVCT detectors. (ii) To measure the dosimetric parameters (output and energy) following major repair. The MVCT detectors also estimated the rotational output constancy well. During this study, dosimetric tests were repeated after replacing MVCT detectors and the target. fixed-gantry/fixed-couch measurements were measured daily to investigate; the system stability. Thermoluminescense dosimeter (TLD) was used during both the measurements subsequently. The MVCT image quality with old and new detectors was comparable and hence acceptable clinically. The spatial resolution was optimal and the dose during TomoImage was 2 cGy (well within the manufacturer tolerance of 4 cGy). The results of lateral beam profiles showed an excellent agreement between the two normalized plots. The output from the rotational procedure revealed 99.7% while the energy was consistent over a period of twelve months. The Hi-Art II system has maintained its calibration to within +/- 2% and energy to within +/- 1.5% over the initial twelve-month period. Based on the periodic measurements for rotational output and consistency in the lateral beam profile shape, the on-board detector proved to be a viable dosimetric quality assurance tool for IMRT with Tomotherapy. Tomotherapy was stable from the dosimetric point of view during the twelve-month period. PMID:20098540

  6. Seeing Childhood in Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncum, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Examines television advertisements aimed at children outlining the implications for the classroom as well as art education as a field of study. Argues that the images presented in mass media offer a challenge to adults related to their childhood conceptions resulting from certain roles, such as teachers. (CMK)

  7. Community Living Skills Guide: Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobol, Sheila; Kreps, Alice Roelofs

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Art. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to eventual…

  8. The Moment Study: protocol for a mixed method observational cohort study of the Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) initiation process among adult cigarette smokers

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jennifer L; Smiley, Sabrina L; Rubin, Leslie F; Anesetti-Rothermel, Andrew; Elmasry, Hoda; Davis, Megan; DeAtley, Teresa; Harvey, Emily; Kirchner, Thomas; Abrams, David B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Alternative Nicotine Delivery Systems (ANDS) such as e-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that aerosolize nicotine and other substances to simulate smoking without using tobacco. Little is known about the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers. The aims of this research are threefold to: (1) examine how ANDS use affects cigarette use; (2) examine how the immediate environmental and psychosocial contexts of cigarette and ANDS use vary within—and between—participants in general and by menthol preference and race; and, (3) examine participants' ‘lived experience’ of the subjective perceptions, meaning, influences and utility of cigarette and ANDS use. Methods and analyses This study's mixed method, 6-week longitudinal design will produce a detailed description of the ANDS initiation process among adult smokers (N=100). Qualitative and quantitative data collection will include 3 weeks of: (1) ecological momentary assessment of patterns of cigarette/ANDS use, satisfaction, mood and craving; (2) geospatial assessment of participants' environment, including indoor and outdoor cigarette/ANDS norms and rules; (3) in-depth interviews about the meaning and utility of cigarette smoking and ANDS use; and, (4) saliva cotinine and exhaled carbon monoxide (CO) biomarkers. A diverse sample will be recruited with an equal number of menthol and non-menthol cigarette smokers. As the primary independent variable, we will investigate how ANDS use affects cigarette consumption. We will also examine how smoking-related and ANDS-related rules and norms surrounding product use influence cigarette and ANDS product use, and how the subjective effects of ANDS use affect ANDS perceptions, beliefs and use. Ethics and dissemination This study was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the US National Institutes of Health (1R21DA036472), registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02261363), and approved by the Chesapeake IRB (Pro00008526). Findings will be

  9. Nevirapine pharmacokinetics when initiated at 200 mg or 400 mg daily in HIV-1 and tuberculosis co-infected Ugandan adults on rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Lamorde, Mohammed; Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Okaba-Kayom, Violet; Ryan, Mairin; Coakley, Peter; Boffito, Marta; Namakula, Rhoda; Kalemeera, Francis; Colebunders, Robert; Back, David; Khoo, Saye; Merry, Concepta

    2011-01-01

    Background Rifampicin lowers nevirapine plasma concentrations by inducing cytochrome P450. However, few data are available on this interaction during the lead-in period of nevirapine treatment. Methods Eighteen HIV-1/tuberculosis co-infected adults receiving rifampicin daily as part of anti-tuberculosis therapy were evenly randomized to nevirapine initiation by dose escalation (NVP200) or nevirapine initiation at 200 mg twice daily (NVP400). Subjects underwent 12 h intensive pharmacokinetic sampling on Days 7, 14 and 21 of nevirapine treatment. A minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 3000 ng/mL was used to interpret nevirapine concentrations 12 h after dosing (C12). Trial registration number: NCT00617643 (www.clinicaltrials.gov). Results Day 7 geometric mean nevirapine C12 [90% confidence interval (CI)] was 1504 (1127–2115) ng/mL and 3148 (2451–4687) ng/mL in the NVP200 and NVP400 arms, respectively (P < 0.01). Nevirapine C12 on Days 14 and 21 was similar. On Day 21, nevirapine concentration in 64% of patients was below the MEC. On Day 7, geometric mean area under the curve (AUC0–12) was lower in the NVP200 arm, 25 223 (90% CI, 21 978–29 695) ng·h/mL versus 43 195 (35 607–57 035) ng·h/mL in the NVP400 arm (P < 0.01). Similarly, on Day 14, nevirapine AUC0–12 was lower in the NVP200 arm 23 668 (18 253–32 218) ng·h/mL versus the NVP400 arm 44 918 (36 264–62 769) ng·h/mL (P = 0.03). Conclusions In co-treated patients, nevirapine concentrations were below the MEC during initiation with dose escalation. Nevirapine initiation at the maintenance dose of 200 mg twice daily is preferred. Sub-therapeutic nevirapine concentrations were common at Day 21 with either regimen. Evaluation of higher nevirapine maintenance doses may be considered. PMID:21047828

  10. Nevirapine Resistance in Previously Nevirapine-Unexposed HIV-1-Infected Kenyan Infants Initiating Early Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Bhavna H; Tapia, Kenneth; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Khasimwa, Brian; Ngayo, Musa; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Wamalwa, Dalton; Overbaugh, Julie; John-Stewart, Grace

    2015-08-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) resistance occurs frequently in infants following NVP use in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens. However, among previously NVP-unexposed infants treated with NVP-antiretroviral therapy (ART), the development and impact of NVP resistance have not been well characterized. In a prospective clinical trial providing early ART to HIV-infected infants <5 months of age in Kenya (OPH03 study), we followed NVP-unexposed infants who initiated NVP-ART for 12 months. Viral loads were assessed and resistance determined using a population-based genotypic resistance assay. Of 99 infants screened, 33 had no prior NVP exposure, 22 of whom were initiated on NVP-ART. Among 19 infants with follow-up, seven (37%) infants developed resistance: one at 3 months and six at 6 months after ART initiation. The cumulative probability of NVP resistance was 5.9% at 3 months and 43.5% at 6 months. Baseline HIV RNA levels (p=0.7) and other characteristics were not associated with developing resistance. Post-ART, higher virus levels at visits preceding the detection of resistance were significantly associated with increased detection of resistance (p=0.004). Virus levels after 6 and 12 months of ART were significantly higher in infants with resistance than those without (p=0.007, p=0.030, respectively). Among infants without previous NVP exposure, development of NVP resistance was frequent and was associated with virologic failure during the first year of ART. Earlier development of NVP resistance in infants than in adults initiating NVP-ART may be due to longer viremia following ART or inadequate NVP levels resulting from NVP lead-in dosing. The development of NVP resistance may, in part, explain the superiority of protease inhibitor-based ART in infants. PMID:25819584

  11. An Art Centered Art Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Hope

    1984-01-01

    There are 10 approaches that teachers can use to sort out and present works of art to students, e.g., stylistic, topical, specific artist. Teachers should use all the approaches when developing a curriculum. An example of how a study of impressionism by secondary students might include these approaches is provided. (RM)

  12. Insights Gained into Arts and Smarts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Findings released this week from three years of studies by neuroscientists and psychologists at seven universities help amplify scientists' understanding of how training in the arts might contribute to improving the general thinking skills of children and adults. The idea that the arts, and music in particular, could make children smarter in other…

  13. Handbook of Art Therapy. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Providing a complete overview of art therapy, from theory and research to practical applications, this is the definitive handbook in the field. Leading practitioners demonstrate the nuts and bolts of arts-based intervention with children, adults, families, couples, and groups dealing with a wide range of clinical issues. Rich with illustrative…

  14. Navigating the Arts in an Electronic Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouch, Virginia

    1994-01-01

    The 1990s will usher in increasingly sophisticated interactive multimedia technologies leading to widespread employment of virtual reality. The arts (visual, music, drama, dance, and creative writing) are intimately involved with instructional technology's future. The arts provide both adult (commercial) creators and contributors to the programs…

  15. Art Therapy with Geriatric Dementia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn-Denis, Kathleen B.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how art therapy can be used with an elderly population experiencing a wide range of cognitive impairments. Claims that the evocative nature of art allows older adults with dementia to become expressive and bypass some of their cognitive deficits. Focuses on evaluation, nonverbal communication, sensory exploration, and self-reflective…

  16. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese martial art training on musculoskeletal health, balance performance, and self-efficacy in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lip, Ryan W.T.; Fong, Shirley S.M.; Ng, Shamay S.M.; Liu, Karen P.Y.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) Chinese martial art training on radial bone strength, upper- and lower-limb muscular strength, shoulder joint mobility, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly participants. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve seniors voluntarily joined the VT training group, and twenty-seven seniors voluntarily joined the control group. The VT group received VT training for three months, while the control group received no training. The bone strength of the distal radius was assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer. Muscular strength in the limbs was evaluated using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer and the five times sit-to-stand test. Shoulder joint mobility was examined using a goniometer. Balance performance and self-efficacy were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Chinese version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant group-by-time interaction effect, group effect, and time effect for all outcome variables. However, general trends of maintenance or improvement in all outcome parameters were observed to a greater extent in the VT group than in the control group. [Conclusion] VT training might be a potential fall-prevention exercise that can be used to maintain general physique, balance, and confidence in the elderly population. A further randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm this postulation. PMID:25931704

  17. Art, Education, and Community: Arts Genesis, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kestler, Carol S.

    Arts Genesis, Inc. (AGI) forms partnerships with diverse communities to assist them in finding fulfillment through the arts by meeting their own self-defined needs; uses arts experiences to encourage discovery, creativity, and diversity; and continually strives for excellence in the arts and education. Arts Genesis grew out of "Project…

  18. Prognostic significance of the intervals between the initiation of antiretroviral therapy and anti-tuberculosis treatment in HIV-tuberculosis co-infected patients: Results from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Hoon; Zhou, Jialun; Lee, Man Po; Zhao, Hongxin; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Pujari, Sanjay; Lee, Christopher; Faridah Syed Omar, Sharifah; Ditangco, Rossana; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Yunihastuti, Evy; Tanuma, Junko; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Sohn, Annette H.; Choi, Jun Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the effect of time intervals between the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and tuberculosis (TB) treatment on clinical outcomes in HIV-TB co-infected patients in an Asian regional cohort. Methods Adult HIV-TB co-infected patients in an observational HIV cohort database who had a known date of ART initiation and history of TB treatment were eligible for study inclusion. The time intervals between the initiation of ART and TB treatment were categorized as follows: TB diagnosed while on ART, early ART (<90 days after TB treatment), delayed ART (>90 days after TB treatment), and ART not started. Outcomes were assessed using survival analyses. Results A total of 768 HIV-TB co-infected patients were included in this study. Median CD4 T-cell count at TB diagnosis was 100 (IQR 40–208) cells/µL. The treatment outcomes between early ART and delayed ART initiation were not significantly different. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that mortality was highest for those diagnosed with TB while on ART (3.77 deaths per 100 person-years), and the prognoses of other groups were not different (in deaths per 100 person-years: 2.12 early ART, 1.46 delayed ART, and 2.94 ART not started). In a multivariate model, the interval between ART initiation and TB therapy did not significantly impact all-cause mortality. Conclusions The negative impact of delayed ART in patients co-infected with TB was not observed in this observational cohort of moderately to severely immunosuppressed patients. The broader impact of earlier ART in actual clinical practice should be monitored more closely. PMID:23980589

  19. Art Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A new class of polyimides, synthesized by Langley Research Center, has been evaluated by the Getty Conservation Institute's Materials Science Group for possible art conservation applications. Polyimides are noted for resistance to high temperature, wear and radiation. They are thermally stable and soluble in some common solvents. After testing under simulated exposures for changes in color, permeability and flexibility, one coating, ODPA-3, 3-ODA may be used to protect bronze statues from corrosion. A test on stained glass windows was unsuccessful.

  20. Snow Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It was nearing the end of a very long, rough winter with a lot of snow and too little time to play outside. The snow had formed small hills and valleys over the bushes and this was at the perfect height for the students to paint. In this article, the author describes how her transitional first-grade students created snow art paintings. (Contains 1…

  1. Decrease in sexual risk behaviours after early initiation of antiretroviral therapy: a 24-month prospective study in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Kévin; Gabillard, Delphine; Moh, Raoul; Danel, Christine; Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; N'takpe, Jean-Baptiste; Carrou, Jérôme Le; Badjé, Anani; Eholié, Serge; Lert, France; Anglaret, Xavier; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Whether early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation could impact sexual risk behaviours remains to be documented. We aimed to investigate changes in sexual behaviours within the 24 months following an early versus standard ART initiation in HIV-positive adults with high CD4 counts. Methods We used data from a prospective behavioural study nested in a randomized controlled trial of early ART (Temprano-ANRS12136). Time trends in sexual behaviours from enrolment in the trial (M0) to 12-month (M12) and 24-month (M24) visits were measured and compared, using Generalized Estimating Equations models, between participants randomly assigned either to initiate ART immediately (early ART) or to defer ART initiation until on-going WHO starting criteria are met (standard ART). Indicators of sexual behaviours included 1) sexual activity in the past year, 2) multiple partnership in the past year, 3) unprotected sex at last intercourse and 4) risky sex (i.e. unprotected sex with a partner of HIV negative/unknown status) at last intercourse. Results Analyses included 1952 participants (975 with early ART and 977 with standard ART; overall median baseline CD4 count: 469/mm3). Among participants with early ART, significant decreases were found between M0 and M24 in sexual activity (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.72, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 0.57–0.92), multiple partnership (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.41–0.79), unprotected sex (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.47–0.75) and risky sex (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45–0.76). Among participants with standard ART, sexual behaviours showed similar trends over time. These decreases mostly occurred within the 12 months following enrolment in the trial in both groups and prior to ART initiation in participants with standard ART. For unprotected sex and risky sex, decreases were or tended to be more pronounced among patients reporting that their last sexual partner was non-cohabiting. Conclusions In these sub-Saharan adults with high CD4 counts, entry into HIV

  2. AstroArts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paulis, D.

    2014-04-01

    AstroArts is the international, online cultural platform of Astronomers Without Borders (AWB). Cofounded in 2012 by visual artist Daniela de Paulis (IT/NL) and astronomer Thilina Heenatigala (Sri Lanka), AstroArts features creative works inspired by astronomy . AstroArts is an international initiative - lead by professionals working in different fields - and includes the 'guest artist of the month' and the Global Astronomy Month programmes. For the 'guest of the month', we feature one artist through a series of weekly blog posts and a Google Hangout on the last week of each month. The Hangout usually includes guests from several of the AWB ongoing programmes, together with the artist, in order to foster collaboration and interdisciplinary discussion. The 'guest of the month' programme is currently expanding to include a virtual residency initiative, which will allow one artist at the time to develop a project in collaboration with scientists affiliated with the AWB network. The projects developed as part of the virtual residency will foster global participation, making the most of online resources. Global Astronomy Month (GAM) is the most popular project of Astronomers Without Borders: founded in 2009 as a follow up of the International Year of Astronomy, GAM is a global platform for astronomy related events that take place every year in April. During GAM, AstroArts is widely featured through online panel discussions with artists and scientists, live film screenings and live performances, often especially designed for web streaming. More information on AstroArts can be found on: http://astronomerswithoutborders.org/news.htm

  3. Arts Education in America: What the Declines Mean for Arts Participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #52

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabkin, Nick; Hedberg, E. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPAs), conducted for the National Endowment for the Arts, have shown a steady decline in the rates of adult attendance at most "benchmark" arts events--specifically, classical music and jazz concerts, musical and non-musical plays, opera, and ballet performances--as well as declines in other forms…

  4. Artful Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    It is no secret that America is overweight. A record number of children are obese and are showing signs of adult diseases such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, people are recognizing this and beginning to do something about it: (1) restaurants and markets are offering healthier options; (2) menus are starting to list…

  5. Evaluation and Record of the Fine Arts Educational Improvement Project, 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baber, Eric

    The second year's activities of a fine arts educational program, funded under ESEA Title 3 and encompassing 184 schools in five central Illinois counties, are described and evaluated. The art activities evaluated are art demonstrations, art workshops, a materials resource center, adult programs, Saturday art centers, the Logan County Fine Arts…

  6. Occupational illness in the arts.

    PubMed

    McCunney, R J; Russo, P K; Doyle, J R

    1987-11-01

    Artists and craftspeople are exposed to the same hazardous materials as workers in industry. Art materials, including solvents, stones, clay, metals and dyes, are all potential health hazards. Patients whose symptoms cannot be easily categorized or who do not respond to initial treatment should be questioned about personal activities in the arts and crafts. A questionnaire devised by the Occupational and Environmental Health Committee of the American Lung Association may be useful. PMID:3318355

  7. Conversations about Visual Arts: Facilitating Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ni; Cress, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Visual arts, such as drawings, are attractive to most young children. Marks left on paper by young children contain meaning. Although it is known that children's oral language could be enhanced through communication with adults, rarely is there a series of dialogues between adults and young children about their drawings. Often heard instead…

  8. Arte en la Clase para Personas Incapacitadas (Art in the Classroom for Handicapped Persons).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee, Arts for the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    The Spanish translation contains a collection of arts strategies intended to stimulate, motivate, and teach basic skills to handicapped children. The lessons involve one or more of the basic art forms (movement, music, drama, and art) and are further divided into five levels of aesthetic development: awareness, imitation, self-initiation, skill…

  9. The Effect of Tuberculosis Treatment at Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation on Subsequent Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soeters, Heidi M.; Poole, Charles; Patel, Monita R.; Van Rie, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the impact of TB treatment at the time of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation on subsequent mortality. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and selected conference proceedings for studies that report adult mortality on cART, stratified by TB treatment status at cART initiation. Stratified random-effects and meta-regression analyses were used to examine the influence of study and population characteristics. Results 22 eligible cohort studies reported data on 98,350 (range 74-15,225) adults, of whom 14,779 (15%) were receiving TB treatment at cART initiation. Studies of those receiving vs. not receiving TB treatment had an average mortality relative risk of 1.10 (95% confidence interval 0.87-1.40) at 1-3 months (based upon 8 estimates), 1.15 (0.94-1.41) at 6-12 months (11 estimates), and 1.33 (1.02-1.75) at 18-98 months (10 estimates) following cART initiation. However, there was a wide range of estimates and those at later time points were markedly heterogeneous. Meta-regression identified factors associated with elevated average risk estimates: lower median baseline CD4 counts and adjustment for baseline hemoglobin at 1-3 months; longer length of follow-up and women-only studies at 6-12 months; and not adjusting for BMI/weight at 18-98 months. Conclusions Patients receiving TB treatment at cART initiation did not have a statistically significant estimated increase in short-term risk of all-cause mortality as compared to those not receiving TB treatment. TB treatment was significantly associated with increased mortality after about a year of cART, suggesting that patients with concurrent TB treatment at cART initiation may benefit from continued support after TB treatment completion. PMID:24143260

  10. What Is Art History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Bradford R.

    1991-01-01

    Defines art history by examining visual and contextual information and distinguishes between the fine and applied arts. Discusses scientific neutrality and the personal and social uses of art. Concludes that it is impossible for art historians to be truly objective, but this should not be problematic because art historians interpret art works for…

  11. Perceptions of Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors: Development and Initial Validation of a New Scale to Measure Stereotypes of Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafar, Sadia; Ross, Erin C.

    2013-01-01

    The Childhood Sexual Abuse Stereotypes Scale was developed to assess stereotypes of adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Scale items were derived from two studies that elicited cultural and personal beliefs about, and emotions experienced towards adult childhood sexual abuse survivors among university undergraduates. Two scales, Emotions and…

  12. The Curriculum Experiences of Pre-School Children in Northern Ireland: Classroom Practices in Terms of Child-Initiated Play and Adult-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimaraes, Sofia; McSherry, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether activities in the preschool curriculum across Northern Ireland are more adult-directed or child-directed. Findings from observations of 71 preschool settings showed that the curriculum of most reception settings was more adult-directed, while most nursery schools, play groups, and private day nurseries adopted a child-initiated…

  13. Art Supply Inventors. Children's Art Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2001-01-01

    Discusses types of art materials that children enjoy using in their artworks. Explores the art materials such as tasty art supplies, such as candy; peeled supplies, such as pencil shavings; sticky art supplies, such as Band-Aids; and fast-food supplies, such as forks and spoons. (CMK)

  14. History and Art: The Heart of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B; And Others

    Learning to appreciate religious art and to understand the interdependence of history and art are basic to the foundations of culture. Students need to be exposed to the art of the diverse adherents of all major religions in order to understand the beliefs and practices of others. Students can examine religious art from ancient times, including…

  15. Fine Arts: Secondary Visual Arts Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This guide to Utah's requirements for students in secondary visual arts is organized and based upon a student achievement portfolio for each course. Foundation I, the required junior high/middle school visual arts course, is designed to provide an overview of visual arts while studying various art tools and materials. With an emphasis on studio…

  16. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  17. Letter from Vancouver: Practice-Based Arts Education Policies October 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aprill, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a keynote speech given by Arnold Aprill at the ArtsSmarts/GenieArts Canadian national annual meeting of arts education partnerships, addressing the development of practice-based arts education policies. ArtsSmarts/GenieArts is a Canadian initiative, launched in 1998 and supported by the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation, that…

  18. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  19. Imagining and Engaging Difference in the Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kimberly F.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on power, difference and knowledge, areas critical to adult education. It conveys insights into how educators and curators in an art museum imagined and engaged with difference, and particularly the black subject, when working within a collaborative project that included the acquisition of art objects (fine art photography).…

  20. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  1. American High Schools and the Liberal Arts Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Arthur G.

    2003-01-01

    The term "liberal arts" usually conjures up one central idea; that is, effective liberal arts education as strong academic achievement. A second, less dominant, and frequently neglected notion regards effective liberal arts education as producing intellectual interests and habits that endure throughout adult life. The two ideas are complementary…

  2. Independent Schools - Independent Thinking - Independent Art: Testing Assumptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnes, Virginia

    This study consists of a review of selected educational reform issues from the past 10 years that deal with changing attitudes towards art and art instruction in the context of independent private sector schools. The major focus of the study is in visual arts and examines various programs and initiatives with an art focus. Programs include…

  3. Adult Development. What do Teachers of Adults Need To Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Susan; And Others

    The first part of this two-part paper provides a general review of adult development and is premised on an understanding of andragogy. Andragogy is the art and science of helping adults learn. It is based on the following four assumptions about adults: (1) as people mature they become less dependent and more self-directed; (2) experiences serve as…

  4. Effects of Three Motivationally Targeted Mobile Device Applications on Initial Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Change in Midlife and Older Adults: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hekler, Eric B.; Grieco, Lauren A.; Winter, Sandra J.; Sheats, Jylana L.; Buman, Matthew P.; Banerjee, Banny; Robinson, Thomas N.; Cirimele, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Background While there has been an explosion of mobile device applications (apps) promoting healthful behaviors, including physical activity and sedentary patterns, surprisingly few have been based explicitly on strategies drawn from behavioral theory and evidence. Objective This study provided an initial 8-week evaluation of three different customized physical activity-sedentary behavior apps drawn from conceptually distinct motivational frames in comparison with a commercially available control app. Study Design and Methods Ninety-five underactive adults ages 45 years and older with no prior smartphone experience were randomized to use an analytically framed app, a socially framed app, an affectively framed app, or a diet-tracker control app. Daily physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured using the smartphone’s built-in accelerometer and daily self-report measures. Results Mixed-effects models indicated that, over the 8-week period, the social app users showed significantly greater overall increases in weekly accelerometry-derived moderate to vigorous physical activity relative to the other three arms (P values for between-arm differences = .04-.005; Social vs. Control app: d = 1.05, CI = 0.44,1.67; Social vs. Affect app: d = 0.89, CI = 0.27,1.51; Social vs. Analytic app: d = 0.89, CI = 0.27,1.51), while more variable responses were observed among users of the other two motivationally framed apps. Social app users also had significantly lower overall amounts of accelerometry-derived sedentary behavior relative to the other three arms (P values for between-arm differences = .02-.001; Social vs. Control app: d = 1.10,CI = 0.48,1.72; Social vs. Affect app: d = 0.94, CI = 0.32,1.56; Social vs. Analytic app: d = 1.24, CI = 0.59,1.89). Additionally, Social and Affect app users reported lower overall sitting time compared to the other two arms (P values for between-arm differences < .001; Social vs. Control app: d = 1.59,CI = 0.92, 2.25; Social vs

  5. Late initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy in Canada: a call for a national public health strategy to improve engagement in HIV care

    PubMed Central

    Cescon, Angela; Patterson, Sophie; Davey, Colin; Ding, Erin; Raboud, Janet M; Chan, Keith; Loutfy, Mona R; Cooper, Curtis; Burchell, Ann N; Palmer, Alexis K; Tsoukas, Christos; Machouf, Nima; Klein, Marina B; Rourke, Sean B; Rachlis, Anita; Hogg, Robert S; Montaner, Julio SG

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) significantly decreases morbidity, mortality and HIV transmission. We aimed to characterize the timing of ART initiation based on CD4 cell count from 2000 to 2012 and identify factors associated with late initiation of treatment. Methods Participants from the Canadian Observational Cohort (CANOC), a multi-site cohort of HIV-positive adults initiating ART naively after 1 January 2000, in three Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Ontario and Québec) were included. Late initiation was defined as a CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 or an AIDS-defining illness before ART initiation (baseline). Temporal trends were assessed using the Cochran–Armitage test, and independent correlates of late initiation were identified using logistic regression. Results In total, 8942 participants (18% female) of median age 40 years (Q1–Q3 33–47) were included. The median baseline CD4 count increased from 190 cells/mm3 (Q1–Q3 80–320) in 2000 to 360 cells/mm3 (Q1–Q3 220–490) in 2012 (p<0.001). Overall, 4274 participants (48%) initiated ART with a CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 or AIDS-defining illness. Late initiation was more common among women, non-MSM, older individuals, participants from Ontario and BC (vs. Québec), persons with injection drug use (IDU) history and individuals starting ART in earlier calendar years. In sub-analysis exploring recent (2008 to 2012) predictors using an updated CD4 criterion (<350 cells/mm3), IDU and residence in BC (vs. Québec) were no longer significant correlates of late initiation. Conclusions This analysis documents increasing baseline CD4 counts over time among Canadians initiating ART. However, CD4 counts at ART initiation remain below contemporary treatment guidelines, highlighting the need for strategies to improve earlier engagement in HIV care. PMID:26443752

  6. The Art of Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of integrating the arts into education to help students learn more and better. The paper looks at advantages to including music, visual arts, dance, and theater arts in the classroom, explaining the part that arts play in assessment. Resources for integrated arts activities are included. (SM)

  7. Art: What Matters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friend, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Is art merely an adjunct to the serious business of life? Is there a secret ingredient that makes some art more worthwhile than other art? Does art have something to offer that makes its pursuit or purchase worthwhile, or is it simply an outlet for spare capital? Does art really matter at all? (Contains 5 figures.)

  8. Gender Issues in Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoubrey, Sharon, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    The expectation of educators for more than a decade has been that they would be aware of and attend to gender issues. The British Columbia Visual Arts Curricula states "Gender-equitable education will initially focus on girls in order to redress historical inequities." However, it is important to be informed about the issues that adversely affect…

  9. Temporal trends in TB notification rates during ART scale-up in Cape Town: an ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Sabine; Boulle, Andrew; Caldwell, Judy; Pienaar, David; Wood, Robin

    2015-01-01

    sub-districts, infant HIV-positive TB decreased consistently whereas adult decreases varied. Conclusions HIV-positive TB notification rates declined during a period of rapid scale-up of ART. Nevertheless, both HIV-positive and HIV-negative TB notification rates remained very high. Decreases among HIV positives were likely blunted by TB remaining a major entry to the ART programme and occurring after delayed ART initiation. PMID:26411694

  10. Economic and epidemiological impact of early antiretroviral therapy initiation in India

    PubMed Central

    Maddali, Manoj V; Dowdy, David W; Gupta, Amita; Shah, Maunank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent WHO guidance advocates for early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation at higher CD4 counts to improve survival and reduce HIV transmission. We sought to quantify how the cost-effectiveness and epidemiological impact of early ART strategies in India are affected by attrition throughout the HIV care continuum. Methods We constructed a dynamic compartmental model replicating HIV transmission, disease progression and health system engagement among Indian adults. Our model of the Indian HIV epidemic compared implementation of early ART initiation (i.e. initiation above CD4 ≥350 cells/mm3) with delayed initiation at CD4 ≤350 cells/mm3; primary outcomes were incident cases, deaths, quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and costs over 20 years. We assessed how costs and effects of early ART initiation were impacted by suboptimal engagement at each stage in the HIV care continuum. Results Assuming “idealistic” engagement in HIV care, early ART initiation is highly cost-effective ($442/QALY-gained) compared to delayed initiation at CD4 ≤350 cells/mm3 and could reduce new HIV infections to <15,000 per year within 20 years. However, when accounting for realistic gaps in care, early ART initiation loses nearly half of potential epidemiological benefits and is less cost-effective ($530/QALY-gained). We project 1,285,000 new HIV infections and 973,000 AIDS-related deaths with deferred ART initiation with current levels of care-engagement in India. Early ART initiation in this continuum resulted in 1,050,000 new HIV infections and 883,000 AIDS-related deaths, or 18% and 9% reductions (respectively), compared to current guidelines. Strengthening HIV screening increases benefits of earlier treatment modestly (1,001,000 new infections; 22% reduction), while improving retention in care has a larger modulatory impact (676,000 new infections; 47% reduction). Conclusions Early ART initiation is highly cost-effective in India but only has modest

  11. American Art Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Standards Approved Art Therapy Master’s Programs Professional Development Job Board ...Read more Approved Art Therapy Master’s ... Public Policy Insurance Reimbursement Licensure Public Policy Professional Development Annual Conference Approved Art Therapy Master's Programs Awards & ...

  12. National ART Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... ART and Birth Defects ART and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... live-birth rate? [PDF - 1.37MB] Section 2: ART Cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos What ...

  13. Teaching Art with Art: Grotesque Visions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a type of visual art called grotesque art and includes four different examples of grotesque art: (1) the painting "Head of Medusa" by Peter Paul Rubens; (2) Rangda, the widow witch from Bali (Indonesia); (3) totem poles; and (4) grotesque sculptures from the Cathedral of Notre Dame (Paris, France). (CMK)

  14. Art as Activism, Activism as Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Kirsten

    2002-01-01

    How can information and critique be introduced into an art project? What can art do? How can it position itself in society today? Since art is able to situate itself in new ways in different social and geographic setting, posing and investigating questions through its particular mode of meaning production, it is always trying to invent new forms…

  15. Keeping the Arts Alive: Fine Arts Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    When budgets are tightened, the school library media specialists and/or the arts programs are often considered expendable. No Child Left Behind legislation means increasing academic time for core subjects, which translates into cutting time for arts education. As money becomes tight, frills are cut (i.e., the arts). Schools don't seem able to fill…

  16. Arts Impact: Lessons from ArtsBridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimshon-Santo, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Arts Impact summarizes lessons learned at the ArtsBridge Program. It is informed by in-depth participant observation, logic modeling, and quantitative evaluation of program impact on K-12 students in inner city schools and arts students at the University of California Los Angeles over a two year period. The case study frames its analysis through a…

  17. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  18. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Charlotte A.; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods. This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results. Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7–27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4+ cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions. The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  19. Histochemical Seeing: Scientific Visualization and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knochel, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    What are the capacities of visual arts curricula to engage learning within narrow frameworks of overly "scientistic" standards (Lather, 2007)? With growing emphasis in schools under STEM initiatives and evidence-based standards, the possible cross-pollination of effects that art education may have on a science-centric education may be a…

  20. Design Standards for School Art Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Art Education Association, Reston, VA.

    The National Art Education Association (NAEA) began work on this general planning reference for school art facilities in 1989, basing its initial draft on a survey of over 90 different groups, including school districts and state education agencies. The final publication represents the views of a broad-based constituency. Photographs of existing…

  1. Artvision: State Arts Plan, 2009-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Arts Council, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The South Dakota Legislature, being aware of the impact of culture on a stable economy, desires to stimulate, encourage, and give recognition and assistance to the arts which, in order to grow and flourish, depend upon freedom, imagination and individual initiative. While the development of the arts has long been considered a matter of local…

  2. Career Paths for Managers in the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Loretta; Cray, David

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the career paths of top-level managers in the arts. By analysing the training and work history of 23 managers in a variety of arts organisations we evaluate the utility of several existing theories for understanding careers that are characterised by low levels of initial knowledge, the absence of a clear method of entry…

  3. Adult Education and Welfare to Work Initiatives: A Review of Research, Practice and Policy. Literacy Leader Fellowship Program Reports, Volume III, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Deborah

    1997-01-01

    This review attempts to clarify adult education's role in moving individuals from welfare to work. Part 1 reviews research on this role, job prospects for low-skilled workers, and literacy requirements of workplaces. Part 1 reports these findings: the likelihood of being on welfare goes up as literacy goes down; a labor force attachment approach…

  4. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chloe E.; Robbins, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Art therapists have long held that art production causes reductions in stress and elevations in mood (Rubin, 1999). The authors examined this claim in a randomized, controlled trial. Fifty adults between the ages of 18 and 30 were randomly assigned to either create an art work or to view and sort a series of art prints. Three measures of overall…

  5. Integrating the Visual Arts--Building Young Children's Knowledge, Skills, and Confidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jill Englebright; Diffily, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    Explores the visual arts as a means to develop skills and abilities across the curriculum and nurture aesthetic development. Considers benefits of art for socioemotional, psychomotor, and cognitive development; integration of art into the curriculum; and the role of adults, children's books, and the classroom for encouraging art appreciation.…

  6. Rock Art of the Greater Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, Edwin C.

    Archaeoastronomical studies in the American Southwest began in 1955 with recognition of what seemed to be pictorial eyewitness records of the Crab supernova of 1054 AD In time, reports of seasonally significant light-and-shadow effects on rock art and associations of rock art with astronomical alignments also emerged. Most astronomical rock art studies remained problematic, however, because criteria for proof of ancient intent were elusive. Disciplined methods for assessing cultural function were difficult to develop, but review of ethnographically documented astronomical traditions of California Indians and of Indians in the American Southwest subsequently increased confidence in the value of some astronomical rock art initiatives.

  7. How art changes your brain: differential effects of visual art production and cognitive art evaluation on functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bolwerk, Anne; Mack-Andrick, Jessica; Lang, Frieder R; Dörfler, Arnd; Maihöfner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Visual art represents a powerful resource for mental and physical well-being. However, little is known about the underlying effects at a neural level. A critical question is whether visual art production and cognitive art evaluation may have different effects on the functional interplay of the brain's default mode network (DMN). We used fMRI to investigate the DMN of a non-clinical sample of 28 post-retirement adults (63.71 years ±3.52 SD) before (T0) and after (T1) weekly participation in two different 10-week-long art interventions. Participants were randomly assigned to groups stratified by gender and age. In the visual art production group 14 participants actively produced art in an art class. In the cognitive art evaluation group 14 participants cognitively evaluated artwork at a museum. The DMN of both groups was identified by using a seed voxel correlation analysis (SCA) in the posterior cingulated cortex (PCC/preCUN). An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was employed to relate fMRI data to psychological resilience which was measured with the brief German counterpart of the Resilience Scale (RS-11). We observed that the visual art production group showed greater spatial improvement in functional connectivity of PCC/preCUN to the frontal and parietal cortices from T0 to T1 than the cognitive art evaluation group. Moreover, the functional connectivity in the visual art production group was related to psychological resilience (i.e., stress resistance) at T1. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the neural effects of visual art production on psychological resilience in adulthood. PMID:24983951

  8. Can Change in Prolonged Walking Be Inferred From a Short Test of Gait Speed Among Older Adults Who Are Initially Well-Functioning?

    PubMed Central

    Neogi, Tuhina; King, Wendy C.; LaValley, Michael P.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability to walk for short and prolonged periods of time is often measured with separate walking tests. It is unclear whether decline in the 2-minute walk coincides with decline in a shorter 20-m walk among older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to describe patterns of change in the 20-m walk and 2-minute walk over 8 years among a large cohort of older adults. Should change be similar between tests of walking ability, separate retesting of prolonged walking may need to be reconsidered. Design A longitudinal, observational cohort study was conducted. Methods Data were from 1,893 older adults who were well-functioning (≥70 years of age). The 20-m walk and 2-minute walk were repeatedly measured over 8 years to measure change during short and prolonged periods of walking, respectively. Change was examined using a dual group-based trajectory model (dual model), and agreement between walking trajectories was quantified with a weighted kappa statistic. Results Three trajectory groups for the 20-m walk and 2-minute walk were identified. More than 86% of the participants were in similar trajectory groups for both tests from the dual model. There was high chance-corrected agreement (kappa=.84; 95% confidence interval=.82, .86) between the 20-m walk and 2-minute walk trajectory groups. Limitations One-third of the original Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study cohort was excluded from analysis due to missing clinic visits, followed by being excluded for health reasons for performing the 2-minute walk, limiting generalizability to healthy older adults. Conclusions Patterns of change in the 2-minute walk are similar to those in the 20-m walk. Thus, separate retesting of the 2-minute walk may need to be reconsidered to gauge change in prolonged walking. PMID:24786943

  9. Spotlight on Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    In this annual edition selected cultural arts organizations from across the state are featured, with a specific focus on how these organizations have aided local school systems as they implemented the arts education component of North Carolina's Basic Education Program. The following arts organizations are featured: Winston-Salem Arts Council;…

  10. The Language of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winarski, Diana L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes activities of kindergarten through grade-four students in an art classroom that emphasizes expression of creative process along with the product. Explores interconnections between art, thinking, and writing as expressed by a former language arts teacher who transfers her knowledge of language, words, and creative expression to art. (BAC)

  11. Art Mini-Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Charlotte

    1976-01-01

    The idea of an open art studio or art mini-course to serve a need above and beyond the regularly scheduled art classes is important and necessary to a school program that is designed to meet the needs of the general intellectual and cultural growth of the child. Describes the art mini-course introduced at the Willow Ridge School in Tonawanda, New…

  12. Cultural Arts Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistone, Kathleen A.

    The handbook presents activities to aid elementary school classroom teachers as they develop and implement cultural arts lessons. A cultural arts program is interpreted as a way to help students develop perceptual awareness, build a basic vocabulary in some art cultural form, evaluate their own works of art, appreciate creative expressions, and…

  13. Children as Art Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    A goal of art learning is always independence, for everyone to become their own art teacher. Teaching for artistic independence can never start too early. As art teachers, children acquire confidence in their art, and in coming to school as artists. Children should be considered artists in residence and visiting artists in schools. It makes sense…

  14. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  15. Folk Arts in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Phillips, Jr., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This serial issue contains a special section with five articles all on the subject of "Folk Arts in Education": (1) "Folk Arts-in-Education Programs in New York State" (Kathleen Mundell); (2) "The Cultural Heritage Project: Presenting Traditional Arts in a Suburban Setting" (Kathleen Mundell); (3) "Folk Arts in Newark Valley: An Upstate New York…

  16. Art and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century's interest in "art for art's sake," many thinkers have argued that art would supplant traditional religion as the spiritual locus of the increasingly secular society of Western modernity. If art can capture the sort of spirituality, idealism, and expressive community of traditional religions but without being ensnared…

  17. K-12 Art Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furney, Trudy; And Others

    The development of students in various art fields is the focus of this K-12 art curriculum guide. The philosophy of the art program and the roles of administrator, teacher, and parent are outlined. The underlying school community relationships, and the objective, goals, and purposes of art education are described. Phases of child development in…

  18. Cultivating Demand for the Arts: Arts Learning, Arts Engagement, and State Arts Policy. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakaras, Laura; Lowell, Julia F.

    2008-01-01

    The findings summarized in this report are intended to shed light on what it means to cultivate demand for the arts, why it is necessary and important to cultivate this demand, and what state arts agencies (SAAs) and other arts and education policymakers can do to help. The research considered only the benchmark arts central to public policy:…

  19. Winter Art Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Timo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Department of Art Education at the University of Lapland in Finland has developed winter art as a method of environmental and community-based art education. I will focus on the Snow Show Winter Art Education Project, a training project funded by the European Union and the State Provincial Office…

  20. ARTS BETA testing report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccune, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    The advanced real time system (ARTS) was tested utilizing existing commercial system hardware and software which has been operating under advanced operating system (AOS) for several years in a multitasking, multiprocessing, and multiple computer environment. Experiences with ARTS in terms of compatibility with AOS, ease of transmission between AOS and ARTS, and functional areas of ARTS which were tested are discussed. Relative and absolute performance of ARTS versus AOS as measured in the system environment are also presented.

  1. Holography: science and art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Pierre M.

    1998-09-01

    Art and science are separated by a very large distance nowadays. Long ago, e.g. in Renaissance, or even earlier, in classic Greece and Rome, or still earlier in Egypt or Mesopotamia, arts and sciences were united. Today they seem to go separate paths: science for the industry, arts for the gallery. Holography is an exception: no art without science, but also no science without art.

  2. The clock is ticking: the rate and timeliness of antiretroviral therapy initiation from the time of treatment eligibility in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Odeny, Thomas A; DeCenso, Brendan; Dansereau, Emily; Gasasira, Anne; Kisia, Caroline; Njuguna, Pamela; Haakenstad, Annie; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Duber, Herbert C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Understanding the determinants of timely antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is useful for HIV programmes intent on developing models of care that reduce delays in treatment initiation while maintaining a high quality of care. We analysed patient- and facility-level determinants of time to ART initiation among patients who initiated ART in Kenya. Methods We collected facility-level information and conducted a retrospective chart review of adults initiating ART between 2007 and 2012 at 51 health facilities in Kenya. We evaluated the association between patient- and facility-level covariates at the time of ART eligibility and time to ART initiation. We also explored the determinants associated with timeliness of ART initiation. Results The analysis included 11,942 patients. The median age at the time eligibility was first determined was 37 years (interquartile range [IQR] 31–45). Overall, 75% of patients initiated ART within two months of eligibility. The median CD4 cell count at the time eligibility was first determined rose from 132 (IQR 51–217) in 2007 to 195 (IQR 91–286) in 2011 to 2012 (p<0.001). The cumulative probability of ART initiation among treatment-eligible patients increased over time: 87.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 85.1–89.0%) in 2007; 96.8% (96.0–97.5%) in 2008; 97.1% (96.3–97.7%) in 2009; 98.5% (98.0 −98.9%) in 2010; and 99.7% (95% CI 99.4 −99.8%) in 2011 to 2012 (p<0.0001). In multivariate analyses, attending a health facility with high ART patient volumes within two months of eligibility was considered the key facility-level determinant of ART initiation (adjusted odds ratio 0.57, 95% CI 0.45–0.72, p<0.001). Patient-level determinants included being eligible for ART in the years subsequent to 2007, advanced World Health Organization clinical stage and low CD4 cell count at the time eligibility was first determined. Conclusions Overall, the time between treatment eligibility and ART initiation decreased

  3. Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV at a Patient’s First Clinic Visit: The RapIT Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Sydney; Maskew, Mhairi; Fox, Matthew P.; Nyoni, Cynthia; Mongwenyana, Constance; Sanne, Ian; Sauls, Celeste; Long, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of patient attrition from care between HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation have been documented in sub-Saharan Africa, contributing to persistently low CD4 cell counts at treatment initiation. One reason for this is that starting ART in many countries is a lengthy and burdensome process, imposing long waits and multiple clinic visits on patients. We estimated the effect on uptake of ART and viral suppression of an accelerated initiation algorithm that allowed treatment-eligible patients to be dispensed their first supply of antiretroviral medications on the day of their first HIV-related clinic visit. Methods and Findings RapIT (Rapid Initiation of Treatment) was an unblinded randomized controlled trial of single-visit ART initiation in two public sector clinics in South Africa, a primary health clinic (PHC) and a hospital-based HIV clinic. Adult (≥18 y old), non-pregnant patients receiving a positive HIV test or first treatment-eligible CD4 count were randomized to standard or rapid initiation. Patients in the rapid-initiation arm of the study (“rapid arm”) received a point-of-care (POC) CD4 count if needed; those who were ART-eligible received a POC tuberculosis (TB) test if symptomatic, POC blood tests, physical exam, education, counseling, and antiretroviral (ARV) dispensing. Patients in the standard-initiation arm of the study (“standard arm”) followed standard clinic procedures (three to five additional clinic visits over 2–4 wk prior to ARV dispensing). Follow up was by record review only. The primary outcome was viral suppression, defined as initiated, retained in care, and suppressed (≤400 copies/ml) within 10 mo of study enrollment. Secondary outcomes included initiation of ART ≤90 d of study enrollment, retention in care, time to ART initiation, patient-level predictors of primary outcomes, prevalence of TB symptoms, and the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. A survival analysis

  4. Revitalizing Arts Education Through Community-Wide Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodilly, Susan J.; Augustine, Catherine H.

    2008-01-01

    For over 30 years, arts education has been a low priority in the nation's public schools. Arts teaching positions were cut, and arts education in schools has dwindled as schools try to increase test scores in mathematics and reading within the time constraints of the school day. Some communities have responded with initiatives aimed at…

  5. Troubled Youth and the Arts: A Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Catherine

    This resource guide contains ideas and information needed to plan, develop, and initiate arts programs which respond to the needs of troubled youth. The authors believe that learning through the arts--making art, knowing artists, and experiencing life as an artist--can have tremendous effect when applied to the needs of troubled youth. When young…

  6. Implementation of routine counselor-initiated opt-out HIV testing on the adult medical ward at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    LaCourse, Sylvia M.; Chester, Frances M.; Matoga, Mitch; Munthali, Charles; Nsona, Dominic; Haac, Bryce; Hoffman, Irving F.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.

    2015-01-01

    The optimal approach of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) for inpatients in high-burden settings is unknown. We prospectively evaluated the implementation of task-shifting from clinician-referral to counselor-initiated PITC on the medical wards of Kamuzu Central Hospital, Malawi. The majority of patients (1905/3154, 60.4%) had an unknown admission HIV status. Counselors offered testing to 66.6% (1268/1905). HIV prevalence was 39.3%. Counselor-initiated PITC significantly increased HIV testing by 79% (643/2957 vs. 1228/3154), resulting in an almost 2-fold increase in patients with known HIV status (2447/3154 vs. 1249/3154) (both p<.0001), with 18.4% of those tested receiving a new diagnosis of HIV. PMID:25622063

  7. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  8. Changing Antiretroviral Eligibility Criteria: Impact on the Number and Proportion of Adults Requiring Treatment in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Ruth C.; Reed, Jason B.; Nkambule, Rejoice; Donnell, Deborah J.; Bicego, George T.; Okello, Velephi; Philip, Neena M.; Ehrenkranz, Peter D.; Duong, Yen T.; Moore, Janet S.; Justman, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) at CD4+ cell count ≥500 cells per microliter reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected adults. We determined the proportion of HIV-infected people with high viral load (VL) for whom transmission prevention would be an additional benefit of early treatment. Design: A randomly selected subset of a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults in Swaziland in 2012. Methods: Eight to 12 months after a national survey to determine adult HIV prevalence, 1067 of 5802 individuals identified as HIV-infected were asked to participate in a follow-up cross-sectional assessment. CD4+ cell enumeration, VL measurements, and ART status were obtained to estimate the proportion of currently untreated adults and of the entire HIV-infected population with high VL (≥1000 copies/mL) whose treatment under a test-and-treat or VL threshold eligibility strategy would reduce HIV transmission. Results: Of the 927 (87% of 1067) participants enrolled, 466 (50%) reported no ART use. Among them, 424 (91%) had VL ≥1000 copies per milliliter; of these, 148 (35%) were eligible for ART at the then existing CD4+ count threshold of <350 cells per microliter; an additional 107 (25%) were eligible with expanded CD4+ criterion of <500 cells per microliter; and 169 (40%) remained ART ineligible. Thus, 36% of the 466 currently untreated and 18% of the total 927 had high VL yet remained ART ineligible under a CD4+ criterion of <500 cells per microliter. Conclusions: A test-and-treat or VL threshold for treatment eligibility is necessary to maximize the HIV transmission prevention benefits of ART. PMID:26361174

  9. Learning by Heart: Intergenerational Theater Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildin, Marsha; Binder, Rose O.; Chipkin, Irving; Fogelman, Vera; Goldstein, Billie; Lippel, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this article describe themselves as a lucky group of older adults, ranging in age from sixty to ninety-two, who participate in an intergenerational arts program at their local senior center in Flushing, Queens, one of New York City's most culturally diverse communities. In their living history theater program, run by Elders…

  10. Learning and Teaching Art: Through Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Social media practices are increasingly woven into the everyday lives of teens and adults, becoming a significant part of how they relate, know, and learn. In this article, I present findings from a design-based research study that explored how the dynamics of learning and teaching art shift through social media. Learning and teaching through…

  11. Web-Based Student Art Galleries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, David

    2010-01-01

    Exhibition is an important part of the artistic process for students as well as professional artists, but finding enough good places to exhibit can be as difficult for student artists as for adult artists. Venues that are accessible, display art attractively, and provide adequate space for many artists are usually in short supply. There is an…

  12. An Update on the Rhythmic Arts Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuduri, Eddie

    2008-01-01

    The Rhythmic Arts Project (TRAP) is touching the lives of typical children and adults with various disabilities all over the world and now has programs in two Bulgarian orphanages, day programs in Australia, and, most recently, in the general hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. TRAP is also currently approaching facilities in more than 20…

  13. Brief Report: Does Most Mortality in Patients on ART Occur in Care or After Lost to Follow-Up? Evidence From the Themba Lethu Clinic, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Maskew, Mhairi; Long, Lawrence; Sanne, Ian; Fox, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: In resource-limited settings, early mortality on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is approximately 10%; yet, it is unclear how much of that mortality occurs in care or after lost to follow-up. We assessed mortality rates and predictors of death among 12,222 nonpregnant ART-naive adults initiating first-line ART between April 2004 and May 2012 in South Africa, stratified by person-years in care and lost. We found 14.6% of patients died and being lost accounted for a minority of deaths across multiple definitions of loss (population attributable-risk percent ranged from 10.4% to 42.5%). Although mortality rates in patients lost were much higher than in care, most ART-related mortality occurred on treatment. PMID:26181816

  14. [Blood in art, art in blood].

    PubMed

    Danic, B; Lefrère, J-J

    2010-12-01

    In the different forms of art developed by Humanity over the centuries, artists have at times chosen themes from the world of medicine or health, such as blood donation or transfusion. In order to illustrate this, we have looked at three artistic domains: painting, movies and body art. PMID:21051264

  15. CyberArts: Exploring Art and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda, Ed.

    This book takes the position that CyberArts(TM) is the new frontier in creativity, where the worlds of science and art meet. Computer technologies, visual design, music and sound, education and entertainment merge to form the new artistic territory of interactive multimedia. This diverse collection of essays, articles, and commentaries…

  16. Focus on Fine Arts: Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Don L.

    Basic arts education must give students the essence of their civilization, the civilizations that contributed to it, and the more distant civilizations that enriched world civilizations as a whole. All students are potentially capable of experiencing and analyzing the fundamental qualitativeness of art; therefore, it is realistic to propose…

  17. ArtStreet: Joining Community Through Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timm-Bottos, Janis

    1995-01-01

    ArtStreet is a group of artists, art therapists, and interested community members who collaborate to create an atmosphere in which homeless artists can create and sell their works. Artists from the community share their expertise in various media, and the project is funded by various local and national foundations. (JPS)

  18. Neolithic Art and the Art History Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilson, Muriel

    1991-01-01

    Addresses issues that might be raised in the study of art history from a critical theory perspective. Suggests that, in view of contemporary environmental and social concerns, Neolithic art would be of particular interest to students as would the possibility of having a society in which neither sex was dominant. (KM)

  19. A Study of the Effects of Different Levels of Initial Diagnosis on Gains in Reading Achievement for Adults in a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Catherine Lucille

    This study sought to determine whether varying the levels of initial diagnosis was related to gains in reading achievement after a maximum period of ten weeks of instruction. The subjects were students enrolled part- or full-time at Parkland College, a public community college located in Champaign, Illinois. Students were assigned to one of three…

  20. Transdisciplinarity and Art Integration: Toward a New Understanding of Art-Based Learning across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Art integration is a rich and complex approach to teaching and learning that not only aligns with new initiatives in education that prioritize conceptual and procedural skills but could also contribute to education's transformation. Framing art integration as a transdisciplinary field with a distinct conceptual framework, epistemology, and…

  1. The Politics of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Art

    2016-01-01

    Art Ellison is longtime advocate for adult education, having managed numerous advocacy campaigns over the past forty years on the state and national levels. Prior to his employment in 1980 as the NH State Director of Adult Education he worked for many years as a high school teacher and as a community organizer. In this article, Ellison offers some…

  2. Bringing Art to Life through Multi-Sensory Tours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodek, Wendy L.

    2012-01-01

    Learning occurs in myriad ways yet most art museums remain wedded to visual instruction. Adult visitors touring the galleries are offered audio guides or lecture style tours to complement the visual but are there other ways to enhance learning? This article reports on a case study that found that active, multi-sensory experiences in art museums…

  3. Theatre at Telford Community Arts, 1974-90

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, Graham

    2004-01-01

    The term 'community arts theatre' is used here to describe theatre created and performed by groups of adults in Telford, Shropshire, a new town in the West Midlands of England. The author, who was the co-founder and a theatre worker at Telford Community Arts (TCA), argues that their work is best understood as grassroots artistic reflections of and…

  4. Where Does It Come From? Developmental Aspects of Art Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schabmann, Alfred; Gerger, Gernot; Schmidt, Barbara M.; Wögerer, Eva; Osipov, Igor; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Art is a unique feature of human experience. It involves the complex interplay among stimuli, persons and contexts. Little is known of how the various features deemed important in art appreciation depend on development, thus are already present at a young age. Similarly to our previous approach with adults of differing levels of expertise, the…

  5. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  6. The Art of Appearance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Seonaid; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how students can examine artists' use of clothing to express ideas about cultural values, lifestyle, and design. Features four, culturally different, artworks from the Art Institute of Chicago. Outlines instructional methods for discussion, creative writing, and art production. (KM)

  7. Chemistry, Color, and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    2001-01-01

    Describes pigments and artists' colors from a chronological perspective. Explains how chemical analysis can be used to distinguish the differences between artists' palettes, identify the evolution of art, and lead to restoration of an art work. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  8. Art and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamal, Pauline Dove

    Art has always adapted technological advances to its own uses. In the last 15 years, art has turned to color photocopiers, computers, mimeograph machines, and thermofax copiers. With this in mind, Central Piedmont Community College began offering a course in 1982 called "Art and Technology" which focused on the application of office machines to…

  9. Art and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Suesi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author offers lesson plan ideas that are designed to guide teachers of art and science to encourage their students to see connections between art images and physics principles. The four works of art discussed are examples that can be linked visually and conceptually to physics properties in mathematics, space, energy, and light.…

  10. The Art of Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  11. Art as Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Peter

    Western society sees art as beautiful, well crafted objects; and art education derives almost its entire theory and practice from this concept. However, this is only one function of the creative process and art educators need to reconsider the fullness and depth of the usage of that process and provide an alternative mission and practice of art…

  12. Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores intersections among art, action, and community. It describes sociopolitical aspects of the author's art therapy work with survivors of repressive regimes living in Brazil, China, and Denmark and considers ways that unique historical and social processes influenced her conceptualization and practice of social action art therapy.

  13. Computer Aided Art Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jim

    The Computer Aided Art program offered at Northern State State University (Aberdeen, South Dakota), is coordinated with the traditional art major. The program is designed to familiarize students with a wide range of art-related computer hardware and software and their applications and to prepare students for problem-solving with unfamiliar…

  14. Arts throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manner, Jane Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes how curriculum integration can help art enhance learning during times when the arts may be considered dispensable and removed from education, presenting examples of how classroom teachers have examined art as a link to expanded understanding of history, science, math, reading, current events, geography, cultural studies, emotions,…

  15. Design for Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeries, Larry

    Experiences suggested within this visual arts packet provide high school students with awareness of visual expression in graphic design, product design, architecture, and crafts. The unit may be used in whole or in part and includes information about art careers and art-related jobs found in major occupational fields. Specific lesson topics…

  16. Art Meets Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohs, C. Renee

    2007-01-01

    Numerous connections between the visual arts and sciences are evident if we choose to look for them. In February 2006, students and faculty from the Art and Geol/Geog departments at NW Missouri State University put together an exhibit at a local art gallery featuring works that were born out of science, inspired by science, or exploring the…

  17. Women Art Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Enid, Ed.; Stankiewicz, Mary Ann, Ed.

    This collection of papers on women art educators reveals the variety of roles played by those women, from anonymous art teachers to leaders in their profession. "Mary Rouse: A Remembrance" (G. Hubbard) is a personal perspective on Rouse, the development of her career, and her considerable impact in the field of art education. "The Search for Mrs.…

  18. A Work of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    During the 2002-03 fiscal crisis in Massachusetts, Gov. Mitt Romney proposed sweeping changes for public colleges in the state. Among them was a proposal to privatize three highly specialized colleges, including the Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MassArt), the nation's only independent public college of art and design. The rationale was…

  19. Art and Montessori.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Joy

    1982-01-01

    Designed for Montessori teachers with little background in the plastic arts, this discussion points out that, while the Montessori program has many features that support creative development, presently, no art curriculum exists. The article indicates the limitations of Maria Montessori's ideas and attitudes about the role of art in the education…

  20. Arts Opportunity Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The increasing focus on arts education during the past few years has brought much-needed attention to the benefits it affords to students of all ages. Past research has proved time and again that the arts support teaching and learning in numerous ways, and recommendations abound that schools should find ways to integrate the arts in classrooms.…

  1. Art's Educational Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores critically the nature of art's value in education and argues in favor of both intrinsic and instrumental value. Form and expression, while being out of favor in some contemporary circles, are re-claimed as appropriate features of art. Concepts and forms in art as elsewhere serve to structure impressions and experience and…

  2. Teaching with Public Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argiro, Carol

    2004-01-01

    "Public art" is a broad term that refers to art in public spaces and includes architecture, landscape, and urban design. Public art makes public spaces more beautiful, encourages us to pause and interact with our environment, or reminds us of important people and events. Just as often, public sculptures become such a part of our everyday…

  3. The Art of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the argument that when viewed as mutually supportive processes of inquiry, art and research have the potential to put the agency of educational change well within reach of artists and art teachers. As researchers well schooled in studio practices of many kinds, artists and art teachers understand that, as we…

  4. Windows to Art Excitement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley; Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that aimed to bring more attention to an art program. Explains that the students created themed murals on the windows of the art classroom, such as a "Jungle,""Ocean,""Masterpiece Paintings," and "Rainforest Tree Frogs." Discusses how the murals were created. (CMK)

  5. Art and the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond. Div. of Humanities and Secondary Administration.

    The contributions of art experiences to special education are discussed and guidelines for integrating art into the curriculum are provided. Art is seen to have potential for developing handicapped children's self expression, independence, sensory stimulation and motivation, perception discrimination, skill development, and career and personal…

  6. Creative Art for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnes, Merle B.

    The book presents a creative art program for preschool children that utilizes art as a vehicle to develop many desirable behaviors -- social, emotional, and intellectual. A total of 45 art activities are described, organized under the headings "Exploration--Seeing and Feeling" (including seeing and feeling different textures, and seeing repeating…

  7. Research Explains Modern Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickhorst, William S.

    1985-01-01

    This tongue-in-cheek article calls for the critical reexamination of the history of modern art. The author believes that modern art is neither an extension of the Renaissance aesthetic nor a collective by-product of artists possessed of creative genius. Creators of modern art were actually representational artists suffering from visual stuttering.…

  8. "I like Art Because..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leishear, Christina Chiddo

    2012-01-01

    There is a lot of creative energy between students and their art materials. In this lesson, the author discusses materials an artist may use to create a work of art--paint, a paintbrush, a palette, crayons, markers, pastels, and so on. Each student sketched a picture of themselves holding some tools that can be used in art. The objectives of this…

  9. Transpersonal Art Therapy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Michael; Farrelly-Hansen, Mimi; Marek, Bernie; Swan-Foster, Nora; Wallingford, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the task of training future art therapists through a unique branch of transpersonal psychology referred to as "contemplative education." Discusses contemplative practices, such as meditation, and their relationship to creating art. Offers a definition of transpersonal art therapy as well as a literature review. (Contains 80 references.)…

  10. Windows into Art Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John Matthews; Paul…

  11. Basic Skills: Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    A curriculum guide for the visual arts is presented. The goal of elementary and middle school education in the four arts disciplines is the development of basic understanding and skills by every student. In secondary education the aim is to continue a sequential curriculum for those students who study the arts. This document is intended as a guide…

  12. Multimedia, Curriculum, & Public Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutts, Glen

    2004-01-01

    As an illustration of meaningful exploration of public art, Coutts provides a tour of a multimedia curriculum project based on art works in Glasgow, Scotland. He explores the potential of multimedia to engage students and teachers in a debate about public art for students at the interface of primary and secondary schools. Scanning the City, a…

  13. From soil in art towards Soil Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-02-01

    The range of art forms and genres dealing with soil is wide and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in cinema, architecture and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and cinema are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, with, or featuring soil or soil conservation issues, created by artists, and occasionally scientists, educators or collaborative efforts thereof.

  14. A Qualitative Analysis of the Effects of Depression and Antidepressants on Physical and Work Functioning among ART Clients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Victoria K.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Huynh, Alexis; Ryan, Gery; Musisi, Seggane

    2013-01-01

    Depression is common among people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, little is known about how depression influences physical health and socioeconomic well-being in the context of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Semi-structured interviews with 40 adult HIV clients receiving ART in Uganda were conducted to assess experiences prior to and after HIV diagnosis and initiation of ART. Content analysis revealed themes that were suggestive of the following patterns: 1) functioning decreased after patients were diagnosed with HIV, but improved following ART, 2) depression is associated with lower physical health functioning and work status levels after both HIV diagnosis and ART, and 3) antidepressant medication is associated with better functioning compared to depressed patients not receiving depression treatment. These findings suggest that depression plays a role in the deleterious effects of HIV on functioning, and that antidepressant treatment provided alongside ART may serve to help individuals regain functioning, particularly employment. These findings highlight the potential value of integrating depression treatment into HIV care. PMID:23442495

  15. The Art Classroom as Art Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr-Johnson, Virginia; Brockmyer, James J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests ways of turning the art room into a microenvironment of sensory intensification--a place where a student steps into a new world of color, sound, and smell that delights the eye and inspires the imagination. (Author/SJL)

  16. Fewer adults add salt at the table after initiation of a national salt campaign in the UK: a repeated cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Jennifer; Edwards, Phil; Shankar, Bhavani; Dangour, Alan D

    2013-08-28

    In 2003, the UK Food Standards Agency and the Department of Health began attempts to reduce national salt intakes via reformulation of processed foods and a consumer awareness campaign on the negative impacts of salt on health. The present study uses large nationally representative samples of households in England to assess whether discretionary salt use was affected by the national salt reduction campaign. Large cross-sectional datasets from the Health Survey for England were used to analyse trends in adults adding salt at the table between 1997 and 2007. Since 1997, there has been a steady decline in salt use at the table. Ordinal logistic regression analysis controlling for age, sex, total household income, region, ethnicity and background trends revealed that the reduction in salt use was significantly greater after the campaign (OR 0·58; 95% CI 0·54, 0·63). Women (OR 0·71; 95% CI 0·68, 0·74), non-white ethnic groups (OR 0·69; 95% CI 0·62, 0·77), high-income households (OR 0·75; 95% CI 0·69, 0·82), middle-income households (OR 0·79; 95% CI 0·75, 0·84) and households in central (OR 0·90; 95% CI 0·84, 0·98) or the south of England (OR 0·82; 95% CI 0·77, 0·88) were less likely to add salt at the table. The results extend previous evidence of a beneficial response to the salt campaign by demonstrating the effect on salt use at the table. Future programmatic and research efforts may benefit from targeting specific population groups and improving the evidence base for evaluating the impact of the campaign. PMID:23286885

  17. Local Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells Are a Preferential Target for Initiation of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcomas Associated with p53 and Rb Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyang; Curtis, Stephen J.; Roy, David M.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The cell of origin and pathogenesis of the majority of adult soft tissue sarcomas (STS) remains poorly understood. Because mutations in both the P53 and RB tumor suppressor genes are frequent in STS in humans, we inactivated these genes by Cre-loxP–mediated recombination in mice with floxed p53 and Rb. Ninety-three percent of mice developed spindle cell/pleomorphic sarcomas after a single subcutaneous injection of adenovirus carrying Cre-recombinase. Similar to human STS, these sarcomas overexpress Cxcr4, which contributes to their invasive properties. Using irradiation chimeras generated by transplanting bone marrow cells from mice carrying either the Rosa26StoploxPLacZ or the Z/EG reporter, as well as the floxed p53 and Rb genes, into irradiated p53loxP/loxPRbloxP/loxP mice, it was determined that sarcomas do not originate from bone marrow–derived cells, such as macrophages, but arise from the local resident cells. At the same time, dermal mesenchymal stem cells isolated by strict plastic adherence and low levels of Sca-1 expression (Sca-1low, CD31negCD45neg) have shown enhanced potential for malignant transformation according to soft agar, invasion, and tumorigenicity assays, after the conditional inactivation of both p53 and Rb. Sarcomas formed after transplantation of these cells have features typical for undifferentiated high-grade pleomorphic sarcomas. Taken together, our studies indicate that local Sca-1low dermal mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells are preferential targets for malignant transformation associated with deficiencies in both p53 and Rb. PMID:20864684

  18. Rising Obesity Prevalence and Weight Gain Among Adults Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Koethe, John R; Jenkins, Cathy A; Lau, Bryan; Shepherd, Bryan E; Justice, Amy C; Tate, Janet P; Buchacz, Kate; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel M; Horberg, Michael A; Blashill, Aaron J; Willig, Amanda; Wester, C William; Silverberg, Michael J; Gill, John; Thorne, Jennifer E; Klein, Marina; Eron, Joseph J; Kitahata, Mari M; Sterling, Timothy R; Moore, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The proportion of overweight and obese adults in the United States and Canada has increased over the past decade, but temporal trends in body mass index (BMI) and weight gain on antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected adults have not been well characterized. We conducted a cohort study comparing HIV-infected adults in the North America AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) to United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) controls matched by sex, race, and age over the period 1998 to 2010. Multivariable linear regression assessed the relationship between BMI and year of ART initiation, adjusting for sex, race, age, and baseline CD4(+) count. Temporal trends in weight on ART were assessed using a generalized least-squares model further adjusted for HIV-1 RNA and first ART regimen class. A total of 14,084 patients from 17 cohorts contributed data; 83% were male, 57% were nonwhite, and the median age was 40 years. Median BMI at ART initiation increased from 23.8 to 24.8 kg/m(2) between 1998 and 2010 in NA-ACCORD, but the percentage of those obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) at ART initiation increased from 9% to 18%. After 3 years of ART, 22% of individuals with a normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) at baseline had become overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)), and 18% of those overweight at baseline had become obese. HIV-infected white women had a higher BMI after 3 years of ART as compared to age-matched white women in NHANES (p = 0.02), while no difference in BMI after 3 years of ART was observed for HIV-infected men or non-white women compared to controls. The high prevalence of obesity we observed among ART-exposed HIV-infected adults in North America may contribute to health complications in the future. PMID:26352511

  19. Cultivating Kuumba: Applying Art Based Strategies to Any Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Auburn Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    There are many contemporary issues to address in adult education. This paper explores art-based strategies and the utilization of creativity (Kuumba) to expand learning for global communities in any field of practice. Benefits of culturally grounded approaches to adult education are discussed. Images from ongoing field research can be viewed at…

  20. Holography - Application To Art: Curatorial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinsmore, Sydney

    1987-06-01

    An exploration of the need to define a specific and critical language to describe the art of holography. Within any discussion of art, critical analysis must maintain an objective openess, particularily when the discourse concerns new media. To apply technological invention to art, new media is often without precedent on which to base criticism and bias. For this reason, holography falls prey to comparative rhetoric and established evaluation of other forms of imaging,as photography emulated the compositional romanticism of painting initially. Isolated and often misunderstood within the context of history, new media vascillates between legitimacy and curiosity in an attempt to create specific parameters to identify perceptual transition.

  1. The Return of the Body: Performance Art and Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gaye Leigh

    1999-01-01

    Explains that performance art incorporates different artistic forms, emphasizes the process of art over the product, and blurs the line between life and art. Discusses the history of performance art, highlights the Performance Art, Culture, and Pedagogy Symposium, and provides examples of how to use performance art in the classroom. (CMK)

  2. Folk Art as Communal Culture and Art Proper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delacruz, Elizabeth Manley

    1999-01-01

    Defines folk art and explores the ascent of folk art in the United States, focusing on (1) the fascination of mainstream artists with indigenous and intuitive art and (2) the growing interest of collectors in folk and outsider art. Reflects on folk art and art education. (CMK)

  3. Art-Based Learning Strategies in Art Therapy Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods research study examined the use of art-based teaching methods in master's level art therapy graduate education in North America. A survey of program directors yielded information regarding in which courses and how frequently art-based methods (individual in-class art making, dyad or group art making, student art projects as…

  4. Art in Story: Teaching Art History to Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saccardi, Marianne

    Integrated art history and language arts activities are presented in this curriculum guide. The art history content is chronologically organized by units: (1) "Art of the Ancient World"; (2) "Arts of the East and Africa"; (3) "Art of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance"; (4) "Five European Masters"; (5) "Impressionism and Post-Impressionism"; (6)…

  5. New School Art Styles: The Project of Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gude, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Art projects are appropriate building blocks for visual art curriculum because good art projects encode complex aesthetic strategies, giving students tools to investigate and make meaning. Art made in schools will inevitably be some form of "school art," defined by Arthur Efland in "The School Art Style: a Functional Analysis,"…

  6. Interventions to improve the rate or timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: meta-analyses of effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P; Rosen, Sydney; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Bärnighausen, Till; Negussie, Eyerusalem; Beanland, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As global policy evolves toward initiating lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) regardless of CD4 count, initiating individuals newly diagnosed with HIV on ART as efficiently as possible will become increasingly important. To inform progress, we conducted a systematic review of pre-ART interventions aiming to increase ART initiation in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase and the ISI Web of Knowledge from 1 January 2008 to 1 March 2015, extended in PubMed to 25 May 2016, for English language publications pertaining to any country in sub-Saharan Africa and reporting on general adult populations. We included studies describing interventions aimed at increasing linkage to HIV care, retention in pre-ART or uptake of ART, which reported ART initiation as an outcome. We synthesized the evidence on causal intervention effects in meta-analysis of studies belonging to distinct intervention categories. Results and discussion We identified 22 studies, which evaluated 25 interventions and included data on 45,393 individual patients. Twelve of twenty-two studies were observational. Rapid/point-of-care (POC) CD4 count technology (seven interventions) (relative risk, RR: 1.26; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.02–1.55), interventions within home-based testing (two interventions) (RR: 2.00; 95% CI: 1.36–2.92), improved clinic operations (three interventions) (RR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.25–1.48) and a package of patient-directed services (three interventions) (RR: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.20–1.97) were all associated with increased ART initiation as was HIV/TB service integration (three interventions) (RR: 2.05; 95% CI: 0.59–7.09) but with high imprecision. Provider-initiated testing (three interventions) was associated with reduced ART initiation (RR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.86–0.97). Counselling and support interventions (two interventions) (RR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.94–1.26) had no impact on ART initiation. Overall, the evidence was graded as low or moderate quality

  7. Learning about the "Real World" in an Urban Arts Youth Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Reed W.; Walker, Kathrin C.

    2006-01-01

    To make the transition to adulthood, youth must learn to function in the complex and unpredictable "real world" of adult life. This is an intensive case study of an urban arts program that sought to provide youth with experiences that prepared them for the real world of arts careers. We conducted 75 interviews with 12 youth and their adult leader…

  8. Adult Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Labour, Copenhagen (Denmark).

    Danish adult vocational training activities take the form of specifically targeted initial and continued training for employed and unemployed adults. Planning, development, and adaptation of vocational training programs (AMU programs) are characterized by tripartite cooperation among public authorities and organizations of employers and employees.…

  9. Changing medical students' attitudes toward older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants met for four 2-hour sessions at local art museums to create and discuss art. Three hundred and twenty-eight individuals (112 treatment group, 96 comparison, 120 older adults) in eight cities participated in the program and evaluation. Participants completed pre-and postsurveys that captured their attitude toward older adults, perception of commonality with older adults, and career plans. Findings suggest that medical students' attitudes toward old adults were positive at pretest. However, Vital Visionary students became more positive in their attitudes toward older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .60, and they felt they had more in common with older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .64. The program did not influence their career plans (p = .35). Findings from this demonstration project suggest that socializing medical students with healthy older adults through art programs can foster positive attitudes and enhance their sense of commonality with older adults. PMID:20730650

  10. Art as Critical Public Pedagogy: A Qualitative Study of Luis Camnitzer and His Conceptual Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana; Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness from the perspective and work of conceptual artist, Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework is grounded in the critical public pedagogy literature. Data collection methods included interviews with conceptual artist Luis Camnitzer and with…

  11. Art Making as a Mental Health Recovery Tool for Change and Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Lith, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic benefits of art making may be implicated in how and why people with mental illness turn to art therapy to aid their recovery. In this longitudinal multiple case study adult participants (N = 12) with severe and ongoing mental illness were recruited through their involvement in diverse community mental health art therapy programs. An…

  12. Americans and the Arts 1984: Highlights from a Nationwide Survey of Public Opinion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris (Louis) and Associates, Inc., New York, NY.

    Highlights of a nationwide public opinion survey concerning the interest and involvement of Americans in the arts are summarized. Telephone interviews were conducted with 1,504 adults. Results showed that the arts are indisputably a part of the mainstream of American life. Because Americans have limited leisure time, the arts must increasingly…

  13. Art & Early Childhood: Personal Narratives & Social Practices. Occasional Paper Series 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunday, Kris, Ed.; McClure, Marissa, Ed.; Schulte, Christopher, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This issue explores the nature of childhood by offering selections that re/imagine the idea of the child as art maker; inquire about the relationships between children and adults when they are making art; and investigate how physical space influences approaches to art instruction. Readers are invited to join a dialogue that questions long-standing…

  14. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression. PMID:27435420

  15. Vygotsky's Stage Theory: The Psychology of Art and the Actor under the Direction of "Perezhivanie"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smagorinsky, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews Vygotsky's writings on arts (particularly logocentric art including the theater) and emotions, drawing on his initial exploration in "The Psychology of Art" and his final considerations set forth in a set of essays, treatises, and lectures produced in the last years of his life. The review of "The Psychology of Art" includes…

  16. A Site to Behold: Creating Curricula about Local Urban Environmental Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, Frances E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes "Site Omaha" an interactive public arts project designed to explore alternative art venues in the urban environment and to create a common link between artists and other community members. "Site Omaha" initiated innovative community arts projects. Provides a brief overview of urban environmental art. (MJP)

  17. The arts, health, and aging in america: 2005-2015.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Gay Powell; Noelker, Linda S; Bienvenu, Beth

    2015-04-01

    In advance of the White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA) in 1981, 1995, and 2005, the arts and aging communities held mini-conferences to ensure that arts, culture, and livability were part of larger public policy discussions. This article takes a historical look at recommendations from the 2005 WHCoA Mini-Conference on Creativity and Aging in America, including arts in health care, lifelong learning, and livability through universal design. Overarching recommendations in 2005 requested investments in research, including cost-benefit analyses; identification of best practices and model programs; program dissemination to broaden the availability of arts programs. The "Arts" is a broad term encompassing all forms of arts including music, theater, dance, visual arts, literature, multimedia and design, folk, and traditional arts to engage the participation of all older Americans; promotion of innovative public and private partnerships to support arts program development, including workforce development (e.g., artists, social workers, and health care providers); and public awareness of the importance of arts participation to healthy aging. Through the leadership of the National Endowment for the Arts and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, thinking about the arts and aging has broadened to include greater emphasis on a whole-person approach to the health and well-being of older adults. This approach engages older adults in arts participation not only as audience members, but as vital members of their community through creative expression focusing on life stories for intergenerational as well as interprofessional collaboration. This article reviews progress made to date and identifies critical gaps in services for future consideration at a 2015 Mini-Conference on Creativity and Aging related to the WCHoA area of emphasis on healthy aging. PMID:26035603

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Early Versus Standard Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Serena P.; Bang, Heejung; Severe, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Ambroise, Alex; Edwards, Alison; Hippolyte, Jessica; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; McGreevy, Jolion; Riviere, Cynthia; Marcelin, Serge; Secours, Rode; Johnson, Warren D.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a randomized clinical trial of early versus standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, early ART decreased mortality by 75%. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of early versus standard ART in this trial. Methods and Findings Trial data included use of ART and other medications, laboratory tests, outpatient visits, radiographic studies, procedures, and hospital services. Medication, laboratory, radiograph, labor, and overhead costs were from the study clinic, and hospital and procedure costs were from local providers. We evaluated cost per year of life saved (YLS), including patient and caregiver costs, with a median of 21 months and maximum of 36 months of follow-up, and with costs and life expectancy discounted at 3% per annum. Between 2005 and 2008, 816 participants were enrolled and followed for a median of 21 months. Mean total costs per patient during the trial were US$1,381 for early ART and US$1,033 for standard ART. After excluding research-related laboratory tests without clinical benefit, costs were US$1,158 (early ART) and US$979 (standard ART). Early ART patients had higher mean costs for ART (US$398 versus US$81) but lower costs for non-ART medications, CD4 cell counts, clinically indicated tests, and radiographs (US$275 versus US$384). The cost-effectiveness ratio after a maximum of 3 years for early versus standard ART was US$3,975/YLS (95% CI US$2,129/YLS–US$9,979/YLS) including research-related tests, and US$2,050/YLS excluding research-related tests (95% CI US$722/YLS–US$5,537/YLS). Conclusions Initiating ART in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, consistent with World Health Organization advice, was cost-effective (US$/YLS <3 times gross domestic product per capita) after a maximum of 3 years, after excluding research-related laboratory tests. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120510 Please see

  19. A REVIEW OF PRESENT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AVAILABLE TO OLDER ADULTS IN CALIFORNIA'S PUBLIC ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DEGABRIELE, EUGENE H.

    ADMINISTRATORS OF ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN ADULT SCHOOLS AND JUNIOR COLLEGES IN CALIFORNIA WERE SURVEYED IN MAY 1967 AS TO WAYS IN WHICH THEIR PROGRAMS WERE SERVING THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF ADULTS AGED 50 AND OVER. FINE ARTS, CRAFTS, HOMEMAKING, BUSINESS EDUCATION, AMERICANIZATION, CIVIC EDUCATION AND SPECIAL FIELDS, VOCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL…

  20. Wearable Arts of Japan: Seattle Art Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, Sarah

    1996-01-01

    Presents four lesson plans centered around artworks involving Japanese clothing. Instructional materials include color plates of a 19th century print showing women's clothing, two beautifully handcrafted coats, and a coverlet in kimono form. The lesson plans discuss Japanese clothing, art, society, and culture. (MJP)

  1. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  2. Math in Art or Art in Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biller, Jerry

    The concept of integrating mathematics and art course work broadens an appreciation of the connection between the two. Although calculations and getting the right answer have traditionally been the focus of mathematics at the secondary level, other topics have recently begun to be addressed, such as mathographics, or the relationship between art…

  3. Geometry and Op Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Evelyn J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students use computers and techniques from Op Art to learn various geometric concepts. Allows them to see the distinct connection between art and mathematics from a personal perspective. Reinforces writing, speaking, and drawing skills while creating slide shows related to the project. (ASK)

  4. The Art of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jory, Tina

    1997-01-01

    Advocates introducing young students to realistic nature drawing as a way of integrating art and science. Describes an earthworm art project using a salt dough model and a realistic drawing. This activity should begin with a view of the real subject whenever possible before proceeding to the actual artwork. (AIM)

  5. Primary Art Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton Unified School District 373, KS.

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary Grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Art. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide begins with a list of topics for art expression. The main body of the guide contains 15 color-coded sections on the following subjects: 1) mobiles and folded paper; 2) collage and photo montage; 3) square paper and mosaics; 4) wax paper and…

  6. Teaching Art Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enderle, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes her experiences as an overseas art teacher. She relates how teaching art and living overseas has provided her with new opportunities to work with a diverse student and faculty population. She also relates how living abroad has made her learn about foreign countries and their inhabitants in an in-depth and…

  7. Equity and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, Ann

    In an effort to ensure that the arts receive equity with other areas of study, this paper presents an argument for the value of arts education in children's development. The argument is based on the work of four experts: (1) Nelson Goodman, who held that symbols are indispensable to communication, and that children's capacity for acquiring…

  8. Industrial Arts Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Vocational Education.

    Requirements and planning guidelines for industrial arts facilities are outlined for application to three types of industrial arts shops. The ratios of areas to students are discussed in regard to the sizes, shapes, and locations of shops. Specifications for walls, floors, ceilings, windows, paint, and illumination are included. An equipment…

  9. ART MODERN/DIALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheng, Katharine K.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews ART MODERN, an on-line data base which provides comprehensive coverage of current worldwide literature on modern art and design since 1800. Areas described include scope, coverage, arrangement of printed and on-line indexes, characteristics of basic index and code searching; also search hints, search negotiation, searchguide, and data base…

  10. The Boutique Liberal Arts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The structure of higher education today, in conjunction with those actively trying to devalue a liberal arts degree in the public sphere, has set the table for what seems like a completely rational solution: finding a "niche." Broadly speaking, colleges offering a liberal arts education identify their "niche market" in terms of…

  11. The Talking Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Every year, fourth graders at Sterling Morton Elementary School in Ohio present a talking art museum for the school and community. In this article, the author describes a lesson on art history which culminates in an activity showcasing all the students' finished paintings in gold frames. A student stands behind the painting and pokes his or her…

  12. Performance Art: Kinetic Reproductions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassin, Cherie

    2001-01-01

    Provides an art project for use with eighth-grade students, who choose a work of art and recreate it in an interpretive and informative manner. Explains that students re-create the background of the artwork and then the students become a part of the painting via characters or objects. (CMK)

  13. Elementary Art Education. Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caucutt, Allen, Ed.

    This collection of writings addresses the issue of developing a generation of aesthetically aware and involved individuals. Each of the 19 articles emphasizes art education as an indispensable force in the total school program. Together these writings form sources of inspiration and ideas for the elementary art teacher. Divided into four…

  14. Cultivating Demand for the Arts: Arts Learning, Arts Engagement, and State Arts Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakaras, Laura; Lowell, Julia F.

    2008-01-01

    To shed light on the decline in demand for the nonprofit arts, the authors describe what it means to cultivate demand for the arts, examine how well U.S. institutions are serving this function, and discuss whether it is in the public interest to make such cultivation a higher priority than it has been in the past. The authors propose that a strong…

  15. Elegant Art Nouveau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2005-01-01

    Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a Viennese painter, was the founder of the Vienna Secession, the Austrian Art Nouveau movement. Art Nouveau is characterised by flowing lines and flat designs based on organic structures. This style is found in the symbolic aspect of Klimt's later work, and in the works of other artists of the late 1890s and early 1900s…

  16. Why Kids Need Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katter, Eldon

    2009-01-01

    Every community can benefit from an investment in an education that prepares its citizens to better understand and appreciate the richness of artistic expression. By making art education an integral part of every school curriculum and certified art specialists an integral part of the teaching staff, people can look forward to a future of…

  17. Visual Arts Research, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Nancy C., Ed.; Thompson, Christine, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the journal "Visual Arts Research" published in 1995. This journal focuses on the theory and practice of visual arts education from educational, historical, philosophical, and psychological perspectives. Number 1 of this volume includes the following contributions: (1) "Children's Sensitivity to…

  18. Art in a Bus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eals, Clay

    1978-01-01

    Unfortunately, many elementary schools today are not equipped with an art room. In addition, thousands of elementary school children complete the first six years of their formal education without the benefit of a qualified art teacher. The project described is one small step toward educating the "whole" child. It features the Artmobile, which…

  19. Mola Art: Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsamian, Araxey

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author describes a lesson plan on Mola art she used in her elementary classroom. Using four examples of Kuna Indian molas, the teacher introduced students to the beautiful, colorful, creative art form of molas. The Kuna women have been making these layered pieces of cloth for more than one hundred years. They use a…

  20. Comics as Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    Spider Man and the Green Lantern are not the first images that most people conjure up when someone mentions "important art." In the world of fine art, comic books are often viewed as the bottom rung of the artistic ladder. In the early half of the 1900s, such an assessment would not have been unreasonable. With their rudimentary visuals and…

  1. The Art of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saccardi, Marianne

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of books for grades K and up which explores the folklore, poetry, fiction, and art of Mexico, and focuses on the Mayans and Aztecs and Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. Also suggests various research, reading, drama, music, social studies, physical education, and art activities and lists related videos and Internet…

  2. Art in Public.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines four works of art, created for public spaces, to help students understand the value of public art in the community. Illustrates work by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Siah Armajani, Jackie Ferrara, and Deborah Butterfield. Outlines lesson activities for elementary and secondary students. (KM)

  3. Mathematics and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, John

    2012-01-01

    This relationship is omnipresent to those who appreciate the shared attributes of these two areas of creativity. The dynamic nature of media, and further study, enable mathematicians and artists to present new and exciting manifestations of the "mathematics in art", and the "art in mathematics". The illustrative images of the relationship--that…

  4. Integrating Art and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Phil; Bickley-Green, Cynthia

    1998-01-01

    North Carolina's ABC program, part of a state effort to improve school performance, calls for greater accountability, a back-to-basics emphasis, and more local control in planning and implementing programs. In response, results of the East Carolina University Math/Art Project, a study to determine the effects of interdisciplinary art and math…

  5. Visual Arts Research, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Nancy C., Ed.; Thompson, Christine, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the journal "Visual Arts in Research" published in 1994. This journal focuses on the theory and practice of visual arts education from educational, historical, philosophical, and psychological perspectives. Number 1 of this volume includes the following contributions: (1) "Zooming in on the Qualitative…

  6. Collaboration in Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoubrey, Sharon, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Educators are familiar with working together to produce curriculum packages, to team teach a unit, to host a parent event, to put on a school-wide concert, or to plan a conference. Collaboration in art education as presented in this publication is a team effort that is slightly different and beyond ordinary collaboration. Collaborative art-making…

  7. LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROBERTS, HERMESE E.

    THE LANGUAGE ARTS LABORATORY WAS ESTABLISHED TO IMPROVE READING ABILITY AND OTHER LANGUAGE ARTS SKILLS AS AN AID IN THE PREVENTION OF DROPOUTS. THE LABORATORY WAS OPERATED ON A SUMMER SCHEDULE WITH A FLEXIBLE PROGRAM OF FROM 45 MINUTES TO 2 1/2 HOURS DAILY. ALL PUPILS WERE 14 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER, AND EXPRESSED A DESIRE TO IMPROVE THEIR READING…

  8. Tangrams: Puzzles of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fee, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Challenging one's brain is the beginning of making great art. Tangrams are a great way to keep students thinking about their latest art project long after leaving the classroom. A tangram is a Chinese puzzle. The earliest known reference to tangrams appears in a Chinese book dated 1813, but the puzzles existed long before that date. The puzzle…

  9. Montana Standards for Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Office of Public Instruction, Helena.

    Arts cultivate the whole child, building many kinds of literacy while developing intuition, reasoning, creativity, imagination, and dexterity into diverse forms of expression and communication. The arts enable students to make decisions and seek multiple solutions. They advance higher order thinking skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.…

  10. Art and Anger Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Judi; Huber, Tonya

    2003-01-01

    Considers if the creative process is a viable tool in anger management. Explores whether a summer art program made a difference in the lives of a class of troubled youth. Uses art-based educational research methods from the qualitative inquiry paradigm to assist the exploration. Presents the authors' reflections on the program. Concludes that art…

  11. Parallels in the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffey, Grace

    1972-01-01

    A mini-course of nine weeks was organized as a laboratory course to survey relationships in literature, music, and art. Three periods in the arts (Romanticism, Impressionism, and Contemporary) were matched with three major activities; the basic areas of study and activity were poetry, short story, and novel. (Author)

  12. Arte Brasileno Erudito y Arte Brasileno Popular. (Brazilian Fine Art and Brazilian Popular Art)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valladares, Clarival Do Prado

    1969-01-01

    Class differences in Brazil explain the inequality between the art produced in the high strata of society and that originating in the economically inferior communities. Genuine expression of art degenerates for two reasons: the influence of modern industrial civilization and the tendency to satisfy the taste of the acquisitive group. (Author/MF)

  13. Art in the Garden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project in which beginning art students created ceramic vegetables that are supposed to be functional, such as a container. Explains how the teacher can demonstrate the process of creating the ceramic vegetables. Includes a list of materials. (CMK)

  14. Culinary Arts Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This chart is intended for use in documenting the fact that a student participating in a culinary arts program has achieved the performance standards specified in the Missouri Competency Profile for culinary arts. The chart includes space for recording basic student and instructor information and the student's on-the-job training and work…

  15. Hungry for Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Describes what occurred during an "Art Exchange Day" between two high schools that offered students access to varying viewpoints about art. Explains how the students created their own artworks of cakes and other desserts, inspired by the work of Wayne Thiebaud. Includes examples. (CMK)

  16. Art-By-Telephone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jesser, David L.; Clarke, Michael ael J.

    In an attempt to bring art instruction into small schools financially unable to support such a program, 11 high schools in 4 western states have been receiving simultaneous instruction in art from a central source with the aid of an amplified telephone and coordinated overhead transparencies. Before the onset of classes, the instructor visits each…

  17. INDUSTRIAL ARTS HANDBOOK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, ALLEN

    TO AID TEACHERS, GUIDANCE COUNSELORS, AND ADMINISTRATORS, AS WELL AS THE STUDENT HIMSELF, THE HANDBOOK OFFERED PURPOSES AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN THE FIELD OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS. IT APPLIED TO ELEMENTARY, JUNIOR HIGH, AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. INDUSTRIAL ARTS PROVIDED AN OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS TO DISCOVER THEIR APTITUDES AND ABILITIES IN…

  18. Art Therapy: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantt, Linda, Comp.; Schmal, Marilyn Strauss, Comp.

    The bibliography on art therapy presents 1175 citations (1940-1973) drawn from searches of the medical indexes, computer systems of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Mental Health, other bibliographies, Centre International de Documentation Concernant les Expressions Plastiques, and the American Journal of Art Therapy.…

  19. The Art of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on secondary students with cognitive or intellectual disabilities. She discusses that these students can be successfully included into the classroom community if schools can provide the appropriate tools such literacy in the arts. Here, she cites the number of reasons why arts can meet the varied needs and…

  20. I: Making Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Malke; Johnson, Marquetta; Plemons, Anna; Makol, Suzanne; Zanskas, Meghan; Dzula, Mark; Mahoney, Meg Robson

    2014-01-01

    Writing about the teaching artist practice should mean writing about art making. As both teacher and artist, the authors are required to be cognizant of their own art-making processes, both how it works and why it is important to them, in order to make this process visible to their students. They also need the same skills to write about how and…

  1. The Arts and Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Louis S.

    1993-01-01

    One form of educational inequity faced by most students is that schools recognize only linguistic and logical intelligence and do not allow for forms of intelligence expressed through the arts. The performance-based assessments of the Kentucky Education Reform Act and the Kentucky Basic Arts pilot program address the multiple intelligences of…

  2. Art as Peace Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Art educators can "critique" senseless violence--mistreatment, exclusion, intimidation, bullying, violation, abuse, corruption, murder, and war--by unleashing the power of students' creativity. In this article, the author, sharing her philosophical context, discusses how art is preventative medicine with the power to transform the…

  3. Big Ideas in Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how she was able to discover some big ideas about art education. She relates how she found great ideas to improve her teaching from the book "Rethinking Curriculum in Art." She also shares how she designed a "Big Idea" unit in her class.

  4. Art, Society and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    In considering the relation of art with society the author comments on the ideas of the American philosopher, John Dewey, the art historian, Lord Kenneth Clark, a popular humanistic educator, Clifton Fadiman, and a major cultural critic, Jacques Barzun. (Author/RK)

  5. Art & Science Grow Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellflue, Pat; Allen, Marie; Gerber, D. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative effort that included a botany professor, an art teacher, and a science teacher, called,"Plants, Pots, and Paints." This interdisciplinary project was successful in connecting content across disciplines (science to art) and for motivating fourth-and fifth-grade students to create something beautiful both they…

  6. The arts as healing.

    PubMed

    Kivnick, H Q; Erikson, J M

    1983-10-01

    The relationship between artistic involvement and individual mental health is considered, and the concept of "healing" is differentiated from that of "therapy." Seven properties of art experience are identified which, when developed, have contributed to patients' recovery from mental illness. Implications of these properties for clinical programs, and the related value of art experience for non-patients, are discussed. PMID:6638153

  7. PLANNING AN ART ROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KROEGER, GARY

    THIS GUIDE IS INTENDED TO PROVIDE SUGGESTIONS IN PLANNING ART FACILITIES FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS. AREAS PROVIDED FOR ARE (1) DRAWING AND PAINTING, (2) GRAPHIC ARTS, (3) GENERAL CRAFTS, (4) MODELING, AND (5) SCULPTURING. WORK CENTERS CAN BE PLANNED IN RELATION TO TRAFFIC FLOW. AT JUNIOR HIGH LEVEL, 24 STUDENTS ARE BEST ACCOMMODATED FOR…

  8. Art Education Is Violent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In an era that is rife with aggression and hostility, most art educators hold close to their hearts the belief that they, and their students, can contribute to making the world a better place. Through their acts as teachers and the daily work of art education, they often strive toward creating a space of "non-violence." For K-12…

  9. [Aesthetic Response to Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, Helen, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The "Bulletin of the Caucus on Social Theory and Art Education" is an annual publication, with each issue devoted to a unified theme. The theme of this issue is aesthetic response. The following papers focus on the audience and the persons responding to art: "Attitudes of Three Urban Appalachian Teenagers Toward Selected Early Modern American…

  10. The Art of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Alim, Jamaal

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Robert F. Sabol, professor of visual and performing arts at Purdue University says that art education has suffered some serious setbacks since No Child Left Behind--the landmark federal education law that put a greater emphasis on high-stakes testing. Since No Child Left Behind became law in 2002, school systems--under increased pressure to…

  11. Support for Arts Education. State Arts Agency Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Supporting lifelong learning in the arts is a top priority for state arts agencies. By supporting arts education in the schools, state arts agencies foster young imaginations, address core academic standards, and promote the critical thinking and creativity skills essential to a 21st century work force. State arts agencies also support…

  12. Old Friends, Bookends: Art Educators and Art Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This viewpoint presents a reflection on a meaningful relationship that developed between a university art education department and a local art therapy studio. Such partnerships are desirable and mutually beneficial because of the significant interest many art educators have in the field of art therapy. The author, an art educator, describes the…

  13. Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, T. L.; Kish, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) Program was initiated to advance the state of the art for rotorcraft transmissions. The goal of the ART Program was to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to reduce transmission weight by 25 pct. and reduce noise by 10 dB while obtaining a 5000 hr 'mean time between failure'. The research done under the ART Program is summarized. A split path design was selected as best able to meet the program goals. Key part technologies needed for this design were identified, studied, and developed. Two of these technologies are discussed in detail: the load sharing of split path designs including the use of a compliant elastomeric torque splitter and the application of a high ratio, low pitch line velocity gear mesh. Development of an angular contact spherical roller bearing, transmission error analysis, and fretting fatigue testing are discussed. The technologies for a light weight, quiet, and reliable rotorcraft transmission were demonstrated.

  14. The Art Learning Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Connie; Russell, Laurie

    1981-01-01

    The Art Learning Resource Center provides a concentrated art experience for fifth graders in the Omaha Public Schools. The program utilizes collections of the Joslyn Art Museum, community resources, and guest artists as motivation for the awareness, appreciation and production of art. A sample lesson on Greek art is included. (Author/SJL)

  15. If Art Is Knowledge, Then . . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, John H.

    1979-01-01

    It is argued that, like scientific and moral statements, art statements shape the world we know. This thesis indicates the need for art encounters and developmental teaching techniques, since the knowledge of art statements can only be apprehended through engagement in art and from discussing art and its qualities. (Author/SJL)

  16. Andragogy: Implications for Secondary and Adult Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Norene F.

    The study of andragogy, a well developed science in Europe, is gaining greater acceptance in the United States. Malcolm Knowles introduced it to American adult educators in 1968 and has made it the central theme of his work since. The distinction between andragogy (the art and science of helping adults learn) and pedagogy (the art and science of…

  17. ...Ready, Set, Go to the Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    A field trip to an art museum is a very special occasion for students, one they will long remember and that will initiate an association with museums that will endure throughout their lives. When teachers plan ahead and schedule a date and time for their class to attend, the museum will probably provide some pertinent information. Some museums may…

  18. Art and Delusion: Unreality in Art School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neher, Ross

    2010-01-01

    The author teaches painting in a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) program at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Each fall semester he asks his students why they have come to Pratt and what they want to do when they graduate. The common answer is to develop as artists and find a commercial gallery to show and sell their work. Some want the MFA degree…

  19. Art: The Telling of History through Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scali, Nancy

    1990-01-01

    Describes several writing projects that use computers to expose students to art, cultural history, and present day technology. Suggests activities for Prehistoric art, Egyptian art, African art, Japanese art, and Native American art. (MG)

  20. ARTS in Search of Talent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askin, Walter

    1983-01-01

    The Arts Recognition and Talent Search (ARTS) program, which provides young artists with a full range of scholarship opportunities and with cash awards, is described. Student work submitted to ARTS in the past is shown. (RM)

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Arts syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Arts syndrome Arts syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Arts syndrome is a disorder that causes serious neurological ...

  2. Arts/Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Described are various arts and crafts ideas, mostly with a February theme. Included are: ceramic boxes, valentine ideas, and patriotic projects--symbols of our country, silhouettes of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, and stars and stripes. (KC)

  3. Sandpainting: A Healing Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Bethany

    2005-01-01

    As part of a unit on Native American art studies, students researched Navajo sand painting. They used Navajo image resources to develop designs for their sand paintings. The process and precautions for this lesson are described in this article.

  4. 3-D Art Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niswander, Virginia

    1983-01-01

    Perceptual motor dysfunctions may not allow children with learning and behavior problems to perform as most children do. A successful art activity for these children is construction using wood scraps. (SR)

  5. [Healing with art?].

    PubMed

    Kühlmann, A Y R Rosalie; Jeekel, J Hans; Pierik, E G J M Robert

    2015-01-01

    Music and other forms of art are increasingly being integrated into hospitals. As well as the aesthetic value of art, more and more attention is being paid to its contribution to the healing of the patient. Scientific research indicates the possible benefits of specific art in healthcare facilities. Using this knowledge of the role and employability of surroundings and art in the healing of patients may be complementary to the high quality of care in the Netherlands. By means of proper, methodologically correct research, it is possible to investigate the use of different aspects of the patient's environment as simple, safe and low-cost measures in improving health and well-being of patients. PMID:26530121

  6. Art is Young

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Alicia

    1975-01-01

    Describes a day care program in Brooklyn, New York, in which preschool children participate in drama, music, and art, activities with help from the cultural resources and the creative people of the city. (ED)

  7. Anatomy and art.

    PubMed

    Laios, Konstantinos; Tsoukalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci, Jean Falcon, Andreas Vesalius, Henry Gray, Henry Vandyke Carter and Frank Netter created some of the best atlases of anatomy. Their works constitute not only scientific medical projects but also masterpieces of art. PMID:24640589

  8. Interviewing Art Linkletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The article reports on the assignments and activities of Dean Griffin, one of four American Vocational Association associates directors; highlighted is a conversation of Griffin's with Art Linkletter, who addressed the Minnesota Vocational Association in October. (AJ)

  9. Art and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Robin

    1975-01-01

    The art department at Fremont Junior High School in Mesa, Arizona, developed a project in which Indian, Mexican-American, and White-Anglo American students learned about their different cultural values and tradititions. (Author/RK)

  10. Workshop: Teaching Primitive Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordison, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the concrete and spiritual aspects of teaching workshops on survival skills or primitive arts. Gives details on lostproofing, or ways to teach a child not to get lost in the outdoors; building a survival shelter; and wilderness cooking. (CDS)

  11. Exploring Art and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Carolyn

    1974-01-01

    At two of the Smithsonian Institution's museums in Washington, D. C. special places have been designed for children to enjoy the rich experiences that works of art can provide and to investigate a room filled with touchable exhibits. (CS)

  12. Reading Improvement Through Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Sylvia K.

    1977-01-01

    A team of enthusiastic, dedicated teachers proved that for problem readers in today's high schools, in a setting where trained reading teachers collaborated with studio teachers, the visual arts can be an important tool for learning. (Author)

  13. Beyond the School: Community and Institutional Partnerships in Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Rita L. Ed.; Kindler, Anna M., Ed.

    Understanding education in contexts broader than schooling has important implications for art education and calls for an examination of alternative venues, initiatives, and strategies that facilitate artistic development, encourage aesthetic growth, and promote reflection about the role and value of art in a society. This anthology demonstrates…

  14. Re-Imagining Classrooms: Educational Environments in Contemporary Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Overlaps between contemporary artistic and pedagogical practices have become commonplace in debates and publications in various fields: from curating and museum studies to art education. Often, such overlaps--particularly pedagogical projects initiated by artists--have been studied from curatorial or art historical perspectives. This paper…

  15. Arts-Based Self-Study: Documenting the Ripple Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Like all forms of inquiry, arts-based self-study research can have unexpected consequences. Although we may start out with a fairly clear objective, the data we generate through arts-based methods might address other questions that are even more important than the ones we thought to ask initially, and our study might have an impact that extends…

  16. Pop-Art Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…

  17. The art framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Fischler, M.; Garren, L.; Lu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Future “Intensity Frontier” experiments at Fermilab are likely to be conducted by smaller collaborations, with fewer scientists, than is the case for recent “Energy Frontier” experiments. art is a C++ event-processing framework designed with the needs of such experiments in mind. An evolution from the framework of the CMS experiment, art was designed and implemented to be usable by multiple experiments without imposing undue maintenance effort requirements on either the art developers or experiments using it. We describe the key requirements and features of art and the rationale behind evolutionary changes, additions and simplifications with respect to the CMS framework. In addition, our package distribution system and our collaborative model with respect to the multiple experiments using art helps keep the maintenance burden low. We also describe in-progress and future enhancements to the framework, including strategies we are using to allow multi-threaded use of the art framework in today's multi- and many-core environments.

  18. Efficacy of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-1 Infection in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 114 Studies with up to 144 Weeks' Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frederick J.; Amin, Janaki; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background A comprehensive assessment of initial HIV-1 treatment success may inform study design and treatment guidelines. Methods Group-based, systematic review and meta-analysis of initial antiretroviral therapy studies, in adults, of ≥48 weeks duration, reported through December 31, 2012. Size-weighted, intention-to-treat efficacy was calculated. Parameters of study design/eligibility, participant and treatment characteristics were abstracted. Multivariable, random effects, linear regression models with backwards, stepwise selection were then used to identify variables associated with efficacy. Outcome Measures Antiviral efficacy (undetectable plasma viral load) and premature cessation of therapy. Results 114 studies were included (216 treatment groups; 40,124 participants; mean CD4 count 248 cells/µL [SD 81]; mean HIV-1 plasma viral load log10 4.9 [SD 0.2]). Mean efficacy across all groups was 60% (SD 16) over a mean 82 weeks' follow-up (SD 38). Efficacy declined over time: 66% (SD 16) at 48 weeks, 60% (SD 16) at 96 weeks, 52% (SD 18) at 144 weeks. The most common reason for treatment cessation was participant decision (11%, SD 6.6). Efficacy was higher with ‘Preferred’ than ‘Alternative’ regimens (as defined by 2013 United States antiretroviral guidelines): 75% vs. 65%, respectively, difference 10%; 95%CI 7.6 to 15.4; p<0.001. In 98 groups (45%) reporting efficacy stratified by pre-treatment viral load (< or ≥100,000 copies/mL), efficacy was greater for the lower stratum (70% vs. 62%, respectively, difference 8.4%; 95%CI 6.0 to 10.9; p<0.001). This difference persisted within ‘Preferred’ regimens. Greatest efficacy was associated with use of tenofovir-emtricitabine (vs. other nucleoside analogue backbones) and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (vs. other third drug classes). Conclusion Initial antiretroviral treatments for HIV-1 to date appear to have suboptimal long-term efficacy, but are more effective when commenced at plasma viral loads

  19. Pragmatist Aesthetics and New Visions of the Contemporary Art Museum: The Tate Modern and the Baltic Center for Contemporary Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Angela

    2004-01-01

    This essay considers the current impetus toward "democratizing" contemporary art exhibition practice with regards to Deweyan/Shusterman pragmatist aesthetics. The author proposes that Dewey might regard fondly new initiatives at museums and art centers such at the Tate Modern and the Baltic, both which, through various curatorial and programming…

  20. Adults' Event Recall: Is Context Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratner, Hilary Horn; Padgett, Robert J.

    In studies of retention of verbal material adults have repeatedly remembered less than younger adults have. A study was conducted which asked older adults to remember an experienced event, retention of experiences being considered a better indicator of functioning ability than retention of word lists. In an initial study, older adults' recall was…