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Sample records for adults receiving antiretroviral

  1. Time Preferences Predict Mortality among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Hayashi, Kami; Linnemayr, Sebastian; Vreeman, Rachel C.; Levin, Irwin P.; Bangsberg, David R.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying characteristics of HIV-infected adults likely to have poor treatment outcomes can be useful for targeting interventions efficiently. Research in economics and psychology suggests that individuals’ intertemporal time preferences, which indicate the extent to which they trade-off immediate vs. future cost and benefits, can influence various health behaviors. While there is empirical support for the association between time preferences and various non-HIV health behaviors and outcomes, the extent to which time preferences predict outcomes of those receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) has not been examined previously. Methods HIV-infected adults initiating ART were enrolled at a health facility in Kenya. Participants’ time preferences were measured at enrollment and used to classify them as having either a low or high discount rate for future benefits. At 48 weeks, we assessed mortality and ART adherence, as measured by Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Logistic regression models adjusting for socio-economic characteristics and risk factors were used to determine the association between time preferences and mortality as well as MEMS adherence ≥90%. Results Overall, 44% (96/220) of participants were classified as having high discount rates. Participants with high discount rates had significantly higher 48-week mortality than participants with low discount rates (9.3% vs. 3.1%; adjusted odds ratio 3.84; 95% CI 1.03, 14.50). MEMS adherence ≥90% was similar for participants with high vs. low discount rates (42.3% vs. 49.6%, AOR 0.70; 95% CI 0.40, 1.25). Conclusion High discount rates were associated with significantly higher risk of mortality among HIV-infected patients initiating ART. Greater use of time preference measures may improve identification of patients at risk of poor clinical outcomes. More research is needed to further identify mechanisms of action and also to build upon and test the generalizability of this finding

  2. Persisting high prevalence of pneumococcal carriage among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heinsbroek, Ellen; Tafatatha, Terence; Phiri, Amos; Ngwira, Bagrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Read, Jonathan M.; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HIV-infected adults have high rates of pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults prior to infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) rollout. Design: Observational cohort study. Methods: We recruited HIV-infected adults newly attending a rural HIV clinic in northern Malawi between 2008 and 2010. Nasopharyngeal samples were taken at baseline and after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. We compared pneumococcal carriage by ART status using generalized estimated equation models adjusted for CD4+ cell count, sex, seasonality, and other potential confounders. Results: In total, 336 individuals were included, of which 223 individuals started ART during follow-up. Individuals receiving ART had higher pneumococcal carriage than individuals not receiving ART (25.9 vs. 19.8%, P = 0.03) particularly for serotypes not included in PCV13 (16.1 vs. 9.6% P = 0.003). Following adjustment, increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes was still observed for individuals on ART, but results for all serotypes were nonsignificant [all serotypes: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.22 (0.95–1.56); non-PCV13 serotypes: aRR 1.72, 95% CI 1.13–2.62]. Conclusion: Pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults in Malawi remained high despite use of ART, consistent with failure of mucosal immune reconstitution in the upper respiratory tract. There was evidence of increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes. HIV-infected adults on ART could remain an important reservoir for pneumococcal diversity post infant pneumococcal vaccine introduction. Control of pneumococcal disease in African HIV remains a priority. PMID:26218599

  3. Hypertension among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Nazisa; MSL, Huang; Lin, Khor Geok; Choong, Lee Christopher Kwok

    2014-01-01

    There are increasing researches about non-communicable disease such as elevated blood pressure among people living with HIV before and after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors among 340 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy at a Malaysian public hospital providing HIV-related treatment. Data on socioeconomic background, anthropometry, medical history and dietary intake of the patients were collected. Hypertension is defined as blood pressure ≥130/85 (mm Hg). Prevalence of hypertension was 45.60% (n=155) of which 86.5% of the hypertensive group were male (n=134). The results showed that increase in age (OR 1.051, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.024-1.078), higher body mass index (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.106-2.71), bigger waist circumference (OR 1.18, 95%CI 1.106-2.71), higher waist-hip ratio (OR 1.070, 95%CI 1.034-1.106), higher fasting plasma glucose (OR 1.332, 95% CI 0.845-2.100) and percentage energy intake from protein >15 (OR 2.519, 95%CI 1.391-4.561) were significant risk factors for hypertension (p<0.001). After adjusting for other variables, increasing age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.069 95%CI 1.016-1.124, p=0.010), being male (aOR 3.026, 95%CI 1.175-7.794, p=0.022) and higher body mass index (aOR 1.26, 95%CI 1.032-1.551, p=0.024) were independently associated with hypertension. None of the antiretroviral therapy and immunologic factors was linked to hypertension. In conclusion hypertension among PLHIV was linked to the well-known risk factors such as age, gender and body mass index. With HAART, people can live longer by making monitoring and control of some reversible factors, especially excessive weight gain for maintaining quality of life. PMID:24576366

  4. Persistently Elevated Serum Interleukin-6 Predicts Mortality Among Adults Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Botswana: Results from a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Bethan; Moyo, Sikhulile; Gabaitiri, Lesego; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Bussmann, Hermann; Koethe, John R.; Musonda, Rosemary; Makhema, Joseph; Novitsky, Vladimir; Marlink, Richard G.; Wester, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Elevated serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in European and U.S. cohorts. Few similar data are available from sub-Saharan Africa, where most cART-treated adults reside and the prevalence of advanced immunosuppression and opportunistic infections (OIs) at cART initiation is higher. This was a retrospective nested case-control analysis of clinical trial data from the completed Adult Antiretroviral Treatment and Drug Resistance (“Tshepo”) study, 2002–2007, Gaborone, Botswana. We measured pretreatment serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and D-dimer in stored plasma samples from 32 deceased participants (cases) and 64 survivors (controls), matched for age, sex, baseline CD4+ cell count, and plasma HIV-1 RNA. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses were used to compare inflammatory biomarker levels, adjusting for pretreatment body mass index (BMI) and the presence of OIs. A total of 37 (5.7%) of 650 patients died on study, for a crude mortality rate of 20.6/1,000 person-years. Of 37 (86%) study participants who died on study 32 were included in this analysis. Causes of death (n=32) included non-AIDS-defining events (31.3%), HIV-related OIs (28.1%), cART/toxicity-related (21.9%), other infectious etiologies (15.6%), and unknown (3.1%). Median time to death was 31 weeks [interquartile range (IQR) 14–64]. Median baseline levels of all three biomarkers were higher in cases compared to matched controls. After adjusting for BMI and the presence of OIs, only baseline and most recent (near time of event) levels of IL-6 remained as significant predictors of all-cause mortality [adjusted OR (aOR)=1.25, 95% CI (1.05–1.48); p=0.012; and aOR=1.48 (1.05–2.09); p=0.027, respectively]. Serum IL-6 levels are important predictors of all-cause mortality in this adult

  5. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  6. Effect of nutritional counseling on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol among Thai HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Chotivichien, Saipin; Arab, Lenore; Prasithsirikul, Wisit; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Sinawat, Sangsom; Detels, Roger

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy have increased risk of metabolic syndrome, including dyslipidemia. In this study, we determined whether individual nutritional counseling reduced dyslipidemia, particularly low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, among HIV-infected patients with dyslipidemia not currently taking lipid-lowering medication. We conducted a randomized 24-week trial among HIV-infected patients with dyslipidemia who were on antiretroviral therapy and were eligible to initiate therapeutic lifestyle changes according to the Thai National Cholesterol Education Program. Participants were randomly assigned to an intervention group that received individual counseling with a nutritionist for seven sessions (baseline, weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24) and a control group that received standard verbal diet information at baseline and nutritional counseling only at week 24. A 24-h recall technique was used to assess dietary intake for both groups at baseline and week 24. Lipid profile (total cholesterol, LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride) was measured at baseline and after 12 and 24 weeks of therapy. An intention-to-treat and linear mixed model were used. Seventy-two patients were randomly assigned, and 62 (86%) participants completed their lipid profile test. After 12 weeks of follow-up, there were significant reductions in the intervention group for total cholesterol (-14.4 ± 4.6 mg/dL, P = .002), LDL cholesterol (-13.7 ± 4.1 mg/dL, P = .001), and triglyceride (-30.4 ± 13.8 mg/dL, P = .03). A significant reduction in LDL cholesterol was also observed in the control group (-7.7 ± 3.8 mg/dL, P = .04), but there were no significant differences in change of mean lipid levels between the groups at 12 weeks of follow-up. After 24 weeks, participants assigned to the intervention group demonstrated significantly greater decreases in serum total cholesterol (-19.0 ± 4.6 vs. 0.2

  7. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure among HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but has not been studied extensively in resource-limited settings. Insight in the predictors or correlates of poor HRQoL may be helpful to identify patients most in need of additional support and to design appropriate interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and April 2013 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients who were at least 6 months on cART were randomly selected and individual patient data were retrieved from medical records. HRQoL was measured by the WHOQoL-HIVBREF, depressive-symptoms by the Kessler-6 scale, and stigma by the Kalichman internalized AIDS-related stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was carried-out to examine associations between HRQoL and the other variables. A total of 664 patients (response-rate 95%) participated in the study. A higher level of depressive-symptoms was most strongly and consistently associated with a lower HRQoL, both in terms of the magnitude of the relationship and in the number of HRQoL domains associated with it. Also, a higher level of HIV-stigma was associated with a lower HRQoL except for the physical domain, while obtaining sufficient nutritious food and job opportunity were associated with a better HRQoL except for the spiritual and social domains, respectively. Demographics, clinical, and treatment characteristics yielded few significant associations with HRQoL. Our study findings suggest that interventions to improve HRQoL should focus on reducing depressive-symptoms and HIV-stigma, and on enhancing food security and job opportunity. PMID:25782603

  8. Non-AIDS-defining events among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in resource-replete versus resource-limited urban setting

    PubMed Central

    Wester, C. William; Koethe, John R.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Stinnette, Samuel E.; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Kipp, Aaron M.; Hong, Hwanhee; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; McGowan, Catherine C.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Marlink, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare incidence and distribution of non-AIDS-defining events (NADEs) among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in urban sub-Saharan African versus United States settings. Design Retrospective cohort analysis of clinical trial and observational data. Methods Compared crude and standardized (to US cohort by age and sex) NADE rates from two urban adult HIV-infected cART-initiating populations: a clinical trial cohort in Gaborone, Botswana (Botswana) and an observational cohort in Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Results Crude NADE incidence rates were similar: 10.0 [95% confidence interval 6.3–15.9] per 1000 person-years in Botswana versus 12.4 [8.4–18.4] per 1000 person-years in the United States. However, after standardizing to an older, predominantly male US population, the overall NADE incidence rates were higher in Botswana [18.7 (8.3–33.1) per 1000 person-years]. Standardized rates differed most for cardiovascular events (8.4 versus 5.0 per 1000 person-years) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (8.0 versus 0.5 per 1000 person-years) – both higher in Botswana. Conversely, hepatic NADE rates were higher in the United States (4.0 versus 0.0 per 1000 person-years), whereas renal NADE rates [3.0 per 1000 person-years (United States) versus 2.4 per 1000 person-years (Botswana)] were comparable. Conclusion Crude NADE incidence rates were similar between cART-treated patients in a US observational cohort and a sub-Saharan African clinical trial. However, when standardized to the US cohort, overall NADE rates were higher in Botswana. NADEs appear to be a significant problem in our sub-Saharan African setting, and the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of NADEs should be a critical component of care in resource-limited settings. PMID:21572309

  9. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  10. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Charlotte A.; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods. This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results. Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7–27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4+ cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions. The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  11. False-positive HIV test results in infancy and management of uninfected children receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Moss, William J; Thuma, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes 2 children misdiagnosed with HIV infection in a clinic in rural Zambia and discusses the implications of false-positive HIV DNA tests in HIV-exposed infants, including the potential magnitude of the problem. Recommendations are needed to address the management of children receiving antiretroviral therapy who are suspected of being uninfected. PMID:25973939

  12. Polyomavirus JCV excretion and genotype analysis in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of shedding of polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) genotypes in urine of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Single samples of urine and blood were collected prospectively from 70 adult HIV-infected patients and 68 uninfected volunteers. Inclusion criteria for HIV-infected patients included an HIV RNA viral load < 1000 copies, CD4 cell count of 200-700 x 106 cells/l, and stable HAART regimen. PCR assays and sequence analysis were carried out using JCV-specific primers against different regions of the virus genome. RESULTS: JCV excretion in urine was more common in HIV-positive patients but not significantly different from that of the HIV-negative group [22/70 (31%) versus 13/68 (19%); P = 0.09]. HIV-positive patients lost the age-related pattern of JCV shedding (P = 0.13) displayed by uninfected subjects (P = 0.01). Among HIV-infected patients significant differences in JCV shedding were related to CD4 cell counts (P = 0.03). Sequence analysis of the JCV regulatory region from both HIV-infected patients and uninfected volunteers revealed all to be JCV archetypal strains. JCV genotypes 1 (36%) and 4 (36%) were the most common among HIV-infected patients, whereas type 2 (77%) was the most frequently detected among HIV-uninfected volunteers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that JCV shedding is enhanced by modest depressions in immune function during HIV infection. JCV shedding occurred in younger HIV-positive persons than in the healthy controls. As the common types of JCV excreted varied among ethnic groups, JCV genotypes associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy may reflect demographics of those infected patient populations.

  13. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    assessments are recommended before treatment, and monitoring during treatment is recommended to assess response, adverse effects, and adherence. Approaches are recommended to improve linkage to and retention in care are provided. Daily tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is recommended for use as preexposure prophylaxis to prevent HIV infection in persons at high risk. When indicated, postexposure prophylaxis should be started as soon as possible after exposure. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Antiretroviral agents remain the cornerstone of HIV treatment and prevention. All HIV-infected individuals with detectable plasma virus should receive treatment with recommended initial regimens consisting of an InSTI plus 2 NRTIs. Preexposure prophylaxis should be considered as part of an HIV prevention strategy for at-risk individuals. When used effectively, currently available ARVs can sustain HIV suppression and can prevent new HIV infection. With these treatment regimens, survival rates among HIV-infected adults who are retained in care can approach those of uninfected adults. PMID:27404187

  14. Glucose Metabolism Disorders, HIV and Antiretroviral Therapy among Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Maganga, Emmanuel; Smart, Luke R.; Kalluvya, Samuel; Kataraihya, Johannes B.; Saleh, Ahmed M.; Obeid, Lama; Downs, Jennifer A.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Peck, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Millions of HIV-infected Africans are living longer due to long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), yet little is known about glucose metabolism disorders in this group. We aimed to compare the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders among HIV-infected adults on long-term ART to ART-naïve adults and HIV-negative controls, hypothesizing that the odds of glucose metabolism disorders would be 2-fold greater even after adjusting for possible confounders. Methods In this cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013, consecutive adults (>18 years) attending an HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled in 3 groups: 153 HIV-negative controls, 151 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 150 HIV-infected on ART for ≥ 2 years. The primary outcome was the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders as determined by oral glucose tolerance testing. We compared glucose metabolism disorder prevalence between each HIV group vs. the control group by Fisher’s exact test and used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders. Results HIV-infected adults on ART had a higher prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders (49/150 (32.7%) vs.11/153 (7.2%), p<0.001) and frank diabetes mellitus (27/150 (18.0%) vs. 8/153 (5.2%), p = 0.001) than HIV-negative adults, which remained highly significant even after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity and socioeconomic status (OR = 5.72 (2.78–11.77), p<0.001). Glucose metabolism disorders were significantly associated with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. Awareness of diabetes mellitus was <25%. Conclusions HIV-infected adults on long-term ART had 5-fold greater odds of glucose metabolism disorders than HIV-negative controls but were rarely aware of their diagnosis. Intensive glucose metabolism disorder screening and education are needed in HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa. Further research should determine how glucose metabolism disorders might be related to immune

  15. HIV, antiretroviral treatment, hypertension, and stroke in Malawian adults

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Connor, Myles D.; Mzinganjira, Henry; Kampondeni, Sam; Choko, Augustine; Hopkins, Mark; Emsley, Hedley C.A.; Bryer, Alan; Faragher, Brian; Heyderman, Robert S.; Allain, Theresa J.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate HIV, its treatment, and hypertension as stroke risk factors in Malawian adults. Methods: We performed a case-control study of 222 adults with acute stroke, confirmed by MRI in 86%, and 503 population controls, frequency-matched for age, sex, and place of residence, using Global Positioning System for random selection. Multivariate logistic regression models were used for case-control comparisons. Results: HIV infection (population attributable fraction [PAF] 15%) and hypertension (PAF 46%) were strongly linked to stroke. HIV was the predominant risk factor for young stroke (≤45 years), with a prevalence of 67% and an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) (95% confidence interval) of 5.57 (2.43–12.8) (PAF 42%). There was an increased risk of a stroke in patients with untreated HIV infection (aOR 4.48 [2.44–8.24], p < 0.001), but the highest risk was in the first 6 months after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) (aOR 15.6 [4.21–46.6], p < 0.001); this group had a lower median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count (92 vs 375 cells/mm3, p = 0.004). In older participants (HIV prevalence 17%), HIV was associated with stroke, but with a lower PAF than hypertension (5% vs 68%). There was no interaction between HIV and hypertension on stroke risk. Conclusions: In a population with high HIV prevalence, where stroke incidence is increasing, we have shown that HIV is an important risk factor. Early ART use in immunosuppressed patients poses an additional and potentially treatable stroke risk. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome may be contributing to the disease mechanisms. PMID:26683649

  16. Sexual risk behaviors among HIV-patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Southern Thailand: roles of antiretroviral adherence and serostatus disclosure.

    PubMed

    Thanawuth, Nattasiri; Rojpibulstit, Malee

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent of unprotected sex among patients already established in HIV-medical care and their associated factors. Sexually active patients who were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from five public hospitals in Trang province, Southern Thailand, were interviewed. Of 279 studied patients, 37.3% had unprotected sex in the prior 3 months and 27.2% did not disclose their serostatus to sexual partners. The median duration interquartile range (IQR) of using ART was 47 (27-60) months and 26.7% were non-adherent to ART (i.e., taking less than 95% of the prescribed doses). More than one-third had the perception that ART use would protect against HIV transmission even with unprotected sex. About 36.6% reported that they were unaware of their current CD4 counts and nearly one-third did not receive any safe sex counseling at each medical follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounders, non-adherence to ART and HIV-nondisclosure were strongly associated with an increase in the risk of unprotected sex with the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 5.03 (95% CI 2.68-9.44) and 3.89 (95% CI 1.57-9.61), respectively. In contrast, the risk for engaging in unprotected sex was less likely among patients having a negative-serostatus partner (aOR = 0.30; 95% CI 0.12-0.75), a longer duration of the use of ART (aOR = 0.98; 95%CI 0.97-0.99) and an unawareness of their current CD4 levels (aOR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.30-0.99). To maximize the benefits from ART, there should be a bigger emphasis on the "positive prevention" program and more efforts are needed to target the population at risk for unprotected sex. Strategies to encourage adherence to ART and for disclosure of serostatus are also required. PMID:26666292

  17. Therapeutic Immunization In HIV Infected Ugandans Receiving Stable Antiretroviral Treatment: A Phase I Safety Study4

    PubMed Central

    Kityo, Cissy; Bousheri, Stephanie; Akao, Juliette; Ssali, Francis; Byaruhanga, Rose; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Muloma, Prossy; Myalo, Sula; Magala, Rose; Lu, Yichen; Mugyenyi, Peter; Cao, Huyen

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic immunizations in HIV infection may boost immunity during antiretroviral treatment. We report on the first therapeutic vaccine trial in Uganda, Africa. This open label Phase I trial was designed to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine candidate. Thirty HIV positive volunteers receiving a stable regimen of antiretroviral therapy with CD4 counts > 400 were recruited for the safety evaluation of LFn-p24C, a detoxified anthrax-derived polypeptide fused to the subtype C HIV gag protein p24. The vaccine was well tolerated and HIV RNA levels remained undetectable following three immunizations. CD4 counts in vaccine recipients were significantly higher compared to the control individuals after 12 months. HIV-specific responses were associated with higher gain in CD4 counts following LFn-p24C immunizations. Volunteers were subsequently asked to undergo a 30-day period of observed treatment interruption. 8/24 (30%) individuals showed no evidence of viral rebound during treatment interruption. All demonstrated prompt suppression of viral load following resumption of ART. Our data demonstrates the safety of LFn-p24C and suggests that adjunct therapeutic immunization may benefit select individuals in further boosting an immune response. PMID:21211581

  18. Nutritional status changes in HIV-infected children receiving combined antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fiore, P; Donelli, E; Boni, S; Pontali, E; Tramalloni, R; Bassetti, D

    2000-11-01

    Maintaining linear growth and weight gain in HIV-infected children is often difficult. Nutritional evaluation and support are recognised as important factors to improve their quality of life. Combination antiretroviral therapy including protease inhibitors (HAART) reduces HIV-viral load and improves survival, quality of life and nutritional status. Our study aimed to determine changes in nutrional status based on body weight, height and nutritional habits, of HIV-infected children receiving HAART. Possible side effects of lipid metabolism were also studied. Twenty five children, 13 treated with HAART (group B) were followed up for 12 months. We did not observe statistically significant differences in nutritional status over that time or between groups A and B. Inadequate energy intake was more common in patients with advanced HIV-disease. Hyperlipidemia was found in 70% of children receiving ritonavir and in approximately 50% of children receiving nelfinavir. We observed an important although not statistically significative modification in the height of those in group B. PMID:11091066

  19. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Megan M; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Despite China's free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent nonadherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent nonadherence (any missed ART in the past four weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use, and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent nonadherence. Male gender, lower education, and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients' educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities. PMID:24666239

  20. Trends in Genotypic HIV-1 Antiretroviral Resistance between 2006 and 2012 in South African Patients Receiving First- and Second-Line Antiretroviral Treatment Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Van Zyl, Gert U.; Liu, Tommy F.; Claassen, Mathilda; Engelbrecht, Susan; de Oliveira, Tulio; Preiser, Wolfgang; Wood, Natasha T.; Travers, Simon; Shafer, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives South Africa’s national antiretroviral (ARV) treatment program expanded in 2010 to include the nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTI) tenofovir (TDF) for adults and abacavir (ABC) for children. We investigated the associated changes in genotypic drug resistance patterns in patients with first-line ARV treatment failure since the introduction of these drugs, and protease inhibitor (PI) resistance patterns in patients who received ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r)-containing therapy. Methods We analysed ARV treatment histories and HIV-1 RT and protease mutations in plasma samples submitted to the Tygerberg Academic Hospital National Health Service Laboratory. Results Between 2006 and 2012, 1,667 plasma samples from 1,416 ARV-treated patients, including 588 children and infants, were submitted for genotypic resistance testing. Compared with 720 recipients of a d4T or AZT-containing first-line regimen, the 153 recipients of a TDF-containing first-line regimen were more likely to have the RT mutations K65R (46% vs 4.0%; p<0.001), Y115F (10% vs. 0.6%; p<0.001), L74VI (8.5% vs. 1.8%; p<0.001), and K70EGQ (7.8% vs. 0.4%) and recipients of an ABC-containing first-line regimen were more likely to have K65R (17% vs 4.0%; p<0.001), Y115F (30% vs 0.6%; p<0.001), and L74VI (56% vs 1.8%; p<0.001). Among the 490 LPV/r recipients, 55 (11%) had ≥1 LPV-resistance mutations including 45 (9.6%) with intermediate or high-level LPV resistance. Low (20 patients) and intermediate (3 patients) darunavir (DRV) cross resistance was present in 23 (4.6%) patients. Conclusions Among patients experiencing virological failure on a first-line regimen containing two NRTI plus one NNRTI, the use of TDF in adults and ABC in children was associated with an increase in four major non- thymidine analogue mutations. In a minority of patients, LPV/r-use was associated with intermediate or high-level LPV resistance with predominantly low-level DRV cross-resistance. PMID

  1. Natural pregnancies in HIV-serodiscordant couples receiving successful antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Pablo; del Romero, Jorge; Leal, Manuel; Hernando, Victoria; Asencio, Román; de Mendoza, Carmen; Labarga, Pablo; Núñez, Marina; Ramos, José Tomás; González-Lahoz, Juan; Soriano, Vincent

    2006-11-01

    Increasing numbers of HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples are concerned about the chances for pregnancy. We reviewed all natural pregnancies attained by HIV-serodiscordant couples seen in 3 clinics in Spain, in which the infected partner had undetectable plasma viremia while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In the case of HIV-infected mothers, only those with undetectable viremia during pregnancy and at delivery were chosen. A total of 62 HIV-serodiscordant couples, 22 HIV-infected women (mean CD4 count of 522 cells/microL, 55% hepatitis C virus [HCV]-seropositive) and 40 HIV-infected men (mean CD4 count of 629 cells/microL, 75% HCV-seropositive), were recorded. Overall, 76 natural pregnancies occurred, and 68 children were born. There were 9 fetal deaths, 1 twin pregnancy, 6 couples with 2 consecutive babies, and 4 couples with 3 consecutive newborns. There were no cases of HIV seroconversion in uninfected sexual partners. One case of vertical HIV transmission occurred, however. Serodiscordant couples attaining natural pregnancy are exposed to a negligible risk of sexual transmission of HIV when the infected partner presents with complete suppression of plasma viremia while receiving HAART. PMID:17003695

  2. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors. PMID:27392000

  3. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors. PMID:27392000

  4. Disclosure amongst adult HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omunakwe, Hannah E; Okoye, Helen; Efobi, Chilota; Onodingene, Maryanne; Chinenye, Sunny; Nwauche, Chijioke A

    2015-09-01

    HIV transmission is still a public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa; disclosure is an effective tool for its prevention, contact tracing and treatment. We aimed to evaluate the disclosure behaviours of adult HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, and identify major challenges to disclosure in a bid to develop ways to improve this practice in the environment. Patients receiving ART in this centre were interviewed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. A total of 250 clients were interviewed over three months. A majority of the patients were tested on account of ill health 143 (57.2%). They commenced ART within 8 ± 15.4 SD months of presentation. The mean period before disclosure was 4.75 ± 12.8 SD months of diagnosis. Thirty-six (14.4%) of the respondents had not disclosed their HIV status; the major barrier to disclosure was stigmatisation in 19 (36%). PMID:25249594

  5. Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Appropriate Percentage of Adults Who Receive Colorectal Cancer Screening as Appropriate Colorectal cancer is the second leading ... Percentage of Adults Who Receive Recommended Colorectal Cancer Screening by Age Group 78pm-ubty Download these data » ...

  6. A comparison of death recording by health centres and civil registration in South Africans receiving antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leigh F; Dorrington, Rob E; Laubscher, Ria; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Wood, Robin; Fox, Matthew P; Cornell, Morna; Schomaker, Michael; Prozesky, Hans; Tanser, Frank; Davies, Mary-Ann; Boulle, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is uncertainty regarding the completeness of death recording by civil registration and by health centres in South Africa. This paper aims to compare death recording by the two systems, in cohorts of South African patients receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods Completeness of death recording was estimated using a capture–recapture approach. Six ART programmes linked their patient record systems to the vital registration system using civil identity document (ID) numbers and provided data comparing the outcomes recorded in patient files and in the vital registration. Patients were excluded if they had missing/invalid IDs or had transferred to other ART programmes. Results After exclusions, 91,548 patient records were included. Of deaths recorded in patients files after 2003, 94.0% (95% CI: 93.3–94.6%) were recorded by civil registration, with completeness being significantly higher in urban areas, older adults and females. Of deaths recorded by civil registration after 2003, only 35.0% (95% CI: 34.2–35.8%) were recorded in patient files, with this proportion dropping from 60% in 2004–2005 to 30% in 2010 and subsequent years. Recording of deaths in patient files was significantly higher in children and in locations within 50 km of the health centre. When the information from the two systems was combined, an estimated 96.2% of all deaths were recorded (93.5% in children and 96.2% in adults). Conclusions South Africa's civil registration system has achieved a high level of completeness in the recording of mortality. However, the fraction of deaths recorded by health centres is low and information from patient records is insufficient by itself to evaluate levels and predictors of ART patient mortality. Previously documented improvements in ART mortality over time may be biased if based only on data from patient records. PMID:26685125

  7. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  8. Earlier versus Later Start of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, François-Xavier; Sok, Thim; Laureillard, Didier; Borand, Laurence; Rekacewicz, Claire; Nerrienet, Eric; Madec, Yoann; Marcy, Olivier; Chan, Sarin; Prak, Narom; Kim, Chindamony; Lak, Khemarin Kim; Hak, Chanroeurn; Dim, Bunnet; Sin, Chhun Im; Sun, Sath; Guillard, Bertrand; Sar, Borann; Vong, Sirenda; Fernandez, Marcelo; Fox, Lawrence; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains an important cause of death among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Robust data are lacking with regard to the timing for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in relation to the start of antituberculosis therapy. Methods We tested the hypothesis that the timing of ART initiation would significantly affect mortality among adults not previously exposed to antiretroviral drugs who had newly diagnosed tuberculosis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. After beginning the standard, 6-month treatment for tuberculosis, patients were randomly assigned to either earlier treatment (2 weeks after beginning tuberculosis treatment) or later treatment (8 weeks after) with stavudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz. The primary end point was survival. Results A total of 661 patients were enrolled and were followed for a median of 25 months. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 25 per cubic millimeter, and the median viral load was 5.64 log10 copies per milliliter. The risk of death was significantly reduced in the group that received ART earlier, with 59 deaths among 332 patients (18%), as compared with 90 deaths among 329 patients (27%) in the later-ART group (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]; 0.44 to 0.86; P = 0.006). The risk of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was significantly increased in the earlier-ART group (hazard ratio, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.78 to 3.59; P<0.001). Irrespective of the study group, the median gain in the CD4+ T-cell count was 114 per cubic millimeter, and the viral load was undetectable at week 50 in 96.5% of the patients. Conclusions Initiating ART 2 weeks after the start of tuberculosis treatment significantly improved survival among HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. (Funded by the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis and the National Institutes of

  9. Antiretroviral adherence and use of alternative therapies among older HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed Central

    Wutoh, A. K.; Brown, C. M.; Kumoji, E. K.; Daftary, M. S.; Jones, T.; Barnes, N. A.; Powell, N. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate adherence to antiretroviral therapy and use of alternative therapies among older human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, and to assess relationships between antiretroviral adherence and clinical outcomes. METHODS: One hundred older HIV-infected patients, aged 50 and over, treated at two large HIV clinics in Washington, DC, were enrolled. A cross-sectional methodology used structured interviews to investigate antiretroviral regimens, use of alternative therapies, and demographics. Medical records provided viral load and CD4 count within 3 months of interview. RESULTS: The mean self-reported adherence was 94%, and 55 patients reported 100% adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between adherence and viral load (r = -312, p = 0.005). There was no significant difference in adherence based on race, gender, mode of transmission, or education. Twenty-one patients (21%) reported the use of an alternative therapy, with several patients using multiple alternative therapies. There was no significant difference in adherence score (p = 0.514) or viral load (p = 0.860) based upon use of alternative therapies. CONCLUSIONS: Older HIV-infected study patients reported high levels of adherence to antiretroviral regimens, and adherence was highly correlated with HIV viral load. Use of alternative therapies did not significantly impact adherence to antiretroviral agents or viral load. High adherence among this older population may be related to older patients' familiarity with medication usage, their increasing awareness of HIV as a disease that requires optimal adherence, and educational efforts promoted by the two clinics in which they are clients. PMID:11491273

  10. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Victor B.; Naima, Nasir; Abah, Isaac O.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Lucy, Ogwuche; London, Ibrahim; Dady, Christiana; Agaba, Patricia; Agbaji, Oche

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs), and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV-infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions) were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3%) patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10) years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%), unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1%) and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%). Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%), rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%), change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%), and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%). A total of 389 (93%) out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212) of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89) were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49). However, 7.5% (30) prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21) were not dispensed, and 3% (12) were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors. PMID:26131046

  11. Socioeconomic and clinical factors explaining the risk of unstructured antiretroviral therapy interruptions among Kenyan adult patients.

    PubMed

    Mûnene, Edwin; Ekman, Björn

    2016-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the extent of unstructured HIV treatment interruptions (TIs) and investigate the effects of socioeconomic, socio-demographic, HIV treatment-related and clinical factors on the magnitude and rate of the same among adult patients at a Kenyan regional referral center. Four hundred and twenty-one adult patients actively receiving antiretroviral therapy at Nyeri County Referral Hospital since 2003 were randomly selected to complete a health survey questionnaire. Electronic records were used to obtain their HIV treatment utilization history. The marginal effects of selected determinants on prevalence and rate of TI were assessed by fitting multiple Poisson log-linear regression models. In total, 392 patients participated in the study. HIV TI was prevalent with 64.5% having had at least one TI of 3 months or more during treatment. The risk of TI was significantly higher in those longer on treatment (prevalence ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-1.28). Greater risk of TI was also associated with lower income (prevalence rate ratio [PRR] = 0.9, 95% CI 0.83-1.00), low medication adherence (PRR = 0.3, 95% CI 0.13-0.72), inconsistent treatment engagement (PRR = 0.4, 95% CI 0.19-0.75) and, contrarily, fewer adverse drug reactions (PRR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.90-0.97). Unstructured HIV TIs appear to be fairly common at the study site. The results suggest that efforts to minimize HIV TI could benefit from treatment-continuity monitoring strategies that target the high-risk sub-samples identified. PMID:26846424

  12. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio is associated with endothelial dysfunction in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pirro, Matteo; Mannarino, Massimo R.; Francisci, Daniela; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Bianconi, Vanessa; Bagaglia, Francesco; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Mannarino, Elmo; Baldelli, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, a marker of cardiovascular (CV) risk, is common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Microalbuminuria is frequent in HIV-infected patients, and is a predictor of renal impairment and CV risk. We investigated the association between microalbuminuria and endothelial dysfunction among HIV-infected patients receiving highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Endothelial function, measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (bFMD), and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR), were measured in 170 HAART-treated HIV-infected adults. The relationship between UACR and bFMD was evaluated. The prevalence of increased UACR, defined by two cut-off levels (20 mg/g and 30 mg/g), was 29% and 17%. UACR was significantly higher while bFMD was lower among patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). UACR was associated with bFMD (r = −0.31; p < 0.001). This association was stronger in MS-patients (r = −0.44; p = 0.003). UACR above 20 mg/g was associated with an increased risk (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.15–4.89, p = 0.020) of severely impaired bFMD (bFMD ≤ 2.1%). Patients with MS and increased UACR had the lowest bFMD compared with those with none or one of the two conditions. Microalbuminuria and endothelial dysfunction are positively associated in HIV-infected patients regardless of known confounders. The coexistence of microalbuminuria and MS amplifies their deleterious influence on endothelial function. PMID:27353425

  13. Short communication: The relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tanvi S; Jacobson, Denise L; Anderson, Lynn; Gerschenson, Mariana; Van Dyke, Russell B; McFarland, Elizabeth J; Miller, Tracie L

    2013-09-01

    Mitochondrial abnormalities may lead to metabolic complications in HIV-infected children who have been receiving long-term antiretroviral treatment. We conducted a matched, case-control study comparing 21 HIV-infected children with insulin resistance (cases) to 21 HIV-infected children without insulin resistance (controls) to assess differences in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copies/cell and oxidative phosphorylation NADH dehydrogenase (C1) and cytochrome c oxidase (C4) enzyme activities in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. MtDNA copies/cell tended to be lower in cases, and fasting serum glucose levels were inversely and significantly correlated with C1 enzyme activity, more so in cases. Larger pediatric studies should evaluate mitochondrial etiologies of insulin resistance and determine the role of antiretroviral therapies or HIV infection on mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23742635

  14. Antiretroviral adherence and treatment outcomes among adult Ethiopian patients.

    PubMed

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R; Gee, Peter; Peterson, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Developing appropriate strategies to sustain optimal medication adherence among the increasing number of HIV-positive patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa is a major challenge. The objective of this study was to determine patient, regimen, disease, patient-provider, and healthcare-related factors associated with adherence with ART over a one-year period, and assess the impact of adherence on treatment outcomes. We performed a prospective, observational study among 246 patients who were initiated on ART in Ethiopia. Of 172 who completed follow-up, 130 (75.6%) had ≥95% adherence. In the multivariate analyses, a higher baseline BMI (OR, 1.2; 95% CI 1.0, 1.4) and use of reminder devices (OR, 9.1; 95% CI 2.0, 41.6) remained positively associated with adherence, while a higher HIV symptom and adverse drug reaction distress score was an independent negative predictor of adherence (OR, 0.90; 95% CI 0.9, 1.0) CD4 count increase was significantly higher in the adherent patients compared to non-adherent patients at 12 months (159 cells/µL [interquartile range (IQR), 72-324 cells/µL] vs. 132 cells/µL [IQR, 43-190 cells/µL]; p = 0.026). Our findings indicate that interventions aimed at improving adherence and thereby treatment outcomes in patients initiated on ART should promote the use of reminder devices, and monitor HIV symptoms and adverse reaction distress and nutritional status. PMID:26829232

  15. Perceptions of health care among persons living with HIV/AIDS who are not receiving antiretroviral medications.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Graham, Jeffrey; Luke, Webster; Austin, James

    2002-05-01

    Antiretroviral medications are effective at improving the health and increasing the survival of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, studies have shown that a substantial number of HIV-infected people do not receive antiretroviral treatments. The current study examined the physical and mental health, substance use, and perceptions of medical care of 163 men and 78 women living with HIV/AIDS. Results of a confidential survey showed that 79 (33%) were not currently treated for HIV. These persons did not differ from those who were treated in chart-abstracted CD4 cell counts, years living with HIV infection, HIV-related symptoms, and HIV-related hospitalizations. Unlike past studies, gender was not found to be a factor in treatment status. However, untreated persons had higher chart-abstracted viral loads and were more likely to be ethnic minorities, have a lower level of education, greater level of depression, and greater pessimistic attitude. They were significantly more likely to have used alcohol, powder cocaine, and crack cocaine in the previous 3 months, were likely to know their own viral load and CD4 count, and held significantly more negative views of their health care and their health care providers. There were no differences between untreated and treated persons in their meeting the year 1999 antiretroviral treatment guidelines that were in effect at the time of data collection. These results suggest that persons who are not receiving antiretroviral medications may be in need of mental health and substance use interventions and may benefit from interventions designed to engage and retain them in medical treatment. PMID:12055031

  16. Factors Associated with Prevalent Tuberculosis Among Patients Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iroezindu, MO; Ofondu, EO; Mbata, GC; van Wyk, B; Hausler, HP; DH, Au; Lynen, L; Hopewell, PC

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity/mortality among human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals in Africa. Reducing TB burden in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a public health priority. Aim: We determined the factors associated with prevalent TB among patients receiving HAART. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adult patients who had received HAART for ≥12 weeks in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Patients whose TB diagnosis predated HAART were excluded from the study. Pre-HAART data were collected from the clinic records, whereas post-HAART data were obtained through medical history, physical examination, and laboratory investigations. Standard TB screening/diagnostic algorithms as applicable in Nigeria were used. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors independently associated with prevalent TB. Results: about 65.8% (222/339) were women. The mean age was 41.1 (10.0) years and 23.6% (73/339) had past history of TB. The prevalence of active TB was 7.7% (26/339). Among these patients, 42.3% (11/26) had pulmonary TB, 34.6% (9/26) had disseminated TB, whereas 23.1% (6/26) had only extra-pulmonary disease. Only 45% (9/20) of patients with pulmonary involvement had positive sputum smear. Factors independently associated with prevalent TB were lower social class (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 31.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–1417.3), HAART non-adherence (aOR125.5; 95% CI: 9.6–1636.3), baseline CD4 <200cells/μl (aOR31.0; 95%CI: 1.6–590.6), previous TB (aOR13.8; 95% CI: 2.0–94.1), and current hemoglobin <10 g/dl (aOR10.3; 95% CI: 1.1–99.2). Conclusion: Factors associated with prevalent TB were a lower social class, HAART non-adherence, severe immunosuppression before HAART initiation, previous TB, and anemia post-HAART. TB case finding should be intensified in these high-risk groups. PMID:27213096

  17. Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Hepatic Fibrosis in HIV-1–Monoinfected Adults With Elevated Aminotransferase Levels on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Caryn G.; McLaughlin, Mary; Matthews, Lindsay; Proschan, Michael; Thomas, Francine; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Abu-Asab, Mones; Orenstein, Abigail; Engle, Ronald E.; Hu, Xiaojun; Lempicki, Richard; Hadigan, Colleen; Kleiner, David E.; Heller, Theo; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Persistent aminotransferase elevations are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), including those without hepatitis B or C coinfection, but their clinical significance is unknown. Methods. HIV-infected adults with aminotransferase levels elevated above the upper limit of normal for ≥6 months while receiving ART, and without chronic viral hepatitis or other known causes of chronic liver disease, underwent a detailed metabolic assessment and liver biopsy. Results. Sixty-two HIV-infected subjects completed the study. Forty (65%) had clinically significant liver pathology, including 34 (55%) with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and 11 (18%) with bridging fibrosis, 10 of whom also had NASH. Nonspecific abnormalities alone were seen in 22 (35%) subjects, including mild steatosis, mild to moderate inflammation, and evidence of drug adaptation. Insulin resistance, obesity, and the presence of either of 2 minor alleles in the PNPLA3 gene were significantly associated with increased risk of NASH and fibrosis. NASH and/or fibrosis were not associated with duration of HIV infection or ART, specific antiretroviral drugs, history of opportunistic infection, immune status, or duration of aminotransferase elevation. Conclusions. HIV-infected adults with chronic aminotransferase elevations while receiving ART have a high rate of liver disease. Noninvasive testing can help identify liver disease in such patients, but liver biopsy is necessary to definitively identify those at risk for liver disease progression and complications. Longitudinal follow-up of this cohort will better characterize the natural history of aminotransferase elevations in this population and identify noninvasive biomarkers of liver disease progression. PMID:25681381

  18. Realtime adherence monitoring of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults and children in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Haberer, Jessica E; Kiwanuka, Julius; Nansera, Denis; Muzoora, Conrad; Hunt, Peter W; So, Jacquelyn; O'Donnell, Michael; Siedner, Mark; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David R

    2013-08-24

    A real-time wireless electronic adherence monitor (EAM) and weekly self-report of missed doses via interactive voice response (IVR) and short message service (SMS) queries were used to measure antiretroviral therapy adherence in 49 adults and 46 children in rural Uganda. Median adherence was 89.5% among adults and 92.8% among children by EAM, and 99-100% for both adults and children by IVR/SMS self-report. Loss of viral suppression was significantly associated with adherence by EAM (odds ratio 0.58 for each 10% increase), but not IVR/SMS. Wireless EAM creates an exciting opportunity to monitor and potentially intervene with adherence challenges as they are happening. PMID:23751260

  19. HIV-positive patients’ perceptions of care received at a selected antiretroviral therapy clinic in Vhembe district, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ndou, Tshifhiwa V.; Risenga, Patrone R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients’ experiences are a reflection of what has happened during the care process and, therefore, provide information about the performance of health care professional workers. They refer to the process of care provision at the antiretroviral therapy (ART) sites. Aim and setting This article explored the perceptions of HIV-positive patients of care received at the Gateway Clinic of the regional hospital that provides antiretroviral treatment in the Vhembe district. Methods A qualitative, explorative and descriptive design was used. A non-probability, convenient sampling method was used to select 20 HIV-positive patients who were above 18 years of age. In-depth individual interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed through Tech’s open coding method. Results One theme and two sub-themes emerged, namely positive experiences related to the environment and attitudes of health professionals, and negative experiences concerning the practices by health care providers. Conclusion Patients’ perceptions of quality of, and satisfaction with, health care may affect health outcomes. Recommendations are made to consider, practice and strengthen the protocols, the standard operating procedures and the principles of infection control in the health facilities. PMID:27380841

  20. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  1. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Takarinda, K. C.; Owiti, P.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Mugurungi, O.; Buruwe, L.; Reid, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: A non-governmental organisation-supported clinic offering health services including antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To compare ART retention between younger (age 10–14 years) vs. older (age 15–19 years) adolescents and younger (age 20–29 years) vs. older (age ⩾30 years) adults and determine adolescent- and adult-specific attrition-associated factors among those initiated on ART between 2010 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 110 (7%) adolescents and 1484 (93%) adults included in the study, no differences in retention were observed between younger vs. older adolescents at 6, 12 and 24 months. More younger adolescents were initiated with body mass index <16 kg/m2 compared with older adolescents (64% vs. 47%; P = 0.04). There were more females (74% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) and fewer patients initiating ART with CD4 count ⩽350 cells/mm3 (77% vs. 81%, P = 0.007) among younger vs. older adults. Younger adults demonstrated more attrition than older adults at all time-points. No attrition risk factors were observed among adolescents. Attrition-associated factors among adults included being younger, having a lower CD4 count and advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease at initiation, and initiation on a stavudine-based regimen. Conclusion: Younger adults demonstrated greater attrition and may require more attention. We were unable to demonstrate differences in attrition among younger vs. older adolescents. Loss to follow-up was the main reason for attrition across all age groups. Overall, earlier presentation for ART care appears important for improved ART retention among adults. PMID:27358802

  2. Sunitinib Malate in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With Cancer Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-14

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Malignancies; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Light Chain Deposition Disease; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Osteolytic Lesions of Multiple Myeloma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Polycythemia Vera; Post

  3. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of an interleukin-2 agonist among HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard T; Pertel, Peter E; Benson, Alice; Cassell, Delanie J; Gazzard, Brian G; Holodniy, Mark; Lalezari, Jacob P; Levy, Yves; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Palella, Frank J; Pollard, Richard B; Rajagopalan, Prabhu; Saag, Michael S; Salata, Robert A; Sha, Beverly E; Choudhri, Shurjeel

    2008-02-01

    We sought to determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose, optimal dose, and preliminary dose efficacy of intermittent subcutaneously (s.c.) administered BAY 50-4798 among patients with HIV infection receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) compared with patients receiving HAART alone. A phase I/II randomized, double-blind, dose-escalation study was conducted of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of s.c. BAY 50-4798 administered to HIV-infected patients already receiving stable HAART. There were no unexpected safety findings in a population of HIV-infected patients receiving HAART plus SC BAY 50-4798 as adjunctive therapy. BAY 50-4798 exhibited nearly dose-proportional pharmacokinetics, and accumulation was minimal during multiple-dose treatment. Limited efficacy data indicated that treatment with BAY 50-4798 caused at least a transient increase in CD4(+) T cell counts in some recipients, particularly at the early time points. In general, this effect appeared to increase with increasing dose. Bay 50-4798 was generally well tolerated across the dose range tested, but a lack of potent, sustained immunologic activity suggests that further optimization of dose and schedule will be necessary. PMID:18279104

  4. Intimate partner violence and antiretroviral adherence among women receiving care in an urban Southeastern Texas HIV clinic.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Debra D; Nava, Angeles; McFarlane, Judith

    2013-01-01

    This nonexperimental, descriptive study examined relationships between recent intimate partner violence (IPV) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among women. Data from 272 HIV-infected women receiving care at a large HIV clinic were obtained through interviews and medical record abstraction. The Severity of Violence Against Women Scale was used to determine IPV experience in the previous 12 months; the prevalence of recent IPV in our sample was 52%. Mean Domestic Violence Specific Morisky Medication Adherence Scale scores among women experiencing recent IPV were significantly lower (M = 5.49, SD = 2.06) than in women without IPV experiences (M = 6.57, SD = 1.57, t[262.1] = 4.91, p < .001). A greater proportion of detectable viral loads (Fisher's exact p < .001) was found in women experiencing recent IPV compared to women who did not experience IPV. The data indicate that clinicians should screen HIV-infected women frequently for IPV when assessing ART adherence. PMID:23790276

  5. Birth outcomes in South African women receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a triple-drug combination, in HIV-infected pregnant women markedly reduces mother to child transmission of HIV and decreases maternal morbidity. However, there remains uncertainty about the effects of in utero exposure to HAART on foetal development. Methods Our objectives were to investigate whether in utero exposure to HAART is associated with low birth weight and/or preterm birth in a population of South African women with advanced HIV disease. A retrospective observational study was performed on women with CD4 counts ≤250 cells/mm3 attending antenatal antiretroviral clinics in Johannesburg between October 2004 and March 2007. Low birth weight (<2.5 kg) and preterm birth rates (<37 weeks) were compared between those exposed and unexposed to HAART during pregnancy. Effects of different HAART regimen and duration were assessed. Results Among HAART-unexposed infants, 27% (60/224) were low birth weight compared with 23% (90/388) of early HAART-exposed (exposed <28 weeks gestation) and 19% (76/407) of late HAART-exposed (exposed ≥28 weeks) infants (p = 0.05). In the early HAART group, a higher CD4 cell count was protective against low birth weight (AOR 0.57 per 50 cells/mm3 increase, 95% CI 0.45-0.71, p < 0.001) and preterm birth (AOR 0.68 per 50 cells/mm3 increase, 95% CI 0.55-0.85, p = 0.001). HAART exposure was associated with an increased preterm birth rate (15%, or 138 of 946, versus 5%, or seven of 147, in unexposed infants, p = 0.001), with early nevirapine and efavirenz-based regimens having the strongest associations with preterm birth (AOR 5.4, 95% CI 2.1-13.7, p < 0.001, and AOR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-15.2, p = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions In this immunocompromised cohort, in utero HAART exposure was not associated with low birth weight. An association between NNRTI-based HAART and preterm birth was detected, but residual confounding is plausible. More advanced immunosuppression was a risk

  6. Viraemia and HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, F; Biot, M; Roman, F; Masquelier, C; Anapenge, M; Bastos, R; Chuquela, H C; Arendt, V; Schmit, J C; Zachariah, R

    2009-06-01

    This study was conducted among individuals taking first-line antiretroviral treatment (ART) for at least 12 months under programme conditions in Maputo, Mozambique in order to report on the level of detectable viraemia and the proportion and types of drug resistance mutations among those with detectable viral loads. HIV-1 RNA viral load levels (lower detection limit <50 copies/ml) were measured, and resistance mutations were sequenced. One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients (69% females, median age 36 years) were included after a mean follow-up time of 23 months. One hundred and seven (72%; 95% CI 64-79) had undetectable viral load, while in 42 (28%, 95% CI 21-36) viral load was detectable (range 50-58884 copies/ml). From 15 patients with viral load >1000 copies/ml, 12 viruses were sequenced: eight were C subtypes and four were circulating recombinant forms (CRF08). Eight (5%; 95% CI 2-9) patients with detectable viral load had one or more major resistance mutations. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and non-NRTI mutations were observed. There were no major mutations for resistance to protease inhibitors. In Maputo, the level of detectable viraemia is reassuringly low. While embarking on ART scale-up, wider surveillance is warranted to monitor programme quality and limit the development of drug resistance, which remains a major potential challenge for the future of ART in Africa. PMID:18804251

  7. HLA Immunogenotype Determines Persistent Human Papillomavirus Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Meys, Rhonda; Purdie, Karin J; de Koning, Maurits N C; Quint, Koen D; Little, Ann-Margaret; Baker, Finnuala; Francis, Nick; Asboe, David; Hawkins, David; Marsh, Steven G E; Harwood, Catherine A; Gotch, Frances M; Bunker, Christopher B

    2016-06-01

    A proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients develop persistent, stigmatizing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cutaneous and genital warts and anogenital (pre)cancer. This is the first study to investigate immunogenetic variations that might account for HPV susceptibility and the largest to date to categorize the HPV types associated with cutaneous warts in HIV-positive patients. The HLA class I and II allele distribution was analyzed in 49 antiretroviral (ART)-treated HIV-positive patients with persistent warts, 42 noninfected controls, and 46 HIV-positive controls. The allele HLA-B*44 was more frequently identified in HIV-positive patients with warts (P = .004); a susceptible haplotype (HLA-B*44, HLA-C*05; P = .001) and protective genes (HLA-DQB1*06; P = .03) may also contribute. Cutaneous wart biopsy specimens from HIV-positive patients harbored common wart types HPV27/57, the unusual wart type HPV7, and an excess of Betapapillomavirus types (P = .002), compared with wart specimens from noninfected controls. These findings suggest that HLA testing might assist in stratifying those patients in whom vaccination should be recommended. PMID:26908737

  8. Marital sex among people living with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Le Coeur, Sophie; Bozon, Michel; Lelièvre, Eva; Sirijitraporn, Preecha; Pipustanawong, Narongdate; Cowatcharagul, Worawut; Pattanapornpun, Nopporn

    2014-01-01

    Before the advent of effective antiretroviral treatment (ART), the sexuality of people living with HIV was mostly discussed in terms of risk. To assess the extent to which ART allows people living with HIV to regain a regular sexual life, we surveyed all HIV-infected people treated in four hospitals in Northern Thailand and a control group from the general population matched by sex, age and residence. Data included socio-demographic and health characteristics, frequency of sexual intercourse in the last month and condom use. Our findings indicate that people living with HIV less often live in steady partnership (50% of the HIV-infected people versus 79% of the controls). After adjusting for factors known to influence sexuality, their probability of being sexually active was estimated to be about half that of the controls. When sexually active, men had a reduced sexual activity compared to controls (2.8 intercourse in the last month versus 4.0), while levels of reported sexual activity were similar among women (2.2 versus 2.8, respectively). Consistent condom use was high among people living with HIV (66% for women and 70% for men). PMID:24960032

  9. Estimated mortality of adult HIV-infected patients starting treatment with combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yiannoutsos, Constantin Theodore; Johnson, Leigh Francis; Boulle, Andrew; Musick, Beverly Sue; Gsponer, Thomas; Balestre, Eric; Law, Matthew; Shepherd, Bryan E; Egger, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Objective To provide estimates of mortality among HIV-infected patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods We report on the death rates from 122 925 adult HIV-infected patients aged 15 years or older from East, Southern and West Africa, Asia Pacific and Latin America. We use two methods to adjust for biases in mortality estimation resulting from loss from follow-up, based on double-sampling methods applied to patient outreach (Kenya) and linkage with vital registries (South Africa), and apply these to mortality estimates in the other three regions. Age, gender and CD4 count at the initiation of therapy were the factors considered as predictors of mortality at 6, 12, 24 and >24 months after the start of treatment. Results Patient mortality was high during the first 6 months after therapy for all patient subgroups and exceeded 40 per 100 patient years among patients who started treatment at low CD4 count. This trend was seen regardless of region, demographic or disease-related risk factor. Mortality was under-reported by up to or exceeding 100% when comparing estimates obtained from passive monitoring of patient vital status. Conclusions Despite advances in antiretroviral treatment coverage many patients start treatment at very low CD4 counts and experience significant mortality during the first 6 months after treatment initiation. Active patient tracing and linkage with vital registries are critical in adjusting estimates of mortality, particularly in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:23172344

  10. Medical eligibility, contraceptive choice, and intrauterine device acceptance among HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Lisa B.; Feldacker, Caryl; Jamieson, Denise J.; Tweya, Hannock; Cwiak, Carrie; Bryant, Amy G.; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Chaweza, Thomas; Mlundira, Linly; Kachale, Fanny; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Hoffman, Irving; Phiri, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine medical eligibility for contraceptive use, contraceptive preference, and acceptance of a copper intrauterine device (IUD) among a cohort of HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods All HIV-infected women who received ART and sought contraceptive services at the Lighthouse clinic, an integrated HIV/ART clinic in Lilongwe, Malawi, between August and December 2010 were invited to participate in a structured interview. Eligibility and preference for the following contraceptive methods were assessed: combined hormonal contraceptives, progestogen-only pills, copper IUD, injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), and contraceptive implants. Results The final sample included 281 women; five were pregnant. The remaining 276 women were eligible for at least three contraceptive methods, with 242 (87.7%) eligible for all five methods evaluated. After counseling, 163 (58.0%) selected DMPA and 98 (34.9%) selected an IUD as their preferred contraceptive method. Regardless of their method of choice, 222 (79.0%) women agreed to have an IUD placed on the same day. Conclusion Most methods of contraception are safe for use by HIV-infected women. Approximately 80% of the women were willing to receive an IUD. Efforts must be made to increase education about, and access to, long-acting reversible methods that may be acceptable and appropriate contraceptive options for HIV-infected women. PMID:24890746

  11. Global Challenges in the Development and Delivery of Paediatric Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Asha; Palasanthiran, Pamela; Sohn, Annette H.

    2008-01-01

    By the end of 2006, compared with 28% coverage for adults, only 15% of children with HIV who needed antiretroviral treatment were receiving it. Major challenges in delivering treatment include the lack of paediatric antiretrovirals that can be dosed in small children and limited studies examining safety and efficacy for existing antiretroviral formulations. The high costs of treatment have been reduced through the use of generic, fixed-dose combination drugs. Evidence-based strategies for managing resistance and the scale-up of pharmacological trials for children in low- and middle-income countries are critical to the success and future development of paediatric antiretrovirals. PMID:18549980

  12. [Perception of pain by patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in North Kivu, DR Congo].

    PubMed

    Escoffier, Claire; Kambale, Alain; Paluku, Faustin; Kabuayi, Jean-Pierre; Boillot, François

    2010-01-01

    This operational research conducted among TB patients co-infected with HIV in North Kivu had three objectives: (i) to clarify the local perception of a certain type of pain (michi in the local language) in patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART); (ii) to identify the attitudes of health care personnel regarding the management of ART side effects; and (iii) to explore ways to improve the quality of life of patients on ART and provide them with pain relief. Twenty in-depth interviews were conducted with patients on ART and their medical care providers in district health centers of North-Kivu and at patients' homes. A semantic analysis of the term michi revealed a nosologic folk entity based on a naturalistic view of the body; the term michi is used to name: (i) the "roots" of plants or trees; (ii) channels (veins, arteries, but also nerves and tendons) in the body through which fluids (blood, water) and energy are conveyed; (iii) different types of acute pain, possibly located along these channels. The description (location, duration, and intensity) of the functional signs and the context of their occurrence (while taking Stavudine) confirmed the medical diagnosis of acute sensory neuropathies. Although a classic ART side effect, neuropathies are underdiagnosed by health workers who find it difficult to recognize signs of treatment toxicity in apparently trivial symptoms. Different reasons account for this: (i) healthcare staff have little time to spend with TB/HIV patients and thus provide inadequate management of functional symptoms; (ii) insufficient attention is paid to patients' acute pain, which is often perceived as "normal"; (iii) insufficient knowledge of ART side effects due to staff turnover higher than the frequency of training that programmes. The study was conducted as part of the DR Congo national programmes for TB and AIDS and led to the formulation of recommendations about improving, especially through training, the assessment of functional

  13. Immunogenicity, Immunologic Memory, and Safety Following Measles Revaccination in HIV-Infected Children Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abzug, Mark J.; Qin, Min; Levin, Myron J.; Fenton, Terence; Beeler, Judy A.; Bellini, William J.; Audet, Susette; Sowers, Sun Bae; Borkowsky, William; Nachman, Sharon A.; Pelton, Stephen I.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Response rates and immunologic memory following measles vaccination are reduced in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected children in the absence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods. HIV-infected children 2 to <19 years old receiving HAART and with HIV loads <30 000 copies/mL, CD4% ≥15, and ≥1 prior measles-mumps-rubella vaccination (MMR) were given another MMR. Measles antibody concentrations before and 8, 32, and 80 weeks postvaccination were determined by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN). A subset was given another MMR 4–5 years later, and PRN antibody was measured before and 7 and 28 days later. Results. At entry, 52% of 193 subjects were seroprotected (PRN ≥120 mIU/mL). Seroprotection increased to 89% 8 weeks postvaccination, and remained at 80% 80 weeks postvaccination. Of 65 subjects revaccinated 4–5 years later, 85% demonstrated memory based on seroprotection before or 7 days after vaccination. HIV load ≤400 copies/mL at initial study vaccination was associated with higher seroprotection rates, greater antibody concentrations, and memory. Grade 3 fever or fatigue occurred in 2% of subjects. Conclusions. Measles revaccination induced high rates of seroprotection and memory in children receiving HAART. Both endpoints were associated with HIV viral load suppression. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT00013871 (www.clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:22693229

  14. Immunogenicity and Immunologic Memory after Hepatitis B Virus Booster Vaccination in HIV-Infected Children Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abzug, Mark J.; Warshaw, Meredith; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Levin, Myron J.; Nachman, Sharon A.; Pelton, Stephen I.; Borkowsky, William; Fenton, Terence

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important cause of comorbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals. The immunogenicity of HBV vaccination in children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was investigated. Methods HIV-infected children receiving HAART who had low to moderate HIV loads and who had previously received ≥3 doses of HBV vaccine were given an HBV vaccine booster. Concentrations of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) were determined before vaccination and at weeks 8, 48, and 96. A subset of subjects was administered a subsequent dose, and anti-HBs was measured before and 1 and 4 weeks later. Results At entry, 24% of 204 subjects were seropositive. Vaccine response occurred in 46% on the basis of seropositivity 8 weeks after vaccination and in 37% on the basis of a ≥4-fold rise in antibody concentration. Of 69 subjects given another vaccination 4–5 years later, immunologic memory was exhibited by 45% on the basis of seropositivity 1 week after vaccination and by 29% on the basis of a ≥4-fold rise in antibody concentration at 1 week. Predictors of response and memory included higher nadir and current CD4 cell percentage, higher CD19 cell percentage, and undetectable HIV load. Conclusions HIV-infected children frequently lack protective levels of anti-HBs after previous HBV vaccination, and a significant proportion of them do not respond to booster vaccination or demonstrate memory despite receiving HAART, leaving this population insufficiently protected from infection with HBV. PMID:19663708

  15. Community-Based Accompaniment Mitigates Predictors of Negative Outcomes for Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neil; Munyaburanga, Christian; Mutagoma, Mwumvaneza; Niyigena, John W; Kayigamba, Felix; Franke, Molly F; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany

    2016-05-01

    Clinical, socioeconomic, and access barriers remain a critical problem to antiretroviral (ART) programs in sub-Saharan Africa. Community-based accompaniment (CBA), including daily home visits and psychosocial and socioeconomic support, has been associated with improved patient outcomes at 1 year. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 578 HIV-infected adults initiating ART in 2007-2008 with or without CBA in rural Rwanda. Among patients without CBA, those with advanced HIV disease, low CD4 cell counts, lower social support, and transport costs had significantly higher odds of negative outcomes at 1 year; amongst patients who received CBA, only those with low CD4 cell counts had significantly higher odds of negative outcomes at 1 year. CBA also significantly mitigated the effect of transport costs and inaccessibility of services on the likelihood of negative outcome. CBA may be one approach to mitigating known risk factors for negative outcomes for patients on ART in resource-poor settings. PMID:26346334

  16. Plasma Sclerostin in HIV-Infected Adults on Effective Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Kristine M; O'Riordan, MaryAnn; Hileman, Corrilynn O; Rapaport, Eric; Labbato, Danielle; Campbell, Thomas B; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-07-01

    Sclerostin is linked to bone physiology and cardiovascular disease through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The goal of this study was to determine if sclerostin is related to bone physiology and cardiovascular disease during antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected persons. This was a cross-sectional analysis from study entry into the Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy bone with RosuvastatiN in HIV (SATURN) trial, an ongoing randomized trial comparing rosuvastatin to placebo in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy. Plasma sclerostin was measured at study entry by ELISA from participants with available samples. Spearman correlation and multivariable linear regression were used to test relationships between sclerostin and bone density or bone turnover and cardiovascular disease. Among 139 HIV-infected participants (median age 46 years, CD4 lymphocyte count 614 cells/μl), the median plasma sclerostin level was 444.1 (IQR 330.3, 570.1) pg/ml. Correlations were detected between sclerostin and age (r=0.26), lumbar spine Z-score (r=0.31), RANKL (r=-0.21), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, r=0.19), and sVCAM-1 (r=0.27), p<0.05. No significant correlations were detected between sclerostin and current (r=0.006) or nadir CD4 count (r=0.11). While associations between sclerostin, lumbar spine Z-score, and sVCAM-1 were robust to covariate adjustment (p<0.01), association with CIMT was no longer significant (p=0.08). Our findings provide preliminary support for a relationship between sclerostin and bone mineral density in HIV-infected persons. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway should be investigated as a potential mechanism for loss of bone mineral density in treated HIV infection. PMID:25919636

  17. Plasma Sclerostin in HIV-Infected Adults on Effective Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    O'Riordan, MaryAnn; Hileman, Corrilynn O.; Rapaport, Eric; Labbato, Danielle; Campbell, Thomas B.; McComsey, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sclerostin is linked to bone physiology and cardiovascular disease through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The goal of this study was to determine if sclerostin is related to bone physiology and cardiovascular disease during antiretroviral treatment in HIV-infected persons. This was a cross-sectional analysis from study entry into the Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy bone with RosuvastatiN in HIV (SATURN) trial, an ongoing randomized trial comparing rosuvastatin to placebo in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy. Plasma sclerostin was measured at study entry by ELISA from participants with available samples. Spearman correlation and multivariable linear regression were used to test relationships between sclerostin and bone density or bone turnover and cardiovascular disease. Among 139 HIV-infected participants (median age 46 years, CD4 lymphocyte count 614 cells/μl), the median plasma sclerostin level was 444.1 (IQR 330.3, 570.1) pg/ml. Correlations were detected between sclerostin and age (r=0.26), lumbar spine Z-score (r=0.31), RANKL (r=−0.21), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, r=0.19), and sVCAM-1 (r=0.27), p<0.05. No significant correlations were detected between sclerostin and current (r=0.006) or nadir CD4 count (r=0.11). While associations between sclerostin, lumbar spine Z-score, and sVCAM-1 were robust to covariate adjustment (p<0.01), association with CIMT was no longer significant (p=0.08). Our findings provide preliminary support for a relationship between sclerostin and bone mineral density in HIV-infected persons. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway should be investigated as a potential mechanism for loss of bone mineral density in treated HIV infection. PMID:25919636

  18. HIV-seropositivity is not important in childbearing decision-making among HIV-positive Ghanaian women receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Laar, Amos K; Taylor, Araba E; Akasoe, Bismark A

    2015-01-01

    Women in their reproductive years make up about 50% of all HIV-positive persons globally. These women, just as their HIV-negative counterparts, wield the right to procreate. However, HIV infection and lack of appropriate information on reproductive options may negatively impact women's procreative decision-making. This study assessed fertility intentions of HIV-positive women receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in southern Ghana. Quantitative methods were used to collect data from HIV-positive women receiving ART at four treatment centers. HIV-positive aged 18-49 years, and receiving ART were selected using systematic random sampling technique. Three hundred eighteen women were interviewed after informed consent. We used univariate analysis to generate descriptive tabulations for key variables. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression modeling respectively produced unadjusted and adjusted associations between background attributes of respondents and their childbearing decision-making. All analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 20.0. Irrespective of age, reproductive history, and duration of HIV diagnosis, 46% of the women were desirous of procreating. The bivariate level analysis shows that women in their late reproductive ages (30-39 years) had the strongest desire to procreate (p < 0.001). After controlling for a number of covariates, primiparous and secundiparious women were about twice as likely to desire children (aOR = 2.553; 95% CI 1.480-4.401), and so were women aged 30-39 years (aOR = 2.149; 95% CI 1.202-3.843). Of 54% women who do not wish to procreate, achievement of desired family size (64.3%) was more popular a reason than fear of vertical transmission of HIV (7.5%), poor health status (5%), and pregnancy-related complications (1.6%). PMID:25650646

  19. Changing Antiretroviral Eligibility Criteria: Impact on the Number and Proportion of Adults Requiring Treatment in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Ruth C.; Reed, Jason B.; Nkambule, Rejoice; Donnell, Deborah J.; Bicego, George T.; Okello, Velephi; Philip, Neena M.; Ehrenkranz, Peter D.; Duong, Yen T.; Moore, Janet S.; Justman, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) at CD4+ cell count ≥500 cells per microliter reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected adults. We determined the proportion of HIV-infected people with high viral load (VL) for whom transmission prevention would be an additional benefit of early treatment. Design: A randomly selected subset of a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults in Swaziland in 2012. Methods: Eight to 12 months after a national survey to determine adult HIV prevalence, 1067 of 5802 individuals identified as HIV-infected were asked to participate in a follow-up cross-sectional assessment. CD4+ cell enumeration, VL measurements, and ART status were obtained to estimate the proportion of currently untreated adults and of the entire HIV-infected population with high VL (≥1000 copies/mL) whose treatment under a test-and-treat or VL threshold eligibility strategy would reduce HIV transmission. Results: Of the 927 (87% of 1067) participants enrolled, 466 (50%) reported no ART use. Among them, 424 (91%) had VL ≥1000 copies per milliliter; of these, 148 (35%) were eligible for ART at the then existing CD4+ count threshold of <350 cells per microliter; an additional 107 (25%) were eligible with expanded CD4+ criterion of <500 cells per microliter; and 169 (40%) remained ART ineligible. Thus, 36% of the 466 currently untreated and 18% of the total 927 had high VL yet remained ART ineligible under a CD4+ criterion of <500 cells per microliter. Conclusions: A test-and-treat or VL threshold for treatment eligibility is necessary to maximize the HIV transmission prevention benefits of ART. PMID:26361174

  20. Differences in Salivary Flow Level, Xerostomia, and Flavor Alteration in Mexican HIV Patients Who Did or Did Not Receive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    López-Verdín, Sandra; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Zamora-Perez, Ana Lourdes; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Cervantes-Cabrera, José Justino; Molina-Frechero, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Objective and subjective alterations related to salivary flow have been reported in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and these alterations are associated with the introduction of antiretroviral therapy. The aim of the current study was to discern whether these alterations are disease induced or secondary to drug therapy. Objective. The objective was to determine the relationships between low salivary flow, xerostomia, and flavor alterations in HIV patients who did or did not receive antiretroviral therapy. Materials and Methods. In this cross-sectional study, HIV patients were divided into two groups based on whether they had received antiretroviral therapy. Those patients with a previous diagnosis of any salivary gland disease were excluded. A survey was used to assess subjective variables, and colorimetry and salivary flow rates were measured using the Schirmer global test. Results. A total of 293 patients were included. The therapy group showed a significantly lower average salivary flow than did the group without therapy, and we observed that the flow rate tended to decrease after one year of therapy. The results were not conclusive, despite significant differences in xerostomia and flavor alteration between the groups. Conclusion. The study results suggest that antiretroviral therapy can cause cumulative damage that affects the amount of salivary flow. PMID:24455222

  1. Differences in Salivary Flow Level, Xerostomia, and Flavor Alteration in Mexican HIV Patients Who Did or Did Not Receive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    López-Verdín, Sandra; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Zamora-Perez, Ana Lourdes; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Cervantes-Cabrera, José Justino

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Objective and subjective alterations related to salivary flow have been reported in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and these alterations are associated with the introduction of antiretroviral therapy. The aim of the current study was to discern whether these alterations are disease induced or secondary to drug therapy. Objective. The objective was to determine the relationships between low salivary flow, xerostomia, and flavor alterations in HIV patients who did or did not receive antiretroviral therapy. Materials and Methods. In this cross-sectional study, HIV patients were divided into two groups based on whether they had received antiretroviral therapy. Those patients with a previous diagnosis of any salivary gland disease were excluded. A survey was used to assess subjective variables, and colorimetry and salivary flow rates were measured using the Schirmer global test. Results. A total of 293 patients were included. The therapy group showed a significantly lower average salivary flow than did the group without therapy, and we observed that the flow rate tended to decrease after one year of therapy. The results were not conclusive, despite significant differences in xerostomia and flavor alteration between the groups. Conclusion. The study results suggest that antiretroviral therapy can cause cumulative damage that affects the amount of salivary flow. PMID:24455222

  2. HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Susan M.; Mahlase, Gethwana; MacDonald, Susan; Christie, Sarah; Cornman, Deborah H.; Fisher, William A.; Greener, Ross; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Pillay, Sandy; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to identify factors associated with HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-positive women and men receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Across 16 clinics, 1,890 HIV+ patients on ART completed a risk-focused audio computer-assisted self-interview upon enrolling in a prevention-with-positives intervention trial. Results demonstrated that 62 % of HIV-positive patients’ recent unprotected sexual acts involved HIV-negative or HIV status unknown partners. For HIV-positive women, multivariable correlates of unprotected sex with HIV-negative or HIV status unknown partners were indicative of poor HIV prevention-related information and of sexual partnership-associated behavioral skills barriers. For HIV-positive men, multivariable correlates represented motivational barriers, characterized by negative condom attitudes and the experience of depressive symptomatology, as well as possible underlying information deficits. Findings suggest that interventions addressing gender-specific and culturally-relevant information, motivation, and behavioral skills barriers could help reduce HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-positive South Africans. PMID:24158486

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention of Tuberculosis in Adults with HIV: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suthar, Amitabh B.; Lawn, Stephen D.; del Amo, Julia; Getahun, Haileyesus; Dye, Christopher; Sculier, Delphine; Sterling, Timothy R.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Williams, Brian G.; Harries, Anthony D.; Granich, Reuben M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is the strongest risk factor for developing tuberculosis and has fuelled its resurgence, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2010, there were an estimated 1.1 million incident cases of tuberculosis among the 34 million people living with HIV worldwide. Antiretroviral therapy has substantial potential to prevent HIV-associated tuberculosis. We conducted a systematic review of studies that analysed the impact of antiretroviral therapy on the incidence of tuberculosis in adults with HIV infection. Methods and Findings PubMed, Embase, African Index Medicus, LILACS, and clinical trial registries were systematically searched. Randomised controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, and retrospective cohort studies were included if they compared tuberculosis incidence by antiretroviral therapy status in HIV-infected adults for a median of over 6 mo in developing countries. For the meta-analyses there were four categories based on CD4 counts at antiretroviral therapy initiation: (1) less than 200 cells/µl, (2) 200 to 350 cells/µl, (3) greater than 350 cells/µl, and (4) any CD4 count. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with a reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis in all baseline CD4 count categories: (1) less than 200 cells/µl (hazard ratio [HR] 0.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07 to 0.36), (2) 200 to 350 cells/µl (HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.60), (3) greater than 350 cells/µl (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.63), and (4) any CD4 count (HR 0.35, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.44). There was no evidence of hazard ratio modification with respect to baseline CD4 count category (p = 0.20). Conclusions Antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with a reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis across all CD4 count strata. Earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy may be a key component of global and national strategies to control the HIV-associated tuberculosis

  5. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  6. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  7. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  8. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  9. Differences between self-reported and electronically monitored adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Siripong, Nalyn; Vreeman, Rachel C.; Pop-Eleches, Cristian; Habyarimana, James P.; Sidle, John E.; Siika, Abraham M.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurement of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient self-report is common in resource-limited settings but widely believed to overstate actual adherence. The extent to which these measures overstate adherence has not been examined among a large patient population. Methods HIV-infected adult patients in Kenya who initiated ART within the past 3 months were followed for 6 months. Adherence was measured by participants’ self-reports of doses missed in the past 7 days during monthly clinic visits and by continuous Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) in participants’ pill bottles. Seven-day self-reported adherence was compared to 7-day MEMS adherence, 30-day MEMS adherence, and adherence more than 90% during each of the first 6 months. Results Self-reported and MEMS adherence measures were linked for 669 participants. Mean 7-day self-reported adherence was 98.7% and mean 7-day MEMS adherence was 86.0%, a difference of 12.7% (P <0.01). The difference between the two adherence measures increased over time due to a decline in 7-day MEMS adherence. However, patients with lower MEMS adherence were in fact more likely to self-report missed doses and the difference between self-reported and MEMS adherence was similar for each number of self-reported missed doses. When analysis was limited to patients who reported rarely or never removing multiple doses at the same time, mean difference was 10.5% (P <0.01). Conclusion There is a sizable and significant difference between self-reported and MEMS adherence. However, a strong relationship between the measures suggests that self-reported adherence is informative for clinical monitoring and program evaluation. PMID:22948266

  10. Correlates of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Mahoney, Christine; Catz, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-infected older African Americans experience higher mortality rates compared to their white counterparts. This disparity may be partly attributable to the differences in ART adherence by different racial and gender groups. The purpose of this study was to describe demographic, psychosocial, and HIV disease-related factors that influence ART adherence and to determine whether race and gender impact ART adherence among HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older. Methods This descriptive study involved a secondary analysis of baseline data from 426 participants in “PRIME,” a telephone-based ART adherence and quality-of-life intervention trial. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between independent variables and ART adherence. Results Higher annual income and increased self-efficacy were associated with being ≥95% ART adherent. Race and gender were not associated with ART adherence. Conclusion These findings indicated that improvements in self-efficacy for taking ART may be an effective strategy to improve adherence regardless of race or gender. PMID:27071744

  11. High Treatment Retention Rate in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy at Two Large HIV Clinics in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Shoko; Tanuma, Junko; Mizushima, Daisuke; Nguyen, Ngoc Chi Thi; Pham, Thanh Thuy Thi; Do, Cuong Duy; Nguyen, Tuan Quang; Nguyen, Dung Thi; Nguyen, Hoai Dung Thi; Nguyen, Lam Tien; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss to follow-up (LTFU) is viewed as a major challenge in improving retention in HIV treatment. In Vietnam, the reasons for disengagement from clinics and the effect of injection drug use (IDU) on LTFU with unknown outcome (true LTFU) are not well known. Methods Patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from two HIV clinics in Hanoi were included in this observational study between 2007 and 2012, and followed up every 6 months until the end of 2013. The reasons for disengagement from the clinic, and ART status during imprisonment were investigated in patients with a history of IDU to identify true LTFU. The retention rate at 6–54 months and true LTFU rate were calculated. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to identify factors associated with true LTFU. Results There were 1,431 patients, with a follow-up time of 4,371 person-years (median 2.49 years). At the end of the follow-up period, 71 (5.0%) patients died, 79 (5.5%) transferred to other clinics, 16 (1.1%) disengaged from the clinics, and the calculated true LTFU was 45 (3.1%), with 12-month ART retention rate of 95.3% for the entire study population. Imprisonment was the most frequent reason for disengagement from the clinics. True LTFU correlated significantly with low CD4 count and high plasma viral load, but not history of IDU. Conclusion Imprisonment is a major cause of disengagement from HIV care among patients with a history of IDU. PMID:26422474

  12. Vitamin E Concentrations in Adults with HIV/AIDS on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaio, Daniella J. Itinoseki; Rondó, Patricia Helen C.; Luzia, Liania Alves; Souza, José Maria P.; Firmino, Aline Vale; Santos, Sigrid Sousa

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS patients are probably more predisposed to vitamin E deficiency, considering that they are more exposed to oxidative stress. Additionally, there are an extensive number of drugs in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens that may interfere with vitamin E concentrations. The objective of this study was to compare serum concentrations of alpha-tocopherol in 182 HIV/AIDS patients receiving different HAART regimens. The patients were divided into three groups according to regimen: nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) + non-nucleoside analog reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs); NRTIs + protease inhibitors + ritonavir; NRTIs + other classes. Alpha-tocopherol was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of HAART regimen, time of use, and compliance with the regimen on alpha-tocopherol concentrations. Alpha-tocopherol concentrations were on average 4.12 μmol/L lower for the NRTIs + other classes regimen when compared to the NRTIs + NNRTIs regimen (p = 0.037). A positive association (p < 0.001) was observed between alpha-tocopherol and cholesterol concentrations, a finding due, in part, to the relationship between liposoluble vitamins and lipid profile. This study demonstrated differences in alpha-tocopherol concentrations between patients using different HAART regimens, especially regimens involving the use of new drugs. Long-term prospective cohort studies are needed to monitor vitamin E status in HIV/AIDS patients since the beginning of treatment. PMID:25225815

  13. Association of Blood Biomarkers of Bone Turnover in HIV-1 Infected Individuals Receiving Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART)

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Butch, Anthony W; Quint, Joshua J; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of bone turnover biomarkers with blood levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and other blood markers in HIV-1 infected men receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Advances in the treatment of HIV-1 infection have extended the life span of HIV-1 infected individuals. However, these advances may come at the price of metabolic side effects and bone disorders, including premature osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Methods Analyses of Ostase BAP, osteocalcin, and TRAP in blood were measured in three groups of MACS participants: 35 HIV-1 infected men on ART (A); 35 HIV-1- infected men not on ART (B); and 34 HIV-1 uninfected men (C). Results The mean and standard deviation results for groups A, B, and C were 19.7 ± 6.56, 17.2 ± 3.96, and 16.9 ± 5.78 for ostase BAP; 7.9 ± 9.53, 8.5 ± 8.30, and 5.5 ± 1.65 for osteocalcin; and 3.9 ± 1.04, 3.1 ± 0.81, and 2.5 ± 0.59 for TRAP, respectively. Simple and multivariate analyses showed significant differences in mean TRAP and BAP concentrations between the three groups. In addition strong correlations between blood levels of Ostase BAP and TRAP (r=0.570, p=0.0004), and between blood levels of Ostase BAP and PTH (r=0.436, P=0.0098) for HIV-1 infected men on ART were observed. Conclusion New strategies for measurement of blood and urine biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption during bone turnover can be useful for clinical monitoring of treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Recently developed methods for measuring serum levels of TRAP and Ostase BAP represent superior laboratory tools for assessing the hyperactivity of osteoclasts, osteoblasts and bone loss in HIV-1 infected individuals receiving ART. Measurements of TRAP and BAP as bone turnover biomarkers are economical and are important for monitoring bone metabolism during ART and

  14. Incomplete adherence among treatment-experienced adults on antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Julie A.; Koole, Olivier; Tsui, Sharon; Menten, Joris; Torpey, Kwasi; van Praag, Eric; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Colebunders, Robert; Auld, Andrew F.; Agolory, Simon; Kaplan, Jonathan E.; Mulenga, Modest; Kwesigabo, Gideon P.; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Bangsberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence across different programmes and examine the relationship between individual and programme characteristics and incomplete adherence among ART clients in sub-Saharan Africa. Design A cross-sectional study. Methods Systematically selected ART clients (≥18 years; on ART ≥6 months) attending 18 facilities in three countries (250 clients/facility) were interviewed. Client self-reports (3-day, 30-day, Case Index ≥48 consecutive hours of missed ART), healthcare provider estimates and the pharmacy medication possession ratio (MPR) were used to estimate ART adherence. Participants from two facilities per country underwent HIV RNA testing. Optimal adherence measures were selected on the basis of degree of association with concurrent HIV RNA dichotomized at less than or greater/equal to 1000 copies/ml. Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for site-level clustering, assessed associations between incomplete adherence and individual and programme factors. Results A total of 4489 participants were included, of whom 1498 underwent HIV RNA testing. Nonadherence ranged from 3.2% missing at least 48 consecutive hours to 40.1% having an MPR of less than 90%. The percentage with HIV RNA at least 1000 copies/ml ranged from 7.2 to 17.2% across study sites (mean = 9.9%). Having at least 48 consecutive hours of missed ART was the adherence measure most strongly related to virologic failure. Factors significantly related to incomplete adherence included visiting a traditional healer, screening positive for alcohol abuse, experiencing more HIV symptoms, having an ART regimen without nevirapine and greater levels of internalized stigma. Conclusion Results support more in-depth investigations of the role of traditional healers, and the development of interventions to address alcohol abuse and internalized stigma among treatment-experienced adult ART patients. PMID:25686684

  15. Persistence of measles, mumps, and rubella protective antibodies 3 years after revaccination in HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Aurpibul, Linda; Puthanakit, Thanyawee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sirisanthana, Virat

    2010-05-15

    Three years after measles, mumps, and rubella revaccination in 38 human immunodeficiency virus-infected children who had achieved immune recovery after antiretroviral therapy, the prevalence of protective antibody levels was 85% for measles, 61% for mumps, and 79% for rubella, compared with 88%, 84%, and 100%, respectively, 1 month after revaccination. PMID:20377409

  16. Thirty-Day Postoperative Mortality Among Individuals With HIV Infection Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy and Procedure-Matched, Uninfected Comparators

    PubMed Central

    King, Joseph T.; Perkal, Melissa F.; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Gordon, Adam J.; Crystal, Stephen; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Rimland, David; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Justice, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has converted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic condition, and patients now undergo a variety of surgical procedures, but current surgical outcomes are inadequately characterized. OBJECTIVE To compare 30-day postoperative mortality in patients with HIV infection receiving ART with the rates in uninfected individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective analysis of nationwide electronic medical record data from the US Veterans Health Administration Healthcare System, October 1, 1996, to September 30, 2010. Common inpatient surgical procedures were grouped using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Clinical Classification System to match HIV-infected and uninfected patients in a 1:2 ratio. Data on 1641 patients with HIV infection receiving combination ART who were undergoing inpatient surgery were compared with data on 3282 procedure-matched, uninfected comparators. Poisson regression models of 30-day postoperative mortality were adjusted for procedure year, age, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, hemoglobin level, albumin level, HIV infection, CD4 cell count, and HIV-1 RNA level. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All-cause 30-day postoperative mortality. RESULTS The most common procedures in both groups were cholecystectomy (10.5%), hip arthroplasty (10.5%), spine surgery (9.8%), herniorrhaphy (7.4%), and coronary artery bypass grafting (7.0%). In patients with HIV infection, CD4 cell distributions were 80.0% with 200/µL or more, 16.3% with 50/µL to 199/µL, and 3.7% with less than 50/µL; 74.1% of patients with HIV infection had undetectable HIV-1 RNA. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was associated with higher 30-day postoperative mortality compared with the mortality in uninfected patients (3.4% [56 patients]) vs 1.6% [53]); incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.11; 95% CI, 1.41–3.17; P < .001). CD4 cell count was inversely associated with mortality, but HIV-1 RNA provided no

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Early Versus Standard Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Serena P.; Bang, Heejung; Severe, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Ambroise, Alex; Edwards, Alison; Hippolyte, Jessica; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; McGreevy, Jolion; Riviere, Cynthia; Marcelin, Serge; Secours, Rode; Johnson, Warren D.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a randomized clinical trial of early versus standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, early ART decreased mortality by 75%. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of early versus standard ART in this trial. Methods and Findings Trial data included use of ART and other medications, laboratory tests, outpatient visits, radiographic studies, procedures, and hospital services. Medication, laboratory, radiograph, labor, and overhead costs were from the study clinic, and hospital and procedure costs were from local providers. We evaluated cost per year of life saved (YLS), including patient and caregiver costs, with a median of 21 months and maximum of 36 months of follow-up, and with costs and life expectancy discounted at 3% per annum. Between 2005 and 2008, 816 participants were enrolled and followed for a median of 21 months. Mean total costs per patient during the trial were US$1,381 for early ART and US$1,033 for standard ART. After excluding research-related laboratory tests without clinical benefit, costs were US$1,158 (early ART) and US$979 (standard ART). Early ART patients had higher mean costs for ART (US$398 versus US$81) but lower costs for non-ART medications, CD4 cell counts, clinically indicated tests, and radiographs (US$275 versus US$384). The cost-effectiveness ratio after a maximum of 3 years for early versus standard ART was US$3,975/YLS (95% CI US$2,129/YLS–US$9,979/YLS) including research-related tests, and US$2,050/YLS excluding research-related tests (95% CI US$722/YLS–US$5,537/YLS). Conclusions Initiating ART in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, consistent with World Health Organization advice, was cost-effective (US$/YLS <3 times gross domestic product per capita) after a maximum of 3 years, after excluding research-related laboratory tests. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120510 Please see

  18. Combinations of Types of Mental Health Services Received in the Past Year Among Young Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... 08, 2015* Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults Combinations of types of mental health services received in the past year among young adults ...

  19. Positive Predictive Value of the WHO Clinical and Immunologic Criteria to Predict Viral Load Failure among Adults on First, or Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Muttai, Hellen; Ng’ang’a, Lucy; Ackers, Marta; Kim, Andrea; Miruka, Fredrick; Erick, Opiyo; Okonji, Julie; Ayuaya, Tolbert; Schwarcz, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Routine HIV viral load (VL) monitoring is the standard of care for persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developed countries. Although the World Health Organization recommends annual VL monitoring of patients on ART, recognizing difficulties in conducting routine VL testing, the WHO continues to recommend targeted VL testing to confirm treatment failure for persons who meet selected immunologic and clinical criteria. Studies have measured positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value, sensitivity and specificity of these criteria among patients receiving first-line ART but not specifically among those on second-line or subsequent regimens. Between 2008 and 2011, adult ART patients in Nyanza, Kenya who met national clinical or immunologic criteria for treatment failure received targeted VL testing. We calculated PPV and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of these criteria to detect virologic treatment failure among patients receiving a) first-line ART, b) second/subsequent ART, and c) any regimen. Of 12,134 patient specimens tested, 2,874 (23.7%) were virologically confirmed as treatment failures. The PPV for 2,834 first-line ART patients who met either the clinical or immunologic criteria for treatment failure was 34.4% (95% CI 33.2–35.7), 33.1% (95% CI 24.7–42.3) for the 40 patients on second-line/subsequent regimens, and 33.4% (95% CI 33.1–35.6) for any ART. PPV, regardless of criteria, for first-line ART patients was lowest among patients over 44 years old and highest for patients aged 15 to 34 years. PPV of immunological and clinical criteria for correctly identifying treatment failure was similarly low for adult patients receiving either first-line or second-line/subsequent ART regimens. Our data confirm the inadequacy of clinical and immunologic criteria to correctly identify treatment failure and support the implementation of routine VL testing. PMID:27383834

  20. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zheng, Yuhuang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Guoqiang; Chen, Xia; Mamadou, Diallo; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%). Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p<0.001) and persistently lower CD4(+) cell count (p<0.001) compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4(+) cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23434049

  1. Assisting the Adult Receiving Inhalation and Intravenous Therapy. Care of the Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Area Vocational Technical Inst., MN.

    These two units for students in a practical nursing program provide supplemental instruction in caring for adult patients receiving inhalation and intravenous therapy. Unit titles are The Administration of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing (IPPB RX) and Intravenous Therapy of Fluids and Blood. Each unit contains the following: objectives,…

  2. Atazanavir/ritonavir-based combination antiretroviral therapy for treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, Chad J; Darin, Kristin M; Murphy, Robert L; Katlama, Christine

    2011-02-01

    In the past 15 years, improvements in the management of HIV infection have dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality. Similarly, rapid advances in antiretroviral medications have resulted in the possibility of life-long therapy with simple and tolerable regimens. Protease inhibitors have been important medications in regimens of combination antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV. One of the recommended and commonly used therapies in this class is once-daily-administered atazanavir, pharmacologically boosted with ritonavir (atazanavir/r). Clinical studies and practice have shown these drugs, in combination with other antiretroviral agents, to be potent, safe and easy to use in a variety of settings. Atazanavir/r has minimal short-term toxicity, including benign bilirubin elevation, and has less potential for long-term complications of hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance compared with other protease inhibitors. A high genetic barrier to resistance and a favorable resistance profile make it an excellent option for initial HIV treatment or as the first drug utilized in the protease inhibitors class. Atazanavir/r is also currently being studied in novel treatment strategies, including combinations with new classes of antiretrovirals to assess nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimens. In this article we review atazanavir/r as a treatment for HIV infection and discuss the latest information on its pharmacology, efficacy and toxicity. PMID:21731578

  3. Atazanavir/ritonavir-based combination antiretroviral therapy for treatment of HIV-1 infection in adults

    PubMed Central

    Achenbach, Chad J; Darin, Kristin M; Murphy, Robert L; Katlama, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In the past 15 years, improvements in the management of HIV infection have dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality. Similarly, rapid advances in antiretroviral medications have resulted in the possibility of life-long therapy with simple and tolerable regimens. Protease inhibitors have been important medications in regimens of combination antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV. One of the recommended and commonly used therapies in this class is once-daily-administered atazanavir, pharmacologically boosted with ritonavir (atazanavir/r). Clinical studies and practice have shown these drugs, in combination with other antiretroviral agents, to be potent, safe and easy to use in a variety of settings. Atazanavir/r has minimal short-term toxicity, including benign bilirubin elevation, and has less potential for long-term complications of hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance compared with other protease inhibitors. A high genetic barrier to resistance and a favorable resistance profile make it an excellent option for initial HIV treatment or as the first drug utilized in the protease inhibitors class. Atazanavir/r is also currently being studied in novel treatment strategies, including combinations with new classes of antiretrovirals to assess nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing regimens. In this article we review atazanavir/r as a treatment for HIV infection and discuss the latest information on its pharmacology, efficacy and toxicity. PMID:21731578

  4. Access to antiretroviral therapy for adults and children with HIV infection in developing countries: Horizons studies, 2002-2008.

    PubMed

    Sarna, Avina; Kellerman, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Access-to-Treatment research initiative of the Population Council's Horizons program undertook 11 projects across Asia and sub-Saharan Africa from 2002 to 2008. The projects included a variety of cross-sectional exploratory studies, situation analyses, and longitudinal randomized, controlled intervention studies that examined service delivery, community awareness, health-seeking behaviors, adherence, cost, and other factors affecting treatment for adults and children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This article summarizes the key findings and lessons learned from these projects, and examines cross-cutting issues such as stigma, quality of life, and sexual-risk behaviors among people living with HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome on antiretroviral therapy. The article concludes with recommendations for evidence-based programming and future research around treatment for both children and adults. PMID:20297759

  5. Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Predict Sustained Quality of Life Deficits in HIV-Positive Ugandan Adults Despite Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ezeamama, Amara E; Woolfork, Makhabele N; Guwatudde, David; Bagenda, Danstan; Manabe, Yukari C; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of psychosocial status at onset of antiretroviral therapy on changes in quality of life (QOL) and subjectively rated health (SRH) among adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in resource-limited settings is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluate the association between stigma, anxiety, depression, and social support and change in QOL and SRH in HIV-infected Ugandan adults during an 18-month period. Psychosocial indicators were assessed at enrollment using structured questionnaires. QOL and SRH measures were assessed at months 0, 6, 12, and 18 using the Medical Outcomes Survey-HIV. Linear mixed models determined risk estimated differences in QOL and SRH in relation to quartiles of each psychosocial status indicator. Repeated measures generalized estimating equations modeling was implemented to assess differences in likelihood of improved versus nonimproved SRH during follow-up. QOL scores and SRH improved significantly for all participants over 18 months (P < 0.0001). The gain in QOL increased dose-dependently as baseline depressive symptoms (time∗depression P < 0.001) and anxiety levels (time∗anxiety P < 0.001) declined. Lower social support was associated with worse QOL at baseline (P = 0.0005) but QOL improvement during follow-up was not dependent on baseline level of social support (time∗social support P = 0.8943) or number of stigmatizing experiences (time∗stigma P = 0.8662). Psychosocial determinants did not predict changes in SRH in this study. High levels of depression and anxiety symptoms at HAART initiation predicts lower gains in QOL for HIV-positive patients for as long as 18 months. Long-term QOL improvements in HIV-infected adults may be enhanced by implementation of psychosocial interventions to reduce depression and anxiety in HIV-infected adults. PMID:26945347

  6. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  7. Failure to Restore the Vγ2-Jγ1.2 Repertoire in HIV-infected Men Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    Hebbeler, Andrew M.; Propp, Nadia; Cairo, Cristiana; Li, Haishan; Cummings, Jean Saville; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Pauza, C. David

    2008-01-01

    Gammadelta (γδ) T cells expressing the Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 (Vγ9-JPVδ2, alternate nomenclature) T cell receptor (TCR) constitute the major peripheral blood population of γδ T cells in adult humans and are specifically depleted during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 T cells provide a convenient model for assessing the impact of antiretroviral therapy on cell populations that are not susceptible to direct infection because they do not express CD4 and depletion occurs by indirect mechanisms. We obtained longitudinal PBMC samples from 16 HIV-infected individuals who were enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 T cells were depleted in these individuals as a result of HIV infection. Despite evidence for clinical benefits of HAART, the Vγ2-Jγ1.2Vδ2 T cell repertoire did not recover after HAART initiation irrespective of treatment duration. These studies highlight important defects among cell subsets lost due to indirect effects of HIV. PMID:18606571

  8. Supplementary feeding with either ready-to-use fortified spread or corn-soy blend in wasted adults starting antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: Randomised, Investigator Blinded, Controlled Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the effect of two different food supplements on body mass index (BMI) in wasted Malawian adults with HIV who were starting antiretroviral therapy. A randomised, investigator blinded, controlled trial was used in a large, public clinic associated with a referral hospital in Blantyre, M...

  9. Disease patterns and causes of death of hospitalized HIV-positive adults in West Africa: a multicountry survey in the antiretroviral treatment era

    PubMed Central

    Lewden, Charlotte; Drabo, Youssoufou J; Zannou, Djimon M; Maiga, Moussa Y; Minta, Daouda K; Sow, Papa S; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Dabis, François; Eholié, Serge P

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe the morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-positive adults hospitalized in West Africa. Method We conducted a six-month prospective multicentre survey within the IeDEA West Africa collaboration in six adult medical wards of teaching hospitals in Abidjan, Ouagadougou, Cotonou, Dakar and Bamako. From April to October 2010, all newly hospitalized HIV-positive patients were eligible. Baseline and follow-up information until hospital discharge was recorded using standardized forms. Diagnoses were reviewed by a local event validation committee using reference definitions. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were studied with a logistic regression model. Results Among 823 hospitalized HIV-positive adults (median age 40 years, 58% women), 24% discovered their HIV infection during the hospitalization, median CD4 count was 75/mm3 (IQR: 25–177) and 48% had previously received antiretroviral treatment (ART). The underlying causes of hospitalization were AIDS-defining conditions (54%), other infections (32%), other diseases (8%) and non-specific illness (6%). The most frequent diseases diagnosed were: tuberculosis (29%), pneumonia (15%), malaria (10%) and cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%). Overall, 315 (38%) patients died during hospitalization and the underlying cause of death was AIDS (63%), non-AIDS-defining infections (26%), other diseases (7%) and non-specific illness or unknown cause (4%). Among them, the most frequent fatal diseases were: tuberculosis (36%), cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%), cryptococcosis (9%) and sepsis (7%). Older age, clinical WHO stage 3 and 4, low CD4 count, and AIDS-defining infectious diagnoses were associated with hospital fatality. Conclusions AIDS-defining conditions, primarily tuberculosis, and bacterial infections were the most frequent causes of hospitalization in HIV-positive adults in West Africa and resulted in high in-hospital fatality. Sustained efforts are needed to integrate care of these disease

  10. Incidence of malaria by cotrimoxazole use in HIV-infected Ugandan adults on antiretroviral therapy: a randomised, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Ronnie P.; Baisley, Kathy; Munderi, Paula; Levin, Jonathan; Anywaine, Zacchaeus; Nunn, Andrew; Kamali, Anatoli; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Previous unblinded trials have shown increased malaria among HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who stop cotrimoxazole (CTX) prophylaxis. We investigated the effect of stopping CTX on malaria in HIV-infected adults on ART in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Methods: HIV-infected Ugandan adults stable on ART and CTX with CD4+ cell count at least 250 cells/μl were randomized (1 : 1) to continue CTX or stop CTX and receive matching placebo (COSTOP trial; ISRCTN44723643). Clinical malaria was defined as fever and a positive blood slide, and considered severe if a participant had at least one clinical or laboratory feature of severity or was admitted to hospital. Malaria incidence and rate ratios were estimated using random effects Poisson regression, accounting for multiple episodes. Results: A total of 2180 participants were enrolled and followed for a median of 2.5 years; 453 malaria episodes were recorded. Malaria incidence was 9.1/100 person-years (pyrs) [95% confidence interval (CI) = 8.2–10.1] and was higher on placebo (rate ratio 3.47; CI = 2.74–4.39). Malaria in the placebo arm decreased over time; although incidence remained higher than in the CTX arm, the difference between arms reduced slightly (interaction P value = 0.10). Fifteen participants experienced severe malaria (<1%); overall incidence was 0.30/100 pyrs (CI = 0.18–0.49). There was one malaria-related death (CTX arm). Conclusion: HIV-infected adults – who are stable on ART and stop prophylactic CTX – experience more malaria than those that continue, but this difference is less than has been reported in previous trials. Few participants had severe malaria. Further research might be useful in identifying groups that can safely stop CTX prophylaxis. PMID:26558729

  11. A comparison of psychiatric diagnoses among HIV-infected prisoners receiving combination antiretroviral therapy and transitioning to the community

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Angela; Altice, Frederick L; Powell, Mary Lindsay; Trestman, Robert L; Springer, Sandra A

    2014-01-01

    Background The criminal justice system (CJS), specifically prisons and jails, is ideally suited for uniform screening of psychiatric (PD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), who are concentrated in these settings. By accurately diagnosing PDs and SUDs in these controlled settings, treatment can be initiated and contribute to improved continuity of care upon release. In the context of PLWHA, it may also improve combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) adherence, and reduce HIV transmission risk behaviors. Methods A retrospective data analysis was conducted by creating a cohort of PLWHA transitioning to the community from prison or jail enrolled who were enrolled in a controlled trial of directly administered antiretroviral (DAART). Participants were systematically assessed for PDs and SUDs using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), a standardized psychiatric assessment tool, and compared to diagnoses documented within the correctional medical record. Results Findings confirm a high prevalence of Axis I PDs (47.4%) and SUDs (67.1%) in PLWHA even after prolonged abstinence from alcohol and drugs. Although prevalence of PDs and SUDs were high in the medical record, there was fair to poor agreement among PDs using the MINI, making evident the potential benefit of more objective and concurrent PD assessments to guide treatment. Conclusions Additional PD diagnoses may be detected in PLWHA in CJS using supplementary and objective screening tools. By identifying and treating PDs and SUDs in the CJS, care may be improved and may ultimately contribute to healthier outcomes after community release if patients are effectively transitioned. PMID:25606368

  12. Increasing HIV-1 pretreatment drug resistance among antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating treatment between 2006 and 2014 in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael H; Silverman, Rachel; Beck, Ingrid A; Yatich, Nelly; Dross, Sandra; McKernan-Mullin, Jennifer; Bii, Stephen; Tapia, Kenneth; Stern, Joshua; Chohan, Bhavna; Sakr, Samah R; Kiarie, James N; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2016-06-19

    Antiretroviral-naïve adults initiating antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya were tested for HIV-1 drug resistance at codons K103N, Y181C, G190A, M184V, and K65R using an oligonucleotide ligation assay. Prevalence of pretreatment drug resistance increased from 3.89% in 2006 to 10.93% in 2014 (P < 0.001), and 95% of those with resistance had at least one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation. Resistance to tenofovir (K65R) was found in 2014 but not in 2006. PMID:27058353

  13. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin C for Invasive Anal Carcinoma in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for anal carcinoma in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 21 HIV-positive patients who were receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy were treated with CRT (50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction plus a 5.4-10.8-Gy external boost; 5-fluorouracil, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1-4 and 29-32; and mitomycin C, 10 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1 and 29). A retrospective analysis was performed with respect to the tumor response, local control, cancer-specific and overall survival, and toxicity. The immunologic parameters, including pre- and post-treatment CD4 count, viral load, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-specific morbidity was recorded during follow-up (median, 53 months; range, 10-99). Results: CRT could be completed in all 21 patients with a reduction in the chemotherapy dose and/or interruption of radiotherapy in 5 and 5 cases, respectively. Acute Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 8 (38%) of the 21 patients. A complete response was achieved in 17 patients (81%), and tumor persistence or early progression was noted in 4 (19%). Six patients (29%) died, 5 of cancer progression and 1 of treatment-related toxicity. The 5-year local control, cancer-specific, and overall survival rate was 59%, 75%, and 67%, respectively. The median CD4 count significantly decreased from 347.5 cells/muL before CRT to 125 cells/muL 3-7 weeks after CRT completion (p <.001). In 6 (32%) of 19 patients, an increase of the HIV viral load was noted. Both parameters returned to the pretreatment values with additional follow-up. Conclusion: Our data have confirmed that in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era, HIV-related anal cancer can be treated with standard CRT without dose reductions. Close surveillance of the immunologic parameters is necessary.

  14. ABC for people with HIV: responses to sexual behaviour recommendations among people receiving antiretroviral therapy in Jinja, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Caroline; Mbonye, Martin; Seeley, Janet; Birungi, Josephine; Wolff, Brent; Coutinho, Alex; Jaffar, Shabbar

    2011-01-01

    People living with HIV who are taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) are increasingly involved in ‘positive prevention’ initiatives. These are generally oriented to promoting abstinence, ‘being faithful’ (partner reduction) and condom use (ABC). We conducted a longitudinal qualitative study with people living with HIV using ART, who were provided with adherence education and counselling support by a Ugandan nongovernmental organisation, The AIDS Support Organisation (TASO). Forty people were selected sequentially as they started ART, stratified by sex, ART delivery mode (clinic- or home-based) and HIV progression stage (early or advanced) and interviewed at enrolment and at 3, 6, 18 and 30 months. At initiation of ART, participants agreed to follow TASO's positive-living recommendations. Initially poor health prevented sexual activity. As health improved, participants prioritised resuming economic production and support for their children. With further improvements, sexual desire resurfaced and people in relationships cemented these via sex. The findings highlight the limitations of HIV prevention based on medical care/personal counselling. As ART leads to health improvements, social norms, economic needs and sexual desires increasingly influence sexual behaviour. Positive prevention interventions need to seek to modify normative and economic influences on sexual behaviour, as well as to provide alternatives to condoms. PMID:21390948

  15. Two-year follow-up of sexual behavior among HIV-uninfected household members of adults taking antiretroviral therapy in Uganda: no evidence of disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Bechange, Stevens; Bunnell, Rebecca; Awor, Anna; Moore, David; King, Rachel; Mermin, Jonathan; Tappero, Jordan; Khana, Kenneth; Bartholow, Bradford

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines HIV risk behavior among HIV-uninfected adults living with people taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. A prospective cohort of 455 HIV-uninfected non-spousal household members of ART patients receiving home-based AIDS care was enrolled. Sexual behavior, HIV risk perceptions, AIDS-related anxiety, and the perception that AIDS is curable were assessed at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months. Generalized linear mixture models were used to model risk behavior over time and to identify behavioral correlates. Overall, risky sex decreased from 29% at baseline to 15% at 24-months. Among women, risky sex decreased from 31% at baseline to 10% at 6 months and 15% at 24 months. Among men, risky sex decreased from 30% at baseline to 8% at 6 months and 13% at 24 months. Perceiving HIV/AIDS as curable and lower AIDS-related anxiety were independently associated with risky sex. No evidence of behavioral disinhibition was observed. Concerns regarding behavioral disinhibition should not slow down efforts to increase ART access in Africa. PMID:18949550

  16. Morbidity and Mortality Patterns of Hospitalised Adult HIV/AIDS Patients in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: A 4-year Retrospective Review from Zaria, Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogoina, Dimie; Obiako, Reginald O.; Muktar, Haruna M.; Adeiza, Mukhtar; Babadoko, Aliyu; Hassan, Abdulaziz; Bansi, Isa; Iheonye, Henry; Iyanda, Matthew; Tabi-Ajayi, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Background. This study, undertaken in major tertiary hospital in northern Nigeria, examined the morbidity and mortality patterns of hospitalised adult HIV/AIDS patients in the HAART era. Methods. Between January 2006 and December 2009, admission records and causes of deaths of hospitalised medical HIV-infected patients were retrieved and analysed according to antiretroviral (ART) status. Results. Of the 207 HIV/AIDS patients reviewed, majority were newly diagnosed (73.4%), and most were hospitalised and died from various AIDS-defining illnesses, mainly disseminated tuberculosis and sepsis. Immune-inflammatory-reconstitution-syndrome, ART-toxicity and ART-failure, contributed to morbidity and mortality in patients receiving ART. Sixty six (31.9%) patients died, with higher mortality in males and in those with lower CD4-cell count, lower PCV, and shorter hospital stay. However, hospital stay ≤3 days and severe anaemia (PCV < 24%) were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion. In the current HAART era, late presentation and tuberculosis continue to fuel the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa, with emerging challenges due to ART-related complications. PMID:23019521

  17. Transmitted drug resistance to rilpivirine in newly diagnosed antiretroviral naive adults.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M; Monge, S; Chueca, N; Guillot, V; Viciana, P; Anta, L; Rodriguez, C; Gomez-Sirvent, J L; Navarro, G; de los Santos, I; Moreno, S; García, F

    2015-01-01

    We characterized transmitted drug resistance to rilpivirine and the predicted efficacy of first-line rilpivirine-containing regimens in antiretroviral-naive Spanish patients. International Antiviral Society-USA mutations were detected in 138 of 2781 patients (4.9%), E138A (3.4%) being the most prevalent. Using the Stanford Algorithm, 121 patients (4.4%) showed low-level or intermediate resistance. No differences in the predicted efficacy of first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimens were observed. As rilpivirine becomes more widely used in clinical practice, the evolution of its transmitted drug resistance will need to be monitored. In addition, the exact role of E138A singletons on rilpivirine activity as part of first-line regimens merits further evaluation. PMID:25636936

  18. Ability to Work and Employment Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Elzi, Luigia; Conen, Anna; Patzen, Annalea; Fehr, Jan; Cavassini, Matthias; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Limited data exist on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals' ability to work after receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to investigate predictors of regaining full ability to work at 1 year after starting cART. Methods.  Antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected individuals <60 years who started cART from January 1998 through December 2012 within the framework of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study were analyzed. Inability to work was defined as a medical judgment of the patient's ability to work as 0%. Results.  Of 5800 subjects, 4382 (75.6%) were fully able to work, 471 (8.1%) able to work part time, and 947 (16.3%) were unable to work at baseline. Of the 947 patients unable to work, 439 (46.3%) were able to work either full time or part time at 1 year of treatment. Predictors of recovering full ability to work were non-white ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-3.54), higher education (OR, 4.03; 95% CI, 2.47-7.48), and achieving HIV-ribonucleic acid <50 copies/mL (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.20-2.80). Older age (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, .42-.72, per 10 years older) and psychiatric disorders (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, .13-.47) were associated with lower odds of ability to work. Recovering full ability to work at 1 year increased from 24.0% in 1998-2001 to 41.2% in 2009-2012, but the employment rates did not increase. Conclusions.  Regaining full ability to work depends primarily on achieving viral suppression, absence of psychiatric comorbidity, and favorable psychosocial factors. The discrepancy between patients' ability to work and employment rates indicates barriers to reintegration of persons infected with HIV. PMID:26955645

  19. Ability to Work and Employment Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Elzi, Luigia; Conen, Anna; Patzen, Annalea; Fehr, Jan; Cavassini, Matthias; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Limited data exist on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals' ability to work after receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to investigate predictors of regaining full ability to work at 1 year after starting cART. Methods. Antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected individuals <60 years who started cART from January 1998 through December 2012 within the framework of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study were analyzed. Inability to work was defined as a medical judgment of the patient's ability to work as 0%. Results. Of 5800 subjects, 4382 (75.6%) were fully able to work, 471 (8.1%) able to work part time, and 947 (16.3%) were unable to work at baseline. Of the 947 patients unable to work, 439 (46.3%) were able to work either full time or part time at 1 year of treatment. Predictors of recovering full ability to work were non-white ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–3.54), higher education (OR, 4.03; 95% CI, 2.47–7.48), and achieving HIV-ribonucleic acid <50 copies/mL (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.20–2.80). Older age (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, .42–.72, per 10 years older) and psychiatric disorders (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, .13–.47) were associated with lower odds of ability to work. Recovering full ability to work at 1 year increased from 24.0% in 1998–2001 to 41.2% in 2009–2012, but the employment rates did not increase. Conclusions. Regaining full ability to work depends primarily on achieving viral suppression, absence of psychiatric comorbidity, and favorable psychosocial factors. The discrepancy between patients' ability to work and employment rates indicates barriers to reintegration of persons infected with HIV. PMID:26955645

  20. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20.332 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive...

  1. [CLINICAL AND PHARMACOECONOMIC RESULTS OF THE USAGE OF VARIOUS HIV REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE INHIBITORS IN THE SCHEMES OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY OF PATIENT RECEIVING THERAPY FOR THE CHRONIC HEPATITIS C VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Moshkovich, G F; Minaeva, S V; Varlova, L W; Goryaeva, M P; Gulyaeva, S S; Tichonova, E V

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy, safety, and economical aspects of treatment with abacavir, zidovudine, stavudine, and phosphazide in the schemes of antiretroviral therapy of the HIV-infected patients receiving therapy for hepatitis C virus were tested. Clinical, immunological, and virologic efficacy of treatment and dynamics of hemoglobin, thrombocytes, and alanine aminotransferase as markers of common adverse events recorded at the start of the antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C and after 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 weeks of the treatment were evaluated. The usage of these drugs in the schemes of antiretroviral therapy exhibited efficacy, high tolerability and safety for all HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors. PMID:27145599

  2. Pregnancy rate and birth outcomes among women receiving antiretroviral therapy in Burkina Faso: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Poda, Armel; Hema, Arsène; Konaté, Aina; Kaboré, Firmin; Zoungrana, Jacques; Kamboulé, Euloges; Soré, Ibrahim; Bado, Guillaume; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Ouédraogo, Macaire; Meda, Nicolas; Sawadogo, Adrien Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In Sub-Saharan Africa, few studies reported pregnancy incidence and outcomes in women taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). This survey aims to estimate the incidence and outcomes of pregnancy in a cohort of HIV positive women initiating ART in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Methods We carried out a retrospective cohort study. We selected women in childbearing age initiating ART and followed up in Bobo-Dioulasso teaching hospital between January 2005 and June 2011. The incidence of pregnancies during follow-up was calculated. Childbirth was defined by the expulsion of a fetus after 22 weeks of amenorrhea. Before this term, it is an abortion. Childbirth is said premature if it occurs before 37 weeks of gestation, to term if it occurs between the 38th and the 42nd week. The annual age-standardized fertility rates were calculated using the baseline population from the 2010 demographic and health survey (DHS) in Burkina Faso. Results A total of 1,763 women of childbearing age under ART were included in the study. They ranged between 18 and 48 years old with a median of 35 years old. A total of 222 pregnancies were observed during 4639 women-years of follow-up, corresponding to an incidence density of 5 pregnancies for 100 women-years (95% CI: 4.2-5.5). Among the 222 pregnancies recorded, 9(4.0%) ended with abortion, 205(92.4%) with childbirth (including 15 premature childbirths); the outcome of 8(3.6%) pregnancies were unknown abortion. Live birth and stillborn rates were 94.0% (193/205) and 6.0% respectively. The standard fertility rate in our cohort was 45 live births for 1,000 women-years. The general decrease in fertility rates was 66.0% among women infected with HIV compared to the overall population Conclusion This study shows a low pregnancy incidence among women initiating ART as compared to their peers from the general population. Pregnancies that occurred during ART generally end with live births. Care packages for HIV infected women of

  3. Are social support and HIV coping strategies associated with lower depression in adults on antiretroviral treatment? Evidence from rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Yeji, Francis; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Newell, Marie-Louise; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Hosegood, Victoria; Bärnighausen, Till

    2014-01-01

    We assess depression rates and investigate whether depression among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) is associated with social support and HIV coping strategies in rural South Africa (SA). The study took place in a decentralised public-sector ART programme in a poor, rural area of KwaZulu-Natal, SA, with high-HIV prevalence and high-ART coverage. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12), validated in this setting, was used to assess depression in 272 adults recently initiated on ART. Estimates of depression prevalence ranged from 33% to 38%, depending on the method used to score the GHQ12. Instrumental social support (providing tangible factors for support, such as financial assistance, material goods or services), but not emotional social support (expressing feelings, such as empathy, love, trust or acceptance, to support a person), was significantly associated with lower likelihood of depression [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-0.81, P < 0.001], when controlling for sex, age, marital status, education, household wealth and CD4 cell count. In addition, using "avoidance of people" as a strategy to cope with HIV was associated with an almost three times higher odds of depression (aOR = 2.79, CI: 1.34-5.82, P = 0.006), whereas none of the other five coping strategies we assessed was significantly associated with depression. In addition to antidepressant drug treatment, interventions enhancing instrumental social support and behavioural therapy replacing withdrawal behaviours with active HIV coping strategies may be effective in reducing the burden of depression among patients on ART. PMID:24991994

  4. Understanding HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among HIV-Infected South Africans Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy: An Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Susan M.; Fisher, William A.; Shuper, Paul A.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Christie, Sarah; MacDonald, Susan; Pillay, Sandy; Mahlase, Gethwana; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study applied the Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills (IMB) model (J. D. Fisher & Fisher, 1992; W. A. Fisher & Fisher, 1993) to identify factors associated with HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-infected South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a population of considerable significance for curtailing, or maintaining, South Africa’s generalized HIV epidemic. HIV prevention information, HIV prevention motivation, HIV prevention behavioral skills, and HIV transmission risk behavior were assessed in a sample of 1,388 South Africans infected with HIV and receiving ART in 16 clinics in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Results confirmed the assumptions of the IMB model and demonstrated that HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation work through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV transmission risk behavior in this population. Subanalyses confirmed these relationships for HIV transmission risk behavior overall and for HIV transmission risk behavior with partners perceived to be HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown. A consistent pattern of gender differences showed that for men, HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation may have direct links with HIV preventive behavior, while for women, the effects of HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation work through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV preventive behavior. These IMB model-based findings suggest directions for HIV prevention interventions with South African men and women living with HIV and on ART as an important component of overall strategies to contain South Africa’s generalized HIV epidemic. PMID:23477576

  5. Effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the survival of HIV-infected adult patients in urban slums of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muhula, Samuel Opondo; Peter, Memiah; Sibhatu, Biadgilign; Meshack, Ndirangu; Lennie, Kyomuhangi

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in access to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) have radically reduced hospitalizations and deaths associated with HIV infection in both developed countries and sub-Saharan Africa. Not much is known about survival of patients on ART in slums. The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with mortality among adult patients on ART in resource poor, urban, sub-Saharan African setting. A prospective open cohort study was conducted with adult patients on ART at a clinic in Kibera slums, Nairobi, Kenya. The patients' enrollment to care was between March 2005 and November 2011. Descriptive statistics were computed and Kaplan-Meier (KM) methods used to estimate survival time while Cox's proportional hazards (CPH) model fitted to determine mortality predictors. A total of 2,011 adult patients were studied, 69% being female. Female gender (p=0.0016), zidovudine-based regimen patients (p<0.0001), CD4 count>351 patients (p<0.0001), WHO stage I patients (p<0.0001) and "Working" functional status patients recorded better survival probability on ART. In CPH analysis, the hazard of dying was higher in patients on Stavudine-based regimen(hazard ratio (HR)=.8; 95% CI, 1.5-2.2; p<0.0001),CD4 count<50 cells/µl (HR=1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.7;p<0.0001), WHO Stage IV at ART initiation (HR=1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6; p=0.016) and bedridden patients (HR=2.7; 95% CI, 1.7-4.4;p<0.0001). There was increased mortality among the males, those with advanced Immunosuppression, late WHO stage and bedridden patients. The findings further justify the need to switch patients on Stavudine-based regimen as per the WHO recommendations. PMID:26090021

  6. Perceived stigma among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment: a prospective randomised trial comparing an m-DOT strategy with standard-of-care in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kaai, Susan; Bullock, Sandra; Sarna, Avina; Chersich, Matthew; Luchters, Stanley; Geibel, Scott; Munyao, Paul; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra; Temmerman, Marleen; Rutenburg, Naomi

    2010-08-01

    HIV and AIDS remain highly stigmatised. Modified directly observed therapy (m-DOT) supports antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence but little is known about its association with perceived stigma in resource-constrained settings. In 2003, 234 HIV-infected adults enrolled in a two-arm randomised trial comparing a health centre-based m-DOT strategy with standard self-administration of ART. Data on perceived stigma were collected using Berger's HIV stigma scale prior to starting ART and after 12 months. This was a secondary analysis to examine whether perceived stigma was related to treatment delivery. Perceived stigma scores declined after 12 months of treatment from a mean of 44.9 (sd=7.6) to a mean of 41.4 (sd=7.7), (t=6.14, P<0.001). No differences were found between the mean scores of participants in both study arms. Also, no difference in scores was detected using GLM, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics and baseline scores. Findings indicate that a well managed clinic-based m-DOT does not increase perceived HIV-related stigma. PMID:21409296

  7. Urine Liver-Type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein and Kidney Injury Molecule-1 in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Combined Antiretroviral Treatment Based on Tenofovir

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Kamila; Piekarska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the presence of kidney tubular damage in the absence of overt evidence of glomerular dysfunction (GFR>60 ml/min without proteinuria) in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Urine kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) levels were measured by ELISA and expressed as a ratio to creatinine. Sixty-six patients (median age 38 years) and 10 healthy controls (median age 35.5 years) were included in the study. Patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, or kidney disease were excluded from the study. All patients received tenofovir/emtricitabine combined with one of three other components, namely efavirenz, atazanavir/norvir, or lopinavir/norvir. A lower concentration of L-FABP/creatinine was observed in HIV-infected as compared to healthy individuals (p=0.0353); KIM-1/creatinine was also lower in comparison with healthy controls but not statistically significantly. Patients receiving efavirenz had higher levels of L-FABP/creatinine in comparison to healthy controls (p=0.0039). Patients with anti-HCV had higher concentrations of L-FABP/creatinine as compared to the HIV-monoinfected individuals (not statistically significant) and to healthy subjects (p=0.0356). All four patients with L-FABP>17.5 μg/g creatinine were HIV/HCV coinfected. On multivariate logistic regression urine L-FABP above 5.5 μg/g creatinine was independently associated with body weight (OR=0.93 p=0.039). This study suggests that HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with lower body weight treated with tenofovir may be at an increased risk of tubular dysfunction and should be monitored more closely. The use of protease inhibitors was not associated with an increased risk of tubular disorders. PMID:24164392

  8. Incidence of serious morbidity in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in a West African care centre, 2003-2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, scaling-up antiretroviral treatment (ART) has required the involvement of decentralized health facilities with limited equipment. We estimated the incidence of serious morbidity among HIV-infected adults receiving ART in one of these HIV routine care center in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We conducted a prospective study at the Centre Medical de Suivi des Donneurs de Sang (CMSDS), which is affiliated with the National Centre for Blood Transfusion in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Adult patients infected with HIV-1 or HIV-1/HIV-2 who initiated ART between January 2003 and December 2008 were eligible for the study. Standardized clinical data were collected at each visit. Serious morbidity was defined as a new episode of malaria, WHO stage 3–4 event, ANRS grade 3–4 adverse event, or any event leading to death or to hospitalization. Results 1008 adults, 67% women, with a median age of 35 years, and a median pre-ART CD4 count of 186/mm3 started ART and were followed for a median of 17.3 months. The overall incidences of loss to follow-up, death, and attrition were 6.2/100 person-years (PY) [95% CI 5.1-7.2], 2.3/100 PY [95% CI 1.6-2.9], and 8.1/100 PY [95% CI 7.0-9.4], respectively. The incidence of first serious event was 11.5/100 PY overall, 15.9/100 PY within the first year and 8.3/100 PY thereafter. The most frequently documented specific diagnoses were malaria, tuberculosis, bacterial septicemia and bacterial pneumonia. Conclusion Among HIV-infected adults followed in routine conditions in a West African primary care clinic, we recorded a high incidence of serious morbidity during the first year on ART. Providing care centers with diagnostic tools and standardizing data collection are necessary steps to improve the quality of care in primary care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24373303

  9. Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, H.

    1983-07-01

    Before discussing Deep Space Network receivers, a brief description of the functions of receivers and how they interface with other elements of the Network is presented. Different types of receivers are used in the Network for various purposes. The principal receiver type is used for telemetry and tracking. This receiver provides the capability, with other elements of the Network, to track the space probe utilizing Doppler and range measurements, and to receive telemetry, including both scientific data from the onboard experiments and engineering data pertaining to the health of the probe. Another type of receiver is used for radio science applications. This receiver measures phase perturbations on the carrier signal to obtain information on the composition of solar and planetary atmospheres and interplanetary space. A third type of receiver utilizes very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) techniques for both radio science and spacecraft navigation data. Only the telemetry receiver is described in detail in this document. The integration of the Receiver-Exciter subsystem with other portions of the Deep Space Network is described.

  10. Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, H.

    1983-01-01

    Before discussing Deep Space Network receivers, a brief description of the functions of receivers and how they interface with other elements of the Network is presented. Different types of receivers are used in the Network for various purposes. The principal receiver type is used for telemetry and tracking. This receiver provides the capability, with other elements of the Network, to track the space probe utilizing Doppler and range measurements, and to receive telemetry, including both scientific data from the onboard experiments and engineering data pertaining to the health of the probe. Another type of receiver is used for radio science applications. This receiver measures phase perturbations on the carrier signal to obtain information on the composition of solar and planetary atmospheres and interplanetary space. A third type of receiver utilizes very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) techniques for both radio science and spacecraft navigation data. Only the telemetry receiver is described in detail in this document. The integration of the Receiver-Exciter subsystem with other portions of the Deep Space Network is described.

  11. Autonomic neuropathy resulting in recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in an HIV patient with Hodgkin lymphoma receiving vinblastine and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cherif, S; Danino, S; Yoganathan, K

    2015-03-01

    Hoarseness of voice due to vocal cord paresis as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy has been well recognised. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy is commonly caused by compression due to tumour or lymph nodes or by surgical damage. Vinca alkaloids are well known to cause peripheral neuropathy. However, vinca alkaloids causing recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy has been reported rarely in children. We report a case of an adult patient with HIV who developed hoarseness of voice due to vocal cord paralysis during vinblastine treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. Mediastinal and hilar lymph node enlargement in such patients may distract clinicians from considering alternative causes of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, with potential ensuing severe or even life-threatening stridor. PMID:24828552

  12. The association of recent incarceration and health outcomes among HIV-infected adults receiving care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Frazier, Emma; Fagan, Jennifer; Hardnett, Felicia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-09-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe factors associated with incarceration as well as the association between recent incarceration and HIV-related sexual risk behaviors, access to insurance, healthcare utilization (emergency department (ED) and hospital use), antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and viral suppression. Design/methodology/approach Using 2009-2010 data from a cross-sectional, nationally representative three-stage sample of HIV-infected adults receiving care in the USA, the authors assessed the demographic characteristics, healthcare utilization, and clinical outcomes of HIV-infected persons who had been recently incarcerated (detention for>24 hours in the past year) using bivariate analyses. The authors used multivariable logistic regression to examine associations of recent incarceration with insurance status as well as clinical and behavioral outcomes. Findings An estimated 22,949 (95 percent confidence interval (CI) 19,062-26,836) or 5.4 percent (CI: 4.7-6.1) of all HIV-infected persons receiving care were recently incarcerated. Factors associated with recent incarceration were age <50 years, being a smoker, having high school diploma or less, being homeless, income at or below the poverty guidelines, having a geometric mean of CD4 count <500 cells/ μL, and using drugs in the past 12 months. Results from multivariable modeling indicated that incarcerated persons were more likely to use ED services, and to have been hospitalized, and less likely to have achieved viral suppression. Originality/value Recent incarceration independently predicted worse health outcomes and greater use of emergency services among HIV-infected adults currently in HIV care. Options to improve the HIV continuum of care, including pre-enrollment for healthcare coverage and discharge planning, may lead to better health outcomes for HIV-infected inmates post-release. PMID:27548016

  13. Food Insufficiency is a Risk Factor for Suboptimal Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults in Urban Peru

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; Murray, Megan B.; Muñoz, Maribel; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Sebastián, José Luís; Atwood, Sidney; Caldas, Adolfo; Bayona, Jaime; Shin, Sonya S.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between food insufficiency and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. A cohort of HIV-infected adults in urban Peru was followed for a two-year period after ART initiation. ART adherence was measured using a 30-day self-report tool and classified as suboptimal if <95% adherence was reported. We conducted a repeated measures cohort analysis to examine whether food insufficiency was more common during months of suboptimal adherence relative to months with optimal adherence. 1,264 adherence interviews were conducted for 134 individuals. Participants who reported food insufficiency in the month prior to interview were more likely to experience suboptimal adherence than those who did not (odds ratio [O.R.]:2.4; 95% confidence interval [C.I.]:1.4, 4.1), even after adjusting for baseline social support score (O.R. per 5 point increase:0.91; C.I.:[0.85, 0.98]) and good baseline adherence self-efficacy (O.R.:0.25; C.I.:[0.09, 0.69]). Interventions that ensure food security for HIV-infected individuals may help sustain high levels of adherence. PMID:20714923

  14. "I Have Remained Strong Because of That Food": Acceptability and Use of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Among Pregnant HIV-Infected Ugandan Women Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Young, Sera; Natamba, Barnabas; Luwedde, Flavia; Nyafwono, Dorcas; Okia, Ben; Osterbauer, Beth; Natureeba, Paul; Johnson, Lynn; Michel, Chloe; Zheng, Amy; Robine, Marion; Achan, Jane; Charlebois, Edwin; Cohan, Deb; Havlir, Diane

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the acceptability and use of macronutrient supplementation among HIV-infected pregnant Ugandan women receiving antiretroviral therapy in a clinical study (NCT 00993031). We first conducted formative research among 56 pregnant and lactating women to select a supplement regimen. Acceptability and use of the supplementation regimen (35 sachets of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) and 4 or 6 kg of instant soy porridge for the household provided monthly) were evaluated among 87 pregnant women. Organoleptic assessments of LNS were favorable. Participants reported consuming LNS a mean of 6.1 days per week, and adherence to recommended consumption behaviors (e.g. frequency, quantity, not sharing) was >80 %. Few women reported negative social consequences of supplementation. The majority of participants also consumed most of the porridge intended for the household. In sum, LNS was acceptable and used regularly. Larger studies to evaluate physical and psychosocial consequences of LNS during pregnancy among HIV-infected women are warranted. PMID:25416075

  15. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    PubMed

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART. PMID:26427376

  16. Adverse Events among HIV/MDR-TB Co-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral and Second Line Anti-TB Treatment in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Isaakidis, Petros; Varghese, Bhanumati; Mansoor, Homa; Cox, Helen S.; Ladomirska, Joanna; Saranchuk, Peter; Da Silva, Esdras; Khan, Samsuddin; Paryani, Roma; Udwadia, Zarir; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Reid, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Background Significant adverse events (AE) have been reported in patients receiving medications for multidrug- and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB & XDR-TB). However, there is little prospective data on AE in MDR- or XDR-TB/HIV co-infected patients on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in programmatic settings. Methods Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is supporting a community-based treatment program for drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a slum setting in Mumbai, India since 2007. Patients are being treated for both diseases and the management of AE is done on an outpatient basis whenever possible. Prospective data were analysed to determine the occurrence and nature of AE. Results Between May 2007 and September 2011, 67 HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients were being treated with anti-TB treatment and ART; 43.3% were female, median age was 35.5 years (Interquartile Range: 30.5–42) and the median duration of anti-TB treatment was 10 months (range 0.5–30). Overall, AE were common in this cohort: 71%, 63% and 40% of patients experienced one or more mild, moderate or severe AE, respectively. However, they were rarely life-threatening or debilitating. AE occurring most frequently included gastrointestinal symptoms (45% of patients), peripheral neuropathy (38%), hypothyroidism (32%), psychiatric symptoms (29%) and hypokalaemia (23%). Eleven patients were hospitalized for AE and one or more suspect drugs had to be permanently discontinued in 27 (40%). No AE led to indefinite suspension of an entire MDR-TB or ART regimen. Conclusions AE occurred frequently in this Mumbai HIV/MDR-TB cohort but not more frequently than in non-HIV patients on similar anti-TB treatment. Most AE can be successfully managed on an outpatient basis through a community-based treatment program, even in a resource-limited setting. Concerns about severe AE in the management of co-infected patients are justified, however, they should not cause delays

  17. Rising Obesity Prevalence and Weight Gain Among Adults Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Koethe, John R; Jenkins, Cathy A; Lau, Bryan; Shepherd, Bryan E; Justice, Amy C; Tate, Janet P; Buchacz, Kate; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel M; Horberg, Michael A; Blashill, Aaron J; Willig, Amanda; Wester, C William; Silverberg, Michael J; Gill, John; Thorne, Jennifer E; Klein, Marina; Eron, Joseph J; Kitahata, Mari M; Sterling, Timothy R; Moore, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The proportion of overweight and obese adults in the United States and Canada has increased over the past decade, but temporal trends in body mass index (BMI) and weight gain on antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected adults have not been well characterized. We conducted a cohort study comparing HIV-infected adults in the North America AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) to United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) controls matched by sex, race, and age over the period 1998 to 2010. Multivariable linear regression assessed the relationship between BMI and year of ART initiation, adjusting for sex, race, age, and baseline CD4(+) count. Temporal trends in weight on ART were assessed using a generalized least-squares model further adjusted for HIV-1 RNA and first ART regimen class. A total of 14,084 patients from 17 cohorts contributed data; 83% were male, 57% were nonwhite, and the median age was 40 years. Median BMI at ART initiation increased from 23.8 to 24.8 kg/m(2) between 1998 and 2010 in NA-ACCORD, but the percentage of those obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) at ART initiation increased from 9% to 18%. After 3 years of ART, 22% of individuals with a normal BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) at baseline had become overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)), and 18% of those overweight at baseline had become obese. HIV-infected white women had a higher BMI after 3 years of ART as compared to age-matched white women in NHANES (p = 0.02), while no difference in BMI after 3 years of ART was observed for HIV-infected men or non-white women compared to controls. The high prevalence of obesity we observed among ART-exposed HIV-infected adults in North America may contribute to health complications in the future. PMID:26352511

  18. Factors related to lipodystrophy and metabolic alterations in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Savès, Marianne; Raffi, François; Capeau, Jacqueline; Rozenbaum, Willy; Ragnaud, Jean-Marie; Perronne, Christian; Basdevant, Arnaud; Leport, Catherine; Chêne, Geneviève

    2002-05-15

    Morphologic and metabolic changes associated with protease inhibitor (PI) therapy have been reported since the introduction of PIs for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. These changes were measured 12-20 months after initiation of PI therapy in a cross-sectional study involving 614 patients from the Antiprotéases Cohorte (APROCO) Study (Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le Sida-EP11). The prevalence was 21% for isolated peripheral atrophy, 17% for isolated fat accumulation, 24% for mixed syndrome, 23% for glucose metabolism alterations, 28% for hypertriglyceridemia (triglyceride level, > or =2.2 mM), and 57% for hypercholesterolemia (cholesterol level, > or =5.5 mM). Age was significantly associated with different phenotypes of lipodystrophy and metabolic alterations, but body-mass index, CD4(+) cell count, and type of nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor or PI received were not constantly associated with these changes. Furthermore, in all models tested, exposure to stavudine was associated with lipoatrophy and exposure of ritonavir was associated with hypertriglyceridemia. Detection and management of these disorders should be implemented to prevent further complications. PMID:11981737

  19. Barriers and Facilitators of Adherence to Antiretroviral Drug Therapy and Retention in Care among Adult HIV-Positive Patients: A Qualitative Study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Bimirew, Mekides A.; Kassie, Desalew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country’s ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. Results Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. Conclusions Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved patient outcomes

  20. Retention of Adult Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew P; MPA, Sydney Rosen

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously published systematic reviews of retention in care after antiretroviral therapy initiation among general adult populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We estimated 36-month retention at 73% for publications from 2007–2010. This report extends the review to cover 2008–2013 and expands it to all low- and middle-income countries. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Register, and ISI Web of Science from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013 and abstracts from AIDS and IAS from 2008–2013. We estimated retention across cohorts using simple averages and interpolated missing times through the last time reported. We estimated all-cause attrition (death, loss to follow-up) for patients receiving first-line ART in routine settings in low- and middle-income countries. Results We found 123 papers and abstracts reporting retention for 154 patient cohorts and 1,554,773 patients in 42 countries. Overall, 43% of all patients not retained were known to have died. Unweighted averages of reported retention was 78%, 71% and 69% at 12, 24, and 36 months after treatment initiation, respectively. We estimated 36-month retention at 65% in Africa, 80% in Asia, and 64% in Latin America and the Caribbean. From lifetable analysis, we estimated retention at 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months at 83%, 74%, 68%, 64% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions Retention at 36 months on treatment averages 65–70%. There are several important gaps in the evidence-base, which could be filled by further research, especially in terms of geographic coverage and duration of follow-up. PMID:25942461

  1. Cotrimoxazole Prophylaxis Discontinuation among Antiretroviral-Treated HIV-1-Infected Adults in Kenya: A Randomized Non-inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Polyak, Christina S.; Yuhas, Krista; Singa, Benson; Khaemba, Monica; Walson, Judd; Richardson, Barbra A.; John-Stewart, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Background Cotrimoxazole (CTX) prophylaxis is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for HIV-1-infected individuals in settings with high infectious disease prevalence. The WHO 2006 guidelines were developed prior to the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The threshold for CTX discontinuation following ART is undefined in resource-limited settings. Methods and Findings Between 1 February 2012 and 30 September 2013, we conducted an unblinded non-inferiority randomized controlled trial of CTX prophylaxis cessation versus continuation among HIV-1-infected adults on ART for ≥18 mo with CD4 count > 350 cells/mm3 in a malaria-endemic region in Kenya. Participants were randomized and followed up at 3-mo intervals for 12 mo. The primary endpoint was a composite of morbidity (malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea) and mortality. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated using Poisson regression. Among 538 ART-treated adults screened, 500 were enrolled and randomized, 250 per arm. Median age was 40 y, 361 (72%) were women, and 442 (88%) reported insecticide-treated bednet use. Combined morbidity/mortality was significantly higher in the CTX discontinuation arm (IRR = 2.27, 95% CI 1.52–3.38; p < 0.001), driven by malaria morbidity. There were 34 cases of malaria, with 33 in the CTX discontinuation arm (IRR = 33.02, 95% CI 4.52–241.02; p = 0.001). Diarrhea and pneumonia rates did not differ significantly between arms (IRR = 1.36, 95% CI 0.82–2.27, and IRR = 1.43, 95% CI 0.54–3.75, respectively). Study limitations include a lack of placebo and a lower incidence of morbidity events than expected. Conclusions CTX discontinuation among ART-treated, immune-reconstituted adults in a malaria-endemic region resulted in increased incidence of malaria but not pneumonia or diarrhea. Malaria endemicity may be the most relevant factor to consider in the decision to stop CTX after ART-induced immune reconstitution in regions with high infectious disease prevalence

  2. Sexual behaviors over a 3-year period among individuals with advanced HIV/AIDS receiving antiretroviral therapy in an urban HIV clinic in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Wandera, Bonnie; Kamya, Moses R.; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Kiragga, Agnes; Kambugu, Andrew; Wanyama, Jane N; Easterbrook, Philippa; Sethi, Ajay K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have prospectively examined sexual behaviors of HIV-infected person on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Sub-Saharan Africa. Methods From 2004 to 2005, 559 HIV-infected, ART-naïve individuals initiating ART at an HIV clinic in Kampala, Uganda were enrolled into a prospective study and followed to 2008. Clinical and sexual behavior information was assessed at enrollment and semi-annually for three years after ART initiation. Using log-binomial regression models, we estimated prevalence ratios (PRs) to determine factors associated with being sexually active and having unprotected sex over three-years after initiating ART. Results 559 adults contributed 2,594 person-visits of follow-up. At the time of ART initiation, 323 (57.9%) were sexually active of which 176 (54.5%) had unprotected sex at last sexual intercourse. Majority (63.4%) of married individuals were unaware of their partner’s HIV status. Female gender (PR=2.97; 95% CI: 1.85, 4.79), being married (PR=1.48; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.06), and reporting unprotected sex prior to ART (PR=1.68; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.42) were among factors independently associated with unprotected sex while on ART. Overall, 7.3% of visit intervals of unprotected sex, 1.0% of intervals of sexual activity, occurred when plasma viral load >1,500 copies/ml, representing periods of greater HIV transmission risk. Conclusions Although unprotected sex reduced over time, women reported unprotected sex more often than men. Disclosure of HIV status was low. Integration of comprehensive prevention programs into HIV care is needed, particularly ones specific for women. PMID:21297481

  3. Determinants of Adult Functional Outcome in Adolescents Receiving Special Educational Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeown, H. R.; Johnstone, E. C.; McKirdy, J.; Owens, D. C.; Stanfield, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. Methods: A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood…

  4. Prices paid for adult and paediatric antiretroviral treatment by low- and middle-income countries in 2012: high, low or just right?

    PubMed

    Perriëns, Joseph H; Habiyambere, Vincent; Dongmo-Nguimfack, Boniface; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    A viable market for antiretroviral drugs in low- and middle-income countries is key to the continued scale-up of antiretroviral treatment. We describe the price paid by low- and middle-income countries for 10 first- and 7 second-line adult and paediatric treatment regimens from 2003 to 2012, and compare the price of their finished formulations with the price of their active pharmaceutical ingredients in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Between 2003 and 2012 the median price of adult first-line treatment regimens per treatment-year decreased from USD499 to USD122, and that of second-line regimens from USD2,934 to USD497. In 2005 adult formulations were sold for a price 170% higher than the cost of their active pharmaceutical ingredients. This margin had decreased to 28% in 2012. Between 2004 and 2013, the price of paediatric treatment per treatment-year decreased from USD585 to USD147 for first-line and from USD763 to USD288 for second-line treatment. In 2005, paediatric treatment regimens were sold at a price 231% higher than the cost of their active pharmaceutical ingredients. This margin remained high and was 195% in 2012. The prices paid for antiretroviral drugs by low- and middle-income countries decreased between 2003 and 2012. Although the margins on their sale decreased, there is likely still space for price reduction, especially for the more recent World Health Organization recommended adult first-line regimens and for paediatric treatment. PMID:25310645

  5. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  6. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  7. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  8. Monitoring and Switching of First-line Antiretroviral Therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: Collaborative Analysis of Adult Treatment Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Andreas D.; Keiser, Olivia; Balestre, Eric; Brown, Steve; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Dabis, François; Davies, Mary-Ann; Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Oyaro, Patrick; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Reynolds, Steven J.; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Wandeler, Gilles; Egger, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-1 viral load (VL) testing is recommended to monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) but not universally available. We examined monitoring of first-line and switching to second-line ART in sub-Saharan Africa, 2004–2013. Methods Adult HIV-1 infected patients starting combination ART in 16 countries were included. Switching was defined as a change from a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen to a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen, with a change of ≥1 NRTI. Virological and immunological failures were defined per World Health Organization criteria. We calculated cumulative probabilities of switching and hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing routine VL monitoring, targeted VL monitoring, CD4 cell monitoring and clinical monitoring, adjusted for programme and individual characteristics. Findings Of 297,825 eligible patients, 10,352 patients (3·5%) switched during 782,412 person-years of follow-up. Compared to CD4 monitoring hazard ratios for switching were 3·15 (95% CI 2·92–3·40) for routine VL, 1·21 (1·13–1·30) for targeted VL and 0·49 (0·43–0·56) for clinical monitoring. Overall 58.0% of patients with confirmed virological and 19·3% of patients with confirmed immunological failure switched within 2 years. Among patients who switched the percentage with evidence of treatment failure based on a single CD4 or VL measurement ranged from 32·1% with clinical to 84.3% with targeted VL monitoring. Median CD4 counts at switching were 215 cells/µl under routine VL monitoring but lower with other monitoring (114–133 cells/µl). Interpretation Overall few patients switched to second-line ART and switching occurred late in the absence of routine viral load monitoring. Switching was more common and occurred earlier with targeted or routine viral load testing. PMID:26423252

  9. Effectiveness of a community-based positive prevention intervention for people living with HIV who are not receiving antiretroviral treatment: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sarna, Avina; Luchters, Stanley; Musenge, Eustasius; Okal, Jerry; Chersich, Matthew; Tun, Waimar; Mall, Sabine; Kingola, Nzioki; Kalibala, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: We report effectiveness of an HIV-prevention intervention delivered by community health workers (CHWs) in Mombasa, Kenya, to PLHIV who have not initiated or who have discontinued ART—an often difficult-to-reach population because they fall outside the ambit of health care and prevention services. Methods: A 2-arm cohort study assessed a structured risk-reduction intervention involving at least 4 one-to-one counseling sessions and personalized support. The control group received standard prevention services. CHWs recruited treatment-naïve people living with HIV (PLHIV) or those who had previously taken antiretroviral drugs. Data were analyzed using a Propensity Score Matched (PSM)-sample to control for baseline differences between the groups. Results: 634 PLHIV were recruited and followed for 6 months. Median age was 35 years, and 74.3% were female. Participants in the intervention group reported reduced risky sexual behaviors both at endline compared with baseline and compared with the control group. At endline, in the PSM analysis, participants in the intervention arm were less likely than participants in the control group to report unprotected sex with a spouse (Odds Ratio [OR] = 0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.03-0.24), and they reported fewer unprotected sex acts (12.3% versus 46.0%, respectively; OR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.09-0.29; P<0.001). Further, 92.4% of participants in the intervention group reported zero unsafe sex acts (with partners of negative or unknown HIV status) compared with 70.8% in the control group (P<0.001), and more participants in the intervention arm were receiving ART (34.3% versus 12.7%, respectively; P<0.001). Conclusion: CHWs effectively reached PLHIV who had never received or who had discontinued ART, and they delivered a risk-reduction intervention that led to declines in reported sexual risk behaviors, as well as to increases in ART uptake. A scaled-up intervention warrants consideration

  10. Nearly Half Of US Adults Living With HIV Received Federal Disability Benefits In 2009.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Lin A; Frazier, Emma L; Sansom, Stephanie L; Farnham, Paul G; Shrestha, Ram K; Hutchinson, Angela B; Fagan, Jennifer L; Viall, Abigail H; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The effects of HIV infection on national labor-force participation have not been rigorously evaluated. Using data from the Medical Monitoring Project and the National Health Interview Survey, we present nationally representative estimates of the receipt of disability benefits by adults living with HIV receiving care compared with the general US adult population. We found that in 2009, adults living with HIV were nine times more likely than adults in the general population to receive disability benefits. The risk of being on disability is also greater for younger and more educated adults living with HIV compared to the general population, which suggests that productivity losses can result from HIV infection. To prevent disability, early diagnosis and treatment of HIV are essential. This study offers a baseline against which to measure the impacts of recently proposed or enacted changes to Medicaid and private insurance markets, including the Affordable Care Act and proposed revisions to the Social Security Administration's HIV Infection Listings. PMID:26438741

  11. Magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia among adult HIV patients receiving first line HAART in Northwestern Tanzania: a cross sectional clinic based study

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Daniel Wilfred; Kilonzo, Semvua Bukheti; Mpondo, Bonaventura Cornel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Moderate to severe anemia is an important clinical problem in HIV patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. The rate of progression and mortality in this sub group of patients is high compared to non anemic patients. In sub Saharan Africa with scale up of Anti retroviral therapy, the magnitude of this problem is not known especially in Tanzania. This study aimed at determining the magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia in HIV patients receiving first line ART in northwestern Tanzania. Methods This was a cross sectional clinic based study, involving adult HIV patients on first line Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy at Bugando Medical Centre Care and Treatment Center. The patients’ data were analyzed using STATA version 11 to determine the prevalence of moderate to severe anemia and risk factors that could predict occurrence of anemia. Results In this study 346 patients on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy were enrolled, of whom 100(40.46%) had moderate to severe anemia. The odds of being anemic were strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 count (< 200 cells/μl) and HIV stage 3&4 at enrollment. Most of the anemic patients had mean corpuscular volume of >100fl. Conclusion The prevalence of moderate to severe anemia is significantly high in this cohort of HIV-infected patients on first line Anti Retroviral Therapy and it is strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 and HIV stage 3 and 4. On clinical grounds this suggests that patients who are initiated on Zidovudine based regimen and those in advanced HIV at enrollment should have regular haemoglobin follow up to identify anemia at its earliest stage to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:27200131

  12. Predictors and Profiles of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among African American Adolescents and Young Adult Males Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Gross, Israel Moses; Hosek, Sybil; Richards, Maryse Heather; Fernandez, M Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for thwarting HIV disease progression and reducing secondary HIV transmission, yet youth living with HIV (YLH) struggle with adherence. The highest rates of new HIV infections in the United States occur in young African American men. A sample of 387 HIV-positive young African American males on ART was selected from a cross-sectional assessment of (YLH) receiving medical care within the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) from 2010 to 2012 (12-24 years old, median 22.00, SD 2.08). Participants completed self-reported adherence, demographic, health, and psychosocial measures. Sixty-two percent self-reported 100% ART adherence. Optimal data analysis identified frequency of cannabis use during the past 3 months as the strongest independent predictor of adherence, yielding moderate effect strength sensitivity (ESS) = 27.1, p < 0.001. Among participants with infrequent cannabis use, 72% reported full adherence; in contrast, only 45% of participants who used cannabis frequently reported full adherence. Classification tree analysis (CTA) was utilized to improve classification accuracy and to identify the pathways of ART adherence and nonadherence. The CTA model evidenced a 38% improvement above chance for correctly classifying participants as ART adherent or nonadherent. Participants most likely to be adherent were those with low psychological distress and minimal alcohol use (82% were adherent). Participants least likely to be adherent were those with higher psychological distress and engaged in weekly cannabis use (69% were nonadherent). Findings suggest multiple profiles of ART adherence for young African American males living with HIV and argue for targeted psychosocial interventions. PMID:27410496

  13. Magnitude of opportunistic infections and associated factors in HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy in eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mitiku, Habtamu; Weldegebreal, Fitsum; Teklemariam, Zelalem

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of opportunistic infections (OIs) and associated factors among HIV-infected adults on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Hiwot Fana Specialized University Hospital, Eastern Ethiopia. Patients and methods A hospital-based retrospective study was conducted in 358 HIV-infected adult patients on ART from April to June 2014. Data were collected through review of clinical records. The data was entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 16.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association of each independent variable with occurrence of OIs. A 95% confidence interval (CI) and P-value less than 0.05 were considered as significant association. Results A total of 358 patients were included in the study, in which majority (68.4%) were females. The mean age of patients was 34 (standard deviation [SD] ±9.8) years. The overall of prevalence of OIs among HIV/AIDS patients on ART was 48%. The highest prevalent rates of OIs observed were tuberculosis (TB) (21.23%), followed by Herpes zoster (11.2%) and oral candidiasis (9.5%). Baseline CD4 cell count <200 cells/mm3 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =1.645, 95% CI =2.187, 3.983), baseline World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage III (AOR =2.801, 95% CI =1.958, 7.165) and IV (AOR =3.856; 95% CI =2.691, 10.390), and not using prophylaxis (AOR =1.912, 95% CI =1.444, 3.824) were found to have strong association with acquisition of OIs. Conclusion There was a high prevalence of OIs observed in this study. Baselines CD4 count of <200 cells/mm3, advanced WHO clinical stages, and not using prophylaxis were found to be predictors of OIs. Interventions were aimed at promoting early HIV testing and enrollment of HIV-infected individuals into ART services needed before CD4 count decreased severely. PMID:25999763

  14. Predictors of loss to follow-up in antiretroviral treatment for adult patients in the Oromia region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Megerso, Abebe; Garoma, Sileshi; Eticha, Tolosa; Workineh, Tilaye; Daba, Shallo; Tarekegn, Mihretu; Habtamu, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is known that antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces mortality from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome related causes. Patient’s lost to follow-up (LTFU) in this treatment poses a paramount problem to the public and health care services. Information on predictors of loss to follow-up is scarce in this study area and similar settings. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying correlates of loss to follow-up in ART among adult patients in the Oromia region of Ethiopia. Methods A case–control study was conducted between February 2015 and April 2015 using medical records. The stratified sampling technique was used to select health facilities. The number of patient records to be included in the study was proportionally allocated to each stratum based on their patient proportion in the regional data. Specific health facilities from which to include the records were randomly selected from a list of the health facilities per stratum. All adult patient records registered as LTFU (416) in the selected health facilities during the 12-month period prior to the data collection date, and 832 patients with good adherence to ART were included. Data were double-entered into Epi Info 7 and analyzed using SPSS 20. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were used to report the results. Qualitative data were thematically analyzed using open code computer software. Results Age 15–24 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 19.82 95% CI: 6.80, 57.73); day laborers (AOR, 5.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.23, 8.89), rural residents (AOR, 2.35; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.89), World Health Organization clinical stage IV (AOR, 2.29; 95% CI: 1.45, 3.62), baseline CD4 <350 cells/mL (AOR, 2.06; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.13), suboptimal adherence to ART (AOR, 7.42; 95% CI: 1.87, 29.41), were factors which increased the risk of loss to follow-up in ART. Conclusion Multiple risk factors, both socioeconomic and clinical, were associated with loss to follow-up. Attention is required to

  15. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infections among antiretroviral-naive and -experienced HIV co-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Sisay, Zufan; Biadgilign, Sibhatu; Abegaz, Woldaregay Erku

    2014-05-01

    Most HIV positive people have not been tested for viral hepatitis and their treatments have not been optimized for possible co-infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the serological pattern of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among antiretroviral (ARV)-naive and -experienced HIV co-infected adults in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A total of 500 frozen HIV positive serum and plasma samples collected from ARV-naive (n = 250) and -experienced (n = 250) adults were randomly selected and screened for HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg and anti-HCV using rapid two-site sandwich immunochromatographic assay. The test was performed at Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University. Positive specimens for HBsAg and anti-HCV markers were further confirmed using third generation ELISA. Of the 500 specimens tested, 15 (3 %), 58 (11.6 %), 3 (0.6 %), 18 (3.6 %), 3 (0.6 %) and 1 (0.2 %) were positive for HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HCV, HBsAg and HBeAg, and HBsAg and anti-HBs markers, respectively. No specimen tested positive for both HBeAg and anti-HBs, and 442 (88.4 %) individuals were non-immune to HBV. Of the 250 ARV-naive individuals, 8 (3.2 %), 33 (13.2 %), 2 (0.8 %), 10 (4 %), 2 (0.8 %), and 1 (0.4 %) were positive for HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HCV, HBsAg and HBeAg, and HBsAg and anti-HBs markers, respectively. Of the 250 ARV-experienced individuals, 7 (2.8 %), 25 (10 %), 1 (0.4 %), 8 (3.2 %), 1 (0.4 %), and 0 (0 %) were positive for HBsAg, Anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HCV, HBsAg and HBeAg, and HBsAg and anti-HBs markers, respectively. In summary, seroprevalence of HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV co-infections was lower in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, than in Sub-Saharan Africa and globally. HBV and HCV infections were not significantly different between HIV positive subjects who were or who were not on ARV. This suggests that the two groups have equal chance of being infected with these two viruses; despite

  16. The reliability of the modified lower extremity functional scale among adults living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy, in Rwanda, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tumusiime, D.K.; Stewart, A.; Venter, F.W.D.; Musenge, E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is common among people living with HIV (PLHIV) on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and affects their daily functional ability and quality of life. Lower extremity functional ability, which is most commonly compromised in patients with PN, has not been clearly evaluated in an African setting, with regard to functional limitations. The lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) was originally developed and validated among elderly people in the USA, where the environment and activities of daily life are very different from those in Rwanda. The purpose of this study was to adapt and establish the reliability of LEFS, among adults living with HIV on ART, in a Rwandan environment. The study translated LEFS from English to Kinyarwanda, the local language spoken in Rwanda, the LEFS was then modified accordingly, and tested for test-retest reliability among 50 adult PLHIV on ART. An average Spearman rank order correlation coefficient, ρ ≥ 0.7, was considered optimal for reliability. Prior to the modification of the LEFS and in the initial testing of the translated LEFS, none of the activities was strongly correlated (ρ ≥ 0.8); most of the activities (90%, 18/20) were moderately correlated (ρ ≥ 0.5) and 10% (2/20) were weakly correlated (ρ ≤ 0.5). The ρ of most of the functional activities improved after modification by an expert group to ρ ≥ 0.7, establishing reliability and validity of LEFS among PLHIV on ART with lower extremity functional limitations, in this environment. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the importance of modifying and establishing test – retest reliability of tools derived from developed world contexts to local conditions in developing countries, such as in Rwanda. The modified LEFS in this study can be used in Rwanda by clinicians, specifically at ART clinics to screen and identify people with functional limitations at an early stage of the limitations, for treatment

  17. Excellent clinical outcomes and retention in care for adults with HIV-associated Kaposi sarcoma treated with systemic chemotherapy and integrated antiretroviral therapy in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Herce, Michael E; Kalanga, Noel; Wroe, Emily B; Keck, James W; Chingoli, Felix; Tengatenga, Listern; Gopal, Satish; Phiri, Atupere; Mailosi, Bright; Bazile, Junior; Beste, Jason A; Elmore, Shekinah N; Crocker, Jonathan T; Rigodon, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV-associated Kaposi sarcoma (HIV-KS) is the most common cancer in Malawi. In 2008, the non-governmental organization, Partners In Health, and the Ministry of Health established the Neno Kaposi Sarcoma Clinic (NKSC) to treat HIV-KS in rural Neno district. We aimed to evaluate 12-month clinical outcomes and retention in care for HIV-KS patients in the NKSC, and to describe our implementation model, which featured protocol-guided chemotherapy, integrated antiretroviral therapy (ART) and psychosocial support delivered by community health workers. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using routine clinical data from 114 adult HIV-KS patients who received ART and ≥1 chemotherapy cycle in the NKSC between March 2008 and February 2012. Results At enrolment 97% of patients (n/N=103/106) had advanced HIV-KS (stage T1). Most patients were male (n/N=85/114, 75%) with median age 36 years (interquartile range, IQR: 29–42). Patients started ART a median of 77 days prior to chemotherapy (IQR: 36–252), with 97% (n/N=105/108) receiving nevirapine/lamivudine/stavudine. Following standardized protocols, we treated 20 patients (18%) with first-line paclitaxel and 94 patients (82%) with bleomycin plus vincristine (BV). Of the 94 BV patients, 24 (26%) failed to respond to BV requiring change to second-line paclitaxel. A Division of AIDS grade 3/4 adverse event occurred in 29% of patients (n/N=30/102). Neutropenia was the most common grade 3/4 event (n/N=17/102, 17%). Twelve months after chemotherapy initiation, 83% of patients (95% CI: 74–89%) were alive, including 88 (77%) retained in care. Overall survival (OS) at 12 months did not differ by initial chemotherapy regimen (p=0.6). Among patients with T1 disease, low body mass index (BMI) (adjusted hazard ratio, aHR=4.10, 95% CI: 1.06–15.89) and 1 g/dL decrease in baseline haemoglobin (aHR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.03–2.25) were associated with increased death or loss to follow-up at 12 months. Conclusions

  18. Pretreatment HIV-1 drug resistance is strongly associated with virologic failure in HIV-infected patients receiving partly active antiretroviral regimens

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Urvi M; Mellors, John W

    2016-01-01

    The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has significantly reduced mortality from AIDS. Hamers et al. explores the impact of pretreatment HIV-1 drug resistance on virologic failure, immunologic response, and acquisition of drug resistance after 1 year of first-line antiretroviral therapy by longitudinally evaluating 2579 participants with pretreatment drug resistance results from the PharmAccess African Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring (PASER-M) cohort. Participants with pretreatment drug resistance who were given a treatment regimen with reduced activity to at least one prescribed drug had a significantly greater risk of virologic failure and acquired drug resistance compared with both participants without pretreatment drug resistance, and participants with pretreatment drug resistance who were prescribed fully active regimens. This paper by Hamers et al. validates the need for at least three fully active antiretroviral drugs to prevent the acquisition of drug resistance and to optimize treatment success in resource limited settings. PMID:22913352

  19. Overcoming Barriers to HIV Treatment Adherence: A Brief Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for HIV-Positive Adults on Antiretroviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Olem, David; Sharp, Kelly M.; Taylor, Jonelle M.; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing HIV treatment adherence is critical in efforts to optimize health outcomes and to prevent further HIV transmission. The Balance Project intervention uses cognitive behavioral approaches to improve antiretroviral medication adherence through promoting adaptive coping with medication side effect and distress related to HIV. This 5-session intervention has been documented to prevent nonadherence among persons living with HIV who experience high levels of distress associated with their antiretroviral medication side effects. We describe the theoretical underpinnings of the intervention, provide details of the training and session protocols with a case example, and discuss implications for future applications of the intervention in both research and clinical settings. PMID:24855332

  20. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one. PMID:20471318

  1. Survival and determinants of mortality in adult HIV/Aids patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Somali Region, Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Damtew, Bereket; Mengistie, Bezatu; Alemayehu, Tadesse

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Studies have shown high initial mortality in Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) programs from resource-limited settings. However, there is dearth of evidence on treatment outcomes and associated determinant factors in public hospitals. Therefore, the objective of this study is to assess survival and identify predictors of death in adult HIV-infected patients initiating ART at a public hospital in Eastern Ethiopia. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing baseline and follow-up records of patients who started ART between December 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011 at Kharamara hospital. Time to death was the main outcome measure. Kaplan-Meier models were used to estimate mortality and Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of mortality. Results A total of 784 patients (58.4% females) were followed for a median of 60 months. There were 87 (11.1%) deaths yielding an overall mortality rate of 5.15/100 PYO (95% CI: 4.73-6.37). The estimated mortality was 8.4%, 9.8%, 11.3%, 12.7% and 14.1% at 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months respectively. The independent predictors of death were single marital status (AHR: 2.31; 95%CI: 1.18-4.50), a bedridden functional status (AHR: 5.91; 95%CI: 2.87-12.16), advanced WHO stage (AHR: 7.36; 95%CI: 3.17-17.12), BMI < 18.5 Kg/m2 (AHR: 2.20; 95%CI: 1.18-4.09), CD4 count < 50 cells/µL (AHR: 2.70; 95%CI: 1.26-5.80), severe anemia (AHR: 4.57; 95%CI: 2.30-9.10), and TB co-infection (AHR: 2.30; 95%CI: 1.28-4.11). Conclusion Improved survival was observed in patients taking ART in Somali region of Ethiopia. The risk for death was higher in patients with advanced WHO stage, low CD4 count, low Hgb, low BMI, and concomitant TB infection. Intensive case management is recommended for patients with the prognostic factors. Optimal immunologic and weight recoveries in the first 6 months suggest increased effort to retain patients in care at this period. PMID:26889319

  2. Retention and risk factors for attrition among adults in antiretroviral treatment programmes in Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Olivier; Tsui, Sharon; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kwesigabo, Gideon; Menten, Joris; Mulenga, Modest; Auld, Andrew; Agolory, Simon; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Colebunders, Robert; Bangsberg, David R.; van Praag, Eric; Torpey, Kwasi; Williams, Seymour; Kaplan, Jonathan; Zee, Aaron; Denison, Julie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We assessed retention and predictors of attrition (recorded death or loss to follow-up) in antiretroviral treatment (ART) clinics in Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study among adults (≥18 years) starting ART during 2003–2010. We purposefully selected six health facilities per country and randomly selected 250 patients from each facility. Patients who visited clinics at least once during the 90 days before data abstraction were defined as retained. Data on individual and programme level risk factors for attrition were obtained through chart review and clinic manager interviews. Kaplan–Meier curves for retention across sites were created. Predictors of attrition were assessed using a multivariable Cox-proportional hazards model, adjusted for site-level clustering. RESULTS From 17 facilities, 4147 patients were included. Retention ranged from 52.0% to 96.2% at 1 year to 25.8%–90.4% at 4 years. Multivariable analysis of ART initiation characteristics found the following independent risk factors for attrition: younger age [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.30 (1.14–1.47)], WHO stage 4 ([aHR (95% CI): 1.56 (1.29–1.88)], >10% bodyweight loss [aHR (95%CI) = 1.17 (1.00–1.38)], poor functional status [ambulatory aHR (95%CI) = 1.29 (1.09–1.54); bedridden aHR1.54 (1.15–2.07)], and increasing years of clinic operation prior to ART initiation in government facilities [aHR (95%CI) = 1.17 (1.10–1.23)]. Patients with higher CD4 cell count were less likely to experience attrition [aHR (95%CI) = 0.88 (0.78–1.00)] for every log (tenfold) increase. Sites offering community ART dispensing [aHR (95% CI) = 0.55 (0.30–1.01) for women; 0.40 (0.21–0.75) for men] had significantly less attrition. CONCLUSIONS Patient retention to an individual programme worsened over time especially among males, younger persons and those with poor clinical indicators. Community ART drug dispensing

  3. Patching the gaps towards the 90–90–90 targets: outcomes of Nigerian children receiving antiretroviral treatment who are co-infected with tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chamla, Dick D; Asadu, Chukwuemeka; Davies, Abiola; de Wagt, Arjan; Ilesanmi, Oluwafunke; Adeyinka, Daniel; Adejuyigbe, Ebun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nigeria has a high burden of children living with HIV and tuberculosis (TB). This article examines the magnitude of TB among children receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), compares their ART outcomes with their non-TB counterparts and argues that addressing TB among children on ART is critical for achieving the 90–90–90 targets. Methods This was a facility-based, retrospective analysis of medical records of children aged <15 years who were newly initiated on ART between 2011 and 2012. Structured tools were used to collect data. STATA software was used to perform descriptive, survival and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 1142 children with a median age of 3.5 years from 20 selected facilities were followed for 24 months. Of these, 95.8% were assessed for TB at ART initiation and 14.7% had TB. Children on ART were more likely to have TB if they were aged 5 years or older (p<0.01) and had delayed ART initiation (p<0.05). The cotrimoxazole and isoniazid prophylaxes were provided to 87.9 and 0.8% of children, respectively. The rate of new TB cases was 3 (2.2–4.0) per 100 person-years at six months and declined to 0.2 (0.06–1.4) per 100 person-years at 24 months. TB infection [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 4.3; 2.3–7.9], malnutrition (aHR: 5.1; 2.6–9.8), delayed ART initiation (aHR: 3.2; 1.5–6.7) and age less than 1 year at ART initiation (aHR: 4.0; 1.4–12.0) were associated with death. Additionally, patients with TB (aHR: 1.3; 1.1–1.6) and children below the age of 1 at ART initiation (aHR: 2.9; 1.7–5.2) were more likely to be lost to follow-up (LFU). Conclusions Children on ART with TB are less likely to survive and more likely to be LFU. These risks, along with low isoniazid uptake and delayed ART initiation, present a serious challenge to achieving the 90–90–90 targets and underscore an urgent need for inclusion of childhood TB/HIV in global plans and reporting mechanisms. PMID:26639112

  4. Effects of naturopathy and yoga intervention on CD4 count of the individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy-report from a human immunodeficiency virus sanatorium, Pune

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Babu; Nair, Pradeep MK; Nanda, Awantika

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is one of the most debilitating conditions which have affected nearly 32 million people across the globe. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the standard care given to the HIV positive individuals. But the patient adherence to ART is found to be very less as per previous studies. Complementary and alternative medicine is becoming a pillar in the rehabilitative efforts for many living with HIV/AIDS. Aim: To evaluate the effect of naturopathy and yoga intervention on CD4 counts of HIV patients. Methods: Ninety-six patients prediagnosed as HIV positive were enrolled after obtaining written consent and treated with naturopathy and yoga interventions like hydrotherapy, diet therapy, mud therapy, counseling, etc., for various durations at National Institute of Naturopathy Sanatorium. They were grouped into four groups (G1: 1–7 days, G2: 8–15 days, G3: 16–30 days, G4: >30 days) based on duration of stay. CD4 count of each individual was recorded pre- and post-stay. Results: All analyses were conducted using R package version 3.01. Dependent sample t-tests were conducted to examine the significance at 95% confidence interval. Of the 96 patients, male patients constitute 55.2% and female patients 44.8% with mean age 34.74 received 1–180 days (mean 28.75, standard deviation: 14.16) treatment. Significant increase in the CD4 count was observed in two out of the four groups (G2: P = 0.052, and G4: P = 0.00038, respectively). Conclusion: An increasing trend in the CD4 count was observed that was proportional to the length of the stay of participants at the HIV sanatorium. This indicates the possibility of lifestyle changes can bring positive outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS when used as an adjuvant with ART care. The lack of control group is a major limitation of this study. No attempt was made to study the subjective changes in the quality of life, viral load, etc., However, larger controlled studies are

  5. “Risk factors associated with virologic failure in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at a public hospital in Peru”

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Alave R; Jorge, Paz B; Elsa, Gonzalez L; Miguel, Campos S; Rodriguez, Martin; Willig, James; Juan, Echevarría Z

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe clinical and biological characteristics of subjects with virologic failure who participated in the sexually transmitted diseases HIV/AIDS National Program from a Peruvian public hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS An exploratory descriptive study was performed with data from subjects older than 18 who started high activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) between May 2004 and December 2009 and who had a viral load control after 24 weeks of HAART. Virologic failure was defined as a viral load value above 1000 copies/mL on follow up after 24 weeks on HAART. RESULTS Of 1 478 records of patients on HAART analized, the median age was 35 years [IQR, 29-41] and 69.6% were male. Also, virologic failure occurred in 24% and 3.7% died. Of subjects with virologic failure, 9.5% died. On multivariate analysis, age, history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, change of antiretroviral therapy due to toxicity, opportunistic infections during HAART, level of CD4 + lymphocytes below 100 cells/ml at start of HAART, adherence and clinical stage were independently associated with virologic failure. In the group of patient with no history of antiretroviral use before starting HAART, age, opportunistic infections during HAART were associated with virologic failure. CONCLUSION This study identified factors associated with virologic failure. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether the use of these factors can help to identify prospectively patients at high risk of failure, and to design interventions aimed to reduce this risk. PMID:23450408

  6. Effect of Rosiglitazone and Metformin on Insulin Resistance in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Containing Protease Inhibitor: Randomized Prospective Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Silič, Anja; Janež, Andrej; Tomažič, Janez; Karner, Primož; Vidmar, Ludvik; Sharma, Prem; Matičič, Mojca

    2007-01-01

    Aim To evaluate and compare effects of 48-week treatment with rosiglitazone and metformin on insulin resistance in patients infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), containing a protease inhibitor. Methods Randomized prospective controlled clinical trial enrolled 90 male patients infected with HIV and having impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance (fasting insulin concentration >20 mIU/L). The patients were randomly assigned into three groups (each 30 patients); the first group receiving 4 mg rosiglitazone once a day, the second group receiving 500 mg metformin two times a day, and the third group serving as control without hypoglycemic treatment. The primary efficacy parameters were fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels compared between baseline and week. Data on insulin resistance and beta cell function were analyzed by the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA). Results After 48 weeks of treatment, the fasting insulin concentration (±standard deviation) in rosiglitazone group significantly declined from 39.0 ± 3.35 to 19.7 ± 3.99 mIU/L (P<0.001; 49% decrease) and in metformin group from 40.3 ± 2.29 to 29.2 ± 2.82 mIU/L (P<0.001; 27% decrease). HOMA indicated that rosiglitazone significantly reduced insulin resistance from 11.3 ± 1.03 to 4.0 ± 0.95 (P<0.001), compared with metformin which reduced it from 11.9 ± 0.73 to 5.7 ± 0.62 (P<0.001). Insulin resistance was significantly lower in the rosiglitazone group after 48 weeks (P<0.001). Metformin significantly improved beta cell function (from 257.3 ± 21.91 to 707.4 ± 207.32; P<0.001), as did rosiglitazone (from 261.3 ± 27.98 to 403.3 ± 162.50; P<0.001), but the improvement in the metformin group was significantly better (P<0.001). However, metformin was more efficient in improving beta cell function (from 257.3 ± 21.91 to 707.4 ± 207.32) than rosiglitazone (from 261.3

  7. Using HIV-attributable mortality to assess the impact of antiretroviral therapy on adult mortality in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kanjala, Chifundo; Michael, Denna; Todd, Jim; Slaymaker, Emma; Calvert, Clara; Isingo, Raphael; Wringe, Alison; Zaba, Basia; Urassa, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background The Tanzanian national HIV care and treatment programme has provided free antiretroviral therapy (ART) to HIV-positive persons since 2004. ART has been available to participants of the Kisesa open cohort study since 2005, but data to 2007 showed a slow uptake of ART and a modest impact on mortality. Additional data from the 2010 HIV serological survey provide an opportunity to update the estimated impact of ART in this setting. Methods The Kisesa Health and Demographic Surveillance Site (HDSS) has collected HIV serological data and demographic data, including verbal autopsy (VA) interviews since 1994. Serological data to the end of 2010 were used to make two estimates of HIV-attributable mortality, the first among HIV positives using the difference in mortality between HIV positives and HIV negatives, and the second in the population using the difference between the observed mortality rate in the whole population and the mortality rate among the HIV negatives. Four time periods (1994–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2007, and 2008–2010) were used and HIV-attributable mortality estimates were analysed in detail for trends over time. A computer algorithm, InterVA-4, was applied to VA data to estimate the HIV-attributable mortality for the population, and this was compared to the estimates from the serological survey data. Results Among HIV-positive adults aged 45–59 years, high mortality rates were observed across all time periods in both males and females. In HIV-positive men, the HIV-attributable mortality was 91.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 84.6%–95.3%) in 2000–2004 and 86.3% (95% CI: 71.1%–93.3%) in 2008–2010, while among women, the HIV-attributable mortality was 87.8% (95% CI: 71.1%–94.3%) in 2000–2004 and 85.8% (95% CI: 59.6%–94.4%) in 2008–2010. In the whole population, using the serological data, the HIV-attributable mortality among men aged 30–44 years decreased from 57.2% (95% CI: 46.9%–65.3%) in 2000–2004 to 36.5% (95

  8. Gender Differences in Survival among Adult Patients Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa: A Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Morna; Schomaker, Michael; Garone, Daniela Belen; Giddy, Janet; Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Lessells, Richard; Maskew, Mhairi; Prozesky, Hans; Wood, Robin; Johnson, Leigh F.; Egger, Matthias; Boulle, Andrew; Myer, Landon

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased mortality among men on antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been documented but remains poorly understood. We examined the magnitude of and risk factors for gender differences in mortality on ART. Methods and Findings Analyses included 46,201 ART-naïve adults starting ART between January 2002 and December 2009 in eight ART programmes across South Africa (SA). Patients were followed from initiation of ART to outcome or analysis closure. The primary outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were loss to follow-up (LTF), virologic suppression, and CD4+ cell count responses. Survival analyses were used to examine the hazard of death on ART by gender. Sensitivity analyses were limited to patients who were virologically suppressed and patients whose CD4+ cell count reached >200 cells/µl. We compared gender differences in mortality among HIV+ patients on ART with mortality in an age-standardised HIV-negative population. Among 46,201 adults (65% female, median age 35 years), during 77,578 person-years of follow-up, men had lower median CD4+ cell counts than women (85 versus 110 cells/µl, p<0.001), were more likely to be classified WHO stage III/IV (86 versus 77%, p<0.001), and had higher mortality in crude (8.5 versus 5.7 deaths/100 person-years, p<0.001) and adjusted analyses (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.31, 95% CI 1.22–1.41). After 36 months on ART, men were more likely than women to be truly LTF (AHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.28) but not to die after LTF (AHR 1.04, 95% CI 0.86–1.25). Findings were consistent across all eight programmes. Virologic suppression was similar by gender; women had slightly better immunologic responses than men. Notably, the observed gender differences in mortality on ART were smaller than gender differences in age-standardised death rates in the HIV-negative South African population. Over time, non-HIV mortality appeared to account for an increasing proportion of observed mortality. The analysis was limited by missing

  9. Food Insecurity and Food Choices in Rural Older Adults with Diabetes Receiving Nutrition Education via Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homenko, Daria R.; Morin, Philip C.; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate differences between rural older adults with diabetes reporting the presence or absence of food insecurity with respect to meal planning, preparation, shopping, obesity, and glycemic control after receiving nutrition counseling through telemedicine. Methods: Food insecurity data were obtained by telephone survey (n = 74).…

  10. Barriers to Successful Transition for Young Adults Who Receive SSI and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Jennifer L.; Timmons, Jaime Ciulla; Moloney, Mairead

    2003-01-01

    A study examined barriers to transition faced by 12 young adults with disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and their families. Obstacles to transition planning that were associated with SSI included difficulties managing the receipt of SSI and unawareness of the supports available through the SSI system. (Contains references.)…

  11. Sequential antiretroviral adherence measurement using electronic bottle cap monitors in a cohort of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Shuter, Jonathan; Sarlo, Julie A; Stubbs, Roxann O; Rode, Richard A; Zingman, Barry S

    2012-01-01

    Most studies employing electronic bottle monitors to measure antiretroviral adherence are limited to 24 weeks of duration, providing a snapshot of adherence from a treatment course that may be lifelong. The stability of these measures in individual patients over time has not been previously described. We measured antiretroviral adherence using Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS) caps in a patient cohort in 2004 and 2005 and repeated the measurement in 2008 and 2009. Forty-eight participants completed both monitoring periods. Mean adherence rates in the first and second periods were 74.2% and 68.9%, respectively. Adherence rates from the 2 periods for individual participants were highly correlated (Spearman rho = .66, P < .001). PMID:22223595

  12. Effects on Anthropometry and Appetite of Vitamins and Minerals Given in Lipid Nutritional Supplements for Malnourished HIV-Infected Adults Referred for Antiretroviral Therapy: Results From the NUSTART Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Andrea M.; Woodd, Susannah; PrayGod, George; Chisenga, Molly; Siame, Joshua; Koethe, John R.; Heimburger, Douglas C.; Kelly, Paul; Friis, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. Objective: We hypothesized that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain in malnourished patients starting ART and that vitamin and mineral supplementation would improve appetite and permit nutritional recovery. Design: The randomized controlled Nutritional Support for Africans Starting Antiretroviral Therapy trial was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, and Lusaka, Zambia. ART-naive adults referred for ART and with body mass index <18.5 kg/m2 received lipid-based nutritional supplements either without (LNS) or with added vitamins and minerals (LNS-VM), beginning before ART initiation. Participants were given 30 g/d LNS from recruitment until 2 weeks after starting ART and 250 g/d from weeks 2 to 6 of ART. Results: Of 1815 patients recruited, 365 (20%) died during the study and 813 (45%) provided data at 12 weeks. Controlling for baseline values, anthropometric measures were consistently higher at 12-week ART in the LNS-VM than in the LNS group but statistically significant only for calf and mid-upper arm circumferences and triceps skinfold. Appetite did not differ between groups. Using piecewise mixed-effects quadratic models including all patients and time points, the main effects of LNS-VM were seen after starting ART and were significant for weight, body mass index, and mid-upper arm circumference. Conclusions: Provision of high levels of vitamins and minerals to patients referred for ART, delivered with substantial macronutrients, increased nutritional recovery but did not seem to act through treatment group differences in appetite. PMID:25501607

  13. Outcome of artemether-lumefantrine treatment for uncomplicated malaria in HIV-infected adult patients on anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria and HIV infections are both highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, with HIV-infected patients being at higher risks of acquiring malaria. The majority of antiretroviral (ART) and anti-malarial drugs are metabolized by the CYP450 system, creating a chance of drug-drug interaction upon co-administration. Limited data are available on the effectiveness of the artemether-lumefantrine combination (AL) when co-administered with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). The aim of this study was to compare anti-malarial treatment responses between HIV-1 infected patients on either nevirapine- or efavirenz-based treatment and those not yet on ART (control-arm) with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, treated with AL. Method This was a prospective, non-randomized, open-label study conducted in Bagamoyo district, with three arms of HIV-infected adults: efavirenz-based treatment arm (EFV-arm) n = 66, nevirapine-based treatment arm (NVP-arm) n = 128, and control-arm n = 75, with uncomplicated malaria. All patients were treated with AL and followed up for 28 days. The primary outcome measure was an adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR) after treatment with AL by day 28. Results Day 28 ACPR was 97.6%, 82.5% and 94.5% for the NVP-arm, EFV-arm and control-arm, respectively. No early treatment or late parasitological failure was reported. The cumulative risk of recurrent parasitaemia was >19-fold higher in the EFV-arm than in the control-arm (Hazard ratio [HR], 19.11 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 10.5–34.5]; P < 0.01). The cumulative risk of recurrent parasitaemia in the NVP-arm was not significantly higher than in the control-arm ([HR], 2.44 [95% {CI}, 0.79–7.6]; P = 0.53). The median (IQR) day 7 plasma concentrations of lumefantrine for the three arms were: 1,125 ng/m (638.8-1913), 300.4 ng/ml (220.8-343.1) and 970 ng/ml (562.1-1729) for the NVP-arm, the EFV-arm and the control-arm, respectively (P

  14. Changes in Quality of Life in 7 Older Adult Patients Receiving Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; Kimura, Melissa N.; Cowie, Harriet R.; de Groot, Caroline M.M.; McMinn, Elise A.P.; Sherson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to report on symptomatic and quality of life (QoL) changes in 7 older adult chiropractic patients who were receiving care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT). Clinical Features Seven patients were selected from 2 chiropractic offices in Auckland, New Zealand. Patients were included if they were older adults receiving AMCT care and for whom at least 2 QoL assessments had been performed. The patients, aged 69-80 years, primarily received care for a variety of musculoskeletal complaints. Intervention and Outcomes The patients reported improvements in their presenting complaints as well as a number of nonmusculoskeletal symptoms. Each patient demonstrated clinical improvements in their RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) results. The average improvement in QoL measured using a SF-36 questionnaire was 8.0 points in the physical component and 4.1 points in the mental component. Four cases had a second progress evaluation using the SF-36 and showed an overall improvement of 5.2 in the physical and 9.8 in the mental components from baseline. Conclusion This case series describes an improvement in QoL, as measured by the SF-36 instrument, as well as subjectively reported improvements in both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms in 7 older adults receiving chiropractic care. PMID:27069434

  15. Dolutegravir in antiretroviral-naive adults with HIV-1: 96-week results from a randomized dose-ranging study

    PubMed Central

    Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Reynes, Jacques; Lazzarin, Adriano; Voronin, Eugene; Pulido, Federico; Felizarta, Franco; Almond, Steve; Clair, Marty St; Flack, Nancy; Min, Sherene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety/tolerability of dolutegravir (DTG, S/GSK1349572), a potent inhibitor of HIV integrase, through the full 96 weeks of the SPRING-1 study. Design: ING112276 (SPRING-1) was a 96-week, randomized, partially blinded, phase IIb dose-ranging study. Methods: Treatment-naive adults with HIV received DTG 10, 25, or 50 mg once daily or efavirenz (EFV) 600 mg once daily (control arm) combined with investigator-selected dual nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone regimen (tenofovir/emtricitabine or abacavir/lamivudine). The primary endpoint of the study was the proportion of participants with plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies/ml, based on time to loss of virologic response at 16 weeks (conducted for the purpose of phase III dose selection), with a planned analysis at 96 weeks. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Results: Of 208 participants randomized to treatment, 205 received study drug. At week 96, the proportion of participants achieving plasma HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies/ml was 79, 78, and 88% for DTG 10, 25, and 50 mg, respectively, compared with 72% for EFV. The median increase from baseline in CD4+ cells was 338 cells/μl with DTG (all treatment groups combined) compared with 301 cells/μl with EFV (P = 0.155). No clinically significant dose-related trends in adverse events were observed, and fewer participants who received DTG withdrew because of adverse events (3%) compared with EFV (10%). Conclusion: Throughout the 96 weeks of the SPRING-1 study, DTG demonstrated sustained efficacy and favorable safety/tolerability in treatment-naive individuals with HIV-1. PMID:23807273

  16. Sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Weymann, Deirdre; Pratt, Brandy; Smolina, Kate; Gladstone, Emilie J.; Raymond, Colette; Mintzes, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to measure sex differences in the risk of receiving potentially inappropriate prescription drugs and to examine what are the factors that contribute to these differences. Design: a retrospective cohort study. Setting: community setting of British Columbia, Canada. Participants: residents of British Columbia aged 65 and older (n = 660,679). Measurements: we measured 2013 period prevalence of prescription dispensations satisfying the American Geriatrics Society's 2012 version of the Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. We used logistic regressions to test for associations between this outcome and a number of clinical and socioeconomic factors. Results: a larger share of women (31%) than of men (26%) filled one or more potentially inappropriate prescription in the community. The odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions are associated with several clinical and socioeconomic factors. After controlling for those factors, community-dwelling women were at 16% higher odds of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription than men (adjusted odds ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.12–1.21). Much of this sex difference stemmed from women's increased odds of receiving potentially inappropriate prescriptions for benzodiazepines and other hypnotics, for tertiary tricyclic antidepressants and for non-selective NSAIDs. Conclusion: there are significant sex differences in older adults' risk of receiving a potentially inappropriate prescription as a result of complex intersections between gender and other social constructs. Appropriate responses will therefore require changes in the information, norms and expectations of both prescribers and patients. PMID:27151390

  17. Albuminuria is associated with elevated acute phase reactants and proinflammatory markers in HIV-infected patients receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    O-charoen, Pichaya; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Gangcuangco, Louie Mar A; Keating, Sheila M; Norris, Philip J; Ng, Roland C K; Mitchell, Brooks I; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Chow, Dominic C

    2014-12-01

    Albuminuria among HIV-infected individuals has been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Inflammation has been associated with albuminuria. The pathophysiology of albuminuria in HIV-infected individuals is poorly understood. We investigated the association of albuminuria with inflammatory biomarkers among HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This is a cross-sectional analysis of participants enrolled in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular Cohort. Plasma inflammatory biomarkers were assessed using the Milliplex Human Cardiovascular disease multiplex assays. A random urine sample was collected for albumin measurement. Albuminuria was defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio of ≥30 mg/g. Framingham risk score was calculated and divided into three classes. Simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses were utilized to assess the correlation between plasma inflammatory biomarkers and albuminuria and were adjusted for Framingham risk category. Among 111 HIV-infected patients [median (IQR) age of 52 (46-57) years, 86% male, median (IQR) CD4 count of 489 (341-638) cells/mm(3), 85% with HIV RNA <50 copies/ml], 18 subjects (16.2%) had moderately increased albuminuria (albuminuria range between 30 and 300 mg/g) and 2 subjects (1.8%) had severely increased albuminuria (albuminuria more than 300 mg/g). In multivariable logistic models, sE-selectin, sVCAM-1, CRP, SAA, and SAP remained significantly associated with albuminuria after adjustment of CVD risk factors. This study showed an association between inflammation and albuminuria independent of previously reported risk factors for albuminuria in HIV-infected subjects who were on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Chronic inflammation despite potent antiretroviral treatment may contribute to higher rates of albuminuria among HIV-infected patients. PMID:25205472

  18. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  19. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  20. Patterns of symptom distress in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Mary E; Short, Thomas H; Moriarty, Helene J

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of the patterns of symptom distress in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer is an important first step in developing interventions that can potentially lessen symptom distress. The purposes of this secondary analysis were to describe the changes in patterns of symptom distress over time in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer, and to examine the relationship of selected demographic and clinical characteristics to symptom distress. Complete data were available for 117 patients. The patterns of symptom distress in adults receiving treatment for lung cancer varied between treatment groups and over time. Symptom distress scores were moderate to high on entry into the study, indicating that symptom management in newly diagnosed lung cancer patients is essential and should begin early in the course of illness. Moreover, clinical interventions should be tailored to the type of treatment. Various demographic and clinical variables were weak and inconsistent predictors of symptom distress, underscoring the importance of examining the role of psychosocial factors in mediating symptom distress. PMID:12418365

  1. Usefulness of highly active antiretroviral therapy on health-related quality of life of adult recipients in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Magafu, Mgaywa G M D; Moji, Kazuhiko; Igumbor, Ehimario U; Hashizume, Masahiro; Mizota, Tsutomu; Komazawa, Osuke; Cai, Guoxi; Yamamoto, Taro

    2009-07-01

    This study assessed health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) recipients aged 18 or older and associated factors, 2 years after HAART administration had started in Kagera, Tanzania. Using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), 329 HAART recipients were interviewed in May 2007. Questions on sociodemographic characteristics, chronic diseases (besides HIV/AIDS), HAART side effects and adherence to antiretroviral drugs were added. Treatment data, the first and latest available CD4 counts were retrieved from patients' records. Gender and age-adjusted mean scale scores of the sample were compared to those of the general Tanzanian population of the late 1990 s using t test. Logistic regression was used to explore the effect of sex, age, education level, income, chronic diseases, CD4 count, HAART side effects and adherence to antiretroviral drugs on recipients' physical functioning and mental health scale scores. The mean scale scores of HAART recipients were generally lower than those of the general population except for general health perceptions (p = 0.191) and mental health (p = 0.161). HAART recipients with chronic disease comorbidity were more likely to score below the general population's mean score for mental health (p = 0.007). While the effect of chronic disease comorbidity on physical functioning among those who recorded a CD4 count increase was negative (odds ratio [OR] = 13.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.7, 49.9), there was no effect on those who did not have such an increase. The control of chronic diseases among recipients should be given priority to improve their HRQOL. PMID:19534603

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding. PMID:25769886

  3. Pregnancy may be followed by an inflexion of the immune reconstitution in HIV-infected women who receive antiretroviral drugs before conception

    PubMed Central

    Le-Moing, Vincent; Taieb, Audrey; Longuet, Pascale; Lewden, Charlotte; Delcey, Véronique; Drobacheff, Marie Christine; Chêne, Geneviève; Leport, Catherine; the ANRS CO8 (APROCO-COPILOTE) study-group

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Whether pregnancy has an impact on evolution of CD4+ cell counts in women treated with highly potent antiretrovirals before conception remains largely unknown. Methods Among patients enrolled in the ANRS CO8 (APROCO/COPILOTE) cohort, we selected all women aged between 18 and 50 years at initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Slopes of CD4+ cell counts during follow-up were estimated using mixed longitudinal models with time-dependent indicators for pregnancy and delivery. Results Among the 260 selected HIV-infected women, a pregnancy occurred among 39 during a median follow-up of 66 months. Women who became pregnant had higher CD4+ cell count at baseline but this difference was progressively blurred during follow-up because they had a slower increase than women who did not become pregnant. The estimated slope of CD4+ cell count decreased significantly from +2.3 cells/mm3/month before pregnancy and in women who did not become pregnant to − 0.04 cells/mm3/month after delivery (p = 0.0003). Conclusion A significant increase in CD4+ cell count may be preferable before pregnancy in women treated with cART, in order to overcome the evolution observed after pregnancy. PMID:18795961

  4. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  5. Effects of Hydroxychloroquine on Immune Activation and Disease Progression Among HIV-Infected Patients Not Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paton, Nicholas I.; Goodall, Ruth L.; Dunn, David T.; Franzen, Samuel; Collaco-Moraes, Yolanda; Gazzard, Brian G.; Williams, Ian G.; Fisher, Martin J.; Winston, Alan; Fox, Julie; Orkin, Chloe; Herieka, Elbushra A.; Ainsworth, Jonathan G.; Post, Frank A.; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Context Therapies to decrease immune activation might be of benefit in slowing HIV disease progression. Objective To determine whether hydroxychloroquine decreases immune activation and slows CD4 cell decline. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial performed at 10 HIV outpatient clinics in the United Kingdom between June 2008 and February 2011. The 83 patients enrolled had asymptomatic HIV infection, were not taking antiretroviral therapy, and had CD4 cell counts greater than 400 cells/μL. Intervention Hydroxychloroquine, 400 mg, or matching placebo once daily for 48 weeks. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome measure was change in the proportion of activated CD8 cells (measured by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR surface markers), with CD4 cell count and HIV viral load as secondary outcomes. Analysis was by intention to treat using mixed linear models. Results There was no significant difference in CD8 cell activation between the 2 groups (−4.8% and −4.2% in the hydroxychloroquine and placebo groups, respectively, at week 48; difference, −0.6%; 95% CI, −4.8% to 3.6%; P=.80). Decline in CD4 cell count was greater in the hydroxychloroquine than placebo group (−85 cells/μL vs −23 cells/μL at week 48; difference, −62 cells/μL; 95% CI, −115 to −8; P=.03). Viral load increased in the hydroxychloroquine group compared with placebo (0.61 log10 copies/mL vs 0.23 log10 copies/mL at week 48; difference, 0.38 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.63; P=.003). Antiretroviral therapy was started in 9 patients in the hydroxychloroquine group and 1 in the placebo group. Trial medication was well tolerated, but more patients reported influenza-like illness in the hydroxychloroquine group compared with the placebo group (29% vs 10%; P=.03). Conclusion Among HIV-infected patients not taking antiretroviral therapy, the use of hydroxychloroquine compared with placebo did not reduce CD8 cell activation but did result in

  6. Alcohol and Race/Ethnicity Elicit Different Changes in Lipid Profiles in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Míguez-Burbano, Maria J.; Lewis, John E.; Malow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the impact of alcohol consumption (88 hazardous and 76 nonhazardous drinkers) and race/ethnicity on lipid profiles in individuals starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). At baseline, Whites and Hispanics had the most adverse lipid profiles, whereas Blacks had the least atherogenic. Whites and Hispanics showed higher increases in cholesterol (W = 11%; H = 6%), triglycerides (W = 40%; H = 24%), and low-density lipoprotein (10%) than Blacks (cholesterol = 4%; triglycerides = 9%; low-density lipoprotein = 4%). Hazardous alcohol consumption was correlated with increased lipids in each group. Hispanics had a clear trait risk for hypertriglyceridemia with HAART (1.9-fold) and with hazardous drinking (3.2-fold; p = .04). The highest risk for hypertriglyceridemia was found in heavy drinkers (3.75-fold; p = .05). Results underscore the importance of an alcohol/race interactive effect on HAART-associated dyslipidemia and the need for assessment and treatment of alcohol disorders. PMID:19427595

  7. Persistent apoptosis in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving potent antiretroviral therapy is associated with poor recovery of CD4 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hansjee, Natasha; Kaufmann, Gilbert R; Strub, Christoph; Weber, Rainer; Battegay, Manuel; Erb, Peter

    2004-06-01

    CD4 T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infection is partly the result of T-cell apoptosis. Spontaneous apoptosis (SA) and apoptosis markers Fas-associated death-domain-like IL-1 beta converting enzyme (FLICE)-like inhibitory protein (FLIP), Bcl-2, TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), TRAIL receptor 1, and Fas were determined in 55 HIV-1 infected persons treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for 48 months. Despite suppressive HAART, SA remained elevated. Increased SA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD8 T lymphocytes and increased TRAIL receptor 1 expression strongly predicted a poorer recovery of CD4 T-cell count. HAART did not significantly alter anti-or proapoptotic markers in cultured PBMCs and T lymphocytes. The significant relationship between residual T-lymphocyte apoptosis and CD4 T-cell recovery suggests that persistent apoptosis may impede immune restoration. PMID:15167285

  8. Brief Report: HIV Drug Resistance in Adults Failing Early Antiretroviral Treatment: Results From the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 Trial.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Jessica M; Hudelson, Sarah E; Ou, San-San; Hart, Stephen; Wallis, Carole; Morgado, Mariza G; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Tripathy, Srikanth; Hovind, Laura; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Sabin, Devin; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Zhang, Xinyi C; Eron, Joseph J; Gallant, Joel E; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James; Badal-Faesen, Sharlaa; Akelo, Victor; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Santos, Breno R; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Mayer, Kenneth H; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) reduces HIV transmission and has health benefits. HIV drug resistance can limit treatment options and compromise use of ART for HIV prevention. We evaluated drug resistance in 85 participants in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial who started ART at CD4 counts of 350-550 cells per cubic millimeter and failed ART by May 2011; 8.2% had baseline resistance and 35.3% had resistance at ART failure. High baseline viral load and less education were associated with emergence of resistance at ART failure. Resistance at ART failure was observed in 7 of 8 (87.5%) participants who started ART at lower CD4 cell counts. PMID:26859828

  9. Effects of a Low Dose of Fish Oil on Inflammatory Markers of Brazilian HIV-Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: A Randomized, Parallel, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Julicristie M.; Rondó, Patrícia H. C.; Lima, Lourdes R. A. V.; Fortuna, Elizabeth S.; Yudkin, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The benefits of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected subjects have been limited by an increased risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of a low dose of marine omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory marker concentrations in HIV-infected subjects under antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods: This was a randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled trial that investigated the effects of 3 g fish oil/day (540 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid—EPA plus 360 mg of docosahexaenoic acid—DHA) or 3 g soy oil/day (placebo) for 24 weeks in 83 male and non-pregnant female HIV-infected adults on ART. Results: There were no differences between groups for the measures at baseline. Multilevel analyses revealed no statistically significant relationship between the longitudinal changes in high sensitivity-C reactive protein (hs-CRP) (Wald Chi2 = 0.17, p = 0.918), fibrinogen (Wald Chi2 = 3.82, p = 0.148), and factor VIII (Wald Chi2 = 5.25, p = 0.073) with fish oil. No significant changes in interleukin-6 (IL6), interleukin-1 beta (IL1-beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) serum concentrations were observed with fish oil supplements for 12 weeks. Conclusions: Compared to placebo, a low dose of 900 mg omega-3 fatty acids (EPA plus DHA) in fish oil capsules did not change hs-CRP, fibrinogen, factor VIII, IL6, IL1-beta and TNF-alpha serum concentrations in HIV-infected subjects on ART. Further investigations should consider the assessment of more sensitive inflammatory markers or higher doses to evaluate the effects of marine omega-3 fatty acids in this population. Registered at the Nederlands Trial Register, Identifier no. NTR1798. PMID:26251920

  10. Greater change in bone turnover markers for efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate versus dolutegravir + abacavir/lamivudine in antiretroviral therapy-naive adults over 144 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Tebas, Pablo; Kumar, Princy; Hicks, Charles; Granier, Catherine; Wynne, Brian; Min, Sherene; Pappa, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Antiretroviral therapy initiation has been linked to bone mineral density and bone biomarker changes. We assessed long-term bone turnover biomarker effects over 144 weeks in patients initiating dolutegravir (DTG) + abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) versus efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (EFV/FTC/TDF). Methods: Patients randomized in SINGLE received DTG (50 mg once daily) + ABC/3TC or fixed-dose combination EFV/FTC/TDF. We evaluated vitamin D serum levels and bone turnover markers (BTMs), including type 1 collagen cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTx), osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP), and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), at baseline and weeks 48, 96, and 144. Results: Among the 833 enrolled patients (68% white, 85% men), baseline median age was 35 years (range 18–85), median CD4+ was 338 cells/μl, and median BMI was 24 kg/m2. Fifty-three percent of patients smoked, and 6% reported baseline vitamin D use, with no meaningful differences between groups. Relative to baseline, CTx, osteocalcin, BSAP, and P1NP increased; vitamin D decreased in both groups at weeks 48, 96, and 144. Changes from baseline typically peaked at weeks 48 or 96 and for the four analytes, excluding vitamin D, with the EFV/FTC/TDF group having significantly greater changes from baseline at all time points. Conclusion: DTG + ABC/3TC in antiretroviral therapy-naive patients resulted in significantly lower increases in BTMs (CTx, osteocalcin, BSAP, P1NP) compared with EFV/FTC/TDF over 144 weeks. The observed changes are consistent with results from other smaller, randomized trials. These differences in BTMs likely correlate with changes in bone mineral density over time. PMID:26355674

  11. Predictors of Poor Retention in Care of HIV-infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Korea: Five-Year Hospital-based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Jeong Eun; Cho, Heerim; Lee, Seung Geun; Chen, Dong Hwan; Chung, Joo Seop; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2016-01-01

    Poor retention in care (RIC) is associated with higher antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and worse survival. Identifying high risk patients for poor RIC is important for targeted intervention. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in Korea. HIV-infected patients initiating ART during 2002-2008 were included. 5 year-RIC was measured by hospital visit constancy (HVC) at 5 years after initiating ART. Among 247 enrolled patients, 179 (72.5%) remained in care, 20 (8.1%) were transferred to other hospitals, 9 (3.6%) died and 39 (15.8%) were lost to follow-up. We compared the demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics between the groups with 100% HVC (n = 166, 67.2%) and ≤ 50% HVC (n = 33, 13.4%). In multivariable analysis, ART-starting age ≤ 30 years (odds ratio [OR] 4.08 vs. > 50; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10-15.15, P = 0.036), no non-HIV related comorbidity (OR 2.94 vs. comorbidity ≥ 1; 95% CI 1.02-8.49, P = 0.046), baseline CD4 cell count > 300 cells/μL (OR 3.58 vs. ≤ 200; 95% CI 1.33-9.65, P = 0.012) were significant predictable factors of poor RIC. HIV/AIDS care-givers should pay attention to young patients with higher baseline CD4 cell counts and no non-HIV related comorbidity. PMID:26955237

  12. A Randomized Trial of Ready-to-Use Supplementary Food Versus Corn-Soy Blend Plus as Food Rations for HIV-Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Louise C.; Teng, Jessica E.; Gregory Jerome, J.; Bonds, Matthew; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Franke, Molly F.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The epidemics of food insecurity, malnutrition, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) frequently overlap. HIV treatment programs increasingly provide nutrient-dense ready-to-use supplementary foods (RUSFs) to patients living with HIV and food insecurity, but in the absence of wasting, it is not known if RUSF confers benefit above less costly food commodities. Methods. We performed a randomized trial in rural Haiti comparing an RUSF with less costly corn-soy blend plus (CSB+) as a monthly supplement to patients with HIV infection who were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) <24 months prior to study start. We compared 6- and 12-month outcomes by ration type in terms of immunologic response, body mass index (BMI), adherence to ART, general health quality of life, household food insecurity, and household wealth. Results. A cohort of 524 patients with HIV receiving ART was randomized and followed over time. Median CD4 cell count at baseline was 339 cells/µL (interquartile range [IQR], 197–475 cells/µL) for the CSB+ group, and 341 cells/µL (IQR, 213–464/µL) for the RUSF group. Measured outcomes improved from baseline over time, but there were no statistically significant differences in change for BMI, household wealth index, hunger, general health perception score, or adherence to ART by ration type at 6 or 12 months. The RUSF group had higher CD4 count at 12 months, but this was also not statistically significant. Conclusions. In 12 months of follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in outcomes between those receiving RUSF-based compared with CSB+-based rations in a cohort of HIV-infected adults on ART in rural Haiti. PMID:24536058

  13. Minimal impact of an iron-fortified lipid-based nutrient supplement on Hb and iron status: a randomised controlled trial in malnourished HIV-positive African adults starting antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    James, Philip; Friis, Henrik; Woodd, Susannah; Rehman, Andrea M; PrayGod, George; Kelly, Paul; Koethe, John R; Filteau, Suzanne

    2015-08-14

    Anaemia, redistribution of Fe, malnutrition and heightened systemic inflammation during HIV infection confer an increased risk of morbidity and mortality in HIV patients. We analysed information on Fe status and inflammation from a randomised, double blind, controlled phase-III clinical trial in Lusaka, Zambia and Mwanza, Tanzania. Malnourished patients (n 1815) were recruited at referral to antiretroviral therapy (ART) into a two-stage nutritional rehabilitation programme, randomised to receive a lipid-based nutrient supplement with or without added micronutrients. Fe was included in the intervention arm during the second stage, given from 2 to 6 weeks post-ART. Hb, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were measured at recruitment and 6 weeks post-ART. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the impact of the intervention, and the effect of reducing inflammation from recruitment to week 6 on Hb and Fe status. There was no effect of the intervention on Hb, serum ferritin, sTfR or serum CRP. A one-log decrease of serum CRP from recruitment to week 6 was associated with a 1.81 g/l increase in Hb (95% CI 0.85, 2.76; P< 0.001), and a 0.11 log decrease in serum ferritin (95% CI - 0.22, 0.03; P= 0.012) from recruitment to week 6. There was no association between the change in serum CRP and the change in sTfR over the same time period (P= 0.78). In malnourished, HIV-infected adults receiving dietary Fe, a reduction in inflammation in the early ART treatment period appears to be a precondition for recovery from anaemia. PMID:26179616

  14. Factors associated with adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in homeless or unstably housed adults living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Royal, Scott W; Kidder, Daniel P; Patrabansh, Satyendra; Wolitski, Richard J; Holtgrave, David R; Aidala, Angela; Pals, Sherri; Stall, Ron

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are homeless or unstably housed. We evaluated homeless or unstably housed PLWHA (n=644) in three US cities were enrolled in the Housing and Health Study. Using baseline data and controlling for gender, race, age, and education, we examined associations between self-reported two- and Seven-day adherence and access to healthcare, mental health, substance use, and attitudes toward HIV medical therapy. Of the 644 participants, 358 (55%) were currently on HAART. For two-day adherence, 280 (78%) reported missing no prescribed doses (100% adherence), and for seven-day adherence, 291 (81%) reported > or =90% adherence. Logistic regression analyses indicated being younger, not having health insurance, and drug use were associated with missing > or =1 dose over the past two days. Scoring lower on SF-36 mental component summary scale and having greater risk of depression (CES-D) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale) were associated with poorer adherence for both two- and seven-day outcomes. Negative attitudes toward HIV treatment were also associated with lower adherence. Adherence to HIV medications in this population is similar to other groups. Coexisting problems of access to healthcare, higher risk of mental health problems, along with poorer attitudes toward treatment are associated with increased likelihood of missing doses. Comprehensive models of HIV care that include a continuum of medical and social services are essential for treating this population. PMID:19401865

  15. A Reduction in Adult Blood Stream Infection and Case Fatality at a Large African Hospital following Antiretroviral Therapy Roll-Out

    PubMed Central

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Houston, Angela; Mukaka, Mavuto; Komrower, Dan; Mwalukomo, Thandie; Tenthani, Lyson; Jahn, Andreas; Moore, Mike; Peters, Remco P. H.; Gordon, Melita A.; Everett, Dean B.; French, Neil; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Allain, Theresa J.; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Blood-stream infection (BSI) is one of the principle determinants of the morbidity and mortality associated with advanced HIV infection, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last 10 years, there has been rapid roll-out of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and cotrimoxazole prophylactic therapy (CPT) in many high HIV prevalence African countries. Methods A prospective cohort of adults with suspected BSI presenting to Queen's Hospital, Malawi was recruited between 2009 and 2010 to describe causes of and outcomes from BSI. Comparison was made with a cohort pre-dating ART roll-out to investigate whether and how ART and CPT have affected BSI. Malawian census and Ministry of Health ART data were used to estimate minimum incidence of BSI in Blantyre district. Results 2,007 patients were recruited, 90% were HIV infected. Since 1997/8, culture-confirmed BSI has fallen from 16% of suspected cases to 10% (p<0.001) and case fatality rate from confirmed BSI has fallen from 40% to 14% (p<0.001). Minimum incidence of BSI was estimated at 0.03/1000 years in HIV uninfected vs. 2.16/1000 years in HIV infected adults. Compared to HIV seronegative patients, the estimated incidence rate-ratio for BSI was 80 (95% CI:46–139) in HIV-infected/untreated adults, 568 (95% CI:302–1069) during the first 3 months of ART and 30 (95% CI:16–59) after 3 months of ART. Conclusions Following ART roll-out, the incidence of BSI has fallen and clinical outcomes have improved markedly. Nonetheless, BSI incidence remains high in the first 3 months of ART despite CPT. Further interventions to reduce BSI-associated mortality in the first 3 months of ART require urgent evaluation. PMID:24643091

  16. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services...

  17. Reclaiming Joy: Pilot Evaluation of a Mental Health Peer Support Program for Older Adults Who Receive Medicaid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Rosemary K.; Sergeant, Julie F.; Landry, Sarah; Leedahl, Skye N.; Rachlin, Roxanne; Koenig, Terry; Graham, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stigma and lack of access to providers create barriers to mental health treatment for older adults living in the community. In order to address these barriers, we developed and evaluated a peer support intervention for older adults receiving Medicaid services. Design and Methods: Reclaiming Joy is a mental health intervention that pairs…

  18. A Randomized, Single-Blind, Substitution Study of OROS Methylphenidate (Concerta) in ADHD Adults Receiving Immediate Release Methylphenidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Mick, Eric; Surman, Craig B. H.; Hammerness, Paul; Doyle, Robert; Aleardi, Megan; Kotarski, Meghan; Williams, Courtney G.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the efficacy, tolerability, and compliance of an extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) in adults with ADHD receiving immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH). Method: Participants were outpatient adults with ADHD who were stable on IR-MPH-administered TID. Participants…

  19. Long-term immune responses and comparative effectiveness of one or two doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in HIV-positive adults in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aristine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Tsai, Mao-Song; Su, Yi-Ching; Liu, Wen-Chun; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection impairs maintenance of immunological memory, yet few studies of HIV-positive adults receiving 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) have followed them beyond the first year. We determined and compared the durability of serological responses and the clinical outcomes of HIV-positive adults annually for five years following vaccination with one or two doses of PCV7. Methods In this non-randomized clinical trial, 221 pneumococcal vaccine-naïve HIV-positive adults receiving one (n=109) or two doses four weeks apart (n=112) of PCV7 between 2008 and 2010 were longitudinally followed for evaluation of significant serological response and for episodes of pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Results At the time of vaccination, the two groups were well matched for age, risk factors, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) coverage, CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA load (PVL). At the end of five years, the CD4 counts for the one- and two-dose groups had increased from 407 and 406 to 550 and 592 cells/µL, respectively, and 82.4 and 81.6% of the participants had fully suppressed PVL. Significant immune responses to ≥2 serotypes persisted for 67.9 vs 78.6%, 64.2 vs 71.4%, 66.1 vs 71.4%, 57.8 vs 69.6% in the second, third, fourth and fifth years after one and two doses of PCV7 in the intention-to-treat analysis, respectively. In multivariate analysis, immunization with two doses of PCV7 (odds ratio (OR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10 to 2.65, p=0.016), concurrent cART (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.16 to 4.00, p=0.015) and CD4 proliferation (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.27, p=0.031) were predictive of persistent serological responses in the fifth year. Only one patient in the one-dose group had documented pneumococcal pneumonia (non-bacteraemic) and none had invasive pneumococcal disease in the 6.5 years of follow-up. Conclusions One or two doses of PCV7 achieve durable seroprotective responses in HIV-treated participants; however, two

  20. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 Cervicovaginal Shedding Among Women Living With HIV-1 and Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Burkina Faso: An 8-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Low, Andrea J.; Nagot, Nicolas; Weiss, Helen A.; Konate, Issouf; Kania, Dramane; Segondy, Michel; Meda, Nicolas; van de Perre, Philippe; Mayaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) replication is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess factors associated with cervicovaginal HSV-2 DNA shedding and genital ulcer disease (GUD) in a cohort of women living with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) in Burkina Faso. Methods. Participants were screened for cervicovaginal HSV-2 DNA, GUD, cervicovaginal and systemic HIV-1 RNA, and reproductive tract infections every 3–6 months over 8 years. Associations with HSV-2 shedding and quantity were examined using random-effects logistic and linear regression, respectively. Results. Of the 236 women with data on HSV-2 shedding, 151 took ART during the study period. Cervicovaginal HSV-2 DNA was detected in 42% of women (99 of 236) in 8.2% of visits (151 of 1848). ART was associated with a reduction in the odds of HSV-2 shedding, which declined for each year of ART use (odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], .59–.92). In the multivariable model, the impact of ART was primarily associated with suppression of systemic HIV-1 RNA (adjusted OR, 0.32; 95% CI, .15–.67). A reduction in the odds of GUD was also observed during ART, mainly in those with HIV-1 suppression (adjusted OR, 0.53; 95% CI, .25–1.11). Conclusions. ART is strongly associated with a decrease in cervicovaginal HSV-2 shedding, and the impact was sustained over several years. PMID:26475931

  1. CD4 trajectory adjusting for dropout among HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in an East African HIV care centre

    PubMed Central

    Kiragga, Agnes N; Lok, Judith J; Musick, Beverly S; Bosch, Ronald J; Mwangi, Ann; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Estimates of CD4 response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) obtained by averaging data from patients in care, overestimate population CD4 response and treatment program effectiveness because they do not consider data from patients who are deceased or not in care. We use mathematical methods to assess and adjust for this bias based on patient characteristics. Design We examined data from 25,261 HIV-positive patients from the East Africa IeDEA Consortium. Methods We used inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW) to represent patients not in care by patients in care with similar characteristics. We address two questions: What would the median CD4 be “had everyone starting ART remained on observation?” and “were everyone starting ART maintained on treatment?” Results Routine CD4 count estimates were higher than adjusted estimates even under the best-case scenario of maintaining all patients on treatment. Two years after starting ART, differences between estimates diverged from 30 cells/µL, assuming similar mortality and treatment access among dropouts as patients in care, to over 100 cells/µL assuming 20% lower survival and 50% lower treatment access among dropouts. When considering only patients in care, the proportion of patients with CD4 above 350 cells/µL was 50% adjusted to below 30% when accounting for patients not in care. One-year mortality diverged 6–14% from the naïve estimates depending on assumptions about access to care among lost patients. Conclusions Ignoring mortality and loss to care results in over-estimation of ART response for patients starting treatment and exaggerates the efficacy of treatment programs administering it. PMID:25131801

  2. Impact of HIV-1 tropism on the emergence of non-AIDS events in HIV-infected patients receiving fully suppressive antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maffongelli, Gaetano; Alteri, Claudia; Gentilotti, Elisa; Bertoli, Ada; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Malagnino, Vincenzo; Svicher, Valentina; Santoro, Maria M.; Dori, Luca; Perno, Carlo F.; Andreoni, Massimo; Sarmati, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The impact of HIV-1 tropism on the emergence of non-AIDS events was evaluated in a cohort of 116 antiretroviral therapy (ART) responder patients. Methods: The patients were followed for the emergence of hypertension, renal impairment, metabolic and bone disorders (defined as non-AIDS events) each 8 weeks at standard visits. A V3 plasma sequence genotype analysis was performed at the time of ART initiation and the geno2pheno algorithm with the results that defines the false-positive rate (FPR) was used to infer HIV tropism. The associations between the non-AIDS events and the FPR at baseline were evaluated using the χ2 test for trend. A Cox-regression analysis using the counting process formulation of Andersen and Gill was performed to define whether the emergence of non-AIDS events was correlated to FPR. Results: The prevalence of at least one non-AIDS event resulted higher in patients with a FPR below 10% than in patients with a R5 virus (P = 0.033). Patients with a FPR below 5.0% most frequently developed non-AIDS events during ART (P = 0.01). A higher prevalence of patients with at least two AIDS events was found in the group of patients with a FPR below 5.0% with respect to the others (P < 0.001). At multivariate Cox-regression analysis, having an X4 virus and age were independently associated with a higher probability of non-AIDS event development. Conclusion: This study shows that an X4 virus, particularly a FPR less than 5%, is related to non-AIDS events development. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. PMID:26595543

  3. Quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA by real-time PCR for occurrence of CMV disease in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gourlain, Karine; Salmon, Dominique; Gault, Elyanne; Leport, Catherine; Katlama, Christine; Matheron, Sophie; Costagliola, Dominique; Mazeron, Marie-Christine; Fillet, Anne-Marie

    2003-03-01

    In HIV-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) included in the Predivir cohort, we have evaluated the usefulness of CMV DNA quantitation by a TaqMan PCR assay from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to predict CMV disease occurrence. In parallel with the immune restoration after treatment by HAART, the percentage of positive samples decreased progressively from 7.3% at Day 0 to 3.5% at Month 12. Among the CMV markers, the smallest concordance with PBL CMV TaqMan PCR, as evaluated by kappa, was observed with pp65 antigenemia, whereas concordance with all other CMV markers was high. Among the 16 patients with CMV DNA copies at least once >100/150,000 cells, CMV disease occurred in six during follow-up, whereas among the 159 patients with CMV DNA copies always <10/150,000 cells, CMV disease occurred in three and among the seven patients with CMV DNA copies >10 and <100 occurred in only one. In univariate Cox models, all the CMV markers including PBL CMV TaqMan PCR >10/150,000 cells (RR: 27.6, IC95: 7.1-107.2), the CD4 cell count <75 cells/mm(3) and the HIV viral load >100,000 copies/ml were predictive for CMV disease. In a stepwise multivariate analysis, which should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of events (n = 10), three covariates were associated independently with CMV disease: pp65 antigenemia >100 nuclei/200,000, PBL CMV TaqMan PCR >10 copies/150,000 cells and HIV viral load remaining or increasing >100,000 copies/ml. PMID:12526052

  4. Feasibility and acceptability of mobile phone short message service as a support for patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiho; Zhang, Wendy; Nyonyitono, Maureen; Lourenco, Lillian; Nanfuka, Mastula; Okoboi, Stephen; Birungi, Josephine; Lester, Richard T; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Munderi, Paula; Moore, David M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mobile phone technologies have been promoted to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We studied the receptiveness of patients in a rural Ugandan setting to the use of short messaging service (SMS) communication for such purposes. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis measuring mobile phone ownership and literacy amongst patients of The AIDS Support Organisation (TASO) in Jinja, Uganda. We performed bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine associations between explanatory variables and a composite outcome of being literate and having a mobile phone. Results From June 2012 to August 2013, we enrolled 895 participants, of whom 684 (76%) were female. The median age was 44 years. A total of 576 (63%) were both literate and mobile phone users. Of these, 91% (527/ 576) responded favourably to the potential use of SMS for health communication, while only 38.9% (124/319) of others were favourable to the idea (p<0.001). A lower proportion of literate mobile phone users reported optimal adherence to ART (86.4% vs. 90.6%; p=0.007). Male participants (AOR=2.81; 95% CI 1.83–4.30), sub-optimal adherence (AOR=1.76; 95% CI 1.12–2.77), those with waged or salaried employment (AOR=2.35; 95% CI 1.23–4.49), crafts/trade work (AOR=2.38; 95% CI 1.11–5.12), or involved in petty trade (AOR=1.85; 95% CI 1.09–3.13) (in comparison to those with no income) were more likely to report mobile phone ownership and literacy. Conclusions In a rural Ugandan setting, we found that over 60% of patients could potentially benefit from a mobile phone-based ART adherence support. However, support for such an intervention was lower for other patients. PMID:26654029

  5. Relationships between Inflammation, Immune Activation and Bone Health among HIV-Infected Adults on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Kristine M.; O’Riordan, MaryAnn; Labbato, Danielle; McComsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the association between bone health and inflammation, T-cell activation and monocyte activation among HIV-infected persons on stable antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of all subjects enrolling in the Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy bone with RosuvastatiN in HIV (SATURN-HIV) trial with available skeletal assessments by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, inflammation, and immune activation markers. Analyses used Wilcoxon rank sum tests, Spearman correlation coefficients and linear regression. Results 142 subjects were included: 78% male, 69% African-American, median age 46.3 years, CD4+ count 604 cells/μL, and 77% with undetectable HIV-1 RNA. 23% had osteopenia/osteoporosis at the hip; 21% at the lumbar spine. sVCAM-1 was correlated with hip (r=−0.22) and spine (r=−0.23 ) BMD, and bone turnover markers (r=0.20–0.33; all p <0.05). No significant correlations were observed between BMD and T-cell activation (%CD38HLA-DR on CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells), monocyte activation (CD14CD16, sCD14, sCD163), or inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α, hs-CRP, d-dimer, RANKL, OPG, sTNF-RI and II). In regression models including traditional bone risk factors, hip BMD was associated with age, race, and body mass index; spine BMD was associated with race, family history of hip fracture, trunk fat, tenofovir, and HIV RNA; bone resorption (CTX) was associated with sICAM-1 and trunk fat; bone formation (P1NP) was associated with sVCAM-1, trunk and limb fat (p≤0.05). Conclusions Future studies should evaluate the longitudinal association of the adhesion molecules to further elucidate potential contributory mechanisms of bone loss among HIV-infected persons on stable ART. PMID:24525466

  6. Effects of 96 Weeks of Rosuvastatin on Bone, Muscle, and Fat in HIV-Infected Adults on Effective Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Kristine M; Jiang, Ying; Debanne, Sara M; McComsey, Grace A

    2016-04-01

    Heightened inflammation and immune activation are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) and lean body mass (LBM) among HIV-infected persons. We hypothesized that a reduction in inflammation with rosuvastatin would be associated with improvements in BMD and LBM. HIV-infected participants on stable antiretroviral therapy without statin indication and with heightened immune activation (≥19% CD8(+)CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells) or inflammation (hsCRP ≥2 mg/liter) were randomized to rosuvastatin 10 mg daily or placebo for 96 weeks. Among 72 participants randomized to rosuvastatin and 75 to placebo, there were no significant differences in the relative changes in BMD (p > 0.29) or in fat (p ≥ 0.19). A trend toward increased LBM (p = 0.059) was seen in the rosuvastatin arm without differences in creatinine kinase or self-reported physical activity (p ≥ 0.10). In a multivariable regression model, rosuvastatin was associated with a significant positive effect on LBM after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, and detectable HIV-1 viral load. Higher baseline sCD163 correlated with increases in LBM from weeks 0 to 96 (p = 0.023); greater changes in total and leg lean mass were seen among statin users with higher compared to lower baseline IP-10 levels (LBM 1.8 vs. -0.3%; p = 0.028 and leg lean mass 2.9 vs. -1.7%; p = 0.012). Rosuvastatin is associated with an absence of toxicity on BMD and a potential benefit on LBM over 96 weeks of therapy. The preservation of LBM in the rosuvastatin arm over the 2 years of the study is of major clinical relevance in delaying loss of muscle mass with aging. PMID:26477698

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Changes in Adiponectin and Endothelial Function in HIV-Infected Adults After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Stein, James H.; Cotter, Bruno R.; Murdock, Deborah G.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Dube, Michael P.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Haas, David W.; Torriani, Francesca J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Studies in persons of European descent have suggested that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups influence antiretroviral therapy (ART) toxicity. We explored associations between mtDNA variants and changes in endothelial function and biomarkers among non-Hispanic white, ART-naive subjects starting ART. A5152s was a substudy of A5142, a randomized trial of initial class-sparing ART regimens that included efavirenz or lopinavir/ritonavir with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), or both without NRTIs. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and cardiovascular biomarker assessments were performed at baseline and at weeks 4 and 24. Ten haplogroup-defining mtDNA polymorphisms were determined. FMD and biomarker changes from baseline to week 24 by mtDNA variant were assessed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Thirty-nine non-Hispanic white participants had DNA and 24-week data. The nonsynonymous m.10398A>G mtDNA polymorphism (N=8) was associated with higher median baseline adiponectin (5.0 vs. 4.2 μg/ml; p=0.003), greater absolute (−1.9 vs. −0.2 μg/ml) and relative (−33% vs. −3%) adiponectin decreases (p<0.001 for both), and lower week 24 brachial artery FMD (3.6% vs. 5.4%; p=0.04). Individual mtDNA haplogroups, including haplogroups H (N=13) and U (N=6), were not associated with adiponectin or FMD changes. In this small pilot study, adiponectin and brachial artery FMD on ART differed in non-Hispanic whites with a nonsynonymous mtDNA variant associated with several human diseases. These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that mtDNA variation influences metabolic ART effects. Validation studies in larger populations and in different racial/ethnic groups that include m.10398G carriers are needed. PMID:23944767

  8. Pill Burden Influences the Association Between Time-Based Prospective Memory and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Younger But Not Older HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, David P; Weber, Erica; Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Avci, Gunes; Woods, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) is associated with antiretroviral (ARV) adherence in HIV, but little is known about how pill burden and age might affect this association. One hundred seventeen older (≥50 years) and 82 younger (<50 years) HIV-infected adults were administered a measure of PM in the laboratory and subsequently were monitored for ARV adherence for 30 days using the Medication Event Monitoring System. In the older group, better time-based PM performance was associated with higher likelihood of adherence, irrespective of pill burden. Within the younger sample, time-based PM was positively related to adherence only in participants with lower pill burdens. Younger HIV-infected individuals with higher pill burdens may overcome the normal effects of time-based PM on adherence through compensatory medication-taking strategies, whereas suboptimal use of these strategies by younger HIV-infected individuals with lower pill burdens may heighten their risk of ARV nonadherence secondary to deficits in time-based PM. PMID:27160771

  9. Artemether-Lumefantrine Exposure in HIV-Infected Nigerian Subjects on Nevirapine-Containing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sunil; Fehintola, Fatai; Huang, Liusheng; Olson, Alexander; Adedeji, Waheed A; Darin, Kristin M; Morse, Gene D; Murphy, Robert L; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Akinyinka, Olusegun O; Adewole, Isaac F; Aweeka, Francesca T; Scarsi, Kimberly K

    2015-12-01

    Coadministration of nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and artemether-lumefantrine is reported to result in variable changes in lumefantrine exposure. We conducted an intensive pharmacokinetic study with 11 HIV-infected adults who were receiving artemether-lumefantrine plus nevirapine-based ART, and we compared the results with those for 16 HIV-negative adult historical controls. Exposure to artemether and lumefantrine was significantly lower and dihydroartemisinin exposure was unchanged in subjects receiving nevirapine-based ART, compared with controls. Nevirapine exposure was unchanged before and after artemether-lumefantrine administration. PMID:26392500

  10. Evidence of Subclinical mtDNA Alterations in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Compared to HIV-Negative Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Money, Deborah M.; Wagner, Emily C.; Maan, Evelyn J.; Chaworth-Musters, Tessa; Gadawski, Izabelle; van Schalkwyk, Julie E.; Forbes, John C.; Burdge, David R.; Albert, Arianne Y. K.; Lohn, Zoe; Côté, Hélène C. F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) can effectively prevent vertical transmission of HIV but there is potential risk of adverse maternal, foetal or infant effects. Specifically, the effect of cART use during pregnancy on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in HIV-positive (HIV+) women is unclear. We sought to characterize subclinical alterations in peripheral blood mtDNA levels in cART-treated HIV+ women during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Methods This prospective longitudinal observational cohort study enrolled both HIV+ and HIV-negative (HIV-) pregnant women. Clinical data and blood samples were collected at three time points in pregnancy (13-<23 weeks, 23-<30 weeks, 30–40 weeks), and at delivery and six weeks post-partum in HIV+ women. Peripheral blood mtDNA to nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio was measured by qPCR. Results Over a four year period, 63 HIV+ and 42 HIV- women were enrolled. HIV+ women showed significantly lower mtDNA/nDNA ratios compared to HIV- women during pregnancy (p = 0.003), after controlling for platelet count and repeated measurements using a multivariable mixed-effects model. Ethnicity, gestational age (GA) and substance use were also significantly associated with mtDNA/nDNA ratio (p≤0.02). Among HIV+ women, higher CD4 nadir was associated with higher mtDNA/nDNA ratios (p<0.0001), and these ratio were significantly lower during pregnancy compared to the postpartum period (p<0.0001). Conclusions In the context of this study, it was not possible to distinguish between mtDNA effects related to HIV infection versus cART therapy. Nevertheless, while mtDNA levels were relatively stable over time in both groups during pregnancy, they were significantly lower in HIV+ women compared to HIV- women. Although no immediate clinical impact was observed on maternal or infant health, lower maternal mtDNA levels may exert long-term effects on women and children and remain a concern. Improved knowledge of such subclinical alterations is

  11. Age at Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation Predicts Immune Recovery, Death, and Loss to Follow-Up Among HIV-Infected Adults in Urban Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jessica; Mwale, Jonas; Marx, Melissa A.; Goma, Fastone M.; Mulenga, Lloyd B.; Stringer, Jeffrey S.A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Chi, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed the association of age at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation with CD4+ T cell count recovery, death, and loss to follow-up (LTFU) among HIV-infected adults in Zambia. We compared baseline characteristics of patients by sex and age at ART initiation [categorized as 16–29 years, 30–39 years, 40–49 years, 50–59 years, and 60 years and older]. We used the medication possession ratio to assess adherence and analysis of covariance to measure the adjusted change in CD4+ T cell count during ART. Using Cox proportional hazard regression, we examined the association of age with death and LTFU. In a secondary analysis, we repeated models with age as a continuous variable. Among 92,130 HIV-infected adults who initiated ART, the median age was 34 years and 6,281 (6.8%) were aged ≥50 years. Compared with 16–29 year olds, 40–49 year olds (–46 cells/mm3), 50–59 year olds (–53 cells/mm3), and 60+ year olds (–60 cells/mm3) had reduced CD4+ T cell gains during ART. The adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) for death was increased for individuals aged ≥40 years (AHR 1.25 for 40–49 year olds, 1.56 for 50–59 year olds, and 2.97 for 60+ year olds). Adherence and retention in care were poorest among 16–29 year olds but similar in other groups. As a continuous variable, a 5-year increase in age predicted reduced CD4+ T cell count recovery and increased risk of death. Increased age at ART initiation was associated with poorer clinical outcomes, while age <30 years was associated with a higher likelihood of being lost to follow-up. HIV treatment guidelines should consider age-specific recommendations. PMID:24998881

  12. Effect of BMI and fat mass on HIV disease progression in HIV-infected, antiretroviral treatment-naïve adults in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Martinez, S S; Campa, A; Bussmann, H; Moyo, S; Makhema, J; Huffman, F G; Williams, O D; Essex, M; Marlink, R; Baum, M K

    2016-06-01

    An obesity paradox has been proposed in many conditions including HIV. Studies conducted to investigate obesity and its effect on HIV disease progression have been inconclusive and are lacking for African settings. This study investigated the relationship between overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and HIV disease progression in HIV+ asymptomatic adults not on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Botswana over 18 months. A cohort study in asymptomatic, ART-naïve, HIV+ adults included 217 participants, 139 with BMI of 18·0-24·9 kg/m2 and seventy-eight participants with BMI≥25 kg/m2. The primary outcome was time to event (≥25 % decrease in cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count) during 18 months of follow-up; secondary outcomes were time to event of CD4 cell count<250 cells/µl and AIDS-defining conditions. Proportional survival hazard models were used to compare hazard ratios (HR) on time to events of HIV disease progression over 18 months. Higher baseline BMI was associated with significantly lower risk of an AIDS-defining condition during the follow-up (HR 0·218; 95 % CI 0·068, 0·701; P=0·011). Higher fat mass at baseline was also significantly associated with decreased risk of AIDS-defining conditions during the follow-up (HR 0·855; 95 % CI 0·741, 0·987; P=0·033) and the combined outcome of having CD4 cell count≤250/µl and AIDS-defining conditions, whichever occurred earlier (HR 0·918; 95 % CI 0·847, 0·994; P=0·036). All models were adjusted for covariates. Higher BMI and fat mass among the HIV-infected, ART-naïve participants were associated with slower disease progression. Mechanistic research is needed to evaluate the association between BMI, fat mass and HIV disease progression. PMID:27087233

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Enhancing Interventions for Adolescents and Young Adults 13–24 Years of Age: A Review of the Evidence Base

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Youth living with HIV are highly under-represented in the evidence base for adherence interventions, despite their diverse and unique needs and barriers. Objective: This systematic review aimed to identify antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions specifically targeting adolescents and young adults (defined as ages 13–24) with the goal of characterizing the evidence base. Methods: Articles were identified using the PubMed database and cover work published through September 14, 2015. Inclusion criteria: (1) average age 13 to 24, (2) HIV positive, (3) on or beginning ART, (4) intervention targeted ART adherence in full or in part, (5) reported adherence, viral load, and/or CD4 count outcomes. Strength of evidence was defined as level 1 [randomized controlled trial (RCT) with significance testing on outcomes], 2 (within group studies with statistical testing on outcomes), 3 (RCTs with descriptive results), or 4 (within group studies with descriptive results). Results: Of 151 articles, 10 met inclusion criteria. Published between 2003 and 2014, these studies evaluated diverse intervention approaches. Most were conducted in the US and were small pilots that have yet to be replicated despite promising results. Only 3 studies met criteria for highest level strength of evidence; 2 supported a phone-based counseling approach with adherence monitors and 1 for weekly individual and family counseling. Conclusions: Despite nearly 20 years passing since the wide-scale availability of ART, and clear recognition that adolescents and youth adults fair worse on the cascade of HIV care, the evidence base remains sparse and underdeveloped. Promising approaches need replication and more rigorous studies are desperately needed. PMID:26959190

  14. [National consensus document by GESIDA/National Aids Plan on antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2011 update)].

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    The update of these adult antiretroviral treatment (cART) recommendations has been carried out by consensus of a panel consisting of members of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (Gesida, AIDS Study Group) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS, Spanish AIDS Plan) who have reviewed the antiretroviral efficacy and safety advances in clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals (PubMed and Embase), or presented in medical scientific meetings. Three levels of evidence were defined according to the data source: randomized studies (level A), cohort or case-control studies (level B), and expert opinion (level C). The decision to recommend, consider or not to recommend antiretroviral treatment (ART) was established by consensus in each situation. The current treatment of choice for HIV infection is the combination of three drugs. Combined ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection, and guidelines on this treatment in patients with an opportunistic type C infection are included. In asymptomatic patients, initiation of ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: a) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts <350 cells/μL; b) Therapy should be recommended when CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/μL, except when CD4 are stabilized, there is low plasma viral load, or the patient not willing; c) Therapy could be deferred when CD4 counts are above 500 cells/ μL, but should be considered in cases of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, hepatitis B fulfilling treatment criteria, high cardiovascular risk, HIV nephropathy, viral load > 100,000 copies/ mL, proportion of CD4 cells < 14%, in people aged >55 years, and in cases of discordant serological sexual couples in order to reduce transmission. cART should include 2 reverse transcriptase inhibitor nucleoside analogues (AN) and a non-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NN) or 2 AN and a

  15. Switching Lopinavir/Ritonavir to Atazanavir/Ritonavir vs Adding Atorvastatin in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy With Hypercholesterolemia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wangpatharawanit, Phanthaboon; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2016-09-15

    A randomized controlled trial was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimens with hypercholesterolemia. Reduction of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein was significantly greater in patients who were randomized to the addition of atorvastatin compared with those who were switched from lopinavir/ritonavir to atazanavir/ritonavir. PMID:27402817

  16. High perceived social standing is associated with better health in HIV-infected Ugandan adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ezeamama, A E; Guwatudde, D; Wang, M; Bagenda, D; Brown, K; Kyeyune, R; Smith, Emily; Wamani, H; Manabe, Y C; Fawzi, W W

    2016-06-01

    Perceived social standing (PSS) was evaluated as a determinant of differences in health outcomes among Ugandan HIV-infected adults from Kampala using cross-sectional study design. PSS was defined using the MacArthur scale of subjective social status translated and adapted for the study setting. Socio-demographic and psychosocial correlates of PSS ranking at enrollment were determined using linear regression models. High versus low PSS was defined based on the median PSS score and evaluated as a determinant of body mass index, hemoglobin, quality of life (QOL) and frailty-related phenotype via linear regression. A log-binomial regression model estimated the relative-risk of good, very good or excellent versus fair or poor self-rated health (SRH) in relation to PSS. Older age, increasing social support and material wealth were correlated with high PSS ranking, whereas female sex, experience of multiple stigmas and multiple depressive symptoms were correlated with low PSS ranking. High PSS participants were on average 1.1 kg/m(2) heavier, had 4.7 % lower frailty scores and 3.6 % higher QOL scores compared to low PSS patients (all p < 0.05); they were also more likely to self-classify as high SRH (RR 1.4, 95 % confidence interval 1.1, 1.7) but had comparable hemoglobin levels (p = 0.634). Low PSS correlated with poor physical and psychosocial wellbeing in HIV-positive Ugandan adults. The assessment of PSS as part of clinical management, combined with efforts to reduce stigma and improve social support, may identify and possibly reduce PSS-associated health inequality in Ugandan adults with HIV. PMID:26733010

  17. Response to Booster Doses of Hepatitis B Vaccine among Young Adults Who Had Received Neonatal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul K. S.; Ngai, Karry L. K.; Lao, Terence T.; Wong, Martin C. S.; Cheung, Theresa; Yeung, Apple C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Luk, Scotty W. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Newborns who have received hepatitis B immunization in 1980s are now young adults joining healthcare disciplines. The need for booster, pre- and post-booster checks becomes a practical question. Aims The aim of this study is to refine the HBV vaccination policy for newly admitted students in the future. Methods A prospective study on medical and nursing school entrants to evaluate hepatitis B serostatus and the response to booster doses among young adults. Findings Among 212 students, 17–23-year-old, born after adoption of neonatal immunization, 2 (0.9%) were HBsAg positive, 40 (18.9%) were anti-HBs positive. At 1 month after a single-dose booster for anti-HBs-negative students, 14.5% had anti-HBs <10 mIU/mL, 29.0% and 56.5% were 10–100 and >100 mIU/mL, respectively. The anti-HBs levels were significantly higher for females than males (mean [SD]: 431 [418] vs. 246 [339] mIU/mL, P = 0.047). At 2–4 month after the third booster dose, 97.1% had anti-HBs >100 mIU/mL and 2.9% had 10–100 mIU/mL. Conclusions Pre-booster check is still worthwhile to identify carriers among newly recruited healthcare workers born after adoption of neonatal immunization. A 3-dose booster, rather than a single dose, is required for the majority to achieve an anti-HBs level >100 mIU/mL, as memory immunity has declined in a substantial proportion of individuals. Cost-effectiveness of post-booster check for anti-HBs is low and should be further evaluated based on contextual specific utilization of results. PMID:25198289

  18. Daily co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in severely immunosuppressed HIV-infected adults in Africa started on combination antiretroviral therapy: an observational analysis of the DART cohort

    PubMed Central

    Walker, AS; Ford, D; Gilks, CF; Munderi, P; Ssali, F; Reid, A; Katabira, E; Grosskurth, H; Mugyenyi, P; Hakim, J; Darbyshire, JH; Gibb, DM; Babiker, AG

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Co-trimoxazole prophylaxis can reduce mortality from untreated HIV infection in Africa; whether benefits occur alongside combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) is unclear. We estimated the effect of prophylaxis after ART initiation in adults. Methods Participants in our observational analysis were from the DART randomised trial of management strategies in HIV-infected, symptomatic, previously untreated African adults starting triple-drug ART with CD4 counts lower than 200 cells per μL. Co-trimoxazole prophylaxis was not routinely used or randomly allocated, but was variably prescribed by clinicians. We estimated effects on clinical outcomes, CD4 cell count, and body-mass index (BMI) using marginal structural models to adjust for time-dependent confounding by indication. DART was registered, number ISRCTN13968779. Findings 3179 participants contributed 14 214 years of follow-up (8128 [57%] person-years on co-trimoxazole). Time-dependent predictors of co-trimoxazole use were current CD4 cell count, haemoglobin concentration, BMI, and previous WHO stage 3 or 4 events on ART. Present prophylaxis significantly reduced mortality (odds ratio 0·65, 95% CI 0·50–0·85; p=0·001). Mortality risk reduction on ART was substantial to 12 weeks (0·41, 0·27–0·65), sustained from 12–72 weeks (0·56, 0·37–0·86), but not evident subsequently (0·96, 0·63–1·45; heterogeneity p=0·02). Variation in mortality reduction was not accounted for by time on co-trimoxazole or current CD4 cell count. Prophylaxis reduced frequency of malaria (0·74, 0·63–0·88; p=0·0005), an effect that was maintained with time, but we observed no effect on new WHO stage 4 events (0·86, 0·69–1·07; p=0·17), CD4 cell count (difference vs non-users, −3 cells per μL [−12 to 6]; p=0·50), or BMI (difference vs non-users, −0·04 kg/m2 [−0·20 to 0·13); p=0·68]. Interpretation Our results reinforce WHO guidelines and provide strong motivation for provision

  19. Integrating Cervical Cancer Screening with HIV Care in Cameroon: Comparative Risk Analysis of Cervical Disease in HIV-Infected Women Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy to Women in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Bekolo, Cavin Epie; O’Bryan, Gillian; Tchago, François Edmond; Nangue, Charlette; Bekoule, Patrick Sylvestre; Kollo, Basile

    2016-01-01

    Background While the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on natural history of cervical lesions remains controversial, resource limited countries need to understand the relevance of their own data to their settings. We compared the risk of cervical disease in HAART-experienced women with that in women in the general population of Cameroon. Methods A retrospective cross sectional survey of women aged 35 years and above, attending a voluntary screening campaign for cervical cancer at the Nkongsamba Regional Hospital in Cameroon between February and May 2014. Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) were determined by Pap smear. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare the odds of SIL in women on HAART to women from the community with unknown HIV status. Results Included were 302 women of whom 131(43.4%) were HIV-infected and receiving HAART on the site while 171 (56.6%) were women from the community. Cervical disease was observed in 51(16.9%) persons of whom 15 (11.5%) cases in the HAART group and 36 (21.1%) cases in the general group (p = 0.027). After controlling for age and other covariates, women in the HAART group had a 67% reduction in the odds of cervical lesions compared with the community group [adjusted odd ratio (aOR) = 0.33, 95%CI: 0.15–0.73, p = 0.006). Conclusion HIV-infected women receiving HAART have a lower risk of cancer than women in the general population. This finding may not be attributed to HAART alone but to all the health benefits derived from receiving a comprehensive HIV care. PMID:26866371

  20. Prognostic Value of HIV-1 RNA on CD4 Trajectories and Disease Progression Among Antiretroviral-Naive HIV-Infected Adults in Botswana: A Joint Modeling Analysis.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Mansour; Novitsky, Vladimir; Wang, Rui; Bussmann, Hermann; Moyo, Sikhulile; Musonda, Rosemary M; Moeti, Themba; Makhema, Joseph M; Essex, Max; Marlink, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Although HIV-1 RNA levels are measured at the time of initial diagnosis, the results are not used for the clinical follow-up of the patients. This study evaluates the prognostic value of the baseline HIV-1 RNA levels (above or below 10,000 copies/ml) on rate of disease progression, among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients in Botswana. A prospective cohort of 436 HIV-infected ART-naive adults with baseline CD4 > 400 cells/mm(3) were followed quarterly for 5 years in an urban clinic in Botswana. Baseline HIV-1 RNA levels and longitudinal CD4(+) T-cell count data were analyzed, using mixed-effects regression jointly modeled with the times to a composite endpoint defined by AIDS-defining clinical conditions or death. During 1,547 person-years (PYs) follow-up time, 106 individuals became eligible for ART initiation (incidence rate: 0.07 PYs) and 6 participants died of AIDS-related illness. There were 203 (47%) individuals with baseline HIV-1 RNA <10,000 copies/ml and 233 (53%) individuals with baseline RNA >10,000 copies/ml. The slope of the predicted CD4 trajectory for individuals with baseline HIV-1 RNA >10,000 copies/ml is 30% steeper than that for those with baseline RNA <10,000. The hazard of reaching the composite endpoint for the individuals with baseline HIV-1 RNA >10,000 copies/ml was 2.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.5-3.0) times higher than that for those with baseline HIV-1 RNA <10,000 copies/ml. CD4 decline in individuals with HIV-1 RNA >10,000 copies/ml is much faster than that in those with RNA <10,000. The elevated HIV-1 RNA can be used as a marker to identify individuals at risk of faster disease progression. PMID:26830351

  1. HIV Prevention Counseling Intervention Delivered During Routine Clinical Care Reduces HIV Risk Behavior in HIV-Infected South Africans Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy: The Izindlela Zokuphila/Options for Health Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Shuper, Paul A.; Christie, Sarah; Pillay, Sandy; Macdonald, Susan; Ngcobo, Ntombenhle; Amico, K. Rivet; Lalloo, Umesh; Friedland, Gerald; Fisher, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Context Sustainable interventions are needed to minimize HIV risk behavior among people living with HIV (PLWH) in South Africa on antiretroviral therapy (ART), a significant proportion of whom do not achieve viral suppression. Objective To determine whether a brief lay counselor delivered intervention implemented during routine care can reduce risky sex among PLWH on ART. Design Cluster randomized 16 HIV clinical care sites in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, to intervention or standard-of-care. Setting Publicly funded HIV clinical care sites. Patients 1891 PLWH on ART received the HIV prevention counseling intervention (n = 967) or standard-of-care counseling (n = 924). Intervention Lay counselors delivered a brief intervention using motivational interviewing strategies based on the Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills (IMB) model during routine clinical care. Main Outcome Measures Number of sexual events without a condom in the past four weeks with partners of any HIV status, and with partners perceived to be HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown, assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results Intervention participants reported significantly greater reductions in HIV risk behavior on both primary outcomes, compared to standard-of-care participants. Differences in STI incidence between arms were not observed. Conclusion Effective behavioral interventions, delivered by lay counselors within the clinical care setting, are consistent with the strategy of linking HIV care and HIV prevention and integrating biomedical and behavioral approaches to stemming the HIV epidemic. PMID:25230288

  2. Recommendations in pediatric antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takehisa; Ch'ng, Tong Wei; Oleske, James M

    2007-02-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV infection and the general principles of therapy are the same for HIV-infected adults, adolescents, children and infants. However, antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection in pediatrics requires the consideration of a number of factors specific to its population, including differences in drug pharmacokinetics and the use of virologic and immunologic markers, as well as age-related adherence issues. This review summarizes the text of the Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection, which was updated in October 2006. The guidelines are the work of the Working Group on Antiretroviral Therapy and Medical Management of HIV-Infected Children, a group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health, which reviews new data on an ongoing basis and provides regular updates to the guidelines. As these guidelines were developed for the US, they may not be applicable in other countries. This summary does not attempt to place the Working Group guidelines in the context of international guidelines, nor does it attempt to detail the use of antiretroviral medication in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV, such as addressing the use of zidovudine versus single-dose nevirapine. PMID:17257086

  3. Delayed entry into HIV medical care in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the USA.

    PubMed

    Robertson, McKaylee; Wei, Stanley C; Beer, Linda; Adedinsewo, Demilade; Stockwell, Sandra; Dombrowski, Julia C; Johnson, Christopher; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Before widespread antiretroviral therapy (ART), an estimated 17% of people delayed HIV care. We report national estimates of the prevalence and factors associated with delayed care entry in the contemporary ART era. We used Medical Monitoring Project data collected from June 2009 through May 2011 for 1425 persons diagnosed with HIV from May 2004 to April 2009 who initiated care within 12 months. We defined delayed care as entry >three months from diagnosis. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated to identify risk factors associated with delayed care. In this nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3-8.8) delayed care after diagnosis. Black race was associated with a lower likelihood of delay than white race (aPR 0.38). Men who have sex with women versus women who have sex with men (aPR 1.86) and persons required to take an HIV test versus recommended by a provider (aPR 2.52) were more likely to delay. Among those who delayed 48% reported a personal factor as the primary reason. Among persons initially diagnosed with HIV (non-AIDS), those who delayed care were twice as likely (aPR 2.08) to develop AIDS as of May 2011. Compared to the pre-ART era, there was a nearly 60% reduction in delayed care entry. Although relatively few HIV patients delayed care entry, certain groups may have an increased risk. Focus on linkage to care among persons who are required to take an HIV test may further reduce delayed care entry. PMID:26493721

  4. Relevance of Interleukin-6 and D-Dimer for Serious Non-AIDS Morbidity and Death among HIV-Positive Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V; Deeks, Steven G.; Wolfson, Julian; Wentworth, Deborah; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Cohen, Calvin J.; Phillips, Andrew; Lundgren, Jens D.; Neaton, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite effective antiretroviral treatment (ART), HIV-positive individuals are at increased risk of serious non-AIDS conditions (cardiovascular, liver and renal disease, and cancers), perhaps due in part to ongoing inflammation and/or coagulation. To estimate the potential risk reduction in serious non-AIDS conditions or death from any cause that might be achieved with treatments that reduce inflammation and/or coagulation, we examined associations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), D-dimer, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels with serious non-AIDS conditions or death in 3 large cohorts. Methods In HIV-positive adults on suppressive ART, associations of IL-6, D-dimer, and hsCRP levels at study entry with serious non-AIDS conditions or death were studied using Cox regression. Hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for age, gender, study, and regression dilution bias (due to within-person biomarker variability) were used to predict risk reductions in serious non-AIDS conditions or death associated with lower “usual” levels of IL-6 and D-dimer. Results Over 4.9 years of mean follow-up, 260 of the 3766 participants experienced serious non-AIDS conditions or death. IL-6, D-dimer and hsCRP were each individually associated with risk of serious non-AIDS conditions or death, HR = 1.45 (95% CI: 1.30 to 1.63), 1.28 (95% CI: 1.14 to 1.44), and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.09 to 1.26) per 2x higher biomarker levels, respectively. In joint models, IL-6 and D-dimer were independently associated with serious non-AIDS conditions or death, with consistent results across the 3 cohorts and across serious non-AIDS event types. The association of IL-6 and D-dimer with serious non-AIDS conditions or death was graded and persisted throughout follow-up. For 25% lower “usual” IL-6 and D-dimer levels, the joint biomarker model estimates a 37% reduction (95% CI: 28 to 46%) in the risk of serious non-AIDS conditions or death if the relationship is causal. Conclusions Both IL-6 and D

  5. The F4/AS01B HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate Is Safe and Immunogenic, But Does Not Show Viral Efficacy in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive, HIV-1-Infected Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Dinges, Warren; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Podzamczer, Daniel; Brockmeyer, Norbert H; García, Felipe; Harrer, Thomas; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Frank, Ian; Colin De Verdière, Nathalie; Yeni, Guy-Patrick; Ortega Gonzalez, Enrique; Rubio, Rafael; Clotet Sala, Bonaventura; DeJesus, Edwin; Pérez-Elias, Maria Jesus; Launay, Odile; Pialoux, Gilles; Slim, Jihad; Weiss, Laurence; Bouchaud, Olivier; Felizarta, Franco; Meurer, Anja; Raffi, François; Esser, Stefan; Katlama, Christine; Koletar, Susan L; Mounzer, Karam; Swindells, Susan; Baxter, John D; Schneider, Stefan; Chas, Julie; Molina, Jean-Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Collard, Alix; Bourguignon, Patricia; Roman, François

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the investigational human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) F4/AS01B vaccine on HIV-1 viral load (VL) was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive HIV-1 infected adults.This phase IIb, observer-blind study (NCT01218113), included ART-naive HIV-1 infected adults aged 18 to 55 years. Participants were randomized to receive 2 (F4/AS01B_2 group, N = 64) or 3 (F4/AS01B_3 group, N = 62) doses of F4/AS01B or placebo (control group, N = 64) at weeks 0, 4, and 28. Efficacy (HIV-1 VL, CD4 T-cell count, ART initiation, and HIV-related clinical events), safety, and immunogenicity (antibody and T-cell responses) were evaluated during 48 weeks.At week 48, based on a mixed model, no statistically significant difference in HIV-1 VL change from baseline was demonstrated between F4/AS01B_2 and control group (0.073 log10 copies/mL [97.5% confidence interval (CI): -0.088; 0.235]), or F4/AS01B_3 and control group (-0.096 log10 copies/mL [97.5% CI: -0.257; 0.065]). No differences between groups were observed in HIV-1 VL change, CD4 T-cell count, ART initiation, or HIV-related clinical events at intermediate timepoints. Among F4/AS01B recipients, the most frequent solicited symptoms were pain at injection site (252/300 doses), fatigue (137/300 doses), myalgia (105/300 doses), and headache (90/300 doses). Twelve serious adverse events were reported in 6 participants; 1 was considered vaccine-related (F4/AS01B_2 group: angioedema). F4/AS01B induced polyfunctional F4-specific CD4 T-cells, but had no significant impact on F4-specific CD8 T-cell and anti-F4 antibody levels.F4/AS01B had a clinically acceptable safety profile, induced F4-specific CD4 T-cell responses, but did not reduce HIV-1 VL, impact CD4 T-cells count, delay ART initiation, or prevent HIV-1 related clinical events. PMID:26871794

  6. The F4/AS01B HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate Is Safe and Immunogenic, But Does Not Show Viral Efficacy in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive, HIV-1-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dinges, Warren; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Podzamczer, Daniel; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; García, Felipe.; Harrer, Thomas; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Frank, Ian; Colin De Verdière, Nathalie; Yeni, Guy-Patrick; Ortega Gonzalez, Enrique; Rubio, Rafael; Clotet Sala, Bonaventura; DeJesus, Edwin; Pérez-Elias, Maria Jesus; Launay, Odile; Pialoux, Gilles; Slim, Jihad; Weiss, Laurence; Bouchaud, Olivier; Felizarta, Franco; Meurer, Anja; Raffi, François; Esser, Stefan; Katlama, Christine; Koletar, Susan L.; Mounzer, Karam; Swindells, Susan; Baxter, John D.; Schneider, Stefan; Chas, Julie; Molina, Jean-Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Collard, Alix; Bourguignon, Patricia; Roman, François

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of the investigational human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) F4/AS01B vaccine on HIV-1 viral load (VL) was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive HIV-1 infected adults. This phase IIb, observer-blind study (NCT01218113), included ART-naive HIV-1 infected adults aged 18 to 55 years. Participants were randomized to receive 2 (F4/AS01B_2 group, N = 64) or 3 (F4/AS01B_3 group, N = 62) doses of F4/AS01B or placebo (control group, N = 64) at weeks 0, 4, and 28. Efficacy (HIV-1 VL, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, and HIV-related clinical events), safety, and immunogenicity (antibody and T-cell responses) were evaluated during 48 weeks. At week 48, based on a mixed model, no statistically significant difference in HIV-1 VL change from baseline was demonstrated between F4/AS01B_2 and control group (0.073 log10 copies/mL [97.5% confidence interval (CI): −0.088; 0.235]), or F4/AS01B_3 and control group (−0.096 log10 copies/mL [97.5% CI: −0.257; 0.065]). No differences between groups were observed in HIV-1 VL change, CD4+ T-cell count, ART initiation, or HIV-related clinical events at intermediate timepoints. Among F4/AS01B recipients, the most frequent solicited symptoms were pain at injection site (252/300 doses), fatigue (137/300 doses), myalgia (105/300 doses), and headache (90/300 doses). Twelve serious adverse events were reported in 6 participants; 1 was considered vaccine-related (F4/AS01B_2 group: angioedema). F4/AS01B induced polyfunctional F4-specific CD4+ T-cells, but had no significant impact on F4-specific CD8+ T-cell and anti-F4 antibody levels. F4/AS01B had a clinically acceptable safety profile, induced F4-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, but did not reduce HIV-1 VL, impact CD4+ T-cells count, delay ART initiation, or prevent HIV-1 related clinical events. PMID:26871794

  7. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN...

  8. Experiences of Receiving a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Survey of Adults in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lydia; Goddard, Lorna; Hill, Elisabeth L.; Henry, Lucy A.; Crane, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A total of 128 adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders were surveyed concerning the process they went through to obtain their diagnosis and the subsequent support they received. Results suggested that routes to diagnosis were quite heterogeneous and overall levels of satisfaction with the diagnostic process were mixed; 40% of…

  9. The Impact of Support Received and Support Provision on Changes in Perceived Social Support among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with…

  10. Field Evaluation of Dried Blood Spots for Routine HIV-1 Viral Load and Drug Resistance Monitoring in Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Monleau, Marjorie; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Dagnra, Anoumou; Kania, Dramane; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Touré-Kane, Coumba; Truong, Lien X. T.; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Delaporte, Eric; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Peeters, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS) can be used in developing countries to alleviate the logistic constraints of using blood plasma specimens for viral load (VL) and HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) testing, but they should be assessed under field conditions. Between 2009 and 2011, we collected paired plasma-DBS samples from treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected adults in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Togo, Thailand, and Vietnam. The DBS were stored at an ambient temperature for 2 to 4 weeks and subsequently at −20°C before testing. VL testing was performed on the plasma samples and DBS using locally available methods: the Abbott m2000rt HIV-1 test, generic G2 real-time PCR, or the NucliSENS EasyQ version 1.2 test. In the case of virological failure (VF), i.e., a plasma VL of ≥1,000 copies/ml, HIVDR genotyping was performed on paired plasma-DBS samples. Overall, we compared 382 plasma-DBS sample pairs for DBS VL testing accuracy. The sensitivities of the different assays in different laboratories for detecting VF using DBS varied from 75% to 100% for the m2000rt test in labs B, C, and D, 91% to 93% for generic G2 real-time PCR in labs A and F, and 85% for the NucliSENS test in lab E. The specificities varied from 82% to 97% for the m2000rt and NucliSENS tests and reached only 60% for the generic G2 test. The NucliSENS test showed good agreement between plasma and DBS VL but underestimated the DBS VL. The lowest agreement was observed for the generic G2 test. Genotyping was successful for 96/124 (77%) DBS tested, and 75/96 (78%) plasma-DBS pairs had identical HIVDR mutations. Significant discrepancies in resistance interpretations were observed in 9 cases, 6 of which were from the same laboratory. DBS can be successfully used as an alternative to blood plasma samples for routine VL and HIVDR monitoring in African and Asian settings. However, the selection of an adequate VL measurement method and the definition of the VF threshold should be considered, and laboratory

  11. Well-Being and Institutional Care in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional and Time Effects of Provided and Received Support

    PubMed Central

    Kroemeke, Aleksandra; Gruszczynska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of provided and received support on older adults’ subjective well-being (positive affect and depression) and to examine whether being a recipient of institutional care moderates these effects. Methods Social support (provided and received), positive affect, and depressive symptoms were assessed twice (at baseline and 1 month later) for 277 older adults (age 77.39 ± 9.20 years, 67.50% women, 65% residents of an institutional care facility). Findings Two structural equation models were analyzed: cross-sectional (at baseline) and longitudinal (after 1 month). The first model revealed a significant positive relationship between providing and receiving support and positive affect, and a negative relationship between receiving support and depression. However, being a recipient of institutional care appeared to be a significant moderator in the longitudinal model. Specifically, the findings indicated effects of both providing and receiving support on positive affect but only for noninstitutionalized older adults. Discussion Although both types of support may be beneficial for older adults, their effects depend on the nature of social exchange and the dimensions of well-being. This suggests that such factors should be systematically investigated in future research. PMID:27548721

  12. Opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV-1-infected adults in the combined antiretroviral therapy era: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Christian; Guardo, Alberto C; Letang, Emilio; Plana, Montserrat; Gatell, Jose M; Miro, Jose M

    2015-06-01

    Despite the availability of effective combined antiretroviral treatment, many patients still present with advanced HIV infection, often accompanied by an AIDS-defining disease. A subgroup of patients starting antiretroviral treatment under these clinical conditions may experience paradoxical worsening of their disease as a result of an exaggerated immune response towards an active (but also subclinical) infectious agent, despite an appropriate virological and immunological response to the treatment. This clinical condition, known as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, may cause significant morbidity and even mortality if it is not promptly recognized and treated. This review updates current knowledge about the incidence, diagnostic criteria, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and management of opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in the combined antiretroviral treatment era. PMID:25860288

  13. Survival on antiretroviral treatment among adult HIV-infected patients in Nepal: a retrospective cohort study in far-western Region, 2006–2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though financial and policy level efforts are made to expand antiretroviral treatment (ART) service free of cost, survival outcome of ART program has not been systematically evaluated in Nepal. This study assesses the mortality rates and determinants among adult HIV-infected patients on ART in Far-western region of Nepal. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 1024 (51.2% men) HIV-infected patients aged ≥15 years, who started ART between May 15th 2006 and May 15th 2011 in five ART sites in the Far-western region, Nepal. Follow-up time was calculated from the date of ART initiation to date of death or censoring (loss to follow-up, transferred out, or 15 November 2011). Mortality rates (per 100 person-years) were calculated. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to estimate survival and explore determinants of mortality. Results The median follow-up time was 19.1 months. The crude mortality rate was 6.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.3-7.6) but more than three-times higher in first 3 months after ART initiation (21.9 (95% CI 16.6- 28.8)). About 12% (83% men) of those newly initiated on ART died during follow-up. The independent determinants of mortality were male sex (hazard ratio (HR) 4.55, 95% CI 2.43-8.51), poor baseline performance scale (bedridden <50% of the day during the past month, HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.19-3.52; bedridden >50% of the day during the past month, HR 3.41, 95% CI 1.67-6.98 compared to normal activity), one standard deviation decrease in baseline bodyweight (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07), and poor WHO clinical stage (stage III, HR 2.96, 95% CI 1.31-6.69; stage IV, HR 3.28, 95% CI 1.30-8.29 compared to WHO clinical stage I or II). Conclusions High mortality was observed within the first 3 months of ART initiation. Patients with poor baseline clinical characteristics had higher mortality, especially men. Earlier initiation of ART through expanded testing and counselling should be encouraged in HIV-infected patients. PMID

  14. Short Communication: Population-Based Surveillance of HIV-1 Drug Resistance in Cameroonian Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy According to the World Health Organization Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fokam, Joseph; Takou, Désiré; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Akonie, Haniel Ze; Kouanfack, Charles; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Colizzi, Vittorio; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Ndjolo, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    With ongoing earlier enrollment on and rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Cameroon, there are increasing risks of transmitted HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at population levels. We, therefore, evaluated the threshold of HIVDR in a population initiating ART, to inform on the effectiveness of first-line regimens, considering HIV-1 diversity, plasma viral load (PVL), and CD4-based disease progression. A total of 53 adults [median (interquartile range, IQR) CD4: 162 cell/mm(3) (48-284); median (IQR) PVL: 5.34 log10 RNA (4.17-6.42) copies/ml] initiating ART in 2014 at the Yaoundé Central Hospital were enrolled for HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase sequencing. Drug resistance mutations (DRMs) were interpreted using the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) list versus the Stanford HIVdb algorithm version 7.0. Level of DRMs was low (3.77%) versus moderate (7.55%), respectively, following the WHO list (T69D, K103N) versus Stanford HIVdb (T69D, A98G, K103N, K238T), respectively. Prevailing clade was CRF02_AG (71.70%). Based on Stanford HIVdb, a slightly higher proportion of patients with DRMs were found among ones infected with CRF02_AG than in those non-CRF02_AG infected (7.89% vs. 6.67%, p = 1.000), with lower PVL (7.69% <5.5 vs. 0% ≥5.5 log10 RNA copies/ml, p = .488) and with higher CD4 counts (9.52% CD4 ≥200 vs. 3.33% CD4 <200 cells/mm(3), p = .749). Thresholds of DRMs suggest that standard first-line regimens currently used in Cameroon may remain effective at population levels, despite scale-up of ART in the country, pending adherence, and closed virological monitoring. With an intent-to-diagnose approach, the discrepant levels of DRMs support using Stanford HIVdb to evaluate initial ART, while revising the WHO list for surveillance. PMID:26602836

  15. Incidence of AIDS-Defining Opportunistic Infections and Mortality during Antiretroviral Therapy in a Cohort of Adult HIV-Infected Individuals in Hanoi, 2007-2014

    PubMed Central

    Tanuma, Junko; Lee, Kyu Ha; Haneuse, Sebastien; Matsumoto, Shoko; Nguyen, Dung Thi; Nguyen, Dung Thi Hoai; Do, Cuong Duy; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Oka, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the prognosis for HIV-infected individuals has improved after antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up, limited data exist on the incidence of AIDS-defining opportunistic infections (ADIs) and mortality during ART in resource-limited settings. Methods HIV-infected adults in two large hospitals in urban Hanoi were enrolled to the prospective cohort, from October 2007 through December 2013. Those who started ART less than one year before enrollment were assigned to the survival analysis. Data on ART history and ADIs were collected retrospectively at enrollment and followed-up prospectively until April 2014. Results Of 2,070 cohort participants, 1,197 were eligible for analysis and provided 3,446 person-years (PYs) of being on ART. Overall, 161 ADIs episodes were noted at a median of 3.20 months after ART initiation (range 0.03–75.8) with an incidence 46.7/1,000 PYs (95% confidence interval [CI] 39.8–54.5). The most common ADI was tuberculosis with an incidence of 29.9/1,000 PYs. Mortality after ART initiation was 8.68/1,000 PYs and 45% (19/45) died of AIDS-related illnesses. Age over 50 years at ART initiation was significantly associated with shorter survival after controlling for baseline CD4 count, but neither having injection drug use (IDU) history nor previous ADIs were associated with poor survival. Semi-competing risks analysis in 951 patients without ADIs history prior to ART showed those who developed ADIs after starting ART were at higher risk of death in the first six months than after six months. Conclusion ADIs were not rare in spite of being on effective ART. Age over 50 years, but not IDU history, was associated with shorter survival in the cohort. This study provides in-depth data on the prognosis of patients on ART in Vietnam during the first decade of ART scale-up. PMID:26939050

  16. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  17. The impact of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kimberly A

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with both receiving social support and providing social support specific to the food. Individuals with higher levels of support provision and received support in turn reported higher levels of perceived support post disaster. Women were more likely to have received flood specific support and to have perceived higher social support post flood. This study provides support and elaboration of earlier findings that link disaster exposure to post-disaster changes in perceived social support. PMID:16454481

  18. Antiretroviral therapy: current drugs.

    PubMed

    Pau, Alice K; George, Jomy M

    2014-09-01

    The rapid advances in drug discovery and the development of antiretroviral therapy is unprecedented in the history of modern medicine. The administration of chronic combination antiretroviral therapy targeting different stages of the human immunodeficiency virus' replicative life cycle allows for durable and maximal suppression of plasma viremia. This suppression has resulted in dramatic improvement of patient survival. This article reviews the history of antiretroviral drug development and discusses the clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and toxicities of the antiretroviral agents most commonly used in clinical practice to date. PMID:25151562

  19. Characteristics and Outcomes of Young Adult Opiate Users Receiving Residential Substance Abuse Treatment.

    PubMed

    Morse, Siobhan; MacMaster, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Opiate use patterns, user characteristics, and treatment response among young adults are of interest due to current high use prevalence and historical low levels of treatment engagement relative to older populations. Prior research in this population suggests that overall, young adults present at treatment with different issues. In this study the authors investigated potential differences between young adult (18-25 years of age) and older adult (26 and older) opiate users and the impact of differences relative to treatment motivation, length and outcomes. Data for this study was drawn from 760 individuals who entered voluntary, private, residential treatment. Study measures included the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), the Treatment Service Review (TSR), and University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA). Interviews were conducted at program intake and 6-month post-discharge. Results indicate that older adults with a history of opiate use present at treatment with higher levels of severity for alcohol, medical, and psychological problems and young adults present at treatment with greater drug use and more legal issues. Significant improvement for both groups was noted at 6 months post treatment; there were also fewer differences between the two age groups of opiate users. Results suggest different strategies within treatment programs may provide benefit in targeting the disparate needs of younger opiate users. Overall, however, results suggest that individualized treatment within a standard, abstinence-based, residential treatment model can be effective across opiate users at different ages and with different issues, levels of severity, and impairment at intake. PMID:25879396

  20. Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults with ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Gary G.; Michaels, M. Alex; Pakull, Barton

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychostimulant treatment may improve simulated driving performance in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of simulated driving performance with mixed amphetamine salts--extended release (MAS XR) 50 mg/day (Cohort 1) and…

  1. First-line antiretroviral therapy durability in a 10-year cohort of naïve adults started on treatment in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Castelnuovo, Barbara; Kiragga, Agnes; Mubiru, Frank; Kambugu, Andrew; Kamya, Moses; Reynolds, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The majority of studies from resource-limited settings only report short-term virological outcomes of patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART). We aim to describe the long-term durability of first-line ART and identify factors associated with long-term virological outcomes. Methods At the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda, 559 adult patients starting ART in 2004 were enrolled into a research cohort and monitored with viral load (VL) testing every six months for 10 years. We report the proportion and cumulative probability of 1) achieving virologic suppression (at least one VL <400 copies/ml); 2) experiencing virologic failure in patients who achieved suppression (two consecutive VLs >1000 copies/ml or one VL >5000, for those without a subsequent one); 3) treatment failure (not attaining virologic suppression or experiencing virologic failure). We used Cox regression methods to determine the characteristics associated with treatment failure. We included gender, baseline age, WHO stage, body mass index, CD4 count, propensity score for initial ART regimen, VL, time-dependent CD4 count and adherence. Results Of the 559 patients enrolled, 472 (84.8%) had at least one VL (67 died, 13 were lost to follow-up, 4 transferred, 2 had no VL available); 73.6% started on d4T/3TC/nevirapine and 26.4% on AZT/3TC/efavirenz. Patients in the two groups had similar characteristics, except for the higher proportion of patients in WHO Stage 3/4 and higher VL in the efavirenz-based group. Four hundred thirty-nine (93%) patients achieved virologic suppression with a cumulative probability of 0.94 (confidence interval (CI): 0.92–0.96); 74/439 (16.9%) experienced virologic failure with a cumulative probability of 0.18 (CI: 0.15–0.22). In the multivariate analysis, initial d4T/3TC/nevirapine regimen (hazard ratio (HR): 3.02; CI: 3.02 (1.66–5.44, p<0.001)) and baseline VL ≥5 log10 copies/ml (HR: 2.29; CI: 1.29–4.04) were associated with treatment

  2. Antiretroviral drug resistance and routine therapy, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Christian; Kouanfack, Charles; Vergne, Laurence; Tardy, Michèle; Zekeng, Léopold; Noumsi, Nathalie; Butel, Christelle; Bourgeois, Anke; Mpoudi-Ngolé, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Peeters, Martine; Delaporte, Eric

    2006-06-01

    Among 128 patients routinely receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy in an HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic in Cameroon, 16.4% had drug resistance after a median of 10 months. Of these, 12.5% had resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 10.2% to non-NRTIs, and 2.3% to protease inhibitors. PMID:16707062

  3. Relationships among Young Adults' Marital Messages Received, Marital Attitudes, and Relationship Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurts, W. Matthew; Myers, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined relationships among university students' marital messages received (MMR), marital attitudes, and romantic relationship self-efficacy (RSE). Results indicated that students' marital attitudes and romantic relationship status predicted their level of RSE. The authors found differences in MMR, marital attitudes, and RSE on the…

  4. Sexual risk behaviour and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Christine L.; Freedman, Mark; Fagan, Jennifer L.; Frazier, Emma L.; Beer, Linda; Huang, Ping; Valverde, Eduardo E.; Johnson, Christopher; Sanders, Catherine; McNaghten, A.D.; Sullivan, Patrick; Lansky, Amy; Mermin, Jonathan; Heffelfinger, James; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence and association of sexual risk behaviours and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults in the United States. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of weighted data from a probability sample of HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient medical care. The facility and patient response rates were 76 and 51%, respectively. Methods: We analysed 2009 interview and medical record data. Sexual behaviours were self-reported in the past 12 months. Viral suppression was defined as all viral load measurements in the medical record during the past 12 months less than 200 copies/ml. Results: An estimated 98 022 (24%) HIV-infected adults engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex; 50 953 (12%) engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex with at least one partner of negative or unknown HIV status; 23 933 (6%) did so while not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in vaginal or anal sex [prevalence ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.93]; unprotected vaginal or anal sex (prevalence ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73–0.98); and unprotected vaginal or anal sex with a partner of negative or unknown HIV status (prevalence ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99). Conclusion: The majority of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the U.S. did not engage in sexual risk behaviours that have the potential to transmit HIV, and of the 12% who did, approximately half were not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in sexual risk behaviours. PMID:25000558

  5. Screening and risk factors of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in critically ill adult patients receiving enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Malnutrition is a frequent problem associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. To avoid malnutrition, most studies focus on the prevention of inadequate nutrition delivery, whereas little attention is paid to the potential role of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). In this trial, we aim to evaluate the prevalence of EPI and identify its potential risk factors in critically ill adult patients without preexisting pancreatic diseases. Methods In this prospective cross-sectional study, we recruited 563 adult patients with critical illnesses. All details of the patients were documented, stool samples were collected three to five days following the initiation of enteral nutrition, and faecal elastase 1 (FE-1) concentrations were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Blood samples were also taken to determine serum amylase and lipase activity. Results The percentages of recruited patients with EPI (FE-1 concentration <200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration <100 μg/g) were 52.2% and 18.3%, respectively. The incidences of steatorrhea were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the patients without EPI, with moderate EPI (FE-1 concentration = 100 to 200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration < 100 μg/g). Both multivariate logistic regression analysis and z-tests indicated that the occurrence of EPI was closely associated with shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Conclusions More than 50% of critically ill adult patients without primary pancreatic diseases had EPI, and nearly one-fifth of them had severe EPI. The risk factors for EPI included shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Trial registration NCT01753024 PMID:23924602

  6. Extensive molluscum contagiosum virus infection in a young adult receiving fingolimod.

    PubMed

    Behle, Valeria; Wobser, Marion; Goebeler, Matthias; Stoevesandt, Johanna

    2016-06-01

    Fingolimod-related viral infections have been described on several occasions since its introduction in 2010. We hereby add a report on an otherwise immunocompetent, 18-year old Caucasian man with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who developed a protracted and extensive molluscum contagiosum (MC) virus infection shortly after being started on fingolimod. Wide-spread cutaneous MC infections in adult patients are considered indicative of underlying immunosuppression. Neurologists prescribing fingolimod ought to be aware of a possibly increased risk of MC, but also need to know about its relative benignity, lack of extra-cutaneous complications, and adequate treatment options. PMID:26860987

  7. A Pilot Study Assessing the Safety and Latency-Reversing Activity of Disulfiram in HIV-1–Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Adam M.; Andrade, Adriana; Eisele, Evelyn; Hoh, Rebecca; Bacchetti, Peter; Bumpus, Namandjé N.; Emad, Fatemeh; Buckheit, Robert; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Lai, Jun; Kennedy, Margene; Chander, Geetanjali; Siliciano, Robert F.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Transcriptionally silent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA persists in resting memory CD4+ T cells despite antiretroviral therapy. In a primary cell model, the antialcoholism drug disulfiram has been shown to induce HIV-1 transcription in latently infected resting memory CD4+ T cells at concentrations achieved in vivo. Methods. We conducted a single-arm pilot study to evaluate whether 500 mg of disulfiram administered daily for 14 days to HIV-1–infected individuals on stable suppressive antiretroviral therapy would result in reversal of HIV-1 latency with a concomitant transient increase in residual viremia or depletion of the latent reservoir in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Results. Disulfiram was safe and well tolerated. There was a high level of subject-to-subject variability in plasma disulfiram levels. The latent reservoir did not change significantly (1.16-fold change; 95% confidence interval [CI], .70- to 1.92-fold; P = .56). During disulfiram administration, residual viremia did not change significantly compared to baseline (1.53-fold; 95% CI, .88- to 2.69-fold; P = .13), although residual viremia was estimated to increase by 1.88-fold compared to baseline during the postdosing period (95% CI, 1.03- to 3.43-fold; P = .04). In a post hoc analysis, a rapid and transient increase in viremia was noted in a subset of individuals (n = 6) with immediate postdose sampling (HIV-1 RNA increase, 2.96-fold; 95% CI, 1.29- to 6.81-fold; P = .01). Conclusions. Administration of disulfiram to patients on antiretroviral therapy does not reduce the size of the latent reservoir. A possible dose-related effect on residual viremia supports future studies assessing the impact of higher doses on HIV-1 production. Disulfiram affects relevant signaling pathways and can be safely administered, supporting future studies of this drug. PMID:24336828

  8. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through “Embrace,” an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach. Results Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1) Experiences with aging, with the themes “Struggling with health,” “Increasing dependency,” “Decreasing social interaction,” “Loss of control,” and “Fears;” and 2) Experiences with Embrace, with the themes “Relationship with the case manager,” “Interactions,” and “Feeling in control, safe, and secure”. The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants’ ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system. Conclusion The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging. PMID:26489096

  9. Perceived Discrimination in Clinical Care in a Nationally Representative Sample of HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Mark A; Collins, Rebecca; Cunningham, William E; Morton, Sally C; Zierler, Sally; Wong, Myra; Tu, Wenli; Kanouse, David E

    2005-01-01

    Background Perceived discrimination in clinical settings could discourage HIV-infected people from seeking health care, adhering to treatment regimens, or returning for follow-up. Objectives This study aims to determine whether HIV-infected people perceive that physicians and other health care providers have discriminated against them. Design, Participants Cross-sectional data (1996 to 1997) from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), which conducted in-person interviews with a nationally representative probability sample of 2,466 HIV-infected adults receiving health care within the contiguous U.S. Measurements Reports of whether health care providers have been uncomfortable with the respondent, treated the respondent as an inferior, preferred to avoid the respondent, or refused the respondent service. Questions also covered the types of providers who engaged in these behaviors. Results Twenty-six percent of HIV-infected adults receiving health care reported experiencing at least 1 of 4 types of perceived discrimination by a health care provider since becoming infected with HIV, including 8% who had been refused service. White respondents (32%) were more likely than others (27%) and Latinos (21%) and nearly twice as likely as African Americans (17%) to report perceived discrimination (P<.001). Respondents whose first positive HIV test was longer ago were also more likely to report discrimination (P<.001). Respondents who reported discrimination attributed it to physicians (54%), nurses and other clinical staff (39%), dentists (32%), hospital staff (31%), and case managers or social workers (8%). Conclusions Many HIV-infected adults believe that their clinicians have discriminated against them. Clinicians should make efforts to address circumstances that lead patients to perceive discrimination, whether real or imagined. PMID:16117747

  10. Values important to terminally ill African American older adults in receiving hospice care.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    While racial disparity in the use of hospice care by older African Americans is widely acknowledged, little is known about the values that they consider as important in receiving health care services along with direct experiences with having these values respected by hospice care providers. Using individual, face-to-face interviews, data were collected directly from 28 African American hospice patients about their experiences in hospice care. Content analysis was used to identify and categorize themes from multiple readings of the qualitative data. Resulting themes included: dying at home, open communications, independent decision-making, autonomy in daily life, unwillingness to be a burden, and relationships. Through the initial assessment, value preferences can be explored and then shared with hospice team members to ensure that services are provided in such a way that their values and preferences are respected. PMID:25494930

  11. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals Changes in Intestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Who Received a Daily Dose of Immunomodulatory Probiotic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota. PMID:26016655

  12. Risk Factors for Thrombocytopenia in Adult Chinese Patients Receiving Linezolid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Guo, Dai-Hong; Cao, Xiutang; Cai, Yun; Xu, Yuanjie; Zhu, Man; Ma, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Linezolid (LZD), an oxazolidinone antibiotic agent, has excellent activity and bioavailability against most methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant gram-positive bacteria. Although LZD is generally well tolerated, several studies have found adverse hematologic effects, of which thrombocytopenia is of most concern. Objective To investigate the risk factors for thrombocytopenia in patients who received oral or parenteral LZD therapy between February 1 and November 30, 2010. Methods Data were extracted retrospectively from the electronic medical records in our hospital information system. Thrombocytopenia was defined as either a final platelet count of <100 × 109/L (criterion 1) or a 25% reduction from the baseline platelet count (criterion 2). Risk factors were determined using logistic regression analysis, and clinical features were predicted using receiver operating characteristic curves. Results The study included 254 patients, with mean (SD) age of 59 (17.66) years. The duration of LZD therapy was 9.43 (5.63) days. Thrombocytopenia developed in 69 patients (27.2%), as defined by criterion 1, and in 127 patients (50%), as defined by criterion 2. At univariate analysis, age, weight, creatinine clearance, serum albumin concentration, baseline platelet count, daily dosage, and concomitant use of caspofungin, levofloxacin, and meropenem were significant risk factors for thrombocytopenia. At multivariate analysis and using ROC curves, daily dose ≥18.75 mg/kg, baseline platelet count ≤181 × 109/L, duration of LZD therapy ≥10 days, and concomitant use of caspofungin and levofloxacin were independent risk factors for thrombocytopenia as defined by criterion 1, whereas creatinine clearance ≤88.39 mL/min/1.73 m2, serum albumin concentration ≤33.5 g/L, daily dose ≥18.46 mg/kg, and caspofungin were independent risk factors for thrombocytopenia as defined by criterion 2. Conclusions The incidence of LZD-related thrombocytopenia in the Chinese

  13. API consensus guidelines for use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (API-ART guidelines). Endorsed by the AIDS Society of India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S B; Pujari, S N; Joshi, S R; Patel, A K

    2006-01-01

    With rational use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been transformed into a chronic manageable illness like diabetes and hypertension. These guidelines provide information on state of art, evidence based approach for use of ART in Indian context. When to initiate ART? Antiretroviral therapy is indicated for all symptomatic HIV infected persons regardless of CD4 counts and plasma viral load (PVL) levels. In asymptomatic patients, ART should be offered when the CD4 counts < 200/mm3 and should be considered in patients with CD4 counts between 200-250/mm3. Therapy is not recommended for patients with CD4 count more than 350/ mm3. Involvement of patient in all treatment decisions and assessing readiness is critical before initiating ART. What to start with? A non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based regimen is recommended for antiretroviral naïve patients. The choice between nevirapine and efavirenz is based on differences in adverse events profiles; cost and availability of convenient fixed dose combinations and need for concomitant use of rifampicin. A backbone of 2-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is combined with the NNRTI. Various combinations and ART strategies not to be used in clinical practice has been enlisted. How to follow up? Recommendations have been made for baseline evaluation and monitoring of patients on ART. These include guidelines on laboratory and clinical evaluation. A plasma viral load at 6 months after initiation of first-line ART is strongly recommended. Yearly estimation of lipid profile has been recommended. How to identify and manage ART failure? The guidelines recognize the issue of identifying ART failure late if only CD4 counts are used for monitoring. In the absence of resistance testing various second-line regimens have been enlisted. A boosted protease inhibitor based regimen is recommended in this situation to be combined with 2-NRTIs. Special

  14. Efficacy of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-1 Infection in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 114 Studies with up to 144 Weeks' Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frederick J.; Amin, Janaki; Carr, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background A comprehensive assessment of initial HIV-1 treatment success may inform study design and treatment guidelines. Methods Group-based, systematic review and meta-analysis of initial antiretroviral therapy studies, in adults, of ≥48 weeks duration, reported through December 31, 2012. Size-weighted, intention-to-treat efficacy was calculated. Parameters of study design/eligibility, participant and treatment characteristics were abstracted. Multivariable, random effects, linear regression models with backwards, stepwise selection were then used to identify variables associated with efficacy. Outcome Measures Antiviral efficacy (undetectable plasma viral load) and premature cessation of therapy. Results 114 studies were included (216 treatment groups; 40,124 participants; mean CD4 count 248 cells/µL [SD 81]; mean HIV-1 plasma viral load log10 4.9 [SD 0.2]). Mean efficacy across all groups was 60% (SD 16) over a mean 82 weeks' follow-up (SD 38). Efficacy declined over time: 66% (SD 16) at 48 weeks, 60% (SD 16) at 96 weeks, 52% (SD 18) at 144 weeks. The most common reason for treatment cessation was participant decision (11%, SD 6.6). Efficacy was higher with ‘Preferred’ than ‘Alternative’ regimens (as defined by 2013 United States antiretroviral guidelines): 75% vs. 65%, respectively, difference 10%; 95%CI 7.6 to 15.4; p<0.001. In 98 groups (45%) reporting efficacy stratified by pre-treatment viral load (< or ≥100,000 copies/mL), efficacy was greater for the lower stratum (70% vs. 62%, respectively, difference 8.4%; 95%CI 6.0 to 10.9; p<0.001). This difference persisted within ‘Preferred’ regimens. Greatest efficacy was associated with use of tenofovir-emtricitabine (vs. other nucleoside analogue backbones) and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (vs. other third drug classes). Conclusion Initial antiretroviral treatments for HIV-1 to date appear to have suboptimal long-term efficacy, but are more effective when commenced at plasma viral loads

  15. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  16. Metabolic syndrome in adults who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute childhood leukemia: an LEA study.

    PubMed

    Oudin, C; Auquier, P; Bertrand, Y; Contet, A; Kanold, J; Sirvent, N; Thouvenin, S; Tabone, M-D; Lutz, P; Ducassou, S; Plantaz, D; Dalle, J-H; Gandemer, V; Beliard, S; Berbis, J; Vercasson, C; Barlogis, V; Baruchel, A; Leverger, G; Michel, G

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated prospectively the incidence and risk factors of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components in 170 adult patients (mean age at evaluation: 24.8±5.4 years) who received an hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for childhood ALL, n=119, or AML, n=51. TBI was carried out in 124 cases; a busulfan-based conditioning was done in 30 patients. Twenty-nine patients developed a MS (17.1%, 95% confidence intervals: 11.7-23.6). The cumulative incidence was 13.4% at 25 years of age and 35.5% at 35 years of age. A higher body mass index (BMI) before transplantation and a growth hormone deficiency were associated with increased MS risk (P=0.002 and 0.01, respectively). MS risk was similar for patients who received TBI or busulfan-based conditioning. The TBI use increased the hyperglycemia risk (odds ratio (OR): 4.7, P=0.02). Women were at the risk of developing increased waist circumference (OR: 7.18, P=0.003) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR: 2.72, P=0.007). The steroid dose was not a risk factor. The MS occurs frequently among transplanted survivors of childhood leukemia. Its incidence increases with age. Both intrinsic (BMI, gender) and extrinsic factors (TBI, alkylating agents) contribute to its etiopathogenesis. PMID:26191949

  17. [Consensus document of Gesida and Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS (SPNS) regarding combined antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2012)].

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    This consensus document has been prepared by a panel consisting of members of the AIDS Study Group (Gesida) and the Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS (SPNS) after reviewing the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals, or presented in medical scientific meetings. Gesida has prepared an objective and structured method to prioritise combined antiretroviral treatment (cART) in naïve patients. Recommendations strength (A, B, C) and the evidence which supports them (I, II, III) are based on a modification of the Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria. The current antiretroviral treatment (ART) of choice for chronic HIV infection is the combination of three drugs. ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection, in pregnancy, in serodiscordant couples with high transmission risk, hepatitis B fulfilling treatment criteria, and HIV nephropathy. Guidelines on ART treatment in patients with concurrent diagnosis of HIV infection and an opportunistic type C infection are included. In asymptomatic patients ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: 1) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts <350 cells/μL; 2) when CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/μL, therapy will be recommended and only delayed if patient is reluctant to take it, the CD4 are stabilised, and the plasma viral load is low; 3) therapy could be deferred when CD4 counts are above 500 cells/μL, but should be considered in cases of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load >10(5) copies/mL, proportion of CD4 cells <14%, and in people aged >55 years. ART should include 2 reverse transcriptase inhibitors nucleoside analogues and a third drug (non-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor, ritonavir boosted protease inhibitor or integrase inhibitor). The panel has consensually

  18. Unresolved antiretroviral treatment management issues in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Shirin; Mofenson, Lynne M; Hobbs, Charlotte V; Cotton, Mark F; Marlink, Richard; Katabira, Elly

    2012-02-01

    Antiretroviral therapy in children has expanded dramatically in low-income and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization revised its pediatric HIV guidelines to recommend initiation of antiretroviral therapy in all HIV-infected children younger than 2 years, regardless of CD4 count or clinical stage. The number of children starting life-long antiretroviral therapy should therefore expand dramatically over time. The early initiation of antiretroviral therapy has indisputable benefits for children, but there is a paucity of definitive information on the potential adverse effects. In this review, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to provide an overview of our knowledge about the complications of treating pediatric HIV. Antiretroviral therapy in children, as in adults, is associated with enhanced survival, reduction in opportunistic infections, improved growth and neurocognitive function, and better quality of life. Despite antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected children may continue to lag behind their uninfected peers in growth and development. In addition, epidemic concurrent conditions, such as tuberculosis, malaria, and malnutrition, can combine with HIV to yield more rapid disease progression and poor treatment outcomes. Additional studies are required to evaluate the long-term effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected infants, children, and adolescents, particularly in resource-limited countries where concomitant infections and conditions may enhance the risk of adverse effects. There is an urgent need to evaluate drug-drug interactions in children to determine optimal treatment regimens for both HIV and coinfections. PMID:22138766

  19. Disability grants or antiretrovirals? A quandary for people with HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Chloe; Richter, Marlise

    2006-05-01

    According to the Department of Social Development, disability grants are available to adult South African citizens and permanent residents who are incapacitated and unable to work due to illness or disability. A number of people living with HIV/AIDS (PWAs) have accessed disability grants once they have fulfilled the criteria set down by the Department of Social Development. Current government policies entitle PWAs, a least in theory, to access antiretroviral medications. Where PWAs have been able to access antiretroviral treatment (ART) through the government's antiretroviral programme, this has led to an improvement in their health and subsequent disqualification for a disability grant. In South Africa's highly unequal society, the disability grant often operates as the only source of income for poor families. This has created an untenable situation as many PWAs are forced to choose between receiving their disability grant and accessing life-saving medication. We explore the intersection of social security with access to ART and argue that it presents complex problems in the context of HIV/AIDS, and thus requires urgent debate and resolution. Potential solutions to this problem, including the provision of a basic income grant to all South Africans, are proposed. PMID:25875149

  20. Executive summary of the GESIDA/National AIDS Plan Consensus Document on Antiretroviral Therapy in Adults Infected by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (Updated January 2016).

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In this update, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended for all patients infected by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1). The objective of ART is to achieve an undetectable plasma viral load (PVL). Initial ART should comprise 3 drugs, namely, 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and 1 drug from another family. Four of the recommended regimens, all of which have an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) as the third drug, are considered a preferred regimen; a further 6 regimens, which are based on an INSTI, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), or a protease inhibitor boosted with cobicistat or ritonavir (PI/COBI, PI/r), are considered alternatives. The reasons and criteria for switching ART are presented both for patients with an undetectable PVL and for patients who experience virological failure, in which case the rescue regimen should include 3 (or at least 2) drugs that are fully active against HIV. The specific criteria for ART in special situations (acute infection, HIV-2 infection, pregnancy) and comorbid conditions (tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections, kidney disease, liver disease, and cancer) are updated. PMID:27068257

  1. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Smartphone App for Daily Reports of Substance Use and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While substance use is one of the most consistent predictors of poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), few studies among people living with HIV (PLH) have utilized mobile phone-based assessment of these health behaviors. PLH were recruited from primary care clinics to report ART and substance use using a smartphone application (app) for 14 consecutive days. The app's feasibility as a data collection tool was evaluated quantitatively via surveys and qualitatively via in-depth interviews to assess daily report completion, compliance, and study satisfaction. Overall, 26 participants (M = 49.5 years, 76% male) completed 95.3% of time-based daily reports. Participants reported high satisfaction with the app and expressed future interest in using smartphones to report daily behaviors. High completion rates and participant acceptability suggest that smartphones are a feasible, acceptable method for collecting substance use and ART data among PLH. Potential areas of concern such as sufficient training and assistance for those with limited smartphone experience should be considered for future app-based research studies among PLH. PMID:27610243

  2. Mortality in the First 3 Months on Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV-Positive Adults in Low- and Middle-income Countries: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Alana T; Long, Lawrence; Useem, Johanna; Garrison, Lindsey; Fox, Matthew P

    2016-09-01

    Previous meta-analyses reported mortality estimates of 12-month post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation; however, 40%-60% of deaths occur in the first 3 months on ART, a more sensitive measure of averted deaths through early ART initiation. To determine whether early mortality is dropping as treatment thresholds have increased, we reviewed studies of 3 months on ART initiation in low- to middle-income countries. Studies of 3-month mortality from January 2003 to April 2016 were searched in 5 databases. Articles were included that reported 3-month mortality from a low- to middle-income country; nontrial setting and participants were ≥15. We assessed overall mortality and stratified by year using random effects models. Among 58 included studies, although not significant, pooled estimates show a decline in mortality when comparing studies whose enrollment of patients ended before 2010 (7.0%; 95% CI: 6.0 to 8.0) with the studies during or after 2010 (4.0%; 95% CI: 3.0 to 5.0). To continue to reduce early HIV-related mortality at the population level, intensified efforts to increase demand for ART through active testing and facilitated referral should be a priority. Continued financial investments by multinational partners and the implementation of creative interventions to mitigate multidimensional complex barriers of accessing care and treatment for HIV are needed. PMID:27513571

  3. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Smartphone App for Daily Reports of Substance Use and Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Sarahmona M; Eliseo-Arras, Rebecca K; Krawiec, Gabriela; Gower, Emily; Dermen, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    While substance use is one of the most consistent predictors of poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), few studies among people living with HIV (PLH) have utilized mobile phone-based assessment of these health behaviors. PLH were recruited from primary care clinics to report ART and substance use using a smartphone application (app) for 14 consecutive days. The app's feasibility as a data collection tool was evaluated quantitatively via surveys and qualitatively via in-depth interviews to assess daily report completion, compliance, and study satisfaction. Overall, 26 participants (M = 49.5 years, 76% male) completed 95.3% of time-based daily reports. Participants reported high satisfaction with the app and expressed future interest in using smartphones to report daily behaviors. High completion rates and participant acceptability suggest that smartphones are a feasible, acceptable method for collecting substance use and ART data among PLH. Potential areas of concern such as sufficient training and assistance for those with limited smartphone experience should be considered for future app-based research studies among PLH. PMID:27610243

  4. Changes in bone marrow morphology in adults receiving romiplostim for the treatment of thrombocytopenia associated with primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Ann; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Anderson, David; Chong, Beng H; Boda, Zoltán; Pabinger, Ingrid; Červinek, Libor; Terrell, Deirdra R; Wang, Xuena; Franklin, Janet

    2016-06-01

    The effects of romiplostim on bone marrow morphology were evaluated in adults with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Patients with platelet counts <50 × 10(9)/L, ≥1 prior ITP therapies, and no collagen at baseline received weekly subcutaneous romiplostim starting at 1 μg/kg, adjusted to maintain platelet counts between 50 and 200 × 10(9)/L. Biopsies were scheduled after 1, 2, or 3 years of romiplostim (cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Irrespective of scheduled time, biopsies were performed earlier if patients discontinued or failed to achieve/maintain a response to romiplostim. Reticulin (silver stain) and collagen (trichrome stain) were graded by two hematopathologists using the modified Bauermeister scale (0-4). Of 169 patients, 131 had evaluable biopsies; 9/131 (6.9 %) had increases of ≥2 grades on the modified Bauermeister scale (cohort 1: 0/34; cohort 2: 2/39; cohort 3: 7/58), including two with collagen. Three of the nine patients had follow-up biopsies, including one patient with collagen; changes were reversible after romiplostim discontinuation. Of the nine patients, one had neutropenia detected by laboratory test and two had adverse events of anemia, both non-serious and not treatment-related. By actual exposure (as some biopsies did not occur as scheduled), the number of patients with grade increases ≥2 were year 1: 3/41, year 2: 1/38, year 3: 5/52. Twenty-four patients sustained platelet counts ≥50 × 10(9)/L for ≥6 months with no ITP medications after discontinuing romiplostim, i.e., they entered clinical remission of their ITP. In conclusion, in patients with ITP receiving romiplostim, bone marrow changes were observed in a small proportion of patients.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT#00907478. PMID:27130310

  5. Effect of Early Antiretroviral Therapy on Sexual Behaviors and HIV-1 Transmission Risk Among Adults With Diverse Heterosexual Partnership Statuses in Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Kévin; Gabillard, Delphine; Moh, Raoul; Danel, Christine; Fassassi, Raïmi; Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; Eholié, Serge; Lert, France; Anglaret, Xavier; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background. The effect of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART; ie, at CD4+ T-cell counts >350 cells/mm3) on sexual behaviors and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) transmission risk has not been documented in populations other than HIV-serodiscordant couples in stable relationships. Methods. On the basis of data from a behavioral study nested in a randomized, controlled trial (Temprano-ANRS12136) of early ART, we compared proportions of risky sex (ie, unprotected sex with a partner of negative/unknown HIV status) reported 12 months after inclusion between participants randomly assigned to initiate ART immediately (hereafter, “early ART”) or according to ongoing World Health Organization criteria. Group-specific HIV transmission rates were estimated on the basis of sexual behaviors and viral load–specific per-act HIV transmission probabilities. The ratio of transmission rates was computed to estimate the protective effect of early ART. Results. Among 957 participants (baseline median CD4+ T-cell count, 478 cells/mm3), 46.0% reported sexual activity in the past month; of these 46.0%, sexual activity for 41.5% involved noncohabiting partners. The proportion of subjects who engaged in risky sex was 10.0% in the early ART group, compared with 12.8% in the standard ART group (P = .17). After accounting for sexual behaviors and viral load, we estimated that the protective effect of early ART was 90% (95% confidence interval, 81%–95%). Conclusion. Twelve months after inclusion, patients in the early and standard ART groups reported similar sexual behaviors. Early ART decreased the estimated risk of HIV transmission by 90%, suggesting a major prevention benefit among seronegative sex partners in stable or casual relationships with seropositive individuals. PMID:23990567

  6. Prevalence of 'being at risk of malnutrition' and associated factors in adult patients receiving nursing care at home in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Franck MPsych, Erik; Lopez Hartmann, Maja; Weyler, Joost; Ysebaert, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is a known problem in hospitals and nursing homes. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of being at risk of malnutrition in community living adults receiving homecare nursing and to determine factors independently associated with this risk of malnutrition. Furthermore, it also aimed to describe aspects of current nutritional nursing care. Patients (n = 100) are screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool to evaluate their risk of malnutrition. A patient survey was used to analyse associated factors. In this population, 29% are at risk for malnutrition. Following a multivariate logistic regression analysis, 'loss of appetite' proved the most important factor. A survey for nurses (n = 61) revealed low awareness, poor knowledge, poor communication between stakeholders and a moderate approach of malnutrition. These findings should encourage homecare nurses to use a recommended screening tool for malnutrition and to actively observe and report loss of appetite to initiate the prescription of individual tailored interventions. Belgian homecare nurses' management does not yet fully comply with international recommendations. Additional training in nutritional nursing care and screening methods for malnutrition is needed. Systematic screening should be further developed and evaluated in this at-risk population. PMID:24810494

  7. Cancer-related pain in older adults receiving palliative care: Patient and family caregiver perspectives on the experience of pain

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Lobchuk, Michelle M; Kilgour, Kelly N

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite an emphasis on pain management in palliative care, pain continues to be a common problem for individuals with advanced cancer. Many of those affected are older due to the disproportionate incidence of cancer in this age group. There remains little understanding of how older patients and their family caregivers perceive patients’ cancer-related pain, despite its significance for pain management in the home setting. OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the cancer pain perceptions and experiences of older adults with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach was used to describe and interpret data collected from semistructured interviews with 18 patients (≥65 years of age) with advanced cancer receiving palliative care at home and their family caregivers. RESULTS: The main category ‘Experiencing cancer pain’ incorporated three themes. The theme ‘Feeling cancer pain’ included the sensory aspects of the pain, its origin and meanings attributed to the pain. A second theme, ‘Reacting to cancer pain’, included patients’ and family caregivers’ behavioural, cognitive (ie, attitudes, beliefs and control) and emotional responses to the pain. A third theme, ‘Living with cancer pain’ incorporated individual and social-relational changes that resulted from living with cancer pain. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an awareness of cancer pain experienced by older patients and their family caregivers within the wider context of ongoing relationships, increased patient morbidity and other losses common in the aged. PMID:23957019

  8. Prognostic factors for health-related quality of life in adults and children with primary antibody deficiencies receiving SCIG home therapy.

    PubMed

    Gardulf, A; Borte, M; Ochs, H D; Nicolay, U

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and treatment satisfaction (TS) of adults and children with primary antibody deficiencies (PAD) before and after the introduction of subcutaneous immunoglobulin G (SCIG) self-infusions at home and to identify prognostic factors (demographic/social, medical, patient/parent reported) for HRQL. 85 adults and 21 parents of children with PAD answered the SF-36 (adults), CHQ-PF50 (parents), and the LQI (adults and parents) at baseline and following 10 months of weekly self-administered SCIG infusions at home. The SCIG home therapy was associated with significant improvements in HRQL and TS, particularly in patients who had previously received IVIG therapy in hospital settings. Background factors that were found to be associated with HRQL changes in adults were age, serum IgG levels at month 10, concomitant joint/muscle/skeletal disorders, clinical study location and smoking status. PMID:17964220

  9. Early Mortality in Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amita; Nadkarni, Girish; Yang, Wei-Teng; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Gupte, Nikhil; Bisson, Gregory P.; Hosseinipour, Mina; Gummadi, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed observational studies of early mortality post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America, as defined by the World Bank, to summarize what is known. Methods and Findings Studies published in English between January 1996 and December 2010 were searched in Medline and EMBASE. Three independent reviewers examined studies of mortality within one year post-ART. An article was included if the study was conducted in a LMIC, participants were initiating ART in a non-clinical trial setting and were ≥15 years. Fifty studies were included; 38 (76%) from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), 5 (10%) from Asia, 2 (4%) from the Americas, and 5 (10%) were multi-regional. Median follow-up time and pre-ART CD4 cell count ranged from 3–55 months and 11–192 cells/mm3, respectively. Loss-to-follow-up, reported in 40 (80%) studies, ranged from 0.3%–27%. Overall, SSA had the highest pooled 12-month mortality probability of 0.17 (95% CI 0.11–0.24) versus 0.11 (95% CI 0.10–0.13) for Asia, and 0.07 (95% CI 0.007–0.20) for the Americas. Of 14 (28%) studies reporting cause-specific mortality, tuberculosis (TB) (5%–44%), wasting (5%–53%), advanced HIV (20%–37%), and chronic diarrhea (10%–25%) were most common. Independent factors associated with early mortality in 30 (60%) studies included: low baseline CD4 cell count, male sex, advanced World Health Organization clinical stage, low body mass index, anemia, age greater than 40 years, and pre-ART quantitative HIV RNA. Conclusions Significant heterogeneity in outcomes and in methods of reporting outcomes exist among published studies evaluating mortality in the first year after ART initiation in LMIC. Early mortality rates are highest in SSA, and opportunistic illnesses such as TB and wasting syndrome are the most common reported causes of death. Strategies addressing modifiable risk factors associated with early

  10. Early Systemic Cellular Immune Response in Children and Young Adults Receiving Decellularized Fresh Allografts for Pulmonary Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Anneke; Breymann, Thomas; Cebotari, Serghei; Boethig, Dietmar; Horke, Alexander; Beerbaum, Philipp; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Bertram, Harald; Ono, Masamichi; Tudorache, Igor; Haverich, Axel; Beutel, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The longevity of homografts is determined by the activation of the recipients' immune system resulting from allogenic antigen exposition. Fresh decellularized pulmonary homografts (DPH) have shown promising early results in pulmonary valve replacement in children and young adults and could potentially avoid significant activation of the immune system, as more than 99% of the donor DNA is removed during the decellularization process. While the humoral immune response to decellularized allografts has been studied, detailed information on the more significant cellular immune response is currently lacking. Methods and Results: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from patients undergoing pulmonary valve replacement with DPH before, after, and for approximately 3 years after implantation. Absolute counts and percentages of mature T- (CD3+), B- (CD19+), and natural killer- (CD16+/CD56+) cells, as well as T helper- (CD4+) and cytotoxic T-cell- (CD8+) subsets, were determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Between May 2009 and September 2013, 199 blood samples taken from 47 patients with a mean age at DPH implantation of 16.6±10.8 years were analyzed. The hemodynamic performance of DPH was excellent in all but one patient, and no valve-related deaths or conduit explantations were observed. The short-term follow up revealed a significant postoperative decrease in cell counts of most subtypes with reconstitution after 3 months. Continued assessment did not show any significant deviations in cell counts from their baseline values. Conclusion: The absence of cellular immune response in patients receiving DPH supports the concept that decellularization can provide a basis for autologous regeneration. PMID:24138470

  11. High rate of lymphoma among a UK cohort of adolescents with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection transitioning to adult care in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Eades, Chris P; Herbert, Sophie A; Edwards, Simon G; Waters, Laura J; Peake, Tabitha; Miller, Robert F; Jungmann, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Among an inner London UK cohort of 147 adolescents transitioning from paediatric into adult care between 2007 and 2015, a new diagnosis of lymphoma was made in five patients; incidence rate = 0.425/100 person-years (95% confidence interval = 0.424-0.426). Previously described risk factors, including low nadir CD4 cell count and ongoing HIV-1 viraemia, appeared to be important. These data suggest that careful surveillance and a low threshold for investigating relevant symptoms continue to be essential for such patients. PMID:26558727

  12. Gender and access to HIV testing and antiretroviral treatments in Thailand: why do women have more and earlier access?

    PubMed

    Le Coeur, Sophie; Collins, Intira J; Pannetier, Julie; Lelièvre, Eva

    2009-09-01

    In the recent scale-up of antiretroviral treatment, gender differences in access to treatment have been reported. In Thailand, as the HIV epidemic became more generalised, there has been a shift from men being disproportionately affected to increased vulnerability of women. In 2007, the Living with Antiretrovirals (LIWA-ANRS 12141) study investigated the gender distribution of all adult patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (N=513 patients) in four community hospitals in northern Thailand and factors influencing the disparities observed. From this retrospective life-event history survey, we found that proportionately more women (53%) were receiving antiretroviral therapy than men, an unexpected result for a country with a higher proportion of infections among men. They were more likely to initiate treatment within one year of diagnosis and were at a more advanced stage of the disease compared to women. This gender distribution is partly explained by the evolving dynamics of the HIV epidemic, initial prioritization of mothers for treatment and earlier access to HIV testing for women. These issues are also entangled with gender differences in the reasons and timing to HIV testing at the individual level. This study found that the majority of men underwent HIV testing for health reasons while the majority of women were tested following family events such as a spouse/child death or during pregnancy. Further qualitative research on gender specific barriers to HIV testing and care, such as perceived low risk of infection, poor access to medical care, lack of social support, actual or anticipated HIV/AIDS-related stigma would provide greater insight. In the meantime, urgent efforts are needed to increase access to voluntary counselling and testing inside and outside the family setting with targeted interventions for men. PMID:19573965

  13. Incidence of Opportunistic Infections and the Impact of Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV-Infected Adults in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Low, Andrea; Gavriilidis, Georgios; Larke, Natasha; B-Lajoie, Marie-Renee; Drouin, Olivier; Stover, John; Muhe, Lulu; Easterbrook, Philippa

    2016-01-01

    Background. To understand regional burdens and inform delivery of health services, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on incidence of key opportunistic infections (OIs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected adults in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Methods. Eligible studies describing the cumulative incidence of OIs and proportion on ART from 1990 to November 2013 were identified using multiple databases. Summary incident risks for the ART-naive period, and during and after the first year of ART, were calculated using random-effects meta-analyses. Summary estimates from ART subgroups were compared using meta-regression. The number of OI cases and associated costs averted if ART was initiated at a CD4 count ≥200 cells/µL were estimated using Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) country estimates and global average OI treatment cost per case. Results. We identified 7965 citations, and included 126 studies describing 491 608 HIV-infected persons. In ART-naive patients, summary risk was highest (>5%) for oral candidiasis, tuberculosis, herpes zoster, and bacterial pneumonia. The reduction in incidence was greatest for all OIs during the first 12 months of ART (range, 57%–91%) except for tuberculosis, and was largest for oral candidiasis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and toxoplasmosis. Earlier ART was estimated to have averted 857 828 cases in 2013 (95% confidence interval [CI], 828 032–874 853), with cost savings of $46.7 million (95% CI, $43.8–$49.4 million). Conclusions. There was a major reduction in risk for most OIs with ART use in LMICs, with the greatest effect seen in the first year of treatment. ART has resulted in substantial cost savings from OIs averted. PMID:26951573

  14. Health benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of earlier eligibility for adult antiretroviral therapy and expanded treatment coverage: a combined analysis of 12 mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Jeffrey W; Menzies, Nicolas A; Stover, John; Cambiano, Valentina; Chindelevitch, Leonid; Cori, Anne; Hontelez, Jan A C; Humair, Salal; Kerr, Cliff C; Klein, Daniel J; Mishra, Sharmistha; Mitchell, Kate M; Nichols, Brooke E; Vickerman, Peter; Bakker, Roel; Bärnighausen, Till; Bershteyn, Anna; Bloom, David E; Boily, Marie-Claude; Chang, Stewart T; Cohen, Ted; Dodd, Peter J; Fraser, Christophe; Gopalappa, Chaitra; Lundgren, Jens; Martin, Natasha K; Mikkelsen, Evelinn; Mountain, Elisa; Pham, Quang D; Pickles, Michael; Phillips, Andrew; Platt, Lucy; Pretorius, Carel; Prudden, Holly J; Salomon, Joshua A; van de Vijver, David A M C; de Vlas, Sake J; Wagner, Bradley G; White, Richard G; Wilson, David P; Zhang, Lei; Blandford, John; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Remme, Michelle; Revill, Paul; Sangrujee, Nalinee; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Doherty, Meg; Shaffer, Nathan; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Hirnschall, Gottfried; Hallett, Timothy B

    2014-01-01

    Background New WHO guidelines recommend ART initiation for HIV-positive persons with CD4 cell counts ≤500 cells/µL, a higher threshold than was previously recommended. Country decision makers must consider whether to further expand ART eligibility accordingly. Methods We used multiple independent mathematical models in four settings—South Africa, Zambia, India, and Vietnam—to evaluate the potential health impact, costs, and cost-effectiveness of different adult ART eligibility criteria under scenarios of current and expanded treatment coverage, with results projected over 20 years. Analyses considered extending eligibility to include individuals with CD4 ≤500 cells/µL or all HIV-positive adults, compared to the previous recommendation of initiation with CD4 ≤350 cells/µL. We assessed costs from a health system perspective, and calculated the incremental cost per DALY averted ($/DALY) to compare competing strategies. Strategies were considered ‘very cost-effective’ if the $/DALY was less than the country’s per capita gross domestic product (GDP; South Africa: $8040, Zambia: $1425, India: $1489, Vietnam: $1407) and ‘cost-effective’ if $/DALY was less than three times per capita GDP. Findings In South Africa, the cost per DALY averted of extending ART eligibility to CD4 ≤500 cells/µL ranged from $237 to $1691/DALY compared to 2010 guidelines; in Zambia, expanded eligibility ranged from improving health outcomes while reducing costs (i.e. dominating current guidelines) to $749/DALY. Results were similar in scenarios with substantially expanded treatment access and for expanding eligibility to all HIV-positive adults. Expanding treatment coverage in the general population was therefore found to be cost-effective. In India, eligibility for all HIV-positive persons ranged from $131 to $241/DALY and in Vietnam eligibility for CD4 ≤500 cells/µL cost $290/DALY. In concentrated epidemics, expanded access among key populations was also cost

  15. Trends in Adults Receiving a Recommendation for Exercise or Other Physical Activity from a Physician or Other Health ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... a physician's advice to exercise vary by body mass index (BMI)? Adults who were obese were about ... and varies substantially across population subgroups. Definitions Body mass index : Based on respondent-reported height and weight ...

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-Term Services and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubritsky, Cynthia; Abbott, Katherine M.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Foust, Janice B.; Naylor, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL)…

  17. Mortality among adults transferred and lost to follow-up from antiretroviral therapy programmes in South Africa: a multicentre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    CORNELL, Morna; LESSELLS, Richard; FOX, Matthew P.; GARONE, Daniela Belen; GIDDY, Janet; FENNER, Lukas; MYER, Landon; BOULLE, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives Little is known about outcomes after transfer out (TFO) and loss to follow-up (LTF) and how differential outcomes might bias mortality estimates, as analyses generally censor or exclude TFOs/LTF. Using data linked to the National Population Register (NPR), we explored mortality among patients TFO and LTF compared with patients retained and investigated how linkage impacted on mortality estimates. Methods A cohort analysis of routine data on adults with civil-identification numbers starting ART 2004–2009 in four large South African ART cohorts. The number, proportion, timing and mortality of TFOs and LTF were reported. Mortality was compared using Kaplan-Meier curves, Cox’s proportional hazards and competing risks regression. Results Before linkage, 1207 patients (6%) had died, 2624 (13%) were LTF, 1067 (5%) were TFO and 14583 (75%) were retained. Compared with retained, mortality risk was three times higher among TFOs (aHR 3.11, 95% CI 2.42–3.99) and 20 times higher among LTF patients (aHR 22.03, 95% CI 20.05–24.21). Excluding early deaths after TFO or LTF, the risk was comparable among TFOs and retained (aHR 0.75, 95% CI 0.54–1.03) and higher among LTF (aHR 2.85, 95% CI 2.43–3.33). After linkage, corrected mortality was higher than site-reported mortality. Censoring did not however lead to substantial underestimation of mortality among TFOs. Conclusions While TFO and LTF predicted mortality, the lower incidence of TFO and subsequent death compared with LTF meant that censoring TFOs did not bias mortality estimates. Future cohort analyses should explicitly consider proportions TFO/LTF and mortality event rates. PMID:24977471

  18. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Antiretroviral Drugs in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, John C.; Erlandson, Kristine Mace

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy has enabled HIV infected persons to reach older ages in high numbers. Hepatic and renal changes that normally occur with advancing age occur earlier and with higher incidence in HIV-infected individuals. A limited number of prospective controlled studies have demonstrated small reductions (17% to 41%) in lopinavir, atazanavir, and lamivudine clearance in older versus younger adults. A much larger number of retrospective studies in adults (age range ~20 to 60 years), including all antiretroviral drugs, have evaluated age as a covariate for pharmacokinetics. Most studies did not detect substantial associations between drug exposures and age. Areas Covered This review summarizes antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics in older persons. The authors review articles from PubMed (search terms: elderly, antiretroviral, pharmacokinetics) in addition to the bibliographies of those selected. Expert Opinion The evidence to date does not support major pharmacokinetic changes in adults between ~20 and 60 years of age. However, additional prospective, well-controlled studies are needed in more persons > 60 years, including those with frailty and comorbidities, with assessment of unbound drug clearance, and incorporation of adherence, pharmacogenetics, and concomitant medications. Until then, guidelines for drug-drug interactions and dosing in renal and hepatic impairment should be followed in older HIV infected individuals. PMID:23514375

  19. Pharmacokinetics of para-Aminosalicylic Acid in HIV-Uninfected and HIV-Coinfected Tuberculosis Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy, Managed for Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    de Kock, Lizanne; Sy, Sherwin K. B.; Diacon, Andreas H.; Prescott, Kim; Hernandez, Kenneth R.; Yu, Mingming; Derendorf, Hartmut; Donald, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis prompted the reintroduction of para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) to protect companion anti-tuberculosis drugs from additional acquired resistance. In sub-Saharan Africa, MDR/XDR tuberculosis with HIV coinfection is common, and concurrent treatment of HIV infection and MDR/XDR tuberculosis is required. Out of necessity, patients receive multiple drugs, and PAS therapy is frequent; however, neither potential drug interactions nor the effects of HIV infection are known. Potential drug-drug interaction with PAS and the effect of HIV infection was examined in 73 pulmonary tuberculosis patients; 22 (30.1%) were HIV coinfected. Forty-one pulmonary MDR or XDR tuberculosis patients received 4 g PAS twice daily, and in a second crossover study, another 32 patients were randomized, receiving 4 g PAS twice daily or 8 g PAS once daily. A PAS population pharmacokinetic model in two dosing regimens was developed; potential covariates affecting its pharmacokinetics were examined, and Monte Carlo simulations were conducted evaluating the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic index. The probability of target attainment (PTA) to maintain PAS levels above MIC during the dosing interval was estimated by simulation of once-, twice-, and thrice-daily dosing regimens not exceeding 12 g daily. Concurrent efavirenz (EFV) medication resulted in a 52% increase in PAS clearance and a corresponding >30% reduction in mean PAS area under the concentration curve in 19 of 22 HIV-M. tuberculosis-coinfected patients. Current practice recommends maintenance of PAS concentrations at ≥1 μg/ml (the MIC of M. tuberculosis), but the model predicts that at only a minimum dose of 4 g twice daily can this PTA be achieved in at least 90% of the population, whether or not EFV is concomitantly administered. Once-daily dosing of 12 g PAS will not provide PAS concentrations exceeding the MIC over the entire dosing

  20. Under-nutrition at baseline and health services utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbin; Brown, Cynthia J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Roth, David L.; West, Delia Smith; Locher, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Older adults receiving Medicare home health services who experience under-nutrition may be at increased risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. We sought to identify the association between baseline nutritional status and subsequent health service utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services. Design This was a longitudinal study using questionnaires and anthropometric measures designed to assess nutritional status (Mini-Nutritional Assessment [MNA]) at baseline and health services utilization and mortality status at six-month and one-year follow-ups. Setting Participants were evaluated in their homes. Participants 198 older adults who were receiving Medicare home health services. Results Based upon MNA, 12.0% of patients were Malnourished, 51.0% were At Risk for Malnourishment, and 36.9% had Normal Nutrition Status. Based upon body mass index (BMI), 8.1% of participants were underweight, 37.9% were normal weight, 25.3% were overweight, and 28.8% were obese. Using multivariate binary logistic regression analyses, participants who were Malnourished or At Risk for Malnourishment were more likely to experience subsequent hospitalization, emergency room visit, home health aide use, and mortality for the entire sample and hospitalization and nursing home stay for overweight and obese participants. Conclusions Experiencing under-nutrition at the time of receipt of Medicare home health services was associated with increased health services utilization and mortality for the entire sample, and with increased health services utilization only for the overweight and obese subsample. Opportunities exist to address risk of under-nutrition in patients receiving home health services, including those who are overweight or obese, to prevent subsequent adverse health outcomes. PMID:21527170

  1. CD4 Cell Count and the Risk of AIDS or Death in HIV-Infected Adults on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy with a Suppressed Viral Load: A Longitudinal Cohort Study from COHERE

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load. Methods and Findings Using data from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (2010 merger), we assessed the risk of a new AIDS-defining event or death in successfully treated patients. We accumulated episodes of viral suppression for each patient while on cART, each episode beginning with the second of two consecutive plasma viral load measurements <50 copies/µl and ending with either a measurement >500 copies/µl, the first of two consecutive measurements between 50–500 copies/µl, cART interruption or administrative censoring. We used stratified multivariate Cox models to estimate the association between time updated CD4 cell count and a new AIDS event or death or death alone. 75,336 patients contributed 104,265 suppression episodes and were suppressed while on cART for a median 2.7 years. The mortality rate was 4.8 per 1,000 years of viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was always associated with a reduced risk of a new AIDS event or death; with a hazard ratio per 100 cells/µl (95% CI) of: 0.35 (0.30–0.40) for counts <200 cells/µl, 0.81 (0.71–0.92) for counts 200 to <350 cells/µl, 0.74 (0.66–0.83) for counts 350 to <500 cells/µl, and 0.96 (0.92–0.99) for counts ≥500 cells/µl. A higher CD4 cell count became even more beneficial over time for patients with CD4 cell counts <200 cells/µl. Conclusions Despite the low mortality rate, the risk of a new AIDS event or death follows a CD4 cell count gradient in patients with viral suppression. A higher CD4 cell count was associated with the greatest benefit for patients with a CD4 cell count <200 cells/µl but still some slight benefit for those with a CD4 cell count ≥500 cells/µl. Please see later in the article for the

  2. Reducing HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adults Receiving Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael P.; Carey, Kate B.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a 10-session, HIV-risk-reduction intervention with 221 women and 187 men receiving outpatient psychiatric care for a mental illness. Patients were randomly assigned to the HIV intervention, a structurally equivalent substance use reduction (SUR) intervention, or standard care; they were assessed pre- and postintervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Patients receiving the HIV-risk-reduction intervention reported less unprotected sex, fewer casual sex partners, fewer new sexually transmitted infections, more safer sex communications, improved HIV knowledge, more positive condom attitudes, stronger condom use intentions, and improved behavioral skills relative to patients in the SUR and control conditions. Patients receiving the SUR intervention reported fewer total and casual sex partners compared with control patients. Exploratory analyses suggested that female patients and patients diagnosed with a major depressive disorder were more likely to benefit from the HIV-risk-reduction intervention. PMID:15065959

  3. Dermatologic adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Luther, Jay; Glesby, Marshall J

    2007-01-01

    Despite the decrease in opportunistic infections associated with HIV in the highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) era, a significant number of patients still present with skin pathology, some of which can be attributed directly or indirectly to antiretroviral therapy. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors exhibit a class effect with regard to skin adverse manifestations, and the spectrum of disease can vary from a mild morbilliform rash to Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Certain protease inhibitors are associated with rash, and indinavir causes retinoid-like manifestations such as paronychia, alopecia, ingrown toe-nails, and curling of straight hair. Abacavir, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is notorious for causing a hypersensitivity reaction in select patients. The fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide causes injection-site reactions in the overwhelming majority of patients, although a new method of delivery has decreased the rate and severity of these reactions. A syndrome of lipoatrophy with or without lipohypertrophy, often termed lipodystrophy, has been described in patients receiving HAART. Potential management of lipoatrophy includes switching antiretrovirals and surgical treatment with facial fillers. Lastly, skin manifestations of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, including herpes zoster and warts, must be recognized and treated accordingly. In the evaluation of the individual HIV-infected patient receiving antiretroviral therapy who presents with a skin disorder, clinicians should consider the CD4 cell count as a marker of the degree of immunodeficiency, the specific antiretrovirals used, and the timing of the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in order to formulate a rational differential diagnosis. Management should be individualized based on the specific drug that is implicated and the severity of the reaction. PMID:17645377

  4. Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Hyderabad, India: barriers, facilitators and identification of target groups.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Mark S; Douglas, G W; Sabitha Rani, G P; Chakraborty, Apurba

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the barriers and facilitators to highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and determined their prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients in Hyderabad, India. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected adults prescribed highly active antiretroviral therapy and receiving care from nine clinics. Depression was screened using Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and facilitators of HIV medication adherence were assessed using an 11-item scale which yielded a total positive attitude to disease score. Prevalence ratios of non-adherence between different categories of potential risk factors were calculated. We compared mean 'facilitators to adherence' scores between the adherent and non-adherent population. Multivariable Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify independent risk factors. Among the 211 respondents, nearly 20% were non-adherent, approximately 8% had either moderately severe or severe depression and mean score for combined facilitators to medication adherence was 33.35 (±7.88) out of a possible 44 points. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included older age, female sex worker, moderate-to-severe depression and the combined facilitators to medication adherence score. These data from a broad range of clinical settings in Hyderabad reveal that key groups to focus on for adherence intervention are female sex workers, older persons and those with depression. PMID:25801316

  5. Reducing HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adults Receiving Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Michael P.; Carey, Kate B.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a 10-session, HIV-risk-reduction intervention with 221 women and 187 men receiving outpatient psychiatric care for a mental illness. Patients were randomly assigned to the HIV intervention, a structurally equivalent substance use reduction (SUR) intervention, or standard care; they were assessed pre- and…

  6. The influence of calcium supplement on body composition, weight loss and insulin resistance in obese adults receiving low calorie diet

    PubMed Central

    Shalileh, Maryam; Shidfar, Farzad; Haghani, Hamid; Eghtesadi, Shahriar; Heydari, Iraj

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are the most important problems of public health. Evidence from molecular animal research and epidemiologic investigations indicate that calcium intake may have an influence on body composition, weight and insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of calcium supplementation on body composition, weight, insulin resistance and blood pressure in the face of calorie restriction in obese adults. METHODS: A double blind randomized placebo-controlled trial on 40 adults with Body Mass Index > 25kg/m2 was conducted. Subjects were maintained for 24 weeks on a balanced deficit diet (-500 kcal/d deficit) and randomly assigned into two groups with 1000 mg ca/d as calcium carbonate or placebo. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in variables at the 12th and 24th week between the two groups. The lean mass showed no significant increase in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to baseline and in placebo group at the 24th week compared to the 12th week. The insulin concentration showed a significant decrease in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to the baseline (p < 0.05). The diastolic blood pressure had a significant decrease at the 24th week compared to the 12th week in both groups (p = 0.013-0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study suggest that 24 weeks of supplementation with 1000 mg ca/d did not have any effect on weight, body composition, insulin resistance and blood pressure beyond what can be achieved in an energy restricted diet in obese adults. PMID:21526081

  7. A Pilot Study of Brief Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback to Reduce Craving in Young Adult Men Receiving Inpatient Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eddie, D.; Kim, C.; Lehrer, P.; Deneke, E.; Bates, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the implementation feasibility, and efficacy for reducing alcohol and drug craving, of a brief, 3-session heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV BFB) intervention added to a traditional 28-day substance abuse disorder (SUD) inpatient treatment program. Forty-eight young adult men received either treatment as usual (TAU) plus three sessions of HRV BFB training over three weeks, or TAU only. Participants receiving HRV BFB training were instructed to practice daily using a handheld HRV BFB device. HRV BFB training was well tolerated by participants and supported by treatment staff. Men receiving TAU + HRV BFB demonstrated a greater, medium effect size reduction in alcohol and drug craving compared to those receiving TAU only, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, an interaction effect was observed in analyses that accounted for baseline craving levels, wherein heart rate variability (HRV) levels at treatment entry were predictive of changes in craving in the TAU group only. Low baseline levels of HRV were associated with increases in craving, whereas higher baseline HRV levels were associated with greater decreases in craving from start to end of treatment. In the TAU + HRV BFB group, however, there was no such association. That is, HRV BFB appeared to dissociate individual differences in baseline HRV levels from changes in craving. Given that alcohol and drug craving often precipitates relapse, HRV BFB merits further study as an adjunct treatment to ameliorate craving experienced by persons with substance use disorders. PMID:25179673

  8. Antiretroviral therapy: Shifting sands.

    PubMed

    Sashindran, V K; Chauhan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has been an extremely difficult pandemic to control. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV has now been transformed into a chronic illness in patients who have continued treatment access and excellent long-term adherence. Existing indications for ART initiation in asymptomatic patients were based on CD4 levels; however, recent evidence has broken the shackles of CD4 levels. Early initiation of ART in HIV patients irrespective of CD4 counts can have profound positive impact on morbidity and mortality. Early initiation of ART has been found not only beneficial for patients but also to community as it reduces the risk of transmission. There have been few financial concerns about providing ART to all HIV-positive people but various studies have proven that early initiation of ART not only proves to be cost-effective but also contributes to economic and social growth of community. A novel multidisciplinary approach with early initiation and availability of ART at its heart can turn the tide in our favor in future. Effective preexposure prophylaxis and postexposure prophylaxis can also lower transmission risk of HIV in community. New understanding of HIV pathogenesis is opening new vistas to cure and prevention. Various promising candidate vaccines and drugs are undergoing aggressive clinical trials, raising optimism for an ever-elusive cure for HIV. This review describes various facets of tectonic shift in management of HIV. PMID:26900224

  9. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-05-01

    Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV. PMID:25844941

  10. Talk or text to tell? How young adults in Canada and South Africa prefer to receive STI results, counseling, and treatment updates in a wireless world.

    PubMed

    Labacher, Lukas; Mitchell, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Young adults often lack access to confidential, long-lasting, and nonjudgmental interactions with sexual health professionals at brick-and-mortar clinics. To ensure that patients return for their STI test results, post-result counseling, and STI-related information, computer-mediated health intervention programming allows them to receive sexual health information through onsite computers, the Internet, and mobile phone calls and text messages. To determine whether young adults (age: M = 21 years) prefer to communicate with health professionals about the status of their sexual health through computer-mediated communication devices, 303 second-year university students (183 from an urban North American university and 120 from a periurban university in South Africa) completed a paper-based survey indicating how they prefer to communicate with doctors and nurses: talking face to face, mobile phone call, text message, Internet chat programs, Facebook, Twitter, or e-mail. Nearly all students, and female students in South Africa in particular, prefer to receive their STI test results, post-results counseling, and STI-related information by talking face to face with doctors and nurses rather than communicating through computers or mobile phones. Results are clarified in relation to gender, availability of various technologies, and prevalence of HIV in Canada and in South Africa. PMID:24015829

  11. Prospective Surveillance for Cardiac Adverse Events in Healthy Adults Receiving Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vaccines: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Elizaga, Marnie L.; Vasan, Sandhya; Marovich, Mary A.; Sato, Alicia H.; Lawrence, Dale N.; Chaitman, Bernard R.; Frey, Sharon E.; Keefer, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vaccinia-associated myo/pericarditis was observed during the US smallpox vaccination (DryVax) campaign initiated in 2002. A highly-attenuated vaccinia strain, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) has been evaluated in clinical trials as a safer alternative to DryVax and as a vector for recombinant vaccines. Due to the lack of prospectively collected cardiac safety data, the US Food and Drug Administration required cardiac screening and surveillance in all clinical trials of MVA since 2004. Here, we report cardiac safety surveillance from 6 phase I trials of MVA vaccines. Methods Four clinical research organizations contributed cardiac safety data using common surveillance methods in trials administering MVA or recombinant MVA vaccines to healthy participants. ‘Routine cardiac investigations’ (ECGs and cardiac enzymes obtained 2 weeks after injections of MVA or MVA-HIV recombinants, or placebo-controls), and ‘Symptom-driven cardiac investigations’ are reported. The outcome measure is the number of participants who met the CDC-case definition for vaccinia-related myo/pericarditis or who experienced cardiac adverse events from an MVA vaccine. Results Four hundred twenty-five study participants had post-vaccination safety data analyzed, 382 received at least one MVA-containing vaccine and 43 received placebo; 717 routine ECGs and 930 cardiac troponin assays were performed. Forty-five MVA recipients (12%) had additional cardiac testing performed; 22 for cardiac symptoms, 19 for ECG/laboratory changes, and 4 for cardiac symptoms with an ECG/laboratory change. No participant had evidence of symptomatic or asymptomatic myo/pericarditis meeting the CDC-case definition and judged to be related to an MVA vaccine. Conclusions Prospective surveillance of MVA recipients for myo/pericarditis did not detect cardiac adverse reactions in 382 study participants. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00082446 NCT003766090 NCT00252148 NCT00083603 NCT00301184

  12. Immunological profiling of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and non-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome death in HIV-infected adults with pulmonary tuberculosis starting antiretroviral therapy: a prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ravimohan, Shruthi; Tamuhla, Neo; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Letlhogile, Rona; Nfanyana, Kebatshabile; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; MacGregor, Rob Roy; Gross, Robert; Weissman, Drew; Bisson, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients co-infected with advanced HIV and tuberculosis are at risk of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and death soon after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Tuberculosis-associated IRIS has been associated with quicker recovery of cellular immune responses after ART initiation and early mortality with slower recovery of these responses. We aimed to assess whether patients who have these outcomes have distinct immunological profiles before and after ART initiation. Methods We undertook this prospective cohort study at 22 public clinics and the main public hospital in Gaborone, Botswana, in ART-naive adults (aged ≥21 years) with advanced HIV (CD4 cell counts ≤125 cells per μL) and pulmonary tuberculosis. We obtained data for clinical variables and for levels of 29 plasma biomarkers, quantified by Luminex assay. We classified patients as having tuberculosis-associated IRIS, early mortality, or survival without a diagnosis of tuberculosis-associated IRIS (controls), on the basis of outcomes recorded in the 6 months after ART initiation. We used rank-sum or χ² tests, and logistic regression with odds ratios (OR) and 95% CIs, to assess the association between variables measured before and 4 weeks after ART initiation with death and tuberculosis-associated IRIS, compared with controls. Findings Between Nov 12, 2009, and July 3, 2013, we enrolled 201 participants. 31 (15%) patients left the study before ART initiation, leaving 170 (85%) patients for analysis. Patients with tuberculosis-associated IRIS had reduced pre-ART concentrations of several pro-inflammatory biomarkers, including interleukin (IL)-6 (adjusted OR per 1 log10 increase 0·40 [95% CI 0·18–0·89]). However, patients with early death had increased pre-ART concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (adjusted OR 9·0 [95% CI 1·0–80·0]) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α (7·8 [1

  13. Identifying religious and/or spiritual perspectives of adolescents and young adults receiving blood and marrow transplants: a prospective qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Hegner, Mary Ann; Mueller, Mark; Davies, Stella

    2014-08-01

    The potential benefits (or detriments) of religious beliefs in adolescent and young adults (AYA) are poorly understood. Moreover, the literature gives little guidance to health care teams or to chaplains about assessing and addressing the spiritual needs of AYA receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). We used an institutional review board-approved, prospective, longitudinal study to explore the use of religion and/or spirituality (R/S) in AYA HSCT recipients and to assess changes in belief during the transplantation experience. We used the qualitative methodology, grounded theory, to gather and analyze data. Twelve AYA recipients were interviewed within 100 days of receiving HSCT and 6 participants were interviewed 1 year after HSCT; the other 6 participants died. Results from the first set of interviews identified 5 major themes: using R/S to address questions of "why me?" and "what will happen to me;" believing God has a reason; using faith practices; and benefitting from spiritual support people. The second set of interviews resulted in 4 major themes: believing God chose me; affirming that my life has a purpose; receiving spiritual encouragement; and experiencing strengthened faith. We learned that AYA patients were utilizing R/S far more than we suspected and that rather than losing faith in the process of HSCT, they reported using R/S to cope with illness and HSCT and to understand their lives as having special purpose. Our data, supported by findings of adult R/S studies, suggest that professionally prepared chaplains should be proactive in asking AYA patients about their understanding and use of faith, and the data can actively help members of the treatment team understand how AYA are using R/S to make meaning, address fear, and inform medical decisions. PMID:24769327

  14. Antiretroviral therapy with heart.

    PubMed

    Randell, Paul; Moyle, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in a substantial improvement in the morbidity and mortality associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As this population ages, cardiovascular disease is becoming an increasingly important health burden. It is clear that many factors are involved in the development of this problem, with traditional risk factors (smoking, dyslipidemia, diabetes, family history, hypertension) the main contributors. ART and HIV infection itself can modify the risk of cardiovascular disease. Not only does this increased risk seem to be mediated through effects on traditional cardiovascular risk factors, namely dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, but there is also some evidence that HIV and ART may be associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. Current data are conflicting and further investigation into this area is needed. Drugs from both nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor classes have been demonstrated to increase cardiovascular risk; however these effects are variable not only between classes but also between drugs in the same class. As newer therapies become available (in existing and new drug classes), the cardiovascular impact of these will need careful evaluation. Currently published guidelines suggest regular monitoring of cardiovascular risks (both before and after commencing ART) and pre-emptive treatment. Existing risk assessment tools have not been fully validated in an HIV setting and need to be used with caution. Lifestyle modification, in the first instance, and pharmacological intervention to reduce traditional risk factors are important management strategies. Initiating, or switching to, ART with a lower potential for metabolic derangement should also be considered. PMID:19940610

  15. Receipt of clinical and prevention services, clinical outcomes, and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-infected young adults in care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Mattson, Christine L; Shouse, R Luke; Prejean, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We describe receipt of clinical and prevention services, clinical outcomes, and sexual risk behaviors among young adult HIV patients in the United States during 2009-2013, using a sample designed to produce nationally representative estimates. Compared with older HIV patients, proportionately more young adults received provider-delivered prevention services and reported sexual risk behaviors. Young adults had similar care patterns as older HIV patients, but were less likely to have or adhere to an antiretroviral therapy prescription and achieve viral suppression. These estimates establish a national baseline from which to monitor changes in clinical outcomes and transmission behaviors among young HIV-infected adults. PMID:27011102

  16. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  17. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  18. Characterizing Adults Receiving Primary Medical Care in New York City: Implications for Using Electronic Health Records for Chronic Disease Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Romo, Matthew L.; Lurie-Moroni, Elizabeth; Perlman, Sharon E.; Newton-Dame, Remle; Thorpe, Lorna E.; McVeigh, Katharine H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Electronic health records (EHRs) from primary care providers can be used for chronic disease surveillance; however, EHR-based prevalence estimates may be biased toward people who seek care. This study sought to describe the characteristics of an in-care population and compare them with those of a not-in-care population to inform interpretation of EHR data. Methods We used data from the 2013–2014 New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES), considered the gold standard for estimating disease prevalence, and the 2013 Community Health Survey, and classified participants as in care or not in care, on the basis of their report of seeing a health care provider in the previous year. We used χ2 tests to compare the distribution of demographic characteristics, health care coverage and access, and chronic conditions between the 2 populations. Results According to the Community Health Survey, approximately 4.1 million (71.7%) adults aged 20 or older had seen a health care provider in the previous year; according to NYC HANES, approximately 4.7 million (75.1%) had. In both surveys, the in-care population was more likely to be older, female, non-Hispanic, and insured compared with the not-in-care population. The in-care population from the NYC HANES also had a higher prevalence of diabetes (16.7% vs 6.9%; P < .001), hypercholesterolemia (35.7% vs 22.3%; P < .001), and hypertension (35.5% vs 26.4%; P < .001) than the not-in-care population. Conclusion Systematic differences between in-care and not-in-care populations warrant caution in using primary care data to generalize to the population at large. Future efforts to use primary care data for chronic disease surveillance need to consider the intended purpose of data collected in these systems as well as the characteristics of the population using primary care. PMID:27126554

  19. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  20. Socioeconomic Support Reduces Nonretention in a Comprehensive, Community-Based Antiretroviral Therapy Program in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Talisuna-Alamo, Stella; Colebunders, Robert; Ouma, Joseph; Sunday, Pamela; Ekoru, Kenneth; Laga, Marie; Wagner, Glenn; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the benefit of socioeconomic support (S-E support), comprising various financial and nonfinancial services that are available based on assessment of need, in reducing mortality and lost to follow-up (LTFU) at Reach Out Mbuya, a community-based, antiretroviral therapy program in Uganda. Design Retrospective observational cohort data from adult patients enrolled between May 31, 2001, and May 31, 2010, were examined. Methods Patients were categorized into none, 1, and 2 or more S-E support based on the number of different S-E support services they received. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we modeled the association between S-E support and mortality or LTFU. Kaplan–Meier curves were fitted to examine retention functions stratified by S-E support. Results In total, 6654 patients were evaluated. After 10 years, 2700 (41%) were retained. Of the 3954 not retained, 2933 (74%) were LTFU and 1021 (26%) had died. After 1, 2, 5, and 10 years, the risks of LTFU or mortality in patients who received no S-E support were significantly higher than those who received some S-E support. In adjusted hazards ratios, patients who received no S-E support were 1.5-fold (1.39–1.64) and 6.7-fold (5.56–7.69) more likely to get LTFU compared with those who received 1 or ≥2 S-E support, respectively. Likewise, patients who received no S-E support were 1.5-fold (confidence interval: 1.16 to 1.89) and 4.3-fold (confidence interval: 2.94 to 6.25) more likely to die compared with those who received 1 or 2+ S-E support, respectively. Conclusions Provision of S-E support reduced LTFU and mortality, suggesting the value of incorporating such strategies for promoting continuity of care. PMID:22217680

  1. A Mathematical Model of Antiretroviral Therapy Evaluation for HIV Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio; Mo Yang, Hyun

    2009-09-01

    Treating HIV-infected patients with a combination of several antiretroviral drugs can lead to emergence of the drug-resistant strain. This work proposes a mathematical model to evaluate the emergence of HIV-1 drug resistant during antiretroviral therapy. The model assumes that all susceptible individuals who can be infected by the wildtype strain (sensible to the treatment) or by drug-resistant virus receive antiretroviral therapy. Patients on treatment regimen can evolve to a state of success or failure and for the individuals in therapeutic fail the therapeutic schema is changed. The analysis of system is performed. The existence and stability of the steady states are considered. We address an analytical expression for the reproductive number in a community where antiretroviral therapy are widely used to treat HIV and where both drug sensitive and drug resistant strains are co-circulating.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  3. Changes in sexual risk taking with antiretroviral treatment: influence of context and gender norms in Mombasa, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Sarna, Avina; Chersich, Matthew; Okal, Jerry; Luchters, Stanley M F; Mandaliya, Kishorchandra N; Rutenberg, Naomi; Temmerman, Marleen

    2009-11-01

    In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 sexually-active adults receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Mombasa Kenya to understand changes in sexual behaviour after treatment initiation and factors influencing condom use. Advanced HIV disease had previously led to marked decreases in sexual desire and function. After HIV testing, numbers of partners reduced and monogamous relationships began to predominate. Receipt of ART strengthened these changes, while improving sexual health. However, concurrent sexual partnerships continue within polygamous marriage and unprotected sex occurs with regular partners, even those who are HIV-negative. Those who used condoms inconsistently prior to ART often remained inconsistent users thereafter. While disclosure of HIV status appeared to support condom use, this does not always predict protected sex. In addition to classic perceptions about condom's effect on intimacy and trust, traditional gender roles, misconceptions about potential harm from condoms and fertility desires hinder condom use. PMID:19557584

  4. Dyslipidaemia associated with antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Chiodo, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a significant impact on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, leading to a remarkable decrease in its morbidity and mortality, but is frequently associated with clinical and metabolic complications. Fat redistribution or lipodystrophy, hypertriglyceridaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus have been extensively reported in subjects treated with protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral regimens. In particular, dyslipidaemia occurs in up to 70-80% of HIV-infected individuals receiving HAART and can be associated with all the available PIs, although hypertriglyceridaemia appears to be more frequent in patients treated with ritonavir, ritonavir-saquinavir, or ritonavir-lopinavir. The potential long-term consequences of HAART-associated hyperlipidaemia are not completely understood, but an increased risk of premature coronary artery disease has been reported in young HIV-positive persons receiving PIs. Dietary changes, regular aerobic exercise and switching to a PI-sparing regimen may act favourably on dyslipidaemia. Lipid-lowering therapy is often required with statins or fibrates. The choice of hypolipidaemic drugs should take into account potential pharmacological interactions with antiretroviral agents. PMID:14645323

  5. Governor signs bill seeking prompter access to antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    1999-10-15

    California Governor Gray Davis signed legislation providing for more timely access to antiretroviral medications through the State's AIDS drug assistance program (ADAP). The bill requires that the State Department of Health Services make any HIV treatment antiretroviral drug approved for marketing by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) available within 30 days of the time the State Office of AIDS receives notice of FDA approval. The bill requires that the drug be validated for treatment by the State Office of AIDS and that enough money is budgeted by the agency to pay for the new medication. Consumer protection items are included, such as requiring prescriptions be filled within 24 hours of submission and providing information at appropriate literacy levels in English, Spanish, Mandarin/Cantonese, Tagalog and other languages. PMID:11367283

  6. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups. PMID:26860637

  7. Pharmacological interactions between rifampicin and antiretroviral drugs: challenges and research priorities for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Semvua, Hadija H; Kibiki, Gibson S; Kisanga, Elton R; Boeree, Martin J; Burger, David M; Aarnoutse, Rob

    2015-02-01

    Coadministration of antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy is often inevitable in high-burden countries where tuberculosis (TB) is the most common opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS. Concurrent use of rifampicin and many antiretroviral drugs is complicated by pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Rifampicin is a very potent enzyme inducer, which can result in subtherapeutic antiretroviral drug concentrations. In addition, TB drugs and antiretroviral drugs have additive (pharmacodynamic) interactions as reflected in overlapping adverse effect profiles. This review provides an overview of the pharmacological interactions between rifampicin-based TB treatment and antiretroviral drugs in adults living in resource-limited settings. Major progress has been made to evaluate the interactions between TB drugs and antiretroviral therapy; however, burning questions remain concerning nevirapine and efavirenz effectiveness during rifampicin-based TB treatment, treatment options for TB-HIV-coinfected patients with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance or intolerance, and exact treatment or dosing schedules for vulnerable patients including children and pregnant women. The current research priorities can be addressed by maximizing the use of already existing data, creating new data by conducting clinical trials and prospective observational studies and to engage a lobby to make currently unavailable drugs available to those most in need. PMID:24943062

  8. Supervision, monitoring and evaluation of nationwide scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Libamba, Edwin; Makombe, Simon; Mhango, Eustice; de Ascurra Teck, Olga; Limbambala, Eddie; Schouten, Erik J.; Harries, Anthony D.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the supervision, monitoring and evaluation strategies used to assess the delivery of antiretroviral therapy during nationwide scale-up of treatment in Malawi. METHODS: In the first quarter of 2005, the HIV Unit of the Ministry of Health and its partners (the Lighthouse Clinic; Médecins Sans Frontières-Belgium, Thyolo district; and WHO's Country Office) undertook structured supervision and monitoring of all public sector health facilities in Malawi delivering antiretroviral therapy. FINDINGS: Data monitoring showed that by the end of 2004, there were 13,183 patients (5274 (40%) male, 12 527 (95%) adults) who had ever started antiretroviral therapy. Of patients who had ever started, 82% (10 761/13,183) were alive and taking antiretrovirals; 8% (1026/13,183) were dead; 8% (1039/13,183) had been lost to follow up; <1% (106/13,183) had stopped treatment; and 2% (251/13,183) had transferred to another facility. Of those alive and on antiretrovirals, 98% (7098/7258) were ambulatory; 85% (6174/7258) were fit to work; 10% (456/4687) had significant side effects; and, based on pill counts, 96% (6824/7114) had taken their treatment correctly. Mistakes in the registration and monitoring of patients were identified and corrected. Drug stocks were checked, and one potential drug stock-out was averted. As a result of the supervisory visits, by the end of March 2005 recruitment of patients to facilities scheduled to start delivering antiretroviral therapy had increased. CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates the importance of early supervision for sites that are starting to deliver antiretroviral therapy, and it shows the value of combining data collection with supervision. Making regular supervisory and monitoring visits to delivery sites are essential for tracking the national scale-up of delivery of antiretrovirals. PMID:16628306

  9. Antiretroviral therapy: 'the state of the art'.

    PubMed

    Montaner, J S; Montessori, V; Harrigan, R; O'Shaughnessy, M; Hogg, R

    1999-03-01

    The field of antiretroviral therapy is evolving at a very rapid pace. At this time, the initiation and optimization of antiretroviral therapy is based on serial plasma viral load determinations which aim to suppress viral replication to as low as possible for as long as possible, thus preventing disease progression. Currently available antiretrovirals require combination therapy with at least three agents to achieve this goal. Increasing availability of newer and more potent antiretroviral regimens will continue to enhance and simplify the number of therapeutic options available in the not too distant future. PMID:10337460

  10. Progress of the National Pediatric Free Antiretroviral Therapy program in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Sun, Xin; He, Yun; Tang, Zhirong; Peng, Guoping; Liu, Aiwen; Qiao, Xiaochun; Li, Huiqin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Dou, Zhihui; Ma, Ye; Liu, Zhongfu; Zhang, Fujie

    2010-10-01

    In 2003, the Chinese Government initiated a free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program focusing on adult AIDS patients. Pediatric antiretroviral (ARV) formulations were yet unavailable. It was not until July 2005, with the initiation of a two-stage program implemented by the Chinese Ministry of Health, that pediatric formulations became accessible in China. Initially, the pediatric ART program was piloted in six provinces with the highest incidences of pediatric HIV/AIDS. The pilot stage allowed the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC) to finalize entry criteria, treatment regimen, and patient monitoring and follow-up procedures. The second stage commenced at the end of 2006 when the program was scaled-up nationally. In order to guarantee treatment of pediatric patients, extensive training in the selection of appropriate ARV drug regimen and dosage was provided to doctors, often through on-site collaboration with domestic and international experts. The CCDC simultaneously established a pediatric ARV management system and a pediatric ART information system. CD4 count and other laboratory tests are being routinely performed on these pediatric patients. By the end of June 2009, 1529 pediatric patients had received ARV under the national program. However, challenges remain. Firstly, many children infected with HIV/AIDS live in rural areas where the treatment quality is hindered by the limited number of medical facilities and skilled medical workers. Secondly, much of the pediatric ARV drug supply depends on donation. An effort needs to be made by the Chinese Government to establish China's own drug procurement and supply system. PMID:20665285

  11. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. PMID:26350595

  12. Longitudinal changes of endocrine and bone disease in adults with β-thalassemia major receiving different iron chelators over 5 years.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Maurizio; Sorrentino, Francesco; Pugliese, Pellegrina; Smacchia, Maria Paola; Daniele, Carmine; Equitani, Francesco; Terlizzi, Filomena; Guitarrini, Maria Rita; Monti, Salvatore; Maffei, Laura; Losardo, Anna; Pasin, Methap; Toscano, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we compared the long-term effects of different iron chelation regimens (deferoxamine, deferiprone, deferoxamine + deferiprone, and deferasirox) in preventing or reversing endocrinopathy (diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, or hypogonadism) and bone disease (measured through DEXA) in 165 adults with β-thalassemia major (TM) (mean age 39.9 ± 8.3 years, 43 % males). After five consecutive years of therapy, patients on deferasirox had the highest decrease in the prevalence of any endocrinopathy compared to other chelators which either had no change (deferiprone and deferoxamine) or had an increase (deferoxamine + deferiprone), p = 0.015. This was attributed to a lower proportion of patients on deferasirox developing new-onset endocrinopathy and higher proportion showing reversal of disease, compared to other chelators. A serum ferritin level of >1300 ng/mL predicted the development of new endocrinopathy (p = 0.025) while a level of <200 ng/mL predicted reversal of existing endocrinopathy (p = 0.147). A significant increase in mean BMD T-score (p < 0.001) and a considerable decrease in osteoporosis prevalence were observed in patients receiving deferasirox but not other chelators. Iron chelation therapy with deferasirox has a role in the prevention of endocrinopathy and reversal of existing disease. PMID:26957357

  13. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. PMID:26350595

  14. Clinical management of dyslipidaemia associated with combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Manfredi, Roberto; Bon, Isabella; Re, Maria Carla; Viale, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of potent combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has had a remarkable impact on the natural history of HIV infection, leading to a dramatic decline in the mortality rate and a considerable increase in the life expectancy of HIV-positive people. However, cART use is frequently associated with several metabolic complications, mostly represented by lipid metabolism alterations, which are reported very frequently among persons treated with antiretroviral agents. In particular, hyperlipidaemia occurs in up to 70%-80% of HIV-positive subjects receiving cART and is mainly associated with specific antiretroviral drugs belonging to three classes of antiretroviral agents: NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs. The potential long-term consequences of cART-associated dyslipidaemia are not completely understood, but an increased risk of premature coronary heart disease has been reported in HIV-infected patients on cART, so prompt correction of lipid metabolism abnormalities is mandatory in this population. Dietary changes, regular aerobic exercise and switching to a different antiretroviral regimen associated with a more favourable metabolic profile are the first steps in clinical management, but lipid-lowering therapy with fibrates or statins is often required. In this case, the choice of hypolipidaemic drugs should take into account the potential pharmacokinetic interactions with many antiretroviral agents. PMID:26846208

  15. Perception of Antiretroviral Generic Medicines: One-Day Survey of HIV-Infected Patients and Their Physicians in France

    PubMed Central

    Jacomet, Christine; Allavena, Clotilde; Peyrol, Fleur; Pereira, Bruno; Joubert, Laurence Morand; Bagheri, Haleh; Cotte, Laurent; Garaffo, Rodolphe; Gerbaud, Laurent; Dellamonica, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background In the interest of cost effectiveness, switching antiretroviral brand name medications to generics is recommended in France since 2013. The study objective was to evaluate the perception of generics per se and antiretroviral generics in HIV-infected patients and their hospital physicians Methods and Findings 556 out of 703 (79%) adult HIV+ outpatients and 116 physicians in 33 clinics were included in a multicentric cross-sectional survey performed in September 2013. Patients completed a self-questionnaire on their perception and acceptability of generics. Physicians completed a questionnaire on their acceptability of switching antiretroviral to generic. Socio-demographic data, medical history and HIV history were collected. Among the 556 patients with a median HIV duration of 13 years, 77% were France native, 59% in active employment, 100% covered by social insurance, 95% on antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-six percent of the patients accepted generics and 55% trusted them overall. Antiretroviral generics were accepted by 44% of them but only by 17% if the pill burden was going to increase. The factor significantly associated with acceptability of antiretroviral generics was acceptance of generics per se (p<0.001). Among the 116 physicians following a median of 100 HIV-patients/year, 75% would prescribe generics, dropping to 26% if the combo had to be broken. Factors significantly associated with willingness to prescribe antiretroviral generics were the absence of concern regarding the chemical entity (OR = 0.33), being aware that the patient would accept generics for other pathologies (OR = 2.04) and would accept antiretroviral generics (OR = 1.94). No factor related to sociodemographic conditions, HIV status or comorbidities was associated with the acceptability of antiretroviral generics. Conclusions Acceptability of antiretroviral generics in this French population was mostly dictated by the patient’s and physician’s knowledge and use of generics

  16. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-06-16

    An improved receiver and receiver mount for calutrons are described. The receiver can be manipulated from outside the tank by a single control to position it with respect to the beam. A door can be operated exteriorly also to prevent undesired portions of the beam from entering the receiver. The receiver has an improved pocket which is more selective in the ions collected. (T.R.H.)

  17. Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy after Diagnosis of Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Meya, David B.; Muzoora, Conrad; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Huppler Hullsiek, Katherine; Musubire, Abdu; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W.; Schutz, Charlotte; Williams, Darlisha A.; Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Thienemann, Friedrich; Lo, Melanie W.; Nielsen, Kirsten; Bergemann, Tracy L.; Kambugu, Andrew; Manabe, Yukari C.; Janoff, Edward N.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis accounts for 20 to 25% of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related deaths in Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for survival; however, the question of when ART should be initiated after diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis remains unanswered. Methods We assessed survival at 26 weeks among 177 human immunodeficiency virus–infected adults in Uganda and South Africa who had cryptococcal meningitis and had not previously received ART. We randomly assigned study participants to undergo either earlier ART initiation (1 to 2 weeks after diagnosis) or deferred ART initiation (5 weeks after diagnosis). Participants received amphotericin B (0.7 to 1.0 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) and fluconazole (800 mg per day) for 14 days, followed by consolidation therapy with fluconazole. Results The 26-week mortality with earlier ART initiation was significantly higher than with deferred ART initiation (45% [40 of 88 patients] vs. 30% [27 of 89 patients]; hazard ratio for death, 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 2.82; P = 0.03). The excess deaths associated with earlier ART initiation occurred 2 to 5 weeks after diagnosis (P = 0.007 for the comparison between groups); mortality was similar in the two groups thereafter. Among patients with few white cells in their cerebrospinal fluid (<5 per cubic millimeter) at randomization, mortality was particularly elevated with earlier ART as compared with deferred ART (hazard ratio, 3.87; 95% CI, 1.41 to 10.58; P = 0.008). The incidence of recognized cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome did not differ significantly between the earlier-ART group and the deferred-ART group (20% and 13%, respectively; P = 0.32). All other clinical, immunologic, virologic, and microbiologic outcomes, as well as adverse events, were similar between the groups. Conclusions Deferring ART for 5 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was associated with

  18. The Impact of Different CD4 Cell-Count Monitoring and Switching Strategies on Mortality in HIV-Infected African Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Application of Dynamic Marginal Structural Models.

    PubMed

    Ford, Deborah; Robins, James M; Petersen, Maya L; Gibb, Diana M; Gilks, Charles F; Mugyenyi, Peter; Grosskurth, Heiner; Hakim, James; Katabira, Elly; Babiker, Abdel G; Walker, A Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is delivered with limited laboratory monitoring, often none. In 2003-2004, investigators in the Development of Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa (DART) Trial randomized persons initiating ART in Uganda and Zimbabwe to either laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM). CD4 cell counts were measured every 12 weeks in both groups but were only returned to treating clinicians for management in the LCM group. Follow-up continued through 2008. In observational analyses, dynamic marginal structural models on pooled randomized groups were used to estimate survival under different monitoring-frequency and clinical/immunological switching strategies. Assumptions included no direct effect of randomized group on mortality or confounders and no unmeasured confounders which influenced treatment switch and mortality or treatment switch and time-dependent covariates. After 48 weeks of first-line ART, 2,946 individuals contributed 11,351 person-years of follow-up, 625 switches, and 179 deaths. The estimated survival probability after a further 240 weeks for post-48-week switch at the first CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/mm(3) or non-Candida World Health Organization stage 4 event (with CD4 count <250) was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 0.97) with 12-weekly CD4 testing, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.95, 0.97) with 24-weekly CD4 testing, 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) with a single CD4 test at 48 weeks (baseline), and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.94) with no CD4 testing. Comparing randomized groups by 48-week CD4 count, the mortality risk associated with CDM versus LCM was greater in persons with CD4 counts of <100 (hazard ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.3) than in those with CD4 counts of ≥100 (hazard ratio = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.7; interaction P = 0.04). These findings support a benefit from identifying patients immunologically failing first-line ART at 48 weeks. PMID:26316598

  19. The Impact of Different CD4 Cell-Count Monitoring and Switching Strategies on Mortality in HIV-Infected African Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy: An Application of Dynamic Marginal Structural Models

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Deborah; Robins, James M.; Petersen, Maya L.; Gibb, Diana M.; Gilks, Charles F.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Grosskurth, Heiner; Hakim, James; Katabira, Elly; Babiker, Abdel G.; Walker, A. Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is delivered with limited laboratory monitoring, often none. In 2003–2004, investigators in the Development of Antiretroviral Therapy in Africa (DART) Trial randomized persons initiating ART in Uganda and Zimbabwe to either laboratory and clinical monitoring (LCM) or clinically driven monitoring (CDM). CD4 cell counts were measured every 12 weeks in both groups but were only returned to treating clinicians for management in the LCM group. Follow-up continued through 2008. In observational analyses, dynamic marginal structural models on pooled randomized groups were used to estimate survival under different monitoring-frequency and clinical/immunological switching strategies. Assumptions included no direct effect of randomized group on mortality or confounders and no unmeasured confounders which influenced treatment switch and mortality or treatment switch and time-dependent covariates. After 48 weeks of first-line ART, 2,946 individuals contributed 11,351 person-years of follow-up, 625 switches, and 179 deaths. The estimated survival probability after a further 240 weeks for post-48-week switch at the first CD4 cell count less than 100 cells/mm3 or non-Candida World Health Organization stage 4 event (with CD4 count <250) was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 0.97) with 12-weekly CD4 testing, 0.96 (95% CI: 0.95, 0.97) with 24-weekly CD4 testing, 0.95 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) with a single CD4 test at 48 weeks (baseline), and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.94) with no CD4 testing. Comparing randomized groups by 48-week CD4 count, the mortality risk associated with CDM versus LCM was greater in persons with CD4 counts of <100 (hazard ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.3) than in those with CD4 counts of ≥100 (hazard ratio = 1.1, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.7; interaction P = 0.04). These findings support a benefit from identifying patients immunologically failing first-line ART at 48 weeks. PMID:26316598

  20. Incidence and risk factors of post-engraftment invasive fungal disease in adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients receiving oral azoles prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, P; Rodríguez-Veiga, R; Boluda, B; Martínez-Cuadrón, D; Cano, I; Lancharro, A; Sanz, J; Arilla, M J; López-Chuliá, F; Navarro, I; Lorenzo, I; Salavert, M; Pemán, J; Calvillo, P; Martínez, J; Carpio, N; Jarque, I; Sanz, G F; Sanz, M A

    2015-11-01

    Studies that analyze the epidemiology and risk factors for invasive fungal disease (IFD) after engraftment in alloSCT are few in number. This single-center retrospective study included 404 alloSCT adult recipients surviving >40 days who engrafted and were discharged without prior IFD. All patients who received ⩾20 mg/day of prednisone were assigned to primary oral prophylaxis (itraconazole or low-dose voriconazole). The primary end point was the cumulative incidence (CI) of probable/proven IFD using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) criteria. The independent prognostic factors after multivariate analyses were used to construct a post-engraftment IFD risk score. The 1-year CI of IFD was 11%. The non-relapse mortality was 40% in those developing IFD and 16% in those who did not. The intent-to-treat analysis showed that 17% of patients abandoned the assigned prophylaxis. Age >40 years, ⩾1 previous SCT, pre-engraftment neutropenia >15 days, extensive chronic GVHD and CMV reactivation were independent risk factors. The post-engraftment IFD score stratified patients into low risk (0-1 factor, CI 0.7%), intermediate risk (2 factors, CI 9.9%) and high risk (3-5 factors, CI 24.7%) (P<0.0001). The antifungal prophylaxis strategy failed to prevent post-engraftment IFD in 11% of alloSCT. Our risk score could be useful to implement risk-adapted strategies using antifungal prophylaxis after engraftment. PMID:26281032

  1. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Brunk, W.O.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given for an improved calutron receiver having a face plate lying at an angle to the direction of the entering ion beams but having an opening, the plane of which is substantially perpendicular to that of the entering ion beams. By so positioning the opening in the receiver, the effective area through which the desired material may enter the receiver is increased, and at the same time the effective area through which containattng material may enter the receiver is reduced.

  2. No effect of interleukin-2 on IgE levels given in addition to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults with CD4 >300 cells/mm3.

    PubMed

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi; Teeratakulpisarn, Somsong; Siangphoe, Umaporn; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Chuenyam, Theshinee; Ungsedhaphan, Chaiwat; Lange, Joep; Cooper, David; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2005-03-01

    HIV-infected patients may have frequent atopy caused by an imbalance of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether IL-2 given in addition to antiretrovirals (ARV) would result in lower IgE levels and less allergic symptoms. Patients naive to IL-2 (n=28) began IL-2 plus ARV and were followed for 12 months. IgE, eosinophil and CD4 counts, HIV RNA, symptom scoring, PFT and skin prick test (SPT) were performed. It was found that the baseline median CD4 and IgE were 386.5 cells/mm3 and 63.5 IU/ml, respectively. Four patients had allergic rhinitis (AR) and 61% had a positive SPT to at least 1 antigen. At month 12, patients had higher CD4 counts (p < 0.001) compared to the baseline; however, there were no differences in IgE levels, allergic symptom scores or HIV RNA. The eosinophil count was higher after IL-2 administration. It was concluded that IL-2 plus ARV resulted in higher CD4 counts but had no effect on atopy. PMID:15997871

  3. The Effect of Tuberculosis Treatment at Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation on Subsequent Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Soeters, Heidi M.; Poole, Charles; Patel, Monita R.; Van Rie, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis examining the impact of TB treatment at the time of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation on subsequent mortality. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and selected conference proceedings for studies that report adult mortality on cART, stratified by TB treatment status at cART initiation. Stratified random-effects and meta-regression analyses were used to examine the influence of study and population characteristics. Results 22 eligible cohort studies reported data on 98,350 (range 74-15,225) adults, of whom 14,779 (15%) were receiving TB treatment at cART initiation. Studies of those receiving vs. not receiving TB treatment had an average mortality relative risk of 1.10 (95% confidence interval 0.87-1.40) at 1-3 months (based upon 8 estimates), 1.15 (0.94-1.41) at 6-12 months (11 estimates), and 1.33 (1.02-1.75) at 18-98 months (10 estimates) following cART initiation. However, there was a wide range of estimates and those at later time points were markedly heterogeneous. Meta-regression identified factors associated with elevated average risk estimates: lower median baseline CD4 counts and adjustment for baseline hemoglobin at 1-3 months; longer length of follow-up and women-only studies at 6-12 months; and not adjusting for BMI/weight at 18-98 months. Conclusions Patients receiving TB treatment at cART initiation did not have a statistically significant estimated increase in short-term risk of all-cause mortality as compared to those not receiving TB treatment. TB treatment was significantly associated with increased mortality after about a year of cART, suggesting that patients with concurrent TB treatment at cART initiation may benefit from continued support after TB treatment completion. PMID:24143260

  4. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    York, H.F.

    1959-07-01

    A receiver construction is presented for calutrons having two or more ion sources and an individual receiver unit for each source. Design requirements dictate that the face plate defining the receiver entrance slots be placed at an angle to the approaching beam, which means that ions striking the face plate are likely to be scattcred into the entrance slots of other receivers. According to the present invention, the face plate has a surface provided with parallel ridges so disposed that one side only of each ridge's exposed directly to the ion beam. The scattered ions are directed away from adjacent receivers by the ridges on the lace plate.

  5. Adherence to antiretrovirals in people coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis1

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Larissa de Araújo; Fiuza, Maria Luciana Teles; Reis, Renata Karina; Ferrer, André Carvalho; Gir, Elucir; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: assess the adherence levels to antiretroviral therapy in people coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis and correlate these levels with the sociodemographic and clinical variables of the study population. Method: cross-sectional study involving 74 male and female adults coinfected with HIV/tuberculosis. For the data collection, a sociodemographic and clinical assessment form and the Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence Assessment Questionnaire were used. For the data analysis, the software STATA version 11 was used, through descriptive statistics, Fisher's chi-square exact test and the probability test. Results: men were predominant (79.7%), between 30 and 39 years of age (35.1%), low income (75.7%) and pulmonary tuberculosis (71.6%). Adherence to antiretroviral therapy was inappropriate in 78.1% of the men; 61.0% of single people; 47.0% unemployed and 76.5% among people gaining less than one minimum wage. A significant difference was observed between compliance and length of use of antiretrovirals (p=0.018), sexual orientation (p=0.024) and number of children (p=0.029). Conclusion: the coinfected patients presented inappropriate adherence to the antiretrovirals, a fact that negatively affects the health conditions of the people living with HIV/tuberculosis coinfection. A statistically significant correlation was found between the levels of adherence and some sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. PMID:27192416

  6. Radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankov, V. N.; Barulin, L. G.; Zhodzishskii, M. I.; Malyshev, I. V.; Petrusinskii, V. V.

    The book is concerned with the design of microelectronic radio receivers and their components based on semiconductor and hybrid integrated circuits. Topics discussed include the hierarchical structure of radio receivers, the synthesis of structural schemes, the design of the principal functional units, and the design of radio receiver systems with digital signal processing. The discussion also covers the integrated circuits of multifunctional amplifiers, analog multipliers, charge-transfer devices, frequency filters, piezoelectronic devices, and microwave amplifiers, filters, and mixers.

  7. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1958-09-01

    Improvements are described in isotope separation devices of the calutron type and, in particular, deals with a novel caiutron receiver which passes the optimum portions of the ion beam to a collecting chamber. In broad aspects the receiver provides means for pass delimited pontion of the beam and an elongated collecting pocket disposed to receive ions passed by the beam delimiting means. The collecting pocket is transversely partitioned into a plurality of ion receiving compartments respectively defined by a corresponding plurality of separately removable liner elements.

  8. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.H.; Stone, K.F.

    1958-09-01

    S>This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and, more specifically, describes a receiver fer collecting the ion curreot after it is formed into a beam of non-homogeneous isotropic cross-section. The invention embodies a calutron receiver having an ion receiving pocket for separately collecting and retaining ions traveling in a selected portion of the ion beam and anelectrode for intercepting ions traveling in another selected pontion of the ion beam. The electrode is disposed so as to fix the limit of one side of the pontion of the ion beam admitted iato the ion receiving pocket.

  9. Characteristics of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 Dually Seropositive Adults in West Africa Presenting for Care and Antiretroviral Therapy: The IeDEA-West Africa HIV-2 Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ekouevi, Didier K.; Balestre, Eric; Coffie, Patrick A.; Minta, Daouda; Messou, Eugene; Sawadogo, Adrien; Minga, Albert; Sow, Papa Salif; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Eholie, Serge P.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Dabis, François; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Ahouada, Carin; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Ahomadegbé, Christelle; Bashi, Jules; Gougounon-Houéto, Alice; Azon-Kouanou, Angèle; Houngbé, Fabien; Koumakpaï, Sikiratou; Alihonou, Florence; d’Almeida, Marcelline; Hodonou, Irvine; Hounhoui, Ghislaine; Sagbo, Gracien; Tossa-Bagnan, Leïla; Adjide, Herman; Drabo, Joseph; Bognounou, René; Dienderé, Arnaud; Traore, Eliezer; Zoungrana, Lassane; Zerbo, Béatrice; Sawadogo, Adrien Bruno; Zoungrana, Jacques; Héma, Arsène; Soré, Ibrahim; Bado, Guillaume; Tapsoba, Achille; Yé, Diarra; Kouéta, Fla; Ouedraogo, Sylvie; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Hiembo, William; Gansonré, Mady; Messou, Eugène; Gnokoro, Joachim Charles; Koné, Mamadou; Kouakou, Guillaume Martial; Bosse, Clarisse Amani; Brou, Kouakou; Assi, Achi Isidore; Chenal, Henri; Hawerlander, Denise; Soppi, Franck; Minga, Albert; Abo, Yao; Bomisso, Germain; Eholié, Serge Paul; Amego, Mensah Deborah Noelly; Andavi, Viviane; Diallo, Zelica; Ello, Frédéric; Tanon, Aristophane Koffi; Koule, Serge Olivier; Anzan, Koffi Charles; Guehi, Calixte; Aka, Edmond Addi; Issouf, Koffi Ladji; Kouakou, Jean-Claude; N’Gbeche, Marie-Sylvie; Touré, Pety; Avit-Edi, Divine; Kouakou, Kouadio; Moh, Magloire; Yao, Valérie Andoblé; Folquet, Madeleine Amorissani; Dainguy, Marie-Evelyne; Kouakou, Cyrille; Méa-Assande, Véronique Tanoh; Oka-Berete, Gladys; Zobo, Nathalie; Acquah, Patrick; Kokora, Marie-Berthe; Eboua, Tanoh François; Timité-Konan, Marguerite; Ahoussou, Lucrèce Diecket; Assouan, Julie Kebé; Sami, Mabéa Flora; Kouadio, Clémence; Renner, Lorna; Goka, Bamenla; Welbeck, Jennifer; Sackey, Adziri; Owiafe, Seth Ntiri; Wejse, Christian; Silva, Zacarias José Da; Paulo, Joao; Rodrigues, Amabelia; da Silva, David; Medina, Candida; Oliviera-Souto, Ines; Østergaard, Lars; Laursen, Alex; Sodemann, Morten; Aaby, Peter; Fomsgaard, Anders; Erikstrup, Christian; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Maïga, Moussa Y; Diakité, Fatoumata Fofana; Kalle, Abdoulaye; Katile, Drissa; Traore, Hamar Alassane; Minta, Daouda; Cissé, Tidiani; Dembelé, Mamadou; Doumbia, Mohammed; Fomba, Mahamadou; Kaya, Assétou Soukho; Traoré, Abdoulaye M; Traoré, Hamady; Toure, Amadou Abathina; Dicko, Fatoumata; Sylla, Mariam; Berthé, Alima; Traoré, Hadizatou Coulibaly; Koïta, Anta; Koné, Niaboula; N'Diaye, Clémentine; Coulibaly, Safiatou Touré; Traoré, Mamadou; Traoré, Naïchata; Charurat, Man; Ajayi, Samuel; Dapiap, Stephen; Otu; Igbinoba, Festus; Benson, Okwara; Adebamowo, Clément; James, Jesse; Obaseki; Osakede, Philip; Olasode, John; Sow, Papa Salif; Diop, Bernard; Manga, Noël Magloire; Tine, Judicael Malick; Signate Sy, Haby; Ba, Abou; Diagne, Aida; Dior, Hélène; Faye, Malick; Gueye, Ramatoulaye Diagne; Mbaye, Aminata Diack; Patassi, Akessiwe; Kotosso, Awèrou; Kariyare, Benjamin Goilibe; Gbadamassi, Gafarou; Komi, Agbo; Mensah-Zukong, Kankoé Edem; Pakpame, Pinuwe; Lawson-Evi, Annette Koko; Atakouma, Yawo; Takassi, Elom; Djeha, Améyo; Ephoévi-gah, Ayoko; Djibril, Sherifa El-Hadj; Dabis, François; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Arrivé, Elise; Coffie, Patrick; Ekouevi, Didier; Jaquet, Antoine; Leroy, Valériane; Lewden, Charlotte; Sasco, Annie; Azani, Jean-Claude; Allou, Gérard; Balestre, Eric; Bohossou, Franck; Karcher, Sophie; Gonsan, Jules Mahan; Carrou, Jérôme Le; Lenaud, Séverin; Nchot, Célestin; Malateste, Karen; Yao, Amon Roseamonde; Siloué, Bertine; Clouet, Gwenaelle; Djetouan, Hugues; Doring, Alexandra; Kouakou, Adrienne; Rabourdin, Elodie; Rivenc, Jean; Anglaret, Xavier; Ba, Boubacar; Essanin, Jean Bosco; Ciaranello, Andrea; Datté, Sébastien; Desmonde, Sophie; Diby, Jean-Serge Elvis; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Horo, Apollinaire Gninlgninrin; Kangah, Serge N'zoré; Malvy, Denis; Meless, David; Mounkaila-Harouna, Aida; Ndondoki, Camille; Shiboski, Caroline; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; PAC-CI; Abidjan

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-2 is endemic in West Africa. There is a lack of evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis, management and antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-2 or HIV-1/HIV-2 dual infections. Because of these issues, we designed a West African collaborative cohort for HIV-2 infection within the framework of the International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA). Methods We collected data on all HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually seropositive patients (both ARV-naive and starting ART) and followed-up in clinical centres in the IeDEA-WA network including a total of 13 clinics in five countries: Benin, Burkina-Faso Côte d’Ivoire, Mali, and Senegal, in the West Africa region. Results Data was merged for 1,754 patients (56% female), including 1,021 HIV-2 infected patients (551 on ART) and 733 dually seropositive for both HIV-1 and HIV 2 (463 on ART). At ART initiation, the median age of HIV-2 patients was 45.3 years, IQR: (38.3–51.7) and 42.4 years, IQR (37.0–47.3) for dually seropositive patients (p = 0.048). Overall, 16.7% of HIV-2 patients on ART had an advanced clinical stage (WHO IV or CDC-C). The median CD4 count at the ART initiation is 166 cells/mm3, IQR (83–247) among HIV-2 infected patients and 146 cells/mm3, IQR (55–249) among dually seropositive patients. Overall, in ART-treated patients, the CD4 count increased 126 cells/mm3 after 24 months on ART for HIV-2 patients and 169 cells/mm3 for dually seropositive patients. Of 551 HIV-2 patients on ART, 5.8% died and 10.2% were lost to follow-up during the median time on ART of 2.4 years, IQR (0.7–4.3). Conclusions This large multi-country study of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dual infection in West Africa suggests that routine clinical care is less than optimal and that management and treatment of HIV-2 could be further informed by ongoing studies and randomized clinical trials in this population. PMID:23824279

  10. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    MacKenzie, K.R.

    1958-09-16

    A novel calutron receiver is described for collecting the constituent material of two closely adjacent selected portions of an ion beam in separate compartments. The receiver is so conntructed that ion scatter and intermixing of the closely adjacent beam portions do nnt occur when the ions strike the receiver structure, and the beam is sharply separated Into the two compartments. In essence, these desirable results are achieved by inclining the adjoining wall of one compartment with respect to the approaching ions to reduce possible rebounding of ions from the compartment into the adjacent compartment.

  11. Severe malnutrition and metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the antiretroviral era: clinical care and management in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Musoke, Philippa M; Fergusson, Pamela

    2011-12-01

    More than 2 million children globally are living with HIV infection and >90% of these reside in sub-Saharan Africa. Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) remains a major problem for HIV-infected children who live in resource-limited settings (RLS), and SAM is an important risk factor for mortality. SAM in HIV-infected children is associated with complications including electrolyte disorders, micronutrient deficiencies, and severe infections, which contribute to the high mortality. Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly improved the survival of HIV-infected children, although the response to ART of children with SAM remains undocumented in the literature. Immune and virologic responses to ART in RLS are similar to those of infected children in resource-rich settings, but delays in initiation of therapy have led to a high early mortality. Antiretroviral drug toxicities have been described in children who receive therapy and may affect their quality of life and long-term survival. Metabolic complications of ART include lipodystrophy, dyslipidemia, lactic acidosis, insulin resistance, and osteopenia. These complications have been well described in adults and children from developed countries, but data from RLS are limited, and these complications may be compounded by SAM. In this article we review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and complications of SAM in HIV-infected children and the metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the era of ART, and discuss future research priorities for RLS. PMID:22089437

  12. Christian identity and men's attitudes to antiretroviral therapy in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Anthony

    2010-12-01

    Increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), especially in urban areas in Zambia, has transformed the landscape of the HIV epidemic to include hope. Drawing upon long-term ethnographic research, this article briefly describes the religious ideas of a cohort of former students of a Catholic mission boarding school for boys. The discussion outlines their understanding of masculinity and charts their responses, first to voluntary counselling and testing for HIV, and, more recently, to the 'miraculous' returns to health they have experienced or witnessed as a result of ART. The article examines the problems of self-disclosure among self-identified Catholics who are aware of their HIV-positive status and their reluctance to publically acknowledge that they are receiving ART. The research locates the source of this reluctance within existing associations of Christianity with 'civilisation' and 'respectability.' The article concludes that the Catholic Church in Zambia needs to do more to combat negative responses to people living with HIV, which cause both shame and loss of respect and militate against Zambians coming forward to access ART as well as against good antiretroviral adherence. One way in which this might be achieved is for the Catholic Church to be more open about priests and other members of the religious community who are receiving ART. PMID:25875888

  13. Medication Possession Ratio Predicts Antiretroviral Regimens Persistence in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Andrew O.; Paz, Jorge; Moran, Fiorella; Carbajal-Gonzalez, Danny; Callacondo, David; Avalos, Odalie; Rodriguez, Martin; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Echevarria, Juan; Willig, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In developing nations, the use of operational parameters (OPs) in the prediction of clinical care represents a missed opportunity to enhance the care process. We modeled the impact of multiple measurements of antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence on antiretroviral treatment outcomes in Peru. Design And Methods Retrospective cohort study including ART naïve, non-pregnant, adults initiating therapy at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima-Peru (2006-2010). Three OPs were defined: 1) Medication possession ratio (MPR): days with antiretrovirals dispensed/days on first-line therapy; 2) Laboratory monitory constancy (LMC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 viral load or CD4 reported; 3) Clinic visit constancy (CVC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 clinic visit. Three multi-variable Cox proportional hazard (PH) models (one per OP) were fit for (1) time of first-line ART persistence and (2) time to second-line virologic failure. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory variables. Results 856 patients were included in first-line persistence analyses, median age was 35.6 years [29.4-42.9] and most were male (624; 73%). In multivariable PH models, MPR (per 10% increase HR=0.66; 95%CI=0.61-0.71) and LMC (per 10% increase 0.83; 0.71-0.96) were associated with prolonged time on first-line therapies. Among 79 individuals included in time to second-line virologic failure analyses, MPR was the only OP independently associated with prolonged time to second-line virologic failure (per 10% increase 0.88; 0.77-0.99). Conclusions The capture and utilization of program level parameters such as MPR can provide valuable insight into patient-level treatment outcomes. PMID:24098475

  14. CD4 Response Up to 5 Years After Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in Latin America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F.; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Hoces, Daniel; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Blevins, Meridith; Pape, Jean W.; Cortes, Claudia P.; Padgett, Denis; Cahn, Pedro; Veloso, Valdilea G.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Shepherd, Bryan E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe CD4 counts at 6-month intervals for 5 years after combination antiretroviral therapy initiation among 12 879 antiretroviral-naive human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults from Latin America and the Caribbean. Median CD4 counts increased from 154 cells/mm3 at baseline (interquartile range [IQR], 60–251) to 413 cells/mm3 (IQR, 234–598) by year 5. PMID:26180829

  15. CD4 Response Up to 5 Years After Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Luz, Paula M; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Hoces, Daniel; Rebeiro, Peter F; Blevins, Meridith; Pape, Jean W; Cortes, Claudia P; Padgett, Denis; Cahn, Pedro; Veloso, Valdilea G; McGowan, Catherine C; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Shepherd, Bryan E

    2015-04-01

    We describe CD4 counts at 6-month intervals for 5 years after combination antiretroviral therapy initiation among 12 879 antiretroviral-naive human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults from Latin America and the Caribbean. Median CD4 counts increased from 154 cells/mm(3) at baseline (interquartile range [IQR], 60-251) to 413 cells/mm(3) (IQR, 234-598) by year 5. PMID:26180829

  16. [Lipodystrophy and metabolic disturbances as complications of antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Kieć-Wilk, Beata; Kalinowska-Nowak, Anna; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    Effective treatment of HIV infection with antiretroviral drugs significantly improve prognosis. Reduction of mortality and life prolongations in patients receiving such therapy have been also connected with the risk of side effects development. Among these complications metabolic disturbances such as lipodystrophy, dyslipidaemia, and insulin resistance which are present according some authors in up to 50% of patients receiving HAART play an important role. In spite of different investigations molecular basis of lipodystrophy development during HAART have not be fully understood, and the latest research revealed a lot of new aspects connected w adipocyte tissue pathophysiology, which were not taken up to know into consideration. In the presented publication the most important information about pathogenesis of lipodystrophy development in HIV infected patients treated with ARV drugs have been presented. PMID:21591364

  17. Self-Efficacy and Depression as Mediators of the Relationship between Pain and Antiretroviral Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Karina M.; Cooperman, Nina A.; Newville, Howard; Arnsten, Julia H.

    2009-01-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the association between pain and antiretroviral adherence, and to estimate the mediating effect of adherence self-efficacy and depression symptom severity. Surveys using audio computer-assisted self-interview were conducted among 70 HIV-infected current and former drug users enrolled in a methadone program. We assessed antiretroviral adherence and adherence self-efficacy using questions from the Adult Clinical Trials Group survey. We considered participants adherent if they reported taking at least 95% of prescribed antiretrovirals over the past seven days. We assessed depression symptom severity using the depression subscale of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Participants reported pain of any duration in response to a question from the Brief Pain Inventory. Participants reporting pain were 87% less likely to be classified as adherent compared to those without pain [ORunadj = 0.13 (95%CI 0.03–0.52)]. When we examined adherence self-efficacy as a mediator of the relationship between pain and adherence, criteria for partial mediation were met. Adjusting for self-efficacy, the beta coefficient for pain decreased by 23% but the independent relationship between pain and antiretroviral adherence was maintained. Mediation criteria were not met when we examined the mediating effect of depression symptom severity on the relationship between pain and adherence. Adjusting for depression symptom severity, the beta coefficient for pain decreased by 9% and the relationship between pain and antiretroviral adherence remained significant. Our results indicate that neither adherence self-efficacy nor depression symptom severity fully mediated the relationship between pain and adherence. HIV providers should recognize the potential impact of pain on antiretroviral adherence among current and former drug users. PMID:19229695

  18. [Severe or life-threatening interactions between antiretrovirals and non-HIV drugs].

    PubMed

    Manzardo, Christian; Tuset, Montserrat; Miró, Jose M; Gatell, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has helped to improved control of the HIV infection, and has led to a progressively older population with the infection having a life expectancy quite similar to that of the general population. On the other hand, it is also known that HIV infection, even in patients with undetectable viral loads and good immunity, carries an increased cardiovascular risk, as well as an increased incidence of certain cancers. Therefore, the majority of HIV-infected patients receive several drugs (either prescribed by the physician or self-administered) combined with antiretrovirals. This article reviews the interactions between antiretrovirals and other drugs that can cause significant damage to patients, or even be life-threatening and of whom clinicians, especially those not directly treating HIV-infected patients, should be aware. A review is also presented on the implications of interactions between antiretrovirals and other drugs in special situations, such as the co-administration with cytostatics, immunesuppressants used in solid organ transplantation, or patients receiving new treatments for hepatitisC. Generally, combinations with two nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors and raltegravir (or in the near future, dolutegravir) are those with less potential for clinically significant interactions. PMID:24913990

  19. Provision of antiretroviral treatment in conflict settings: the experience of Médecins Sans Frontières

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Many countries ravaged by conflict have substantial morbidity and mortality attributed to HIV/AIDS yet HIV treatment is uncommonly available. Universal access to HIV care cannot be achieved unless the needs of populations in conflict-affected areas are addressed. Methods From 2003 Médecins Sans Frontières introduced HIV care, including antiretroviral therapy, into 24 programmes in conflict or post-conflict settings, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. HIV care and treatment activities were usually integrated within other medical activities. Project data collected in the Fuchia software system were analysed and outcomes compared with ART-LINC data. Programme reports and other relevant documents and interviews with local and headquarters staff were used to develop lessons learned. Results In the 22 programmes where ART was initiated, more than 10,500 people were diagnosed with HIV and received medical care, and 4555 commenced antiretroviral therapy, including 348 children. Complete data were available for adults in 20 programmes (n = 4145). At analysis, 2645 (64%) remained on ART, 422 (10%) had died, 466 (11%) lost to follow-up, 417 (10%) transferred to another programme, and 195 (5%) had an unclear outcome. Median 12-month mortality and loss to follow-up were 9% and 11% respectively, and median 6-month CD4 gain was 129 cells/mm 3. Patient outcomes on treatment were comparable to those in stable resource-limited settings, and individuals and communities obtained significant benefits from access to HIV treatment. Programme disruption through instability was uncommon with only one program experiencing interruption to services, and programs were adapted to allow for disruption and population movements. Integration of HIV activities strengthened other health activities contributing to health benefits for all victims of conflict and increasing the potential sustainability for implemented activities. Conclusions With commitment, simplified treatment and monitoring

  20. Long-Term Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy in China: An Observational Cohort Study from 2003-2014.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Tan, Jingguang; Ma, Wenzhe; Zheng, Hui; Lu, Yan; Wang, Ning; Peng, Zhihang; Yu, Rongbin

    2015-08-01

    In order to assess the effectiveness of the Chinese government's expanded access program, a cohort study on all adult HIV patients in Shenzhen was conducted from December 2003 to February 2014 to estimate the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on mortality, tuberculosis and CD4 cell counts. Marginal structural regression models adjusted for baseline and time-varying covariates. Of the 6897 patients enrolled and followed up for a maximum of 178 months, 44.92% received ART. Among patients who commenced receiving ART during the study, there were 98 deaths and 59 new tuberculosis diagnoses, while there were 410 deaths and 201 new tuberculosis diagnoses among those without ART. ART was associated with both lower mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11-0.27) and the presence of tuberculosis (HR = 0.27; 95% CI = 0.19-0.37). Each month of ART was associated with an average increase in CD4 cell count of 6.52 cells/µL (95% CI = 6.08-7.12 cells/µL). In conclusions, the effectiveness of ART provided by China government health services is the same as that in higher-income countries. Accounting to higher mortality rates from the delay of starting ART, faster expansion and timely imitation of ART are urgent. PMID:26213959

  1. Antiretroviral therapy and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are more common in the HIV-infected population than in the general population. AKI is associated with an increased risk of heart failure, cardiovascular disease, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and mortality. Tenofovir is associated with severe AKI in a small percentage of patients and with subclinical abnormalities in many more. HIV-associated nephropathy is now a relatively rare form of CKD, because of the widespread use of potent antiretroviral therapy. The CKD spectrum in HIV-infected patients has become more frequently characterized by comorbid CKD, with an increased frequency of CKD related to diabetes or hypertension being observed. Kidney transplantation is a therapeutic option for HIV-infected patients with ESRD if their HIV infection is controlled, although rates of acute graft rejection and drug-drug interactions are high. This article summarizes a presentation by Christina M. Wyatt, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in Washington, DC, in June 2013. PMID:25101531

  2. [Adhesion to the antiretroviral treatment].

    PubMed

    Carballo, M

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the therapy antiretroviral is to improve the quality of life and the survival of the persons affected by the VIH through the suppression of the viral replication. Nevertheless one of the present problems is the resistant apparition of stumps to the new medicines caused by an incorrect management of the therapeutic plan; by an incorrect adhesion of the personal processing. Since the therapeutic success will depend, among others factors, and of important form of the degree of implication and commitment of the person affected, is a matter of identifying prematurely the possible situations concomitants (personal factors and of addiction, psycho-social, related to the processing and its possible secondary effects, associated factors to the own illness or even to the relation professional-patient) that can interfere in a correct adhesion. For it is necessary of the interaction multidisciplinary of the welfare team, and fundamental the work of nursing at the moment of to detect the possible determinant factors and the intervention definition of strategies arrived at by consensus with the own person, that they promote it or it improve. The quantification of the degree of adhesion (measure in %) values through various direct and indirect methods and should keep in mind in it takes of therapeutic decisions being able to come to be advised the suspension of the processing until obtaining to conscience to the person affected of the importance of a correct therapeutic compliance. PMID:15672996

  3. Trends and Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Patient Monitoring Practices in Kenya and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Dansereau, Emily; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Ng, Marie; Achan, Jane; Burstein, Roy; DeCenso, Brendan; Gasasira, Anne; Ikilezi, Gloria; Kisia, Caroline; Masters, Samuel H.; Njuguna, Pamela; Odeny, Thomas A.; Okiro, Emelda A.; Roberts, D. Allen; Duber, Herbert C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) require routine monitoring to track response to treatment and assess for treatment failure. This study aims to identify gaps in monitoring practices in Kenya and Uganda. Methods We conducted a systematic retrospective chart review of adults who initiated ART between 2007 and 2012. We assessed the availability of baseline measurements (CD4 count, weight, and WHO stage) and ongoing CD4 and weight monitoring according to national guidelines in place at the time. Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to analyze facility and patient factors associated with meeting monitoring guidelines. Results From 2007 to 2012, at least 88% of patients per year in Uganda had a recorded weight at initiation, while in Kenya there was a notable increase from 69% to 90%. Patients with a documented baseline CD4 count increased from 69% to about 80% in both countries. In 2012, 83% and 86% of established patients received the recommended quarterly weight monitoring in Kenya and Uganda, respectively, while semiannual CD4 monitoring was less common (49% in Kenya and 38% in Uganda). Initiating at a more advanced WHO stage was associated with a lower odds of baseline CD4 testing. On-site CD4 analysis capacity was associated with increased odds of CD4 testing at baseline and in the future. Discussion Substantial gaps were noted in ongoing CD4 monitoring of patients on ART. Although guidelines have since changed, limited laboratory capacity is likely to remain a significant issue in monitoring patients on ART, with important implications for ensuring quality care. PMID:26275151

  4. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improvement in a calutron receiver for collecting the isotopes ts described. The electromagnetic separation of the isotopes produces a mass spectrum of closely adjacent beams of ions at the foci regions, and a dividing wall between the two pockets is arranged at an angle. Substantially all of the tons of the less abundant isotope enter one of the pockets and strike one side of the wall directly, while substantially none of the tons entering the other pocket strikes the wall directly.

  5. Intellectual property rights, market competition and access to affordable antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The number of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased from around half a million in 2003 to almost 10 million in only 10 years, and will continue to increase in the coming years. Over 16 million more are eligible to start ART according to the last World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. The demand is also switching from the less expensive antiretrovirals (ARVs) that allowed such scale-up to newer more expensive ones with fewer side effects or those that can be used by people who have developed resistance to first-line treatment. However, patents on these new drugs can delay robust generic competition and, consequently, price reduction made possible by economies of scale. Various ways to address this issue have been envisaged or implemented, including the use of the flexibilities available under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), systematic widespread voluntary licensing, of which the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) is an example, and the application of different prices in different countries, called tiered pricing. This paper helps explain the impact of patents on market competition for ARVs and analyses various approaches available today to minimize this impact. PMID:25309984

  6. Economic evaluation of initial antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected patients: an update of Italian guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Giorgio L; Di Matteo, Sergio; Antinori, Andrea; Medaglia, Massimo; Murachelli, Silvia; Rizzardini, Giuliano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has allowed many HIV-infected patients to enjoy longer survival and a better quality of life. We performed an economic analysis to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HAART regimens in Italy for managing HIV-naïve infected patients with a viral load below 100,000 copies/mL. Patients and methods The population considered in the model consisted of adult subjects with an HIV viral load below 100,000 copies/mL who received antiretroviral HAART treatment for the first time, according to the Italian National Guidelines with recommendation grade A1. The incremental cost-effectiveness analysis of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) was carried out by means of a Markov model. Both the outcomes (QALYs) and the costs were discounted by 3.5%. The time horizon adopted in the model was 10 years. The point of view of the analysis was that of the Italian national health service. Results The tenofovir (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC)/rilpivirine (RPV) single-tablet regimen (STR) (€7,417.00) revealed the lowest mean treatment cost. TDF/FTC + raltegravir (RAL) showed a better quality of life (0.906 QALY/year), followed by TDF/FTC/RPV (STR; 0.900 QALY/year), TDF/FTC + RPV (multipill regimen) (0.889 QALY/year), and TDF/FTC + atazanavir (ATV/r) (0.886 QALY/year). TDF/FTC/RPV (STR) appeared to be the most cost-effective therapeutic choice (€13,655.00), followed by TDF/FTC + RPV (multipill regimen) (€15,803.00), and TDF/FTC + efavirenz (EFV) (€16,181.00). The sensitivity analysis on the main variables confirmed the validity of the base case scenario. Conclusion STR (TDF/FTC/RPV) is the most cost-effective treatment strategy compared with the other therapeutic regimens recommended by the Italian guidelines for the treatment of naïve patients with a viral load <100,000 copies/mL. The inclusion of adverse-event management of HIV-infected patients affects the cost-effectiveness ratio of all HAART regimens. PMID:24124383

  7. Antiretroviral Therapies in Women after Single-Dose Nevirapine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lockman, S.; Hughes, M.D.; McIntyre, J.; Zheng, Y.; Chipato, T.; Conradie, F.; Sawe, F.; Asmelash, A.; Hosseinipour, M.C.; Mohapi, L.; Stringer, E.; Mngqibisa, R.; Siika, A.; Atwine, D.; Hakim, J.; Shaffer, D.; Kanyama, C.; Wools-Kaloustian, K.; Salata, R.A.; Hogg, E.; Alston-Smith, B.; Walawander, A.; Purcelle-Smith, E.; Eshleman, S.; Rooney, J.; Rahim, S.; Mellors, J.W.; Schooley, R.T.; Currier, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peripartum administration of single-dose nevirapine reduces mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but selects for nevirapine-resistant virus. METHODS In seven African countries, women infected with HIV-1 whose CD4+ T-cell counts were below 200 per cubic millimeter and who either had or had not taken single-dose nevirapine at least 6 months before enrollment were randomly assigned to receive antiretroviral therapy with tenofovir–emtricitabine plus nevirapine or tenofovir-emtricitabine plus lopinavir boosted by a low dose of ritonavir. The primary end point was the time to confirmed virologic failure or death. RESULTS A total of 241 women who had been exposed to single-dose nevirapine began the study treatments (121 received nevirapine and 120 received ritonavir-boosted lopinavir). Significantly more women in the nevirapine group reached the primary end point than in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group (26% vs. 8%) (adjusted P = 0.001). Virologic failure occurred in 37 (28 in the nevirapine group and 9 in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group), and 5 died without prior virologic failure (4 in the nevirapine group and 1 in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group). The group differences appeared to decrease as the interval between single-dose nevirapine exposure and the start of antiretroviral therapy increased. Retrospective bulk sequencing of baseline plasma samples showed nevirapine resistance in 33 of 239 women tested (14%). Among 500 women without prior exposure to single-dose nevirapine, 34 of 249 in the nevirapine group (14%) and 36 of 251 in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group (14%) had virologic failure or died. CONCLUSIONS In women with prior exposure to peripartum single-dose nevirapine (but not in those without prior exposure), ritonavir-boosted lopinavir plus tenofovir–emtricitabine was superior to nevirapine plus tenofovir–emtricitabine for initial antiretroviral therapy. (Funded by the National

  8. Antiretroviral-based HIV prevention strategies for women

    PubMed Central

    Chirenje, Z Mike; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Parikh, Urvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Almost three decades have elapsed since researchers identified HIV as the cause of AIDS, with current estimates from UNAIDS that 33.4 million adults were living with HIV/AIDS in 2008. Two-thirds of this burden of disease is in Sub-Saharan Africa, and 60% of those infected are women. The disease still remains incurable and current prevention strategies including abstinence, male/female condom use and male circumcision are only partially effective. New strategies to curb the epidemic are urgently needed. Scientists are diligently exploring HIV prevention methods that are safe, effective and affordable. These new biological interventions include oral pre- exposure prophylaxis using oral antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, ARV treatment in HIV-infected persons to reduce transmission and topical ARV-based microbicide formulations. PMID:20954882

  9. Great Spotted Cuckoo Fledglings Often Receive Feedings from Other Magpie Adults than Their Foster Parents: Which Magpies Accept to Feed Foreign Cuckoo Fledglings?

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius) – magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism. PMID:25272009

  10. Great spotted cuckoo fledglings often receive feedings from other magpie adults than their foster parents: which magpies accept to feed foreign cuckoo fledglings?

    PubMed

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius)--magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism. PMID:25272009

  11. Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV at a Patient’s First Clinic Visit: The RapIT Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Sydney; Maskew, Mhairi; Fox, Matthew P.; Nyoni, Cynthia; Mongwenyana, Constance; Sanne, Ian; Sauls, Celeste; Long, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of patient attrition from care between HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation have been documented in sub-Saharan Africa, contributing to persistently low CD4 cell counts at treatment initiation. One reason for this is that starting ART in many countries is a lengthy and burdensome process, imposing long waits and multiple clinic visits on patients. We estimated the effect on uptake of ART and viral suppression of an accelerated initiation algorithm that allowed treatment-eligible patients to be dispensed their first supply of antiretroviral medications on the day of their first HIV-related clinic visit. Methods and Findings RapIT (Rapid Initiation of Treatment) was an unblinded randomized controlled trial of single-visit ART initiation in two public sector clinics in South Africa, a primary health clinic (PHC) and a hospital-based HIV clinic. Adult (≥18 y old), non-pregnant patients receiving a positive HIV test or first treatment-eligible CD4 count were randomized to standard or rapid initiation. Patients in the rapid-initiation arm of the study (“rapid arm”) received a point-of-care (POC) CD4 count if needed; those who were ART-eligible received a POC tuberculosis (TB) test if symptomatic, POC blood tests, physical exam, education, counseling, and antiretroviral (ARV) dispensing. Patients in the standard-initiation arm of the study (“standard arm”) followed standard clinic procedures (three to five additional clinic visits over 2–4 wk prior to ARV dispensing). Follow up was by record review only. The primary outcome was viral suppression, defined as initiated, retained in care, and suppressed (≤400 copies/ml) within 10 mo of study enrollment. Secondary outcomes included initiation of ART ≤90 d of study enrollment, retention in care, time to ART initiation, patient-level predictors of primary outcomes, prevalence of TB symptoms, and the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. A survival analysis

  12. Knowledge, Stigma, and Behavioral Outcomes among Antiretroviral Therapy Patients Exposed to Nalamdana's Radio and Theater Program in Tamil Nadu, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nambiar, Devaki; Ramakrishnan, Vimala; Kumar, Paresh; Varma, Rajeev; Balaji, Nithya; Rajendran, Jeeva; Jhona, Loretta; Chandrasekar, Chokkalingam; Gere, David

    2011-01-01

    Arts-based programs have improved HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, and behavior in general and at-risk populations. With HIV transformed into a chronic condition, this study compares patients at consecutive stages of receiving antiretroviral treatment, coinciding with exposure to a radio-and-theater-based educational program (unexposed [N = 120],…

  13. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  14. Adherence to directly observed antiretroviral therapy among human immunodeficiency virus-infected prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Wohl, David A; Stephenson, Becky L; Golin, Carol E; Kiziah, C Nichole; Rosen, David; Ngo, Bich; Liu, Honghu; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2003-06-15

    Directly observed therapy (DOT) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is commonly used in correctional settings; however, the efficacy of DOT for treating HIV infection has not been determined. We prospectively assessed adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens among 31 HIV-infected prison inmates who were receiving >or=1 antiretrovirals via DOT. Adherence was measured by self-report, pill count, electronic monitoring caps, and, for DOT only, medication administration records. Overall, median adherence was 90%, as measured by pill count; 86%, by electronic monitoring caps; and 100%, by self-report. Adherence, as measured by electronic monitoring caps, was >90% in 32% of the subjects. In 91% of cases, adherence, as measured by medication administration records, was greater than that recorded by electronic monitoring caps for the same medications administered by DOT. Objective methods of measurement revealed that adherence to antiretroviral regimens administered wholly or in part by DOT was antiretroviral therapy. PMID:12802758

  15. Risk of premature atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease associated with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Pocaterra, Daria; Chiodo, Francesco

    2008-07-01

    The use of new potent protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapies in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been increasingly associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including hyperlipidaemia, fat redistribution syndrome, insulin resistance, and diabetes mellitus. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in clinical practice has remarkably changed the natural history of HIV disease, leading to a notable extension of life expectancy, and prolonged lipid and glucose metabolism abnormalities are expected to lead to significant effects on the long-term prognosis and outcome of HIV-infected patients. Prediction modeling, surrogate markers and hard cardiovascular endpoints suggest an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases in HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART, even though the absolute risk of cardiovascular complications remains still low, and must be balanced against the evident virological, immunological, and clinical benefits descending from combination antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless, the assessment of cardiovascular risk should be performed on regular basis in HIV-positive individuals, especially after initiation or change of antiretroviral treatment. Appropriate lifestyle measures (including smoking cessation, dietary changes, and aerobic physical activity) are critical points, and switching HAART may be considered, although maintaining viremic control should be the main goal of therapy. Pharmacological treatment of dyslipidaemia (usually with statins and fibrates), and hyperglycaemia (with insulin-sensitizing agents and thiazolidinediones), becomes suitable when lifestyle modifications and switching therapy are ineffective or not applicable. PMID:18358535

  16. New antiretrovirals and new combinations.

    PubMed

    Havlir, D V; Lange, J M

    1998-01-01

    The appearance in the clinic of two to three new antiretroviral agents yearly since 1995 has permitted unprecedented advances in HIV treatment. This remarkable pace of drug development is a testimony to an extraordinary international effort involving scientists, clinicians, governments, community activists and industry dedicated to the rapid and safe development of novel therapies. New drugs present the opportunity to improve HIV therapy. They also create an enormous challenge to the clinician, who must constantly assimilate data on new drugs and incorporate this information into practical management strategies. Combination therapy has proven the most effective approach to treat HIV disease. The profound and sustained viral suppression achievable with combinations such as indinavir (IDV), lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (ZDV) have resulted in a dramatic shift in HIV treatment paradigms over the last year. The full potential of combination therapy with available drugs has yet to be realized as only a limited number of the possible combinations incorporating new drugs have been fully tested. Even drugs available for many years may have untapped potential. Didanosine (ddI) and stavudine (d4T), once thought to be contraindicated in combination because of their overlapping peripheral neuropathy toxicity, have proven well tolerated and effective. Combination therapy can increase antiviral suppression, prevent drug resistance, optimize drug exposure and simplify dosing, but it can also result in pharmacologic antagonism, subtherapeutic drug concentrations and unexpected toxicities. Clinical studies have confirmed in vitro studies showing pharmacologic antagonism for the combination of ZDV and d4T. Combining protease inhibitors with each other or with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors is complicated by effects both classes of drugs have on drug metabolism and clearance. These observations underline the importance of carefully conducted clinical studies to

  17. Phase IIa study of the immunogenicity and safety of the novel Staphylococcus aureus vaccine V710 in adults with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Moustafa; Aronoff, George R; Chandran, Chandra; Hartzel, Jonathan S; Smugar, Steven S; Galphin, Claude M; Mailloux, Lionel U; Brown, Elizabeth; Dinubile, Mark J; Kartsonis, Nicholas A; Guris, Dalya

    2012-09-01

    Bacteremia is the second leading cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are on hemodialysis. A vaccine eliciting long-term immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus in patients on chronic hemodialysis may reduce the incidence of bacteremia and its complications in these patients. V710 is a vaccine containing iron surface determinant B (IsdB), a highly conserved S. aureus surface protein, which has been shown to be immunogenic in healthy subjects. In this blinded phase II immunogenicity study, 206 chronic hemodialysis patients between the ages of 18 and 80 years old were randomized to receive 60 μg V710 (with or without adjuvant), 90 μg V710 (with adjuvant), or a placebo in various combinations on days 1, 28, and 180. All 201 vaccinated patients were to be followed through day 360. The primary hypothesis was that at least 1 of the 3 groups receiving 2 V710 doses on days 1 and 28 would have a ≥2.5 geometric mean fold rise (GMFR) in anti-IsdB IgG titers over the baseline 28 days after the second vaccination (day 56). At day 56, all three groups receiving 2 doses of V710 achieved a ≥2.5 GMFR in anti-IsdB antibodies compared to the baseline (P values of <0.001 for all 3 groups), satisfying the primary immunogenicity hypothesis. None of the 33 reported serious adverse experiences were considered vaccine related by the investigators. V710 induced sustained antibody responses for at least 1 year postvaccination in patients on chronic hemodialysis. PMID:22837094

  18. What do we need for airway management of adult casualties on the Primary Casualty Receiving Facility? A review of airway management on Role 3 Afloat.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S; Read, J; Sudheer, S; Risdall, J E; Connor, D

    2015-01-01

    The Primary Casualty Receiving Facility (PCRF) of the Royal Navy (RN) is currently based on Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) ARGUS and provides a functioning hospital with surgical teams and a CT scanner (Role 3) within the maritime environment. The case mix could include complex trauma, critically ill patients returning to theatre several times, as well as non-battle injury procedures. This paper describes how we have used national guidelines, evidence from recent military experience, and the Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs) to review and rationalise the airway equipment that is available and that would be required for the PCRF in its current configuration, whilst maintaining capability in a deployed setting. PMID:26867417

  19. High rates of malnutrition in older adults receiving different levels of health care in Lleida, Catalonia: an assessment of contributory factors.

    PubMed

    Jürschik, Pilar; Torres, Joan; Solá, Román; Nuin, Carmen; Botigué, Teresa; Lavedán, Ana

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to define the factors associated with the presence or risk of malnutrition in older adults (>65 years of age) attending health care centers in Lleida, Catalonia, using a cross-sectional study approach. Nutritional parameters assessed included the Mini Nutritional Assessment Scale, sociodemographic and psychosocial factors, functional and cognitive status, swallowing and oral problems, texture and route of administration of the diet, changes in dietary intake, and presence of digestive disorders. A total of 398 individuals (184 men) with an average age of 77 years were included in the assessment. Poor nutritional status was recorded in 58% of the individuals. Factors independently associated with unsatisfactory nutritional status included weight loss, functional dependence, cognitive impairment, loneliness, living without a partner, history of heart disease, lung disease, and the presence of acute vomiting. PMID:21104512

  20. Asymptomatic HIV-infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Impaired Lung CD4+ T-Cell Responses to Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Dominic H.; Afran, Louise; Kankwatira, Anstead M.; Malamba, Rose D.; Allain, Theresa J.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Russell, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapy (ART) remain at higher risk of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) than HIV-uninfected individuals. This increased susceptibility may be caused by impairment of alveolar macrophage (AM) function and/or mycobacteria-specific alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses observed in HIV-infected ART-naive adults. Objectives: To determine whether ART was associated with improvement in both AM function, assessed by phagosomal proteolysis, and alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses to Mycobacterium in HIV-infected individuals. Methods: Peripheral blood was drawn and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed on healthy, 35 HIV-uninfected, 25 HIV-infected ART-naive, and 50 HIV-infected ART-treated asymptomatic adults. Phagosomal proteolysis of AM was assessed with fluorogenic beads. Mycobacteria-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were measured by intracellular cytokine staining. Measurements and Main Results: HIV-infected adults on ART exhibited lower plasma HIV viral load and higher blood CD4+ T-cell count than ART-naive adults. AM proteolysis and total mycobacteria-specific Th1 CD4+ T-cell responses in individuals on ART for greater than or equal to 4 years were similar to HIV-uninfected control subjects but those on ART for less than 4 years had impaired responses. Total influenza-specific alveolar Th1 CD4+ T-cell responses were intact in all individuals receiving ART. In contrast, BAL and blood mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses were impaired in adults on ART irrespective of duration. Conclusions: AM and mycobacteria-specific alveolar CD4+ T-cell responses in HIV-infected adults on ART for less than 4 years are impaired and may partly explain the high risk of TB in HIV-infected individuals on ART. Strategies to augment ART to improve lung immune cell function and reduce the high incidence of TB in HIV-infected adults who initiate ART should be investigated. PMID:25225948

  1. Progress in antiretroviral drug delivery using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mallipeddi, Rama; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2010-01-01

    There are currently a number of antiretroviral drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). More recently, antiretrovirals are being evaluated in the clinic for prevention of HIV infection. Due to the challenging nature of treatment and prevention of this disease, the use of nanocarriers to achieve more efficient delivery of antiretroviral drugs has been studied. Various forms of nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles (polymeric, inorganic, and solid lipid), liposomes, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, and cell-based nanoformulations have been studied for delivery of drugs intended for HIV prevention or therapy. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the application of nanocarrier systems to the delivery of anti-HIV drugs, specifically antiretrovirals. For anti-HIV drugs to be effective, adequate distribution to specific sites in the body must be achieved, and effective drug concentrations must be maintained at those sites for the required period of time. Nanocarriers provide a means to overcome cellular and anatomical barriers to drug delivery. Their application in the area of HIV prevention and therapy may lead to the development of more effective drug products for combating this pandemic disease. PMID:20957115

  2. CROI 2016: Advances in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara S; Olender, Susan A; Tieu, Hong-Van; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections highlighted exciting advances in antiretroviral therapy, including important data on investigational antiretroviral drugs and clinical trials. Clinical trials demonstrated benefits from a long-acting injectable coformulation given as maintenance therapy, examined intravenous and subcutaneous administration of a monoclonal antibody directed at the CD4 binding site of HIV-1, and provided novel data on tenofovir alafenamide. Several studies focused on the role of HIV drug resistance, including the significance of minority variants, transmitted drug resistance, use of resistance testing, and drug class-related resistance. Novel data on the HIV care continuum in low- and middle-income settings concentrated on differentiated HIV care delivery models and outcomes. Data on progress toward reaching World Health Organization 90-90-90 targets as well as outcomes related to expedited initiation of HIV treatment and adherence strategies were presented. Results from a trial in Malawi showed reduced rates of mother-to-child transmission among HIV-infected women who initiated antiretroviral therapy prior to pregnancy, and several studies highlighted the effect of antiretroviral therapy in pediatric populations. A special session was dedicated to the findings of studies of Ebola virus disease and treatment during the outbreak in West Africa. PMID:27398863

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  4. Predictors and impact of non-adherence in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder receiving OROS methylphenidate: results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication non-adherence has an important impact on treatment efficacy and healthcare burden across a range of conditions and therapeutic areas. The aim of this analysis was to determine predictors of non-adherence and impact of non-adherence on treatment response in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Post-hoc analysis of a 13-week randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study of OROS methylphenidate (MPH) 54 and 72 mg/day. Primary efficacy variable was the Conners’ Adult ADHD Rating Scale – Screening Version (CAARS:O-SV). Daily adherence was calculated as average daily adherence (100 × capsules taken/2), with overall adherence calculated as the average daily adherence. Predictors of adherence were assessed using mixed-effects logistic regression. Descriptive statistics were generated for change in CAARS:O-SV score for adherent (> 95% adherence) and non-adherent subjects. Predictors of change were analyzed using a mixed model. Results Subjects were allocated to OROS MPH (54 mg, n = 87; 72 mg, n = 92) or placebo (n = 97). Mean adherence was 92.6% and 93.3% (OROS MPH 54 and 72 mg/day, respectively), versus 97.5% (placebo). Adherence was higher and less variable in completers. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included female sex, shorter time since ADHD diagnosis, higher education level (completion of university) and score on the Drug Use Screening Inventory psychiatric disorders subscale. Improvements from baseline in CAARS:O-SV score were numerically greater in subjects defined as adherent than in those who were non-adherent. Significant predictors of CAARS:O-SV change in patients who completed the study included percentage adherence up to the point of assessment (p < 0.0001), baseline score (p < 0.0001) and family history of ADHD (p = 0.0003). Conclusion The results of this analysis suggest that newly diagnosed patients, those with a high score on the DUSI-R psychiatric disorder scale, women

  5. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  6. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  7. Effects of PPARγ and RBP4 Gene Variants on Metabolic Syndrome in HIV-Infected Patients with Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Nan-Yao; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chang, Ho-Ching; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Background PPARγ and RBP4 are known to regulate lipid and glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The influences of PPARγ (C1431T and Pro12Ala) and RBP4 (−803GA) polymorphisms on metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients receiving anti-retroviral therapy were examined in this study. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study of HIV-1 infected adults with antiretroviral therapy for more than one year in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital was conducted. The gene polymorphisms were determined by quantitative PCR. Results Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Eighty-two (90.1%) patients were males with a mean age of 44.4 years. For the C1431T polymorphism in PPARγ, while patients with the T allele (48.4%) had trends toward lower rate of hypertriglyceridemia, the borderline significance together with insignificant power did not support the protective effect of the T allele against development of hypertriglyceridemia. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPARγ, although patients with the Pro/Ala genotype (8.8%) had a higher level of serum LDL (138.0 vs. 111.5 mg/dl, P = 0.04) and trends toward higher rates of hypercholesterolemia and serum LDL>110 mg/dl, these variables were found to be independent of the Pro/Ala genotype in the multivariate analysis. For the −803GA polymorphism in RBP4, patients with the A allele (23.1%) more often had insulin resistance (HOMA>3.8; 33.3 vs. 8.7%, P = 0.01) and more often received anti-hypoglycemic drugs (14.3 vs. 1.4%, P = 0.04). The detrimental effect of the A allele in RBP4 −803GA polymorphism on development of insulin resistance was supported by the multivariate analysis adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The impacts of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms on metabolism in HIV-infected patients are not significant. RBP4 −803GA polymorphism has increased risk of insulin resistance in HIV-infected patients with anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23145084

  8. Obesity Among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States: Data From the Cross-Sectional Medical Monitoring Project and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Paul, Angela M; Wei, Stanley C; Mattson, Christine L; Robertson, McKaylee; Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C; Bell, Tanvir K; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-07-01

    Our objective was to compare obesity prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults receiving care and the U.S. general population and identify obesity correlates among HIV-infected men and women.Cross-sectional data was collected in 2009 to 2010 from 2 nationally representative surveys: Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).Weighted prevalence estimates of obesity, defined as body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m, were compared using prevalence ratios (PR, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Correlates of obesity in HIV-infected adults were examined using multivariable logistic regression.Demographic characteristics of the 4006 HIV-infected adults in MMP differed from the 5657 adults from the general U.S. population in NHANES, including more men (73.2% in MMP versus 49.4% in NHANES, respectively), black or African Americans (41.5% versus 11.6%), persons with annual incomes <$20,000 (64.5% versus 21.9%), and homosexuals or bisexuals (50.9% versus 3.9%). HIV-infected men were less likely to be obese (PR 0.5, CI 0.5-0.6) and HIV-infected women were more likely to be obese (PR1.2, CI 1.1-1.3) compared with men and women in the general population, respectively. Among HIV-infected women, younger age was associated with obesity (<40 versus >60 years). Among HIV-infected men, correlates of obesity included black or African American race/ethnicity, annual income >$20,000 and <$50,000, heterosexual orientation, and geometric mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count >200 cells/μL.Obesity is common, affecting 2 in 5 HIV-infected women and 1 in 5 HIV-infected men. Correlates of obesity differ for HIV-infected men and women; therefore, different strategies may be needed for the prevention and treatment. PMID:26166086

  9. Anti-Retroviral Therapy Increases the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in South African HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Joel A.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Ross, Ian L.; Lacerda, Miguel; Maartens, Gary; Blom, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Data on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia and associated risk factors in HIV-infected patients from sub-Saharan Africa is sparse. We performed a cross-sectional analysis in a cohort of HIV-infected South African adults. Methods We studied HIV-infected patients who were either antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive or receiving non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based or protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART. Evaluation included fasting lipograms, oral glucose tolerance tests and clinical anthropometry. Dyslipidemia was defined using the NCEP ATPIII guidelines. Results The median age of the participants was 34 years (range 19–68 years) and 78% were women. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in 406 ART-naive and 551 participants on ART was 90.0% and 85%, respectively. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDLC) was the most common abnormality [290/406 (71%) ART-naïve and 237/551 (43%) ART- participants]. Participants on ART had higher triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDLC) and HDLC than the ART-naïve group. Severe dyslipidaemia, (LDLC> 4.9 mmol/L or TG >5.0 mmol/L) was present in <5% of participants. In multivariate analyses there were complex associations between age, gender, type and duration of ART and body composition and LDLC, HDLC and TG, which differed between ART-naïve and ART-participants. Conclusion Participants on ART had higher TG, TC, LDLC and HDLC than those who were ART-naïve but severe lipid abnormalities requiring evaluation and treatment were uncommon. PMID:26986065

  10. Internet Health Information Seeking Behavior and Antiretroviral Adherence in Persons Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Somnath; Chander, Geetanjali; Korthuis, P. Todd; Sharma, Rashmi K.; Sharp, Victoria; Cohn, Jonathan; Moore, Richard D.; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the Internet has the potential to educate persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), websites may contain inaccurate information and increase the risk of nonadherence with antiretroviral therapy (ART). The objectives of our study were to determine the extent to which PLWHA engage in Internet health information seeking behavior (IHISB) and to determine whether IHISB is associated with ART adherence. We conducted a survey of adult, English-speaking HIV-infected patients at four HIV outpatient clinic sites in the United States (Baltimore, Maryland; Detroit, Michigan; New York, and Portland, Oregon) between December 2004 and January 2006. We assessed IHISB by asking participants how much information they had received from the Internet since acquiring HIV. The main outcome was patient-reported ART adherence over the past three days. Data were available on IHISB for 433 patients, 334 of whom were on ART therapy. Patients had a mean age of 45 (standard error [SE] 0.45) years and were mostly male (66%), African American (58%), and had attained a high school degree (73%). Most (55%) reported no IHISB, 18% reported some, and 27% reported “a fair amount” or “a great deal.” Patients who reported higher versus lower levels of IHISB were significantly younger, had achieved a higher level of education, and had higher medication self-efficacy. In unadjusted analyses, higher IHISB was associated with ART adherence (odds ratio [OR], 2.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27–6.94). This association persisted after adjustment for age, gender, race, education, clinic site, and medication self-efficacy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.76, 95% CI 1.11–6.87). Our findings indicate that IHISB is positively associated with ART adherence even after controlling for potentially confounding variables. Future studies should investigate the ways in which Internet health information may promote medication adherence among PLWHA. PMID:21682586

  11. Antiretroviral concentrations in small hair samples as a feasible marker of adherence in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Matthew D; Salmen, Charles R; Tessler, Robert A; Omollo, Dan; Bacchetti, Peter; Magerenge, Richard; Mattah, Brian; Salmen, Marcus R; Zoughbie, Daniel; Fiorella, Kathryn J; Geng, Elvin; Njoroge, Betty; Jin, Chengshi; Huang, Yong; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Gandhi, Monica

    2014-07-01

    Antiretroviral hair levels objectively quantify drug exposure over time and predict virologic responses. We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of collecting small hair samples in a rural Kenyan cohort. Ninety-five percentage of participants (354/373) donated hair. Although median self-reported adherence was 100% (interquartile range, 96%-100%), a wide range of hair concentrations likely indicates overestimation of self-reported adherence and the advantages of a pharmacologic adherence measure. Higher nevirapine hair concentrations observed in women and older adults require further study to unravel behavioral versus pharmacokinetic contributors. In resource-limited settings, hair antiretroviral levels may serve as a low-cost quantitative biomarker of adherence. PMID:24694932

  12. Radiation doses received by adult Japanese populations living outside Fukushima Prefecture during March 2011, following the Fukushima 1 nuclear power plant failures.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D

    2012-12-01

    Data on the concentration of radionuclides in air for March following the reactor failures at the Fukushima NPP were available for Takasaki, Chiba and Tokyo. Gamma dose data for the same/close locations and for fixed locations in other prefectures were also obtained. Gamma dose data was used to calculate the cumulative gamma dose, during 2 weeks (15th-28th March) following the power plant failures. Corresponding doses were calculated for sites in other Japanese prefectures - except Fukushima Prefecture, for which equivalent monitoring data was not published. For Takasaki, Chiba and Tokyo air concentration data and ICRP dose coefficients were used to calculate inhalation committed effective doses (CED, E(50)) and thyroid equivalent doses (H) for adult members of the public. Average ratios of gamma dose to inhalation CED and inhalation CED from iodine isotopes to thyroid equivalent dose, determined for Takasaki, Chiba and Tokyo, were then used to predict these quantities for sites in other prefectures. Cumulative gamma dose profiles were used to identify dose increments that could be attributed to Fukushima releases within 11 prefectures (excluding Fukushima Prefecture). The most impacted of these were located in Gunma, Ibaraki, Tochigi and Saitama Prefectures - to the south of Fukushima - and in Miyagi Prefecture - to the north of Fukushima. Calculated total doses ranged from 16 μSv in Shizuoka (Shizuoka) to 400 μSv in Ibaraki (Mito). The total doses calculated for the major population centres of Tokyo and Chiba were 97 μSv and 80 μSv, respectively. For all prefecture locations the largest calculated contribution to total dose, during the period of assessment, was from inhalation (~80%). Estimated thyroid equivalent doses ranged from 5.9 mSv in Ibaraki to 200 μSv in Shizuoka. All total doses calculated were probably overestimates - since no allowances were made for shielding and shelter during the passage of radioactive clouds. Minor contributions to dose from

  13. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  14. Predicting virological decay in patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Model trajectories of viral load measurements from time of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and use the model to predict whether patients will achieve suppressed viral load (≤200 copies/ml) within 6-months of starting cART. Design: Prospective cohort study including HIV-positive adults (UK Collaborative HIV Cohort Study). Methods: Eligible patients were antiretroviral naive and started cART after 1997. Random effects models were used to estimate viral load trends. Patients were randomly selected to form a validation dataset with those remaining used to fit the model. We evaluated predictions of suppression using indices of diagnostic test performance. Results: Of 9562 eligible patients 6435 were used to fit the model and 3127 for validation. Mean log10 viral load trajectories declined rapidly during the first 2 weeks post-cART, moderately between 2 weeks and 3 months, and more slowly thereafter. Higher pretreatment viral load predicted steeper declines, whereas older age, white ethnicity, and boosted protease inhibitor/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors based cART-regimen predicted a steeper decline from 3 months onwards. Specificity of predictions and the diagnostic odds ratio substantially improved when predictions were based on viral load measurements up to the 4-month visit compared with the 2 or 3-month visits. Diagnostic performance improved when suppression was defined by two consecutive suppressed viral loads compared with one. Conclusions: Viral load measurements can be used to predict if a patient will be suppressed by 6-month post-cART. Graphical presentations of this information could help clinicians decide the optimum time to switch treatment regimen during the first months of cART. PMID:27124894

  15. Mediators of antiretroviral adherence: a multisite international study.

    PubMed

    Corless, I B; Guarino, A J; Nicholas, P K; Tyer-Viola, L; Kirksey, K; Brion, J; Dawson Rose, C; Eller, L S; Rivero-Mendez, M; Kemppainen, J; Nokes, K; Sefcik, E; Voss, J; Wantland, D; Johnson, M O; Phillips, J C; Webel, A; Iipinge, S; Portillo, C; Chen, W-T; Maryland, M; Hamilton, M J; Reid, P; Hickey, D; Holzemer, W L; Sullivan, K M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of stressful life events (SLE) on medication adherence (3 days, 30 days) as mediated by sense of coherence (SOC), self-compassion (SCS), and engagement with the healthcare provider (eHCP) and whether this differed by international site. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional sample of 2082 HIV positive adults between September 2009 and January 2011 from sites in Canada, China, Namibia, Puerto Rico, Thailand, and US. Statistical tests to explore the effects of stressful life events on antiretroviral medication adherence included descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance, analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, and path analysis. An examination by international site of the relationships between SLE, SCS, SOC, and eHCP with adherence (3 days and 30 days) indicated these combined variables were related to adherence whether 3 days or 30 days to different degrees at the various sites. SLE, SCS, SOC, and eHCP were significant predictors of adherence past 3 days for the United States (p = < 0.001), Canada (p = 0.006), and Namibia (p = 0.019). The combined independent variables were significant predictors of adherence past 30 days only in the United States and Canada. Engagement with the provider was a significant correlate for antiretroviral adherence in most, but not all, of these countries. Thus, the importance of eHCP cannot be overstated. Nonetheless, our findings need to be accompanied by the caveat that research on variables of interest, while enriched by a sample obtained from international sites, may not have the same relationships in each country. PMID:22774796

  16. Health Care Outcomes and Advance Care Planning in Older Adults Who Receive Home-Based Palliative Care: A Pilot Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Cha, Stephen S.; Hanson, Gregory J.; Peterson, Stephanie M.; Rahman, Parvez A.; Naessens, James M.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Approximately 20% of seniors live with five or more chronic medical illnesses. Terminal stages of their lives are often characterized by repeated burdensome hospitalizations and advance care directives are insufficiently addressed. This study reports on the preliminary results of a Palliative Care Homebound Program (PCHP) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota to service these vulnerable populations. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate inpatient hospital utilization and the adequacy of advance care planning in patients who receive home-based palliative care. Methods: This is a retrospective pilot cohort study of patients enrolled in the PCHP between September 2012 and March 2013. Two control patients were matched to each intervention patient by propensity scoring methods that factor in risk and prognosis. Primary outcomes were six-month hospital utilization including ER visits. Secondary outcomes evaluated advance care directive completion and overall mortality. Results: Patients enrolled in the PCHP group (n=54) were matched to 108 controls with an average age of 87 years. Ninety-two percent of controls and 33% of PCHP patients were admitted to the hospital at least once. The average number of hospital admissions was 1.36 per patient for controls versus 0.35 in the PCHP (p<0.001). Total hospital days were reduced by 5.13 days. There was no difference between rates of ER visits. Advanced care directive were completed more often in the intervention group (98%) as compared to controls (31%), with p<0.001. Goals of care discussions were held at least once for all patients in the PCHP group, compared to 41% in the controls. PMID:25375663

  17. Directly administered antiretroviral therapy: pilot study of a structural intervention in methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, James L; Haug, Nancy A; Larios, Sandra; Gruber, Valerie A; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Powelson, Elisabeth; Logan, Deborah P; Shapiro, Bradley

    2012-12-01

    Devising interventions to provide integrated treatment for addiction and medical problems is an urgent issue. This study piloted a structural intervention, Directly Administered Antiretroviral Therapy (DAART), to assist methadone-maintenance patients in HIV medication adherence. Twenty-four participants received: (1) antiretroviral medications at the methadone clinic daily before receiving their methadone; (2) take-home antiretroviral medication for days they were not scheduled to attend the methadone clinic, and (3) brief adherence counseling to address adherence barriers. DAART lasted 24 weeks, with a planned step-down to twice-weekly administration in weeks 25-36, followed by self-administration in weeks 37-48. Retention rates at weeks 24, 36, and 48 were 83, 92, and 75% respectively. DAART was associated with improvement in the proportion of participants achieving viral suppression as well as with high medication adherence rates (clinic-verified; 85% and self-reported 97%) during the active intervention phase. DAART was effective as an intervention but did not promote transition to self-administration. This study demonstrates that DAART is adaptable and simple enough to be implemented into methadone treatment programs interested in providing HIV adherence services. PMID:23007110

  18. The Impact of Non-Antiretroviral Polypharmacy on the Continuity of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Among HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Krentz, Hartmut B; Gill, M John

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival achieved by many patients with HIV/AIDS has complicated their medical care as increasing numbers of co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy, increased pill burdens, and greater risks of drug-drug interactions potentially compromising antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the impact of non-antiretroviral polypharmacy on ART for all adults followed at the Southern Alberta Clinic, Calgary, Canada. Polypharmacy was defined as ≥5 daily medications. We compared the impact of polypharmacy on continuous (i.e., remaining on same ART for ≥6 months) vs. non-continuous (i.e., discontinuing or switching ART) ART dosing frequency, number of ART pills, number of non-ART medications, and age. Of 1190 (89.5%) patients on ART, 95% were on three-drug regimens, 63.9% on QD ART, and 62% ≥3 ART pills daily; 32.2% were experiencing polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was associated with lower CD4, AIDS, >180 months living with HIV, higher numbers of ART pills, and older age (all p < 0.01); 32.1% stopped or switched ART. Polypharmacy increased the risk for non-continuous ART (36.8% vs. 30.0%; p < 0.01). Non-continuous ART increased with daily ART pill count but not increased age. Non-adherence and adverse effects accounted for the majority of non-continuous ART. We found a strong association between polypharmacy and non-continuous ART, potentially leading to effective ART being compromised. Collaborative approaches are needed to anticipate the negative impacts of polypharmacy. PMID:26544766

  19. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy - Pharmacogenomic aspect

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Bhavik; Shankarkumar, Aruna; Ghosh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy with three drug regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection significantly suppresses the viral replication. However, this therapeutic impact is restricted by adverse drug events and response in terms of short and long term efficacy. There are multiple factors involved in different responses to antiretrovirals (ARVs) such as age, body weight, disease status, diet and heredity. Pharmacogenomics deals with individual genetic make-up and its role in drug efficacy and toxicity. In depth genetic research has provided evidence to predict the risk of developing certain toxicities for which personalized screening and surveillance protocols may be developed to prevent side effects. Here we describe the use of pharmacogenomics for optimal use of HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy). PMID:26831415

  20. Drug Interactions with New and Investigational Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin C.; Paul, Sunita; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 individual and fixed-dose combinations of antiretrovirals are approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, owing to the ongoing limitations of drug resistance and adverse effects, new treatment options are still required. A number of promising new agents in existing or new drug classes are in development or have recently been approved by the US FDA. Since these agents will be used in combination with other new and existing antiretrovirals, understanding the potential for drug interactions between these compounds is critical to their appropriate use. This article summarizes the drug interaction potential of new and investigational protease inhibitors (darunavir), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (etravirine and rilpivirine), chemokine receptor antagonists (maraviroc, vicriviroc and INCB 9471), integrase inhibitors (raltegravir and elvitegravir) and maturation inhibitors (bevirimat). PMID:19492868

  1. Displacement and HIV: Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Therapy Use by Ethnic Shan Migrants in Northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jordan K; DiStefano, Anthony S; Yang, Joshua S; Wood, Michele M

    2016-01-01

    Migrant populations face increased HIV vulnerabilities, including limited access to antiretroviral therapy. Civil conflict in Myanmar has displaced thousands of people from the minority Shan ethnic group into northern Thailand, where they bear a disproportionate HIV burden. To identify barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral therapy use in this population, we conducted a rapid ethnographic assessment and case study with a clinical sample of Shan migrants receiving treatment for HIV in a district hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, Thai nurses providing their care, and health care administrators (n = 23). Barriers included fears of arrest and deportation, communication difficulties, perceived social marginalization, limited HIV knowledge, and lack of finances. Facilitating factors included hospital-based migrant registration services and community outreach efforts involving support group mobilization, referral practices, and radio broadcasts. These findings provided a contextualized account to inform policies, community interventions, and nursing practice to increase treatment access for minority migrant groups. PMID:27188762

  2. Use of Third Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Ghidinelli, Massimo; Castro, Jose Luis; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Cortes, Claudia P.; Padgett, Denis; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Fink, Valeria; Duran, Adriana; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine C.; Cahn, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is expanding in Latin America. Many patients require second and third line therapy due to toxicity, tolerability, failure, or a combination of factors. The need for third line HAART, essential for program planning, is not known. Methods Antiretroviral-naïve patients ≥18 years who started first HAART after January 1, 2000 in Caribbean, Central and South America Network (CCASAnet) sites in Argentina, Brazil, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. Clinical trials participants were excluded. Third line HAART was defined as use of darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine, enfuvirtide, maraviroc or raltegravir. Need for third line HAART was defined as virologic failure while on second line HAART. Results Of 5853 HAART initiators followed for a median of 3.5 years, 310 (5.3%) failed a second line regimen and 44 (0.8%) received a third line regimen. Cumulative incidence of failing a 2nd or starting a 3rd line regimen was 2.7% and 6.0% three and five years after HAART initiation, respectively. Predictors at HAART initiation for failing a second or starting a third line included female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–2.00, p = 0.001), younger age (HR = 2.76 for 20 vs. 40 years, 95% CI 1.86–4.10, p<0.001), and prior AIDS (HR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.62–2.90, p<0.001). Conclusions Third line regimens may be needed for at least 6% of patients in Latin America within 5 years of starting HAART, a substantial proportion given the large numbers of patients on HAART in the region. Improved accessibility to third line regimens is warranted. PMID:25221931

  3. The concomitant use of second-generation antipsychotics and long-term antiretroviral therapy may be associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Maria; Umlauf, Anya; Sanders, Chelsea; Meyer, Jonathan M; Allen McCutchan, John; Duarte, Nichole; Hampton Atkinson, Joseph; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J

    2014-08-15

    To study the effect of concurrent use of second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) on metabolic syndrome (MetS) components conferring increased cardiovascular risk in a sample of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). A retrospective study of participants consecutively recruited at the UCSD HIV Neurobehavioral Research Program examined effects of combined ART and SGAs on body mass index (BMI), nonfasting serum lipids, diabetes mellitus (DM) incidence, and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Metabolic outcome variables and covariates were compared using t-tests, Chi-squared or Fisher's exact tests. Linear and logistic multivariable models explored metabolic outcomes for participants taking (SGA+) or not taking (SGA-) concomitant SGAs, after controlling for demographic and HIV disease- and ART-related covariates. Of 2229 HIV-infected participants, 12% (N=258) were treated with SGAs. In multivariable models adjusted for relevant covariates, the SGA+ group had significantly higher mean triglycerides, significantly higher odds of DM, significantly higher MAPs and marginally higher BMI. The use of SGAs in HIV-infected adults taking ART was independently associated with worse indicators of MetS and cardiovascular risk. Aggressive monitoring for the metabolic complications from concurrent SGA and ART is indicated in all patients receiving these medication combinations. PMID:24794030

  4. Dosing antiretroviral medication when crossing time zones: a review

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Joseph M.; Volny-Anne, Alain; Waitt, Catriona; Boffito, Marta; Khoo, Saye

    2016-01-01

    International tourism continues to increase worldwide, and people living with HIV and their clinicians are increasingly confronted with the problem of how to dose antiretroviral therapy during transmeridian air travel across time zones. No guidance on this topic currently exists. This review is a response to requests from patient groups for clear, practical and evidence-based guidance for travelling on antiretroviral therapy; we present currently available data on the pharmacokinetic forgiveness and toxicity of various antiretroviral regimens, and synthesize this data to provide guidelines on how to safely dose antiretrovirals when travelling across time zones. PMID:26684823

  5. Dosing antiretroviral medication when crossing time zones: a review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joseph M; Volny-Anne, Alain; Waitt, Catriona; Boffito, Marta; Khoo, Saye

    2016-01-01

    International tourism continues to increase worldwide, and people living with HIV and their clinicians are increasingly confronted with the problem of how to dose antiretroviral therapy during transmeridian air travel across time zones. No guidance on this topic currently exists. This review is a response to requests from patient groups for clear, practical and evidence-based guidance for travelling on antiretroviral therapy; we present currently available data on the pharmacokinetic forgiveness and toxicity of various antiretroviral regimens, and synthesize this data to provide guidelines on how to safely dose antiretrovirals when travelling across time zones. PMID:26684823

  6. Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Antiretroviral-Naive Patients with Established HIV Type 1 Infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and Review of the Latin American and Caribbean Literature

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barbara S.; Rojas Fermín, Rita A.; Reyes, Emily Virginia; Vaughan, Catherine; José, Lina; Javier, Carmen; Franco Estévez, Ramona; Donastorg Cabral, Yeycy; Batista, Arelis; Lie, Yolanda; Coakley, Eoin; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Emergence of HIV resistance is a concerning consequence of global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). To date, there is no published information about HIV resistance from the Dominican Republic. The study's aim was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors in a sample of chronically HIV-1-infected patients in one clinic in Santo Domingo. The data are presented in the context of a review of the TDR literature from Latin America and the Caribbean. Genotype testing was successfully performed on 103 treatment-naive adults planning to initiate antiretroviral therapy; the World Health Organization (WHO) list of surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) was used to determine the presence of TDR mutations. WHO SDRM were identified in eight patients (7.8%); none had received sdNVP. There were no significant differences in epidemiologic or clinical variables between those with or without WHO SDRM. The prevalence of WHO SDRM was 1.0% and 6.8% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, respectively. No WHO SDRMs for protease inhibitors were identified. Among 12 studies of TDR in the region with a sample size of at least 100 subjects, the reported prevalence of SDRM ranged from 2.8% to 8.1%. The most commonly identified SDRM was K103N. This information adds to our understanding of the epidemiology of TDR in the region and the possible role such mutations could play in undermining first-line treatment. Ongoing surveillance is clearly needed to better understand the TDR phenomenon in the Caribbean. PMID:21851324

  7. Antiretroviral drug levels and interactions affect lipid, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism in HIV-1 seronegative subjects: A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Yarasheski, Kevin E.; Para, Michael F.; Reichman, Richard C.; Morse, Gene D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral medications (ARVs) develop undesirable changes in lipid and glucose metabolism that mimic the metabolic syndrome and may be proatherogenic. Antiretroviral drug levels and their interactions may contribute to these metabolic alterations. Methods: Fifty-six HIV-seronegative adults were enrolled in an open-label, randomized, pharmacokinetic interaction study, and received a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (efavirenz on days 1-21) plus a protease inhibitor (PI; amprenavir on days 11-21), with a second PI on days 15-21 (saquinavir, nelfinavir, indinavir, or ritonavir). Fasting triglycerides, total, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol, glucose, insulin and C-peptide levels were measured on days 0, 14, 21, and 2-3 weeks after discontinuing drugs. Regression models were used to estimate changes in these parameters and associations between these changes and circulating levels of study drugs. Results: Short-term efavirenz and amprenavir administration significantly increased cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels. Addition of a second protease inhibitor further increased triglycerides, total- and LDL-cholesterol levels. Higher amprenavir levels predicted larger increases in triglycerides, total and LDL-cholesterol. Two weeks after all study drugs were stopped, total, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol remained elevated above baseline. Conclusions: ARV regimens that include a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor plus single or boosted PIs are becoming more common, but the pharmacodynamic interactions associated with these regimens can result in persistent, undesirable alterations in serum lipid/lipoprotein levels. Additional pharmacodynamic studies are needed to examine the metabolic effects of ritonavir-boosted regimens, with and without efavirenz. PMID:18007962

  8. The HIV Treatment Gap: Estimates of the Financial Resources Needed versus Available for Scale-Up of Antiretroviral Therapy in 97 Countries from 2015 to 2020

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) released revised guidelines in 2015 recommending that all people living with HIV, regardless of CD4 count, initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) upon diagnosis. However, few studies have projected the global resources needed for rapid scale-up of ART. Under the Health Policy Project, we conducted modeling analyses for 97 countries to estimate eligibility for and numbers on ART from 2015 to 2020, along with the facility-level financial resources required. We compared the estimated financial requirements to estimated funding available. Methods and Findings Current coverage levels and future need for treatment were based on country-specific epidemiological and demographic data. Simulated annual numbers of individuals on treatment were derived from three scenarios: (1) continuation of countries’ current policies of eligibility for ART, (2) universal adoption of aspects of the WHO 2013 eligibility guidelines, and (3) expanded eligibility as per the WHO 2015 guidelines and meeting the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS “90-90-90” ART targets. We modeled uncertainty in the annual resource requirements for antiretroviral drugs, laboratory tests, and facility-level personnel and overhead. We estimate that 25.7 (95% CI 25.5, 26.0) million adults and 1.57 (95% CI 1.55, 1.60) million children could receive ART by 2020 if countries maintain current eligibility plans and increase coverage based on historical rates, which may be ambitious. If countries uniformly adopt aspects of the WHO 2013 guidelines, 26.5 (95% CI 26.0 27.0) million adults and 1.53 (95% CI 1.52, 1.55) million children could be on ART by 2020. Under the 90-90-90 scenario, 30.4 (95% CI 30.1, 30.7) million adults and 1.68 (95% CI 1.63, 1.73) million children could receive treatment by 2020. The facility-level financial resources needed for scaling up ART in these countries from 2015 to 2020 are estimated to be US$45.8 (95% CI 45.4, 46.2) billion under

  9. Human papillomavirus infection in the oral cavity of HIV patients is not reduced by initiating antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Lee, Anthony; Chen, Huichao; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Seaman, Todd; Landovitz, Raphael J.; John, Malcolm; Reilly, Nancy; Naini, Linda; Palefsky, Joel; Jacobson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral malignancies is increasing among HIV-infected populations, and the prevalence of oral warts has reportedly increased among HIV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We explored whether ART initiation among treatment-naive HIV-positive adults is followed by a change in oral HPV infection or the occurrence of oral warts. Design: Prospective, observational study. Methods: HIV-1 infected, ART-naive adults initiating ART in a clinical trial were enrolled. End points included detection of HPV DNA in throat-washes, changes in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV RNA, and oral wart diagnosis. Results: Among 388 participants, 18% had at least one HPV genotype present before initiating ART, and 24% had at least one genotype present after 12–24 weeks of ART. Among those with undetectable oral HPV DNA before ART, median change in CD4+ count from study entry to 4 weeks after ART initiation was larger for those with detectable HPV DNA during follow-up than those without (P =  0.003). Both prevalence and incidence of oral warts were low (3% of participants having oral warts at study entry; 2.5% acquiring oral warts during 48 weeks of follow-up). Conclusion: These results suggest: effective immune control of HPV in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients is not reconstituted by 24 weeks of ART; whereas ART initiation was not followed by an increase in oral warts, we observed an increase in oral HPV DNA detection after 12–24 weeks. The prevalence of HPV-associated oral malignancies may continue to increase in the modern ART era. PMID:26919735

  10. Experiences of participating in an antiretroviral treatment adherence club

    PubMed Central

    Dudhia, Raashika; Kagee, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to streamline the management of large numbers of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in South Africa, adherence clubs were introduced in some districts in the Western Cape since 2008. Adherence clubs are group clinic visits of approximately thirty ART users who receive group adherence counselling and obtain a supply of medication. We sought to document the experiences of patients attending adherence clubs and health care workers at clinics where clubs were operating. Participants were six ART adherence club members and seven health care workers, which included HIV nurses, medical doctors, pharmacists and counsellors. Data in the form of one-on-one interviews were collected at the Infectious Diseases Clinic of a large district hospital in a peri-urban area in the Western Cape region of South Africa. The interviews covered ART users’ experiences of the clubs, advantages and challenges that arose in the context of the club-based method of providing treatment, and the concerns facing ART users and health care workers (HCW’s) with regard to the clubs. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. There were clear benefits to the introduction of adherence clubs, most importantly the reduced amount of time ART users needed to spend at the clinic. Yet, various problems also emerged, the most important one being the logistical problems associated with the timely and correct delivery of drugs. These benefits and disadvantages are discussed in the context of providing ART services to large numbers of patients in post-apartheid South Africa. PMID:25168720

  11. Antiretroviral Treatment and Sexual Risk Behavior in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Risher, Kathryn; Rehle, Thomas; Simbayi, Leickness; Shisana, Olive; Celentano, David D

    2016-04-01

    The sexual behavior of individuals living with HIV determines the onward transmission of HIV. With the understanding that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevents transmission of HIV, the sexual behaviors of the individuals not on ART with unsuppressed viral loads becomes of the greatest importance in elucidating transmission. We assessed the association between being on ART and sexual risk behavior among those living with HIV in a nationally representative population-based cross-sectional survey of households in South Africa that was conducted in 2012. Of 2237 adults (aged 15-49) who tested HIV-seropositive, 667 (29.8 %) had detectable antiretroviral drugs in their blood specimens. Among males, 77.7 % of those on ART reported having had sex in the past year contrasted with 88.4 % of those not on ART (p = 0.001); among females, 72.2 % of those on ART reported having had sex in the past year while 80.3 % of those not on ART did (p < 0.001). For males and females, the odds of reporting consistent condom use and condom use at last sex were statistically significantly higher for individuals on ART compared to those not on ART (males: consistent condom use aOR 2.8, 95 % CI 1.6-4.9, condom use at last sex aOR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.5-4.6; females: consistent condom use aOR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.7-3.1, condom use at last sex aOR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.7-3.1), while there were no statistically significant differences in odds of reporting multiple sexual partners in the past year. In this nationally representative population-based survey of South African adults, we found evidence of less risky sexual risk behavior among people living with HIV on ART compared to those not on ART. PMID:26194426

  12. Obesity Among HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States: Data From the Cross-Sectional Medical Monitoring Project and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Paul, Angela M.; Wei, Stanley C.; Mattson, Christine L.; Robertson, McKaylee; Hernandez-Romieu, Alfonso C.; Bell, Tanvir K.; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to compare obesity prevalence among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults receiving care and the U.S. general population and identify obesity correlates among HIV-infected men and women. Cross-sectional data was collected in 2009 to 2010 from 2 nationally representative surveys: Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Weighted prevalence estimates of obesity, defined as body mass index ≥30.0 kg/m2, were compared using prevalence ratios (PR, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Correlates of obesity in HIV-infected adults were examined using multivariable logistic regression. Demographic characteristics of the 4006 HIV-infected adults in MMP differed from the 5657 adults from the general U.S. population in NHANES, including more men (73.2% in MMP versus 49.4% in NHANES, respectively), black or African Americans (41.5% versus 11.6%), persons with annual incomes <$20,000 (64.5% versus 21.9%), and homosexuals or bisexuals (50.9% versus 3.9%). HIV-infected men were less likely to be obese (PR 0.5, CI 0.5–0.6) and HIV-infected women were more likely to be obese (PR1.2, CI 1.1–1.3) compared with men and women in the general population, respectively. Among HIV-infected women, younger age was associated with obesity (<40 versus >60 years). Among HIV-infected men, correlates of obesity included black or African American race/ethnicity, annual income >$20,000 and <$50,000, heterosexual orientation, and geometric mean CD4+ T-lymphocyte cell count >200 cells/μL. Obesity is common, affecting 2 in 5 HIV-infected women and 1 in 5 HIV-infected men. Correlates of obesity differ for HIV-infected men and women; therefore, different strategies may be needed for the prevention and treatment. PMID:26166086

  13. Antiretroviral treatment, management challenges and outcomes in perinatally HIV-infected adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Agwu, Allison L; Fairlie, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Three decades into the HIV/AIDS epidemic there is a growing cohort of perinatally HIV-infected adolescents globally. Their survival into adolescence and beyond represent one of the major successes in the battle against the disease that has claimed the lives of millions of children. This population is diverse and there are unique issues related to antiretroviral treatment and management. Drawing from the literature and experience, this paper discusses several broad areas related to antiretroviral management, including: 1) diverse presentation of HIV, (2) use of combination antiretroviral therapy including in the setting of co-morbidities and rapid growth and development, (3) challenges of cART, including nonadherence, resistance, and management of the highly treatment-experienced adolescent patient, (4) additional unique concerns and management issues related to PHIV-infected adolescents, including the consequences of longterm inflammation, risk of transmission, and transitions to adult care. In each section, the experience in both resource-rich and limited settings are discussed with the aim of highlighting the differences and importantly the similarities, to share lessons learnt and provide insight into the multi-faceted approaches that may be needed to address the challenges faced by this unique and resilient population. PMID:23782477

  14. Advance Care Planning and HIV Infection in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sangarlangkarn, Aroonsiri; Merlin, Jessica S; Tucker, Rodney O; Kelley, Amy S

    In the era of antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection has become a chronic illness with associated multimorbidity, and practitioners are faced with an emerging population of HIV-infected patients with evolving needs for advance care planning (ACP), defined as communication between individuals and their proxies to plan for future health care decisions. This article provides a review of original research studies on ACP in HIV-infected adults in the era of antiretroviral therapy (1996-present) from PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO. Eleven studies conducted between 1996 and 2015 met the selection criteria, with study sizes ranging from 9 to 2864 participants. Most studies consisted of white men in outpatient settings and had poorly defined definitions of ACP. Prevalence of ACP was variable (36%-54% had end-of-life communication, 8%-47% had advance directives). Lack of ACP was most commonly associated with low income, followed by lower severity of illness, low education level, black or Hispanic race, female sex, younger age, injection drug use, and social isolation. Practitioners reported limited time or energy and inadequate preparation or training as barriers to ACP. Existing literature on ACP in the era of antiretroviral therapy is limited, but shows that ACP prevalence in HIV-infected individuals is variable depending on socioeconomic factors, severity of illness, and practitioner resources and training. More research is needed to increase ACP among HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27398771

  15. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M.; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Liomba, N. George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39–56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1–31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61–244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31–57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  16. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L; Shea, Thomas C; Liomba, N George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39-56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥ 2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1-31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61-244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31-57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  17. Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Mobile Text Messaging to Promote Retention and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy for People Living With HIV in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Denis; Artavia-Mora, Luis; Bedi, Arjun; Thiombiano, Boundia Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Background Retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) is a critical challenge in many African countries including Burkina Faso. Delivering text messaging (short message service, SMS) interventions through mobile phones may help facilitate health service delivery and improve patient health. Despite this potential, no evaluations have been delivered for national scale settings to demonstrate the impact of mobile health (mHealth) for PLHIV. Objectives This study aims to test the impact of SMS text messaging reminders for PLHIV in Burkina Faso, who are under ART. The evaluation identifies whether patients who receive SMS text messages are more likely to (1) retain in care (measured as a dichotomous variable), (2) adhere to antiretroviral regimens (measured as the number of doses missed in the past 7 days), and (3) experience slower disease progression (measured with T-lymphocytes cells). The second objective is to assess its effects on the frequency of health center visits, physical and psychosocial health, nutrition and whether the type of message (text vs image) and frequency (weekly vs semiweekly) have differential impacts including the possibility of message fatigue over time. Methods This 24-month, wide-scale intervention implements a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the impact of four variants of a mHealth intervention versus a control group. Our sample comprises adult patients (>15 years of age) undergoing antiretroviral therapy with access to mobile phone services. Multivariate regression analysis will be used to analyze the effect of the intervention on the study population. Data collection is done at baseline and three follow-up waves 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention starts. Results The targeted 3800 patients were recruited between February 2015 and May 2015. But political uncertainty delayed the launch of the intervention until October 2015. Data

  18. Association between HIV in pregnancy and antiretroviral therapy, including protease inhibitors and low birth weight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, P J; Smit, R; Stevens, M; Sever, J L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of low birth weight infants born to HIV seropositive women and to demonstrate any effects of antiretroviral therapy on birth weight. METHODS: Retrospective review of all obstetrical medical records from January 1, 1995 through June 30, 1998 to identify HIV seropositive women. We evaluated their antiretroviral therapy, CD4 counts, and birth weights of their newborns. We conducted detailed review of the clinical and laboratory findings for the HIV-infected untreated patients, women who received ZDV antepartum alone, and those who received PIs as part of antiretroviral treatment. RESULTS: The frequency of low birth weight infants was significantly increased in HIV seropositive compared to HIV seronegative parturients. Low birth weight infants were more frequent among HIV infected women with lower CD4 counts but the association was not statistically significant. Women who received no antepartum treatment, antepartum only ZDV, and those treated with PIs had significantly more low birth weight infants than did comparison groups. HIV seropositive women also had high frequencies of several obstetrical risk factors for low birth weight infants. CONCLUSION: The present study showed a significantly increased frequency of low birth weight infants among HIV infected women and especially the subgroups of infected women who received no antepartum treatment, antepartum ZDV only, and those treated with PIs. This association, however, may be related to the presence of many other preterm obstetrical risk factors noted in this study. Increasing numbers of HIV seropositive women are being treated with PIs according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines. If PIs are a cause of low birth weight infants, women taking these drugs may have incremental risk of low birth weight. PMID:10805364

  19. Antiretroviral therapy CNS penetration and HIV-1–associated CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Winston, A.; Walsh, J.; Post, F.; Porter, K.; Gazzard, B.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Pillay, D.; Hill, T.; Johnson, M.; Gilson, R.; Anderson, J.; Easterbrook, P.; Bansi, L.; Orkin, C.; Ainsworth, J.; Palfreeman, A.; Gompels, M.; Phillips, A.N.; Sabin, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The impact of different antiretroviral agents on the risk of developing or surviving CNS disease remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using antiretroviral regimens with higher CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) scores was associated with reduced incidence of CNS disease and improved survival in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) Study. Methods: Adults without previous CNS disease, who commenced combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) between 1996 and 2008, were included (n = 22,356). Initial and most recent cART CPE scores were calculated. CNS diseases were HIV encephalopathy (HIVe), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cerebral toxoplasmosis (TOXO), and cryptococcal meningitis (CRYPTO). Incidence rates and overall survival were stratified by CPE score. A multivariable Poisson regression model was used to identify independent associations. Results: The median (interquartile range) CPE score for initial cART regimen increased from 7 (5–8) in 1996–1997 to 9 (8–10) in 2000–2001 and subsequently declined to 6 (7–8) in 2006–2008. Differences in gender, HIV acquisition risk group, and ethnicity existed between CPE score strata. A total of 251 subjects were diagnosed with a CNS disease (HIVe 80; TOXO 59; CRYPTO 56; PML 54). CNS diseases occurred more frequently in subjects prescribed regimens with CPE scores ≤4, and less frequently in those with scores ≥10; however, these differences were nonsignificant. Initial and most recent cART CPE scores ≤4 were independently associated with increased risk of death. Conclusion: Clinical status at time of commencing cART influences antiretroviral selection and CPE score. This information should be considered when utilizing CPE scores for retrospective analyses. PMID:21339496

  20. [Clinical and biological effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in the ANRS 1215 cohort].

    PubMed

    De Beaudrap, P; Diouf, A; Bousso Niang, K

    2014-10-01

    In 1998, the cohort ANRS 1215 was launched in Senegal with one of the first African antiretroviral treatment programs. Four hundred forty four HIV-infected adults started on ART were included between 1998 and 2004, and followed up to 2010. Mortality before 6 months was 15.6/100 person-year (PY) and associated to the initial disease severity. It decreased to 3.36/100 PY thereafter. The cumulative risks of virologic failure at 60 months and of drug resistance at 48 months were 25% and 16%, respectively. PMID:24619515

  1. Health outcomes among HIV-positive Latinos initiating antiretroviral therapy in North America versus Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Koethe, John R; Giganti, Mark J; Rebeiro, Peter; Althoff, Keri N; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Padgett, Denis; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R; Willig, James; Levison, Julie; Kitahata, Mari; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Moore, Richard D; McGowan, Catherine; Shepherd, Bryan E; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Latinos living with HIV in the Americas share a common ethnic and cultural heritage. In North America, Latinos have a relatively high rate of new HIV infections but lower rates of engagement at all stages of the care continuum, whereas in Latin America antiretroviral therapy (ART) services continue to expand to meet treatment needs. In this analysis, we compare HIV treatment outcomes between Latinos receiving ART in North America versus Latin America. Methods HIV-positive adults initiating ART at Caribbean, Central and South America Network for HIV (CCASAnet) sites were compared to Latino patients (based on country of origin or ethnic identity) starting treatment at North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) sites in the United States and Canada between 2000 and 2011. Cox proportional hazards models compared mortality, treatment interruption, antiretroviral regimen change, virologic failure and loss to follow-up between cohorts. Results The study included 8400 CCASAnet and 2786 NA-ACCORD patients initiating ART. CCASAnet patients were younger (median 35 vs. 37 years), more likely to be female (27% vs. 20%) and had lower nadir CD4 count (median 148 vs. 195 cells/µL, p<0.001 for all). In multivariable analyses, CCASAnet patients had a higher risk of mortality after ART initiation (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 to 1.96), particularly during the first year, but a lower hazard of treatment interruption (AHR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.50), change to second-line ART (AHR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.51 to 0.62) and virologic failure (AHR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.57). Conclusions HIV-positive Latinos initiating ART in Latin America have greater continuity of treatment but are at higher risk of death than Latinos in North America. Factors underlying these differences, such as HIV testing, linkage and access to care, warrant further investigation. PMID:26996992

  2. Adherence to HIV/AIDS antiretroviral therapy among drug users: A qualitative study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Zahra; Eftkhar, Hasan; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Ebadi, Abbas; Abbasian, Ladan; Zamani, Fereshte; Aghamollaei, Teamur; Shojaeizade, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: The introduction of antiretroviral therapy has caused a remarkable decrease in the occurrence of diseases and mortality among HIV-positive patients, while this success has not been achieved among injection addicts due to a low adherence to antiretroviral medicine. This study aims at clarifying the important factors affecting adherence to treatment in addicts suffering from HIV. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative research, data were gathered through in-depth interviews and field notes, and were interpreted through content analysis in the form of constant comparison. The participants were 16 drug addicts living with HIV/AIDS. Most of them had records of imprisonment and were receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) drug treatments in the AIDS center of Imam Khomeini Hospital complex, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Sampling was started in a purposive method and was continued until data were saturated. Results: Four main categories including psychological reactions, contradictory beliefs, perceived support, and individual and environmental barriers were extracted from the data, each having some sub-categories. Conclusions: The obtained results indicated that adherence to the treatment of HIV is not constant and mono-dimensional, but is a function of different factors. Hence, an individual having feeble adherence in a specific time and under specific circumstances may show desirable adherence under a different circumstance. Thus, treatment of addicts living with HIV/AIDS requires physical, psychological, and social attention along with drug treatments. PMID:26985220

  3. Can antiretroviral therapy be tailored to each human immunodeficiency virus-infected individual? Role of pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Asensi, Victor; Collazos, Julio; Valle-Garay, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics refers to the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within human genes on drug therapy outcome. Its study might help clinicians to increase the efficacy of antiretroviral drugs by improving their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and by decreasing their side effects. HLAB*5701 genotyping to avoid the abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a cost-effective diagnostic tool, with a 100% of negative predictive value, and, therefore, it has been included in the guidelines for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HALDRB*0101 associates with nevirapine-induced HSR. CYP2B6 SNPs modify efavirenz plasma levels and their genotyping help decreasing its central nervous system, hepatic and HSR toxicities. Cytokines SNPs might influence the development of drug-associated lipodystrophy. APOA5, APOB, APOC3 and APOE SNPs modify lipids plasma levels and might influence the coronary artery disease risk of HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy. UGT1A1*28 and ABCB1 (MDR1) 3435C > T SNPs modify atazanavir plasma levels and enhance hyperbilirubinemia. Much more effort needs to be still devoted to complete large prospective studies with multiple SNPs genotyping in order to reveal more clues about the role played by host genetics in antiretroviral drug efficacy and toxicity. PMID:26279978

  4. Site-nurse initiated Adherence and Symptom Support Telephone Calls for HIV-positive individuals starting antiretroviral therapy, ACTG 5031, a substudy of ACTG 384.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory K.; Testa, Marcia A.; Su, Max; Safren, Steven A.; Morse, Gene; Lammert, Sara; Shafer, Robert W.; Reynolds, Nancy R.; Chesney, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective and easy to implement interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy are needed. Objective: To compare a site-nurse initiated adherence and symptom support telephone calls for HIV-positive individuals starting antiretroviral therapy compare to the study site’s standard of care. Methods: A randomized controlled trial of site-nurse initiated adherence and symptom support telephone calls for HIV-positive individuals starting antiretrovirals. Subjects were randomized to receive site-nurse initiated telephone calls (intervention) or no additional calls above the site’s standard of care (control). Subjects received calls 1-3 days after initiating antiretrovirals, weeks 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, and every 8 weeks thereafter. Self-reported adherence was captured during study visits. Results: A total of 333 subjects starting antiretrovirals as part of ACTG 384 were co-enrolled into ACTG 5031. Subjects were followed for up to 160 weeks and were contacted for 74% of scheduled calls. There was no significant difference in proportion of patients with >95% mean Total Adherence, 87.9% and 91.2% (p=0.34) and mean self-reported Total Adherence, 97.9% and 98.4% in the intervention and control, respectively, or in symptom distress and clinical endpoints. Conclusions: In the context of a clinical trial, where self-reported adherence was exceptionally high, the site-nurse initiated telephone calls did not further improve self-reported adherence, symptom distress or clinical outcomes. PMID:24144900

  5. Dolutegravir-based antiretroviral therapy in a severely overweight child with a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus infection. A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Wagner, N; Wyler-Lazarevic, C A; Yerly, S; Samer, C; Peytavin, G; Posfay-Barbe, K M; Calmy, A; Ambrosioni, J

    2015-07-01

    The management of multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (MDR HIV) infections in children is particularly challenging due to the lack of experience with new drugs. Dolutegravir, combined with an optimized antiretroviral background therapy, is promising for the treatment of MDR HIV and has been approved recently for adults and adolescents. Data for children are extremely limited. We describe the efficacy, safety and plasmatic levels of a dolutegravir-based, complex active antiretroviral treatment regimen in a severely overweight 11-year-old child infected with an MDR HIV strain. PMID:26082840

  6. [Clinical management of acute and chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection before starting antiretroviral treatment].

    PubMed

    Miró, José M; Manzardo, Christian; Zamora, Laura; Pumarola, Tomas; Herreras, Zoe; Gallart, Teresa; Gatell, José M

    2011-12-01

    The evaluation of new cases of HIV infection is relatively common in Spain, where several thousands of patients with new infections are diagnosed each year. Eighty per cent of them have a chronic HIV infection at the first clinical evaluation, which is symptomatic (late presenters) in up to 30% of patients. The initial evaluation of HIV infection is not only directed at determining the clinical, virological (plasma HIV RNA viral load, resistance test and viral tropism) and immunological (CD4+ T-cell cell count) situation of the patients, but must also address the study of their co-infections (hepatitis, tuberculosis) and comorbidities (cardiovascular, hepatic, renal and bone) and the risk of HIV transmission. This is needed in order to decide, whether or not to start antiretroviral treatment, and with which combined antiretroviral treatment to start with, the prophylaxis of opportunistic infections, and the treatment of coinfections and comorbidities. The past and current medical history, the physical examination and laboratory tests will help us decide if the patient is to receive therapeutic intervention. The level of CD4+ T-cell lymphocytes is the best marker to suggest when to start combined antiretroviral treatment, indicating whether or not to start prophylaxis against opportunistic infections (if patients have a CD4+ T-cell count below 200 cells/mm(3)), and in advanced patients should make us suspect the presence of active opportunistic diseases in symptomatic cases. The management of patients with HIV infection must also include appropriate health education on the modes of transmission and prevention of HIV infection, and also to explain its natural history and how it can be modified with proper antiretroviral treatment, as well as to promote a healthy life. No less important is the psychological support, as these patients must learn to live with a chronic infection, which managed properly can ensure a very good long-term prognosis and quality of life. PMID

  7. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls. PMID:23101561

  8. Plasma micronutrient concentrations are altered by antiretroviral therapy and lipid-based nutrient supplements in lactating HIV-infected Malawian women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods: Plasma micronutrient concentrations were measured in a subsample (n = 690) of Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition (BAN) study participants who were randomly assigned at delivery to receive HAART, LNS, HAART+LNS, or no HAART/no LNS (control). HAART consisted of protease inhibitor–b...

  9. Growth and HIV-free survival of HIV-exposed infants in Malawi: A randomized trial of two complementary feeding interventions in the context of maternal antiretroviral therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the growth of HIV-exposed children receiving 1 of 2 complementary foods after prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission through maternal lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). In rural Malawi, 280 HIV-infected pregnant women were consecutively identifi...

  10. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  11. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  12. Bone Mineral Density and Fractures in Antiretroviral-Naive Persons Randomized to Receive Abacavir-Lamivudine or Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate-Emtricitabine Along With Efavirenz or Atazanavir-Ritonavir: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5224s, a Substudy of ACTG A5202

    PubMed Central

    Kitch, Douglas; Daar, Eric S.; Tierney, Camlin; Jahed, Nasreen C.; Tebas, Pablo; Myers, Laurie; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; Sax, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Yin and Overton, on pages 1705-7.) Background.  Long-term effects of abacavir (ABC)–lamivudine (3TC), compared with tenofovir (TDF)–emtricitabine (FTC) with efavirenz (EFV) or atazanavir plus ritonavir (ATV/r), on bone mineral density (BMD) have not been analyzed. Methods.  A5224s was a substudy of A5202, in which HIV-infected treatment-naive participants were randomized and blinded to receive ABC-3TC or TDF-FTC with open-label EFV or ATV/r. Primary bone end points included Dual-emission X-ray absorbtiometry (DXA)-measured percent changes in spine and hip BMD at week 96. Primary analyses were intent-to-treat. Statistical tests used the factorial design and included linear regression, 2-sample t, log-rank, and Fisher's exact tests. Results.  Two hundred sixty-nine persons randomized to 4 arms of ABC-3TC or TDF-FTC with EFV or ATV/r. At baseline, 85% were male, and 47% were white non-Hispanic; the median HIV-1 RNA load was 4.6 log10 copies/mL, the median age was 38 years, the median weight was 76 kg, and the median CD4 cell count was 233 cells/μL. At week 96, the mean percentage changes from baseline in spine and hip BMD for ABC-3TC versus TDF-FTC were -1.3% and -3.3% (P = .004) and -2.6% and -4.0% (P = .024), respectively; and for EFV versus ATV/r were -1.7% and -3.1% (P = .035) and -3.1% and -3.4% (P = .61), respectively. Bone fracture was observed in 5.6% of participants. The probability of bone fractures and time to first fracture were not different across components. Conclusions. Compared with ABC-3TC, TDF-FTC–treated participants had significantly greater decreases in spine and hip BMD, whereas ATV/r led to more significant losses in spine, but not hip, BMD than EFV. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00118898. PMID:21606537

  13. Drug Interactions and Antiretroviral Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Matthew; Sperati, C. John; Lucas, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the improved longevity afforded by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-infected individuals are developing several non-AIDS related comorbid conditions. Consequently, medical management of the HIV-infected population is increasingly complex, with a growing list of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This article reviews some of the most relevant and emerging potential interactions between antiretroviral medications and other agents. The most common DDIs are those involving protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors which alter the cytochrome P450 enzyme system and/or drug transporters such as p-glycoprotein. Of note are the new agents for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. These new classes of drugs and others drugs which are increasingly used in this patient population represent a significant challenge with regard to achieving the goals of effective HIV suppression and minimization of drug-related toxicities. Awareness of DDIs and a multidisciplinary approach are imperative in reaching these goals. PMID:24950731

  14. Decreased human immunodeficiency virus type 1 plasma viremia during antiretroviral therapy reflects downregulation of viral replication in lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, O J; Pantaleo, G; Holodniy, M; Schnittman, S; Niu, M; Graziosi, C; Pavlakis, G N; Lalezari, J; Bartlett, J A; Steigbigel, R T

    1995-01-01

    Although several immunologic and virologic markers measured in peripheral blood are useful for predicting accelerated progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, their validity for evaluating the response to antiretroviral therapy and their ability to accurately reflect changes in lymphoid organs remain unclear. In the present study, changes in certain virologic markers have been analyzed in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue during antiretroviral therapy. Sixteen HIV-infected individuals who were receiving antiretroviral therapy with zidovudine for > or = 6 months were randomly assigned either to continue on zidovudine alone or to add didanosine for 8 weeks. Lymph node biopsies were performed at baseline and after 8 weeks. Viral burden (i.e., HIV DNA copies per 10(6) mononuclear cells) and virus replication in mononuclear cells isolated from peripheral blood and lymph node and plasma viremia were determined by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. Virologic and immunologic markers remained unchanged in peripheral blood and lymph node of patients who continued on zidovudine alone. In contrast, a decrease in virus replication in lymph nodes was observed in four of six patients who added didanosine to their regimen, and this was associated with a decrease in plasma viremia. These results indicate that decreases in plasma viremia detected during antiretroviral therapy reflect downregulation of virus replication in lymphoid tissue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7597072

  15. Some Books about Alaska Received in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of State Libraries.

    This annual bibliography of Alaska- and Arctic-related publications received by the Alaska Division of State Libraries is divided into three categories. There are 26 titles in the "Juvenile Fiction" section, 122 in the "Adult Non-Fiction" section, and 19 in the "Adult Fiction" section. Government publications are generally not included, although a…

  16. Some Books about Alaska Received in 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of State Libraries.

    This publication is an annotated listing of 143 books about Alaska or the Arctic, received by the Alaska Division of State Libraries in 1986. Most of the material is current or published in recent years, with the exception of government publications. Categories are juvenile, adult non-fiction, adult fiction, and reference. A few Alaska state and…

  17. Accessibility of antiretroviral therapy in Ghana: convenience of access.

    PubMed

    Addo-Atuah, Joyce; Gourley, Dick; Gourley, Greta; White-Means, Shelley I; Womeodu, Robin J; Faris, Richard J; Addo, Nii Akwei

    2012-01-01

    The convenience of accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important for initial access to care and subsequent adherence to ART. We conducted a qualitative study of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and ART healthcare providers in Ghana in 2005. The objective of this study was to explore the participants' perceived convenience of accessing ART by PLWHA in Ghana. The convenience of accessing ART was evaluated from the reported travel and waiting times to receive care, the availability, or otherwise, of special considerations, with respect to the waiting time to receive care, for those PLWHA who were in active employment in the formal sector, the frequency of clinic visits before and after initiating ART, and whether the PLWHA saw the same or different providers at each clinic visit (continuity of care). This qualitative study used in-depth interviews based on Yin's case-study research design to collect data from 20 PLWHA and 24 ART healthcare providers as study participants. • Reported travel time to receive ART services ranged from 2 to 12 h for 30% of the PLWHA. • Waiting time to receive care was from 4 to 9 h. • While known government workers, such as teachers, were attended to earlier in some of the centres, this was not a consistent practice in all the four ART centres studied. • The PLWHA corroborated the providers' description of the procedure for initiating and monitoring ART in Ghana. • PLWHA did not see the same provider every time, but they were assured that this did not compromise the continuity of their care. Our study suggests that convenience of accessing ART is important to both PLWHA and ART healthcare providers, but the participants alluded to other factors, including open provider-patient communication, which might explain the PLWHA's understanding of the constraints under which they were receiving care. The current nation-wide coverage of the ART programme in Ghana, however, calls for the replication of this study to identify

  18. Antiretroviral treatment literacy among HIV voluntary counseling and testing clients in Moshi, Tanzania, 2003 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Landman, Keren Z; Thielman, Nathan M; Mgonja, Anna; Shao, Humphrey J; Itemba, Dafrosa K; Ndosi, Evelyn M; Tribble, Alison C; Shao, John F; Bartlett, John A; Crump, John A

    2007-03-01

    Antiretroviral treatment literacy leads to greater HIV testing and treatment and antiretroviral treatment adherence. Among northern Tanzanian subjects, antiretroviral treatment awareness was only 17%. Factors associated with low antiretroviral treatment literacy included having exchanged money or gifts for sex, living in rural areas, having more than 2 children, and having a primary education only. Previous HIV testing was protective against low antiretroviral treatment literacy. These results support refocusing HIV education efforts and increasing synergy between HIV prevention and treatment programs. PMID:17329501

  19. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  20. Alcohol use disorders and antiretroviral therapy among prisoners in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Michael; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Vázquez, Mariana; Altice, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While Argentina has significantly improved access to HIV care and antiretroviral therapy (ART) for both the general population and prisoners, the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among HIV-infected prisoners and their relationship to accessing ART in Argentina is currently unknown. This study aims to characterize the substance abuse patterns of HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and to assess the independent correlates of receipt of pre-incarceration ART. Design/methodology/approach An anonymous, cross-sectional survey of 100 HIV-infected federal prisoners was conducted in the Buenos Aires municipality from July–December 2010. AUDs were assessed using the AUDIT scale. Findings A majority (63 per cent) of participants met criteria for AUDs, 45 per cent of subjects were diagnosed with HIV in prison and one-quarter had initiated ART during the current incarceration. In addition, over one-third (35 per cent) of participants did not receive ART during the pre-incarceration period despite receiving it upon incarceration. This correlated significantly with the presence of having an AUD (AOR 0.20, 95 per cent CI 0.06–0.74, p = 0.016). Practical implications AUDs are prevalent among HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and are significantly related to negative secondary HIV prevention and treatment outcomes. While Argentina has provided an exemplary model of HIV-related health care reform within its prisons, future efforts to provide screening and treatment for AUDs are needed to improve the health of the nation’s incarcerated population. Originality/value This paper is the first to describe pre-incarceration drug and alcohol use disorders and issues related to access to ART among prisoners in Argentina. PMID:24772187

  1. High-Dose Vitamin D and Calcium Attenuates Bone Loss with Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Edgar Turner; Chan, Ellen S.; Brown, Todd T.; Tebas, Pablo; McComsey, Grace A.; Melbourne, Kathleen M.; Napoli, Andrew; Hardin, William Royce; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Yin, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation for HIV-1 infection is associated with 2-6% loss in bone mineral density (BMD). Objective To evaluate vitamin D3 (4000 IU daily) plus calcium (1000 mg calcium carbonate daily) supplementation on bone loss associated with ART initiation. Design 48-week prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Setting Thirty nine AIDS Clinical Trials Network research units. Participants ART-naïve HIV-infected adults. Measurements BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, parathyroid hormone (PTH), phosphate metabolism, markers of bone turnover and systemic inflammation. Results 165 eligible subjects were randomized (79 Vitamin D/calcium (VitD/Cal); 86 placebo); 142 subjects with evaluable DXA data were included in the primary analysis. The study arms were well-balanced at baseline: median age 33 years; 90% male; 33% non-Hispanic black; median CD4 count 341 cells/mm3; and median 25(OH)D 23 ng/mL (57 nmol/L). At 48 weeks, subjects receiving placebo had greater decline in total hip BMD than VitD/Cal: −3.19% median change (1st-3rd quartile (Q1, Q3) −5.12%, −1.02%) vs. (−1.46% −3.16%,−0.40%). respectively (p=0.001). Lumbar spine BMD loss for the two groups was similar: −2.91% (−4.84%, −1.06%) vs. −1.41% (−3.78%, 0.00%), (p=0.085). At week 48, 90% of participants achieved HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL. Levels of 25(OH)D3 increased in the VitD/Cal but not the placebo group: median change of 24.5 (14.6, 37.8) vs. 0.7 (−5.3, 4.3) ng/mL, respectively (p<0.001). Additionally, increases in markers of bone turnover were blunted in the VitD/Cal group. Limitations No international sites were included; only 48 weeks of follow up Conclusion Vitamin D/calcium supplementation mitigates the loss of BMD seen with initiation of efavirenz/emtricitabine/tenofovir, particularly at the total hip, which is the site of greatest concern for fragility fracture. Primary Funding

  2. Comparative efficacy versus effectiveness of initial antiretroviral therapy in clinical trials versus routine care

    PubMed Central

    Routman, Justin S.; Willig, James H.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Abroms, Sarah R.; Varshney, Mohit; Adusumilli, Sunil; Allison, Jeroan J.; Savage, Karen G.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited. The present study found similar first year virologic and CD4 outcomes among antiretroviral-naïve patients treated through routine care vs. those participating in clinical trials. Background The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited due to study eligibility criteria and volunteer bias. While well chronicled in many conditions, the efficacy vs. effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains understudied. Methods A retrospective study of the UAB 1917 Clinic Cohort evaluated naïve patients starting ART between 1/1/00–12/31/06. Patients received ART through clinical trials or routine care. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were fit to evaluate factors associated with virologic failure (VF=VL>50 copies/mL) and change from baseline CD4 count 6 and 12 months after ART initiation. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of missing data on outcomes. Results Among 570 patients starting ART during the study period, 121 (21%) enrolled in clinical trials vs. 449 (79%) receiving ART via routine care. ART receipt through routine care was not associated with VF at either 6 (OR=1.00;95%CI=0.54–1.86) or 12 (OR=1.56;95%CI=0.80–3.05) months in primary analyses. No significant differences in CD4 count responses at 6 and 12 months were observed. Conclusions Though marked differences in efficacy vs. effectiveness have been observed in the therapeutic outcomes of other conditions, our analyses found no evidence of such divergence among our patients initiating antiretroviral therapy for HIV. PMID:20067423

  3. [Clinical efficacy and tolerance of enfuvirtide (Fuzeon), new antiretroviral inhibitors of intracellular penetration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1].

    PubMed

    Raffi, François

    2004-09-01

    The TORO 1 and TORO 2 clinical trials compared the efficacy and safety of enfuvirtide in combination with an optimized background antiretroviral regimen and optimized background regimen alone in HIV-1 infected patients. The patients had had previous treatment with each of the three classes of antiretroviral drugs and had a plasma level of HIV-1 RNA above 5000 copies/ml at baseline. They were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either enfuvirtide (90 mg subcutaneously twice daily) plus a background regimen optimized with the aid of resistance testing, or an optimized antiretroviral regimen alone (control group). Six hundred and sixty-one patients were enrolled in the enfuvirtide arm and 334 in the control group. The median baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level was 5.2 log10 copies/ml in the enfuvirtide group and 5.1 log10 copies/ml in the control group. Patients had a median of 7 years of previous antiretroviral treatment. The optimized background regimen comprised a mean of 4 antiretroviral drugs in both groups. At week 48, the mean reduction in viral load was -1.48 log10 copies/ml in the enfuvirtide group, and -0.63 log10 copies/ml in the control group (difference = 0.846 log10 copies/ml, IC95%: -1.066; -0.626. p < 0.0001). The mean increase in the CD4+ cell count was significantly greater in the enfuvirtide group (91 cells/mm3) than in the control group (45 cells/mm3). Injection site reactions were the main reported adverse event which occurred in 98% of the enfuvirtide patients. Most had mild to moderate pain or discomfort not requiring analgesic or limiting usual activities. PMID:15742550

  4. Adherence to extended postpartum antiretrovirals is associated with decreased breastmilk HIV-1 transmission: Results of the BAN study

    PubMed Central

    DAVIS, Nicole L.; MILLER, William C.; HUDGENS, Michael G.; CHASELA, Charles S.; SICHALI, Dorothy; KAYIRA, Dumbani; NELSON, Julie A. E.; STRINGER, Jeffrey S. A.; ELLINGTON, Sascha R.; KOURTIS, Athena P.; JAMIESON, Denise J; VAN DER HORST, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimate association between postpartum antiretroviral adherence and breastmilk HIV-1 transmission Design Prospective cohort study Methods Mother-infant pairs were randomized after delivery to immediately begin receiving 28 weeks of either triple maternal antiretrovirals (zidovudine, lamivudine, and either nevirapine, nelfinavir, or lopinavir-ritonavir) or daily infant nevirapine as part of the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study. Associations between postpartum antiretroviral adherence and rate of breastmilk HIV-1 transmission were estimated using Cox models. We measured adherence over four postpartum time intervals using pill count, suspension bottle weight, and maternal self-report. Adherence was categorized and lagged by one interval. Missing adherence measures were multiply imputed. Infant HIV-1 infection was determined by DNA PCR every 2-6 weeks. The primary endpoint was infant HIV-1 infection by 38 weeks of age among infants alive and uninfected at 5 weeks. Results Analyses included 1479 mother-infant pairs and 45 transmission events. Using pill count and bottle weight information, 22-40% of mother-infant pairs at any given interval were <90% adherent. Having ≥90% adherence was associated with a 52% (95% CI 3-76%) relative reduction in the rate of breastmilk HIV-1 transmission, compared with having <90% adherence when controlling for study arm, breastfeeding status, and maternal characteristics. Complete case analysis rendered similar results (n=501; relative reduction 59%, 95% CI 6-82%). Conclusion Non-adherence to extended postpartum ART regimens in ‘real world’ settings is likely to be higher than that seen in BAN. Identifying mothers with difficulty adhering to antiretrovirals, and developing effective adherence interventions, will help maximize benefits of ARV provision throughout breastfeeding. PMID:25493600

  5. Preferential adherence to antiretroviral therapy over tuberculosis (TB) treatment: a qualitative study of drug–resistant TB/HIV co–infected patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Amrita; Padayatchi, Nesri; O’Donnell, Max

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and second–line antituberculosis medications is essential to achieve successful outcomes among individuals co–infected with HIV and multi or extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR–TB). In 2012–13, we designed a qualitative study to explore barriers to adherence in KwaZulu–Natal, South Africa. We conducted six focus groups comprising 23 adults receiving treatment for either MDR-TB (n=2) or XDR-TB (n=21); 17 were on concurrent ART. Participants expressed a preference for ART over M/XDR–TB treatment as a result of greater tolerability, lower pill burden, and a commitment to ART. Treatment outcomes and the social morbidity associated with M/XDR-TB, characterised by public notification, stigma, and social isolation, were perceived to be worse than with HIV. Poor communication, low patient involvement, and provider supervision of treatment exacerbated participants’ negative experiences with TB care. To improve adherence, it is critical that new regimens for drug-resistant TB be developed with better efficacy, lower pill burden, and fewer adverse effects. For the first time, such improved regimens are on the horizon. In parallel and equally important is the implementation of a cohesive approach that promotes patient involvement, empowerment, and treatment literacy for HIV and for TB. PMID:25035943

  6. Mobile phone technologies improve adherence to antiretroviral treatment in a resource-limited setting: a randomized controlled trial of text message reminders

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Eleches, Cristian; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Habyarimana, James P.; Zivin, Joshua G.; Goldstein, Markus P.; de Walque, Damien; MacKeen, Leslie; Haberer, Jessica; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Sidle, John; Ngare, Duncan; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective There is limited evidence on whether growing mobile phone availability in sub-Saharan Africa can be used to promote high adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study tested the efficacy of short message service (SMS) reminders on adherence to ART among patients attending a rural clinic in Kenya. Design A randomized controlled trial of four SMS reminder interventions with 48 weeks of follow-up. Methods Four hundred and thirty-one adult patients who had initiated ART within 3 months were enrolled and randomly assigned to a control group or one of the four intervention groups. Participants in the intervention groups received SMS reminders that were either short or long and sent at a daily or weekly frequency. Adherence was measured using the medication event monitoring system. The primary outcome was whether adherence exceeded 90% during each 12-week period of analysis and the 48-week study period. The secondary outcome was whether there were treatment interruptions lasting at least 48 h. Results In intention-to-treat analysis, 53% of participants receiving weekly SMS reminders achieved adherence of at least 90% during the 48 weeks of the study, compared with 40% of participants in the control group (P=0.03). Participants in groups receiving weekly reminders were also significantly less likely to experience treatment interruptions exceeding 48 h during the 48-week follow-up period than participants in the control group (81 vs. 90%, P = 0.03). Conclusion These results suggest that SMS reminders may be an important tool to achieve optimal treatment response in resource-limited settings. PMID:21252632

  7. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety. PMID:25721922

  8. Th1/17 Polarization of CD4 T Cells Supports HIV-1 Persistence during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Kim, Dhohyung; Li, Xiaodong; Kiselinova, Maja; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Shang, Hong; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Yu, Xu G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to persist long term in latently infected CD4 T cells represents a characteristic feature of HIV-1 infection and the predominant barrier to efforts aiming at viral eradication and cure. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that only small subsets of CD4 T cells with specific developmental and maturational profiles are able to effectively support HIV-1 long-term persistence. Here, we analyzed how the functional polarization of CD4 T cells shapes and structures the reservoirs of HIV-1-infected cells. We found that CD4 T cells enriched for a Th1/17 polarization had elevated susceptibilities to HIV-1 infection in ex vivo assays, harbored high levels of HIV-1 DNA in persons treated with antiretroviral therapy, and made a disproportionately increased contribution to the viral reservoir relative to their contribution to the CD4 T memory cell pool. Moreover, HIV-1 DNA levels in Th1/17 cells remained stable over many years of antiretroviral therapy, resulting in a progressively increasing contribution of these cells to the viral reservoir, and phylogenetic studies suggested preferential long-term persistence of identical viral sequences during prolonged antiretroviral treatment in this cell compartment. Together, these data suggest that Th1/17 CD4 T cells represent a preferred site for HIV-1 DNA long-term persistence in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Current antiretroviral therapy is very effective in suppressing active HIV-1 replication but does not fully eliminate virally infected cells. The ability of HIV-1 to persist long term despite suppressive antiretroviral combination therapy represents a perplexing aspect of HIV-1 disease pathogenesis, since most HIV-1 target cells are activated, short-lived CD4 T cells. This study suggests that CD4 T helper cells with Th1/17 polarization have a preferential role as a long-term reservoir for HIV-1 infection during antiretroviral therapy, possibly because these cells may imitate some of the

  9. Tuberculosis treatment and risk of stavudine substitution in first line antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Westreich, Daniel J.; Sanne, Ian; Maskew, Mhairi; Malope-Kgokong, Babatyi; Conradie, Francesca; Majuba, Pappie; Funk, Michele Jonsson; Kaufman, Jay S.; Van Rie, Annelies; MacPhail, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment for tuberculosis (TB) is common among individuals receiving stavudine-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), but the effect of TB treatment on stavudine toxicity has received little attention. We estimated the effect of TB treatment on risk of stavudine substitution among individuals receiving first-line HAART. Methods We evaluated a cohort of 7,066 patients who initiated HAART between April 2004 and March 2007 in Johannesburg, South Africa. Three exposure categories were considered: ongoing TB treatment at HAART initiation; concurrent initiation of TB treatment and HAART; incident TB treatment after HAART initiation. The outcome was single-drug stavudine substitution. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were estimated using marginal structural models to control for confounding, loss to follow-up, and competing risks. Results Individuals with ongoing and concurrent TB treatment were at increased risk of stavudine substitution, irrespective of stavudine dose. For ongoing TB treatment, aHR was 3.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.82-5.56) in the first two months of HAART, 2.51 (95% CI 1.77-3.54) in months 3-6, and 1.19 (95% CI 0.94-1.52) thereafter. For concurrent TB treatment, aHR was 6.60 (95% CI 3.03-14.37) in the first two months,1.88 (95% CI 0.87-4.09) in months 3-6, and 1.07 (95% CI 0.65-1.76) thereafter. There was no effect of incident TB on stavudine substitution risk. Conclusions Risk of stavudine substitution was increased among patients receiving TB treatment, especially soon after HAART initiation. In settings where alternative antiretroviral drugs are available, initiation of stavudine in patients receiving TB treatment may need to be reconsidered. PMID:19385733

  10. Adherence to HIV antiretrovirals among persons with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn J; Kanouse, David E; Koegel, Paul; Sullivan, Greer

    2003-04-01

    Despite the absence of empirical evidence, serious mental illness is assumed to be a high risk factor for nonadherence to HIV antiretroviral regimens. To assess antiretroviral adherence among persons with serious mental illness, we conducted a study in which adherence was observed over a 2-week period with electronic monitoring bottle caps and self-report. Forty-seven participants enrolled, with all but two (96%) completing the study. Psychiatric diagnoses included bipolar depression (n = 24), schizophrenia (n = 12), schizoaffective disorder (n = 5), and major depression with psychotic features (n = 6). Mean adherence (proportion of prescribed doses taken) was 66% (standard deviation [SD] = 34), as measured by electronic monitoring; 40% demonstrated at least 90% adherence, but 31% had less than 50% adherence. Self-reported adherence to psychotropics was moderately correlated with self-reported (r = 0.45, p < 0.05) and electronically monitored (r = 0.39, p < 0.05) antiretroviral adherence. Viral load (log(10)) was negatively correlated with electronically monitored (r = -0.28, p < 0.10) and self-reported (r = -0.39, p < 0.05) antiretroviral adherence, after controlling for the length of time on treatment. These findings suggest that many patients with serious mental illness are able to adhere very well to antiretroviral regimens, yet a substantial proportion of our sample displayed poor adherence, indicating the need for research to further assess the factors that influence adherence to antiretrovirals in this population. PMID:12737641

  11. Highly active antiretroviral treatment for the prevention of HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 an estimated 33 million people were living with HIV; 67% resided in sub-Saharan Africa, with 35% in eight countries alone. In 2007, there were about 1.4 million HIV-positive tuberculosis cases. Globally, approximately 4 million people had been given highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) by the end of 2008, but in 2007, an estimated 6.7 million were still in need of HAART and 2.7 million more became infected with HIV. Although there has been unprecedented investment in confronting HIV/AIDS - the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS estimates $13.8 billion was spent in 2008 - a key challenge is how to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic given limited and potentially shrinking resources. Economic disparities may further exacerbate human rights issues and widen the increasingly divergent approaches to HIV prevention, care and treatment. HIV transmission only occurs from people with HIV, and viral load is the single greatest risk factor for all modes of transmission. HAART can lower viral load to nearly undetectable levels. Prevention of mother to child transmission offers proof of the concept of HAART interrupting transmission, and observational studies and previous modelling work support using HAART for prevention. Although knowing one's HIV status is key for prevention efforts, it is not known with certainty when to start HAART. Building on previous modelling work, we used an HIV/AIDS epidemic of South African intensity to explore the impact of testing all adults annually and starting persons on HAART immediately after they are diagnosed as HIV positive. This theoretical strategy would reduce annual HIV incidence and mortality to less than one case per 1000 people within 10 years and it would reduce the prevalence of HIV to less than 1% within 50 years. To explore HAART as a prevention strategy, we recommend further discussions to explore human rights and ethical considerations, clarify research priorities and review feasibility and acceptability

  12. Work-Related Barriers and Facilitators to Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Persons Living with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Madriz, Gilberto; Lerner, Debra; Ruthazer, Robin; Rogers, William H.; Wilson, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how the structure of work affects adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy. We surveyed participants in an adherence intervention study to learn more about job characteristics, including measures of psychological demand and control, and job accommodations. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Of 156 trial subjects, 69 were employed, and these 69 made 229 study visits. Psychological demands and control were unrelated to adherence, but the presence of workplace accommodations was significantly associated with adherence (p <0.05). In multivariable models adjusting for clustering, those who reported having received an accommodation were 12% more adherent than those who did not receive an accommodation. Adherence was unrelated to experiencing side effects affecting work performance. Having the ability to institute job accommodations was more important to adherence than the psychosocial structure of the work. These potential benefits of requesting modifications need to be weighed against the possible risks of workplace disclosure. PMID:20091340

  13. Antiretroviral Regimens in Pregnancy and Breast-Feeding in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, R.L.; Hughes, M.D.; Ogwu, A.; Kitch, D.; Lockman, S.; Moffat, C.; Makhema, J.; Moyo, S.; Thior, I.; McIntosh, K.; van Widenfelt, E.; Leidner, J.; Powis, K.; Asmelash, A.; Tumbare, E.; Zwerski, S.; Sharma, U.; Handelsman, E.; Mburu, K.; Jayeoba, O.; Moko, E.; Souda, S.; Lubega, E.; Akhtar, M.; Wester, C.; Tuomola, R.; Snowden, W.; Martinez-Tristani, M.; Mazhani, L.; Essex, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The most effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in pregnancy and its efficacy during breast-feeding are unknown. METHODS We randomly assigned 560 HIV-1–infected pregnant women (CD4+ count, ≥200 cells per cubic millimeter) to receive coformulated abacavir, zidovudine, and lamivudine (the nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor [NRTI] group) or lopinavir–ritonavir plus zidovudine-lamivudine (the protease-inhibitor group) from 26 to 34 weeks’ gestation through planned weaning by 6 months post partum. A total of 170 women with CD4+ counts of less than 200 cells per cubic millimeter received nevirapine plus zidovudine–lamivudine (the observational group). Infants received single-dose nevirapine and 4 weeks of zidovudine. RESULTS The rate of virologic suppression to less than 400 copies per milliliter was high and did not differ significantly among the three groups at delivery (96% in the NRTI group, 93% in the protease-inhibitor group, and 94% in the observational group) or throughout the breast-feeding period (92% in the NRTI group, 93% in the protease-inhibitor group, and 95% in the observational group). By 6 months of age, 8 of 709 live-born infants (1.1%) were infected (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5 to 2.2): 6 were infected in utero (4 in the NRTI group, 1 in the protease-inhibitor group, and 1 in the observational group), and 2 were infected during the breast-feeding period (in the NRTI group). Treatment-limiting adverse events occurred in 2% of women in the NRTI group, 2% of women in the protease-inhibitor group, and 11% of women in the observational group. CONCLUSIONS All regimens of HAART from pregnancy through 6 months post partum resulted in high rates of virologic suppression, with an overall rate of mother-to-child transmission of 1.1%. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00270296.) PMID:20554983

  14. Integration of Antiretroviral Therapy with Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grobler, Anneke; Padayatchi, Nesri; Baxter, Cheryl; Gray, Andrew L.; Gengiah, Tanuja; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Naidoo, Anushka; Jithoo, Niraksha; Nair, Gonasagrie; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Friedland, Gerald; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported that integrating antiretroviral therapy (ART) with tuberculosis treatment reduces mortality. However, optimal time to initiate ART during tuberculosis treatment remains contentious. Methods To address this, we conducted a 3-arm, open-label randomized controlled trial in South Africa in acid-fast bacilli smear positive patients (n=642) with HIV and CD4+ counts <500 cells/mm3. Findings on the early therapy group (ART initiated within 4 weeks of tuberculosis treatment initiation, n=214) and late therapy group (ART initiated within the first 4 weeks of the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment, n=215) are presented here. Results Median CD4+ count and viral load at baseline was 150 cells/mm3 and 161000 copies/ml, being similar in both groups. Incidence rate of AIDS or death was 6.9 (18/259.4) and 7.8 (19/244.2) per 100 person-years in the early and late therapy groups respectively (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR)=0.89; 95%Confidence Interval (95%CI): 0.44,1.79; P=0.73). However, in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3, the incidence rates of AIDS or death were 8.5 (early) and 26.3 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=0.32; 95%CI: 0.07,1.13; P=0.06). Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) incidence rates were 20.2 (early) and 7.7 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=2.62; 95%CI: 1.48,4.82; P<0.001). Adverse events requiring antiretroviral drug switches occurred in 10 (early) and 1 (late) patients (P=0.006). Conclusions The benefits of AIDS-free survival balanced against the risks of IRIS and ART-related adverse events, support early ART initiation in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3 and deferred ART initiation to the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment when CD4+ counts are higher. PMID:22010915

  15. Effects of combination antiretroviral therapies on the risk for myocardial infarction among HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Emily S.; Napravnik, Sonia; Eron, Joseph J; Stalzer, Brant; Floris-Moore, Michelle; Simpson, Ross J; Stürmer, Til

    2014-01-01

    Background Cohort studies have demonstrated greater risk of myocardial infarction (MI) associated with specific antiretroviral use, while meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials have not. These differences may be due to inherent biases in the observational study design or to the limited duration of randomized trials. We conducted a new-user, active-comparator cohort study emulating a randomized controlled trial comparing initiation of several antiretrovirals as part of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and MI. Methods We included North Carolina (NC) Medicaid beneficiaries infected with HIV between 2002 and 2008 who were previously untreated with cART. We compared hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of MI between abacavir and tenofovir recipients, and lopinavir-ritonavir or atazanavir recipients and non-nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase-inhibitor (NNRTI) recipients. We adjusted for confounding through inverse-probability-weighting methods. Results There were 3,481 NC Medicaid new cART recipients who contributed 6,399 person-years and experienced 38 MI events. Receiving abacavir compared with tenofovir as part of cART was associated with an increased rate of MI unadjusted (HR= 2.70 [95% CI= 1.24 - 5.91]; HR= 2.05 [0.72 - 5.86]). Point estimates also suggest a relationship between receipt of atazanavir or lopinavir-ritonavir compared with an NNRTI and MI, although, estimates were imprecise. Conclusions We found an increased rate of MI among patients initiating abacavir compared with tenofovir although the association was decreased after confounding adjustment. Without a very large prospective comparative clinical trial, a much larger observational study of patients initiating cART would be needed to better define this apparent association. PMID:24713880

  16. Antiretroviral procurement and supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Ripin, David J; Jamieson, David; Meyers, Amy; Warty, Umesh; Dain, Mary; Khamsi, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Procurement, the country-level process of ordering antiretrovirals (ARVs), and supply chain management, the mechanism by which they are delivered to health-care facilities, are critical processes required to move ARVs from manufacturers to patients. To provide a glimpse into the ARV procurement and supply chain, the following pages provide an overview of the primary stakeholders, principal operating models, and policies and regulations involved in ARV procurement. Also presented are key challenges that need to be addressed to ensure that the supply chain is not a barrier to the goal of universal coverage. This article will cover the steps necessary to order and distribute ARVs, including different models of delivery, key stakeholders involved, strategic considerations that vary depending on context and policies affecting them. The single drug examples given illustrate the complications inherent in fragmented supply and demand-driven models of procurement and supply chain management, and suggest tools for navigating these hurdles that will ultimately result in more secure and reliable ARV provision. Understanding the dynamics of ARV supply chain is important for the global health community, both to ensure full and efficient treatment of persons living with HIV as well as to inform the supply chain decisions for other public health products. PMID:25310145

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir. PMID:25860317

  18. Antiretroviral Refill Adherence Correlates with, But Poorly Predicts Retention in HIV Care.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Robert A; Frasca, Katherine; Swift, Lyles; Sha, Daohang; Bilker, Warren B; Bamford, Laura; Yehia, Baligh R; Gross, Robert

    2016-05-01

    If antiretroviral refill adherence could predict non-retention in care, it could be clinically useful. In a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults in Philadelphia between October 2012 and April 2013, retention in care was measured by show versus no-show at an index visit. Three measures of adherence were defined per person: (1) percent of doses taken for two refills nearest index visit, (2) days late for last refill before index visit, and (3) longest gap between any two refills. Of 393 patients, 108 (27.4 %) no-showed. Adherence was higher in the show group on all measures with longest gap having the greatest difference: 40 days (IQR 33-56) in the show versus 47 days (IQR 38-69) in the no-show group, p < 0.001. Yet, no cut-points of adherence adequately predicted show versus no-show. Antiretroviral adherence being associated, but a poor predictor of retention suggests that these two behaviors are related but distinct phenomena. PMID:26400078

  19. Nearly Full Employment Recovery Among South African HIV Patients On Antiretroviral Therapy: Evidence From A Large Population Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Jacob; Tanser, Frank; Newell, Marie-Louise; Bärnighausen, Till

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy for HIV may have important economic benefits for patients and their households. We quantified the impact of HIV treatment on employment status among HIV patients in rural South Africa who were enrolled in a public-sector HIV treatment program supported by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. We linked clinical data from more than 2000 patients in the treatment program with ten years of longitudinal socioeconomic data from a complete community-based population cohort of over 30,000 adults residing in the clinical catchment area. We estimated the employment effects of HIV treatment in fixed effects regressions. Four years after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, employment among HIV patients had recovered to about 90 percent of baseline rates observed in the same patients three to five years before they started treatment. Many patients initiated treatment early enough that they were able to avoid any loss of employment due to HIV. These results represent the first estimates of employment recovery among HIV patients in a general population, relative to the employment levels that these patients had prior to job-threatening illness and the decision to seek care. We find large economic benefits to HIV treatment. For some patients, further gains could be obtained from initiating antiretroviral therapy earlier, prior to HIV-related job loss. PMID:22778335

  20. Alarming attrition rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-antiretroviral therapy care in Myanmar, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myo Minn; Gupta, Vivek; Aung, Thet Ko; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Oo, Htun Nyunt; Kumar, Ajay MV

    2016-01-01

    Background High retention rates have been documented among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Myanmar. However, there is no information on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in care before initiation of ART (pre-ART care). We assessed attrition (loss-to-follow-up [LTFU] and death) rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-ART care and their associated factors over a 4-year period. Design In this retrospective cohort study, we extracted routinely collected data of HIV-infected adults (>15 years old) entering pre-ART care (June 2011–June 2014) as part of an Integrated HIV Care (IHC) programme, Myanmar. Attrition rates per 100 person-years and cumulative incidence of attrition were calculated. Factors associated with attrition were examined by calculating hazard ratios (HRs). Results Of 18,037 HIV-infected adults enrolled in the IHC programme, 11,464 (63%) entered pre-ART care (60% men, mean age 37 years, median cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count 160 cells/µL). Of the 11,464 eligible participants, 3,712 (32%) underwent attrition of which 43% were due to deaths and 57% were due to LTFU. The attrition rate was 78 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 75–80). The cumulative incidence of attrition was 70% at the end of a 4-year follow-up, of which nearly 90% occurred in the first 6 months. Male sex (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4–1.6), WHO clinical Stage 3 and 4, CD4 count <200 cells/µL, abnormal BMI, and anaemia were statistically significant predictors of attrition. Conclusions Pre-ART care attrition among persons living with HIV in Myanmar was alarmingly high – with most attrition occurring within the first 6 months. Strategies aimed at improving early HIV diagnosis and initiation of ART are needed. Suggestions include comprehensive nutrition support and intensified monitoring to prevent pre-ART care attrition by tracking patients who do not return for pre-ART care appointments. It is high time that Myanmar moves towards a

  1. Predictors of impaired renal function among HIV infected patients commencing highly active antiretroviral therapy in Jos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agbaji, Oche O.; Onu, Adamu; Agaba, Patricia E.; Muazu, Muhammad A.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Idoko, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection even in the era of antiretroviral therapy, with kidney function being abnormal in up to 30% of HIV-infected patients. We determined the predictors of impaired renal function in HIV-infected adults initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study among HIV-1 infected patients attending the antiretroviral clinic at the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), between November 2005 and November 2007. Data were analysed for age, gender, weight, WHO clinical stage, CD4 count, HIV-1 RNA viral load, HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody status. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Statistical analysis was done using Epi Info 3.5.1. Results: Data for 491 (294 females and 197 males) eligible patients were abstracted. The mean age of this population was 38.8±8.87 years. One hundred and seventeen patients (23.8%; 95% CI, 20.2-27.9%) had a reduced eGFR (defined as <60 mL/min), with more females than males (28.6% vs. 16.8%; P=0.02) having reduced eGFR. Age and female sex were found to have significant associations with reduced eGFR. Adjusted odds ratios were 1.07 (95% CI, 1.04, 1.10) and 1.96 (95% CI, 1.23, 3.12) for age and female sex, respectively. Conclusions: Older age and female sex are independently associated with a higher likelihood of having lower eGFRs at initiation of HAART among our study population. We recommend assessment of renal function of HIV-infected patients prior to initiation of HAART to guide the choice and dosing of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:22083208

  2. Spaceborne receivers: Basic principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principles of operation of microwave receivers for space observations of planetary surfaces were examined. The design philosophy of the receiver as it is applied to operate functionally as an efficient receiving system, the principle of operation of the key components of the receiver, and the important differences among receiver types are explained. The operating performance and the sensitivity expectations for both the modulated and total power receiver configurations are outlined. The expressions are derived from first principles and are developed through the important intermediate stages to form practicle and easily applied equations. The transfer of thermodynamic energy from point to point within the receiver is illustrated. The language of microwave receivers is applied statistics.

  3. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  4. Management of HIV/AIDS in older patients–drug/drug interactions and adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Mary J; Zeuli, John D; Kasten, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer with their disease, as HIV has become a chronic illness managed with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This has led to an increasing number of patients greater than 50 years old living successfully with HIV. As the number of older adults with HIV has increased, there are special considerations for the management of HIV. Older adults with HIV must be monitored for drug side effects and toxicities. Their other non-HIV comorbidities should also be considered when choosing a cART regimen. Older adults with HIV have unique issues related to medication compliance. They are more likely than the younger HIV patients to have vision loss, cognitive impairment, and polypharmacy. They may have lower expectations of their overall health status. Depression and financial concerns, especially if they are on a fixed income, may also contribute to noncompliance in the aging HIV population. PMID:26604826

  5. Influence of antiretroviral treatment on quality of life in seropositive inmates.

    PubMed

    del Castillo, L Sordo; Ruiz-Pérez, I; de Labry-Lima, A Olry; Soto-Blanco, J M; Girela-López, E; Castro-Recio, J M; Antón-Basanta, J J

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of antiretroviral treatment on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of three groups of HIV-positive inmates: those who are taking antiretroviral treatment, those who are not on treatment as it has not yet been indicated, and those who refuse to take treatment even though it has been recommended. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 585 HIV+ inmates in three prisons. The response variable was HRQOL. Independent variables were: sociodemographic variables, psychosocial and drug-related variables. Two multivariate linear regression models were constructed in order to determine the HRQOL, physical health score (PHS) and mental health score (MHS), for each of the three groups identified, using patients who refused treatment as the reference category. Patients who refused therapy had a lower MHS compared with patients in whom treatment was not indicated (P = 0.038). With regard to PHS, patients refusing therapy had a lower score than patients who were not indicated therapy (P = 0.005), and than patients receiving therapy (P = 0.010). PMID:18397557

  6. Antiretroviral Resistance and Pregnancy Characteristics of Women with Perinatal and Nonperinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Lazenby, Gweneth B; Mmeje, Okeoma; Fisher, Barbra M; Weinberg, Adriana; Aaron, Erika K; Keating, Maria; Luque, Amneris E; Willers, Denise; Cohan, Deborah; Money, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare HIV drug resistance in pregnant women with perinatal HIV (PHIV) and those with nonperinatal HIV (NPHIV) infection. Methods. We conducted a multisite cohort study of PHIV and NPHIV women from 2000 to 2014. Sample size was calculated to identify a fourfold increase in antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance in PHIV women. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Categorical variables were compared using χ (2) and Fisher's exact tests. Univariate analysis was used to determine factors associated with antiretroviral drug resistance. Results. Forty-one PHIV and 41 NPHIV participants were included. Women with PHIV were more likely to have drug resistance than those with NPHIV ((55% versus 17%, p = 0.03), OR 6.0 (95% CI 1.0-34.8), p = 0.05), including multiclass resistance (15% versus 0, p = 0.03), and they were more likely to receive nonstandard ARVs during pregnancy (27% versus 5%, p = 0.01). PHIV and NPHIV women had similar rates of preterm birth (11% versus 28%, p = 0.08) and cesarean delivery (47% versus 46%, p = 0.9). Two infants born to a single NPHIV woman acquired HIV infection. Conclusions. PHIV women have a high frequency of HIV drug resistance mutations, leading to nonstandard ARVs use during pregnancy. Despite nonstandard ARV use during pregnancy, PHIV women did not experience increased rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27413359

  7. Antiretroviral Resistance and Pregnancy Characteristics of Women with Perinatal and Nonperinatal HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mmeje, Okeoma; Fisher, Barbra M.; Weinberg, Adriana; Aaron, Erika K.; Keating, Maria; Luque, Amneris E.; Willers, Denise; Cohan, Deborah; Money, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare HIV drug resistance in pregnant women with perinatal HIV (PHIV) and those with nonperinatal HIV (NPHIV) infection. Methods. We conducted a multisite cohort study of PHIV and NPHIV women from 2000 to 2014. Sample size was calculated to identify a fourfold increase in antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistance in PHIV women. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Categorical variables were compared using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. Univariate analysis was used to determine factors associated with antiretroviral drug resistance. Results. Forty-one PHIV and 41 NPHIV participants were included. Women with PHIV were more likely to have drug resistance than those with NPHIV ((55% versus 17%, p = 0.03), OR 6.0 (95% CI 1.0–34.8), p = 0.05), including multiclass resistance (15% versus 0, p = 0.03), and they were more likely to receive nonstandard ARVs during pregnancy (27% versus 5%, p = 0.01). PHIV and NPHIV women had similar rates of preterm birth (11% versus 28%, p = 0.08) and cesarean delivery (47% versus 46%, p = 0.9). Two infants born to a single NPHIV woman acquired HIV infection. Conclusions. PHIV women have a high frequency of HIV drug resistance mutations, leading to nonstandard ARVs use during pregnancy. Despite nonstandard ARV use during pregnancy, PHIV women did not experience increased rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27413359

  8. HIV-1 Alters Intestinal Expression of Drug Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Implications for Antiretroviral Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Kis, Olena; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hoque, M Tozammel; Walmsley, Sharon L; Dandekar, Satya; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the expression of intestinal drug efflux transporters, i.e., P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs), in the human upper intestinal tract. Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from HIV-negative healthy volunteers, ART-naive HIV-positive (HIV(+)) subjects, and HIV(+) subjects receiving ART (10 in each group). Intestinal tissue expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was examined by microarray, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry analyses. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly lower expression of CYP3A4 and ABCC2/MRP2 in the HIV(+) ART-naive group than in uninfected subjects. qPCR analysis confirmed significantly lower expression of ABCC2/MRP2 in ART-naive subjects than in the control group, while CYP3A4 and ABCG2/BCRP showed a trend toward decreased expression. Protein expression of MRP2 and BCRP was also significantly lower in the HIV(+) naive group than in the control group and was partially restored to baseline levels in HIV(+) subjects receiving ART. In contrast, gene and protein expression of ABCB1/Pgp was significantly increased in HIV(+) subjects on ART relative to HIV(+) ART-naive subjects. These data demonstrate that the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters is significantly altered in therapy-naive HIV(+) subjects and in those receiving ART. Since CYP3A4, Pgp, MRPs, and BCRP metabolize or transport many antiretroviral drugs, their altered expression with HIV infection may negatively impact drug pharmacokinetics in HIV(+) subjects. This has clinical implications when using data from healthy volunteers to guide ART. PMID:26902756

  9. Cholelithiasis and Nephrolithiasis in HIV-Positive Patients in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Yin; Liao, Sih-Han; Liu, Wen-Chun; Cheng, Aristine; Lin, Shu-Wen; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Tsai, Mao-Song; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Wu, Mon-Ro; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to describe the epidemiology and risk factors of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis among HIV-positive patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of HIV-positive patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography for chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver, or elevated aminotransferases between January 2004 and January 2015. Therapeutic drug monitoring of plasma concentrations of atazanavir was performed and genetic polymorphisms, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1*28 and multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) G2677T/A, were determined in a subgroup of patients who received ritonavir-boosted or unboosted atazanavir-containing combination antiretroviral therapy. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and laboratory testing were collected and analyzed. Results During the 11-year study period, 910 patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography were included for analysis. The patients were mostly male (96.9%) with a mean age of 42.2 years and mean body-mass index of 22.9 kg/m2 and 85.8% being on antiretroviral therapy. The anchor antiretroviral agents included non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (49.3%), unboosted atazanavir (34.4%), ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (20.4%), and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (5.5%). The overall prevalence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 12.5% and 8.2%, respectively. Among 680 antiretroviral-experienced patients with both baseline and follow-up sonography, the crude incidence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the independent factors associated with incident cholelithiasis were exposure to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir for >2 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–35.16) and older age (AOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00–1.09). The positive association between duration of exposure to ritonavir

  10. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  11. Factors influencing global antiretroviral procurement prices

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral medicines (ARVs) are one of the most costly parts of HIV/AIDS treatment. Many countries are struggling to provide universal access to ARVs for all people living with HIV and AIDS. Although substantial price reductions of ARVs have occurred, especially between 2002 and 2008, achieving sustainable access for the next several decades remains a major challenge for most low- and middle-income countries. The objectives of the present study were twofold: first, to analyze global ARV prices between 2005 and 2008 and associated factors, particularly procurement methods and key donor policies on ARV procurement efficiency; second, to discuss the options of procurement processes and policies that should be considered when implementing or reforming access to ARV programs. Methods An ARV-medicines price-analysis was carried out using the Global Price Reporting Mechanism from the World Health Organization. For a selection of 12 ARVs, global median prices and price variation were calculated. Linear regression models for each ARV were used to identify factors that were associated with lower procurement prices. Logistic regression models were used to identify the characteristics of those countries which procure below the highest and lowest direct manufactured costs. Results Three key factors appear to have an influence on a country's ARV prices: (a) whether the product is generic or not; (b) the socioeconomic status of the country; (c) whether the country is a member of the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative. Factors which did not influence procurement below the highest direct manufactured costs were HIV prevalence, procurement volume, whether the country belongs to the least developed countries or a focus country of the United States President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief. Conclusion One of the principal mechanisms that can help to lower prices for ARV over the next several decades is increasing procurement efficiency. Benchmarking prices could be one useful

  12. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  13. Effects of nutritional supplementation for HIV patients starting antiretroviral treatment: randomised controlled trial in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Kæstel, Pernille; Tesfaye, Markos; Yilma, Daniel; Girma, Tsinuel; Wells, Jonathan C K; Ritz, Christian; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F; Zerfu, Dilnesaw; Brage, Søren; Andersen, Åse B; Friis, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effects of lipid based nutritional supplements with either whey or soy protein in patients with HIV during the first three months of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and to explore effects of timing by comparing supplementation at the start of ART and after three months delay. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Three public ART facilities in Jimma, Oromia region, Ethiopia. Participants Adults with HIV eligible for ART with body mass index (BMI) >16. Intervention Daily supplementation with 200 g (4600 kJ) of supplement containing whey or soy during either the first three or the subsequent three months of ART. Outcome measures Primary: lean body mass assessed with deuterium dilution, grip strength measured with dynamometers, and physical activity measured with accelerometer and heart rate monitors. Secondary: viral load and CD4 counts. Auxiliary: weight and CD3 and CD8 counts. Results Of 318 patients enrolled, 210 (66%) were women, mean age was 33 (SD 9), and mean BMI was 19.5 (SD 2.4). At three months, participants receiving the supplements containing whey or soy had increased their lean body mass by 0.85 kg (95% confidence interval 0.16 kg to 1.53 kg) and 0.97 kg (0.29 kg to 1.64 kg), respectively, more than controls. This was accompanied by an increased gain of grip strength of 0.68 kg (−0.11 kg to 1.46 kg) for the whey supplement group and 0.93 kg (0.16 kg to 1.70 kg) for the soy supplement group. There were no effects on physical activity. Total weight gain increased by 2.05 kg (1.12 kg to 2.99 kg) and 2.06 kg (1.14 kg to 2.97 kg) for the whey and soy groups, respectively. In addition, in the whey supplement group overall CD3 counts improved by 150 cells/µL (24 to 275 cells/µL), of which 112 cells/µL (15 to 209 cells/µL) were CD8 and 25 cells/µL (−2 to 53 cells/µL) were CD4. Effects of the soy containing supplement on immune recovery were not significant. The effects of the two supplements, however, were not

  14. The (political) economics of antiretroviral treatment in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nattrass, Nicoli J

    2008-12-01

    Despite unprecedented international mobilisation to support universal provision of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), national governments continue to play the key role in determining access to treatment. Whereas some AIDS-affected countries have performed as well as or better than expected given their level of development, institutional characteristics and demographic challenges (e.g. Thailand and Brazil), others (notably South Africa) have not. This article argues that the 'economics' of antiretroviral drug delivery is at heart a political-economy of access to treatment. It depends on commitment on the part of national governments to negotiate with pharmaceutical companies over patented antiretroviral drug prices, on their policy towards compulsory licensing, and on the approach they adopt to delivering HAART. Civil society has an important role to play in encouraging governments to become, and remain, committed to taking action to ensure sustainable and widespread access to HAART. PMID:18964022

  15. Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Among Children and Youth in the United States With Perinatal HIV.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Russell B; Patel, Kunjal; Kagan, Ron M; Karalius, Brad; Traite, Shirley; Meyer, William A; Tassiopoulos, Katherine K; Seage, George R; Seybolt, Lorna M; Burchett, Sandra; Hazra, Rohan

    2016-07-01

    Among 234 US youths with perinatal human immunodeficiency virus, 75% had antiretroviral resistance, substantially higher than that of the reference laboratory overall (36%-44%). Resistance to newer antiretrovirals and to all antiretrovirals in a class was uncommon. The only factor independently associated with future resistance was a higher peak viral load. PMID:27056398

  16. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C; Rivera-Morales, Lydia G; Garcia-Campos, Jorge; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Paredes, Roger; Vielma-Ramirez, Herlinda J; Ramirez, Teresa J; Chavez-Garcia, Marcelino; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Luz M; Vazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI) are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM's) at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies) could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM's in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM's during STI. PMID:26807922

  17. Pre-antiretroviral therapy serum selenium concentrations predict WHO stages 3, 4 or death but not virologic failure post-antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Gupte, Nikhil; Yang, Wei-Teng; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Tang, Alice M; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Riviere, Cynthia; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R; Cardoso, Sandra W; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Semba, Richard D; Christian, Parul; Campbell, Thomas B; Gupta, Amita

    2014-11-01

    A case-cohort study, within a multi-country trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings (PEARLS)), was conducted to determine if pre-ART serum selenium deficiency is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression after ART initiation. Cases were HIV-1 infected adults with either clinical failure (incident World Health Organization (WHO) stage 3, 4 or death by 96 weeks) or virologic failure by 24 months. Risk factors for serum selenium deficiency (<85 μg/L) pre-ART and its association with outcomes were examined. Median serum selenium concentration was 82.04 μg/L (Interquartile range (IQR): 57.28-99.89) and serum selenium deficiency was 53%, varying widely by country from 0% to 100%. In multivariable models, risk factors for serum selenium deficiency were country, previous tuberculosis, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Serum selenium deficiency was not associated with either clinical failure or virologic failure in multivariable models. However, relative to people in the third quartile (74.86-95.10 μg/L) of serum selenium, we observed increased hazards (adjusted hazards ratio (HR): 3.50; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.30-9.42) of clinical failure but not virologic failure for people in the highest quartile. If future studies confirm this relationship of high serum selenium with increased clinical failure, a cautious approach to selenium supplementation might be needed, especially in HIV-infected populations with sufficient or unknown levels of selenium. PMID:25401501

  18. Antiretroviral treatment adherence as a mediating factor between psychosocial variables and HIV viral load.

    PubMed

    Attonito, Jennifer; Dévieux, Jessy G; Lerner, Brenda D G; Hospital, Michelle M; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors may directly impact HIV health measures such as viral load (VL) whether or not patients are taking antiretroviral treatment (ART) consistently. Structural equation modeling plus Baron and Kenny's (1986) four-step approach were used to test a mediated model predicting VL among 246 HIV-infected adults who were on ART. Exogenous variables were social support, barriers to adherence, and stress. Moderators were alcohol use, marijuana use, and neurocognitive impairment. A small positive association between marijuana use and ART adherence approached significance. Only barriers to adherence predicted a decrease in adherence rates and an increase in VL. No other factors were significantly associated with either VL or adherence, and no interaction effects between exogenous variables and moderators were identified. The association between barriers to adherence and VL was partially mediated by ART adherence. Findings provide modest support for a direct link between psychosocial variables and a virologic response to ART. PMID:25305029

  19. Antiretroviral treatment adherence as a mediating factor between psychosocial variables and HIV viral load

    PubMed Central

    Attonito, Jennifer; Dévieux, Jessy G.; Lerner, Brenda D. G.; Hospital, Michelle M.; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors may directly impact HIV health measures such as viral load (VL), whether or not patients are taking antiretroviral treatment (ART) consistently. Structural equation modeling plus Baron and Kenny’s (1986) four-step approach were used to test a mediated model predicting VL among 246 HIV-infected adults who were on ART. Exogenous variables were social support, barriers to adherence, and stress. Moderators were alcohol use, marijuana use, and neurocognitive impairment. A small positive association between marijuana use and ART adherence approached significance. Only barriers to adherence predicted a decrease in adherence rates and an increase in VL. No other factors were significantly associated with either VL or adherence and no interaction effects between exogenous variables and moderators were identified. The association between barriers to adherence and VL was partially mediated by ART adherence. Findings provide modest support for a direct link between psychosocial variables and a virologic response to ART. PMID:25305029

  20. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART. PMID:26346333

  1. Role of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in reducing mortality in HIV infected adults being treated for tuberculosis: randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mwaba, Peter; Chintu, Chifumbe; Mwinga, Alwyn; Darbyshire, Janet H; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of prophylactic oral co-trimoxazole in reducing mortality in HIV positive Zambian adults being treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. Design Double blind placebo controlled randomised clinical trial. Participants Two groups of antiretroviral treatment naive adults with HIV infection: patients newly diagnosed as having tuberculosis and receiving tuberculosis treatment either for the first time or for retreatment after relapse; previously treated patients not receiving treatment. Intervention Oral co-trimoxazole or matching placebo daily. Primary outcome measures Time to death and occurrence of serious adverse events related to study drug. Results 1003 patients were randomised: 835 (416 co-trimoxazole, 419 placebo) were receiving treatment for tuberculosis, 762 (376 co-trimoxazole, 386 placebo) of them newly diagnosed previously untreated patients and 73 (40 co-trimoxazole, 33 placebo) receiving a retreatment regimen; 168 (84 co-trimoxazole, 84 placebo) were not on treatment but had received treatment in the past. Of 835 participants receiving tuberculosis treatment, follow-up information was available for 757, with a total of 1012.6 person years of follow-up. A total of 310 (147 co-trimoxazole, 163 placebo) participants died, corresponding to death rates of 27.3 and 34.4 per 100 person years. In the Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio for death (co-trimoxazole:placebo) was 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.63 to 0.99). The effect of co-trimoxazole waned with time, possibly owing to falling adherence levels; in a per protocol analysis based on patients who spent at least 90% of their time at risk supplied with study drug, the hazard ratio was 0.65 (0.45 to 0.93). Conclusions Prophylaxis with co-trimoxazole reduces mortality in HIV infected adults with pulmonary tuberculosis. Co-trimoxazole was generally safe and well tolerated. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15281875. PMID:18617486

  2. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Read, T; Mijch, A; Fairley, C K

    2003-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a powerful predictor of response to therapy. For optimal antiretroviral therapy response, individuals need to take more than 95% of their prescribed medication. The most widely used method for measuring adherence is self-report of the number of missed doses and this should be done at every clinic visit. There are several well-recognized predictors of poor adherence, such as illicit drug use, depression, limited knowledge or ambivalence about starting treatment. Adherence can be improved by addressing these issues or through other means such as pill boxes or electronic reminders. PMID:12752896

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy as HIV Prevention: Status and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Kartik K.

    2010-01-01

    As antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection has become increasingly accessible, attention has focused on whether these drugs can used for prevention because of increased tolerability of newer medications, decreased cost, and the limitations of other approaches. We review the status of antiretroviral HIV prevention, including chemoprophylaxis, as well as the effects of treatment of infected individuals on prevention. It is possible that the life-saving agents that have transformed the natural history of AIDS can be a critical component of HIV prevention efforts, but their ultimate role in affecting HIV transmission dynamics remains to be defined. PMID:20724682

  4. Comparative manufacture and cell-based delivery of antiretroviral nanoformulations

    PubMed Central

    Balkundi, Shantanu; Nowacek, Ari S; Veerubhotla, Ram S; Chen, Han; Martinez-Skinner, Andrea; Roy, Upal; Mosley, R Lee; Kanmogne, Georgette; Liu, Xinming; Kabanov, Alexander V; Bronich, Tatiana; McMillan, JoEllyn; Gendelman, Howard E

    2011-01-01

    Nanoformulations of crystalline indinavir, ritonavir, atazanavir, and efavirenz were manufactured by wet milling, homogenization or sonication with a variety of excipients. The chemical, biological, immune, virological, and toxicological properties of these formulations were compared using an established monocyte-derived macrophage scoring indicator system. Measurements of drug uptake, retention, release, and antiretroviral activity demonstrated differences amongst preparation methods. Interestingly, for drug cell targeting and antiretroviral responses the most significant difference among the particles was the drug itself. We posit that the choice of drug and formulation composition may ultimately affect clinical utility. PMID:22267924

  5. Maximizing the benefits of antiretroviral therapy for key affected populations

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Ian R; Beckham, Sarah W; Kazatchkine, Michel; Thomas, Ruth M; Albers, Eliot R; Cabral, Mauro; Lange, Joep; Vella, Stefano; Kurian, Manoj; Beyrer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Scientific research has demonstrated the clinical benefits of earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and that ART can markedly reduce HIV transmission to sexual partners. Ensuring universal access to ART for those who need it has long been a core principle of the HIV response, and extending the benefits of ART to key populations is critical to increasing the impact of ART and the overall effectiveness of the HIV response. However, this can only be achieved through coordinated efforts to address political, social, legal and economic barriers that key populations face in accessing HIV services. Discussion Recent analyses show that HIV prevalence levels among key populations are far higher than among the general population, and they experience a range of biological and behavioural factors, and social, legal and economic barriers that increase their vulnerability to HIV and have resulted in alarmingly low ART coverage. World Health Organization 2014 consolidated guidance on HIV among key populations offers the potential for increased access to ART by key populations, following the same principles as for the general adult population. However, it should not be assumed that key populations will achieve greater access to ART unless stigma, discrimination and punitive laws, policies and practices that limit access to ART and other HIV interventions in many countries are addressed. Conclusions Rights-based approaches and investments in critical enablers, such as supportive legal and policy environments, are essential to enable wider access to ART and other HIV interventions for key populations. The primary objective of ART should always be to treat the person living with HIV; prevention is an important, additional benefit. ART should be provided only with informed consent. The preventive benefits of treatment must not be used as a pretext for failure to provide other necessary HIV programming for key populations, including comprehensive harm

  6. Successful antiretroviral therapy by using unusual antiretroviral combinations in heavily pre-treated patients: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Dentone, Chiara; Alessandrini, Anna; Bruzzone, Bianca; Icardi, Giancarlo; Garraffo, Rodolphe; De Macina, Ilaria; Viscoli, Claudio; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In the context of HIV-infected patients with several past antiretroviral therapies and multiple failures, it is possible to be faced with viruses resistant to all drug classes. We report on two HIV-1 infected patients in which the historical genotype showed mutations against all the major drug classes and in which viral suppression has been obtained by non-conventional antiretroviral therapy regimens, including the combination of darunavir at high dosage (800 mg bid), dolutegravir (50 mg bid) and a third agent, i.e. enfuvirtide in the first case and etravirine in the second one. PMID:25332227

  7. Data-fusion receiver

    DOEpatents

    Gabelmann, Jeffrey M.; Kattner, J. Stephen; Houston, Robert A.

    2006-12-19

    This invention is an ultra-low frequency electromagnetic telemetry receiver which fuses multiple input receive sources to synthesize a decodable message packet from a noise corrupted telemetry message string. Each block of telemetry data to be sent to the surface receiver from a borehole tool is digitally encoded into a data packet prior to transmission. The data packet is modulated onto the ULF EM carrier wave and transmitted from the borehole to the surface and then are simultaneously detected by multiple receive sensors disbursed within the rig environment. The receive sensors include, but are not limited to, electric field and magnetic field sensors. The spacing of the surface receive elements is such that noise generators are unequally coupled to each receive element due to proximity and/or noise generator type (i.e. electric or magnetic field generators). The receiver utilizes a suite of decision metrics to reconstruct the original, non noise-corrupted data packet from the observation matrix via the estimation of individual data frames. The receiver will continue this estimation process until: 1) the message validates, or 2) a preset "confidence threshold" is reached whereby frames within the observation matrix are no longer "trusted".

  8. Hybrid receiver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M.