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Sample records for adults receiving art

  1. Psychosocial factors affecting medication adherence among HIV-1 infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie T; Phiri, Kelesitse; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; Marlink, Richard G; Wester, C William

    2010-06-01

    As increasing numbers of persons are placed on potentially life-saving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in sub-Saharan Africa, it is imperative to identify the psychosocial and social factors that may influence antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence. Using an 87 question survey, the following data were collected from patients on cART in Botswana: demographics, performance (Karnofsky) score, perceived stigma and level of HIV disclosure, attitudes and beliefs concerning HIV/AIDS, substance and/or drug use, depression, and pharmacy and healthcare provider-related factors. Overall adherence rates were determined by patient self-report, institutional adherence, and a culturally modified Morisky scale. Three hundred adult patients were recruited between April and May 2005. The overall cART adherence rate was 81.3% based on 4 day and 1 month patient recall and on clinic attendance for ARV medication refills during the previous 3 months. Adults receiving cART for 1-6 months were the least adherent (77%) followed by those receiving cART for greater than 12 months (79%). Alcohol use, depression, and nondisclosure of positive HIV status to their partner were predictive of poor adherence rates (p value <0.02). A significant proportion (81.3%) of cART-treated adults were adherent to their prescribed treatment, with rates superior to those reported in resource-rich settings. Adherence rates were poorest among those just starting cART, most likely due to the presence of ARV-related toxicity. Adherence was lower among those who have been treated for longer periods of time (greater than 1 year), suggesting complacency, which may become a significant problem, especially among these long-term cART-treated patients who return to improved physical and mental functioning and may be less motivated to adhere to their ARV medications. Healthcare providers should encourage HIV disclosure to "at-risk" partners and provide ongoing counseling and education to help patients

  2. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  3. Art messaging to engage homeless young adults.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Thomas, Alexandra; Hudson, Angela; Kahilifard, Farinaz; Avila, Glenna; Orser, Julie; Cuchilla, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Art has been shown to be an empowering and engaging entity with numerous benefits to vulnerable populations, including the homeless persons and young adults. However, little is known how homeless young adults perceive the use of art as messages that can communicate the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. The purpose of this study was to solicit perspectives of homeless, drug-using young adults as to how art can be used to design messages for their peers about the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Qualitative methodology via focus group discussions was utilized to engage 24 homeless young adults enrolled from a drop-in site in Santa Monica, California. The findings revealed support for a myriad of delivery styles, including in-person communication, flyers, music, documentary film, and creative writing. The young adults also provided insight into the importance of the thematic framework of messages. Such themes ranged from empowering and hopeful messages to those designed to scare young homeless adults into not experimenting with drugs. The findings indicate that in addition to messages communicating the need to prevent or reduce drug and alcohol use, homeless young adults respond to messages that remind them of goals and dreams they once had for their future, and to content that is personal, real, and truthful. Our research indicates that messages that reinforce protective factors such as hope for the future and self-esteem may be as important to homeless young adults as information about the risks and consequences of drug use.

  4. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  5. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  6. Careers in Music and the Arts: The Messages Women Receive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordon, Ann E.

    This study examines women's experiences in pursuing careers in the arts or music. Data for the study was gathered through a survey mailed to a random sample of women graduates (n=73) from an internationally known school for music and art. While most survey questions were closed-ended and focused on demographic information, the most revealing…

  7. The Spoken Word as Arts-Based Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriweather, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Arts-based adult education has been embraced by a growing number of adult educators. These educators have explored its potential in the workplace, in the community and in academia. This article contributes to this work by exploring the Spoken Word, an art form located within the genre of poetry, and its potential as a tool of arts-based adult…

  8. Adult Learning in and through the Arts. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Multiple, sometimes competing, purposes for adult arts education are to develop the individual, maintain the dominant culture, or change the culture; develop appreciative audiences or creative practitioners; or liberate creativity or develop technical skills. Art may be the means or a goal in itself; that is, the arts may be used for instrumental…

  9. Restraint Use in Older Adults Receiving Home Care.

    PubMed

    Scheepmans, Kristien; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Paquay, Louis; Van Gansbeke, Hendrik; Milisen, Koen

    2017-08-01

    To determine the prevalence, types, frequency, and duration of restraint use in older adults receiving home nursing care and to determine factors involved in the decision-making process for restraint use and application. Cross-sectional survey of restraint use in older adults receiving home care completed by primary care nurses. Homes of older adults receiving care from a home nursing organization in Belgium. Randomized sample of older adults receiving home care (N = 6,397; mean age 80.6; 66.8% female). For each participant, nurses completed an investigator-constructed and -validated questionnaire collecting information demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics and aspects of restraint use. A broad definition of restraint was used that includes a range of restrictive actions. Restraints were used in 24.7% of the participants, mostly on a daily basis (85%) and often for a long period (54.5%, 24 h/d). The most common reason for restraint use was safety (50.2%). Other reasons were that the individual wanted to remain at home longer, which necessitated the use of restraints (18.2%) and to provide respite for the informal caregiver (8.6%). The latter played an important role in the decision and application process. The physician was less involved in the process. In 64.5% of cases, there was no evaluation after restraint use was initiated. Use of restraints is common in older adults receiving home care nursing in Belgium. These results contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of use of restraints in home care, a situation that may be even more complex than in nursing homes and acute hospital settings. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  11. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  12. Cover Art, Consumerism, and YA [Young Adult] Reading Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kies, Cosette

    Cover art has long been used as a marketing device for books, particularly with books aimed at young adults (YAs) aged 12 to 18. An examination of some of the teen thrillers published by novelist Lois Duncan since the 1970s yields several discoveries about changes in cover art that come with various editions. Many covers have been resigned to…

  13. For the Arts To Have Meaning...A Model of Adult Education in Performing Arts Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitinoja, L.; Heimlich, J. E.

    A model of adult education appears to function in the outreach programs of three Columbus (Ohio) performing arts organizations. The first tier represents the arts organization's board of trustees, and the second represents the internal administration of the company. Two administrative bodies are arbitrarily labelled as education and marketing,…

  14. Time Spent Caregiving and Help Received by Spouses and Adult Children of Brain-Impaired Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Robert B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 233 family caregivers for brain-impaired adults. Spousal caregivers (both husbands and wives) devoted much time to caregiving. Most caregivers received little assistance from other family members and friends, but husbands received more than others. Employed spouses received more paid help than unemployed spouses; employment did not affect…

  15. Visual Arts in Counselling Adults with Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Khai Ling; Mustaffa, M. S.; Tan, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a better understanding of using visual arts in counselling adults with depressive disorders. Three in-depth case studies were conducted in the counselling unit of a mental health hospital in Malaysia. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were applied to explore three adult participants' counselling experiences.…

  16. Visual Arts in Counselling Adults with Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Khai Ling; Mustaffa, M. S.; Tan, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a better understanding of using visual arts in counselling adults with depressive disorders. Three in-depth case studies were conducted in the counselling unit of a mental health hospital in Malaysia. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were applied to explore three adult participants' counselling experiences.…

  17. Delay Discounting in Adults Receiving Treatment for Marijuana Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica N.; Petry, Nancy M.; LaPaglia, Donna M.; Reynolds, Brady; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Delay discounting is an index of impulsive decision-making and reflects an individual’s preference for smaller immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards. Multiple studies have indicated comparatively high rates of discounting among tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, and other types of drug users, but few studies have examined discounting among marijuana users. This report is a secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial that randomized adults with marijuana dependence to receive one of four treatments that involved contingency management (CM) and cognitive–behavioral therapy interventions. Delay discounting was assessed with the Experiential Discounting Task (Reynolds & Schiffbauer, 2004) at pretreatment in 93 participants and at 12 weeks posttreatment in 61 participants. Results indicated that higher pretreatment delay discounting (i.e., more impulsive decision-making) significantly correlated with lower readiness to change marijuana use (r = − 0.22, p = .03) and greater number of days of cigarette use (r = .21, p = .04). Pretreatment discounting was not associated with any marijuana treatment outcomes. CM treatment significantly interacted with time to predict change in delay discounting from pre- to posttreatment; participants who received CM did not change their discounting over time, whereas those who did not receive CM significantly increased their discounting from pre- to posttreatment. In this sample of court-referred young adults receiving treatment for marijuana dependence, delay discounting was not strongly related to treatment outcomes, but there was some evidence that CM may protect against time-related increases in discounting. PMID:23245197

  18. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  19. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  20. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  1. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  2. Perspectives from older adults receiving cancer treatment about the cancer-related information they receive

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Margaret I.; McAndrew, Alison; Harth, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cancer patients have reported that information plays a significant role in their capacity to cope with cancer and manage the consequences of treatment. This study was undertaken to identify the importance older adults receiving cancer treatment assign to selected types of cancer-related information, their satisfaction with the cancer-related information they received, and the barriers to effective information provision for this age group. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases with separate samples. Six hundred and eighty-four older cancer patients receiving treatment completed a standardized survey and 39 completed a semi-structured interview to gather perspectives about cancer-related information. Data were analyzed for 65-79 years and 80+ year groups. Results: Information topics about their medical condition, treatment options, and side effects of treatment were rated as most important by the older cancer patients. Women assigned a higher importance ratings than men to information overall (t = 4.8, P < 0.01). Although participants were generally satisfied with the information, they received many described challenges they experienced in communicating with health care professionals because of the medical language and fast pace of speaking used by the professionals. Conclusions: The older cancer patients in this study endorsed the same topics of cancer-related information as most important as has been reported in studies for other age groups. However, this older group recommended that, during their interactions with older individuals, health care professionals use fewer medical words, speak at a slower pace, and provide written information in addition to the actual conversation. PMID:27981110

  3. Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Irma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can…

  4. Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Irma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can…

  5. The benefit of supplementary feeding for wasted Malawian adults initiating ART.

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, Joep J; Ndekha, MacDonald; Moore, Elinor; Kumwenda, Johnstone J; Zijlstra, Eduard E; Manary, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Food insecurity is considered to be an important contributor to HIV associated wasting in sub-Saharan Africa. Low body mass index (BMI) is a strong risk factor for early mortality during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Nutritional supplementation has become standard of care in wasted patients starting ART in many countries in the region, but there is no unequivocal evidence base for this intervention. Against this background, we performed a retrospective study to compare food supplementation versus no nutritional intervention in wasted adults starting ART in Blantyre, Malawi. All patients received free nevirapine, lamivudine, and stavudine. Participants in an effectiveness trial of two food supplements received either corn-soy blend (CSB) or ready-to-use food spread (RUFS) during the first 14 weeks of ART. Results were compared with a historical control group receiving no food supplement that was part of an observational cohort study of outcomes of the same ART regimen. Characteristics on initiation of ART were similar in the three groups, except the use of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis which was more frequent in the food-supplemented groups. Linear regression analysis showed that increase in BMI was greatest in the RUFS group and better in the CSB group than in those receiving no food supplementation at 14 weeks. These differences were no longer significant at 26 weeks. Lower BMI, CD4 count and hemoglobin, WHO clinical stage IV, male gender, and not receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis were independent risk factors for mortality at 14 and 26 weeks in the logistic regression analysis. Supplementary food use was not directly associated with improved survival.

  6. Assisting the Adult Receiving Inhalation and Intravenous Therapy. Care of the Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Area Vocational Technical Inst., MN.

    These two units for students in a practical nursing program provide supplemental instruction in caring for adult patients receiving inhalation and intravenous therapy. Unit titles are The Administration of Intermittent Positive Pressure Breathing (IPPB RX) and Intravenous Therapy of Fluids and Blood. Each unit contains the following: objectives,…

  7. Creative arts therapy improves quality of life for pediatric brain tumor patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Madden, Jennifer R; Mowry, Patricia; Gao, Dexiang; Cullen, Patsy McGuire; Foreman, Nicholas K

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods pilot study evaluated the effects of the creative arts therapy (CAT) on the quality of life (QOL) of children receiving chemotherapy. A 2-group, repeated measures randomized design compared CAT with a volunteer's attention (n = 16). Statistical analysis of the randomized controlled phase of the study suggested an improvement in the following areas after the CAT: parent report of child's hurt (P = .03) and parent report of child's nausea (P = .0061). A nonrandomized phase, using a different instrument showed improved mood with statistical significance on the Faces Scale (P < .01), and patients were more excited (P < .05), happier (P < .02), and less nervous (P < .02). Provider focus groups revealed positive experiences. Case studies are included to exemplify the therapeutic process. With heightened interest in complementary therapy for children with cancer, future research with a larger sample size is needed to document the impact of incorporating creative arts into the healing process.

  8. Learning with the Arts: What Opportunities Are There for Work-Related Adult Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Claire; Verenikina, Irina; Brown, Ian

    2010-01-01

    What can arts-based learning offer to adult, work-related education? A study was undertaken that explored the benefits of learning with the arts for professional development of an adult learner in Australia. The individual experiences of nine adults who participated in arts-based workshops to build work-related skills were examined using the…

  9. Learning with the Arts: What Opportunities Are There for Work-Related Adult Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Claire; Verenikina, Irina; Brown, Ian

    2010-01-01

    What can arts-based learning offer to adult, work-related education? A study was undertaken that explored the benefits of learning with the arts for professional development of an adult learner in Australia. The individual experiences of nine adults who participated in arts-based workshops to build work-related skills were examined using the…

  10. Physiological responses to passive exercise in adults receiving mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Amidei, Christina; Sole, Mary Lou

    2013-07-01

    Critical illness may weaken muscles, with long-term consequences. To assess physiological responses to an early standardized passive exercise protocol to prevent muscle weakness in adults receiving mechanical ventilation. A quasi-experimental within-subjects repeated-measures design was used. Within 72 hours of intubation, 30 patients had 20 minutes of bilateral passive leg movement delivered by continuous-passive-motion machines at a standardized rate and flexion-extension. Heart rate, mean blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and cytokine levels were measured before, during, and after the intervention. The Behavioral Pain Scale was used to measure patients' comfort. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the effect of the exercise on independent variables. Patients were mostly white men with a mean age of 56.5 years (SD, 16.9) with moderate mortality risk and illness severity. Heart rate, mean blood pressure, and oxygen saturation did not differ from baseline at any time measured. Pain scores were significantly reduced (F(2.43,70.42) = 4.08; P = .02) 5 and 10 minutes after exercise started and remained reduced at the end of exercise and 1 hour later. Interleukin 6 levels were significantly reduced (F(1.60,43.1) = 4.35; P = .03) at the end of exercise but not after the final rest period. Interleukin 10 levels did not differ significantly. Ratios of interleukin 6 to interleukin 10 decreased significantly (F(1.61,43.38) = 3.42; P = .05) at the end of exercise and again after 60 minutes' rest. The exercise was well tolerated, and comfort improved during and after the intervention. Cytokine levels provided physiological rationale for benefits of early exercise.

  11. Assessment of Quality of Life of HIV-Positive People Receiving ART: An Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Deepika; Puri, Seema; Mathew, Minnie

    2012-01-01

    Context: HIV/AIDS is known to affect an individual not only physically but also mentally, socially, and financially. It is a syndrome that builds a vacuum in a person affecting his/her life as a whole. Aims: The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) receiving ART and its association with Body mass index (BMI) and CD4 count. Study Design: An observational study was performed on PLHIV receiving ART in Orissa, India. Materials and Methods: Data on sociodemographic profile, BMI, and CD4 were gathered from 153 HIV-positive subjects. QOL was assessed using WHOQOL-HIV BREF scale. Results: The overall QOL score of the subjects was moderate; PLHIV with lower BMI also had poorer QOL (P<0.05). Employment affected only the social health domain of the subjects. Men reported poorer level of independence and physical health while women reported poorer social relationships and environment. All the six domains correlated significantly with the overall QOL indicated by the G-facet. Conclusion: Attention toward improving the nutritional status of PLHIV should be accorded high priority to ensure improvement in the overall QOL of PLHIV. PMID:23112442

  12. Retention in care, resource utilization, and costs for adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Zambia: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Of the estimated 800,000 adults living with HIV in Zambia in 2011, roughly half were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). As treatment scale up continues, information on the care provided to patients after initiating ART can help guide decision-making. We estimated retention in care, the quantity of resources utilized, and costs for a retrospective cohort of adults initiating ART under routine clinical conditions in Zambia. Methods Data on resource utilization (antiretroviral [ARV] and non-ARV drugs, laboratory tests, outpatient clinic visits, and fixed resources) and retention in care were extracted from medical records for 846 patients who initiated ART at ≥15 years of age at six treatment sites between July 2007 and October 2008. Unit costs were estimated from the provider’s perspective using site- and country-level data and are reported in 2011 USD. Results Patients initiated ART at a median CD4 cell count of 145 cells/μL. Fifty-nine percent of patients initiated on a tenofovir-containing regimen, ranging from 15% to 86% depending on site. One year after ART initiation, 75% of patients were retained in care. The average cost per patient retained in care one year after ART initiation was $243 (95% CI, $194-$293), ranging from $184 (95% CI, $172-$195) to $304 (95% CI, $290-$319) depending on site. Patients retained in care one year after ART initiation received, on average, 11.4 months’ worth of ARV drugs, 1.5 CD4 tests, 1.3 blood chemistry tests, 1.4 full blood count tests, and 6.5 clinic visits with a doctor or clinical officer. At all sites, ARV drugs were the largest cost component, ranging from 38% to 84% of total costs, depending on site. Conclusions Patients initiate ART late in the course of disease progression and a large proportion drop out of care after initiation. The quantity of resources utilized and costs vary widely by site, and patients utilize a different mix of resources under routine clinical conditions than if they were

  13. Liver Fibrosis in HIV Patients Receiving a Modern cART

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Raphael; Schierwagen, Robert; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Boesecke, Christoph; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Trebicka, Jonel; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Liver-related death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals is about 10 times higher compared with the general population, and the prevalence of significant liver fibrosis in those with HIV approaches 15%. The present study aimed to assess risk factors for development of hepatic fibrosis in HIV patients receiving a modern combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). This cross-sectional prospective study included 432 HIV patients, of which 68 (16%) patients were anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive and 23 (5%) were HBsAg positive. Health trajectory including clinical characteristics and liver fibrosis stage assessed by transient elastography were collected at inclusion. Liver stiffness values >7.1 kPa were considered as significant fibrosis, while values >12.5 kPa were defined as severe fibrosis. Logistic regression and Cox regression uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent factors associated with liver fibrosis. Significant liver fibrosis was detected in 10% of HIV mono-infected, in 37% of HCV co-infected patients, and in 18% of hepatitis B virus co-infected patients. The presence of diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6) and FIB4 score (OR = 2.4) were independently associated with presence of significant fibrosis in the whole cohort. Similarly, diabetes mellitus (OR = 5.4), adiposity (OR = 4.6), and the FIB4 score (OR = 3.3) were independently associated with significant fibrosis in HIV mono-infected patients. Importantly, cumulative cART duration protected, whereas persistent HIV viral replication promoted the development of significant liver fibrosis along the duration of HIV infection. Our findings strongly indicate that besides known risk factors like metabolic disorders, HIV may also have a direct effect on fibrogenesis. Successful cART leading to complete suppression of HIV replication might protect from development of liver fibrosis. PMID:26683921

  14. THE ARTS IN HIGHER ADULT EDUCATION, A SECOND REVIEW OF PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOLDMAN, FREDA H.

    A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE ARTS IN THE CONTEMPORARY UNIVERSITY PRECEDES DESCRIPTIONS OF SPECIFIC ADULT PROGRAM PROTOTYPES. THE CURRENT PLACE OF THE ARTS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY INCLUDES RECENT TRENDS IN ART INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNMENT, BUSINESS, FOUNDATIONS, ARTS COUNCILS, PUBLICATIONS, AND EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION. ISSUES AND PROBLEMS CONCERNING THE…

  15. Beyond Traditional Art Education: Transformative Lifelong Learning in Community-Based Settings with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Pamela Harris; La Porte, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Quality community-based art education programs for older adults over the age of 50 should exploit the broad range of interests and cognitive abilities of participants by utilizing adult education theory, brain research, and the best practices of adult art education programs. We consider a developing paradigm on the cognitive abilities of the…

  16. Beyond Traditional Art Education: Transformative Lifelong Learning in Community-Based Settings with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Pamela Harris; La Porte, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Quality community-based art education programs for older adults over the age of 50 should exploit the broad range of interests and cognitive abilities of participants by utilizing adult education theory, brain research, and the best practices of adult art education programs. We consider a developing paradigm on the cognitive abilities of the…

  17. Major clinical outcomes in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive participants and in those not receiving ART at baseline in the SMART study.

    PubMed

    Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline A; Phillips, Andrew N; Babiker, Abdel; Cohen, Calvin J; Gatell, Jose M; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Grund, Birgit; Law, Matthew; Losso, Marcelo H; Palfreeman, Adrian; Wood, Robin

    2008-04-15

    The SMART study randomized 5,472 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/microL to intermittent antiretroviral therapy (ART; the drug conservation [DC] group) versus continuous ART (the viral suppression [VS] group). In the DC group, participants started ART when the CD4+ cell count was <250 cells/microL. Clinical outcomes in participants not receiving ART at entry inform the early use of ART. Patients who were either ART naive (n=249) or who had not been receiving ART for >or= 6 months (n=228) were analyzed. The following clinical outcomes were assessed: (i) opportunistic disease (OD) or death from any cause (OD/death); (ii) OD (fatal or nonfatal); (iii) serious non-AIDS events (cardiovascular, renal, and hepatic disease plus non-AIDS-defining cancers) and non-OD deaths; and (iv) the composite of outcomes (ii) and (iii). A total of 477 participants (228 in the DC group and 249 in the VS group) were followed (mean, 18 months). For outcome (iv), 21 and 6 events occurred in the DC (7 in ART-naive participants and 14 in those who had not received ART for >or= 6 months) and VS (2 in ART-naive participants and 4 in those who had not received ART for 6 months) groups, respectively. Hazard ratios for DC vs. VS by outcome category were as follows: outcome (i), 3.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-9.56; p=.02); outcome (ii), 3.26 (95% CI, 1.04-10.25; p=.04); outcome (iii), 7.02 (95% CI, 1.57-31.38; p=.01); and outcome (iv), 4.19 (95% CI, 1.69-10.39; p=.002 ). Initiation of ART at CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/microL compared with <250 cells/microL may reduce both OD and serious non-AIDS events. These findings require validation in a large, randomized clinical trial.

  18. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... own resources; and (b) Does not require intermediate or skilled nursing care. ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive...

  19. Predictors of insulin requirements among hospitalized adults receiving parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Roehl, Kelly A; Lach, Kristen; Coltman, Anne E; Bacon, Cheryl A; Singh, Shubha; Peterson, Sarah J; Sowa, Diane C

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this quality improvement project was to determine factors predictive of parenteral nutrition (PN) insulin therapy. Patients receiving PN at a tertiary care academic medical center between January 1, 2009, and December 1, 2012, 18 years or older were included. Variables collected included demographics, medical information, and PN-specific data. χ(2) and Student t tests were used to determine differences between patients who did and did not require PN insulin. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to determine associations between characteristics. Stepwise forward logistic regression was used determine the best predictors of PN insulin. A total of 1388 patients were started on PN. After adjusting for potential confounders, strong associations existed between PN insulin requirements and diabetes mellitus (DM) diagnosis (OR, 8.90; 95% CI, 4.98-15.90, P < .001), overweight/obese status (body mass index ≥25.0 kg/m(2)) (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.04-4.30, P = .04), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.11, P = .04), blood glucose (BG) on day of PN start >120 mg/dL (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.32-4.05, P = .003), mean BG >180 mg/dL while receiving PN (OR, 6.10; 95% CI, 2.18-17.04, P = .001), and hemoglobin A1c (A1c) ≥5.7% (OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.84-5.50, P < .001). Among variables available at PN initiation, DM diagnosis (P < .001), A1c ≥5.7% (P < .001), BG >120 mg/dL on PN start day (P < .001), and ICU admission (P < .001) predicted the need for PN insulin.

  20. Lessons in Beauty: Art and Adult Education. Studies in Pedagogy, Andragogy, and Gerontagogy, Volume 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gent, Bastiaan

    This book explores the connections between art and education and, specifically, the links among the art of painting, the training of artists, and the education of adults. Five chapters discuss moralization, professionalization, aestheticization, musealization, and indoctrination. "Instruction and Diversion: Moral Lessons in Dutch Art"…

  1. The Use of Art in the Teaching Practice for Developing Communication Skills in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Niki; Fragoulis, Iosif

    2012-01-01

    The use of Art for educational reasons has been recently developing in Greece both in formal education and in Adult Education. Relevant theoretical texts and studies, (Dewey, 1934. Gardner, 1990. Perkins, 1994) pin point that training through the Arts can contribute to an integrated learning, since through systematic observation of works of art,…

  2. Using Photography and Art in Concept Mapping Research with Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams Carawan, Lena; Nalavany, Blace

    2010-01-01

    Reflexive photography for individual interviews and the use of art with focus groups provides a valuable method for exploring the psychosocial issues encountered by adults with dyslexia. Reflexive photography and art is particularly appropriate when interviewing adults with dyslexia who may have difficulty expressing and focusing on what they want…

  3. Using Photography and Art in Concept Mapping Research with Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams Carawan, Lena; Nalavany, Blace

    2010-01-01

    Reflexive photography for individual interviews and the use of art with focus groups provides a valuable method for exploring the psychosocial issues encountered by adults with dyslexia. Reflexive photography and art is particularly appropriate when interviewing adults with dyslexia who may have difficulty expressing and focusing on what they want…

  4. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied.The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells.A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children.B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02).Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity.

  5. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied. The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells. A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children. B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02). Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:26166114

  6. The effectiveness of art therapy in the treatment of traumatized adults: a systematic review on art therapy and trauma.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Karin Alice; de Niet, Gerrit J; Knipscheer, Jeroen W; Kleber, Rolf J; Hutschemaekers, Giel J M

    2015-04-01

    Art therapy has often been applied in the treatment of traumatized adults, and good results in clinical practice have been reported. However, although art therapy experts underline these benefits, the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment has not been established by systematic review. The aim of this systematic review is to identify and evaluate empirical evidence of the effectiveness of art therapy for trauma treatment. As a result of the systematic review, six controlled, comparative studies on art therapy for trauma in adult patients were found. In half of the included studies, a significant decrease in psychological trauma symptoms was found in the treatment groups, and one study reported a significant decrease in depression. Although there are limitations in the number of included studies, the number of participants, the heterogeneity of included studies, and their methodological quality, the results contribute to insight into the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment and form an evidence base for the urgent need for further research on art therapy and trauma treatment.

  7. Determinants of Adult Functional Outcome in Adolescents Receiving Special Educational Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeown, H. R.; Johnstone, E. C.; McKirdy, J.; Owens, D. C.; Stanfield, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. Methods: A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood…

  8. Determinants of Adult Functional Outcome in Adolescents Receiving Special Educational Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeown, H. R.; Johnstone, E. C.; McKirdy, J.; Owens, D. C.; Stanfield, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. Methods: A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood…

  9. Possible biotin deficiency in adults receiving long-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Innis, S M; Allardyce, D B

    1983-02-01

    Two adult patients receiving total parenteral nutrition on a long-term home basis presented with severe loss of hair. Both patients had extensive gut resection, consumed no biotin orally and received no biotin parenterally. Supplementation with Berroca-C, one ampule containing 200 micrograms biotin per day resulted in gradual regrowth of healthy hair. The patients now receive a parenteral solution containing biotin and have shown no recurrence of alopecia. It is suggested that biotin deficiency can occur in the adult when no preformed biotin is provided to the body and the contribution of this vitamin from intestinal microbial biosynthesis is compromised.

  10. Self-Reported Reasons for Not Receiving Mental Health Treatment in Adults With Serious Suicidal Thoughts.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto-Crawford, S Janet; Han, Beth; McKeon, Richard T

    2017-06-01

    This study examined self-reported reasons for not receiving mental health treatment among adults with past-year serious suicidal thoughts and their sociodemographic characteristics associated with these reasons. Using the 2008-2013 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, we examined 8,400 respondents aged 18 years or older who had past-year serious thoughts of suicide and did not receive mental health treatment that year. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the associations between sociodemographic characteristics and self-reported reasons for not receiving mental health treatment among these suicidal adults. Among adults with serious suicidal thoughts who did not receive mental health treatment in the past year, three-fourths did not feel the need for treatment. Of the one-fourth of those who felt the need for treatment, the main reason for not receiving treatment was financial (58.4%), followed by logistical reasons such as not knowing where to go (36.1%). A greater proportion of suicidal adults than nonsuicidal adults perceived more than 1 barrier to treatment (43.8% vs 34.3%). Among suicidal adults who did not receive mental health treatment that year, the odds of not feeling the need for mental health treatment were higher in men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.42-1.99), adults aged 50 years or older (AOR = 3.02; 95% CI, 2.02-4.51), racial and ethnic minorities (AORs = 1.59-2.13), publicly insured (AOR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.14-2.07), and nonmetropolitan residents (AOR = 1.50; 95% CI, 1.20-1.88). Most suicidal adults did not feel the need for mental health treatment. Of those who felt the need, multiple barriers were identified. A multifaceted approach to address these barriers is needed to promote receipt of mental health treatment among this vulnerable population.

  11. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  12. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  13. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  14. Substance Use and Adherence Among People Living with HIV/AIDS Receiving cART in Latin America.

    PubMed

    De Boni, Raquel B; Shepherd, Bryan E; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Cesar, Carina; Cortés, Claudia; Padgett, Denis; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F; Rebeiro, Peter F; Duda, Stephany N; McGowan, Catherine C

    2016-11-01

    This cross-sectional study describes substance use prevalence and its association with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) adherence among 3343 individuals receiving care at HIV clinics in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru. A rapid screening tool evaluated self-reported 7-day recall of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine use, and missed cART doses. Overall, 29.3 % individuals reported having ≥1 alcoholic drinks, 5.0 % reported any illicit drug use and 17.0 % reported missed cART doses. In the logistic regression model, compared to no substance use, alcohol use [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.46, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.99-3.05], illicit drug use (AOR = 3.57, 95 % CI: 2.02-6.30), and using both alcohol and illicit drugs (AOR = 4.98, 95 % CI: 3.19-7.79) were associated with missed cART doses. The associations between substance use and likelihood of missing cART doses point to the need of targeting alcohol and illicit drug use to improve adherence among people living with HIV in Latin America.

  15. Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Young Adults Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Thomas, Alexandra; Hudson, Angela; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Avila, Glenna; Orser, Julie; Cuchilla, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Art has been shown to be an empowering and engaging entity with numerous benefits to vulnerable populations, including the homeless persons and young adults. Yet, little is known how homeless young adults perceive the use of art as messages that can communicate the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Objectives The purpose of this study was to solicit perspectives of homeless drug-using young adults as to how art can be used to design messages for their peers about the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Methods Qualitative methodology via focus group discussions was utilized to engage 24 homeless young adults enrolled from a drop-in site in Santa Monica. Results The findings revealed support for a myriad of delivery styles, including in person communication, flyers, music, documentary film and creative writing. The young adults also provided insight into the importance of the thematic framework of messages. Such themes ranged from empowering and hopeful messages to those designed to scare young homeless adults into not experimenting with drugs. Conclusions The findings indicate that in addition to messages communicating the need to prevent or reduce drug and alcohol use, homeless young adults respond to messages that remind them of goals and dreams they once had for their future, and to content that is personal, real and truthful. . Our research indicates that messages that reinforce protective factors such as hope for the future and self-esteem may be as important to homeless young adults as information about the risks and consequences of drug use. PMID:21441664

  16. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  17. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  18. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood and Anxiety for Adults in Treatment for Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurer, Mattye; van der Vennet, Renée

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether art production or viewing and sorting art reproductions would be more effective in reducing negative mood and anxiety for 28 adults with substance use disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups and completed pre- and posttest measures of negative mood and anxiety The hypothesis that art…

  19. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  20. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  1. A Guide To Setting Up a Creative Art Experiences Program for Older Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Jane E.

    This guide is intended to help agencies serving older adults with mental retardation and other developmental disabilities in setting up a relatively inexpensive creative art program. The first section presents a rationale for creative art experiences for this population and then provides specific information on program development, including…

  2. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood and Anxiety for Adults in Treatment for Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurer, Mattye; van der Vennet, Renée

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether art production or viewing and sorting art reproductions would be more effective in reducing negative mood and anxiety for 28 adults with substance use disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups and completed pre- and posttest measures of negative mood and anxiety The hypothesis that art…

  3. RF surface receive array coils: the art of an LC circuit.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Zheng, Tsinghua; Yang, Xiaoyu; Finnerty, Matthew J; Handa, Shinya

    2013-07-01

    The radiofrequency (RF) receive array coil is a complicated device with many inductors and capacitors and serves as one of the most critical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) electronic devices. It directly determines the achievable level of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simply put, however, the RF coil is nothing but an LC circuit. The receive array coil was first proposed more than 20 years ago, evolving from a simple arrangement with a few electronic channels to a complicated system of 128 channels, enabling highly sophisticated parallel imaging, at different field strengths. This article summarizes the basic concepts pertaining to RF receive coil arrays and their associated SNR and reviews the theories behind the major components of such arrays. This includes discussions of the intrinsic SNR of a receive coil, the matching circuits, low-noise preamplifiers, coupling/decoupling amongst coils, the coupling between receive and transmit coils, decoupling via preamplifiers, and baluns. An 8-channel receive array coil on a cylindrical former serves as a useful example for demonstrating various points in the review.

  4. Food Insecurity and Food Choices in Rural Older Adults with Diabetes Receiving Nutrition Education via Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homenko, Daria R.; Morin, Philip C.; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate differences between rural older adults with diabetes reporting the presence or absence of food insecurity with respect to meal planning, preparation, shopping, obesity, and glycemic control after receiving nutrition counseling through telemedicine. Methods: Food insecurity data were obtained by telephone survey (n = 74).…

  5. Food Insecurity and Food Choices in Rural Older Adults with Diabetes Receiving Nutrition Education via Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homenko, Daria R.; Morin, Philip C.; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate differences between rural older adults with diabetes reporting the presence or absence of food insecurity with respect to meal planning, preparation, shopping, obesity, and glycemic control after receiving nutrition counseling through telemedicine. Methods: Food insecurity data were obtained by telephone survey (n = 74).…

  6. Barriers to Successful Transition for Young Adults Who Receive SSI and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Jennifer L.; Timmons, Jaime Ciulla; Moloney, Mairead

    2003-01-01

    A study examined barriers to transition faced by 12 young adults with disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and their families. Obstacles to transition planning that were associated with SSI included difficulties managing the receipt of SSI and unawareness of the supports available through the SSI system. (Contains references.)…

  7. Participatory arts for older adults: a review of benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Noice, Tony; Noice, Helga; Kramer, Arthur F

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the scientific literature on the enhancement of healthy aging in older adults through active participation in the arts. Methodologies and conclusions are described for studies of dance, expressive writing, music (singing and instrumental), theatre arts, and visual arts including documentation of mental/physical improvements in memory, creativity, problem solving, everyday competence, reaction time, balance/gait, and quality of life. In addition to these gains in measures of successful aging, the article also provides (in a Supplementary Appendix) some selected examples of arts engagement for remedial purposes. Finally, it offers suggestions for expanding inquiry into this underinvestigated corner of aging research.

  8. Participatory Arts for Older Adults: A Review of Benefits and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Noice, Tony; Noice, Helga; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the scientific literature on the enhancement of healthy aging in older adults through active participation in the arts. Methodologies and conclusions are described for studies of dance, expressive writing, music (singing and instrumental), theatre arts, and visual arts including documentation of mental/physical improvements in memory, creativity, problem solving, everyday competence, reaction time, balance/gait, and quality of life. In addition to these gains in measures of successful aging, the article also provides (in a Supplementary Appendix) some selected examples of arts engagement for remedial purposes. Finally, it offers suggestions for expanding inquiry into this underinvestigated corner of aging research. PMID:24336875

  9. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance among Ethnically Diverse Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Amanda Alders

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of art therapy on the cognitive performance of a multisite, ethnically diverse sample ("N" = 91) of older adults. Participants were recruited from several U.S. facilities that included a community center, a retirement center, an adult daycare, an assisted living facility, and a skilled nursing facility.…

  10. Contemporary Adult Education Philosophies and Practices in Art Galleries and Museums in Canada and the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.; Bell, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Public art galleries and museums have been mandated to become more relevant and useful to the lived experiences of the broad communities they claim to serve. Adult education has long been part of the work of these institutions, although historically the relationship has been uneasy, and they seldom feature in the adult education literature. To…

  11. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance among Ethnically Diverse Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Amanda Alders

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of art therapy on the cognitive performance of a multisite, ethnically diverse sample ("N" = 91) of older adults. Participants were recruited from several U.S. facilities that included a community center, a retirement center, an adult daycare, an assisted living facility, and a skilled nursing facility.…

  12. One Approach to Teaching the Specific Language Disabled Adult Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Binnie L.

    1981-01-01

    One approach never before used in adult language arts instruction--the Slingerland Simultaneous Multisensory Technique--has been found useful for specific language disabled adults in multisensory programs at Anchorage Community College. The Slingerland method builds from single sight, sound, and feel of letters through combinations, encoding,…

  13. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  14. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  15. Writing and Reading with Art: Adult Literacy, Transformation, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Nair Rios; Goncalves, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Especially in a time of economic and social crisis, besides poverty and social segregation, immigrants face an additional difficulty to get integrated in a new society: lack of oral and written knowledge of the language of the country they are now living in. This paper describes an on-going research project--Writing and Reading with Art (WRAP)…

  16. Writing and Reading with Art: Adult Literacy, Transformation, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Nair Rios; Goncalves, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Especially in a time of economic and social crisis, besides poverty and social segregation, immigrants face an additional difficulty to get integrated in a new society: lack of oral and written knowledge of the language of the country they are now living in. This paper describes an on-going research project--Writing and Reading with Art (WRAP)…

  17. Changes in Quality of Life in 7 Older Adult Patients Receiving Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; Kimura, Melissa N.; Cowie, Harriet R.; de Groot, Caroline M.M.; McMinn, Elise A.P.; Sherson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to report on symptomatic and quality of life (QoL) changes in 7 older adult chiropractic patients who were receiving care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT). Clinical Features Seven patients were selected from 2 chiropractic offices in Auckland, New Zealand. Patients were included if they were older adults receiving AMCT care and for whom at least 2 QoL assessments had been performed. The patients, aged 69-80 years, primarily received care for a variety of musculoskeletal complaints. Intervention and Outcomes The patients reported improvements in their presenting complaints as well as a number of nonmusculoskeletal symptoms. Each patient demonstrated clinical improvements in their RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) results. The average improvement in QoL measured using a SF-36 questionnaire was 8.0 points in the physical component and 4.1 points in the mental component. Four cases had a second progress evaluation using the SF-36 and showed an overall improvement of 5.2 in the physical and 9.8 in the mental components from baseline. Conclusion This case series describes an improvement in QoL, as measured by the SF-36 instrument, as well as subjectively reported improvements in both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms in 7 older adults receiving chiropractic care. PMID:27069434

  18. A Survey of State-of-the-Art LORAN-C Receivers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    MARKET SHARE Datamarine Epsco ** Fui urg 5% Micrologic 15% Meico ** Nelco ** Digital Marine 5% Raytheon 5% Sitex/Koden 30% SRD Labs 15% Texas...RECEIVER MANUFACTURES DATE 02/10/84 MOBEL 0 C-PLO? IX EPSCO MARINE 411 PROVIDENCE HWY, WESTWOOD MA. 02090 PHONE 617-329-1500 LIS? .0=IC ) (U" DVEP.F!SE...DIST. AND CORR. A-15 LoRAN-C RECiIVE MANUFACTURRS OATS O02/8IS MODEL 0 C-NAY XL EPSCO MARINE 411 PROVIDENCE INiT WNSTMoeD MA. 02090 PHONE 617-329-1500

  19. Prevalence of urinary incontinence among community-dwelling adults receiving home care.

    PubMed

    Du Moulin, M F M T; Hamers, J P H; Ambergen, A W; Janssen, M A P; Halfens, R J G

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2005 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) in adults receiving home care. Of the 2,866 patients surveyed, 46% suffered from UI; 6.5% had stress, 16.6% had urge, 9% had mixed, and 17.6% had functional incontinence. No diagnosis regarding type of UI had been established in 50.2%. Factors associated with UI were advanced age, higher body mass index, and impaired mobility. UI is prevalent in older persons receiving home care, but the lack of diagnosis of type of UI in half of the participants surveyed impedes management of UI.

  20. Lamivudine Concentration in Hair and Prediction of Virologic Failure and Drug Resistance among HIV Patients Receiving Free ART in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Jiafeng; Ruan, Yuhua; Hsi, Jenny; Liao, Lingjie; Shao, Yiming; Xing, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background The assessment of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important in order to predict treatment outcomes. Lamivudine (3TC) is one of the most widely used NRTIs in China, but its concentrations in hair and association with virologic failure and drug resistance have not been studied. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey to investigate 3TC concentrations in hair as a predictor of virologic failure and drug resistance among HIV patients receiving free ART. We also compared the capacity of hair 3TC concentrations with self-reported adherence in predicting virologic responses. Hair 3TC concentrations were detected through the LC-MS/MS system. Results In patients without HIV drug resistance (HIVDR), with a threshold hair 3TC concentration of 260 ng/g, the sensitivity and specificity in predicting virologic suppression were 76.9% and 89.9%, respectively. Some factors, including CD4+ cell counts, initial treatment regimens with 3TC, and current regimens with second-line drugs, influenced the association between hair 3TC concentrations and virologic suppression. In patients who experienced virologic failure with HIVDR, with a threshold of 180 ng/g, the sensitivity and specificity were 70.0% and 74.4%, respectively. Hair 3TC concentrations had higher sensitivity and specificity in predicting virologic failure and drug resistance than self-reported adherence. Conclusions The hair 3TC concentration was a stronger indicator than self-reported adherence in predicting virologic failure and drug resistance in HIV patients receiving free ART. PMID:27119346

  1. Determinants of adult functional outcome in adolescents receiving special educational assistance.

    PubMed

    McGeown, H R; Johnstone, E C; McKirdy, J; Owens, D C; Stanfield, A C

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood Behaviour Checklist - CBCL) and autistic traits (using the Social Communication Questionnaire - SCQ) during adolescence and were followed up 6 years later (at a mean age of 22 years) using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) to assess functional outcome. A significant positive relationship was found between CBCL score and WHO-DAS II score (β = 0.511, P = 0.001). IQ score showed a negative relationship with total WHO-DAS II score (β = -0.247, P = 0.04). SCQ score was not found to significantly influence total WHO-DAS II score (β = -0.028, P = 0.84). Although the role of global intellectual ability is important, these results stress the highly predictive value of adolescent behaviours on functional outcomes in adult life among young adults receiving special educational assistance. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  2. Freirean Literacy and the Liberal Arts: Empowering the Returning Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivisonno, Ann

    The "problem-posing" education model of Paulo Freire takes as its departure point the life experience of the learner, rather than the teacher's knowledge. Ursuline College (Cleveland, Ohio) created several courses for returning adult students that were based on Freire's ideas. One course called "Humanities Focus on Life" is for…

  3. Freirean Literacy and the Liberal Arts: Empowering the Returning Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivisonno, Ann

    The "problem-posing" education model of Paulo Freire takes as its departure point the life experience of the learner, rather than the teacher's knowledge. Ursuline College (Cleveland, Ohio) created several courses for returning adult students that were based on Freire's ideas. One course called "Humanities Focus on Life" is for…

  4. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  5. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  6. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  7. Martial arts training attenuates arterial stiffness in middle aged adults.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Ingenito, Teresa; Piccirillo, Barbara; Herbst, Meredith; Petrizzo, John; Cherian, Vincen; McCutchan, Christopher; Burke, Caitlin; Stamatinos, George; Jung, Min-Kyung

    2013-09-01

    Arterial stiffness increases with age and is related to an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Poor trunk flexibility has been shown to be associated with arterial stiffness in middle-aged subjects. The purpose of our research study was to measure arterial stiffness and flexibility in healthy middle-aged martial artists compared to age and gender matched healthy sedentary controls. Ten martial artists (54.0 ± 2.0 years), who practice Soo Bahk Do (SBD), a Korean martial art, and ten sedentary subjects (54.7 ± 1.8 years) for a total of twenty subjects took part in this cross-sectional study. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all subjects using pulse wave velocity (PWV), a recognized index of arterial stiffness. Flexibility of the trunk and hamstring were also measured. The independent variables were the martial artists and matched sedentary controls. The dependent variables were PWV and flexibility. There were significant differences, between the SBD practitioners and sedentary controls, in PWV (P = 0.004), in trunk flexibility (P= 0.002), and in hamstring length (P= 0.003). The middle-aged martial artists were more flexible in their trunk and hamstrings and had less arterial stiffness compared to the healthy sedentary controls. The flexibility component of martial art training or flexibility exercises in general may be considered as a possible intervention to reduce the effects of aging on arterial stiffness.

  8. Martial Arts Training Attenuates Arterial Stiffness in Middle Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Douris, Peter C.; Ingenito, Teresa; Piccirillo, Barbara; Herbst, Meredith; Petrizzo, John; Cherian, Vincen; McCutchan, Christopher; Burke, Caitlin; Stamatinos, George; Jung, Min-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Arterial stiffness increases with age and is related to an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Poor trunk flexibility has been shown to be associated with arterial stiffness in middle-aged subjects. The purpose of our research study was to measure arterial stiffness and flexibility in healthy middle-aged martial artists compared to age and gender matched healthy sedentary controls. Methods Ten martial artists (54.0 ± 2.0 years), who practice Soo Bahk Do (SBD), a Korean martial art, and ten sedentary subjects (54.7 ± 1.8 years) for a total of twenty subjects took part in this cross-sectional study. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all subjects using pulse wave velocity (PWV), a recognized index of arterial stiffness. Flexibility of the trunk and hamstring were also measured. The independent variables were the martial artists and matched sedentary controls. The dependent variables were PWV and flexibility. Results There were significant differences, between the SBD practitioners and sedentary controls, in PWV (P = 0.004), in trunk flexibility (P= 0.002), and in hamstring length (P= 0.003). Conclusion The middle-aged martial artists were more flexible in their trunk and hamstrings and had less arterial stiffness compared to the healthy sedentary controls. The flexibility component of martial art training or flexibility exercises in general may be considered as a possible intervention to reduce the effects of aging on arterial stiffness. PMID:24427479

  9. Decreased Chronic Morbidity but Elevated HIV Associated Cytokine Levels in HIV-Infected Older Adults Receiving HIV Treatment: Benefit of Enhanced Access to Care?

    PubMed Central

    Mutevedzi, Portia C.; Rodger, Alison J.; Kowal, Paul; Nyirenda, Makandwe; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HIV with chronic morbidity and inflammatory markers (cytokines) in older adults (50+years) is potentially relevant for clinical care, but data from African populations is scarce. Objective To examine levels of chronic morbidity by HIV and ART status in older adults (50+years) and subsequent associations with selected pro-inflammatory cytokines and body mass index. Methods Ordinary, ordered and generalized ordered logistic regression techniques were employed to compare chronic morbidity (heart disease (angina), arthritis, stroke, hypertension, asthma and diabetes) and cytokines (Interleukins-1 and -6, C-Reactive Protein and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha) by HIV and ART status on a cross-sectional random sample of 422 older adults nested within a defined rural South African population based demographic surveillance. Results Using a composite measure of all morbidities, controlling for age, gender, BMI, smoking and wealth quintile, HIV-infected individuals on ART had 51% decreased odds (95% CI:0.26-0.92) of current morbidity compared to HIV-uninfected. In adjusted regression, compared to HIV-uninfected, the proportional odds (aPOR) of having elevated inflammation markers of IL6 (>1.56pg/mL) was nearly doubled in HIV-infected individuals on (aPOR 1.84; 95%CI: 1.05-3.21) and not on (aPOR 1.94; 95%CI: 1.11-3.41) ART. Compared to HIV-uninfected, HIV-infected individuals on ART had >twice partial proportional odds (apPOR=2.30;p=0.004) of having non-clinically significant raised hsCRP levels(>1ug/mL); ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals had >double apPOR of having hsCRP levels indicative of increased heart disease risk(>3.9ug/mL;p=0.008). Conclusions Although HIV status was associated with increased inflammatory markers, our results highlight reduced morbidity in those receiving ART and underscore the need of pro-actively extending these services to HIV-uninfected older adults, beyond mere provision at fixed clinics. Providing health services

  10. Cardiovascular Disease Among Transgender Adults Receiving Hormone Therapy: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Streed, Carl G; Harfouch, Omar; Marvel, Francoise; Blumenthal, Roger S; Martin, Seth S; Mukherjee, Monica

    2017-08-15

    Recent reports estimate that 0.6% of adults in the United States, or approximately 1.4 million persons, identify as transgender. Despite gains in rights and media attention, the reality is that transgender persons experience health disparities, and a dearth of research and evidence-based guidelines remains regarding their specific health needs. The lack of research to characterize cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD risk factors in transgender populations receiving cross-sex hormone therapy (CSHT) limits appropriate primary and specialty care. As with hormone therapy in cisgender persons (that is, those whose sex assigned at birth aligns with their gender identity), existing research in transgender populations suggests that CVD risk factors are altered by CSHT. Currently, systemic hormone replacement for cisgender adults requires a nuanced discussion based on baseline risk factors and age of administration of exogenous hormones because of concern regarding an increased risk for myocardial infarction and stroke. For transgender adults, CSHT has been associated with the potential for worsening CVD risk factors (such as blood pressure elevation, insulin resistance, and lipid derangements), although these changes have not been associated with increases in morbidity or mortality in transgender men receiving CSHT. For transgender women, CSHT has known thromboembolic risk, and lower-dose transdermal estrogen formulations are preferred over high-dose oral formulations. In addition, many studies of transgender adults focus predominantly on younger persons, limiting the generalizability of CSHT in older transgender adults. The lack of randomized controlled trials comparing various routes and formulations of CSHT, as well as the paucity of prospective cohort studies, limits knowledge of any associations between CSHT and CVD.

  11. Retrospective reports of parenting received in their families of origin: relationships to adult attachment in adult children of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Nair, Veena; Rawlings, Tanaya; Cash, Thomas F; Steer, Kate; Fals-Stewart, William

    2005-09-01

    The present study examined general and romantic attachment and parenting students received in their families of origin among 401 college students who resided with an alcohol-abusing parent prior to age 16 years as compared to those who did not reside with alcohol-abusing parents. Participants completed the Children's Report of Parent Behavior Instrument [Schludermann, E. and Schludermann, S. (1970). Children's Report of Parent Behavior Inventory (CRPBI). Canada: University of Manitoba], Experiences in Close Relationships--Revised [Fraley, R. C., Waller, N. G., and Brennan, K. G. (2000). An item response theory analysis of self-report measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 350-365], Relationship Scale Questionnaire [Griffin, D. W. and Bartholomew, K. (1994). Models of the self and other: Fundamental dimensions underlying measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, 430-445], and the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test [Jones, J. W. (1983). The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test: Test manual. Chicago: Camelot]. Young adults who met criteria for ACOAs reported more anxious and avoidant behavior in romantic relationships and a more fearful style of general adult attachment. Parenting behavior in one's family of origin predicted anxious behavior in romantic relationships and a fearful overall style of attachment, whereas being an ACOA and parenting in one's family of origin predicted avoidant behavior in romantic relationships.

  12. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  13. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  14. Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arviso, Kathern; And Others

    Designed as a helpful guide and "how-to-do-it" outline for those on the Navajo Reservation who work with children, this guide is arranged to offer quick reference and simple projects requiring the minimum of materials. The projects are designed to meet the Navajo child's art needs based on the belief that the art program of the…

  15. Art and Culture of the American Indian, A Guide for Adult Education Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickards, Montana H.; And Others

    Adult Basic Education for American Indians can most effectively be achieved through their art and culture. To highlight the desire of the Indian to be regarded in his own cultural setting, this document offers various ideas and expressions of noted American Indians who were participants at the 1970 ABE Institute for Teachers of American Indians…

  16. What If Grandma Moses Attended Night School? Strategies for Reprioritizing Adult Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Paul J.

    Through their own inventiveness and persistence, adults are circumventing institutional indifference and creating alternative educational networks to teach themselves art. Problems that must be overcome are as follows: inadequate instructor preparation, a generally narrow array of programs in most community centers with the preponderance of…

  17. Institute of Study for Older Adults, Liberal Arts Program: Annual Report, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Nancy

    The Liberal Arts Program described in this report is the largest and most stable of the projects of the Institute of Study for Older Adults (ISOA) at New York City Technical College. The report deals with the program's activities and emphases during 1979-80. After introductory material on the ISOA's growth, activities, funding, and outreach model,…

  18. The Lure of Non-Credit Studio Art Classes for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Gina C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation and satisfaction of adult learners who participated in non-credit studio art classes. Leisure motivation has been researched by educators, philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists (Candy, 1991; Brookfield, 2005: Dewey, 1980; Knowles, 1998; Maslow, 1970; Rogers, 1961, Stebbins,…

  19. The Lure of Non-Credit Studio Art Classes for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Gina C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation and satisfaction of adult learners who participated in non-credit studio art classes. Leisure motivation has been researched by educators, philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists (Candy, 1991; Brookfield, 2005: Dewey, 1980; Knowles, 1998; Maslow, 1970; Rogers, 1961, Stebbins,…

  20. Longitudinal prevalence and correlates of elder mistreatment among older adults receiving home visiting nursing.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Santos, Elizabeth J; Liebel, Dianne V; Russ, Ann J; Conwell, Yeates

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify elder mistreatment (EM) prevalence among a cohort of older adults receiving visiting nurse care in their homes, determine EM subtypes, and identify factors associated with EM. EM data were collected by nurses during monthly home visits for up to 24 months. It took the nurses a mean of 10.5 visits to discern EM. Fifty-four (7.4%) of 724 patients were identified as mistreated, of which 33 had enough information to subtype the EM. Of these 33, 27 were victims of neglect, 16 of psychological abuse, and 10 of financial exploitation, and 17 suffered more than one type. Among the entire sample, 11 variables were positively correlated with EM presence. Nurses visiting older adults in their homes should be aware that their patients are, as a group, vulnerable to EM, and that the factors identified here may be specific markers of greater risk.

  1. Evaluation of Altered Drug Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Michael A; Sieg, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-support modality used in patients with refractory cardiac and/or respiratory failure. A significant resurgence in the use ECMO has been seen in recent years as a result of substantial improvements in technology and survival benefit. With expanding ECMO use, a better understanding of how ECMO affects drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is necessary. The vast majority of PK studies in patients receiving ECMO have been conducted within neonatal or pediatric populations or within a controlled environment (e.g., in vitro or ex vivo). Because of significant differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, it may be inappropriate to extrapolate these PK data to adults. Thus, the aims of this review are to evaluate the changes in drug PK during ECMO and to summarize the available PK data for common drugs used in the adult critically ill patients during ECMO support. A search of the PubMed (1965-July 2016), EMBASE (1965-July 2016), and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register databases was performed. All relevant studies describing PK alterations during ECMO in ex vivo experiments and in adults were included. Evaluation of the data indicated that drug PK in adults receiving ECMO support may be significantly altered. Factors influencing these alterations are numerous and have intricate relationships with each other but can generally be classified as ECMO circuit factors, drug factors, and patient factors. Commonly used drugs in these patients include antimicrobials, sedatives, and analgesics. PK data for most of these drugs are generally lacking; however, recent research efforts in this patient population have provided some limited guidance in drug dosing. With an improved understanding of altered drug PK secondary to ECMO therapy, optimization of pharmacotherapy within this critically ill population continues to move forward.

  2. From Amateur to Framauteur: Art Development of Adolescents and Young Adults within an Interest-Based Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manifold, Marjorie Cohee

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the art developmental progression of adolescents and young adults within the cultural context of an interest-based community is described; the role of narrative and sociocultural community to the art development of adolescents and young adults is highlighted. Artistic development begins in response to an aesthetic phenomenon, is…

  3. HIV viral load suppression in adults and children receiving antiretroviral therapy - results from the IeDEA collaboration.

    PubMed

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kariminia, Azar; Althoff, Keri N; Cesar, Carina; Cortes, Claudia P; Davies, Mary-Ann; Do, Viet Chau; Eley, Brian; Gill, John; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Machado, Daisy Maria; Moore, Richard; Prozesky, Hans; Zaniewski, Elizabeth; Law, Matthew

    2017-07-08

    Having 90% of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and achieving an undetectable viral load (VL) is one of the 90:90:90 by 2020 targets. In this global analysis, we investigated the proportions of adult and paediatric patients with VL suppression in the first three years after ART initiation. Patients from the IeDEA cohorts who initiated ART between 2010 and 2014 were included. Proportions with VL suppression (<1000 copies/mL) were estimated using: (i) strict intention-to-treat (ITT) - loss to follow-up (LTFU) and dead patients counted as having detectable VL; and (ii) modified ITT - LTFU and dead patients were excluded. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of viral suppression at one year after ART initiation using modified ITT. A total of 35561 adults from 38 sites/16 countries and 2601 children from 18 sites/6 countries were included. When comparing strict with modified ITT methods, the proportion achieving VL suppression at three years from ART initiation changed from 45.1% to 90.2% in adults, and 60.6% to 80.4% in children. In adults, older age, higher CD4 count pre-ART, and homosexual/bisexual HIV exposure were associated VL suppression. In children, older age and higher CD4 percentage pre-ART showed significant associations with VL suppression. Large increases in the proportion of VL suppression in adults were observed when we excluded those who were LTFU or had died. The increases were less pronounced in children. Greater emphasis should be made to minimise LTFU and maximise patient retention in HIV-infected patients of all age groups.

  4. Martial Art Training and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter; Douris, Christopher; Balder, Nicole; LaCasse, Michael; Rand, Amir; Tarapore, Freya; Zhuchkan, Aleskey; Handrakis, John

    2015-09-29

    Cognitive performance includes the processes of attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning, which typically declines with aging. Previous research has demonstrated that aerobic and resistance exercise improves cognitive performance immediately following exercise. However, there is limited research examining the effect that a cognitively complex exercise such as martial art training has on these cognitive processes. Our study compared the acute effects of 2 types of martial art training to aerobic exercise on cognitive performance in middle-aged adults. We utilized a repeated measures design with the order of the 3 exercise conditions randomly assigned and counterbalanced. Ten recreational middle-aged martial artists (mean age = 53.5 ± 8.6 years) participated in 3 treatment conditions: a typical martial art class, an atypical martial art class, and a one-hour walk at a self-selected speed. Cognitive performance was assessed by the Stroop Color and Word test. While all 3 exercise conditions improved attention and processing speed, only the 2 martial art conditions improved the highest order of cognitive performance, executive function. The effect of the 2 martial art conditions on executive function was not different. The improvement in executive function may be due to the increased cortical demand required by the more complex, coordinated motor tasks of martial art exercise compared to the more repetitive actions of walking.

  5. Martial Art Training and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Douris, Peter; Douris, Christopher; Balder, Nicole; LaCasse, Michael; Rand, Amir; Tarapore, Freya; Zhuchkan, Aleskey; Handrakis, John

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive performance includes the processes of attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning, which typically declines with aging. Previous research has demonstrated that aerobic and resistance exercise improves cognitive performance immediately following exercise. However, there is limited research examining the effect that a cognitively complex exercise such as martial art training has on these cognitive processes. Our study compared the acute effects of 2 types of martial art training to aerobic exercise on cognitive performance in middle-aged adults. We utilized a repeated measures design with the order of the 3 exercise conditions randomly assigned and counterbalanced. Ten recreational middle-aged martial artists (mean age = 53.5 ± 8.6 years) participated in 3 treatment conditions: a typical martial art class, an atypical martial art class, and a one-hour walk at a self-selected speed. Cognitive performance was assessed by the Stroop Color and Word test. While all 3 exercise conditions improved attention and processing speed, only the 2 martial art conditions improved the highest order of cognitive performance, executive function. The effect of the 2 martial art conditions on executive function was not different. The improvement in executive function may be due to the increased cortical demand required by the more complex, coordinated motor tasks of martial art exercise compared to the more repetitive actions of walking. PMID:26672872

  6. Outcomes for adult scoliosis patients receiving chiropractic rehabilitation: a 24-month retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to retrospectively report the results of patients who completed an exercise-based chiropractic program and its potential to alter the natural progression of adult scoliosis at 24 months after the clinic portion of treatment was concluded. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted at 2 spine clinics in Michigan, USA. Each clinic uses the same chiropractic rehabilitation program to treat patients with adult scoliosis. Multidimensional patient outcomes included radiographic, respiratory, disability, and pain parameters. Outcomes were measured at baseline, at end of active treatment, and at long-term follow-up. Results A total of 28 patients fit the inclusion criteria for the study. The average beginning primary Cobb angle was 44° ± 6°. Patients received the same chiropractic rehabilitation program for approximately 6 months. At the end of active treatment, improvements were recorded in Cobb angle, pain scores, spirometry, and disability rating. All radiographic findings were maintained at 24-month follow-up. Conclusion This report is among the first to demonstrate sustained radiographic, self-rated, and physiologic benefits after treatment ceased. After completion of a multimodal chiropractic rehabilitation treatment, a retrospective cohort of 28 adult scoliosis patients reported improvements in pain, Cobb angle, and disability immediately following the conclusion of treatment and 24 months later. PMID:22014907

  7. Physical activity in adults with cystic fibrosis receiving intravenous antibiotics in hospital and in the community.

    PubMed

    Khiroya, Heena; Pound, Rebecca; Qureshi, Ushna; Brown, Catherine; Barrett, Joanne; Rashid, Rifat; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Turner, Alice M; Nash, Edward F

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous antibiotic therapy (IVAT) for CF acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE) can be delivered in hospital or in the community. This study aimed to compare physical activity in CF patients receiving hospital and community-delivered IVAT, as well as other health outcomes. This was a non-randomised parallel group prospective observational study. Hospitalised and community-treated CF adults receiving IVAT for APE were asked to wear ActiGraph® activity monitors, complete the habitual activity estimation scale (HAES), food diary, modified shuttle test (MST) and CFQ-R at the start and end of therapy. Nutritional and clinical outcomes were also compared between the cohorts. The primary outcomes was physical activity measured by the ActiGraph® activity monitors at the beginning and end of treatment in both cohorts. Physical activity (measured and self-reported) was no different between the cohorts, with both hospitalised and community-treated subjects being generally sedentary. Body weight increased significantly in the hospitalised cohort, whereas no difference was seen in the community-treated cohort. FEV1 % predicted and FVC % predicted increased in community-treated subjects, whereas only FVC % predicted increased in hospitalised subjects. CFQ-R respiratory domain increased to a greater extent in community-treated subjects. CF adults receiving IVAT for APE, both in hospital and in the community, are generally sedentary and we found no difference in physical activity between the two groups. These findings suggests the need to further promote physical activity in suitable patients during APE where considered appropriate.

  8. T follicular helper cells and antibody response to Hepatitis B virus vaccine in HIV-1 infected children receiving ART.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Yonas; Yibeltal, Desalegn; Bobosha, Kidist; Andargie, Temesgen E; Lemma, Mahlet; Gebre, Meseret; Mekonnen, Eyasu; Habtewold, Abiy; Nilsson, Anna; Aseffa, Abraham; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2017-08-21

    HBV vaccine has 95% efficacy in children to prevent HBV infection and related cancer. We conducted a prospective study in HIV-1 infected children receiving ART (n = 49) and controls (n = 63) to assess humoral and cellular responses to HBV vaccine provided with three doses under an accelerated schedule of 4 weeks apart. At 1 month post-vaccination all children, except 4 HIV-1 infected, displayed protective antibody (ab) titers to HBV vaccine; ab titers were lower in infected children (P < 0.0001). Ab titers decreased (P < 0.0001) in both HIV-1 infected and control children at 6 months. The frequency of circulating Tfh (cTFh) cells was 20.3% for controls and 20.8% for infected children prior to vaccination and remained comparable post-vaccination. Cytokine expression by cTfh cells upon activation with HBV antigen was comparable in the two groups at baseline and 1 month post-vaccination. Higher plasma levels (P < 0.0001) of CXCL13 were found in infected children which correlated with cTfh cell frequency at baseline. In conclusion, a lower ab response to HBV vaccine was measured in HIV-1 infected children. The frequency and activation profile of cTfh cells was comparable in infected children and controls suggesting that cells other than Tfh cells are responsible for impaired ab response to HBV vaccine.

  9. Safety and clinical outcomes among older adults receiving daptomycin therapy: Insights from a patient registry.

    PubMed

    DePestel, Daryl D; Hershberger, Ellie; Lamp, Kenneth C; Malani, Preeti N

    2010-12-01

    Serious gram-positive bacterial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality among older adults and can present significant challenges to clinicians. Data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of newer agents in this population are limited. Daptomycin is a lipopeptide with activity against resistant gram-positive organisms. To better understand the overall safety and effectiveness of daptomycin in older adults (≥66 years of age), the authors reviewed the data that were collected as part of an ongoing registry maintained by Cubist Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Lexington, Massachusetts), the manufacturer of daptomycin. The Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE) is a multicenter, retrospective registry designed to collect postmarketing clinical data on patients who received daptomycin. The CORE data collected from 58 institutions across the United States between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007, were analyzed to better understand the overall safety profile of daptomycin and the clinical outcomes of older adults who were treated with this agent. Patients were considered to be nonevaluable if the medical record did not contain sufficient information to determine response at the end of therapy. Nonevaluable patients were excluded from the clinical outcome analysis but included in the safety analysis. The registry contained 1073 patients aged ≥66 years who received daptomycin; 23.8% (255/1073) were ≥81 years of age. Overall, 18.1% (194/1073) of patients experienced 324 adverse events, and 6.2% (67/1073) of patients experienced 97 adverse events that were considered possibly related to treatment with daptomycin. The most frequently reported adverse events that were considered possibly treatment related included creatine phosphokinase (CPK) elevations, gastrointestinal disorders, and skin rashes. Among the 67 patients who experienced ≥1 adverse event that was possibly related to daptomycin, 30 discontinued therapy due to the adverse event

  10. Reclaiming Joy: Pilot Evaluation of a Mental Health Peer Support Program for Older Adults Who Receive Medicaid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Rosemary K.; Sergeant, Julie F.; Landry, Sarah; Leedahl, Skye N.; Rachlin, Roxanne; Koenig, Terry; Graham, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stigma and lack of access to providers create barriers to mental health treatment for older adults living in the community. In order to address these barriers, we developed and evaluated a peer support intervention for older adults receiving Medicaid services. Design and Methods: Reclaiming Joy is a mental health intervention that pairs…

  11. A Randomized, Single-Blind, Substitution Study of OROS Methylphenidate (Concerta) in ADHD Adults Receiving Immediate Release Methylphenidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Mick, Eric; Surman, Craig B. H.; Hammerness, Paul; Doyle, Robert; Aleardi, Megan; Kotarski, Meghan; Williams, Courtney G.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the efficacy, tolerability, and compliance of an extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) in adults with ADHD receiving immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH). Method: Participants were outpatient adults with ADHD who were stable on IR-MPH-administered TID. Participants…

  12. Reclaiming Joy: Pilot Evaluation of a Mental Health Peer Support Program for Older Adults Who Receive Medicaid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Rosemary K.; Sergeant, Julie F.; Landry, Sarah; Leedahl, Skye N.; Rachlin, Roxanne; Koenig, Terry; Graham, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stigma and lack of access to providers create barriers to mental health treatment for older adults living in the community. In order to address these barriers, we developed and evaluated a peer support intervention for older adults receiving Medicaid services. Design and Methods: Reclaiming Joy is a mental health intervention that pairs…

  13. A Randomized, Single-Blind, Substitution Study of OROS Methylphenidate (Concerta) in ADHD Adults Receiving Immediate Release Methylphenidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Mick, Eric; Surman, Craig B. H.; Hammerness, Paul; Doyle, Robert; Aleardi, Megan; Kotarski, Meghan; Williams, Courtney G.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the efficacy, tolerability, and compliance of an extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) in adults with ADHD receiving immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH). Method: Participants were outpatient adults with ADHD who were stable on IR-MPH-administered TID. Participants…

  14. Stigma And HIV Care Continuum Outcomes Among Ethiopian Adults Initiating ART.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Susie; Tymejczyk, Olga; Kulkarni, Sarah; Lahuerta, Maria; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Remien, Robert H; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis; Elul, Batya

    2017-08-22

    Stigma harms the mental health of HIV-positive individuals and reduces adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), but less is known about stigma and other outcomes across the HIV care continuum. Among 1180 Ethiopian adults initiating ART at six urban HIV clinics, we examined the relationship of internalized, anticipated, and enacted stigma to HIV care-related outcomes ascertained by interview (repeat HIV-positive testing, provider vs. self-referred testing, missed clinic visit before ART initiation, eagerness to begin ART) and by abstraction of routinely collected clinical data (late ART initiation, 3-month gap in care following ART initiation). Logistic regression was used to assess the association of each type of stigma with each outcome, adjusting for potential confounders. Scoring higher on each stigma domain was associated with 50%-90% higher odds of repeat HIV-positive testing. High internalized stigma was associated with higher odds of provider vs. self-referred test (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]high vs. low: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-2.2). Higher anticipated stigma was associated with lower eagerness to begin ART (aORhigh vs. low: 0.55; 0.35-0.87; aORmedium vs. low: 0.45; 95%CI: 0.30-0.69). Any enacted stigma was associated with higher odds of a missed visit (aORany vs. none 1.8; 1.2-2.8). Stigma was not associated with late ART-initiation or with a subsequent gap in care. These findings provide further evidence of the importance of measuring and addressing stigma across the entire care continuum. Future work should test hypotheses about specific stigma domains and outcomes in prospective intervention or observational studies.

  15. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Healy, JR; Thoma, BN; Peahota, MM; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, NC; Kraft, WK

    2016-01-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration–time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log‐likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two‐compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non‐ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher‐weight patients. PMID:27639260

  16. Localization of Sonic hedgehog secreting and receiving cells in the developing and adult rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Guasti, Leonardo; Paul, Alex; Laufer, Ed; King, Peter

    2011-04-10

    Sonic hedgehog signaling was recently demonstrated to play an important role in murine adrenal cortex development. The organization of the rat adrenal differs from that of the mouse, with the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata separated by an undifferentiated zone in the rat, but not in the mouse. In the present study we aimed to determine the mRNA expression patterns of Sonic hedgehog and the hedgehog signaling pathway components Patched-1 and Gli1 in the developing and adult rat adrenal. Sonic hedgehog expression was detected at the periphery of the cortex in cells lacking CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 expression, while signal-receiving cells were localized in the overlying capsule mesenchyme. Using combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that the cells expressing Sonic hedgehog lie between the CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 layers, and thus Sonic hedgehog expression defines one cell population of the undifferentiated zone.

  17. Connecting Socially Isolated Older Rural Adults with Older Volunteers through Expressive Arts.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ann; Skinner, Mark W; Wilkinson, Fay; Reid, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Employing a participatory arts-based research approach, we examined an innovative program from rural Ontario, Canada, designed to address social isolation among older people. Older socially isolated adults were matched to trained volunteers, where in dyads, the eight pairs created expressive art in their home setting over the course of 10 home visits. With thematic and narrative inquiry, we analysed the experiences and perceptions of the program leader, older participants, and older volunteers via their artistic creations, weekly logs, evaluations, and field notes. The findings reveal a successful intervention that positively influenced the well-being of older adult participants and older volunteers, especially in regards to relationships, personal development, and creating meaning as well as extending the intervention's impact beyond the program's duration. We also discuss opportunities for similar programs to inform policy and enable positive community-based health and social service responses to rural social isolation.

  18. Delirium in adult patients receiving palliative care: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Román, Sofía; Beltrán Zavala, Cristina; Lara Solares, Argelia; Chiquete, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Delirium in palliative care patients is common and its diagnosis and treatment is a major challenge. Our objective was to perform a literature analysis in two phases on the recent scientific evidence (2007-2012) on the diagnosis and treatment of delirium in adults receiving palliative care. In phase 1 (descriptive studies and narrative reviews) 133 relevant articles were identified: 73 addressed the issue of delirium secondarily, and 60 articles as the main topic. However, only 4 prospective observational studies in which delirium was central were identified. Of 135 articles analysed in phase 2 (clinical trials or descriptive studies on treatment of delirium in palliative care patients), only 3 were about prevention or treatment: 2 retrospective studies and one clinical trial on multicomponent prevention in cancer patients. Much of the recent literature is related to reviews on studies conducted more than a decade ago and on patients different to those receiving palliative care. In conclusion, recent scientific evidence on delirium in palliative care is limited and suboptimal. Prospective studies are urgently needed that focus specifically on this highly vulnerable population. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Homeless adults engagement in art: first steps towards identity, recovery and social inclusion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yvonne; Gray, Marion; McGinty, Sue; Ebringer, Sally

    2011-12-01

    The Australian policy on homelessness identifies participation in structured activities as the first step towards social inclusion and increasing the likelihood of permanently leaving a homeless lifestyle. Art interventions increase interpersonal function and social participation and provide a means of expression and transformation with people who are homeless. This study explores the value of an art programme provided by a non-government agency for homeless adults. Qualitative methods including participant observation and purposive interviews were analysed inductively and thematically to gain an understanding of the participants' experience of art and its value. Interviews with stakeholders provided additional information and triangulation of the data. The study demonstrates that art occupations provide a starting point for participation in community and a positive experience that encourages the construction of new identities, routines and roles. Furthermore, art provides an alternative from the problems associated with homelessness, mental health and substance abuse and allows for public recognition and social inclusion. Health professionals should work towards the social inclusion of homeless people through providing occupational opportunities for participation in safe settings as a first step to community engagement. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  20. Trends in in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults receiving maintenance dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Susan P. Y.; Kreuter, William; Curtis, J. Randall; Hall, Yoshio N.; O’Hare, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Understanding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practices and outcomes can help to support advance care planning in patients receiving maintenance dialysis. Objective To characterize patterns and outcomes of in-hospital CPR in US adults receiving maintenance dialysis. Design A national retrospective cohort study. Setting A comprehensive national registry for end-stage renal disease. Participants 663,734 Medicare beneficiaries aged 18 years who initiated maintenance dialysis between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010. Exposure Receipt of in-hospital CPR from 91 days after dialysis initiation through the time of death, first kidney transplant or end of follow-up on December 31, 2011. Main outcomes and measures Incidence of CPR and survival after the first episode of CPR recorded in Medicare claims during follow-up. Results The annual incidence of CPR for the overall cohort was 1.4 events/1,000 in-hospital days (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–1.4). Approximately one in five (21.9%, 95% CI 21.4–22.3) CPR recipients survived to hospital discharge, with a median post-discharge survival of 5.0 months (interquartile range 0.7–16.8). Among patients who died in the hospital, 14.9% (95% CI 14.8–15.1) received CPR during their terminal admission. From 2000–2011, there was an increase in the incidence of CPR (1.0 events/1,000 in-hospital days [95% CI 0.9–1.1] to 1.6 events/1,000 in-hospital days [95% CI 1.6–1.7]; trend p<0.001), the proportion of CPR recipients who survived to discharge (15.2% [95% CI 11.1–20.5] to 28% [95% CI 26.7–29.4]; trend p<0.001) and the proportion of in-hospital deaths preceded by CPR (9.5% [95% CI 8.4–10.8] to 19.8% [95% CI 19.2–20.4]; trend p<0.001), with no substantial change in duration of post-discharge survival. Conclusions and relevance Among a national cohort of patients receiving maintenance dialysis, the incidence of CPR was higher and long-term survival worse than reported for other populations. PMID

  1. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-Based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracun Sova, Rajka

    2015-01-01

    Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires "knowledge". The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three…

  2. More than Meets the Eye: Adult Education for Critical Consciousness in Luis Camnitzer's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana Carlina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness through the conceptual art of Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework grounding this research was critical public pedagogy, influenced by both critical theory and Stuart Hall's systems of representation (1997). This framework…

  3. More than Meets the Eye: Adult Education for Critical Consciousness in Luis Camnitzer's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana Carlina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness through the conceptual art of Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework grounding this research was critical public pedagogy, influenced by both critical theory and Stuart Hall's systems of representation (1997). This framework…

  4. Response to booster doses of hepatitis B vaccine among young adults who had received neonatal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chan, Paul K S; Ngai, Karry L K; Lao, Terence T; Wong, Martin C S; Cheung, Theresa; Yeung, Apple C M; Chan, Martin C W; Luk, Scotty W C

    2014-01-01

    Newborns who have received hepatitis B immunization in 1980s are now young adults joining healthcare disciplines. The need for booster, pre- and post-booster checks becomes a practical question. The aim of this study is to refine the HBV vaccination policy for newly admitted students in the future. A prospective study on medical and nursing school entrants to evaluate hepatitis B serostatus and the response to booster doses among young adults. Among 212 students, 17-23-year-old, born after adoption of neonatal immunization, 2 (0.9%) were HBsAg positive, 40 (18.9%) were anti-HBs positive. At 1 month after a single-dose booster for anti-HBs-negative students, 14.5% had anti-HBs <10 mIU/mL, 29.0% and 56.5% were 10-100 and >100 mIU/mL, respectively. The anti-HBs levels were significantly higher for females than males (mean [SD]: 431 [418] vs. 246 [339] mIU/mL, P = 0.047). At 2-4 month after the third booster dose, 97.1% had anti-HBs >100 mIU/mL and 2.9% had 10-100 mIU/mL. Pre-booster check is still worthwhile to identify carriers among newly recruited healthcare workers born after adoption of neonatal immunization. A 3-dose booster, rather than a single dose, is required for the majority to achieve an anti-HBs level >100 mIU/mL, as memory immunity has declined in a substantial proportion of individuals. Cost-effectiveness of post-booster check for anti-HBs is low and should be further evaluated based on contextual specific utilization of results.

  5. Malnutrition is related to functional impairment in older adults receiving home care.

    PubMed

    Kiesswetter, E; Pohlhausen, S; Uhlig, K; Diekmann, R; Lesser, S; Heseker, H; Stehle, P; Sieber, C C; Volkert, D

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this work were (a) to provide a detailed description of the association between nutritional (Mini Nutritional Assessment; MNA®) and functional status in a sample of older adults receiving home care, using both questionnaire- and performance-based functional methods, and (b) to investigate the impact of different MNA subscales on this association. Multi-centre, cross-sectional. Home care. 296 persons ≥65 years in need of care (80.7±7.7 y). Nutritional status was determined by the MNA and functional status by two questionnaires (Instrumental and Basic Activities of Daily Living; IADL, ADL) and three performance tests (handgrip strength, HGS; Short Physical Performance Battery, SPPB; Timed 'Up and Go' Test, TUG). A categorical and a covariance analytical approach were used to test for differences in functional status between MNA groups (well nourished, risk of malnutrition, malnourished). In addition, functional parameters were correlated with total MNA, a modified MNA version (modMNA), where functional items were excluded, and MNA subscales ('functionality', 'general assessment', 'anthropometry', 'dietary assessment', and 'subjective assessment'). 57% of the participants were at risk of malnutrition and 12% malnourished. 35% reported severe limitations in IADL, 18% in ADL. 40%, 39% and 35% had severe limitations in HGS, SPPB and TUG; 9%, 28% and 34% were not able to perform the tests. Functional status deteriorated significantly from the well nourished to the malnourished group in all functional measures. The modMNA was weak but still significantly related to all functional parameters except TUG. The subscale 'functionality' revealed strongest correlations with functional measures. All other MNA subscales showed only weak or no associations. More than one half of the seniors receiving home care were at nutritional risk and poor functional level, respectively. Malnutrition according to MNA was significantly associated to both questionnaire- and

  6. Increased proportions of dendritic cells and recovery of IFNγ responses in HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving ART.

    PubMed

    Saraswati, Henny; Lee, Silvia; Tan, Dino; Yunihastuti, Evy; Gani, Rino; Price, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) numbers and functions can be affected by HIV and HCV disease, but the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on DC and the implications of these changes are unclear. We examined circulating DC in samples from Indonesian patients beginning ART with advanced HIV disease and documented mild/moderate HCV hepatitis. Frequencies of myeloid and plasmacytoid DC increased after 6 months on ART, but frequencies of DC producing IL-12 or IFNα following stimulation with TLR agonists (CL075, CpG) did not change. IFNγ responses to CL075, HCV and other antigens rose over this period. Hence increased IFNγ responses during ART may be associated with increased DC frequencies rather than changes in their functional capacity.

  7. The role of art education in adult prisons: The Western Australian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Margaret; Paris, Lisa; Whale, Jacqui

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration costs are high; in Australia, for example, each prisoner costs an average of AUD 115,000 per year. Other countries are also feeling the fiscal pinch of high incarceration costs, and a number of jurisdictions are now closing some of their prisons. Most prison costs are non-discretionary (accommodation, meals, etc.). But some of the costs relate to discretionary activities, services and facilities (including schooling). In terms of correctional education, many prison managers try to invest any meagre correctional education resources available to them in those classes and courses which have proven to have the best results, such as improved labour market outcomes and reduced recidivism, minimising subsequent re-imprisonment. Course offers for prisoner-students include vocational training, adult basic education (ABE) and art studies. The two-tiered question this paper asks is: do art classes and courses produce these measurable outcomes and, if not, are there other reasons why they should continue to be funded? Addressing these issues, the authors argue that (1) these measurable outcomes are too narrow and do not reflect the complex but less quantifiable benefits to the individual and the community of studying art in prison, and (2) better measures of all impacts of art studies in prisons are needed, including qualitative and humanitarian aspects.

  8. Home-Based Art Therapy for Older Adults with Mental Health Needs: Views of Clients and Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElroy, Siobhan; Warren, Alison; Jones, Fay

    2006-01-01

    The value of art therapy for older people with mental health problems is well documented although there is a paucity of research for people who are home bound. This study, based in England, involved five clients, all older people with mental health problems, receiving art therapy sessions at home. The clients and caregivers were then interviewed…

  9. Garden walking and art therapy for depression in older adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Liehr, Patricia; Gregersen, Thomas; Nishioka, Reiko

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare garden walking (either alone or guided) with art therapy in older adults with depression. Depression was measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and stories of sadness/joy. Prior to the intervention, 47% of participants had depression scores in the severe range and 53% in the mild range. At the end of the intervention, none of the participants had scores in the severe range, 89% had scores in the mild range, and 11% had scores in the normal range. Results of the GDS data using repeated measures analysis of variance indicated significant decreases in depression for all three groups from pretest to posttest. All participants, regardless of group assignment, had a lower percentage of negative-emotion word use and a higher percentage of positive-emotion word use over time. This study provides evidence for nurses wishing to guide older adults in safe, easy, and inexpensive ways to reduce depression.

  10. Non-AIDS-defining events among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in resource-replete versus resource-limited urban setting

    PubMed Central

    Wester, C. William; Koethe, John R.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Stinnette, Samuel E.; Rebeiro, Peter F.; Kipp, Aaron M.; Hong, Hwanhee; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; McGowan, Catherine C.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Marlink, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare incidence and distribution of non-AIDS-defining events (NADEs) among HIV-1-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in urban sub-Saharan African versus United States settings. Design Retrospective cohort analysis of clinical trial and observational data. Methods Compared crude and standardized (to US cohort by age and sex) NADE rates from two urban adult HIV-infected cART-initiating populations: a clinical trial cohort in Gaborone, Botswana (Botswana) and an observational cohort in Nashville, Tennessee (USA). Results Crude NADE incidence rates were similar: 10.0 [95% confidence interval 6.3–15.9] per 1000 person-years in Botswana versus 12.4 [8.4–18.4] per 1000 person-years in the United States. However, after standardizing to an older, predominantly male US population, the overall NADE incidence rates were higher in Botswana [18.7 (8.3–33.1) per 1000 person-years]. Standardized rates differed most for cardiovascular events (8.4 versus 5.0 per 1000 person-years) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (8.0 versus 0.5 per 1000 person-years) – both higher in Botswana. Conversely, hepatic NADE rates were higher in the United States (4.0 versus 0.0 per 1000 person-years), whereas renal NADE rates [3.0 per 1000 person-years (United States) versus 2.4 per 1000 person-years (Botswana)] were comparable. Conclusion Crude NADE incidence rates were similar between cART-treated patients in a US observational cohort and a sub-Saharan African clinical trial. However, when standardized to the US cohort, overall NADE rates were higher in Botswana. NADEs appear to be a significant problem in our sub-Saharan African setting, and the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of NADEs should be a critical component of care in resource-limited settings. PMID:21572309

  11. [Vaccination of adult patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Perspective of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Espínoza Mora, M Del Rosario; Lazo Páez, Gustavo; León Bratti, M Paz; Schauer, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In this article the present recommendations for immunization of adult patients who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation -a common procedure in therapy of many types of hematological diseases and serious inborn defects of the immune system- are reviewed and discussed. Patients that undergo this kind of transplantation procedure exhibit, compared to the general population, an elevated susceptibility of immune-preventable infections, due to loss of the humoral and cellular protective immunity. A revaccination strategy for transplanted patients can result in a significant diminution of morbidity and mortality related to the treatment of these diseases. Few data are published about the duration and magnitude of the vaccination response in this specific population of patients. Moreover, deviation from international guidelines recommendations for post-transplant immune prophylaxis can be observed frequently, partly as a result of the absence of specific vaccines in some countries. Multiple factors as intensity of the pharmacologic immune suppression, myeloablative regimen, administration of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, duration of the post-transplant period or the presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), can influence the immune response and establish special considerations for certain biological agents, as observed in case of living attenuated virus composed vaccines. This conditions are responsible for the fact that an optimal time point for vaccination of transplanted patients remains not clearly defined. More specific studies about the underlying immunological mechanisms during immunocompromised periods are necessary to understand better the immunogenicity and security of existing vaccines. The development of innovative vaccines as well can induce certain advances in the post-transplant therapy.

  12. Cannabinoids for nausea and vomiting in adults with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lesley A; Azariah, Fredric; Lavender, Verna T C; Stoner, Nicola S; Bettiol, Silvana

    2015-11-12

    Cannabis has a long history of medicinal use. Cannabis-based medications (cannabinoids) are based on its active element, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and have been approved for medical purposes. Cannabinoids may be a useful therapeutic option for people with chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting that respond poorly to commonly used anti-emetic agents (anti-sickness drugs). However, unpleasant adverse effects may limit their widespread use. To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of cannabis-based medications for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults with cancer. We identified studies by searching the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and LILACS from inception to January 2015. We also searched reference lists of reviews and included studies. We did not restrict the search by language of publication. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared a cannabis-based medication with either placebo or with a conventional anti-emetic in adults receiving chemotherapy. At least two review authors independently conducted eligibility and risk of bias assessment, and extracted data. We grouped studies based on control groups for meta-analyses conducted using random effects. We expressed efficacy and tolerability outcomes as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 23 RCTs. Most were of cross-over design, on adults undergoing a variety of chemotherapeutic regimens ranging from moderate to high emetic potential for a variety of cancers. The majority of the studies were at risk of bias due to either lack of allocation concealment or attrition. Trials were conducted between 1975 and 1991. No trials involved comparison with newer anti-emetic drugs such as ondansetron. Comparison with placebo People had more chance of reporting complete absence of vomiting (3 trials; 168 participants; RR 5.7; 95% CI 2.6 to 12.6; low quality evidence

  13. The Impact of Support Received and Support Provision on Changes in Perceived Social Support among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with…

  14. Experiences of Receiving a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Survey of Adults in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lydia; Goddard, Lorna; Hill, Elisabeth L.; Henry, Lucy A.; Crane, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A total of 128 adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders were surveyed concerning the process they went through to obtain their diagnosis and the subsequent support they received. Results suggested that routes to diagnosis were quite heterogeneous and overall levels of satisfaction with the diagnostic process were mixed; 40% of…

  15. The Impact of Support Received and Support Provision on Changes in Perceived Social Support among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with…

  16. Experiences of Receiving a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Survey of Adults in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lydia; Goddard, Lorna; Hill, Elisabeth L.; Henry, Lucy A.; Crane, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A total of 128 adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders were surveyed concerning the process they went through to obtain their diagnosis and the subsequent support they received. Results suggested that routes to diagnosis were quite heterogeneous and overall levels of satisfaction with the diagnostic process were mixed; 40% of…

  17. Well-Being and Institutional Care in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional and Time Effects of Provided and Received Support

    PubMed Central

    Kroemeke, Aleksandra; Gruszczynska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal effects of provided and received support on older adults’ subjective well-being (positive affect and depression) and to examine whether being a recipient of institutional care moderates these effects. Methods Social support (provided and received), positive affect, and depressive symptoms were assessed twice (at baseline and 1 month later) for 277 older adults (age 77.39 ± 9.20 years, 67.50% women, 65% residents of an institutional care facility). Findings Two structural equation models were analyzed: cross-sectional (at baseline) and longitudinal (after 1 month). The first model revealed a significant positive relationship between providing and receiving support and positive affect, and a negative relationship between receiving support and depression. However, being a recipient of institutional care appeared to be a significant moderator in the longitudinal model. Specifically, the findings indicated effects of both providing and receiving support on positive affect but only for noninstitutionalized older adults. Discussion Although both types of support may be beneficial for older adults, their effects depend on the nature of social exchange and the dimensions of well-being. This suggests that such factors should be systematically investigated in future research. PMID:27548721

  18. A comparative study of art therapy in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and improvement in quality of life by watercolor painting.

    PubMed

    Bozcuk, H; Ozcan, K; Erdogan, C; Mutlu, H; Demir, M; Coskun, S

    2017-02-01

    There is limited data on the role of art therapy used in cancer patients. We wanted to test the effect of painting art therapy provided by a dedicated professional painting artist on quality of life and anxiety and depression levels in patients having chemotherapy. Cancer patients having chemotherapy in the day unit of a medical oncology department of a university hospital were offered to take part in a painting art therapy program (PATP). This program consisted of a professional painting artist facilitating and helping patients to perform painting during their chemotherapy sessions while they were in the day unit, as well as supplying them painting material for home practice. The changes in quality of life domains of EORTC-QLQ-C30 questionnaire and in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scores (HADS) were assessed before and after the PATP. These results were contrasted with a reference group of cancer patients on chemotherapy but not taking part in the PATP. In order to adjust for multiple comparisons of quality of life parameters between patient groups, we utilized the Bonferroni correction. A total of 48 patients, of which 26 patients did and 22 did not have prior exposure to PATP, were enrolled in the PATP. A control group of 24 patients who did not have any PATP activity during the study period also took part in the study. With PATP, there was significant improvement in global quality of life (F=7.87, P=0.001), and depression scores (F=7.80, P=0.001). To our knowledge, this is the largest comparative PATP experience in cancer patients on chemotherapy and show that PATP is feasible in the clinics. Our results confirm that art therapy in the form of painting improves quality of life and depression in cancer patients having chemotherapy. This effect was more pronounced in patients without any previous experience of PATP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Healthcare utilization in adults with opioid dependence receiving extended release naltrexone compared to treatment as usual.

    PubMed

    Soares, William E; Wilson, Donna; Rathlev, Niels; Lee, Joshua D; Gordon, Michael; Nunes, Edward V; O'Brien, Charles P; Friedmann, Peter D

    2017-05-12

    Opioid use disorders have reached epidemic proportions, with overdose now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. Extended release naltrexone (XR-NTX) has emerged as a medication treatment that reduces opioid use and craving. However, the effect of XR-NTX therapy on acute healthcare utilization, including emergency department visits and inpatient hospitalizations, remains uncertain. The objective of the current study is to evaluate hospital-based healthcare resource utilization in adults involved in the criminal justice system with a history of opioid use disorder randomized to XR-NTX therapy compared with treatment as usual (TAU) during a 6-month treatment phase and 12months post-treatment follow up. This retrospective exploratory analysis uses data collected in a published randomized trial. Comparisons of the number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions (for drug detox, psychiatric care and other medical reasons) were performed using chi square tests for any admission and negative binomial models for number of admissions. Of the 308 participants randomized, 96% had utilization data (76% complete 6months, 67% complete follow up). No significant differences were seen in overall healthcare utilization (IRR=0.88, 95%CI 0.63-1.23, p=0.45), or substance use-related drug detox hospitalizations (IRR=0.83, 95%CI 0.32-2.16, p=0.71). Despite having more participants report chronic medical problems at baseline (43% vs. 32%, p=0.05), those receiving XR-NTX generally experienced equivalent or lower rates of healthcare utilization compared to TAU. The XR-NTX group had significantly lower medical/surgical related hospital admissions (IRR=0.55, 95%CI 0.30-1.00, p=0.05) during the course of the entire study. XR-NTX did not significantly increase rates of healthcare utilization compared to TAU. Provider concerns regarding healthcare utilization should not preclude the consideration of XR-NTX as therapy for opioid use disorders. Copyright © 2017

  20. Reproductive and contraceptive counseling received by adult women with congenital heart disease: a risk-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Hinze, Alicia; Kutty, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Sandene, Erin K; Meza, Jane; Kugler, John D

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to study the prevalence of counseling received by adult women with congenital heart disease to determine from whom they received such counseling and to describe their contraceptive and reproductive knowledge. Using a cross-sectional survey, information was collected from 83 women, ≥ 19 years of age with congenital heart disease from a group of 404 women followed in our adult congenital heart disease clinic. Women were stratified into combined hormonal contraceptive and pregnancy World Health Organization risk classes 1-4 based on cardiac lesion. We hypothesized that >50% of women had not received both contraceptive and reproductive counseling that addressed their heart condition; indeed, 59% of women reported they had not received such counseling (P=.05). Women who had received heart-specific contraceptive counseling were in higher risk combined hormonal contraceptive World Health Organization classes (P=.02). Similarly, women who reported receiving counseling regarding risks of pregnancy were also in higher pregnancy World Health Organization risk classes (P=.002). Fifty-two of 77 women (63%) did not know if there was a contraindicated contraceptive method given their underlying heart condition; 16 of these 52 women (31%) were combined hormonal contraceptive class 3 or class 4. This adult congenital heart disease survey study demonstrates an opportunity to improve individualized contraceptive and reproductive counseling with a goal toward minimizing each patient's risk of potentially avoidable adverse events. A stronger collaboration among health care professionals is needed to increase the prevalence of heart-specific counseling and to increase the quality of counseling these women are receiving. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  2. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  3. Safety and efficacy of ombitasvir – 450/r and dasabuvir and ribavirin in HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients receiving atazanavir or raltegravir ART regimens

    PubMed Central

    Eron, Joseph J; Lalezari, Jay; Slim, Jihad; Gathe, Joseph; Ruane, Peter J; Wang, Chia; Elion, Richard; Blick, Gary; Khatri, Amit; Hu, Yiran B; Gibbons, Krystal; Fredrick, Linda; Co, Melannie; D'Amico, Ronald; Da Silva-Tillmann, Barbara; Trinh, Roger; Sulkowski, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Objective Whether concomitant HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) affects the safety and efficacy of interferon-free HCV therapies or whether HCV treatment may negatively affect HIV control is unclear. We assessed the 3 direct-acting antiviral (3D) regimen of ombitasvir, ABT-450 (identified by AbbVie and Enanta; co-dosed with ritonavir) and dasabuvir with ribavirin (RBV) in HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients with and without cirrhosis, including HCV treatment-experienced, receiving atazanavir (ATV)- or raltegravir (RAL)-based ART therapy. Methods HCV genotype 1-positive treatment-naïve or pegIFN/RBV-experienced patients, with or without Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, CD4+ count ≥200 cells/mm3 or CD4 + % ≥14%, and plasma HIV-1 RNA suppressed on stable ART received open-label 3D + RBV for 12 or 24 weeks. Rates of HCV-sustained virologic response at post-treatment weeks 4 and 12 (SVR4 and SVR12, respectively) and bilirubin-related adverse events (AEs) are reported from post-hoc analyses for subgroups defined by treatment duration and ART regimen. Results The SVR12 rate for patients receiving 12 weeks of 3D + RBV was 93.5% with comparable rates in patients receiving either ATV (93.8%) or RAL therapy (93.3%) (Table 1). The SVR4 rate for the 24-week arm was 96.9% with a single virologic breakthrough at treatment week 16 in a patient receiving RAL therapy. Patients receiving concomitant ATV had more AEs related to indirect hyperbilirubinemia including ocular icterus, jaundice and grade 3 or 4 elevations in total bilirubin (predominantly indirect). No patient discontinued the study due to AEs, and no serious AEs were reported during or after treatment. No patient had a confirmed plasma HIV-1 RNA value ≥200 copies/mL during the treatment period. Conclusions In this first study to evaluate an IFN-free regimen in HCV genotype 1-positive treatment-naïve and experienced patients with HIV-1 co-infection, including those with cirrhosis, high rates of SVR were comparable to those with

  4. The impact of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kimberly A

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with both receiving social support and providing social support specific to the food. Individuals with higher levels of support provision and received support in turn reported higher levels of perceived support post disaster. Women were more likely to have received flood specific support and to have perceived higher social support post flood. This study provides support and elaboration of earlier findings that link disaster exposure to post-disaster changes in perceived social support.

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of yellow fever 17D vaccine in adults receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy: an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kernéis, Solen; Launay, Odile; Ancelle, Thierry; Iordache, Laura; Naneix-Laroche, Véronique; Méchaï, Frédéric; Fehr, Thierry; Leroy, Jean-Philippe; Issartel, Bertrand; Dunand, Jean; van der Vliet, Diane; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Consigny, Paul-Henri; Hanslik, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    To assess the safety and immunogenicity of live attenuated yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine in adults receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy. All adult travelers on systemic corticosteroid therapy who had received the YF17D vaccine in 24 French vaccination centers were prospectively enrolled and matched with healthy controls (1:2) on age and history of YF17D immunization. Safety was assessed in a self-administered standardized questionnaire within 10 days after immunization. YF-specific neutralizing antibody titers were measured 6 months after vaccination in patients receiving corticosteroids. Between July 2008 and February 2011, 102 vaccine recipients completed the safety study (34 receiving corticosteroids and 68 controls). The median age was 54.9 years (interquartile range [IQR] 45.1-60.3 years) and 45 participants had a history of previous YF17D immunization. The median time receiving corticosteroid therapy was 10 months (IQR 1-67 months) and the prednisone or equivalent dosage was 7 mg/day (IQR 5-20). Main indications were autoimmune diseases (n = 14), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 9), and upper respiratory tract infections (n = 8). No serious adverse event was reported; however, patients receiving corticosteroids reported more frequent moderate/severe local reactions than controls (12% and 2%, respectively; relative risk 8.0, 95% confidence interval 1.4-45.9). All subjects receiving corticosteroids who were tested (n = 20) had neutralizing antibody titers >10 after vaccination. After YF17D immunization, moderate/severe local reactions may be more frequent in patients receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy. Immunogenicity seems satisfactory. Large-scale studies are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Trends in adults receiving a recommendation for exercise or other physical activity from a physician or other health professional.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Patricia M; Schoenborn, Charlotte A

    2012-02-01

    The Healthy People 2020 objectives for physical activity include two objectives for increasing the proportion of physician office visits that include counseling or education related to exercise (see http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/default.aspx). Physician counseling for exercise has not previously been tracked by the Healthy People initiative. The present report looks at this emerging health issue from the vantage point of adults in the general population who had seen a physician or other health professional in the past 12 months and had been advised to begin or continue to do exercise or other physical activity. About 8 in 10 adults had seen a health professional in the past 12 months during 2000 (80.6%), 2005 (81.2%), and 2010 (79.8%), although estimates varied by demographic subgroups (10–12). Over time, estimates of the percentage of adults being advised to exercise could be influenced by major changes in the characteristics of adults seeing a health professional. In 2010, about one in three adults (32.4%) who had seen a physician or other health professional in the past year had been advised to exercise or do other physical activity, which reflects an upward trend since 2000, moving in the direction of meeting Healthy People 2020 goals. In relative terms, there has been more than a 40% increase—from 22.6% of adults in 2000 to 32.4% in 2010. Although increases were noted for every population and health condition group studied, these increases were larger for some groups than others. The increase in the percentage of adults receiving exercise advice is particularly noteworthy for the oldest age group. In 2000, 15.3% of adults aged 85 and over had been advised to exercise; by 2010, the percentage had increased to 28.9%. Across the chronic health conditions studied, adults with diabetes were the most likely, and those with cancer were the least likely, to have been advised by their physician to exercise. An upward trend of 8–10 percentage points, however

  7. Receipt of HIV/STD Prevention Counseling by HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Yuko; ZHU, Julia; CREPAZ, Nicole; BEER, Linda; PURCELL, David W.; JOHNSON, Christopher H.; VALVERDE, Eduardo E.; SKARBINSKI, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objective Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Design Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Methods Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. Results About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a health care provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. Conclusions HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines. PMID:24056066

  8. Family nutritional support improves survival, immune restoration and adherence in HIV patients receiving ART in developing country.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Charlotte; Laporte, Remi; Ide, Moussa; Nouhou, Yacouba; de Truchis, Pierre; Rouveix, Elisabeth; Adamou, Adiza; Pauly, Vanessa; Mattei, Jean-François; Gastaut, Jean-Albert

    2010-01-01

    In developing countries, access to antiretroviral treatment for persons living with HIV is still in progress. Malnutrition represents another cause of acquired immunodeficiency and premature death. This evaluation program estimated the impact of family nutritional support during the first year of antiretroviral treatment in West Africa's sub-Sahara region. Family nutritional support was proposed to patients with CD-4 cell count <200 /mm3 and/or developing a WHO stage III/IV or with body mass index <18.5 kg/m2 and receiving antiretroviral treatment. Follow-up of 62 patients receiving support was compared to 118 patients who had only received antiretroviral treatment the year before. Average body mass index, CD-4 cell count were 20.7 and 20.5, 217 and 191/mm3 respectively in supported and control groups (NS). Twenty-two (36%) and 56 (48%) were WHO stage III/IV (NS) respectively in supported and control groups. One patient who received support and twelve controls died (Mortality Ratio=0.19; p<0.05). Increase in CD-4 cell count was around 1.7 times higher (+ 114 vs. + 68 CD-4 cells/mm3 respectively in supported and control groups; p<0.05) and observance was improved in supported group (p<0.005). The evolutions of WHO stage and body mass index were not different but the study period was short. Family nutritional support for persons living with HIV initiating antiretroviral treatment in a developing country showed a positive impact after six months. This family intervention could be integrated into AIDS interventions as an effective and comprehensive community-based primary care.

  9. ASAM Patient Placement Criteria treatment levels: do they correspond to care actually received by homeless substance abusing adults?

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Freyder, Paul J; Gibbon, Jeanette L; Hanusa, Barbara J; Seltzer, Debora; Fine, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    We report findings from a community-based two-city survey of homeless adults comparing the level of substance abuse treatment assigned to them using the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria with care actually received during the previous 12 months. Overall 531 adults were surveyed with 382 meeting DSM-IIIR criteria of being in need of treatment or having a demand for treatment. Of those with a treatment need, 1.5% met criteria for outpatient care, 40.3% intensive outpatient/partial hospitalization care, 29.8% medically monitored care and 28.8% managed care levels. In contrast, of those receiving treatment (50.5%, 162 persons), almost all care received by this cohort was either inpatient or residential based (83.6%). Unsheltered homeless persons and those without insurance were significantly more likely to report not receiving needed treatment. Lack of treatment availability or capacity, expense, and changing one's mind while on a wait list were the most commonly cited reasons for no treatment.

  10. Neighborhood problems and health among older adults: received and donated social support and the sense of mastery as effect modifiers.

    PubMed

    Schieman, Scott; Meersman, Stephen C

    2004-03-01

    This study examines the associations between perceived neighborhood problems and mental and physical health, exploring the extent to which received social support, donated social support, and the sense of mastery moderate those associations. In 2001-2002, face-to-face interviews were conducted with a sample of 1,167 adults over age 65 in several counties in Maryland and the District of Columbia. For men, received support and perceived mastery buffer against the detrimental effects of neighborhood problems on anger. In contrast, donated support exacerbates the negative physical health effects of neighborhood problems. For women, donated support amplifies the effects of neighborhood problems on anger. However, with anger and depression, the buffering effects of received support become evident only after accounting for the interaction between neighborhood problems and donated support. The findings have implications for the stress process model, the theoretical perspectives on different forms of social support, and the "buffering" and "cost of caring" predictions for women and men.

  11. Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults with ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Gary G.; Michaels, M. Alex; Pakull, Barton

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychostimulant treatment may improve simulated driving performance in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of simulated driving performance with mixed amphetamine salts--extended release (MAS XR) 50 mg/day (Cohort 1) and…

  12. Circulating HIV DNA Correlates With Neurocognitive Impairment in Older HIV-infected Adults on Suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Michelli Faria de; Murrel, Ben; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Vargas, Milenka; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Older HIV-infected adults have a higher risk of neurocognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the associations between levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood, soluble markers of inflammation and cellular trafficking in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive functioning among 18 younger (22–40 years) and 26 older (50–71 years) HIV-infected subjects, who were administered a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Older HIV-infected individuals presented higher levels of inflammation in CSF and blood compared to younger individuals, but no difference was observed in HIV DNA levels. Among older participants, higher HIV DNA levels were significantly associated with more severe neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.005), particularly in the Executive Functions domain (p = 0.004). No association was observed between HIV DNA and neurocognition among younger individuals. Despite significantly increased inflammation observed in the older group, none of the inflammatory markers were associated with neurocognitive impairment among older HIV+ individuals (p > 0.05). Our study supports the involvement of peripheral HIV DNA reservoir in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive disorder during suppressive ART. Correlates of neurocognitive impairment might differ between younger and older adults, suggesting that future treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders likely need to be tailored based on age. PMID:26603568

  13. Health and development of ART conceived young adults: a study protocol for the follow-up of a cohort.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cate; Hammarberg, Karin; Bruinsma, Fiona; Berg, Turi; Amor, David; Sanson, Ann; Fisher, Jane R; Halliday, Jane

    2013-03-15

    Use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) continues to increase, yet little is known of the longer term health of ART conceived offspring. There are some adverse birth outcomes associated with ART conception but the subsequent developmental trajectory is unclear. Undertaking research in this area is challenging due the sensitive nature of the topic and the time elapsed since birth of the ART conceived young adults. The aim of this report is to describe a research protocol, including design and ethical considerations, used to compare the physical and psychosocial health outcomes of ART conceived young adults aged 18-28 years, with their spontaneously conceived peers. This is a retrospective cohort study of mothers who conceived with ART in Victoria, Australia and gave birth to a singleton child between 1982 and 1992. A current address for each mother was located and a letter of invitation to participate in the study was sent by registered mail. Participation involved completing a telephone interview about her young adult offspring's health and development from birth to the present. Mothers were also asked for consent for the researcher to contact their son/daughter to invite them to complete a structured telephone interview about their physical and psychosocial health. A comparison group of women living in Victoria, Australia, who had given birth to a spontaneously conceived singleton child between 1982 and 1992 was recruited from the general population using random digit dialling. Data were collected from them and their young adult offspring in the same way. Regression analyses were used to evaluate relationships between ART exposure and health status, including birth defects, chronic health conditions, hospital admissions, growth and sexual development. Psychosocial wellbeing, parental relationships and educational achievement were also assessed. Factors associated with the age of disclosure of ART conception were explored with the ART group only. The

  14. Integrating Art into Group Treatment for Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Carol-Lynne J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research supports the use of exposure-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and integrated treatments show potential for enhanced symptom reduction. This pilot study developed a manualized group treatment integrating art interventions with exposure, grounding, and narrative therapy for five adults with PTSD who were…

  15. The Teaching of Art in Adult Education: An Analysis from the Experience in Cuiabá City, Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Araujo, Gustavo Cunha; de Oliveira, Ana Arlinda

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a Master's study conducted at the Graduate Program in Education of Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso, which sought to understand how educational practices occur in the teaching of art in Youth and Adult Education in Cuiabá city, Mato Grosso state, Brazil, using qualitative, descriptive and interpretative…

  16. Adult Education for Social and Environmental Change in Contemporary Public Art Galleries and Museums in Canada, Scotland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, pubic art galleries and museums have a well-deserved reputation for elitism, colonialism and exclusion and they are, therefore, frequently omitted from the discourse of adult education. However, the escalating social, cultural and ecological problems of this new century have placed pressure on these public institutions to change and…

  17. Integrating Art into Group Treatment for Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Carol-Lynne J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research supports the use of exposure-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and integrated treatments show potential for enhanced symptom reduction. This pilot study developed a manualized group treatment integrating art interventions with exposure, grounding, and narrative therapy for five adults with PTSD who were…

  18. Adult Education for Social and Environmental Change in Contemporary Public Art Galleries and Museums in Canada, Scotland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, pubic art galleries and museums have a well-deserved reputation for elitism, colonialism and exclusion and they are, therefore, frequently omitted from the discourse of adult education. However, the escalating social, cultural and ecological problems of this new century have placed pressure on these public institutions to change and…

  19. Effectiveness, safety, durability and immune recovery in a retrospective, multicentre, observational cohort of ART-experienced, HIV-1-infected patients receiving maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Dentone, C; Sterrantino, G; Signori, A; Cenderello, G; Guerra, M; De Leo, P; Bartolacci, V; Mantia, E; Orofino, G; Giacomini, M; Bruzzone, B; Francisci, D; Di Biagio, A

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective, multicentre, observational study was to assess the durability, safety, immune recovery and effectiveness on viral suppression of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a maraviroc (MVC)-based cohort. We collected clinical, demographical, immunological and virological parameters of adult HIV patients who were infected by CCR5-tropic virus and started an ART regimen containing MVC from 2005 to 2012. We created a longitudinal mixed model to assess the change over time of data. We enrolled 126 drug-experienced patients; the median duration of MVC treatment was 25 months. The probability of stopping ART at one year was 13.3%, and at three years was 27.3%. Statistically significant changes were observed for CD4+ cell count increase ( p < 0.001), HIV-RNA decrease ( p < 0.001) and total cholesterol decrease ( p = 0.005). Ninety-four patients (79.7%) had CD4 ≥ 200 cells/mm(3) at baseline while nine of them reached this threshold at nine months (7.6%), 17 (13%) after nine months and six (5%) remained below 200 cells/mm(3) at the end of the study. Overall, 114 patients (90.5%) achieved an HIV-RNA ≤ 50 cp/ml. A majority of patients maintained CD4 cell counts of ≥ 200 cells/mm(3) and achieved an undetectable HIV viral load within three months. MVC-containing regimens are safe and appear to be a feasible therapeutic option for ART.

  20. Relationships among Young Adults' Marital Messages Received, Marital Attitudes, and Relationship Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurts, W. Matthew; Myers, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined relationships among university students' marital messages received (MMR), marital attitudes, and romantic relationship self-efficacy (RSE). Results indicated that students' marital attitudes and romantic relationship status predicted their level of RSE. The authors found differences in MMR, marital attitudes, and RSE on the…

  1. Relationships among Young Adults' Marital Messages Received, Marital Attitudes, and Relationship Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurts, W. Matthew; Myers, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined relationships among university students' marital messages received (MMR), marital attitudes, and romantic relationship self-efficacy (RSE). Results indicated that students' marital attitudes and romantic relationship status predicted their level of RSE. The authors found differences in MMR, marital attitudes, and RSE on the…

  2. Ceftolozane/Tazobactam Pharmacokinetics in a Critically Ill Adult Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Derek N; Nicolau, David P; Burcham, Pam; Chunduri, Anil; Shidham, Ganesh; Bauer, Karri A

    2016-05-01

    Limited data are available on ceftolozane/tazobactam dosing in patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Thus we performed a pharmacokinetic analysis of intravenous ceftolozane/tazobactam in a critically ill patient receiving CRRT at our medical center. A 47-year-old critically ill man with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia, bacteremia, and osteomyelitis was receiving ceftolozane/tazobactam 3 g (ceftolozane 2 g/tazobactam 1 g) every 8 hours while receiving continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). After the fifth dose of ceftolozane/tazobactam, plasma samples were obtained at 1-, 2-, 4-, 6-, and 8-hour time points. Two additional post-hemodialysis filter plasma samples were obtained to assess CVVHDF clearance. The maximum and minimum plasma concentrations for ceftolozane were 163.9 μg/ml and 79.4 μg/ml, respectively. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0-8 hours (AUC0-8 ) was 689 μg hour/ml; the plasma half-life was 13.3 hours. The ceftolozane CVVHDF clearance and total clearance were 2.4 L/hour and 2.9 L/hour, respectively. Compared with a patient with normal renal function, this patient receiving CVVHDF had decreased ceftolozane clearance. A ceftolozane/tazobactam dosage of 1.5 g every 8 hours should adequately achieve a desired drug concentration above the minimum inhibitory concentration of 8 μg/ml for the treatment of pneumonia. Additional pharmacokinetic data are needed to confirm our results and for alternative forms of CRRT. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  3. Plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load rebound among people who inject drugs receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a Canadian setting: an ethno-epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Small, Will; Milloy, M J; McNeil, Ryan; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) living with HIV often experience sub-optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment outcomes, including HIV plasma viral load (PVL) rebound. While previous studies have identified risk factors for PVL rebound among PWID, no study has examined the perspectives of PWID who have experienced PVL rebound episodes. We conducted an ethno-epidemiological study to investigate the circumstances surrounding the emergence of rebound episodes among PWID in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Comprehensive clinical records linked to a community-based prospective observational cohort of HIV-positive drug users were used to identify PWID who had recently experienced viral rebound. In-depth qualitative interviews with 16 male and 11 female participants explored participant perspectives regarding the emergence of viral rebound. A timeline depicting each participant's HIV viral load and adherence to ART was used to elicit discussion of circumstances surrounding viral rebound. Viral rebound episodes were shaped by interplay between various individual, social, and environmental factors that disrupted routines facilitating adherence. Structural-environmental influences resulting in non-adherence included housing transitions, changes in drug use patterns and intense drug scene involvement, and inadequate care for co-morbid health conditions. Social-environmental influences on ART adherence included poor interactions between care providers and patients producing non-adherence, and understandings of HIV treatment that fostered intentional treatment discontinuation. This study describes key pathways which led to rebound episodes among PWID receiving ART and illustrates how environmental forces may increase vulnerability for non-adherence leading to treatment failure. Our findings have potential to help inform interventions and supports that address social-structural forces that foster non-adherence among PWID.

  4. Antiepileptic dosing for critically ill adult patients receiving renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Keaton S; Cook, Aaron M; Bastin, Melissa L Thompson; Oyler, Douglas R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate current literature for dosing recommendations for the use of antiepileptic medications in patients receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT). With the assistance of an experienced medical librarian specialized in pharmacy and toxicology, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, WorldCat, and Scopus through May 2016. Four hundred three articles were screened for inclusion, of which 130 were identified as potentially relevant. Micromedex® DRUGDEX as well as package inserts were used to obtain known pharmacokinetic properties and dosage adjustment recommendations in RRT if known. Data regarding antiepileptic drug use in RRT are limited and mostly consist of case reports limiting our proposed dosing recommendations. Known pharmacokinetic parameters should guide dosing, and recommendations are provided where possible. Additional studies are necessary before specific dosing recommendations can be made for most antiepileptic drugs in critically ill patients receiving RRT, specifically with newer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Understanding, management and modelling of urban hydrology and its consequences for receiving waters: A state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, T. D.; Andrieu, H.; Hamel, P.

    2013-01-01

    Urban hydrology has evolved to improve the way urban runoff is managed for flood protection, public health and environmental protection. There have been significant recent advances in the measurement and prediction of urban rainfall, with technologies such as radar and microwave networks showing promise. The ability to predict urban hydrology has also evolved, to deliver models suited to the small temporal and spatial scales typical of urban and peri-urban applications. Urban stormwater management increasingly consider the needs of receiving environments as well as those of humans. There is a clear trend towards approaches that attempt to restore pre-development flow-regimes and water quality, with an increasing recognition that restoring a more natural water balance benefits not only the environment, but enhances the liveability of the urban landscape. Once regarded only as a nuisance, stormwater is now increasingly regarded as a resource. Despite the advances, many important challenges in urban hydrology remain. Further research into the spatio-temporal dynamics of urban rainfall is required to improve short-term rainfall prediction. The performance of stormwater technologies in restoring the water balance and in removing emerging priority pollutants remain poorly quantified. All of these challenges are overlaid by the uncertainty of climate change, which imposes a requirement to ensure that stormwater management systems are adaptable and resilient to changes. Urban hydrology will play a critical role in addressing these challenges.

  6. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections.

  7. Time course of hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency in adults receiving cranial radiotherapy for primary extrasellar brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Madaschi, Sara; Sara, Madaschi; Fiorino, Claudio; Claudio, Fiorino; Losa, Marco; Marco, Losa; Lanzi, Roberto; Roberto, Lanzi; Mazza, Elena; Elena, Mazza; Motta, Micaela; Micaela, Motta; Perna, Lucia; Lucia, Perna; Brioschi, Elena; Elena, Brioschi; Scavini, Marina; Marina, Scavini; Reni, Michele; Michele, Reni

    2011-04-01

    No longitudinal data on hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) function are available in patients who had received cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for primary extrasellar brain tumors (PBT). To investigate the effects of CRT on HP function in adults with PBT. Twenty-six adults irradiated for PBT and six CRT naive controls were studied. CRT was delivered with 6 MV X-ray by a linear accelerator (2 Gy fraction schedule). Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) excluded the HP region that was contoured on the planning CT. Median dose to the HP region was 41.8 Gy (IQR: 30.7-49.8). All controls maintained normal HP function. Hypopituitarism developed in 38% of CRT patients (GH deficiency 29%, ACTH 22%, TSH 14%, gonadotropin 4%, no abnormal prolactin level or diabetes insipidus). All HP failures occurred within 32 months after CRT. Adults undergoing CRT for PBT are at increased risk for HP dysfunction within 3 years from CRT. Endocrine surveillance is recommended also in adults patients exposed to CRT for primary brain tumors distant from HP region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. More Rhode Island Adults Have Dental Coverage After the Medicaid Expansion: Did More Adults Receive Dental Services? Did More Dentists Provide Services?

    PubMed

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Oh, Junhie

    2017-10-02

    Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion since 2014, 68,000 more adults under age 65 years were enrolled in Rhode Island Medicaid as of December 2015, a 78% increase from 2013 enrollment. This report assesses changes in dental utilization associated with this expansion. Medicaid enrollment and dental claims for calendar years 2012-2015 were extracted from the RI Medicaid Management Information System. Among adults aged 18-64 years, annual numbers and percentages of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental service were summarized. Additionally, dental service claims were assessed by provider type (private practice or health center). Although 15,000 more adults utilized dental services by the end of 2015, the annual percentage of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental services decreased over the reporting periods, compared to pre-ACA years (2012-13: 39%, 2014: 35%, 2015: 32%). From 2012 to 2015, dental patient increases in community health centers were larger than in private dental offices (78% vs. 34%). Contrary to the Medicaid population increase, the number of dentists that submitted Medicaid claims decreased, particularly among dentists in private dental offices; the percentage of RI private dentists who provided any dental service to adult Medicaid enrollees decreased from 29% in 2012 to 21% in 2015. Implementation of Medicaid expansion has played a critical role in increasing the number of Rhode Islanders with dental coverage, particularly among low-income adults under age 65. However, policymakers must address the persistent and worsening shortage of dental providers that accept Medicaid to provide a more accessible source of oral healthcare for all Rhode Islanders. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-10.asp].

  9. The Feasibility of Inpatient Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults Receiving Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Levitan, Denise; Pardee, Timothy S.; Isom, Scott; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the feasibility and utility of a bedside geriatric assessment (GA) to detect impairment in multiple geriatric domains in older adults initiating chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). DESIGN Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING Single academic institution. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML and planned chemotherapy. MEASUREMENTS Bedside GA was performed during inpatient exmination for AML. GA measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Examination; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; Distress Thermometer, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (includes self- reported activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental ADLs, and mobility questions); Short Physical Performance Battery (includes timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance); grip strength, and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index. RESULTS Of 54 participants (mean age 70.8 ± 6.4) eligible for this analysis, 92.6% completed the entire GA battery (mean time 44.0 ± 14 minutes). The following impairments were detected: cognitive impairment, 31.5%; depression, 38.9%; distress, 53.7%; impairment in ADLs, 48.2%; impaired physical performance, 53.7%; and comorbidity, 46.3%. Most were impaired in one (92.6%) or more (63%) functional domains. For the 38 participants rated as having good performance status according to standard oncologic assessment (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Performance Scale score ≤1), impairments in individual GA measures ranged from 23.7% to 50%. Significant variability in cognitive, emotional, and physical status was detected even after stratification according to tumor biology (cytogenetic risk group classification). CONCLUSION Inpatient GA was feasible and added new information to standard oncology assessment, which may be important for stratifying therapeutic risk in older adults with AML. PMID:22091497

  10. Metabolic Testing for Adults in a State Medicaid Program Receiving Antipsychotics: Remaining Barriers to Achieving Population Health Prevention Goals.

    PubMed

    Morrato, Elaine H; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Brewer, Sarah E; Dickinson, L Miriam; Thomas, Deborah S K; Miller, Benjamin F; Dearing, James; Druss, Benjamin G; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid quality indicators track diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease screening in adults receiving antipsychotics and/or those with serious mental illness. To inform performance improvement interventions by evaluating the relative importance of patient, prescriber, and practice factors affecting metabolic testing. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Missouri Medicaid administrative claims data (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012) linked with prescriber market data. The analysis included 9316 adults (age, 18-64 years) who were starting antipsychotic medication. Secondary analysis included the subset of adults (n = 1813) for whom prescriber knowledge, attitudes, and behavior survey data were available. Generalized estimating equations were performed to identify factors associated with failure to receive annual testing during antipsychotic treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR], <1 favor testing). Data analysis was performed from October 1, 2014, to February 18, 2016. Oral second-generation antipsychotics. A medical claim for glucose or lipid testing occurring within 180 days before and after the antipsychotic prescription claim. The 9317 patients (mean [SD] age, 37.6 [12.0] years) initiated antipsychotic medication in a variety of prescriber specialty-settings: 24.3%, community mental health center (CMHC); 27.6%, non-CMHC behavioral health; 24.3%, primary care practitioners; and 23.8%, other/unknown. Annual testing rates were 79.6% for glucose and 41.2% for lipids. Failure to test glucose and lipids was most strongly associated with patient factors and health care utilization. To illustrate by using findings from glucose modeling (reported as adjusted OR [95% CI]), lower failure to receive testing was associated with older age (40-49 vs 18-29 years; 0.64 [0.55-0.74]), diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (0.55 [0.44-0.67]), cardiometabolic comorbidity (dyslipidemia, 0.28 [0.22-0.37]), hypertension (0.59 [0.50-0.69]), and greater

  11. Values important to terminally ill African American older adults in receiving hospice care.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    While racial disparity in the use of hospice care by older African Americans is widely acknowledged, little is known about the values that they consider as important in receiving health care services along with direct experiences with having these values respected by hospice care providers. Using individual, face-to-face interviews, data were collected directly from 28 African American hospice patients about their experiences in hospice care. Content analysis was used to identify and categorize themes from multiple readings of the qualitative data. Resulting themes included: dying at home, open communications, independent decision-making, autonomy in daily life, unwillingness to be a burden, and relationships. Through the initial assessment, value preferences can be explored and then shared with hospice team members to ensure that services are provided in such a way that their values and preferences are respected.

  12. Effects of anorexia on mortality among older adults receiving home care: an observation study.

    PubMed

    Landi, F; Liperoti, R; Lattanzio, F; Russo, A; Tosato, M; Barillaro, C; Bernabei, R; Onder, G

    2012-01-01

    We describe the prevalence of secondary anorexia in a population of older people living in community and receiving home care. In addition, we examined the relationship between secondary anorexia and mortality. We analyzed data from a large collaborative observational study group, the Italian Silver Network Home Care project, that collected data on patients admitted to home care programs. A total of twelve Home Health Agencies participated in such project evaluating the implementation of the Minimum Data Set for Home Care (MDS-HC) instrument. A total of 2757 patients were enrolled in the present study. The main outcome measures were the prevalence of anorexia, weight loss and survival. More than 25% (744 subjects) of the study sample suffered from anorexia. During a mean follow-up of 10 months from initial MDS-HC assessment, 468 patients (17%) died. There was uneven distribution of the risk. After adjusting for age, gender and for all other possible risk factors for death (living alone, physical and cognitive disability, behavior problems, urinary incontinence, pressure ulcer, hearing impairment, congestive heart failure, hypertension, depression, diabetes, renal failure, cancer), subjects with anorexia were more likely to die relative to patients without anorexia (RR, 1.83; 95% CI 1.45-2.31). Even though the risk of mortality was higher among subjects suffering from anorexia and weight loss, the anorexia per se was associated with higher risk compared with subjects without anorexia (RR, 1.45; 95% CI 1.01-2.19). Anorexia is associated with a significant higher risk of all-cause mortality. The present findings support the possibility that anorexia has an independent effect on survival even among old people receiving home care.

  13. Across the Learning Divide: Adults Learning in the Arts and Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Shiela; Sargant, Naomi

    Learning about the arts and crafts gives individuals the means to examine themselves and their relationship with the world around them, whether through being an appreciative audience or their own creative practice. The arts and crafts are themselves industries creating jobs both in arts forms and in their support. People want and are entitled to…

  14. Missed Opportunities for Measles, Mumps, Rubella Vaccination Among Departing U.S. Adult Travelers Receiving Pretravel Health Consultations.

    PubMed

    Hyle, Emily P; Rao, Sowmya R; Jentes, Emily S; Parker Fiebelkorn, Amy; Hagmann, Stefan H F; Taylor Walker, Allison; Walensky, Rochelle P; Ryan, Edward T; LaRocque, Regina C

    2017-07-18

    Measles outbreaks continue to occur in the United States and are mostly due to infections in returning travelers. To describe how providers assessed the measles immunity status of departing U.S. adult travelers seeking pretravel consultation and to assess reasons given for nonvaccination among those considered eligible to receive the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine. Observational study in U.S. pretravel clinics. 24 sites associated with Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded consortium. Adults (born in or after 1957) attending pretravel consultations at GTEN sites (2009 to 2014). Structured questionnaire completed by traveler and provider during pretravel consultation. 40 810 adult travelers were included; providers considered 6612 (16%) to be eligible for MMR vaccine at the time of pretravel consultation. Of the MMR-eligible, 3477 (53%) were not vaccinated at the visit; of these, 1689 (48%) were not vaccinated because of traveler refusal, 966 (28%) because of provider decision, and 822 (24%) because of health systems barriers. Most MMR-eligible travelers who were not vaccinated were evaluated in the South (2262 travelers [65%]) or at nonacademic centers (1777 travelers [51%]). Nonvaccination due to traveler refusal was most frequent in the South (1432 travelers [63%]) and in nonacademic centers (1178 travelers [66%]). These estimates could underrepresent the opportunities for MMR vaccination because providers accepted verbal histories of disease and vaccination as evidence of immunity. Of U.S. adult travelers who presented for pretravel consultation at GTEN sites, 16% met criteria for MMR vaccination according to the provider's assessment, but fewer than half of these travelers were vaccinated. An increase in MMR vaccination of eligible U.S. adult travelers could reduce the likelihood of importation and transmission of measles virus. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, and the

  15. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the opinions and experiences of community-living older adults with regard to integrated care and support, along with the extent to which it meets their health and social needs. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 older adults receiving integrated care and support through “Embrace,” an integrated care model for community-living older adults that is based on the Chronic Care Model and a population health management model. Embrace is currently fully operational in the northern region of the Netherlands. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory approach. Results Responses of participants concerned two focus areas: 1) Experiences with aging, with the themes “Struggling with health,” “Increasing dependency,” “Decreasing social interaction,” “Loss of control,” and “Fears;” and 2) Experiences with Embrace, with the themes “Relationship with the case manager,” “Interactions,” and “Feeling in control, safe, and secure”. The prospect of becoming dependent and losing control was a key concept in the lives of the older adults interviewed. Embrace reinforced the participants’ ability to stay in control, even if they were dependent on others. Furthermore, participants felt safe and secure, in contrast to the fears of increasing dependency within the standard care system. Conclusion The results indicate that integrated care and support provided through Embrace met the health and social needs of older adults, who were coping with the consequences of aging. PMID:26489096

  16. Psychological wellbeing in 20-year-old adults receiving repeated lifestyle counselling since infancy.

    PubMed

    Kaseva, Kaisa; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Elovainio, Marko; Pahkala, Katja; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Hintsanen, Mirka; Hakulinen, Christian; Lagström, Hanna; Jula, Antti; Niinikoski, Harri; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Viikari, Jorma; Simell, Olli; Raitakari, Olli

    2015-08-01

    This study examined whether there was an association between a repeated dietary and lifestyle intervention that began in infancy and participants' psychological wellbeing at the age of 20. We examined the psychological wellbeing of 457 young adults participating in the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP), a randomised controlled trial conducted in Finland between 1989 and 2011. We assessed potential differences in psychological wellbeing between the intervention and control groups by examining participants' satisfaction with life, how they rated their health, their experiences of stress and the consequences of experiencing stress and symptoms of depression at the age of 20. We also assessed socio-economic status during childhood as a potential confounding factor. We found no association between the long-term dietary and lifestyle intervention and participants' psychological wellbeing in adulthood. Adjusting for sex and childhood socio-economic status did not affect the results and socio-economic status did not moderate the association between the intervention and psychological wellbeing. Our findings showed no association between intensive dietary and lifestyle counselling that was initiated in infancy with psychological wellbeing in adulthood and the initiative did not appear to pose any psychological risks. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Geiger, Ann M; Tooze, Janet A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Williamson, Jeff D; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Powell, Bayard L

    2013-05-23

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients.

  18. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients. PMID:23550038

  19. The Clinical Practice of Assessing Cognitive Function in Adults Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: Whom Are We Missing?

    PubMed

    Obbels, Jasmien; Vanbrabant, Koen; Bouckaert, Filip; Verwijk, Esmée; Sienaert, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Cognition can be affected by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Good clinical practice includes neuropsychological assessment, although this is seldom a part of routine clinical practice. It looks like a substantial part of patients fail to complete cognitive assessments. This constitutes a problem in the generalizability of published clinical research on cognitive side effects. Most studies of ECT-related cognitive adverse effects do not discuss this important issue of so-called cognitive test nonparticipants. Recent findings suggest that cognitive test nonparticipants are more severely ill, and probably more vulnerable to cognitive side effects. To examine the feasibility of a neuropsychological test battery in daily clinical practice, in an adult population referred for ECT. We reviewed the clinical records of 84 patients referred for ECT. Demographic and clinical characteristics of those patients who were able to complete our routine cognitive testing at baseline are compared with those who could not complete the assessment. From 84 ECT patients, 60 (71%) completed a pre-ECT cognitive assessment, whereas 24 (29%) did not. Patients with a unipolar depression, with psychotic symptoms, who started their treatment with a bitemporal electrode placement were more likely to be test noncompleters than test completers. Patients with a unipolar depression, with psychotic features, who are treated with a bitemporal electrode placement, have a higher likelihood of not completing a pre-ECT cognitive assessment. These patients probably represent a subgroup more vulnerable to cognitive side effects.

  20. Antimicrobial dosing concepts and recommendations for critically ill adult patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy or intermittent hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Heintz, Brett H; Matzke, Gary R; Dager, William E

    2009-05-01

    Infectious diseases and impaired renal function often occur in critically ill patients, and delaying the start of appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy or starting inappropriate therapy has been associated with poor outcomes. Our primary objective was to critically review and discuss the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) on the clinical pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of antimicrobial agents. The effect of continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRTs) and intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) on drug disposition in these two populations was also evaluated. Finally, proposed dosing strategies for selected antimicrobials in critically ill adult patients as well as those receiving CRRT or IHD have been compiled. We conducted a PubMed search (January 1980-March 2008) to identify all English-language literature published in which dosing recommendations were proposed for antimicrobials commonly used in critically ill patients, including those receiving CRRT or IHD. All pertinent reviews, selected studies, and associated references were evaluated to ensure their relevance. Forty antimicrobial, antifungal, and antiviral agents commonly used in critically ill patients were included for review. Dosage recommendations were synthesized from the 42 reviewed articles and peer-reviewed, evidence-based clinical drug databases to generate initial guidance for the determination of antimicrobial dosing strategies for critically ill adults. Because of the evolving process of critical illness, whether in patients with AKI or in those with CKD, prospective adaptation of these initial dosing recommendations to meet the needs of each individual patient will often rely on prospectively collected clinical and laboratory data.

  1. Proportion of lifetime UV dose received by children, teenagers and adults based on time-stamped personal dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Thieden, Elisabeth; Philipsen, Peter A; Sandby-Møller, Jane; Heydenreich, Jakob; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2004-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) reduction campaigns since 1986 were based on the estimation that individuals get 80% of their cumulative lifetime UV dose by the age of 18. To investigate if this estimation is true, we compared annual UV doses received during life in 164 Danish volunteers: children, teenagers, indoor workers, and golfers (age range 4-67 y) who recorded sun exposure behavior in diaries and carried personal UV dosimeters, measuring time-stamped UV doses. The annual UV dose did not significantly correlate with age but the variation in annual UV dose was high (median 166 SED (standard erythema dose), 95% range: 37-551 SED). The annual UV dose did correlate with days with risk behavior (sunbathing/exposing upper body) (r=0.51, p<0.001) and in adults also with hours performing outdoor sports (r=0.39, p<0.001), gardening, and sun-bed sessions (r=0.26, p=0.02). Teenagers had significantly more days with risk behavior than adults (21 vs 13 d, p=0.006) but not than children (15 d). No differences in UV dose among the age groups were found on workdays. Only 25% of the lifetime UV dose was received before the age of 20 and the annual UV dose was thus independent of age. Reduction of cumulative lifetime UV dose could be obtained by minimizing risk behavior.

  2. Continued Slow Decay of the Residual Plasma Viremia Level in HIV-1–Infected Adults Receiving Long-term Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Riddler, Sharon A.; Aga, Evgenia; Bosch, Ronald J.; Bastow, Barbara; Bedison, Margaret; Vagratian, David; Vaida, Florin; Eron, Joseph J.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Mellors, John W.

    2016-01-01

    We measured plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA levels by means of single-copy assay in 334 participants receiving virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). A residual viremia load of ≥1 copy/mL after 4 years of ART was predicted by a higher pre-ART HIV-1 RNA level, higher CD8+ T-cell count during treatment, and a lower ratio of CD4+ T cells to CD8+ T cells during treatment but not by initial ART regimen. In a longitudinal subset of 64 individuals, continued decay of the plasma HIV-1 RNA level was observed, with an average annual decrease of 6% and an estimated half-life of 11.5 years. In contrast to prior reports, the persistent viremia level continues to slowly decline during years 4–12 of suppressive ART. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT00001137. PMID:26333941

  3. Recruitment manoeuvres for adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Carol; Goligher, Ewan C; Young, Meredith E; Keating, Jennifer L; Holland, Anne E; Romero, Lorena; Bradley, Scott J; Tuxen, David

    2016-11-17

    Recruitment manoeuvres involve transient elevations in airway pressure applied during mechanical ventilation to open ('recruit') collapsed lung units and increase the number of alveoli participating in tidal ventilation. Recruitment manoeuvres are often used to treat patients in intensive care who have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the effect of this treatment on clinical outcomes has not been well established. This systematic review is an update of a Cochrane review originally published in 2009. Our primary objective was to determine the effects of recruitment manoeuvres on mortality in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome.Our secondary objective was to determine, in the same population, the effects of recruitment manoeuvres on oxygenation and adverse events (e.g. rate of barotrauma). For this updated review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, EBSCO), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) and the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry from inception to August 2016. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adults who were mechanically ventilated that compared recruitment manoeuvres versus standard care for patients given a diagnosis of ARDS. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Ten trials met the inclusion criteria for this review (n = 1658 participants). We found five trials to be at low risk of bias and five to be at moderate risk of bias. Six of the trials included recruitment manoeuvres as part of an open lung ventilation strategy that was different from control ventilation in aspects other than the recruitment manoeuvre (such as mode of ventilation, higher positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration and lower tidal volume or plateau

  4. Long-term functional outcome in adult prison inmates with ADHD receiving OROS-methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Ylva; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Grann, Martin; Lindefors, Nils

    2012-12-01

    In a recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we established a robust efficacy (Cohen's d = 2.17) of osmotic release oral system-methylphenidate (OROS-methylphenidate) delivered 72 mg daily for 5 weeks versus placebo on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, global severity and global functioning in 30 adult male prison inmates with ADHD and coexisting disorders. Outcomes continued to improve during the subsequent 47-week open-label extension with OROS-methylphenidate delivered at a flexible daily dosage of up to 1.3 mg/kg body weight. In the present study, we evaluated long-term effectiveness and maintenance of improvement over the cumulated 52-week trial on cognition, motor activity, institutional behaviour and quality of life. Post hoc, we explored the associations between investigators' and self-ratings of ADHD symptoms and between ratings of symptoms and functioning, respectively. Outcomes, calculated by repeated measures ANOVA, improved from baseline until week 16, with maintenance or further improvement until week 52. Both verbal and visuospatial working memory, and abstract verbal reasoning improved significantly over time, as well as several cognition-related measures and motor activity. No substance abuse was detected and a majority of participants took part in psychosocial treatment programmes. The quality of life domains of Learning, and Goals and values improved over time; the latter domain was at open-label endpoint significantly related to improvements in attention. Investigators' and self-ratings of ADHD symptoms, as well as global symptom severity related most significantly to global functioning at week 52. Finally, investigators' and self-ratings of ADHD symptoms associated significantly at baseline with increasing convergence over time.

  5. Polymorphisms and Mutational Covariation Associated with Death in a Prospective Cohort of HIV/AIDS Patients Receiving Long-Term ART in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengtao; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jianjun; Tian, Suian; Su, Bin; Wang, Zhe; Liao, Lingjie; Xing, Hui; You, Yinghui; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Background HIV drug resistance is associated with faster clinical progression of AIDS. However, the effect of significant polymorphisms and mutational covariation on mortality among HIV/AIDS patients receiving long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), have rarely been studied. Methods In this prospective cohort study from December 2003 to December 2014, we present a new computational modelling approach based on bioinformatics-based models and several statistical methods to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the acquisition of polymorphisms and mutations on death in HIV/AIDS patients receiving long-term ART in China. Results This study involved 654 ART-treated patients, who had been followed for 5473.4 person-years, a median of 9.8 years, and 178 died (25.2%, 3.3/100 person-years). The first regimens included AZT/d4T + NVP+ ddI (78.9%) or AZT/d4T + NVP+ 3TC (20.0%). We calculated an individual Ka/Ks value for each specific amino acid mutation. Result showed that 20 polymorphisms (E6D, Q18H, E35D, S37N, T39A, K43E, S68N, L74I, I93L, K103N, V106A, E169D, Y181C, G190A, Q197K, T200V, T200E, T215I, E224D and P225H) were strongly associated with AIDS related deaths. Among them, 7 polymorphisms (L74I, K103N, V106A, Y181C, G190A, T215I and P225H) were known to be drug resistance mutations, 7 polymorphisms (E6D, E35D, S37N, I93L, E169D, T200V and T200E were considered to be potential drug resistance mutations, and 6 polymorphisms (T39A, K43E, S68N, Q197K, T200V and E224D) were newly found to have an association with drug resistance mutations, which formed a complex network of relationships. Conclusions Some polymorphisms and mutational covariation may be the important influencing factors in the failure of treatment. Understanding these mechanisms is essential for the development of new therapies, designing optimal drug combinations, and determining effective clinical management of individual patients. PMID:28099515

  6. Oral Health Status of Older Adults in Sweden Receiving Elder Care: Findings From Nursing Assessments.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Isabelle; Jansson, Henrik; Lindmark, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Frail elderly people often have poor oral hygiene, contributing to oral health problems that can detract significantly from quality of life. The aim of this study was to describe oral health status of frail elderly individuals using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide-Jönköping (ROAG-J), a mouth assessment instrument that can be used in daily nursing care. Data were obtained from the Swedish Senior Alert quality registry in one Swedish municipality. ROAG-J assessments on admission to elder care and one subsequent occasion were used. ROAG-J measurements documented oral health in nine areas: voice, lips, oral mucosa, tongue, gums, teeth, saliva, swallowing, and presence of any prostheses or implants. Assessments were made by nursing staff during the course of daily nursing care. Individuals 65 years of age or older and receiving elder care services (N = 667) were involved; 1,904 assessments made between November 2011 and March 2014 were used for the analysis. On the basis of both assessments, less than one third of participants had oral health problems. No significant difference in any of the oral health variables was found between first and subsequent assessments. At first assessment, men and women differed in tongue health (p < .01); at the subsequent assessment, gender differences in voice (p < .05), mucous membranes (p < .003), tongue (p < .01), and saliva (p < .006) were observed. Most participants had good oral health. Assessments made by nursing staff using the ROAG-J demonstrate that this tool can be used in daily nursing care, where different, important oral conditions may be encountered. However, knowledge about oral health conditions and the ROAG-J instrument is important to ensure high validity. The ROAG-J enables nursing staff to detect problems in the mouth and to guide decisions related to oral health interventions.

  7. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals Changes in Intestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Who Received a Daily Dose of Immunomodulatory Probiotic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota. PMID:26016655

  8. Pyrosequencing analysis reveals changes in intestinal microbiota of healthy adults who received a daily dose of immunomodulatory probiotic strains.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-05-26

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota.

  9. Occurrence of impaired fasting glucose in GH-deficient adults receiving GH replacement compared with untreated subjects.

    PubMed

    Woodmansee, Whitney W; Hartman, Mark L; Lamberts, Steven W J; Zagar, Anthony J; Clemmons, David R

    2010-01-01

    The effects of GH replacement on glucose metabolism in GH-deficient (GHD) adults in clinical practice are not well defined. Therefore, we assessed GH treatment effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and haemoglobin A1c (A1c) concentrations in GHD adults in a clinical setting. Post-hoc analysis of the observational Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study conducted at 157 US centres (1997-2002). GH-deficient adults who were GH-naïve at study entry and had at least two FPG measurements. Effect of GH treatment on the frequency and time course of abnormal FPG (> or =5.6 mmol/l) development, FPG normalization, progression of increased FPG and abnormal follow-up A1c (>6%) values in GHD patients treated with GH (n = 403) or untreated (n = 169) at their physician's discretion. In subjects without pre-existing diabetes mellitus, development of an abnormal FPG tended to occur in a greater percentage of GH-treated than untreated subjects (35.3% versus 24.5, P = 0.06). Additionally, GH treatment was associated with a mild, transient increase in FPG and shorter time to development of an abnormal FPG in these subjects (P < 0.01). Most ( approximately 80%) abnormal FPG values were below 7 mmol/l and normalized in 69% of GH-treated subjects without diabetes. Treatment with GH had no effect on the rate of FPG normalization, progression of increased FPG or abnormal follow-up A1c values. Initiation of GH replacement in GHD adults was associated with a mild increase in FPG that often normalized spontaneously. Nevertheless, clinicians should monitor FPG in patients receiving GH treatment.

  10. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure among HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but has not been studied extensively in resource-limited settings. Insight in the predictors or correlates of poor HRQoL may be helpful to identify patients most in need of additional support and to design appropriate interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and April 2013 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients who were at least 6 months on cART were randomly selected and individual patient data were retrieved from medical records. HRQoL was measured by the WHOQoL-HIVBREF, depressive-symptoms by the Kessler-6 scale, and stigma by the Kalichman internalized AIDS-related stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was carried-out to examine associations between HRQoL and the other variables. A total of 664 patients (response-rate 95%) participated in the study. A higher level of depressive-symptoms was most strongly and consistently associated with a lower HRQoL, both in terms of the magnitude of the relationship and in the number of HRQoL domains associated with it. Also, a higher level of HIV-stigma was associated with a lower HRQoL except for the physical domain, while obtaining sufficient nutritious food and job opportunity were associated with a better HRQoL except for the spiritual and social domains, respectively. Demographics, clinical, and treatment characteristics yielded few significant associations with HRQoL. Our study findings suggest that interventions to improve HRQoL should focus on reducing depressive-symptoms and HIV-stigma, and on enhancing food security and job opportunity.

  11. The Adult Years: Mastering the Art of Self-Renewal. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Frederic M.

    This book identifies skills and competencies that can empower adults throughout the life cycle. Part 1 focuses on the emerging adult. Chapter 1 contrasts new opportunities for adult living with the negative belief that the United States' best days are behind. Chapter 2 makes a case for a cyclical pattern for understanding adult life. Part 2…

  12. Health care costs of adults treated for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who received alternative drug therapies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eric Q; Birnbaum, Howard G; Zhang, Huabin F; Ivanova, Jasmina I; Yang, Elaine; Mallet, David

    2007-09-01

    2004 U.S. dollars using the consumer price index for medical care. T tests were used for descriptive cost comparisons. Generalized linear models (GLMs) were used to compare costs of adults receiving alternative therapies, adjusting for demographic characteristics, substance abuse, depression, and the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Of the 4,569 patients who received 1 of these 3 drug therapies for ADHD, 31.8% received OROS-MPH for a median duration of 99 days of therapy, 34.0% received MAS-XR for a median 128 days, and 34.2% received atomoxetine for a median 86 days. In the 6-month follow-up period, the mean (standard deviation) total medical and drug costs were $2,008 ($3,231) for OROS-MPH, $2,169 ($4,828) for MAS-XR, and $2,540 ($4,269) for atomoxetine-treated adults. The GLM for patient characteristics suggested that 6-month, risk-adjusted mean medical costs, excluding drug costs, for adults treated with OROS-MPH were $142 less (10.4%, $1,220 vs. $1,362) compared with MAS-XR (P =0.022) and $132 less (9.8%, $1,220 vs. $1,352) compared with atomoxetine (P =0.033); risk-adjusted mean medical costs were not significantly different between MAS-XR and atomoxetine. The GLM comparison of risk-adjusted total direct costs, including drug cost, was on average $156 less (8.0%, $1,782 vs. $1,938) for OROS-MPH compared with MAS-XR (P = 0.017) and $226 less (11.3%, $1,782 vs. $2,008) compared with atomoxetine (P <0.001); the risk-adjusted total direct costs were not significantly different between MAS-XR and atomoxetine. Two high-cost outliers (greater than 99.96th percentile, 1 each for OROS-MPH and atomoxetine) accounted for $47 (30%) of the $156 cost difference between OROS-MPH and MAS-XR and $11 (5%) of the $226 cost difference between OROS-MPH and atomoxetine, and the medical diagnoses for the highest-cost claims for these 2 outlier patients were unrelated to ADHD. After adjusting for patient characteristics including substance abuse, depression, and the Charlson Comorbidity

  13. [Low oxygen saturation during early postoperative period in adult patients receiving opioids by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Sato, Chiyo; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yuge, Osafumi; Ogawa, Ryo

    2004-06-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) provides effective postoperative analgesia. However, there are few reports concerning the adverse outcome of respiratory depression. We measured arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) continuously during early postoperative period in 38 adult patients receiving opioids by intravenous PCA. We assessed the severity and incidence of desaturation, defined as SpO2 below 90% for more than 10 seconds. Nine patients showed desaturation and were studied after the surgery of the extremities, body surfaces, thorax or abdomen. Two patients showed desaturation with combination of surgery of long duration and obesity. Six patients, all of whom with liver cirrhosis, underwent thoracic and abdominal procedures, and showed desaturation because of respiratory dysfunction and hypoxemia caused by the surgery itself. One patient showed respiratory depression due to the opioids. We conclude that careful monitoring with a pulse oximeter and giving oxygen are essential to prevent desaturation during early postoperative period.

  14. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  15. Promoting Well-Being and Gerotranscendence in an Art Therapy Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Raquel Chapin

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a community art therapy program that was designed to promote health and well-being in old age. Observations of diverse participant interactions in the nondirective therapy studio over the course of 6 years revealed the benefits of art making and how it may influence well-being during the process of advancing age. Program…

  16. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance of Hispanic/Latino Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alders, Amanda; Levine-Madori, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot study investigating the efficacy of art therapy to enhance cognitive performance in a sample of 24 elderly Hispanic/Latino members of a community center who participated in a weekly structured thematic therapeutic arts program. A 12-week, quasi-experimental, pretest/posttest, nonrandomized, controlled…

  17. Promoting Well-Being and Gerotranscendence in an Art Therapy Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Raquel Chapin

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a community art therapy program that was designed to promote health and well-being in old age. Observations of diverse participant interactions in the nondirective therapy studio over the course of 6 years revealed the benefits of art making and how it may influence well-being during the process of advancing age. Program…

  18. Effects of Art Therapy on Distress Levels of Adults with Cancer: A Proxy Pretest Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glinzak, Leara

    2016-01-01

    This study identified decreased distress after art therapy in a proxy pretest study with a convenience sample of 73 patients being treated for cancer. Art therapy outcomes from 4 settings (oncology unit, infusion clinic, individual sessions, and open studio) were measured via the self-report Distress Thermometer, which was collected as part of an…

  19. Effects of Art Therapy on Distress Levels of Adults with Cancer: A Proxy Pretest Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glinzak, Leara

    2016-01-01

    This study identified decreased distress after art therapy in a proxy pretest study with a convenience sample of 73 patients being treated for cancer. Art therapy outcomes from 4 settings (oncology unit, infusion clinic, individual sessions, and open studio) were measured via the self-report Distress Thermometer, which was collected as part of an…

  20. Mortality, AIDS-morbidity and loss to follow-up by current CD4 cell count among HIV-1 infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Africa and Asia: data from the ANRS 12222 collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Gabillard, Delphine; Lewden, Charlotte; Ndoye, Ibra; Moh, Raoul; Ségéral, Olivier; Tonwe-Gold, Besigin; Etard, Jean-François; Pagnaroat, Men; Fournier-Nicolle, Isabelle; Eholié, Serge; Konate, Issouf; Minga, Albert; Mpoudi-Ngolé, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Anglaret, Xavier; Laurent, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited countries, estimating CD4-specific incidence rates of mortality and morbidity among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) may help assess the effectiveness of care and treatment programmes, identify program weaknesses and inform decisions. Methods We pooled data from 13 research cohorts in five sub-Saharan African (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire and Senegal) and two Asian (Cambodia and Laos) countries. HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) who received ART in 1998-2008 and had at least one CD4 count available were eligible. Changes in CD4 counts over time were estimated by a linear mixed regression. CD4-specific incidence rates were estimated as the number of first events occurring in a given CD4 stratum divided by the time spent within the stratum. Results Overall 3,917 adults (62% women) on ART were followed-up during 10,154 person-years. In the ≤50, 51-100, 101-200, 201-350, 351-500, 501-650 and >650/mm3 CD4 cells strata, death rates were: 20.6, 11.8, 6.7, 3.3, 1.8, 0.9 and 0.3 per 100 person-years; AIDS rates were: 50.5, 32.9, 11.5, 4.8, 2.8, 2.2 and 2.2 per 100 person-years; and loss to follow-up rates were: 4.9, 6.1, 3.5, 3.1, 2.9, 1.7 and 1.2 per 100 person-years, respectively. Mortality and morbidity were higher during the first year following ART initiation. Conclusion In these resource-limited settings, death and AIDS rates remained substantial after ART initiation, even in individuals with high CD4 cell counts. Ensuring earlier ART initiation and optimizing case finding and treatment for AIDS-defining diseases should be seen as priorities. PMID:23274931

  1. Predictors of Treatment Failure among Adult Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) Clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Takele, Abulie; Gashaw, Ketema; Demelash, Habtamu; Nigatu, Dabere

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment failure defined as progression of disease after initiation of ART or when the anti-HIV medications can’t control the infection. One of the major concerns over the rapid scaling up of ART is the emergence and transmission of HIV drug resistant strains at the population level due to treatment failure. This could lead to the failure of basic ART programs. Thus this study aimed to investigate the predictors of treatment failure among adult ART clients in Bale Zone Hospitals, South east Ethiopia. Methods Retrospective cohort study was employed in four hospitals of Bale zone named Goba, Robe, Ginir and Delomena. A total of 4,809 adult ART clients were included in the analysis from these four hospitals. Adherence was measured by pill count method. The Kaplan Meier (KM) curve was used to describe the survival time of ART patients without treatment failure. Bivariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for identifying associated factors of treatment failure. Result The incidence rate of treatment failure was found 9.38 (95% CI 7.79–11.30) per 1000 person years. Male ART clients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to females [AHR = 4.49; 95% CI: (2.61–7.73)].Similarly, lower CD4 count (<100 m3/dl) at initiation of ART was found significantly associated with higher odds of treatment failure [AHR = 3.79; 95% CI: (2.46–5.84).Bedridden [AHR = 5.02; 95% CI: (1.98–12.73)] and ambulatory [AHR = 2.12; 95% CI: (1.08–4.07)] patients were more likely to experience treatment failure as compared to patients with working functional status. TB co-infected clients had also higher odds to experience treatment failure [AHR = 3.06; 95% CI: (1.72–5.44)]. Those patients who had developed TB after ART initiation had higher odds to experience treatment failure as compared to their counter parts [AHR = 4.35; 95% CI: (1.99–9.54]. Having other opportunistic infection during ART initiation was also

  2. Preferences of Young Adults With First-Episode Psychosis for Receiving Specialized Mental Health Services Using Technology: A Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Elce, Jennifer; Tucci, Natasha; Fuhrer, Rebecca; Tamblyn, Robyn; Malla, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the potential and interest of using technology for delivering specialized psychiatric services to young adults, surprisingly limited attention has been paid to systematically assess their perspectives in this regard. For example, limited knowledge exists on the extent to which young people receiving specialized services for a first-episode psychosis (FEP) are receptive to using new technologies as part of mental health care, and to which types of technology-enabled mental health interventions they are amenable to. Objective The purpose of this study is to assess the interest of young adults with FEP in using technology to receive mental health information, services, and supports. Methods This study uses a cross-sectional, descriptive survey design. A convenience sample of 67 participants between the ages of 18 and 35 were recruited from two specialized early intervention programs for psychosis. Interviewer-administered surveys were conducted between December 2013 and October 2014. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results Among the 67 respondents who completed the survey, the majority (85%, 57/67) agreed or strongly agreed with YouTube as a platform for mental health-related services and supports. The top five technology-enabled services that participants were amenable to were (1) information on medication (96%, 64/67); (2) information on education, career, and employment (93%, 62/67); (3) decision-making tools pertaining to treatment and recovery (93%, 62/67); (4) reminders for appointments via text messaging (93%, 62/67); and (5) information about mental health, psychosis, and recovery in general (91%, 61/67). The top self-reported barriers to seeking mental health information online were lack of knowledge on how to perform an Internet search (31%, 21/67) and the way information is presented online (27%, 18/67). Two thirds (67%; 45/67) reported being comfortable in online settings, and almost half (48%; 32/67) reported a preference for mixed

  3. Preferences of Young Adults With First-Episode Psychosis for Receiving Specialized Mental Health Services Using Technology: A Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shalini; Dell'Elce, Jennifer; Tucci, Natasha; Fuhrer, Rebecca; Tamblyn, Robyn; Malla, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Despite the potential and interest of using technology for delivering specialized psychiatric services to young adults, surprisingly limited attention has been paid to systematically assess their perspectives in this regard. For example, limited knowledge exists on the extent to which young people receiving specialized services for a first-episode psychosis (FEP) are receptive to using new technologies as part of mental health care, and to which types of technology-enabled mental health interventions they are amenable to. The purpose of this study is to assess the interest of young adults with FEP in using technology to receive mental health information, services, and supports. This study uses a cross-sectional, descriptive survey design. A convenience sample of 67 participants between the ages of 18 and 35 were recruited from two specialized early intervention programs for psychosis. Interviewer-administered surveys were conducted between December 2013 and October 2014. Descriptive statistics are reported. Among the 67 respondents who completed the survey, the majority (85%, 57/67) agreed or strongly agreed with YouTube as a platform for mental health-related services and supports. The top five technology-enabled services that participants were amenable to were (1) information on medication (96%, 64/67); (2) information on education, career, and employment (93%, 62/67); (3) decision-making tools pertaining to treatment and recovery (93%, 62/67); (4) reminders for appointments via text messaging (93%, 62/67); and (5) information about mental health, psychosis, and recovery in general (91%, 61/67). The top self-reported barriers to seeking mental health information online were lack of knowledge on how to perform an Internet search (31%, 21/67) and the way information is presented online (27%, 18/67). Two thirds (67%; 45/67) reported being comfortable in online settings, and almost half (48%; 32/67) reported a preference for mixed formats when viewing mental health

  4. Antifungal catheter lock therapy for the management of a persistent Candida albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Paul DiMondi, V; Townsend, Mary L; Johnson, Melissa; Durkin, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Antifungal catheter lock therapy (AfLT) with liposomal amphotericin B has been used in the treatment of pediatric central line infections caused by Candida species; however, reports describing the use of liposomal amphotericin B lock therapy in the adult hemodialysis patient population are lacking. Management of central line-associated candidemia with systemic therapy alone is often challenging due to the propensity of Candida species to form biofilms on foreign bodies. We describe a 64-year-old woman who was receiving hemodialysis 3 times/week and was hospitalized with persistent fungemia. Despite receiving intravenous micafungin, she had multiple positive blood cultures for Candida albicans, which finally cleared after 7 days. Her double-lumen catheter was considered the most likely nidus of infection. Although catheter removal would have been preferred, this was not possible given her vasculopathy, history of multiple bloodstream infections, and lack of other available sites for vascular access. Catheter exchange was performed, and liposomal amphotericin B AfLT was administered in combination with intravenous micafungin for a total of 6 days. During this time, the patient experienced no discernible adverse effects secondary to AfLT. At discharge, AfLT was discontinued, and intravenous micafungin was changed to oral fluconazole. After 6 months of treatment, the patient remained culture negative and maintained her dialysis access. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of liposomal amphotericin B catheter lock therapy used to manage a persistent C. albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis. AfLT is a novel concept for treating catheter-associated fungal infections. Liposomal amphotericin B was chosen based on its favorable in vitro activity against Candida species biofilms in catheter lock environments. We identified several barriers to implementing AfLT, and these issues may prohibit the use of AfLT. This case report

  5. Parenteral fish oil and liver function tests in hospitalized adult patients receiving parenteral nutrition: A propensity score-matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Llop-Talaveron, J M; Badia-Tahull, M B; Leiva-Badosa, E; Ramon-Torrel, J M

    2017-08-01

    Intravenous fat emulsions are associated with liver disease and there is some evidence that the administration of intravenous fish oil (FO) may be useful in reversing it. The aim of our study was to assess whether there are differences in the changes of liver function tests (LFTs) in hospitalized adult patients with parenteral nutrition (PN) with FO and vegetal lipids vs patients without FO. The secondary aim was to study the relationship between impaired LFT and FO. This was a 4-year, propensity score-matched analysis including patients aged ≥18 years treated with PN for ≥10 days. The exclusion criteria were previous liver disease, biliary disorders or pancreatic cancer, and altered initial LFT values. Patients were classified into 2 groups: FO cohort (patients who received FO - in addition to vegetal oil - after the first week of PN) and the vegetal oil cohort (patients who received only vegetal oil). A propensity score matched cohort design was developed. Univariate analyses were used to study the changes in LFTs. To evaluate whether LFT alterations vary with FO administration, four stepwise multiple linear regression models were conducted. 52 patients were included, 52% men, median 66 (55-75) years and 69 kg (61.7-78.8), with 18.5 (14-31.8) days of PN treatment. Maximum FO supplementation was 23%. During the first week with PN (none of the groups receiving FO), gammaglutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and total bilirubin (BIL) increased significantly. Comparing LFT values at seven days of PN with at the end of PN treatment, the univariate analysis showed a better response for the FO group. The group without FO showed a significant increase for GGT and AP. In multivariate models, the percentage of FO administered was associated with a decrease in GGT, B = -0.33 [CI 95% = -0.54/-0.12], in AP, B = -0.12 [CI 95% = -0.20/-0.03] and ALT, B = -0.12 [CI 95% = -0.21/-0.024]. Lipid composition plays a significant role in LFT alteration

  6. The Black Arts Movement and African American Young Adult Literature: An Evaluation of Narrative Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Laretta

    2005-01-01

    In this article I question whether or not African American young adult literature serves as a primer for, and a version of, African American adult literature. Using the Black Aesthetic as my literary theory and the Coretta Scott King Award as the young adult canon, I note that while the content of adolescent literature is consistent with the…

  7. Task Force Report. State of the Art of Adult Education: CONFINTEA Follow Up. [and] Workshop Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes task force recommendations on the role of the International Council for Adult Education in monitoring achievement of adult education objectives, qualitative and quantitative indicators, and diverse data collection methods. Eleven workshop reports discuss progress on adult education policy advocacy, documentation, health care reform,…

  8. Magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia among adult HIV patients receiving first line HAART in Northwestern Tanzania: a cross sectional clinic based study

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Daniel Wilfred; Kilonzo, Semvua Bukheti; Mpondo, Bonaventura Cornel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Moderate to severe anemia is an important clinical problem in HIV patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. The rate of progression and mortality in this sub group of patients is high compared to non anemic patients. In sub Saharan Africa with scale up of Anti retroviral therapy, the magnitude of this problem is not known especially in Tanzania. This study aimed at determining the magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia in HIV patients receiving first line ART in northwestern Tanzania. Methods This was a cross sectional clinic based study, involving adult HIV patients on first line Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy at Bugando Medical Centre Care and Treatment Center. The patients’ data were analyzed using STATA version 11 to determine the prevalence of moderate to severe anemia and risk factors that could predict occurrence of anemia. Results In this study 346 patients on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy were enrolled, of whom 100(40.46%) had moderate to severe anemia. The odds of being anemic were strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 count (< 200 cells/μl) and HIV stage 3&4 at enrollment. Most of the anemic patients had mean corpuscular volume of >100fl. Conclusion The prevalence of moderate to severe anemia is significantly high in this cohort of HIV-infected patients on first line Anti Retroviral Therapy and it is strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 and HIV stage 3 and 4. On clinical grounds this suggests that patients who are initiated on Zidovudine based regimen and those in advanced HIV at enrollment should have regular haemoglobin follow up to identify anemia at its earliest stage to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:27200131

  9. Body piercing and tattoos: a survey on young adults' knowledge of the risks and practices in body art

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The practice of tattooing and piercing has expanded in western society. In order to verify young adults' knowledge of the risk and practices related to body art, an investigation was conducted among freshmen of the University of Bari in the region of Apulia, Italy. Methods The study was carried out in the Academic Year 2009-2010 through an anonymous self-administered written questionnaire distributed to 1.656 freshmen enrolled in 17 Degree Courses. Results Of the 1.598 students included in the analysis, 78.3% believe it is risky to undergo piercing/tattoo practices. AIDS was indicated as a possible infection by 60.3% of freshmen, hepatitis C by 38.2%, tetanus by 34.3% and hepatitis B by 33.7% of the sample. 28.1% of freshmen were not aware that there are also non-infectious complications. 29% of the sample had at least one piercing or tattoo (this percentage does not include earlobe piercing in women). Of those with body art, the decision to undergo body art was made autonomously in 57.9% of the participants. 56.3% of freshmen undergoing body art had taken less than a month to decide. With regard to the reasons that led the sample to undergo body art, 28.4% were unable to explain it, 23.8% answered to improve their aesthetic aspect, 18.4% to distinguish themselves from others, 12.3% for fashion; 17.1% for other reasons. 25.4% of the sample declared that they had a piercing (79.8% female vs 20.2% male; ratio M/F 1:4.0). The average age for a first piercing was 15.3 years (range 10-27; SD ± 2.9). 9.6% of the sample declared that they have a tattoo (69.9% female vs 30.1% male; ratio M/F 1:2.3). The average age for a first tattoo was 17.5 years (range 10-26, SD ± 2.4). Conclusions Most of the freshmen knew about AIDS-related risks but not other potential risks. Body art is fairly common among young adults (especially women). The decision is often not shared with the family and is undertaken mostly without a specific reason or for the improvement of

  10. Comparing longitudinal CD4 responses to cART among non-perinatally HIV-infected youth versus adults: Results from the HIVRN Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fleishman, John A.; Mahiane, Guy; Nonyane, Bareng Aletta Sanny; Althoff, Keri N.; Yehia, Baligh R.; Berry, Stephen A.; Rutstein, Richard; Nijhawan, Ank; Mathews, Christopher; Aberg, Judith A.; Keruly, Jeanne C.; Moore, Richard D.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Youth have residual thymic tissue and potentially greater capacity for immune reconstitution than adults after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, youth face behavioral and psychosocial challenges that may make them more likely than adults to delay ART initiation and less likely to attain similar CD4 outcomes after initiating cART. This study compared CD4 outcomes over time following cART initiation between ART-naïve non-perinatally HIV-infected (nPHIV) youth (13–24 years-old) and adults (≥25–44 years-old). Methods Retrospective analysis of ART-naïve nPHIV individuals 13–44 years-old, who initiated their first cART between 2008 and 2011 at clinical sites in the HIV Research Network. A linear mixed model was used to assess the association between CD4 levels after cART initiation and age (13–24, 25–34, 35–44 years), accounting for random variation within participants and between sites, and adjusting for key variables including gender, race/ethnicity, viral load, gaps in care (defined as > 365 days between CD4 tests), and CD4 levels prior to cART initiation (baseline CD4). Results Among 2,595 individuals (435 youth; 2,160 adults), the median follow-up after cART initiation was 179 weeks (IQR 92–249). Baseline CD4 was higher for youth (320 cells/mm3) than for ages 25–34 (293) or 35–44 (258). At 239 weeks after cART initiation, median unadjusted CD4 was higher for youth than adults (576 vs. 539 and 476 cells/mm3, respectively), but this difference was not significant when baseline CD4 was controlled. Compared to those with baseline CD4 ≤200 cells/mm3, individuals with baseline CD4 of 201–500 and >500 cells/mm3 had greater predicted CD4 levels: 390, 607, and 831, respectively. Additionally, having no gaps in care and higher viral load were associated with better CD4 outcomes. Conclusions Despite having residual thymic tissue, youth attain similar, not superior, CD4 gains as adults. Early ART initiation

  11. Comparing longitudinal CD4 responses to cART among non-perinatally HIV-infected youth versus adults: Results from the HIVRN Cohort.

    PubMed

    Agwu, Allison L; Fleishman, John A; Mahiane, Guy; Nonyane, Bareng Aletta Sanny; Althoff, Keri N; Yehia, Baligh R; Berry, Stephen A; Rutstein, Richard; Nijhawan, Ank; Mathews, Christopher; Aberg, Judith A; Keruly, Jeanne C; Moore, Richard D; Gebo, Kelly A

    2017-01-01

    Youth have residual thymic tissue and potentially greater capacity for immune reconstitution than adults after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, youth face behavioral and psychosocial challenges that may make them more likely than adults to delay ART initiation and less likely to attain similar CD4 outcomes after initiating cART. This study compared CD4 outcomes over time following cART initiation between ART-naïve non-perinatally HIV-infected (nPHIV) youth (13-24 years-old) and adults (≥25-44 years-old). Retrospective analysis of ART-naïve nPHIV individuals 13-44 years-old, who initiated their first cART between 2008 and 2011 at clinical sites in the HIV Research Network. A linear mixed model was used to assess the association between CD4 levels after cART initiation and age (13-24, 25-34, 35-44 years), accounting for random variation within participants and between sites, and adjusting for key variables including gender, race/ethnicity, viral load, gaps in care (defined as > 365 days between CD4 tests), and CD4 levels prior to cART initiation (baseline CD4). Among 2,595 individuals (435 youth; 2,160 adults), the median follow-up after cART initiation was 179 weeks (IQR 92-249). Baseline CD4 was higher for youth (320 cells/mm3) than for ages 25-34 (293) or 35-44 (258). At 239 weeks after cART initiation, median unadjusted CD4 was higher for youth than adults (576 vs. 539 and 476 cells/mm3, respectively), but this difference was not significant when baseline CD4 was controlled. Compared to those with baseline CD4 ≤200 cells/mm3, individuals with baseline CD4 of 201-500 and >500 cells/mm3 had greater predicted CD4 levels: 390, 607, and 831, respectively. Additionally, having no gaps in care and higher viral load were associated with better CD4 outcomes. Despite having residual thymic tissue, youth attain similar, not superior, CD4 gains as adults. Early ART initiation with minimal delay is as essential to optimizing outcomes for

  12. Development of Severe Anemia and Changes in Hemoglobin in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Ugandan Adults Receiving Zidovudine-, Stavudine-, and Tenofovir-Containing Antiretroviral Regimens.

    PubMed

    Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Katende, David; Levin, Jonathan; Wakeham, Katie; Heiner, Grosskurth; Kamali, Anatoli; Lalloo, David G

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common problem in HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe the contribution of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen to the incidence of anemia and changes in hemoglobin (Hb) in HIV-infected patients in Uganda. This study was nested in a prevention of cryptococcal disease trial (CRYPTOPRO; ISCRTN7648152). Patients received 3 different backbones of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor in a nonrandomized manner. Of the 852 patients (161 on zidovudine [ZDV], 628 on stavudine [d4T], and 63 on tenofovir [TDF]; all received lamuvidine), the risk of developing grade 4 anemia was higher (adjusted hazard ratio 2.7) for those receiving ZDV than those receiving d4T. Those receivingd4T had a higher average increase in Hb than those receiving ZDV (P = .024) or TDF (P = .014). In this observational study, ZDV was associated with severe anemia compared to d4T or TDF; those receiving ZDV and TDF had smaller increases in Hb after ART initiation. We encourage publication of data on cohorts using TDF from Africa. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Prevalence of 'being at risk of malnutrition' and associated factors in adult patients receiving nursing care at home in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Franck MPsych, Erik; Lopez Hartmann, Maja; Weyler, Joost; Ysebaert, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is a known problem in hospitals and nursing homes. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of being at risk of malnutrition in community living adults receiving homecare nursing and to determine factors independently associated with this risk of malnutrition. Furthermore, it also aimed to describe aspects of current nutritional nursing care. Patients (n = 100) are screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool to evaluate their risk of malnutrition. A patient survey was used to analyse associated factors. In this population, 29% are at risk for malnutrition. Following a multivariate logistic regression analysis, 'loss of appetite' proved the most important factor. A survey for nurses (n = 61) revealed low awareness, poor knowledge, poor communication between stakeholders and a moderate approach of malnutrition. These findings should encourage homecare nurses to use a recommended screening tool for malnutrition and to actively observe and report loss of appetite to initiate the prescription of individual tailored interventions. Belgian homecare nurses' management does not yet fully comply with international recommendations. Additional training in nutritional nursing care and screening methods for malnutrition is needed. Systematic screening should be further developed and evaluated in this at-risk population.

  14. Cancer-related pain in older adults receiving palliative care: Patient and family caregiver perspectives on the experience of pain

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Lobchuk, Michelle M; Kilgour, Kelly N

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite an emphasis on pain management in palliative care, pain continues to be a common problem for individuals with advanced cancer. Many of those affected are older due to the disproportionate incidence of cancer in this age group. There remains little understanding of how older patients and their family caregivers perceive patients’ cancer-related pain, despite its significance for pain management in the home setting. OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the cancer pain perceptions and experiences of older adults with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach was used to describe and interpret data collected from semistructured interviews with 18 patients (≥65 years of age) with advanced cancer receiving palliative care at home and their family caregivers. RESULTS: The main category ‘Experiencing cancer pain’ incorporated three themes. The theme ‘Feeling cancer pain’ included the sensory aspects of the pain, its origin and meanings attributed to the pain. A second theme, ‘Reacting to cancer pain’, included patients’ and family caregivers’ behavioural, cognitive (ie, attitudes, beliefs and control) and emotional responses to the pain. A third theme, ‘Living with cancer pain’ incorporated individual and social-relational changes that resulted from living with cancer pain. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an awareness of cancer pain experienced by older patients and their family caregivers within the wider context of ongoing relationships, increased patient morbidity and other losses common in the aged. PMID:23957019

  15. The Effect of a Community-Engaged Arts Program on Older Adults' Well-being.

    PubMed

    Phinney, Alison; Moody, Elaine M; Small, Jeff A

    2014-09-01

    This mixed-methods study evaluated the effect of a community-engaged arts program on the physical, emotional, and social well-being of seniors. Weekly workshops were offered over a three-year period at community centers where artists worked with four groups of seniors to produce a collective art piece or performance for public presentation. Participants completed pre- and post- questionnaires, and group interviews were conducted at the program's end. Paired t-test analyses indicated that seniors experienced improvement in perceived overall health, experience of pain, and sense of community. Interpretive descriptive analysis of the group interviews revealed six themes that informed understanding : (1) providing structure and discipline; (2) facilitating coping; (3) requiring hard work and effort; (4) bringing out one's artistic side; (5) promoting social involvement; and (6) making a contribution. These results are consistent with previous research and contribute to further understanding of how community-engaged arts can benefit the well-being of older people.

  16. Adult Education and Lifelong Learning in Arts and Cultural Institutions: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.; Sanford, Kathy; Jayme, Bruno de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Using a content analysis approach, this article shares the results of scholarly adult education study on museum and library adult education and learning as represented in peer-reviewed publications over the past 60 years. Findings show a paucity of studies in general, but particularly around libraries. The majority of publications on libraries…

  17. A Comparison of Adults' Responses to Collage versus Drawing in an Initial Art-Making Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Teresa; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this systematic comparison of collage and drawing was to contribute to the sparse body of literature on the way individuals might respond to two materials commonly used in art therapy. Eight graduate and undergraduate university students who identified as non-artists completed two tasks, one using drawing materials and one using…

  18. Applying the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) to Adults in an Asian Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nan, Joshua Kin-man; Hinz, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment is the foundation for conceptualizing effective interventions. Due to their nonverbal nature, art therapy assessments have an advantage over traditional verbal assessments in some populations and potentially across cultures. This pilot study provides preliminary reliability data to support the cross-cultural use of the Formal Elements…

  19. A "Neogeographical Education"? The Geospatial Web, GIS and Digital Art in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadimitriou, Fivos

    2010-01-01

    Neogeography provides a link between the science of geography and digital art. The carriers of this link are geospatial technologies (global navigational satellite systems such as the global positioning system, Geographical Information System [GIS] and satellite imagery) along with ubiquitous information and communication technologies (such as…

  20. A Comparison of Adults' Responses to Collage versus Drawing in an Initial Art-Making Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Teresa; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this systematic comparison of collage and drawing was to contribute to the sparse body of literature on the way individuals might respond to two materials commonly used in art therapy. Eight graduate and undergraduate university students who identified as non-artists completed two tasks, one using drawing materials and one using…

  1. A "Neogeographical Education"? The Geospatial Web, GIS and Digital Art in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadimitriou, Fivos

    2010-01-01

    Neogeography provides a link between the science of geography and digital art. The carriers of this link are geospatial technologies (global navigational satellite systems such as the global positioning system, Geographical Information System [GIS] and satellite imagery) along with ubiquitous information and communication technologies (such as…

  2. Applying the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) to Adults in an Asian Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nan, Joshua Kin-man; Hinz, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment is the foundation for conceptualizing effective interventions. Due to their nonverbal nature, art therapy assessments have an advantage over traditional verbal assessments in some populations and potentially across cultures. This pilot study provides preliminary reliability data to support the cross-cultural use of the Formal Elements…

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of micronutrient deficiencies pre- and post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) among a diverse multicountry cohort of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Christian, Parul; Yang, Wei-Teng; Gupte, Nikhil; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Santos, Breno; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tripathy, Srikanth; Riviere, Cynthia; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R; Cardoso, Sandra W; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Tang, Alice M; Semba, Richard D; Campbell, Thomas B; Gupta, Amita

    2016-02-01

    HIV-infected adults have increased risk of several individual micronutrient deficiencies. However, the prevalence and risk factors of concurrent and multiple micronutrient deficiencies and whether micronutrient concentrations change after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation have not been well described. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of individual, concurrent and multiple micronutrient deficiencies among ART-naïve HIV-infected adults from nine countries and assess change in micronutrient status 48 weeks post-ART initiation. A random sub-cohort (n = 270) stratified by country was selected from the multinational PEARLS clinical trial (n = 1571 ART-naïve, HIV-infected adults). We measured serum concentrations of vitamins A, D (25-hydroxyvitamin), E, carotenoids and selenium pre-ART and 48 weeks post-ART initiation, and measured vitamins B6, B12, ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor at baseline only. Prevalence of single micronutrient deficiencies, concurrent (2 coexisting) or conditional (a deficiency in one micronutrient given a deficiency in another) and multiple (≥3) were determined using defined serum concentration cutoffs. We assessed mean changes in micronutrient concentrations from pre-ART to week 48 post-ART initiation using multivariable random effects models. Of 270 participants, 13.9%, 29.2%, 24.5% and 32.4% had 0, 1, 2 and multiple deficiencies, respectively. Pre-ART prevalence was the highest for single deficiencies of selenium (53.2%), vitamin D (42.4%), and B6 (37.3%) with 12.1% having concurrent deficiencies of all three micronutrients. Deficiency prevalence varied widely by country. 48 weeks post-ART initiation, mean vitamin A concentration increased (p < 0.001) corresponding to a 9% decrease in deficiency. Mean concentrations also increased for other micronutrients assessed 48 weeks post-ART (p < 0.001) but with minimal change in deficiency status. Single and multiple micronutrient

  4. Effectiveness of educational or behavioral interventions on adherence to phosphate control in adults receiving hemodialysis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Milazi, Molly; Bonner, Ann; Douglas, Clint

    2017-04-01

    People with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) develop impaired excretion of phosphate. Hyperphosphatemia develops in ESKD as a result of the kidney's reduced ability to excrete ingested phosphate load and is characterized by high bone turnover and increased musculoskeletal morbidity including bone pain and muscle weakness. Increased serum phosphate levels are also associated with cardiovascular disease and associated mortality. These effects are significant considering that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in ESKD, making phosphate control a crucial treatment goal. To determine the effectiveness of education or behavioral interventions on adherence to phosphate control in adults with ESKD receiving hemodialysis (HD). Adults aged over 18 years with ESKD undergoing HD, attending dialysis facilities regardless of frequency and duration of treatment sessions per week. Studies with participants receiving hemodiafiltration were excluded. All types of educational and behavioral interventions aimed at improving adherence to dietary phosphate restriction, phosphate binder medication and HD. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, before and after and cohort studies. Outcome measures included serum phosphate levels, patient knowledge and adherence to phosphate control methods, chronic kidney disease (CKD) self-management behavior and perceived self-efficacy for CKD related to phosphate control. A search was conducted in CINAHL, MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global to find published studies between January 2005 and December 2015. Risk of bias was assessed by three reviewers prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Data were extracted using the standardized data extraction tool from JBI-MAStARI. Data were pooled using JBI software

  5. Epidemiology of adults receiving acute inpatient rehabilitation for a primary diagnosis of traumatic brain injury in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Jeffrey P; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Corrigan, John D; Kreider, Scott; Bell, Jeneita M; Coronado, Victor G; Whiteneck, Gale G

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the overall and by age-group characteristics at admission and discharge from rehabilitation between 2001 and 2010 of all late-teens and adults undergoing inpatient rehabilitation for a primary diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States. Secondary data analysis. Acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities. Patients aged 16 years and older receiving inpatient rehabilitation for a primary diagnosis of TBI between 2001 and 2010. Functional independence, level of disability, and living situation. The incidence of TBI by age group found the largest proportion of cases to be aged 80 years and older, with a gradual decline in incidence in the age group of 30 years, at which point there was a slight increase. Injuries resulted predominantly from falls (49.8%) and motor vehicle crashes (40.8%); however, injuries to the youngest individuals were largely from motor vehicle crashes with decreasing rates as age increased, while injuries due to falls rose as age increased, with the oldest age groups most likely to incur a TBI. Preinjury alcohol misuse and substance use were found to occur in 22.9% and 12.2% of the total population, respectively; however, age distributions demonstrated high preinjury use among individuals younger than 50 years (eg, 46.4% and 30.6% for those aged 20 and 29 years, respectively) with decreasing misuse as age increased. Of the total population, 49.2% were retired, 31.1% employed, 14.1% not working, and 5.6% students. Trends by age showed that younger individuals were more likely to be students or employed (eg, 14.5% and 62.0% for those aged 20 and 29 years, respectively), with employment status peaking for those aged 30 to 39 years, and declining to 3.2% for the oldest age group (80 years and older). The trend of person(s) living alone between pre- and postrehabilitation showed the least amount of change for those aged 16 to 19 years with steadily increasing changes as age increased. Similar trends were seen for residence

  6. [Adult cardiopulmonary bypass in the twentieth century: science, art or empiricism?].

    PubMed

    Mota, André Lupp; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to highlight some less discussed aspects of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), taking into consideration the physiology, physiopathology, and some new technologies of perfusion. Thus, some points, to a certain extent philosophical, have motivated this revision: a) To preserve and update the surgeon knowledge regarding CPB, even to keep his/her pedagogical leadership on his/her surgical team; b) To question if elderly and diabetic patients, as a result of their individual characteristics deserve more appropriate protocols similar to those adopted for children; c) One third aspect would be the questioning of the systemic inflammatory reaction caused by the blood exposure to CPB non-endothelized circuit surface, in face of the increasing importance of blood contact with the surgical wound; d) In relation to the treatment of the vasoplegic syndrome, methylene blue continues being the best therapeutical option, even so, many times are not efficient on account of a highly probable existence of a "therapeutical window" based on the guanylate cyclase dynamics of action (saturation and synthesis "de novo") and; finally, e) The reason of the title, highlighting that based on its current patterns, would the CPB be an outcome of empiricism, art, or science? The bottom line of this article carries the certainty of that as much as the empiricism, art, and science are highly related to CPB.

  7. Accessibility to cochlear implants in Belgium: State of the art on selection, reimbursement, habilitation, and outcomes in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    De Raeve, Leo; Wouters, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Belgium, and especially the northern region called Flanders, has been a center of expertise in cochlear implants and early hearing screening for many years. Some of their surgeons and engineers were pioneers in the development of cochlear implants and in 1998 Flanders was the first region in Europe to implement a universal hearing screening program for all neonates. The Belgian National Institute for Health and Disability Insurance has reimbursed cochlear implants in children and adults since 1994 and bilateral implantation in children under the age of 12 years since February 2010. These deaf children, screened and implanted early, achieve higher auditory, speech and language outcomes and increasing numbers are going to regular schools using fewer interpreters. In 2010, 93% of severe-to-profound deaf preschool children in Flanders had received cochlear implants and 25% had bilateral implants. Although on average twice as many adults as children are implanted a year in Belgium, we have less research data available from this adult population. Also very little is published about the growth curves and minimal rehabilitation requirements (intensity, duration etc.) after implantation for both children and adults. So, there still remain many challenges for the future. PMID:23453148

  8. Understanding Patterns of Social Support and Their Relationship to an ART Adherence Intervention Among Adults in Rural Southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Atukunda, Esther C; Musiimenta, Angella; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Wyatt, Monique A; Ashaba, Justus; Ware, Norma C; Haberer, Jessica E

    2017-02-01

    SMS is a widely used technology globally and may also improve ART adherence, yet SMS notifications to social supporters following real-time detection of missed doses showed no clear benefit in a recent pilot trial. We examine the demographic and social-cultural dynamics that may explain this finding. In the trial, 63 HIV-positive individuals initiating ART received a real-time adherence monitor and were randomized to two types of SMS reminder interventions versus a control (no SMS). SMS notifications were also sent to 45 patient-identified social supporters for sustained adherence lapses. Like participants, social supporters were interviewed at enrollment, following their matched participant's adherence lapse and at exit. Social supporters with regular income (RR = 0.27, P = 0.001) were significantly associated with fewer adherence lapses. Instrumental support was associated with fewer adherence lapses only among social supporters who were food secure (RR = 0.58, P = 0.003). Qualitative interview data revealed diverse and complex economic and relationship dynamics, affecting social support. Resource availability in emotionally positive relationships seemingly facilitated helpful support, while limited resources prevented active provision of support for many. Effective social support appeared subject to social supporters' food security, economic stability and a well-functioning social network dependent on trust and supportive disclosure.

  9. Development of severe anaemia and changes in Haemoglobin (Hb) in a cohort of HIV infected Ugandan Adults receiving Zidovudine, Stavudine and Tenofovir containing antiretroviral regimens

    PubMed Central

    Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Katende, David; Levin, Jonathan; Wakeham, Katie; Heiner, Grosskurth; Kamali, Anatoli; Lalloo, David G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaemia is a common problem in HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We describe the contribution of ART regimen on the incidence of anaemia and changes in haemoglobin in Ugandan patients. Methods This study was nested in a prevention of cryptococcal disease trial (CRYPTOPRO; ISCRTN7648152). Patients received three different nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbones in a non-randomised manner. Results Of 852 patients (161 on zidovudine, 628 on stavudine and 63 on tenofovir (all received lamuvidine), the risk of developing grade 4 anaemia was higher (aHR 2.7) for those taking zidovudine compared with stavudine. Those taking stavudine had a greater average increase in haemoglobin than those taking zidovudine (p=0.024) or tenofovir (p=0.014). Conclusion In this observational study zidovudine was associated with higher levels of severe anaemia than stavudine or tenofovir; those receiving zidovudine and tenofovir had smaller haemoglobin rises after ART initiation. We encourage publication of data from African cohorts using tenofovir. PMID:25425638

  10. In Vitro Differentiation of Embryonic and Adult Stem Cells into Hepatocytes: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Snykers, Sarah; De Kock, Joery; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are a unique source of self-renewing cells within the human body. Before the end of the last millennium, adult stem cells, in contrast to their embryonic counterparts, were considered to be lineage-restricted cells or incapable of crossing lineage boundaries. However, the unique breakthrough of muscle and liver regeneration by adult bone marrow stem cells at the end of the 1990s ended this long-standing paradigm. Since then, the number of articles reporting the existence of multipotent stem cells in skin, neuronal tissue, adipose tissue, and bone marrow has escalated, giving rise, both in vivo and in vitro, to cell types other than their tissue of origin. The phenomenon of fate reprogrammation and phenotypic diversification remains, though, an enigmatic and rare process. Understanding how to control both proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and their progeny is a challenge in many fields, going from preclinical drug discovery and development to clinical therapy. In this review, we focus on current strategies to differentiate embryonic, mesenchymal(-like), and liver stem/progenitor cells into hepatocytes in vitro. Special attention is paid to intracellular and extracellular signaling, genetic modification, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. In addition, some recommendations are proposed to standardize, optimize, and enrich the in vitro production of hepatocyte-like cells out of stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19056906

  11. A Study of the Graduates of the Master of Arts Program in Adult Education at the University of Minnesota: Roles, Educative Functions, and Assessment of the Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, James

    A study was conducted to identify the employment history and educative functions of the graduates of the Master of Arts (M.A.) in adult education of the University of Minnesota and their assessment of the M.A. program. A self-administered mailed questionnaire was used to survey the 61 graduates of the program between 1979 and 1986; 54 graduates…

  12. The Development of a Stress Management Program for the Adult Degree Completion Program Admissions Team at a Four-Year Private Liberal Arts College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Brian

    A stress management program was developed for the adult degree completion program admissions team at Warner Southern College, a four-year private liberal arts college. A relatively recent stress-inducing change was caused by an administrative decision to expand the program offerings from five sites to seven, using current staff. Derived from the…

  13. Health-Related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-Term Services and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubritsky, Cynthia; Abbott, Katherine M.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Foust, Janice B.; Naylor, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL)…

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-Term Services and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubritsky, Cynthia; Abbott, Katherine M.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Foust, Janice B.; Naylor, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL)…

  15. Health-related quality of life: expanding a conceptual framework to include older adults who receive long-term services and supports.

    PubMed

    Zubritsky, Cynthia; Abbott, Katherine M; Hirschman, Karen B; Bowles, Kathryn H; Foust, Janice B; Naylor, Mary D

    2013-04-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL) concept that encompasses aspects of QOL that affect health such as function, physical, and emotional health. Examining existing theoretical constructs and indicators of HRQoL among LTSS recipients led us to posit a revised conceptual framework for studying HRQoL among LTSS recipients. We adapted the Wilson and Cleary HRQoL model by expanding function to specifically include cognition, adding behavior and LTSS environmental characteristics in order to create a more robust HRQoL conceptual framework for older adults receiving LTSS. This refined conceptual model allows for the measurement of a mix of structural, process, and outcome measures. Continued development of a multidimensional conceptual framework with specific HRQoL measures that account for the unique characteristics of older adults receiving LTSS will contribute significantly to LTSS research, policy, and planning efforts.

  16. Health-related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-term Services and Supports

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Katherine M.

    2013-01-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL) concept that encompasses aspects of QOL that affect health such as function, physical, and emotional health. Examining existing theoretical constructs and indicators of HRQoL among LTSS recipients led us to posit a revised conceptual framework for studying HRQoL among LTSS recipients. We adapted the Wilson and Cleary HRQoL model by expanding function to specifically include cognition, adding behavior and LTSS environmental characteristics in order to create a more robust HRQoL conceptual framework for older adults receiving LTSS. This refined conceptual model allows for the measurement of a mix of structural, process, and outcome measures. Continued development of a multidimensional conceptual framework with specific HRQoL measures that account for the unique characteristics of older adults receiving LTSS will contribute significantly to LTSS research, policy, and planning efforts. PMID:22859435

  17. Vaccines against norovirus: state of the art trials in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Baehner, F; Bogaerts, H; Goodwin, R

    2016-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), a group of nonenveloped, single-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the Caliciviridae family, are the leading cause worldwide of acute infectious gastroenteritis. Serious and eventual fatal outcomes may be observed in at-risk populations such as the very young or older adults, especially in those with underlying diseases. NoVs are highly infectious, with a low number of virus particles causing infection, and they are highly resistant to environmental conditions. NoVs have multiple routes of transmission including faecal-oral, aerosolized vomitus, person to person and via contaminated surfaces or food and water. NoVs can cause frequent and dramatic outbreaks where people congregate in close quarters such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, cruise liners and military barracks and ships. Of the seven NoV genogroups, human disease is most frequently caused by genogroups I and II, although genogroup IV has also been associated with illness. The absence of reliable, high-yield cell culture systems or animal models has steered the development of vaccines towards nonreplicating recombinant capsid proteins including viruslike particles and the sub-virus-sized P particles. Takeda Vaccines is developing a candidate NoV vaccine formulation based on adjuvanted viruslike particles from the GI.1 genotype and a consensus GII.4 sequence derived from three natural GII.4 variants. Early clinical trial results show good tolerability and robust immune responses to both components. This approach is designed to induce broad protective immune responses in adults and children. Copyright © 2016 Takeda Pharmaceuticals International AG. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Martial art training enhances the glutathione antioxidant system in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Elokda, Ahmed S; Handrakis, John P; Principal, Suze; Rondo, Eleni; Bovell, Juan; Coughlin, William P; Mastroianni, Charles N; Wong, Michael J; Zimmerman, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the antioxidant capacity of physically active middle-aged martial artists to age-matched sedentary controls. Nine sedentary subjects (mean age 52.9 yr) and 9 martial artists (mean age 51.8 yr) who practice Soo Bahk Do, a Korean martial art and were age- and sex-matched performed a graded exercise test (GXT) using a modified Bruce protocol. Ages ranged from 41 to 58 years. A GXT has been shown to be an effective technique for inducing oxidative stress. Glutathione (GSH) is the body's most highly concentrated antioxidant, is the central component of the antioxidant system, and plays an essential role in protecting tissues against oxidative stress. Free radical oxidation leads to the transformation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Venous blood samples for GSH and GSSG were collected before and immediately after the GXT. Repeated measures analysis of variance were performed on the resting baseline values and immediate post-GXT values of GSH, GSSG, and GSH:GSSG to compare groups. The blood GSH, GSSG, and GSH:GSSG levels were significantly different (p < 0.001) between the 2 groups at rest and after the GXT. The Soo Bahk Do practitioners had higher resting levels of GSH and lower levels of GSSG and responded more effectively to acute oxidative stress than the age-matched sedentary controls. Soo Bahk Do appears to enhance the antioxidant defense system and may be an effective intervention for improving overall health by protecting against the adverse effects of oxidative stress that is associated with the free radical theory of aging. Health professionals should be aware of alternative methods of training, conditioning, and exercise that can improve the general adaptation response to oxidative stress.

  19. Arts Education Beyond the Classroom. ACA Arts Research Seminar Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfe, Judith H., Ed.; Heine, Joni Cherbo, Ed.

    The 13 seminar papers presented in this collection discuss various avenues used for educating adults in the arts in order to enrich existing arts audiences and to educate the widest possible adult population in the practice and history of art and aesthetics. These efforts will ensure that the quality and quantity of arts participation and support…

  20. Arts Education Beyond the Classroom. ACA Arts Research Seminar Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfe, Judith H., Ed.; Heine, Joni Cherbo, Ed.

    The 13 seminar papers presented in this collection discuss various avenues used for educating adults in the arts in order to enrich existing arts audiences and to educate the widest possible adult population in the practice and history of art and aesthetics. These efforts will ensure that the quality and quantity of arts participation and support…

  1. EXCRETION OF THIAMINE AND ITS METABOLITES IN THE URINE OF YOUNG ADULT MALES RECEIVING RESTRICTED INTAKES OF THE VITAMIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Eight young men consuming a 2800-kcal diet consisting of 80 g protein, 100 g fat and 400 g carbohydrate and providing 0.11 to 0.18 mg thiamine/day...change appreciably during thiamine deficiency. The biochemical pattern for thiamine deficiency in human adults is described. (Author)

  2. Dual-Process Models of Associative Recognition in Young and Older Adults: Evidence from Receiver Operating Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Michael R.; Light, Leah L.; Chung, Christie

    2005-01-01

    In 3 experiments, young and older adults studied lists of unrelated word pairs and were given confidence-rated item and associative recognition tests. Several different models of recognition were fit to the confidence-rating data using techniques described by S. Macho (2002, 2004). Concordant with previous findings, item recognition data were best…

  3. Reducing HIV-Risk Behavior Among Adults Receiving Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael P.; Carey, Kate B.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Gordon, Christopher M.; Schroder, Kerstin E. E.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a 10-session, HIV-risk-reduction intervention with 221 women and 187 men receiving outpatient psychiatric care for a mental illness. Patients were randomly assigned to the HIV intervention, a structurally equivalent substance use reduction (SUR) intervention, or standard care; they were assessed pre- and postintervention and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Patients receiving the HIV-risk-reduction intervention reported less unprotected sex, fewer casual sex partners, fewer new sexually transmitted infections, more safer sex communications, improved HIV knowledge, more positive condom attitudes, stronger condom use intentions, and improved behavioral skills relative to patients in the SUR and control conditions. Patients receiving the SUR intervention reported fewer total and casual sex partners compared with control patients. Exploratory analyses suggested that female patients and patients diagnosed with a major depressive disorder were more likely to benefit from the HIV-risk-reduction intervention. PMID:15065959

  4. Pre-ART nutritional status and its association with mortality in adult patients enrolled on ART at Fiche Hospital in North Shoa, Oromia region, Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Kokeb; Baraki, Negga; Kedir, Haji

    2016-12-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) compromises the nutritional status of infected individuals and in turn, malnutrition worsens the effects of the infection itself by weakening the immune system consequently accelerating disease progression and death. However, few studies have examined the association between nutritional status at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and early mortality. Therefore, this study assesses pre-ART nutritional status and other baseline characteristics and mortality among adult patients on ART at Fiche Hospital, Ethiopia. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 489 ART enrolled adult patients between August 01, 2006 and September 30, 2013 in Fiche Hospital. Study participants were selected by using systematic random sampling method. Actuarial table was used to estimate survival of patients after ART initiation and log rank test was used to compare the survival curves. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to determine independent predictors of time to death. Most of the study subjects were females 254 (51.9%). A total of 489 patients were included in the analysis, of whom 87 died during a median study follow-up of 22 months. The estimated mortality among malnourished was 21, 28, 33, and 38% at 5, 10, 15, and 25 months respectively with mortality incidence density of 5.63 deaths per 100 person years. The independent predictors of mortality were: BMI <18.5 kg/m(2) (AHR = 5.4 95% CI 3.03-9.58), baseline ambulatory functional status (AHR = 3.84; 95% CI 2.19-6.74), bedridden functional status (AHR = 4.78; 95% CI 2.14-10.65), WHO clinical stage III (AHR 2.21; 95% CI 1.16-4.21), WHO clinical stage IV (AHR 4.05; 95% CI 1.50-10.97) and CD4 count less than 200 cells/μl (AHR = 2.95; 95% CI 1.48-5.88), two and more opportunistic infections (AHR 2.30; 95% CI 1.11-4.75). Undernutrition at the time of ART initiation was associated with increased risk of death, particularly during the first 3 months after ART initiation

  5. Undernutrition at baseline and health services utilization and mortality over a 1-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongbin; Brown, Cynthia J; Burgio, Kathryn L; Kilgore, Meredith L; Ritchie, Christine S; Roth, David L; West, Delia Smith; Locher, Julie L

    2011-05-01

    Older adults receiving Medicare home health services who experience undernutrition may be at increased risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. We sought to identify the association between baseline nutritional status and subsequent health service utilization and mortality over a 1-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services. This was a longitudinal study using questionnaires and anthropometric measures designed to assess nutritional status (Mini-Nutritional Assessment) at baseline and health services utilization and mortality status at 6-month and 1-year follow-ups. Participants were evaluated in their homes. A total of 198 older adults who were receiving Medicare home health services. Based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment, 12.0% of patients were malnourished, 51.0% were at risk for malnourishment, and 36.9% had normal nutritional status. Based on body mass index, 8.1% of participants were underweight, 37.9% were normal weight, 25.3% were overweight, and 28.8% were obese. Using multivariate binary logistic regression analyses, participants who were malnourished or at risk for malnourishment were more likely to experience subsequent hospitalization, emergency room visit, home health aide use, and mortality for the entire sample and hospitalization and nursing home stay for overweight and obese participants. Experiencing undernutrition at the time of receipt of Medicare home health services was associated with increased health services utilization and mortality for the entire sample, and with increased health services utilization only for the overweight and obese subsample. Opportunities exist to address risk of undernutrition in patients receiving home health services, including those who are overweight or obese, to prevent subsequent adverse health outcomes. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Under-nutrition at baseline and health services utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbin; Brown, Cynthia J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Roth, David L.; West, Delia Smith; Locher, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Older adults receiving Medicare home health services who experience under-nutrition may be at increased risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. We sought to identify the association between baseline nutritional status and subsequent health service utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services. Design This was a longitudinal study using questionnaires and anthropometric measures designed to assess nutritional status (Mini-Nutritional Assessment [MNA]) at baseline and health services utilization and mortality status at six-month and one-year follow-ups. Setting Participants were evaluated in their homes. Participants 198 older adults who were receiving Medicare home health services. Results Based upon MNA, 12.0% of patients were Malnourished, 51.0% were At Risk for Malnourishment, and 36.9% had Normal Nutrition Status. Based upon body mass index (BMI), 8.1% of participants were underweight, 37.9% were normal weight, 25.3% were overweight, and 28.8% were obese. Using multivariate binary logistic regression analyses, participants who were Malnourished or At Risk for Malnourishment were more likely to experience subsequent hospitalization, emergency room visit, home health aide use, and mortality for the entire sample and hospitalization and nursing home stay for overweight and obese participants. Conclusions Experiencing under-nutrition at the time of receipt of Medicare home health services was associated with increased health services utilization and mortality for the entire sample, and with increased health services utilization only for the overweight and obese subsample. Opportunities exist to address risk of under-nutrition in patients receiving home health services, including those who are overweight or obese, to prevent subsequent adverse health outcomes. PMID:21527170

  7. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  9. Clinical and behavioral characteristics of adults receiving medical care for HIV infection --- Medical Monitoring Project, United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    Blair, Janet M; McNaghten, A D; Frazier, Emma L; Skarbinski, Jacek; Huang, Ping; Heffelfinger, James D

    2011-09-02

    As of December 31, 2008, an estimated 663,084 persons were living with a diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the 40 U.S. states that have had confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. Although HIV surveillance programs in the United States collect information about persons who have received a diagnosis of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), supplemental surveillance projects are needed to collect information about care-seeking behaviors, health-care use, and other behaviors among persons living with HIV. Data on the clinical and behavioral characteristics of persons receiving medical care for HIV infection are critical to reduce HIV-related morbidity and mortality and for program planning to allocate services and resources, guide prevention planning, assess unmet medical and ancillary service needs, and help develop intervention programs and health policies at the local, state, and national levels. Data were collected during June 2007-September 2008 for patients who received medical care in 2007 (sampled from January 1-April 30). The Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) is an ongoing, multisite supplemental surveillance project that assesses behaviors, clinical characteristics, and quality of care of HIV-infected persons who are receiving medical care. Participants must be aged ≥ 18 years and have received medical care at sampled facilities that provide HIV medical care within participating MMP project areas. Self-reported behavioral and selected clinical data are collected using an in-person interview. A total of 26 project areas in 19 states and Puerto Rico were funded to collect data during the 2007 MMP data collection cycle. The results from the 2007 MMP cycle indicated that among 3,643 participants, a total of 3,040 (84%) had some form of health insurance or coverage during the 12 months before the interview; of these, 45% reported having Medicaid, 37% reported having private

  10. The influence of calcium supplement on body composition, weight loss and insulin resistance in obese adults receiving low calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Shalileh, Maryam; Shidfar, Farzad; Haghani, Hamid; Eghtesadi, Shahriar; Heydari, Iraj

    2010-07-01

    Obesity and diabetes are the most important problems of public health. Evidence from molecular animal research and epidemiologic investigations indicate that calcium intake may have an influence on body composition, weight and insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of calcium supplementation on body composition, weight, insulin resistance and blood pressure in the face of calorie restriction in obese adults. A double blind randomized placebo-controlled trial on 40 adults with Body Mass Index > 25kg/m(2) was conducted. Subjects were maintained for 24 weeks on a balanced deficit diet (-500 kcal/d deficit) and randomly assigned into two groups with 1000 mg ca/d as calcium carbonate or placebo. There were no significant differences in variables at the 12th and 24th week between the two groups. The lean mass showed no significant increase in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to baseline and in placebo group at the 24th week compared to the 12th week. The insulin concentration showed a significant decrease in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to the baseline (p < 0.05). The diastolic blood pressure had a significant decrease at the 24th week compared to the 12th week in both groups (p = 0.013-0.009). Results from this study suggest that 24 weeks of supplementation with 1000 mg ca/d did not have any effect on weight, body composition, insulin resistance and blood pressure beyond what can be achieved in an energy restricted diet in obese adults.

  11. Complete manuscript Title: Changes in RANKL during the first two years after cART initiation in HIV-infected cART naïve adults.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Inger Hee; Salem, Mohammad; Gerstoft, Jan; Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Obel, Niels; Pedersen, Court; Ullum, Henrik; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg

    2017-04-11

    By assessing the changes in concentration of soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor κ B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegrin (OPG) after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients we aimed to evaluate whether the initial accelerated bone loss could be mediated by increased soluble RANKL (sRANKL) levels associated with CD4+ T cell recovery. We used multiplex immunoassays to determine sRANKL and OPG concentrations in plasma from 48 HIV patients at baseline and 12, 24, 48 and 96 weeks after cART initiation. Soluble RANKL changed significantly over time (overall p = 0.02) with 25% decrease (95% CI: -42 to -5) at week 24 compared to baseline and stabilized at a lower level thereafter. We found no correlation between CD4+ T cell count increment and changes in sRANKL or between percentage change in BMD and changes in sRANKL. In this study there was no indication that the accelerated bone loss after cART initiation was mediated by early changes in sRANKL due to CD4+ T cell recovery. Future studies should focus on the initial weeks after initiation of cART. Clinical-Trial.gov . id NCT00135460 , August 25, 2005. The study was approved by the Danish Data Protection Agency, Danish Medicines Agency and Regional Ethics Committee.

  12. Hepatitis C Screening Rate Among Underserved Adults With Serious Mental Illness Receiving Care in California Community Mental Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Trager, Evan; Khalili, Mandana; Masson, Carmen L; Vittinghoff, Eric; Creasman, Jennifer; Mangurian, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Although HCV is more prevalent among people with severe mental illness (SMI; e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) than in the general population (17% vs 1%), no large previous studies have examined HCV screening in this population. In this cross-sectional study, we examined administrative data for 57 170 California Medicaid enrollees with SMI to identify prevalence and predictors of HCV screening from October 2010 through September 2011. Only 4.7% (2674 of 57 170) received HCV screening, with strongest predictors being nonpsychiatric health care utilization and comorbid substance abuse.

  13. Understanding the relationship between domestic abuse and suicide behavior in adults receiving primary care: does forgiveness matter?

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward C; Kahle, Emma R; Yu, Elizabeth A; Hirsch, Jameson K

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the interrelation of domestic abuse, forgiveness of self, forgiveness of others, and suicide behavior in a community sample of 101 patients receiving primary care from a clinic in the southeastern United States. As expected, it was found that more frequent experience of domestic abuse was associated with more frequent suicide behavior. Results from conducting mediation analyses and using bootstrapping techniques provided support for a model in which the relationship between domestic abuse and suicide behavior was accounted for by forgiveness of self, but not by forgiveness of others. The article concludes with a discussion of some of the implications of the present findings for practice and the study's limitations.

  14. The Impact of Strong for Life on the Physical Functioning and Health of Older Adults Receiving Home and Community-Based Services.

    PubMed

    Danilovich, Margaret; Corcos, Daniel; Eisenstein, Amy; Marquez, David; Hughes, Susan

    2017-01-01

    To test the effects of Strong for Life (SFL) on the physical performance and self-rated health of older adults receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS). Randomized, two-group trial with pre-post measures. In-home exercise program. Clients aged 65-95 (n=42) and their Home Care Aide (HCA) (n=32) were randomly assigned to a usual care and SFL intervention or usual care control group. Clients were instructed in SFL by their HCA and completed SFL 3 times per week for 12-weeks. Outcomes included grip and quadriceps strength, Timed Up and Go, gait speed, Self-Efficacy for Exercise, pain, and PROMIS-global health measured at baseline and immediately following the intervention. Clients completed opened ended survey items on SFL program evaluation. Effect sizes were moderate for grip strength (d= .38), pain (d= .34), and PROMIS-global health (d= .27). Small effect sizes were found for all other measures. Median quadriceps and TUG scores differentially improved among intervention participants versus controls. No adverse health events and high program satisfaction were reported. Frailty prevalence in the control group increased between baseline and post-test while frailty prevalence in the intervention group decreased during the same time period. Strong for Life has the potential to improve the strength, mobility, health, and frailty of older adults receiving HCBS. This study provides initial evidence of the impact of SFL for older adults receiving HCBS, as well as the safety of the intervention evidenced by the lack of reported adverse events.

  15. Into the Curriculum. Art: Making Snowmen; Health: It's Flu Season!; Language Arts/Technology: Choices; Reading/Language Arts: Getting To Know Young Adult Authors; Science: It's All in the Weather; Social Studies: Middle Ages Daily Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amato, Laura; Small, Esther

    2003-01-01

    Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with special curriculum units in art, health, language arts, technology, reading, science, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each…

  16. Iatrogenic chylothorax due to pleural cavity extravasation of total parenteral nutrition in two adults receiving nutrition through a peripherally inserted central catheter.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas J; Jamous, Fady G; Kooistra, Alma; Zawada, Edward T

    2010-02-01

    Extravasation of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) delivered via central lines is a known potential complication, but significant extravasations of infusate into the pleural space when using peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have not been reported in adults. We report 2 cases ofpleural cavity extravasation ofTPN delivered via a PICC. Measurement of the glucose level of the effusate is a quick way to determine the presence of TPN and should be considered in any patient receiving TPN via any type of central line with a rapidly developing effusion.

  17. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-05-01

    Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV.

  18. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV. PMID:25844941

  19. Duration of Influenza Virus Shedding Among HIV-Infected Adults in the cART Era, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Timothy; Kojic, E. Milu; Overton, Edgar T.; Henry, Keith; Önen, Nur; Rhame, Frank; Conley, Lois; Brooks, John T.; Fry, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The duration of influenza virus shedding in HIV-infected adults is unknown and could affect quarantine and treatment recommendations. Participants were monitored for influenza-like illness (ILI), defined as fever and cough or sore throat, using weekly telephone audio computer-assisted self-interviews. Those with ILI were further evaluated at three HIV specialty clinics. For those with influenza, we collected nasopharyngeal washes every 3 days after the date of confirmed influenza infection for 21–28 days; specimens underwent reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and viral culture. Duration of influenza virus shedding was the interval from the date of onset (day 0) of ILI to the date of last culture-positive specimen. Characteristics were compared between patients with and without influenza using Fisher's exact test. We used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test to examine factors that may have affected influenza virus shedding. From October 2010 to April 2011, we enrolled 961 participants in syndromic surveillance and diagnosed 20 patients with influenza whose characteristics were as follows: median age 48 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 43–53), 60% male, 50% non-Hispanic black, 95% had been prescribed combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART), 85% were virologically suppressed (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml), median CD4 cell count 317 cells/mm3 (IQR: 190-544), and median follow-up time 21 days (IQR: 19–22). Compared with persons without influenza, persons with influenza were more likely to be older, use injection drugs, and have a lower median CD4 cell count and were less likely to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. Median durations of shedding, PCR detection, and ILI symptoms were 3 (IQR: 0–5), 10 (IQR: 6–15), and 14 days (IQR: 12–26), respectively. Median days of shedding were similar among patients with and without any prior influenza vaccination (0 vs. 4, p = .448), HIV viral suppression (2 vs

  20. A Pilot Study of Brief Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback to Reduce Craving in Young Adult Men Receiving Inpatient Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eddie, D.; Kim, C.; Lehrer, P.; Deneke, E.; Bates, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the implementation feasibility, and efficacy for reducing alcohol and drug craving, of a brief, 3-session heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV BFB) intervention added to a traditional 28-day substance abuse disorder (SUD) inpatient treatment program. Forty-eight young adult men received either treatment as usual (TAU) plus three sessions of HRV BFB training over three weeks, or TAU only. Participants receiving HRV BFB training were instructed to practice daily using a handheld HRV BFB device. HRV BFB training was well tolerated by participants and supported by treatment staff. Men receiving TAU + HRV BFB demonstrated a greater, medium effect size reduction in alcohol and drug craving compared to those receiving TAU only, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, an interaction effect was observed in analyses that accounted for baseline craving levels, wherein heart rate variability (HRV) levels at treatment entry were predictive of changes in craving in the TAU group only. Low baseline levels of HRV were associated with increases in craving, whereas higher baseline HRV levels were associated with greater decreases in craving from start to end of treatment. In the TAU + HRV BFB group, however, there was no such association. That is, HRV BFB appeared to dissociate individual differences in baseline HRV levels from changes in craving. Given that alcohol and drug craving often precipitates relapse, HRV BFB merits further study as an adjunct treatment to ameliorate craving experienced by persons with substance use disorders. PMID:25179673

  1. Oral manifestations of HIV infection in children and adults receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy [HAART] in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Omar JM; Matee, Mecky IN; Simon, Elison NM; Kikwilu, Emil; Moshi, Mainen J; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Mikx, Frans HM; Verweij, Paul E; van der Ven, André JAM

    2006-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence and types of HIV-related oral lesions between children and adult Tanzanian patients on HAART with those not on HAART and to relate the occurrence of the lesions with anti-HIV drug regimen, clinical stage of HIV disease and CD4+ cell count. Methods Participants were 532 HIV infected patients, 51 children and 481 adults, 165 males and 367 females. Children were aged 2–17 years and adults 18 and 67 years. Participants were recruited consecutively at the Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) HIV clinic from October 2004 to September 2005. Investigations included; interviews, physical examinations, HIV testing and enumeration of CD4+ T cells. Results A total of 237 HIV-associated oral lesions were observed in 210 (39.5%) patients. Oral candidiasis was the commonest (23.5%), followed by mucosal hyperpigmentation (4.7%). There was a significant difference in the occurrence of oral candidiasis (χ2 = 4.31; df = 1; p = 0.03) and parotid enlargement (χ2 = 36.5; df = 1; p = 0.04) between children and adults. Adult patients who were on HAART had a significantly lower risk of; oral lesions (OR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.22 – 0.47; p = 0.005), oral candidiasis (OR = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.18 – 0.44; p = 0.003) and oral hairy leukoplakia (OR = 0.18; 95% CI = 0.04 – 0.85; p = 0.03). There was no significant reduction in occurrence of oral lesions in children on HAART (OR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.11–1.14; p = 0.15). There was also a significant association between the presence of oral lesions and CD4+ cell count < 200 cell/mm3 (χ2 = 52.4; df = 2; p = 0.006) and with WHO clinical stage (χ2 = 121; df = 3; p = 0.008). Oral lesions were also associated with tobacco smoking (χ2 = 8.17; df = 2; p = 0.04). Conclusion Adult patients receiving HAART had a significantly lower prevalence of oral lesions, particularly oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia. There was no significant change in occurrence of oral lesions in children

  2. Socialization in the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orend, Richard J.

    Socialization is a process by which children learn the attitudes and orientations that will guide their behavior as adults. The analyses described in this report use this socialization model as a basis for describing the relationship between childhood and early adult arts-related experiences and current arts-related leisure participation. Three…

  3. The discrepancy between subjective and objective measures of sleep in older adults receiving CBT for comorbid insomnia.

    PubMed

    Lund, Hannah G; Rybarczyk, Bruce D; Perrin, Paul B; Leszczyszyn, David; Stepanski, Edward

    2013-10-01

    To examine the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on the underreporting of sleep relative to objective measurement, a common occurrence among individuals with insomnia. Pre-treatment and post-treatment self-report measures of sleep were compared with those obtained from home-based polysomnography (PSG) in 60 adults (mean age = 69.17; 42 women) with comorbid insomnia. The self-report data were published previously in a randomized controlled trial demonstrating the efficacy of CBT-I compared with a placebo treatment. Self-report measures significantly underestimated sleep at pre-treatment and CBT-I led to a correction in this discrepancy. There were no significant changes in PSG after CBT-I. Path analysis showed that an increase in an objective proxy measure of sleep quality (i.e., decreased stage N1 sleep) after CBT-I was significantly related to improvements in self-report of sleep, with full mediation by reductions in discrepancy. This is the first CBT-I outcome study to analyze discrepancy changes and demonstrate that these changes account for a significant portion of self-report outcome. In addition, improved sleep quality as measured by a decrease in percentage of stage N1 sleep following treatment may be one mechanism that explains why sleep estimation is more accurate following CBT-I. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Talk or text to tell? How young adults in Canada and South Africa prefer to receive STI results, counseling, and treatment updates in a wireless world.

    PubMed

    Labacher, Lukas; Mitchell, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Young adults often lack access to confidential, long-lasting, and nonjudgmental interactions with sexual health professionals at brick-and-mortar clinics. To ensure that patients return for their STI test results, post-result counseling, and STI-related information, computer-mediated health intervention programming allows them to receive sexual health information through onsite computers, the Internet, and mobile phone calls and text messages. To determine whether young adults (age: M = 21 years) prefer to communicate with health professionals about the status of their sexual health through computer-mediated communication devices, 303 second-year university students (183 from an urban North American university and 120 from a periurban university in South Africa) completed a paper-based survey indicating how they prefer to communicate with doctors and nurses: talking face to face, mobile phone call, text message, Internet chat programs, Facebook, Twitter, or e-mail. Nearly all students, and female students in South Africa in particular, prefer to receive their STI test results, post-results counseling, and STI-related information by talking face to face with doctors and nurses rather than communicating through computers or mobile phones. Results are clarified in relation to gender, availability of various technologies, and prevalence of HIV in Canada and in South Africa.

  5. Impact of Cannabis Use on Treatment Outcomes among Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Shevorykin, Alina; Radoncic, Vanja; Smith, Kathryn M. Z.; Smith, Philip H.; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Papini, Santiago; Hien, Denise A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Research has demonstrated a strong link between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) in general and cannabis use disorders in particular. Yet, few studies have examined the impact of cannabis use on treatment outcomes for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs. Methods: Participants were 136 individuals who received cognitive-behavioral therapies for co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Multivariate regressions were utilized to examine the associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment outcomes. Multilevel linear growth models were fit to the data to examine the cross-lagged associations between weekly cannabis use and weekly PTSD symptom severity and primary substance use during treatment. Results: There were no significant positive nor negative associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment PTSD symptom severity and days of primary substance use. Cross-lagged models revealed that as cannabis use increased, subsequent primary substance use decreased and vice versa. Moreover, results revealed a crossover lagged effect, whereby higher cannabis use was associated with greater PTSD symptom severity early in treatment, but lower weekly PTSD symptom severity later in treatment. Conclusion: Cannabis use was not associated with adverse outcomes in end-of-treatment PTSD and primary substance use, suggesting independent pathways of change. The theoretical and clinical implications of the reciprocal associations between weekly cannabis use and subsequent PTSD and primary substance use symptoms during treatment are discussed. PMID:28178207

  6. Impact of Cannabis Use on Treatment Outcomes among Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ruglass, Lesia M; Shevorykin, Alina; Radoncic, Vanja; Smith, Kathryn M Z; Smith, Philip H; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Papini, Santiago; Hien, Denise A

    2017-02-07

    Research has demonstrated a strong link between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder PTSD and substance use disorders (SUDs) in general and cannabis use disorders in particular. Yet, few studies have examined the impact of cannabis use on treatment outcomes for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs. Participants were 136 individuals who received cognitive-behavioral therapies for co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Multivariate regressions were utilized to examine the associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment outcomes. Multilevel linear growth models were fit to the data to examine the cross-lagged associations between weekly cannabis use and weekly PTSD symptom severity and primary substance use during treatment. There were no significant positive nor negative associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment PTSD symptom severity and days of primary substance use. Cross-lagged models revealed that as cannabis use increased, subsequent primary substance use decreased and vice versa. Moreover, results revealed a crossover lagged effect, whereby higher cannabis use was associated with greater PTSD symptom severity early in treatment, but lower weekly PTSD symptom severity later in treatment. Cannabis use was not associated with adverse outcomes in end-of-treatment PTSD and primary substance use, suggesting independent pathways of change. The theoretical and clinical implications of the reciprocal associations between weekly cannabis use and subsequent PTSD and primary substance use symptoms during treatment are discussed.

  7. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO.

  8. Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve to Define the Cutoff Points of Voice Handicap Index Applied to Young Adult Male Smokers.

    PubMed

    Tafiadis, Dionysios; Chronopoulos, Spyridon K; Kosma, Evangelia I; Voniati, Louiza; Raptis, Vasilis; Siafaka, Vasiliki; Ziavra, Nausica

    2017-07-11

    Voice performance is an inextricable key factor of everyday life. Obviously, the deterioration of voice quality can cause various problems to human communication and can therefore reduce the performance of social skills (relevant to voice). The deterioration could be originated from changes inside the system of the vocal tract and larynx. Various prognostic methods exist, and among them is the Voice Handicap Index (VHI). This tool includes self-reported questionnaires, used for determining the cutoff points of total score and of its three domains relevant to young male Greek smokers. The interpretation of the calculated cutoff points can serve as a strong indicator of imminent or future evaluation by a clinician. Consistent with previous calculation, the VHI can also act as a feedback for smokers' voice condition and as monitoring procedure toward smoking cessation. Specifically, the sample consisted of 130 male nondysphonic smokers (aged 18-33 years) who all participated in the VHI test procedure. The test results (through receiver operating characteristic analysis) concluded to a total cutoff point score of 19.50 (sensitivity: 0.838, 1-specificity: 0). Also, in terms of constructs, the Functional domain was equal to 7.50 (sensitivity: 0.676, 1-specificity: 0.032), the Physical domain was equal to 7.50 (sensitivity: 0.706, 1-specificity: 0.032), and the Emotional domain was equal to 6.50 (sensitivity: 0.809, 1-specificity: 0.048). Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  10. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  11. Crohn's disease patients with chronic intestinal failure receiving long-term parenteral nutrition: a cross-national adult study.

    PubMed

    Elriz, K; Palascak-Juif, V; Joly, F; Seguy, D; Beau, P; Chambrier, C; Boncompain, M; Fontaine, E; Laharie, D; Savoye, G; Lerebours, E

    2011-10-01

    Chronic intestinal failure (CIF) is a very rare Crohn's disease (CD) complication.   To determine incidence of CIF treated with home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in adult CD patients and to isolate factors associated with severe CIF. This retrospective multicentre study included 38 patients with CD-related CIF treated with HPN for at least 12 months in French HPN centres. Severe CIF was defined by a length of remnant small bowel of less than 100 cm or CIF occurrence within the 15 years following CD diagnosis. Median delay between CD diagnosis and CIF was 15 years. CIF incidence did not decrease over time (1.4/year before 1995 vs. 2.2/year after). Median number of small bowel resections per patient was three (range 1-8). Median small bowel resection, remnant and initial lengths were 160, 80 and 260 cm, respectively. Twenty-four per cent of patients developed stenosis within 1 year after CD diagnosis and 76% developed perforative complications within 2 years. In multivariate analysis, severe CIF, defined as CIF onset <15 years after CD diagnosis, was associated with a more recent CD diagnosis (odds ratio, 0.785; 95% confidence interval, 0.623-0.989). CIF occurred despite frequent use of immunosuppressants. Course of CD remained severe during HPN: immunosuppressants prescription occurred in 11 patients, surgery in six. Six patients died from CD (n = 2), HPN complications (n = 2) or other causes (n = 2). Chronic intestinal failure requiring HPN is rare during CD. Incidence remained stable over time. Surgical procedures play a minor role in the occurrence of severe chronic intestinal failure compared to CD severity. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Neurobehavioral derangements in adult mice receiving decabrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE 209) during a defined period of neonatal brain development.

    PubMed

    Viberg, Henrik; Fredriksson, Anders; Jakobsson, Eva; Orn, Ulrika; Eriksson, Per

    2003-11-01

    Flame retardants are used to suppress or inhibit combustion processes in an effort to reduce the risk of fire. One class of flame retardants, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), has been found to be increasing in the environment and in human milk. Previous studies have shown that lower brominated PBDEs, tetra-, penta-, and hexabrominated diphenyl ethers, can cause developmental neurotoxic effects. The present study shows that the highly brominated PBDE 2,2',3,3',4,4',5,5',6,6'-decaBDE (PBDE 209) can be absorbed during neonatal life and induce developmental neurotoxic effects in adult mice, effects that also worsen with age. These effects seem to be inducible only during a defined critical period of neonatal life. Neonatal Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) male mice were exposed on day 3 to 2.22 or 20.1 mg PBDE 209/kg body weight, on day 10 to 1.34, 13.4, or 20.1 mg PBDE 209/kg body weight, or on day 19 to 2.22 or 20.1 mg PBDE 209/kg body weight, or to [U-14C]-2,2',3,3',4,4',5,5',6,6'-decaBDE. The oral neonatal administration of [U-14C]PBDE 209 on day 3, 10, or 19 showed that the compound distributes throughout the body and increases in the brain, from 24 h after administration to 7 days after administration, in 3-day-old and 10-day-old mice. The spontaneous behavior tests, observed in 2-, 4-, and 6-month-old mice, showed that the effect only occurred in mice exposed on day 3 and that this effect worsened with age. We conclude that more attention should be focused on the highly brominated PBDEs as possible developmental neurotoxic agents.

  13. Identifying religious and/or spiritual perspectives of adolescents and young adults receiving blood and marrow transplants: a prospective qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Hegner, Mary Ann; Mueller, Mark; Davies, Stella

    2014-08-01

    The potential benefits (or detriments) of religious beliefs in adolescent and young adults (AYA) are poorly understood. Moreover, the literature gives little guidance to health care teams or to chaplains about assessing and addressing the spiritual needs of AYA receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). We used an institutional review board-approved, prospective, longitudinal study to explore the use of religion and/or spirituality (R/S) in AYA HSCT recipients and to assess changes in belief during the transplantation experience. We used the qualitative methodology, grounded theory, to gather and analyze data. Twelve AYA recipients were interviewed within 100 days of receiving HSCT and 6 participants were interviewed 1 year after HSCT; the other 6 participants died. Results from the first set of interviews identified 5 major themes: using R/S to address questions of "why me?" and "what will happen to me;" believing God has a reason; using faith practices; and benefitting from spiritual support people. The second set of interviews resulted in 4 major themes: believing God chose me; affirming that my life has a purpose; receiving spiritual encouragement; and experiencing strengthened faith. We learned that AYA patients were utilizing R/S far more than we suspected and that rather than losing faith in the process of HSCT, they reported using R/S to cope with illness and HSCT and to understand their lives as having special purpose. Our data, supported by findings of adult R/S studies, suggest that professionally prepared chaplains should be proactive in asking AYA patients about their understanding and use of faith, and the data can actively help members of the treatment team understand how AYA are using R/S to make meaning, address fear, and inform medical decisions. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and Weighting Methods for a Nationally Representative Sample of HIV-infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States-Medical Monitoring Project

    PubMed Central

    Iachan, Ronaldo; H. Johnson, Christopher; L. Harding, Richard; Kyle, Tonja; Saavedra, Pedro; L. Frazier, Emma; Beer, Linda; L. Mattson, Christine; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health surveys of the general US population are inadequate for monitoring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection because the relatively low prevalence of the disease (<0.5%) leads to small subpopulation sample sizes. Objective: To collect a nationally and locally representative probability sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care to monitor clinical and behavioral outcomes, supplementing the data in the National HIV Surveillance System. This paper describes the sample design and weighting methods for the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP) and provides estimates of the size and characteristics of this population. Methods: To develop a method for obtaining valid, representative estimates of the in-care population, we implemented a cross-sectional, three-stage design that sampled 23 jurisdictions, then 691 facilities, then 9,344 HIV patients receiving medical care, using probability-proportional-to-size methods. The data weighting process followed standard methods, accounting for the probabilities of selection at each stage and adjusting for nonresponse and multiplicity. Nonresponse adjustments accounted for differing response at both facility and patient levels. Multiplicity adjustments accounted for visits to more than one HIV care facility. Results: MMP used a multistage stratified probability sampling design that was approximately self-weighting in each of the 23 project areas and nationally. The probability sample represents the estimated 421,186 HIV-infected adults receiving medical care during January through April 2009. Methods were efficient (i.e., induced small, unequal weighting effects and small standard errors for a range of weighted estimates). Conclusion: The information collected through MMP allows monitoring trends in clinical and behavioral outcomes and informs resource allocation for treatment and prevention activities. PMID:27651851

  15. Recent changes in sociodemographic characteristics, dietary behaviors and clinical parameters of adults receiving food assistance in France.

    PubMed

    Castetbon, Katia; Grange, Dorothée; Guibert, Gaëlle; Vernay, Michel; Escalon, Hélène; Vincelet, Catherine

    2016-08-12

    In 2004-2005, a survey carried out on food recipients in France revealed an alarming nutritional situation. In 2011-2012, and using a protocol similar to that of 2004-2005, our objective was to update the description of sociodemographic characteristics, dietary behaviors and clinical parameters of food assistance recipients and to analyze changes since 2004-2005. Both surveys included multistage random sampling of adults benefitting from structures that supply food pantries and charitable grocery stores. Data on sociodemographic characteristics and dietary behaviors were collected along with weight, height and blood pressure measurements. Comparisons between the 2004-2005 (n = 883) and 2011-2012 (n = 1,058) survey observations were made, adjusting for socio-demographic changes which had occurred in the meantime. Since 2004-2005, proportions of food recipients ≥55 years (13.1-19.1 %), born in France (29.2-36.8 %) and employed (5.5-11.7 %) have increased; food insufficiency has decreased (95-74 %). For over half of the recipients, canned (52.4 %) and non-perishable (50.9 %) foods were obtained only from food assistance. Frequency of consumption significantly increased even after adjustment for socio-demographic changes; this was the case for dairy products (for twice a day consumption, 30.2-36.4 %), fruits and vegetables (three times a day, 7.8-13.9 %), and meat, eggs and fish (twice a day, 9.4-19.2 %). In 2011-2012, 15.6 % of men and 36.0 % of women were obese, while 44.5 and 35.1 % had high blood pressure, respectively. Between 2004-2005 and 2011-2012 in France, consumption of staple foods has been slightly improved in food assistance recipients. However, prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors remains high, which underlines the need for long-term efforts at better quality of foods delivered.

  16. Site-specific differences in T cell frequencies and phenotypes in the blood and gut of HIV-uninfected and ART-treated HIV+ adults.

    PubMed

    Yukl, Steven A; Shergill, Amandeep K; Girling, Valerie; Li, Qingsheng; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Haase, Ashley; Havlir, Diane V; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy.

  17. Site-Specific Differences in T Cell Frequencies and Phenotypes in the Blood and Gut of HIV-Uninfected and ART-Treated HIV+ Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep K.; Girling, Valerie; Li, Qingsheng; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Haase, Ashley; Havlir, Diane V.; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy. PMID:25811360

  18. How cultural capital, habitus and class influence the responses of older adults to the field of contemporary visual art.

    PubMed

    Newman, Andrew; Goulding, Anna; Whitehead, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    This article explores the responses of 38 older people to contemporary visual art through the results of a 28-month study entitled, Contemporary Visual Art and Identity Construction: Wellbeing amongst Older People. A framework for the analysis is provided by previous work on the consumption of art and by Bourdieu's constructs of cultural capital, habitus and field. Five groups of older people, with a range of different backgrounds, were taken to galleries and their responses were recorded, transcribed and analysed. It is concluded that participants' responses are influenced by their cultural capital, habitus and class-which, in turn, are affected by their life course experiences. Those who could not recognise the field (e.g., did not view contemporary art as "art") created their own meanings that they associated with the artworks. Evidence indicates that group dynamics and class mobility are likewise important. Participants also used the experience to respond to real or anticipated age-associated deficits.

  19. Factors associated with (risk of) undernutrition in community-dwelling older adults receiving home care: a cross-sectional study in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Pols-Vijlbrief, Rachel; Wijnhoven, Hanneke Ah; Molenaar, Hilde; Visser, Marjolein

    2016-08-01

    It is generally thought that causes of undernutrition are multifactorial, but there are limited quantitative studies performed. We therefore examined a wide range of potential factors associated with undernutrition in community-dwelling older adults. Cross-sectional study. Community-dwelling older adults (≥65 years) receiving home care in the Netherlands. Data on potential factors associated with (risk of) undernutrition were collected among 300 older adults. Nutritional status was assessed by the SNAQ65+ instrument. Undernutrition was defined as mid-upper arm circumference <25 cm or unintentional weight loss of ≥4 kg in 6 months. Being at risk of undernutrition was defined as having poor appetite and inability to walk up and down stairs of fifteen steps, without resting. Of all participants, ninety-two (31·7 %) were undernourished and twenty-four (8·0 %) were at risk of undernutrition. Based on multivariate logistic regression analyses, the statistically significant factors associated with (risk of) undernutrition (P<0·05) were: unable to go outside (OR=5·39), intestinal problems (OR=2·88), smoking (OR=2·56), osteoporosis (OR=2·46), eating fewer than three snacks daily (OR=2·61), dependency in activities of daily living (OR=1·21), physical inactivity (OR=2·01), nausea (OR=2·50) and cancer (OR=2·84); a borderline significant factor was depression symptoms (OR=1·83, P=0·053). The study suggests that (risk of) undernutrition is a multifactorial problem and that associated factors can be found in several domains. These findings may support the development of intervention trials for the prevention and treatment of undernutrition in community-dwelling older adults.

  20. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-06-16

    An improved receiver and receiver mount for calutrons are described. The receiver can be manipulated from outside the tank by a single control to position it with respect to the beam. A door can be operated exteriorly also to prevent undesired portions of the beam from entering the receiver. The receiver has an improved pocket which is more selective in the ions collected. (T.R.H.)

  1. Prevalence and predictors of kaposi sarcoma herpes virus seropositivity: a cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the most common AIDS-defining tumour in HIV-infected individuals in Africa. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection precedes development of KS. KSHV co-infection may be associated with worse outcomes in HIV disease and elevated KSHV viral load may be an early marker for advanced HIV disease among untreated patients. We examined the prevalence of KSHV among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) and compared immunological, demographic and clinical factors between patients seropositive and seronegative for KSHV. Results We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from 404 HIV-infected treatment-naïve adults initiating ART at the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa between November 2008 and March 2009. Subjects were screened at ART initiation for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens. Seropositivity to KSHV was defined as positive to either lytic KSHV K8.1 or latent KSHV Orf73 antibodies. KSHV viremia was determined by quantitative PCR and CD3, 4 and 8 lymphocyte counts were determined with flow cytometry. Of the 404 participants, 193 (48%) tested positive for KSHV at ART initiation; with 76 (39%) reactive to lytic K8.1, 35 (18%) to latent Orf73 and 82 (42%) to both. One individual presented with clinical KS at ART initiation. The KSHV infected group was similar to those without KSHV in terms of age, race, gender, ethnicity, smoking and alcohol use. KSHV infected individuals presented with slightly higher median CD3 (817 vs. 726 cells/mm3) and CD4 (90 vs. 80 cells/mm3) counts than KSHV negative subjects. We found no associations between KSHV seropositivity and body mass index, tuberculosis status, WHO stage, HIV RNA levels, full blood count or liver function tests at initiation. Those with detectable KSHV viremia (n = 19), however, appeared to present with signs of more advanced HIV disease including anemia and WHO stage 3 or 4 defining conditions compared to those in whom the virus was

  2. The Information and Motivation and Behavioral Skills Model of ART Adherence among HIV-Positive Adults in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Santillán Torres Torija, Carolina; Villagrán Vázquez, Gabina; Robles Montijo, Silvia Susana; de Lourdes Eguiluz Romo, Luz

    2015-01-01

    Middle-income countries are in need of research that uses theoretical-based models to assess factors that predict adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and help in the design, implementation, and evaluation of interventions for nonadherent populations. In Mexico, the Information and Motivation and Behavioral Skills (IMB) Model of ART Adherence constructs is useful in describing and predicting adherence behaviors in various samples but has not been articulated to people living with HIV (PLWH) on ART. The aim of this was to characterize the IMB core constructs and identify correlates of ART adherence in an HIV-positive clinic sample in Mexico. A convenience sample of 109 HIV-positive patients attending their monthly visits at a local public hospital were interviewed with the Spanish version of the LifeWindows IMB ART Adherence Questionnaire (LW-IMB-AAQ) as well as a sociodemographic questionnaire. All participants were recruited from a hospital-based outpatient clinical care site. Partial confirmation of the relationships proposed by the IMB Model of ART Adherence was found. As predicted by the model, only behavioral skills had direct association with all measures of self-reported adherence, and motivation was associated with behavioral skills. Information did not demonstrate significant relations to either motivation or behavioral skills, nor did it directly associate with adherence. Self-reported adherence did not associate with CD4 counts, nor did any of the IMB model core constructs. Applicability of the IMB Model of ART Adherence in this setting is discussed. The IMB Model of ART Adherence offered promise in this population and could help tailor population-specific interventions to promote high rates of ART adherence. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Self-transfer and mortality amongst adults lost to follow-up in ART programmes in low- and middle-income countries: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Lynne S; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Ajose, Olawale; Ford, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    To ascertain estimates of adult patients, recorded as lost to follow-up (LTFU) within antiretroviral treatment (ART) programmes, who have self-transferred care, died or truly stopped ART in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Science Direct, LILACS, IndMed and AIM databases (2003-2013) and IAS/AIDS conference abstracts (2011-2013) were searched for tracing studies reporting the proportion of traced patients found to have self-transferred, died or stopped ART. These estimates were then combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Risk of bias was assessed through subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Twenty eight studies were eligible for inclusion, reporting true outcomes for 10,806 traced patients attending approximately 258 ART facilities. None were from outside sub-Saharan Africa. Twenty three studies reported 4.5-54.4% traced LTFU patients self-transferring care, providing a pooled estimate of 18.6% (95% CI 15.8-22.0%). A significant positive association was found between rates of self-transfer and LTFU in the ART cohort. The pooled estimates for unreported deaths were 38.8% (95% CI 30.8-46.8%; 27 studies) and 28.6% (95% CI 21.9-36.0%; 20 studies) for patients stopping ART. A significant decrease in unreported deaths from 50.0% (95% CI 41.5-58.4%) to 30.0% (95% CI 21.1-38.9%) was found comparing study periods before and after 31 December 2007. Substantial unaccounted for transfers and deaths amongst patients LTFU confirms that retention and mortality is underestimated where the true outcomes of LTFU patients are not ascertained. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of not monitoring residual gastric volume on risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia in adults receiving mechanical ventilation and early enteral feeding: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Reignier, Jean; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Le Gouge, Amelie; Boulain, Thierry; Desachy, Arnaud; Bellec, Frederic; Clavel, Marc; Frat, Jean-Pierre; Plantefeve, Gaetan; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Lascarrou, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-16

    Monitoring of residual gastric volume is recommended to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in patients receiving early enteral nutrition. However, studies have challenged the reliability and effectiveness of this measure. To test the hypothesis that the risk of VAP is not increased when residual gastric volume is not monitored compared with routine residual gastric volume monitoring in patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and early enteral nutrition. Randomized, noninferiority, open-label, multicenter trial conducted from May 2010 through March 2011 in adults requiring invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 2 days and given enteral nutrition within 36 hours after intubation at 9 French intensive care units (ICUs); 452 patients were randomized and 449 included in the intention-to-treat analysis (3 withdrew initial consent). Absence of residual gastric volume monitoring. Intolerance to enteral nutrition was based only on regurgitation and vomiting in the intervention group and based on residual gastric volume greater than 250 mL at any of the 6 hourly measurements and regurgitation or vomiting in the control group. Proportion of patients with at least 1 VAP episode within 90 days after randomization, as assessed by an adjudication committee blinded to patient group. The prestated noninferiority margin was 10%. In the intention-to-treat population, VAP occurred in 38 of 227 patients (16.7%) in the intervention group and in 35 of 222 patients (15.8%) in the control group (difference, 0.9%; 90% CI, -4.8% to 6.7%). There were no significant between-group differences in other ICU-acquired infections, mechanical ventilation duration, ICU stay length, or mortality rates. The proportion of patients receiving 100% of their calorie goal was higher in the intervention group (odds ratio, 1.77; 90% CI, 1.25-2.51; P = .008). Similar results were obtained in the per-protocol population. Among adults requiring mechanical ventilation and receiving

  5. Attitudes of Adult Learners toward the Board of Governors Bachelor of Arts Degree Program at Chicago State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson-Davenport, Michael A.

    A study was conducted to determine the attitudes of adult learners toward the Board of Governors (BOG) bachelor's degree program at Chicago State University. The study also examined characteristics and types of adult learners, availability and kinds of services adult learners want, relevance of coursework, biases from campus officials toward…

  6. The role of SNPs in the α-chain of the IL-7R gene in CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV-infected African patients receiving suppressive cART.

    PubMed

    Rajasuriar, R; Booth, D R; Gouillou, M; Spelman, T; James, I; Solomon, A; Chua, K; Stewart, G; Deeks, S; Bangsberg, D R; Muzoora, C; Cameron, P U; Hunt, P; Martin, J; Lewin, S R

    2012-01-01

    We previously found an association between faster CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and interleukin-7 receptor-α (IL-7Rα) haplotype-2 in a predominantly Caucasian cohort. This study aims to determine whether this association was also significant in Africans. Patients were recruited from the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes (UARTO) cohort (n=352). We used survival analysis and linear mixed modelling (LMM) to determine factors associated with CD4 T-cell recovery. Eight IL-7Rα single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in both Africans and Caucasians (n=57). Soluble (s)IL-7Rα levels were measured by ELISA. In UARTO, IL-7Rα haplotype-2 was associated with slower CD4 T-cell recovery following cART by using survival analysis (P=0.020) and no association was found with LMM (P=0.958). The tagging-SNP for IL-7Rα haplotype-2 (rs6897932) was associated with decreased sIL-7Rα (P<0.001). The haplotypes for the IL-7Rα were significantly different in Africans and Caucasians. Using IL-7Rα genotypes we found slower CD4 T-cell recovery in UARTO patients was still associated with rs6897932 (P=0.009) and rs3194051 was associated with faster CD4 T-cell recovery (P=0.006). Unlike Caucasians, we did not demonstrate a significant association between IL-7Rα haplotype 2 and faster CD4 T-cell recovery in Africans. The IL-7Rα SNPs associated with CD4 T-cell recovery following cART differ in African and Caucasian cohorts.

  7. High-pressure liquid chromatography and microbiological assay of serum ofloxacin levels in adults receiving intravenous and oral therapy for skin infections.

    PubMed Central

    Auten, G M; Preheim, L C; Sookpranee, M; Bittner, M J; Sookpranee, T; Vibhagool, A

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-two adults hospitalized with skin and skin structure infections received intravenous ofloxacin followed by oral ofloxacin. The standard treatment was 400 mg every 12 h. One patient with renal failure received 400 mg every 24 h. Serum ofloxacin levels were measured (1.5 h postdose and 1 h predose) during intravenous (32 patients) and oral (30 patients) therapy. Levels were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and microbiological assay (MBA). Mean levels +/- standard deviation (in micrograms per milliliter) when measured by MBA after intravenous dosing were (postdose versus predose) 6.23 +/- 2.49 versus 2.42 +/- 1.56, and those after oral dosing were 6.17 +/- 3.25 versus 3.49 +/- 2.77. When measured by HPLC, mean levels +/- standard deviation after intravenous dosing were 5.81 +/- 2.08 versus 2.14 +/- 1.26 and those after oral dosing were 5.63 +/- 2.92 versus 3.41 +/- 2.98. There were no significant differences between levels achieved with oral or intravenous dosing when measured by either MBA or HPLC. Levels in serum did not correlate with side effects. The MICs for 50 and 90% of the 40 aerobic pathogens isolated from 21 patients were 0.5 and 2.0 micrograms/ml, respectively. Cure or improvement was achieved in 30 patients. Intravenous and oral administration of ofloxacin yielded similar levels in serum which were safe and effective in the therapy of skin infections in adult patients. PMID:1810189

  8. Cancer in children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology: a Nordic cohort study from the Committee of Nordic ART and Safety (CoNARTaS).

    PubMed

    Sundh, Karin Jerhamre; Henningsen, Anna-Karina A; Källen, Karin; Bergh, Christina; Romundstad, Liv Bente; Gissler, Mika; Pinborg, Anja; Skjaerven, Rolv; Tiitinen, Aila; Vassard, Ditte; Lannering, Birgitta; Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt

    2014-09-01

    Do children and young adults born after assisted reproductive technology (ART) have an increased risk of cancer? Children born after ART showed no overall increase in the rate of cancer when compared with children born as a result of spontaneous conception. Children born after ART have more adverse perinatal outcomes, i.e. preterm births, low birthweights and birth defects. Previous studies have shown divergent results regarding the risk of cancer among children born after ART. A retrospective Nordic population-based cohort study was performed, comprising all children born after ART in Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Norway between 1982 and 2007. The mean (±standard deviation) follow-up time was 9.5 (4.8) years. Children born after ART (n = 91 796) were compared with a control group of children born after spontaneous conception. This control group was almost 4-fold the size of the ART group (n = 358 419) and matched for parity, year of birth and country. Data on perinatal outcomes and cancer were obtained from the National Medical Birth Registries, the Cancer Registries, the Patient Registries and the Cause of Death Registries. The cancer diagnoses were divided into 12 main groups. Hazard ratios (HRs) and adjusted HR were calculated. Adjustments were carried out for country, maternal age, parity, sex, gestational age and birth defects. There was no significant increase in overall cancer rates among children born after ART when compared with children born after spontaneous conception (adjusted HR 1.08; 95% CI 0.91-1.27). Cancer, of any form, was found among 181 children born after ART (2.0/1000 children, 21.0/100 000 person-years) compared with 638 children born after spontaneous conception (1.8/1000 children, 18.8/100 000 person-years). Leukaemia was the most common type of cancer (n = 278, 0.62/1000 children) but no significantly increased incidence was found among children born after ART. An increased risk was observed for 2 of 12 cancer groups. They were central

  9. Relationship specialization amongst sources and receivers of social support and its correlations with loneliness and subjective well-being: a cross sectional study of Nepalese older adults.

    PubMed

    Chalise, Hom Nath; Saito, Tami; Takahashi, Miyako; Kai, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Social support, subjective well-being (SWB), and loneliness are issues of central importance in research concerned with the quality of life (QOL) of elderly people in the 21st century. However, very little is known about the situation in low-income countries such as in Nepal. The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationships significant in social support (received (SSR) and provided (SSP)) and analyze their connections with loneliness and SWB. The subjects, not suffering from dementia, were 60 years and above living in Kathmandu city. The data was analyzed using logistic regression with some confounding variables controlled. The results indicate that loneliness is high and SWB is low amongst Nepalese older adults. SSR from children living together and SSP to spouse, children living together and friends and neighbors reduce loneliness. SSP to children living apart increases SWB-life satisfaction. SSR from children living together and SSP to children (living together and apart) increases SWB-life stability. However, SSP to relatives reduces SWB-life satisfaction and SSR from relatives reduces SWB-life stability in Nepalese older adult men.

  10. The Prevalence of Vitamin D Insufficiency and Deficiency and Their Relationship with Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk in Adults Receiving Long-Term Home Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Napartivaumnuay, Navaporn; Gramlich, Leah

    2017-05-10

    It has been demonstrated that low bone mass and vitamin D deficiency occur in adult patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency and its relationship with bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk in long-term HPN patients. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all 186 patients in the HPN registry followed by the Northern Alberta Home Parenteral Nutrition Program receiving HPN therapy >6 months with a 25 (OH) D level and BMD reported were studied. Results: The mean age at the initiation of HPN was 53.8 (20-79) years and 23 (37%) were male. The mean HPN duration was 56 (6-323) months and the most common diagnosis was short bowel syndrome. Based on a total of 186 patients, 62 patients were categorized based on serum vitamin D status as follows: 1 (24.2%) sufficient, 31 (50%) insufficient and 16 (25.8%) deficient. Despite an average of 1891 IU/day orally and 181 IU/day intravenously vitamin D, the mean vitamin D level was 25.6 ng/mL (insufficiency) and 26.2 ± 11.9 ng/mL in patients with the highest 10-year fracture risk. Conclusion: Suboptimal vitamin D levels are common among patients on long-term HPN despite nutrient intake that should meet requirements.

  11. 30-micron heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Spears, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Advantages and constraints of remote measurements using heterodyne spectroscopy near 30 microns are discussed. The state of the art of wideband HgCdTe photomixers and PbSnSe diode-laser local oscillators being developed for FIR heterodyne receivers is described. The first compact 30-micron heterodyne radiometer was built, and initial results at 28-microns show about 2-percent mixer efficiency for a 500-MHz-bandwidth receiver. Factors limiting receiver performance are discussed, along with the projected sensitivity of new interdigitated-electrode HgCdTe photoconductor mixers being developed for operation up to 200 microns.

  12. Quality of Life in Young Adult Patients with a Cardiogenetic Condition Receiving an ICD for Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Agnes J; Vermeer, Alexa M; Smets, Ellen M; Dekker, Lukas R; Wilde, Arthur A; Van Langen, Irene M; Christiaans, Imke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-07-01

    Prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy prevents sudden cardiac death (SCD) among young adults with cardiogenetic conditions, but might reduce quality of life (QoL) due to potential device complications, ongoing medical appointments, and lifestyle restrictions. We investigated QoL in the first year after ICD implantation for the primary prevention of SCD and compared QoL scores with population norms. Consecutive patients with cardiogenetic conditions (aged 18-50 years) referred to the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam to receive ICD therapy for the primary prevention of SCD between 2007 and 2009 were eligible. Patients completed questions about QoL (Short-Form 36 Health Survey; SF-36), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale; CES-D), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; STAI), and the impact of receiving ICD therapy on lifestyle and work, shortly before ICD implantation and after 2 months, 6 months, and 12 months. Thirty-five of 47 eligible patients participated. QoL was significantly reduced shortly before and 2 months after ICD implantation but improved over time and was comparable with population norms at 6 months and 12 months after ICD implantation. Yet, only about half of the patients believed they had a normal life like everyone else, and 28% had lost or changed their job due to their cardiogenetic condition and ICD therapy. Receiving a diagnosis of a cardiogenetic condition and subsequent ICD implantation was accompanied with a temporarily reduced QoL and a significant negative impact on professional life. Clinicians should inform their patients of the possible QoL consequences when deciding about ICD implantation in primary prevention of SCD in cardiogenetic conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Brunk, W.O.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given for an improved calutron receiver having a face plate lying at an angle to the direction of the entering ion beams but having an opening, the plane of which is substantially perpendicular to that of the entering ion beams. By so positioning the opening in the receiver, the effective area through which the desired material may enter the receiver is increased, and at the same time the effective area through which containattng material may enter the receiver is reduced.

  14. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    York, H.F.

    1959-07-01

    A receiver construction is presented for calutrons having two or more ion sources and an individual receiver unit for each source. Design requirements dictate that the face plate defining the receiver entrance slots be placed at an angle to the approaching beam, which means that ions striking the face plate are likely to be scattcred into the entrance slots of other receivers. According to the present invention, the face plate has a surface provided with parallel ridges so disposed that one side only of each ridge's exposed directly to the ion beam. The scattered ions are directed away from adjacent receivers by the ridges on the lace plate.

  15. Evidence for Technology Interventions to Promote ART Adherence in Adult Populations: a Review of the Literature 2012-2015.

    PubMed

    Amico, K Rivet

    2015-12-01

    Leveraging technology to enhance antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, and factors associated with it, has tremendous appeal as a low-cost, generalizable strategy to offer high-quality adherence support given an increasingly limited workforce. As the numbers of individuals living with HIV entering care and initiating ART are expected to increase substantially worldwide in the next decade, capacity to support ART adherence is needed and use of computers, internet, and mobile phones has the potential to offer those efficiencies-provided they are effective. This review summarizes recent advances in the evidence base for technology-driven, technology-delivered, or technology-enhanced ART adherence intervention approaches. A PubMed search limited to January 2013 through July 2015 identified 13 qualifying studies evaluating computer-delivered interventions, internet approaches, mobile phone technologies, and electronic dose monitoring with triggered messaging and data-informed counseling. Considerable support for each area has emerged, with the majority of studies reviewed demonstrating significant effects on ART adherence and clinical outcomes. Gaps are identified and recommendations offered.

  16. Evidence for Technology Interventions to Promote ART Adherence in Adult Populations: A review of the literature 2012 - 2015

    PubMed Central

    Amico, K. Rivet

    2015-01-01

    Leveraging technology to enhance antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, and factors associated with it, has tremendous appeal as a low-cost, generalizable strategy to offer high-quality adherence support given an increasingly limited workforce. As the numbers of individuals living with HIV entering care and initiating ART are expected to increase substantially worldwide in the next decade, capacity to support ART adherence is needed and use of computers, internet and mobile phones has the potential to offer those efficiencies--providing they are effective. This review summarizes recent advances in the evidence base for technology-driven, -delivered or -enhanced ART adherence intervention approaches. A Pubmed search limited to January 2013 through July 2015 identified 13 qualifying studies evaluating computer-delivered interventions, internet approaches, mobile phone technologies, and electronic dose monitoring with triggered messaging and data-informed counseling. Considerable support for each area has emerged, with the majority of studies reviewed demonstrating significant effects on ART adherence and clinical outcomes. Gaps are identified and recommendations offered. PMID:26412085

  17. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups.

  18. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.H.; Stone, K.F.

    1958-09-01

    S>This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and, more specifically, describes a receiver fer collecting the ion curreot after it is formed into a beam of non-homogeneous isotropic cross-section. The invention embodies a calutron receiver having an ion receiving pocket for separately collecting and retaining ions traveling in a selected portion of the ion beam and anelectrode for intercepting ions traveling in another selected pontion of the ion beam. The electrode is disposed so as to fix the limit of one side of the pontion of the ion beam admitted iato the ion receiving pocket.

  19. A Curriculum Evaluation Study of Commercial Art Programs in the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical and Adult Schools: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, William H.; Niesl, Joseph

    A study of 2-year associate degree commercial arts programs in Wisconsin was conducted to determine the entry-level job requirements of commercial artists on a statewide basis; to identify skill tasks, performance levels, and learning experiences required of commercial artists; to evaluate the relevance of 2-year programs to industry requirements;…

  20. Who is utilizing anti-retroviral therapy in Ghana: An analysis of ART service utilization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV patients has led to concerns regarding inequities in utilization of ART services in resource-limited contexts. In this paper, we describe regional and sex differentials in the distribution of ART among adult HIV patients in Ghana. We highlight the need for interventions to address the gender-based and geographic inequities related to the utilization of ART services in Ghana. Methods We reviewed National AIDS/STIs Control Program’s ART service provision records from January 2003 through December 2010, extracting data on adults aged 15+ who initiated ART in Ghana over a period of eight years. Data on the number of patients on treatment, year of enrollment, sex, and region were obtained and compared. Results The number of HIV patients receiving ART in Ghana increased more than 200-fold from 197 in 2003, to over 45,000 in 2010. However, for each of six continuous years (2005-2010) males comprised approximately one-third of adults newly enrolled on ART. As ART coverage has expanded in Ghana, the proportion of males receiving ART declined from 41.7% in 2004 to 30.1% in 2008 and to 27.6% in 2010. Also, there is disproportionate regional ART utilization across the country. Some regions report ART enrollment lower than their percent share of number of HIV infected persons in the country. Conclusions Attention to the comparatively fewer males initiating ART, as well as disproportionate regional ART utilization is urgently needed. All forms of gender-based inequities in relation to HIV care must be addressed in order for Ghana to realize successful outcomes at the population level. Policy makers in Ghana and elsewhere need to understand how gender-based health inequities in relation to HIV care affect both men and women and begin to design appropriate interventions. PMID:23072340

  1. Alcohol use and receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention in a representative sample of sexual minority and heterosexual adults receiving health care.

    PubMed

    Lehavot, Keren; Blosnich, John R; Glass, Joseph E; Williams, Emily C

    2017-10-01

    Despite evidence of alcohol disparities between sexual minority and heterosexual individuals in the general population, research has not examined whether there are disparities in receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention - together considered one of the highest prevention priorities for US adults. This study examined differences in alcohol use and receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention across sexual minority status. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2014 data from eight US states were used to estimate patterns of alcohol use and receipt of alcohol screening and brief intervention among persons reporting sexual orientation and a checkup in the last two years (N=47,800). Analyses were conducted in 2016-2017. Gay men and bisexual women reported higher rates of alcohol use on some measures compared to heterosexual men and women, respectively. There were some differences in screening and brief intervention by sexual orientation. Lesbian women were more likely to report being asked about heavy episodic drinking than heterosexual women, and among those reporting unhealthy alcohol use, gay men were less likely, and bisexual men were more likely, to report receiving brief intervention compared to heterosexual men. Overall similarities between sexual minorities and heterosexuals in alcohol use and receipt of screening and brief intervention are encouraging. Nonetheless, research is needed to confirm findings and understand mechanisms underlying disparities in receipt of brief intervention between gay and heterosexual men. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Long-Term Speech and Language Outcomes in Prelingually Deaf Children, Adolescents and Young Adults Who Received Cochlear Implants in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Chad V.; Kronenberger, William G.; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Pisoni, David B.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated long-term speech and language outcomes in 51 prelingually deaf children, adolescents, and young adults who received cochlear implants (CIs) prior to 7 years of age and used their implants for at least 7 years. Average speech perception scores were similar to those found in prior research with other samples of experienced CI users. Mean language test scores were lower than norm-referenced scores from nationally representative normal-hearing, typically-developing samples, although a majority of the CI users scored within one standard deviation of the normative mean or higher on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Fourth Edition (63%) and Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Fourth Edition (69%). Speech perception scores were negatively associated with a meningitic etiology of hearing loss, older age at implantation, poorer pre-implant unaided pure tone average thresholds, lower family income, and the use of Total Communication. Users of CIs for 15 years or more were more likely to have these characteristics and were more likely to score lower on measures of speech perception compared to users of CIs for 14 years or less. The aggregation of these risk factors in the > 15 years of CI use subgroup accounts for their lower speech perception scores and may stem from more conservative CI candidacy criteria in use at the beginning of pediatric cochlear implantation. PMID:23988907

  3. Longitudinal changes of endocrine and bone disease in adults with β-thalassemia major receiving different iron chelators over 5 years.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Maurizio; Sorrentino, Francesco; Pugliese, Pellegrina; Smacchia, Maria Paola; Daniele, Carmine; Equitani, Francesco; Terlizzi, Filomena; Guitarrini, Maria Rita; Monti, Salvatore; Maffei, Laura; Losardo, Anna; Pasin, Methap; Toscano, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we compared the long-term effects of different iron chelation regimens (deferoxamine, deferiprone, deferoxamine + deferiprone, and deferasirox) in preventing or reversing endocrinopathy (diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, or hypogonadism) and bone disease (measured through DEXA) in 165 adults with β-thalassemia major (TM) (mean age 39.9 ± 8.3 years, 43 % males). After five consecutive years of therapy, patients on deferasirox had the highest decrease in the prevalence of any endocrinopathy compared to other chelators which either had no change (deferiprone and deferoxamine) or had an increase (deferoxamine + deferiprone), p = 0.015. This was attributed to a lower proportion of patients on deferasirox developing new-onset endocrinopathy and higher proportion showing reversal of disease, compared to other chelators. A serum ferritin level of >1300 ng/mL predicted the development of new endocrinopathy (p = 0.025) while a level of <200 ng/mL predicted reversal of existing endocrinopathy (p = 0.147). A significant increase in mean BMD T-score (p < 0.001) and a considerable decrease in osteoporosis prevalence were observed in patients receiving deferasirox but not other chelators. Iron chelation therapy with deferasirox has a role in the prevention of endocrinopathy and reversal of existing disease.

  4. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly.

  5. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. PMID:26350595

  6. Long-term speech and language outcomes in prelingually deaf children, adolescents and young adults who received cochlear implants in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Chad V; Kronenberger, William G; Colson, Bethany G; Henning, Shirley C; Pisoni, David B

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated long-term speech and language outcomes in 51 prelingually deaf children, adolescents and young adults who received cochlear implants (CIs) prior to 7 years of age and had used their implants for at least 7 years. Average speech perception scores were similar to those found in prior research with other samples of experienced CI users. Mean language test scores were lower than norm-referenced scores from nationally representative normal-hearing, typically developing samples, although a majority of the CI users scored within 1 standard deviation of the normative mean or higher on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Fourth Edition (63%), and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Fourth Edition (69%). Speech perception scores were negatively associated with a meningitic etiology of hearing loss, older age at implantation, poorer preimplant unaided pure-tone average thresholds, lower family income and the use of 'total communication'. Subjects who had used CIs for 15 years or more were more likely to have these characteristics and were more likely to score lower on measures of speech perception compared to those who had used CIs for 14 years or less. The aggregation of these risk factors in the >15 years of CI use subgroup accounts for their lower speech perception scores and may stem from more conservative CI candidacy criteria in use at the beginning of pediatric cochlear implantation.

  7. Art for Libraries' Sake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Mark-Elliot

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates the benefits of an aggressive library program of regularly scheduled and professionally curated art exhibitions and related events. Describes the Visual Arts Program at the Pacific Beach branch library (San Diego). A sidebar by Debra Wilcox Johnson discusses libraries' development of cultural programming for adults. (AEF)

  8. Gerontology and the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jean Ellen, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research on the place of the arts in programs for the elderly. In nine articles deals with characteristics and attitudes of adult students in art and music, dance therapy, and creativity. Discusses the aging advocacy movement and suggests it can be useful to program planners and gerontologists. (JAC)

  9. PLANNING THE ART ROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POPOLIZIO, VINCENT J.; AND OTHERS

    FACILITIES FOR CARRYING OUT AN ART PROGRAM MUST BE DESIGNED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS IN SCHOOL AND THOSE ENROLLED IN ADULT PROGRAMS. PROVISIONS MUST BE INCLUDED FOR PAINTING AND DRAWING, THE GRAPHIC ARTS, GENERAL CRAFTS, MODELING, SCHULPTURING, PHOTOGRAPHY, SERIGRAPHY, AND MECHANICAL DRAWING. WORK CENTERS AND TRAFFIC FLOW NEED CAREFUL…

  10. Gerontology and the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jean Ellen, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research on the place of the arts in programs for the elderly. In nine articles deals with characteristics and attitudes of adult students in art and music, dance therapy, and creativity. Discusses the aging advocacy movement and suggests it can be useful to program planners and gerontologists. (JAC)

  11. The Effects of Art History-Enriched Art Therapy on Anxiety, Time on Task, and Art Product Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol L.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated effects of art history enrichment of art therapy task on anxiety, time on task, and art product quality among 13 chronic adult psychiatric day hospital patients. Results indicated art history enrichment task reduced anxiety and increased time on task. Art organization level tended toward significant increase compared with control…

  12. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, J.A.

    1981-01-19

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals is described. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  13. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, Jeremy A.

    1982-01-01

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  14. (Cost)-effectiveness of case-management by district nurses among primary informal caregivers of older adults with dementia symptoms and the older adults who receive informal care: design of a randomized controlled trial [ISCRTN83135728

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Aaltje PD; van Hout, Hein PJ; van Marwijk, Harm WJ; Nijpels, Giel; de Bruijne, Martine C; Bosmans, Judith E; Pot, Anne-Margriet; Stalman, Wim AB

    2005-01-01

    Background Dementia is an incurable disease with devastating consequences for both patients and their relatives. The objective of this study is to describe the study protocol of a randomized controlled trial with assignment to either usual care or case-management by district nurses, among informal caregivers of older adults with dementia symptoms who live at home and the older adults who receive informal care. Methods/design In this randomized controlled trial, effectiveness as well as cost-effectiveness of case-management is evaluated. It concerns case-management in early-detected patients with dementia symptoms and their primary informal caregivers. Participants are followed up to twelve months after baseline assessment. The main outcome measure of the effect evaluation is the caregiver's sense of competence to care for the older person with dementia symptoms. The economic evaluation is performed from a societal perspective. Discussion This is one of the first trials on case-management that includes an economic evaluation. In addition, it concerns a tailor-made intervention in early-detected patients with dementia symptoms and their caregivers. The results of this randomized controlled trial will provide valuable information for health professionals and policy makers on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of early tailor-made case-management for patients and their informal caregivers. Moreover, positive effects will challenge current health care systems to move to more pro-active approaches for this group. PMID:16343336

  15. A systematic review on the effectiveness of continuity of care and its role in patient satisfaction and decreased hospital readmissions in the adult patient receiving home care services.

    PubMed

    Santomassino, Michelle; Costantini, Gwendolyn D; McDermott, Michele; Primiano, Denise; Slyer, Jason T; Singleton, Joanne K

    2012-01-01

    Continuity of care, a concept that in its broadest terms describes patient and provider coordination across time and settings, has evidenced a positive correlation with patient satisfaction and hospital readmission rates. Home health care, where patients receive care from a variety of healthcare practitioners, is one area where these measures are being investigated to determine the effectiveness of continuity of care. To examine and synthesize the best available evidence related to the effectiveness of continuity of care interventions and their impact on patient satisfaction and all-cause hospital readmissions rates in the adult patient who is receiving home care services. Male and female aged 18 years or older receiving home care services, regardless of diagnosis, stage or severity of disease, co-morbidities, or previous treatment received.All types and models of interventions for continuity of care delivered by nurses to patients receiving home care services were considered for inclusion in the review.Patient satisfaction and hospital readmissions.In this review randomised controlled trials were considered for inclusion. In their absence, other research designs, such as non-randomised controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies, and before and after studies were considered for inclusion. Published and unpublished literature in the English language was sought from the inception of the databases through November 1, 2011.The databases searched included: Academic Search Premier, CINAHL ERIC, Health Reference Center Academic, MEDLINE via PubMed, ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health Source, ProQuest Health Management, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Health Source Nursing Academic, PsycINFO and Bio-Med. A search of the grey literature and virtual hand searching of relevant journals was also performed. Two reviewers evaluated the included studies for methodological quality using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs

  16. QuickStats: Percentage* of Adults Aged ≥65 Years Who Reported Ever Receiving a Pneumococcal Vaccination,(†) by Race/Ethnicity(§) and Number of 10 Diagnosed Chronic Conditions(¶) - National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    2016-11-11

    During 2014-2015, the percentage of adults aged ≥65 years who reported ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccination ranged from 42.6% for adults who had none of the 10 selected diagnosed chronic conditions to 78.3% for adults with ≥4 diagnosed chronic conditions. For all racial/ethnic populations the percentage of adults who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination increased as the number of reported chronic conditions increased. Regardless of the number of selected chronic conditions, non-Hispanic white adults were more likely than Hispanic and non-Hispanic black adults to have received the vaccination.

  17. A Balanced Comprehensive Art Curriculum Makes Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollifson, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Ohio schools have developed a Balanced Comprehensive Art Curriculum (BCAC) that includes art history, art criticism, and art in society as well as traditional art production. Students in kindergarten through 12th grade receive equitable instruction in all four curriculum areas. Includes a resource list and table. (MD)

  18. Reviews [Review of "Visual Arts and Older People: Developing Quality Programs" by Pearl Greenberg].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Sally

    1987-01-01

    Reviews Pearl Greenberg's book on developing art programs for older adults. Finds it useful as reference for adult educators and those specifically involved in establishing art classes for older adults but lacking in its chapters on suggested art projects. (AEM)

  19. Prevention of respiratory tract infections with bacterial lysate OM-85 bronchomunal in children and adults: a state of the art

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and also represent a cause of death in some parts of the world. The treatment of RTIs implies a continuous search for stronger therapies and represents an economical burden for health services and society. In this context the prevention of infections is absolutely required. The use of bacterial lysates as immuno-modulators to boost immunological response is widely debated. Aim of this review is to summarize the main clinical studies on the effect of the bacterial lysate OM-85 in treating RTIs in susceptible subjects - namely children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-affected adults. Results from clinical trials and recent systematic reviews are reported. The results show that mean number of RTIs decreases upon treatment with OM-85, as measured by frequency of exacerbations or number of antibiotic courses. Data from systematic reviews indicated that OM-85 is particularly beneficial in children at high risk of RTIs. In COPD-affected adults, clinical studies showed that treatment with OM-85 reduced exacerbations, although systematic reviews did not legitimate the protective effect of OM-85 toward COPD as significant. The use of OM-85 could be efficacious in reducing exacerbation frequency of RTIs in children and adults at risk. However further high-quality studies are needed to better explain the mechanism of action and confirm the beneficial results of OM85. PMID:23692890

  20. Age as a predictive factor of mental health service use among adults with depression and/or anxiety disorder receiving care through the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    DiNapoli, Elizabeth A; Cully, Jeffery A; Wayde, Ernest; Sansgiry, Shubhada; Yu, Hong Jen; Kunik, Mark E

    2016-06-01

    This study compared mental health service utilization by treatment modality and determined predictive factors of use among younger-adult (18-35 years), middle-aged adult (36-64 years), and older-adult veterans (65+ years) with a newly recognized diagnosis of depression and/or anxiety disorder. This retrospective study used data from the Veterans Health Administration National Patient Care Database outpatient and inpatient treatment files during the 2010 fiscal year (N = 583,692). Younger adults were the most likely to use mental health services, followed by middle-aged adults and then older adults. Age was found to be one of the greatest predictors of utilization of mental health services, with odds of use being threefold among younger adults compared with older adults. Continued efforts are needed to improve the awareness of, access to, and receipt of mental health services in veterans, particularly older adults, with depression and anxiety disorders. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Experience Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda

    This Arkansas art education curriculum guide for grades 1 to 6 covers basic concepts, vocabulary, activities, and evaluation for each grade. The basic concepts to be taught throughout these grades include line, shape, color, space, drawing, painting, printing, art history, and art careers. Specific art techniques and types of arts are introduced…

  2. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improvement in a calutron receiver for collecting the isotopes ts described. The electromagnetic separation of the isotopes produces a mass spectrum of closely adjacent beams of ions at the foci regions, and a dividing wall between the two pockets is arranged at an angle. Substantially all of the tons of the less abundant isotope enter one of the pockets and strike one side of the wall directly, while substantially none of the tons entering the other pocket strikes the wall directly.

  3. High rate of virological failure and low rate of switching to second-line treatment among adolescents and adults living with HIV on first-line ART in Myanmar, 2005-2015

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Oo, Myo Minn; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Win, Than; Aung, Thet Ko; Min, Aung Chan; Oo, Htun Nyunt

    2017-01-01

    Background The number of people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Myanmar has been increasing rapidly in recent years. This study aimed to estimate rates of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART due to treatment failure at the Integrated HIV Care program (IHC). Methods Routinely collected data of all adolescent and adult patients living with HIV who were initiated on first-line ART at IHC between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative hazard of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART were estimated. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using the Cox regression model to identify risk factors associated with the two outcomes. Results Of 23,248 adults and adolescents, 7,888 (34%) were tested for HIV viral load. The incidence rate of virological failure among those tested was 3.2 per 100 person-years follow-up and the rate of switching to second-line ART among all patients was 1.4 per 100 person-years follow-up. Factors associated with virological failure included: being adolescent; being lost to follow-up at least once; having WHO stage 3 and 4 at ART initiation; and having taken first-line ART elsewhere before coming to IHC. Of the 1032 patients who met virological failure criteria, 762 (74%) switched to second-line ART. Conclusions We found high rates of virological failure among one third of patients in the cohort who were tested for viral load. Of those failing virologically on first-line ART, about one quarter were not switched to second-line ART. Routine viral load monitoring, especially for those identified as having a higher risk of treatment failure, should be considered in this setting to detect all patients failing on first-line ART. Strategies also need to be put in place to prevent treatment failure and to treat more of those patients who are actually failing. PMID:28182786

  4. High rate of virological failure and low rate of switching to second-line treatment among adolescents and adults living with HIV on first-line ART in Myanmar, 2005-2015.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Harries, Anthony D; Kumar, Ajay M V; Oo, Myo Minn; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Win, Than; Aung, Thet Ko; Min, Aung Chan; Oo, Htun Nyunt

    2017-01-01

    The number of people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Myanmar has been increasing rapidly in recent years. This study aimed to estimate rates of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART due to treatment failure at the Integrated HIV Care program (IHC). Routinely collected data of all adolescent and adult patients living with HIV who were initiated on first-line ART at IHC between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative hazard of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART were estimated. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using the Cox regression model to identify risk factors associated with the two outcomes. Of 23,248 adults and adolescents, 7,888 (34%) were tested for HIV viral load. The incidence rate of virological failure among those tested was 3.2 per 100 person-years follow-up and the rate of switching to second-line ART among all patients was 1.4 per 100 person-years follow-up. Factors associated with virological failure included: being adolescent; being lost to follow-up at least once; having WHO stage 3 and 4 at ART initiation; and having taken first-line ART elsewhere before coming to IHC. Of the 1032 patients who met virological failure criteria, 762 (74%) switched to second-line ART. We found high rates of virological failure among one third of patients in the cohort who were tested for viral load. Of those failing virologically on first-line ART, about one quarter were not switched to second-line ART. Routine viral load monitoring, especially for those identified as having a higher risk of treatment failure, should be considered in this setting to detect all patients failing on first-line ART. Strategies also need to be put in place to prevent treatment failure and to treat more of those patients who are actually failing.

  5. Industrial and Practical Arts, Vocational Education, and General Adult Education, Leflore County School District, Mississippi. Reports of Consultants and Advisory Specialists under Planning Grant, Title III, Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Roy W.; Hunt, Elizabeth E.

    Descriptions of vocational, practical arts, and general adult education programs for an exemplary school curriculum, grades K-12 in Leflore County, Mississippi, are given in this 1969 document. Suggestions include development of an area vocational-technical school designed to supply partially the anticipated manpower needs of this rural county. It…

  6. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese martial art training on musculoskeletal health, balance performance, and self-efficacy in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Lip, Ryan W T; Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Liu, Karen P Y; Guo, X

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) Chinese martial art training on radial bone strength, upper- and lower-limb muscular strength, shoulder joint mobility, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly participants. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve seniors voluntarily joined the VT training group, and twenty-seven seniors voluntarily joined the control group. The VT group received VT training for three months, while the control group received no training. The bone strength of the distal radius was assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer. Muscular strength in the limbs was evaluated using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer and the five times sit-to-stand test. Shoulder joint mobility was examined using a goniometer. Balance performance and self-efficacy were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Chinese version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant group-by-time interaction effect, group effect, and time effect for all outcome variables. However, general trends of maintenance or improvement in all outcome parameters were observed to a greater extent in the VT group than in the control group. [Conclusion] VT training might be a potential fall-prevention exercise that can be used to maintain general physique, balance, and confidence in the elderly population. A further randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm this postulation.

  7. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese martial art training on musculoskeletal health, balance performance, and self-efficacy in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lip, Ryan W.T.; Fong, Shirley S.M.; Ng, Shamay S.M.; Liu, Karen P.Y.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) Chinese martial art training on radial bone strength, upper- and lower-limb muscular strength, shoulder joint mobility, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly participants. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve seniors voluntarily joined the VT training group, and twenty-seven seniors voluntarily joined the control group. The VT group received VT training for three months, while the control group received no training. The bone strength of the distal radius was assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer. Muscular strength in the limbs was evaluated using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer and the five times sit-to-stand test. Shoulder joint mobility was examined using a goniometer. Balance performance and self-efficacy were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Chinese version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant group-by-time interaction effect, group effect, and time effect for all outcome variables. However, general trends of maintenance or improvement in all outcome parameters were observed to a greater extent in the VT group than in the control group. [Conclusion] VT training might be a potential fall-prevention exercise that can be used to maintain general physique, balance, and confidence in the elderly population. A further randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm this postulation. PMID:25931704

  8. Early loss to follow-up of recently diagnosed HIV-infected adults from routine pre-ART care in a rural district hospital in Kenya: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amin S; Fielding, Katherine L; Thuo, Nahashon M; Nabwera, Helen M; Sanders, Eduard J; Berkley, James A

    2012-01-01

    To determine the rate and predictors of early loss to follow-up (LTFU) for recently diagnosed HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-ineligible adults in rural Kenya. Prospective cohort study. Clients registering for HIV care between July 2008 and August 2009 were followed up for 6 months. Baseline data were used to assess predictors of pre-ART LTFU (not returning for care within 2 months of a scheduled appointment), LTFU before the second visit and LTFU after the second visit. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with LTFU before the second visit, while Cox regression was used to assess predictors of time to LTFU and LTFU after the second visit. Of 530 eligible clients, 178 (33.6%) were LTFU from pre-ART care (11.1/100 person-months). Of these, 96 (53.9%) were LTFU before the second visit. Distance (>5 km vs. <1 km: adjusted hazard ratio 2.6 [1.9-3.7], P < 0.01) and marital status (married vs. single: 0.5 [0.3-0.6], P < 0.01) independently predicted pre-ART LTFU. Distance and marital status were independently associated with LTFU before the second visit, while distance, education status and seasonality showed weak evidence of predicting LTFU after the second visit. HIV disease severity did not predict pre-ART LTFU. A third of recently diagnosed HIV-infected, ART-ineligible clients were LTFU within 6 months of registration. Predictors of LTFU among ART-ineligible clients are different from those among clients on ART. These findings warrant consideration of an enhanced pre-ART care package aimed at improving retention and timely ART initiation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Improved immunogenicity of high-dose influenza vaccine compared to standard-dose influenza vaccine in adult oncology patients younger than 65 years receiving chemotherapy: A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jamshed, Saad; Walsh, Edward E; Dimitroff, Lynda J; Santelli, Jeanine Seguin; Falsey, Ann R

    2016-01-27

    Patients undergoing chemotherapy often fail to develop robust responses to influenza vaccination. Compared to standard-dose influenza vaccine (SD), high-dose influenza vaccine (HD) has shown improved immunogenicity and protection against influenza illness in adults 65 years and older. This study compared the immunogenicity and tolerability of HD to SD in adults younger than 65 years of age receiving chemotherapy. This double-blind study randomized patients receiving chemotherapy to vaccination with either SD or HD influenza vaccine. Hemagglutination inhibition assays (HAI) were performed prior to and 4 weeks after vaccination. HAI were summarized as geometric mean titers (GMT), seroconversion rates, and seroprotection rates. A total of 105 subjects were enrolled in the trial (51 received SD and 54 received HD). Subjects were well matched for demographic and medical conditions. Both vaccines were well tolerated with no SAEs. Of the 100 subjects with evaluable data, seroconversion rates for all 3 influenza antigens & post-vaccination GMTs for H3N2 & B strains were significantly improved with HD compared to SD. Seroprotection was excellent and equivalent in both groups. Trivalent high-dose influenza vaccine can be safely administered to patients receiving chemotherapy with improved immunogenicity and seroconversion compared to standard-dose vaccine. Post-vaccination seroprotection rates were similar in both groups. A larger study is needed to show clinical benefits with HD in this population. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01666782. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gourdeous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a gourd art project for her art club. Prior to students actually working on the gourds, the author and her art volunteer did a joint demonstration on the process students would go through to create their project. The volunteer brought in and explained her gourd art and shared information about the drying and…

  11. Gourdeous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a gourd art project for her art club. Prior to students actually working on the gourds, the author and her art volunteer did a joint demonstration on the process students would go through to create their project. The volunteer brought in and explained her gourd art and shared information about the drying and…

  12. The Combination of Pill Count and Self-Reported Adherence is a Strong Predictor of First-Line ART Failure for Adults in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Johnson, Brent A.; Nachega, Jean B.; Wu, Baohua; Ordóñez, Claudia E.; Hare, Anna Q.; Kearns, Rachel; Murphy, Richard; Sunpath, Henry; Marconi, Vincent C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a strong predictor of virologic failure (VF) among people with HIV. Various methods such as patient self-report, pill counts and pharmacy refills have been utilized to monitor adherence. However, there are limited data on the accuracy of combining methods to better predict VF in routine clinical settings. We examined various methods to assess adherence including pill count, medication possession ratio (MPR), and self-reported adherence in order to determine which was most highly associated with VF after ≥ 6 months on ART. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a case-control study. At enrollment, pharmacy refill data were collected retrospectively from the medical chart, pill counts were completed to derive a pill count adherence ratio (PCAR) and a self-report questionnaire was administered to all participants. Parametric smooth splines and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to assess the accuracy of the adherence methods. Results 458 patients were enrolled from October 2010 to June 2012. Of these, 158 (34.50%) experienced VF (cases) and 300 (65.50%) were controls. The median (IQR) PCAR was 1.10 (0.99–1.14) for cases and 1.13 (1.08–1.18) for controls (p<0.0001). The median MPR was 1.00 (0.97–1.07) for cases and 1.03 (0.96–1.07) for controls (p=0.83). Combination of PCAR and self-reported questions was highly associated with VF. Conclusion In this setting, a combination of pill count adherence and self-report adherence questions had the highest diagnostic accuracy for VF. Further validation of this simple, low-cost combination is warranted in large prospective studies. PMID:25426940

  13. Parents as Partners in Art Education Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    The author describes a parent art program, how it works, and ways to implement it. She emphasizes the strengths of parent programs as a way to support and enrich existing arts education, not as a replacement. Hansen describes the art kit--the adult's teaching resource--and the basic four-part process: presentation, demonstration, an art activity,…

  14. Temporal Patterns and Drug Resistance in CSF Viral Escape Among ART-Experienced HIV-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Misra, Vikas; Lorenz, David; Cervantes-Arslanian, Anna M.; Lyons, Jennifer; Chalkias, Spyridon; Wurcel, Alysse; Burke, Deirdre; Venna, Nagagopal; Morgello, Susan; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral escape is an increasingly recognized clinical event among HIV-1-infected adults. We analyzed longitudinal data and drug-resistance mutations to characterize profiles of HIV-1-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy with discordant CSF and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. Methods: Forty-one cases of CSF escape defined as detectable CSF HIV-1 RNA when plasma levels were undetectable, or HIV-1 RNA >0.5-log higher in CSF than plasma were identified from Boston Hospitals and National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium (NNTC) from 2005 to 2016. Results: Estimated prevalence of CSF escape in Boston and NNTC cohorts was 6.0% and 6.8%, respectively; median age was 50, duration of HIV-1 infection 17 years, CD4 count 329 cells/mm3 and CD4 nadir 21 cells/mm3. Neurological symptoms were present in 30 cases; 4 had repeat episodes of CSF escape. Cases were classified into subtypes based plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in the preceding 24 months: high-level viremia (1000 copies/mL), low-level viremia (LLV: 51–999 copies/mL), and plasma suppression with CSF blip or escape (CSF RNA <200 or ≥200 copies/mL). High-level viremia cases reported more substance abuse, whereas LLV or plasma suppression cases were more neurosymptomatic (81% vs. 53%); 75% of repeat CSF escape cases were classified LLV. M184V/I mutations were identified in 74% of CSF samples when plasma levels were ≤50 copies per milliliter. Conclusions: Characteristics frequently observed in CSF escape include HIV-1 infection >15 years, previous LLV, and M184V/I mutations in CSF. Classification based on preceding plasma HIV RNA levels provides a useful conceptual framework to identify causal factors and test therapeutics. PMID:28328546

  15. Fear and Risk of Falling, Activities of Daily Living, and Quality of Life: Assessment When Older Adults Receive Emergency Department Care.

    PubMed

    Çinarli, Tuğba; Koç, Zeliha

    Falls tend to create fear and concern in older adults who also seek care in emergency departments (EDs) at high rates. The purposes of this study were to (a) describe risk and fear of falling in older adults seeking care in the ED and (b) explore relationships between risk and fear of falling with activities of daily living and quality of life. The study was conducted in the ED of Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital in Samsun, Turkey. Data were collected for 7 months in 2013-2014. Adults aged 65 years and above who scored at least 20 on the Standardized Mini-Mental Test and who presented for care in the ED were eligible to take part. Patients self-reported demographic information and completed the Tinetti Falls Efficacy Scale, the Morse Fall Scale, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and the Modified Barthel Index (MBI). A total of 151 older adults took part. Prevalence of falls was high (48.3%), as well as fear of falling (63.6%). Risk of falling (Morse Fall Scale scores) was negatively correlated with the ability to carry out activities of daily living (MBI scores; r = -.50, p < .001) and positively related to scores on the NHP (r = .45, p < .001); likewise, fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale scores) was negatively correlated with the ability to carry out activities of daily living (MBI scores; r = -.79, p < .001) and positively correlated with NHP scores (r = .64, p < .001). Older adults seeking care in the ED who have a higher risk of falling are more dependent in daily living activities and experience lower quality of life. Care seeking in the ED offers an opportunity to assess fall risk and fear of falling and provide guidance on prevention and management of falls in older adults.

  16. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  17. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  18. Participation needs of older adults having disabilities and receiving home care: met needs mainly concern daily activities, while unmet needs mostly involve social activities.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Pier-Luc; Larivière, Nadine; Desrosiers, Johanne; Voyer, Philippe; Champoux, Nathalie; Carbonneau, Hélène; Carrier, Annie; Levasseur, Mélanie

    2015-08-01

    Participation is a key determinant of successful aging and enables older adults to stay in their homes and be integrated into the community. Assessing participation needs involves identifying restrictions in the accomplishment of daily and social activities. Although meeting participation needs involves older adults, their caregivers and healthcare providers, little is known about their respective viewpoints. This study thus explored the participation needs of older adults having disabilities as perceived by the older adults themselves, their caregivers and healthcare providers. A qualitative multiple case study consisted of conducting 33 semi-structured interviews in eleven triads, each composed of an older adult, his/her caregiver and a healthcare provider recruited in a Health and Social Services Centre (HSSC) in Québec, Canada. Interview transcripts and reviews of clinical records were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics based on thematic saliency analysis methods. Aged 66 to 88 years, five older adults had physical disabilities, five had mild cognitive impairment and one had psychological problems, leading to moderate to severe functional decline. Caregivers and healthcare providers were mainly women, respectively retired spouses and various professionals with four to 32 years of clinical experience. Participation needs reported by each triad included all domains of participation. Needs related to daily activities, such as personal care, nutrition, and housing, were generally met. Regarding social activities, few needs were met by various resources in the community and were generally limited to personal responsibilities, including making decisions and managing budgets, and some community life activities, such as going shopping. Unmet needs were mainly related to social activities, involving leisure, other community life activities and interpersonal relationships, and some daily activities, including fitness and mobility. This study

  19. Art Education/Art Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The special issue presents 13 articles dealing with art education and art therapy for special groups. Included are the following titles and authors: "Art Education for Special Groups: The Emotionally Disturbed" (E. Ulman); "You Are The Early Warning System" (C. Stember); "School Art Therapist Rationale for DPI Certification" (V. Minar); "Art…

  20. The Role of Community Centre-based Arts, Leisure and Social Activities in Promoting Adult Well-being and Healthy Lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mat; Kimberlee, Richard; Deave, Toity; Evans, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Developed countries are experiencing high levels of mental and physical illness associated with long term health conditions, unhealthy lifestyles and an ageing population. Given the limited capacity of the formal health care sector to address these public health issues, attention is turning to the role of agencies active in civil society. This paper sought to evaluate the associations between participation in community centre activities, the psycho-social wellbeing and health related behaviours. This was based on an evaluation of the South West Well-being programme involving ten organisations delivering leisure, exercise, cooking, befriending, arts and crafts activities. The evaluation consisted of a before-and-after study with 687 adults. The results showed positive changes in self-reported general health, mental health, personal and social well-being. Positive changes were associated with diet and physical activity. Some activities were different in their outcomes—especially in cases where group activities were combined with one-to-one support. The results suggest that community centre activities of this nature offer benefits that are generically supportive of health behaviour changes. Such initiatives can perform an important role in supporting the health improvement objectives of formal health care services. For commissioners and partner agencies, accessibility and participation are attractive features that are particularly pertinent to the current public health context. PMID:23665850

  1. Giving and taking--differential effects of providing, receiving and anticipating emotional support on quality of life in adults with multiple illnesses.

    PubMed

    Warner, Lisa M; Schüz, Benjamin; Wurm, Susanne; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Tesch-Römer, Clemens

    2010-07-01

    Multimorbidity challenges quality of life (QoL) in old age. Anticipating and providing social support have been shown to promote QoL whereas receiving support often had detrimental effects. Little is known about which psychological processes explain these effects. This study examines the effects of receiving, anticipating and providing emotional support on QoL, with control beliefs and self-esteem as simultaneous mediators in an elderly multimorbid sample (N = 1415). Anticipating and providing support positively predicted QoL, mediated through self-esteem and control beliefs. Received support negatively predicted QoL, without mediation. Self-esteem and control beliefs can help to explain the relation between QoL and support.

  2. Cost-Utility Analysis of Long-Acting Beta Agonists versus Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in Older Adults with Persistent Asthma Receiving Concomitant Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy.

    PubMed

    Altawalbeh, Shoroq M; Thorpe, Joshua M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Smith, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting beta agonists (LABA) and leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) are the major add-on treatments in older adults with persistent asthma when inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) fail to achieve adequate asthma control. To evaluate the cost-utility of ICS + LABA treatment compared with ICS + LTRA treatment in older adults with asthma. A Markov model was used to estimate the incremental costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy associated with ICS + LABA treatment versus ICS + LTRA treatment in older adults with asthma in the United States from the health system perspective. The HCUPnet 2010 national statistics were used to extract the costs associated with asthma and cardiovascular hospitalizations, and inpatient mortality associated with these events. Event probabilities were predicted using Medicare 2009-2010 claims for older adults with asthma. Treatment costs were estimated on the basis of average wholesale drug price listings, and utility estimates were extracted from the literature. To account for uncertainty, one-way sensitivity analysis and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed. The model predicted that, compared with ICS + LTRA treatment, ICS + LABA treatment costs $5,823 more while gaining 0.03 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $209,090 per QALY. Hospitalization probabilities and posthospitalization utilities were the most influential parameters in the one-way sensitivity analysis. Probabilistic uncertainty analysis using Monte-Carlo simulations showed that the probabilities that ICS + LTRA treatment is cost-effective compared with ICS + LABA treatment are 77% and 62% at $50,000 and $100,000 per QALY gained willingness-to-pay thresholds, respectively. The cost-effectiveness of ICS + LABA treatment is economically unfavorable in older adults when compared with LTRA as add-on treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR

  3. You've Got Art Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2000-01-01

    States that paying attention to the mail children receive, the items that are contained, and how children prepare and send mail is an excellent lesson for art teachers interested in advancing the "mail arts" as an authentic form of child's art. Describes mail art as created by children. (CMK)

  4. Prevalence of self-reported high blood pressure awareness, advice received from health professionals, and actions taken to reduce high blood pressure among US adults--Healthstyles 2002.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Carma; Neff, Linda J; Croft, Janet B; Keenan, Nora L; Malarcher, Ann M; Hyduk, Alexandra; Bansil, Pooja; Mensah, George A

    2005-09-01

    High blood pressure awareness, advice received from health care providers, and adoption of heart-healthy behaviors were assessed using the Healthstyles 2002 survey. About 20% of respondents reported that they had high blood pressure, and 53% of these were currently taking medications to lower blood pressure. Black men had the highest adjusted prevalence of high blood pressure (32%). Medication use among persons with high blood pressure was lower among Hispanics (45%) than among blacks (54%) and whites (54%). Persons reporting having high blood pressure were five times more likely to report having received advice from a health care professional to go on a diet or change eating habits (p<0.05) and reduce salt or sodium in their diet (p<0.05), but five times less likely to have received advice to exercise (p<0.05) than those reporting not having high blood pressure, after adjustment for differences in sex, race/ethnicity, and age. Persons with self-reported high blood pressure were also more likely to be making these modifications (p<0.05). Among people with high blood pressure, current medication use was associated with both receiving and following advice for diet change and salt reduction (p<0.05). Future initiatives are needed to improve the proportion of Hispanics and blacks taking prescribed medications to improve high blood pressure control and reduce risk for serious sequelae such as heart disease and stroke.

  5. Brain responses to biological motion predict treatment outcome in young adults with autism receiving Virtual Reality Social Cognition Training: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y J Daniel; Allen, Tandra; Abdullahi, Sebiha M; Pelphrey, Kevin A; Volkmar, Fred R; Chapman, Sandra B

    2017-03-29

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by remarkable heterogeneity in social, communication, and behavioral deficits, creating a major barrier in identifying effective treatments for a given individual with ASD. To facilitate precision medicine in ASD, we utilized a well-validated biological motion neuroimaging task to identify pretreatment biomarkers that can accurately forecast the response to an evidence-based behavioral treatment, Virtual Reality-Social Cognition Training (VR-SCT). In a preliminary sample of 17 young adults with high-functioning ASD, we identified neural predictors of change in emotion recognition after VR-SCT. The predictors were characterized by the pretreatment brain activations to biological vs. scrambled motion in the neural circuits that support (a) language comprehension and interpretation of incongruent auditory emotions and prosody, and (b) processing socio-emotional experience and interpersonal affective information, as well as emotional regulation. The predictive value of the findings for individual adults with ASD was supported by regression-based multivariate pattern analyses with cross validation. To our knowledge, this is the first pilot study that shows neuroimaging-based predictive biomarkers for treatment effectiveness in adults with ASD. The findings have potentially far-reaching implications for developing more precise and effective treatments for ASD.

  6. Quality of life and participation in daily life of adults with Pompe disease receiving enzyme replacement therapy: 10 years of international follow-up.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Deniz; Kruijshaar, Michelle E; Plug, Iris; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Kanters, Tim A; Wens, Stephan C A; Reuser, Arnold J J; van Doorn, Pieter A; van der Ploeg, Ans T

    2016-03-01

    Pompe disease is an inheritable metabolic disorder for which enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available since 2006. Effects of ERT have been shown on distance walked, pulmonary function and survival. We investigated whether it also improves quality of life and participation in daily life in adult patients with the disease. In an international survey, we assessed quality of life (Short Form 36, SF-36) and participation (Rotterdam Handicap Scale, RHS) annually between 2002 and 2012. Repeated measurements mixed effects models were used to describe the data over time. Responses were available for 174 adult patients. In the periods before and after start of ERT, the median follow-up times were 4 years each (range 0.5-8). The SF-36 Physical Component Summary measure (PCS) deteriorated before ERT (-0.73 score points per year (sp/y); CI 95 % -1.07 to -0.39), while it improved in the first 2 years of ERT (1.49 sp/y; CI 0.76 to 2.21), and remained stable thereafter. The Mental Component Summary measure (MCS) remained stable before and during ERT. After declining beforehand (-0.49 sp/year; CI -0.64 to-0.34), the RHS stabilized under ERT. In adult patients with Pompe disease, ERT positively affects quality of life and participation in daily life. Our results reinforce previous findings regarding the effect of ERT on muscle strength, pulmonary function and survival.

  7. Safe Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Though most art materials are safe for children (and labelled accordingly), parents and teachers should follow recommended safety guidelines, such as those presented in this article, when choosing, using, and storing children's art materials. (SM)

  8. Car Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses car art and its appeal to boys and girls. Describes the popularity of customizing cars, focusing on this as a future career for students. Includes a list of project ideas that focuses on car art. (CMK)

  9. Black Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baraka, Amiri

    1987-01-01

    Discusses black art as not only an expression of black life but as revolutionary art. It must be collective, functional, and committing. It must also be anti-racist, anti-capitalist, and anti-imperialist. (LHW)

  10. Peramivir pharmacokinetics in two critically ill adults with 2009 H1N1 influenza A concurrently receiving continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Jose A; Bauer, Karri A; Hollister, Alan S; Shidham, Ganesh; Firstenberg, Michael S; Reed, Erica E; Mangino, Julie E; Goff, Debra A

    2010-10-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics of intravenous peramivir-an investigational neuraminidase inhibitor for the treatment of 2009 H1N1 infection or nonsubtypable influenza A thought to be the 2009 H1N1 virus-in patients concurrently receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Pharmacokinetic analysis. Critical care unit at a university-affiliated hospital. Two critically ill women with 2009 H1N1 influenza A treated with compassionate-use intravenous peramivir administered as a daily infusion of 600 mg over 30 minutes while receiving continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), a form of CRRT. Plasma samples were collected from the two patients before and 30 minutes after the fourth (first patient) and ninth (second patient) peramivir infusion to estimate minimum (C(min)) and maximum (C(max)) plasma concentrations, respectively. Two additional postinfusion concentrations were measured from each patient to estimate noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters of peramivir while receiving CVVHDF. In the two patients, respectively, C(min) was 2170 and 251 ng/ml, C(max) was 18,400 and 20,300 ng/ml, area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0-24 hours (AUC(0-24)) was 178,000 and 94,400 ng·hour/ml, drug clearance was 56 and 106 ml/minutes, and plasma half-life was 7.6 and 3.7 hours. The volume of distribution adjusted for ideal body weight at steady state was 0.51 and 0.54 L/kg, respectively. The first patient had a slower peramivir plasma clearance compared with the second patient, but both patients had higher peramivir clearances as calculated from AUC(0-24) than those predicted by CRRT. Thus, the dosage of intravenous peramivir was appropriate in these patients. Additional pharmacokinetic data are needed to confirm these results and help guide dosing in patients receiving various forms of CRRT.

  11. Language Arts - Spanish Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Magdalena; Sones, Mary

    This publication presents three suggested language arts curriculum units. They represent a cross-section of materials that have been developed to deal with the learning problems of students with special language difficulties. Originally developed for grades 7-12, these units may be adapted for use in adult education or at other grade levels. They…

  12. [Use of Mental Health Service Among Young Adults on Unemployment Benefit Before and after Receiving Counseling at a Psychiatric Liaison Department].

    PubMed

    Hagen, C; Bänfer, S; Werkstetter, L; Hebebrand, J; Reissner, V

    2016-12-14

    Objective: To determine mental health service utilization before and after consultation of a psychiatric liaison service ("Support 25") among youths aged 16-24 years suffering from mental disorders and receiving unemployment benefits. Methods: Longitudinal registration of mental health service use over a 9-month period (N=148); measurement of possible moderators with questionnaires and rating scales. Results: Mental health service utilization increased from initially 22% to 40% and 47.5% 3 and 6 months after receiving individual treatment recommendation. Low-threshold psychosocial counseling was frequented more often than specific psychiatric or psychotherapeutic treatment. Subjects who contacted mental health services showed a trend towards a lower level of psychosocial functioning than subjects who did not seek treatment. Stigma-related factors did not hinder mental health service use. Conclusions: Despite a high degree of psychiatric morbidity, the surveyed sample of unemployed youths had problems to successfully enter mental health services. Although a substantial increase in service use was observed after receiving psychoeducational information at a psychiatric liaison service, the use of low-threshold counseling predominated. This finding suggests that the mental health system should adapt better to the specific needs of young unemployed, for example, by expanding low-threshold psychiatric pre-treatment offers at vocational centers.

  13. Art English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Art English is a combination of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL)/English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) and art content. As a new instructional area, it faces several challenges: as with all English for Special Purposes (ESP), exchange of information among programs; development of a suitable combination of art content and ESL, due to lack of…

  14. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  15. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  16. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  17. Art Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Advocating that Canadian art programs should use and model environmentally safe practices, the articles in this journal focus on issues of safe practices in art education. Articles are: (1) "What is WHMIS?"; (2) "Safety Precautions for Specific Art Processes"; (3) "Toxic Substances"; (4) "Using Clay, Glazes, and…

  18. Art English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Art English is a combination of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL)/English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) and art content. As a new instructional area, it faces several challenges: as with all English for Special Purposes (ESP), exchange of information among programs; development of a suitable combination of art content and ESL, due to lack of…

  19. Integrating Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    These articles focus on art as a component of interdisciplinary integration. (1) "Integrated Curriculum and the Visual Arts" (Anna Kindler) considers various aspects of integration and implications for art education. (2) "Integration: The New Literacy" (Tim Varro) illustrates how the use of technology can facilitate…

  20. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  1. Great spotted cuckoo fledglings often receive feedings from other magpie adults than their foster parents: which magpies accept to feed foreign cuckoo fledglings?

    PubMed

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius)--magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism.

  2. Great Spotted Cuckoo Fledglings Often Receive Feedings from Other Magpie Adults than Their Foster Parents: Which Magpies Accept to Feed Foreign Cuckoo Fledglings?

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius) – magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism. PMID:25272009

  3. Art. Program Planning, Primary, Junior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York Borough Board of Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    Over 20 ideas for planning art programs for grades 1 through 6 are included in this planning guide. Introductory comments stress the individuality of children and caution art teachers not to judge by adult standards and not to direct lessons step-by-step or show how things should be drawn. Outdoor sketching is recommended as a way to develop…

  4. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  5. [Art therapy and "art brut"].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Emese; Simon, Lajos

    2010-01-01

    The authors in this article explor the most important steps of the development of the research on the psychopathology of expression. They introduce the development of Art Brut and it's place in art history. They deal with the characteristics of art therapy.

  6. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  7. Trabecular Bone Score Reflects Trabecular Microarchitecture Deterioration and Fragility Fracture in Female Adult Patients Receiving Glucocorticoid Therapy: A Pre-Post Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A recently developed diagnostic tool, trabecular bone score (TBS), can provide quality of trabecular microarchitecture based on images obtained from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Since patients receiving glucocorticoid are at a higher risk of developing secondary osteoporosis, assessment of bone microarchitecture may be used to evaluate risk of fragility fractures of osteoporosis. In this pre-post study of female patients, TBS and fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) adjusted with TBS (T-FRAX) were evaluated along with bone mineral density (BMD) and FRAX. Medical records of patients with (n = 30) and without (n = 16) glucocorticoid treatment were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had undergone DXA twice within a 12- to 24-month interval. Analysis of covariance was conducted to compare the outcomes between the two groups of patients, adjusting for age and baseline values. Results showed that a significant lower adjusted mean of TBS (p = 0.035) and a significant higher adjusted mean of T-FRAX for major osteoporotic fracture (p = 0.006) were observed in the glucocorticoid group. Conversely, no significant differences were observed in the adjusted means for BMD and FRAX. These findings suggested that TBS and T-FRAX could be used as an adjunct in the evaluation of risk of fragility fractures in patients receiving glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:28127556

  8. High rates of malnutrition in older adults receiving different levels of health care in Lleida, Catalonia: an assessment of contributory factors.

    PubMed

    Jürschik, Pilar; Torres, Joan; Solá, Román; Nuin, Carmen; Botigué, Teresa; Lavedán, Ana

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to define the factors associated with the presence or risk of malnutrition in older adults (>65 years of age) attending health care centers in Lleida, Catalonia, using a cross-sectional study approach. Nutritional parameters assessed included the Mini Nutritional Assessment Scale, sociodemographic and psychosocial factors, functional and cognitive status, swallowing and oral problems, texture and route of administration of the diet, changes in dietary intake, and presence of digestive disorders. A total of 398 individuals (184 men) with an average age of 77 years were included in the assessment. Poor nutritional status was recorded in 58% of the individuals. Factors independently associated with unsatisfactory nutritional status included weight loss, functional dependence, cognitive impairment, loneliness, living without a partner, history of heart disease, lung disease, and the presence of acute vomiting.

  9. Art in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Students are often required to create work in a vacuum, handing in papers to an inauthentic audience for the purpose of receiving a grade. As a result, students often neglect to consider the effects that their work can have on others. In this article, the author highlights an art project from her middle school in Kings Park, New York, that…

  10. The Art of Delegating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canei, Robert A.

    The problems that develop from delegation, as well as those which develop because of the lack of it, have received increasing attention in recent years. The manual presents a program based on the art of delegating authority and responsibility from a management perspective. The course is designed to help managers realize the value of delegation by…

  11. Art in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Students are often required to create work in a vacuum, handing in papers to an inauthentic audience for the purpose of receiving a grade. As a result, students often neglect to consider the effects that their work can have on others. In this article, the author highlights an art project from her middle school in Kings Park, New York, that…

  12. Adult mortality or morbidity is not increased in childhood-onset growth hormone deficient patients who received pediatric GH treatment: an analysis of the Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study (HypoCCS).

    PubMed

    Mo, Daojun; Hardin, Dana Sue; Erfurth, Eva Marie; Melmed, Shlomo

    2014-10-01

    The French Safety and Appropriateness of Growth Hormone treatments in Europe (SAGhE) cohort has raised concern of increased mortality risk during follow-up into adulthood in certain patients who had received growth hormone (GH) treatment during childhood. The Hypopituitary Control and Complications Study monitored mortality and morbidity of adult GH-deficient patients including those with childhood-onset GH deficiency (COGHD) who received GH treatment as children. Evaluate risk of mortality, cancer, myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in a prospective observational study. COGHD patients [n = 1,204, including 389 diagnosed with idiopathic COGHD (ICOGHD)] had received pediatric GH treatment. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and cancer standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) in patients without a prior cancer were estimated relative to reference populations. Crude incidence rates were estimated for MI and stroke. No increased mortality or cancer incidence was observed, as compared with reference populations, during a follow-up of 3.7 ± 3.3 years (mean ± SD). The overall SMR for COGHD was 1.14 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.55-2.10], and for ICOGHD, 0.33 (0.01-1.84). The overall cancer SIR for COGHD was 0.27 (0.01-1.50), and for ICOGHD, 0.00 (0.00-2.45). No incident case of MI was reported. The crude stroke incidence rate [181.3 per 100,000 person-years] in COGHD patients was consistent with the rates reported in reference populations. No incident case of stroke was identified in ICOGHD patients who are presumed to have no increased stroke risk factors. The results indicate no increased risk of mortality or incidence of cancer, stroke, or MI in adult GH-deficient patients who had previously received pediatric GH treatment.

  13. Improvement in health-related quality of life among adults with serious mental illness receiving inpatient treatment: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J Christopher; Madan, Alok; Allen, Jon G; Ellis, Thomas; Mahoney, Jane; Hardesty, Susan; Frueh, B Christopher; Oldham, John M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined changes in health-related quality of life in adult inpatients with serious mental illness engaged in a 6- to 8-week intensive treatment program. Admission and discharge assessment with the MOS 36-item Short-Form Health Survey was completed (June 2010-June 2012) for 410 adults aged 18-68 years. Paired t tests and effect size estimates were calculated for the overall sample, and reliable change index scores and clinical significance were calculated to estimate individual-level response and recovery rates. Hierarchical stepwise regression analyses were conducted to explore patient pretreatment characteristics, including total number of DSM-IV-TR diagnoses, that influence treatment response. Large effect size improvements were demonstrated for the Mental Component Summary score (Cohen d = 1.5), including subjective ratings of vitality (Cohen d = 1.1), social functioning (Cohen d = 1.3), role-emotional functioning (Cohen d = 1.3), and mental health (Cohen d = 1.3). Equivocal findings for change in physical health were demonstrated, with the majority of patients demonstrating no significant change in function (t409 = 0.14, P = .89) but approximately equal numbers of patients demonstrating improvement and deterioration. The pretreatment characteristic of a tendency to be interpersonally distant, cold, and disengaged was predictive of a poorer outcome on Mental Component Summary treatment response (P < .001). In light of a heavy burden of illness and high psychiatric comorbidity of this sample, treatment response was generally positive for improvement in mental health functioning. This study adds to a growing body of evidence indicating robust treatment response even for those with serious mental illness when treatment is intensive and multimodal. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  14. The Team Approach to Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Visual arts rarely seem to receive the accolades that are bestowed upon other special subject areas such as music and sports. In this article, the author describes a way in which publicity could be generated for students involved with the visual arts. The mural-painting process provides a creative outlet for students and gives them the opportunity…

  15. Guerilla Science: Outreach at music and art festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosin, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Guerilla Science a non-profit science education organization that, since 2007, has brought live events to unconventional venues for science, such as music festivals, art galleries, banquets, department stores and theaters. Guerilla Science sets science free by taking it out of the lab and into the traditional domains of the arts. By producing events that mix science with art, music and play, they create unique opportunities for adult audiences to experience science in unorthodox ways, such as interactive events, games, live experiments, demonstrations and performances by academics, artists, musicians, actors, and professional science communicators. Much of Guerilla Science's work has focused on astrophysical and terrestrial plasmas, and this presentation will provide an overview of Guerilla Science's work in this area. Guerilla Science has produced over twenty events, receiving international media coverage, and directly reached over fifteen thousand members of the public.

  16. Predictors and impact of non-adherence in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder receiving OROS methylphenidate: results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication non-adherence has an important impact on treatment efficacy and healthcare burden across a range of conditions and therapeutic areas. The aim of this analysis was to determine predictors of non-adherence and impact of non-adherence on treatment response in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Post-hoc analysis of a 13-week randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study of OROS methylphenidate (MPH) 54 and 72 mg/day. Primary efficacy variable was the Conners’ Adult ADHD Rating Scale – Screening Version (CAARS:O-SV). Daily adherence was calculated as average daily adherence (100 × capsules taken/2), with overall adherence calculated as the average daily adherence. Predictors of adherence were assessed using mixed-effects logistic regression. Descriptive statistics were generated for change in CAARS:O-SV score for adherent (> 95% adherence) and non-adherent subjects. Predictors of change were analyzed using a mixed model. Results Subjects were allocated to OROS MPH (54 mg, n = 87; 72 mg, n = 92) or placebo (n = 97). Mean adherence was 92.6% and 93.3% (OROS MPH 54 and 72 mg/day, respectively), versus 97.5% (placebo). Adherence was higher and less variable in completers. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included female sex, shorter time since ADHD diagnosis, higher education level (completion of university) and score on the Drug Use Screening Inventory psychiatric disorders subscale. Improvements from baseline in CAARS:O-SV score were numerically greater in subjects defined as adherent than in those who were non-adherent. Significant predictors of CAARS:O-SV change in patients who completed the study included percentage adherence up to the point of assessment (p < 0.0001), baseline score (p < 0.0001) and family history of ADHD (p = 0.0003). Conclusion The results of this analysis suggest that newly diagnosed patients, those with a high score on the DUSI-R psychiatric disorder scale, women

  17. Patient-provider communication about the emotional cues and concerns of adolescent and young adult patients and their family members when receiving a diagnosis of cancer.

    PubMed

    Korsvold, Live; Mellblom, Anneli V; Lie, Hanne C; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon Håvard; Finset, Arnstein

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine how emotional cues/concerns are expressed and responded to in medical consultations with adolescent and young adults (AYA), an understudied patient group, at the time of cancer diagnosis. Nine consultations in which AYA patients aged 12-25 years were informed about their cancer diagnosis and treatment plans were audio recorded. Expressions of emotional cues/concerns and physicians' responses were identified and coded using The Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES). A total of 135 emotional cues/concerns (range: 2-26, median: 13) were identified. Cues or concerns that were expressed by patients and relatives following questions from physicians were more often explicit than patient-initiated cues/concerns. Questions about medical and practical issues could often be understood as ways of expressing emotional cues. When patients or relatives expressed less explicit verbal cues about underlying concerns, physicians often responded by presenting medical information without commenting on the emotional aspect indicated by the cue. The communication was dominated by information-giving, but the questions from patients and relatives and their responses to the information often had emotional connotations. Patients' requests for information may include an emotional aspect. These preliminary findings should be tested in a larger sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mindful art.

    PubMed

    Malafouris, Lambros

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) begin asking if the study of the mind's inner life can provide a foundation for a science of art. Clearly there are many epistemological problems involved in the study of the cognitive and affective basis of art appreciation. I argue that context is key. I also propose that as long as the "mind's life" continues to be perceived as an "inner" intracranial phenomenon, little progress can be made. Mind and art are one.

  19. Predictors of unprotected sexual intercourse among HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral drugs in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ebuenyi, Ikenna Desmond; Ogoina, Dimie; Harry, Tubonye Clement

    2017-08-22

    This study aims to evaluate the predictor of unprotected sexual intercourse among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a tertiary facility in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. A cross sectional study was undertaken in a 200 bed tertiary hospital in Bayelsa state, south-south Nigeria. A standardized pre-tested interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect demographic, clinical and sexual history from consecutive HIV-1 infected adults receiving ART for at least 6 months. Independent predictors of unprotected sexual intercourse (defined as irregular condom use or unprotected sex in previous 6months) were determined using an unconditional logistic regression model. Out of 241 patients studied, 71.8% were females, 48.5% were married, and 20.7% had a sexual partner that is HIV-1 infected. Sixty (24.9%) patients engaged in unprotected sex, 86 (35.7%) used condom consistently and 95 (39.4%) abstained. Female sex, being currently married, age18-35years, partner being HIV-positive and living with sexual partner were significant associated with risky sex. Female sex, age18-35years and being currently married were the only independent predictors of unprotected sex. HIV-infected adults receiving ART in resource limited settings are potential sources of secondary transmission of HIV. Condom use in the prevention of secondary transmission of HIV in study area should target females, young adults and married couples.

  20. Voice Handicap Index and Interpretation of the Cutoff Points Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve as Screening for Young Adult Female Smokers.

    PubMed

    Tafiadis, Dionysios; Kosma, Evangelia I; Chronopoulos, Spyridon K; Papadopoulos, Aggelos; Drosos, Konstantinos; Siafaka, Vassiliki; Toki, Eugenia I; Ziavra, Nausica

    2017-04-06

    The relationship between smoking and alterations of the vocal tract and larynx is well known. This pathology leads to the degradation of voice performance in daily living. Multiple assessment methods of vocal tract and larynx have been developed, and in recent years they were enriched with self-reported questionnaires such as Voice Handicap Index (VHI). This study determined the cutoff points of VHI's total score and its three domains for young female smokers in Greece. These estimated cutoff points could be used by voice specialists as an indicator for further clinical evaluation (foreseeing a potential risk of developing a vocal symptom because of smoking habits). A sample of 120 female nondysphonic smokers (aged 18-31) was recruited. Participants filled out the VHI and Voice Evaluation Form. VHI's cutoff point of total score was calculated at the value of 19.50 (sensitivity: 0.780, 1-specificity: 0.133). Specifically, the construct domain of functional was 7.50 (sensitivity: 0.900, 1-specificity: 0.217), for physical it was 8.50 (sensitivity: 0.867, 1-specificity: 0.483), and for emotional it was 7.50 (sensitivity: 0.833, 1-specificity: 0.200) through the use of receiver operating characteristic. Furthermore, VHI could be used as a monitoring tool for smokers and as a feedback for smoking cessation. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  2. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  3. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  4. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  5. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  6. Indigenous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Linda Lomahaftewa, a noted painter, has taught at much bigger places than the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). But Lomahaftewa, who is Hopi-Choctaw, and others on the faculty of IAIA are intensely devoted to the mission of this small but unique school. IAIA--the nation's only four-year fine arts institution devoted to American Indian and…

  7. Graphic Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide to teaching graphic arts, one in a series of instructional materials for junior high industrial arts education, is designed to assist teachers as they plan and implement new courses of study and as they make revisions and improvements in existing courses in order to integrate classroom learning with real-life experiences. This graphic…

  8. Art Smart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Gerard, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    As evidenced by countless studies, time spent engaging in the arts has lasting effects on children of all ages, not only instilling in them a sense of creativity and innovation, but also providing them the skills needed to compete in a global economy. In May 2011, the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities released "Reinvesting in…

  9. Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Richard J.; Fleming, Mary Ann

    Educational goals and objectives, student activities, and visual aids are included in this guide to a three-dimensional design unit that combines creative art and industrial arts skills. Course goals include challenging students' creative skills, encouraging student interaction and successful group work, and providing an atmosphere of fun and…

  10. Art Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Though people may like different types of music, everyone likes music. In middle school, music and art are of key importance for students to express and define what kind of person they are. In this article, the author presents an art project where students are asked to create their own guitars. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  11. Art Playgroup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiniger, Christina

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how parents can be involved in a developmentally appropriate art program for very young children. "Art Playgroup," a program for children ages two to five and their parents is one suggestion. Operating under the auspices of DTA Center for Learning & Growing, a nonprofit in Ellsworth, Maine, DTA…

  12. Indigenous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Linda Lomahaftewa, a noted painter, has taught at much bigger places than the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). But Lomahaftewa, who is Hopi-Choctaw, and others on the faculty of IAIA are intensely devoted to the mission of this small but unique school. IAIA--the nation's only four-year fine arts institution devoted to American Indian and…

  13. Graphic Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide to teaching graphic arts, one in a series of instructional materials for junior high industrial arts education, is designed to assist teachers as they plan and implement new courses of study and as they make revisions and improvements in existing courses in order to integrate classroom learning with real-life experiences. This graphic…

  14. Beyond Attendance: A Multi-Modal Understanding of Arts Participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak-Leonard, Jennifer L.; Brown, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    First conducted in 1982, the National Endowment for the Arts' (NEA's) Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) serves as the longest-standing resource for studying U.S. adult levels of arts attendance, personal arts creation and performance, and arts participation through electronic media. The environment in which arts organizations…

  15. Mission Accomplished: Working with State Arts Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Johanna Misey

    2005-01-01

    Most everyone involved professionally in the non-profit arts comes in contact with a state arts agency. A person may be on the Teaching Artist roster, works for a grantee organization, or has directly received a grant or fellowship. The work that one does in the school is probably funded by the state arts agency. Or, at a more basic level, the…

  16. Using Interdisciplinary Arts Education to Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorimer, Maureen Reilly

    2009-01-01

    Amid crossing currents of educational expectations pressing on principals, the author advocates for enhancing inclusion of the visual and performing arts. Although electives and clubs provide arts exposure to a selected few, many students do not receive consistent and high-quality arts experiences. Carefully planned, interdisciplinary arts…

  17. Education and Arts Participation: A Study of Arts Socialization and Current Arts-Related Activities Using 1982 and 1992 SPPA Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orend, Richard J.; Keegan, Carol

    This monograph focuses on the relationship between pre-adult socialization in the arts and subsequent arts participation, as measured in the data collected in the 1992 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The study aims to increase understanding of art socialization experiences as they relate to…

  18. Public Participation in the Arts via the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, David; And Others

    This report examined media audiences for the arts using data gathered in the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPA) covering approximately 18,000 U.S. adults in 1982 and 16,000 adults in 1985. The SPA questionnaire covers the use of television, radio, and recordings as a means to participate in seven particular arts activities, which…

  19. The art of being healthy: a qualitative study to develop a thematic framework for understanding the relationship between health and the arts

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Christina R; Knuiman, Matthew; Wright, Peter; Rosenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective In recent years the health–arts nexus has received increasing attention; however, the relationship is not well understood and the extent of possible positive, negative and unintended outcomes is unknown. Guided by the biopsychosocial model of health and theories of social epidemiology, the aim of this study was to develop a framework pertaining to the relationship between arts engagement and population health that included outcomes, confounders and effect modifiers. A health–arts framework is of value to researchers seeking to build the evidence base; health professionals interested in understanding the health–arts relationship, especially those who use social prescribing for health promotion or to complement treatments; in teaching medical, nursing and health-science students about arts outcomes, as well as artists and health professionals in the development of policy and programmes. Design A qualitative study was conducted. Semistructured interviews were analysed thematically. Setting Western Australia. Participants 33 Western Australian adults (18+ years). Participants were randomly selected from a pool of general population nominees who engaged in the arts for enjoyment, entertainment or as a hobby (response rate=100%). Results A thematic analysis was conducted using QSR-NVivo10. The resulting framework contained seven outcome themes and 63 subthemes. Three themes specifically related to health, that is, mental, social and physical health, while economic, knowledge, art and identity outcomes were classified as health determinants. Within each theme, positive, negative and unintended outcomes (subthemes) were identified and categorised as relating to the individual and/or to the community. A list of confounding and/or effect modifying factors, related to both the arts and health, was identified. Conclusions Given the increasing pressure on health resources, the arts have the potential to assist in the promotion of health and healing. This

  20. The art of being healthy: a qualitative study to develop a thematic framework for understanding the relationship between health and the arts.

    PubMed

    Davies, Christina R; Knuiman, Matthew; Wright, Peter; Rosenberg, Michael

    2014-04-25

    In recent years the health-arts nexus has received increasing attention; however, the relationship is not well understood and the extent of possible positive, negative and unintended outcomes is unknown. Guided by the biopsychosocial model of health and theories of social epidemiology, the aim of this study was to develop a framework pertaining to the relationship between arts engagement and population health that included outcomes, confounders and effect modifiers. A health-arts framework is of value to researchers seeking to build the evidence base; health professionals interested in understanding the health-arts relationship, especially those who use social prescribing for health promotion or to complement treatments; in teaching medical, nursing and health-science students about arts outcomes, as well as artists and health professionals in the development of policy and programmes. A qualitative study was conducted. Semistructured interviews were analysed thematically. Western Australia. 33 Western Australian adults (18+ years). Participants were randomly selected from a pool of general population nominees who engaged in the arts for enjoyment, entertainment or as a hobby (response rate=100%). A thematic analysis was conducted using QSR-NVivo10. The resulting framework contained seven outcome themes and 63 subthemes. Three themes specifically related to health, that is, mental, social and physical health, while economic, knowledge, art and identity outcomes were classified as health determinants. Within each theme, positive, negative and unintended outcomes (subthemes) were identified and categorised as relating to the individual and/or to the community. A list of confounding and/or effect modifying factors, related to both the arts and health, was identified. Given the increasing pressure on health resources, the arts have the potential to assist in the promotion of health and healing. This framework expands on current knowledge, further defines the health-arts

  1. Outcomes of HIV-infected patients receiving care at multiple clinics.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Schranz, Asher J; Momplaisir, Florence; Keller, Sara C; Gross, Robert; Frank, Ian; Metlay, Joshua P; Brady, Kathleen A

    2014-08-01

    Receiving care at multiple clinics may compromise the therapeutic patient-provider alliance and adversely affect the treatment of people living with HIV. We evaluated 12,759 HIV-infected adults in Philadelphia, PA between 2008 and 2010 to determine the effects of using multiple clinics for primary HIV care. Using generalized estimating equations with logistic regression, we examined the relationship between receiving care at multiple clinics (≥ 1 visit to two or more clinics during a calendar year) and two outcomes: (1) use of ART and (2) HIV viral load ≤ 200 copies/mL for patients on ART. Overall, 986 patients (8 %) received care at multiple clinics. The likelihood of attending multiple clinics was greater for younger patients, women, blacks, persons with public insurance, and for individuals in their first year of care. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, patients receiving care at multiple clinics were less likely to use ART (AOR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.55-0.71) and achieve HIV viral suppression (AOR = 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.94) than individuals using one clinic. Qualitative data are needed to understand the reasons for visiting multiple clinics.

  2. Cost/efficacy analysis of preferred Spanish AIDS study group regimens and the dual therapy with lopinavir/ritonavir plus lamivudine for initial ART in HIV infected adults.

    PubMed

    Gatell Artigas, Josep María; Arribas López, José Ramón; Lázaro Y de Mercado, Pablo; Blasco Bravo, Antonio Javier

    2016-01-01

    The National AIDS Plan and the Spanish AIDS study group (GESIDA) proposes "preferred regimens" (PR) of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV-infected patients. In 2013, the recommended regimens were all triple therapy regimens. The Gardel Study assessed the efficacy of a dual therapy (DT) combination of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus lamivudine (3TC). Our objective is to evaluate the GESIDA PR and the DT regimen LPV/r+3TC cost/efficacy ratios. Decision tree models were built. probability of having viral load <50 copies/mL at week 48. ART regime cost: costs of ART, adverse effects, and drug resistance tests during the first 48 weeks. Cost/efficacy ratios varied between 5,817 and 13,930 euros per responder at 48 weeks, for the DT of LPV/r+3TC and tenofovir DF/emtricitabine+raltegravir, respectively. Taking into account the official Spanish prices of ART, the most efficient regimen was DT of LPV/r+3TC, followed by the triple therapy with non-nucleoside containing regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. One World, Many Cultures. Papers from the International Conference on Adult Education and the Arts (4th, St. Andrews, Scotland, July 10-14, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David, Ed.; McConnell, Bridget, Ed.; Normie, Gerald, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Bridget McConnell); "Introduction" (David J. Jones); opening addresses by George Robertson MP, Shadow Scottish Secretary, and by Charlie McConnell, Executive Director, Scottish Community Education Council; and speech by Christine Hamilton, Deputy Director, Scottish Arts Council;…

  4. Cost/efficacy analysis of preferred Spanish AIDS study group regimens and the dual therapy with LPV/r+3TC for initial ART in HIV infected adults.

    PubMed

    Gatell, Josép M; Arribas, José R; Lázaro, Pablo; Blasco, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The National AIDS Plan and the Spanish AIDS study group (GESIDA) panel of experts propose "preferred regimens" of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV-infected patients for 2013 [1]. All these regimens are triple therapy regimens. The Gardel Study assessed the efficacy and safety of a dual therapy (DT) combination of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) 400/100 mg BID+ lamivudine (3TC) 150 mg BID [2]. The objective of this study is to evaluate the costs and efficiency of initiating treatment with the GESIDA "preferred regimens" and DT. Economic assessment of costs and efficiency (cost/efficacy) through decision tree analysis models. Efficacy was defined as the probability of having viral load <50 copies/mL at week 48, in an intention-to-treat analysis. Cost of initiating treatment with an ART regime was defined as the costs of ART and its consequences (adverse effects, changes of ART regime and drug resistance tests) during the first 48 weeks. The payer perspective (Spanish National Health System) was applied considering only differential direct costs: ART (official prizes), management of adverse effects, resistance tests, and determination of HLA B*5701. The setting is Spain and the costs are those of 2013. A sensitivity deterministic analysis was conducted, building three scenarios for each regime: base, most favourable and most unfavourable cases. In the base case scenario, the cost of initiating treatment ranges from 5138 euros for DT, to 12,059 euros for tenofovir DF/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC)+raltegravir (RAL). The efficacy ranges between 0.66 for abacavir (ABC)/3TC+LPV/r and ABC/3TC+atazanavir (ATV)/r, and 0.88 for DT. Efficiency, in terms of cost/efficacy, varies between 5817 and 13,930 euros per responder at 48 weeks, for DT and TDF/FTC+RAL respectively. DT is the most efficient regimen in the most favourable (5503 euros per responder) and most unfavourable (6169 euros per responder) scenarios. Considering the ART official Spanish prizes, the most

  5. Early Mortality in Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amita; Nadkarni, Girish; Yang, Wei-Teng; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Gupte, Nikhil; Bisson, Gregory P.; Hosseinipour, Mina; Gummadi, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed observational studies of early mortality post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America, as defined by the World Bank, to summarize what is known. Methods and Findings Studies published in English between January 1996 and December 2010 were searched in Medline and EMBASE. Three independent reviewers examined studies of mortality within one year post-ART. An article was included if the study was conducted in a LMIC, participants were initiating ART in a non-clinical trial setting and were ≥15 years. Fifty studies were included; 38 (76%) from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), 5 (10%) from Asia, 2 (4%) from the Americas, and 5 (10%) were multi-regional. Median follow-up time and pre-ART CD4 cell count ranged from 3–55 months and 11–192 cells/mm3, respectively. Loss-to-follow-up, reported in 40 (80%) studies, ranged from 0.3%–27%. Overall, SSA had the highest pooled 12-month mortality probability of 0.17 (95% CI 0.11–0.24) versus 0.11 (95% CI 0.10–0.13) for Asia, and 0.07 (95% CI 0.007–0.20) for the Americas. Of 14 (28%) studies reporting cause-specific mortality, tuberculosis (TB) (5%–44%), wasting (5%–53%), advanced HIV (20%–37%), and chronic diarrhea (10%–25%) were most common. Independent factors associated with early mortality in 30 (60%) studies included: low baseline CD4 cell count, male sex, advanced World Health Organization clinical stage, low body mass index, anemia, age greater than 40 years, and pre-ART quantitative HIV RNA. Conclusions Significant heterogeneity in outcomes and in methods of reporting outcomes exist among published studies evaluating mortality in the first year after ART initiation in LMIC. Early mortality rates are highest in SSA, and opportunistic illnesses such as TB and wasting syndrome are the most common reported causes of death. Strategies addressing modifiable risk factors associated with early

  6. Americans Personal Participation in the Arts: 1992. A Monograph Describing the Data from the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Monnie; Cherbo, Joni Maya

    This monograph examines the extent to which the U.S. adult population was involved in personal art participation in 1992, compares it to participation in 1982, and profiles personal arts participants. The National Endowment for the Arts attempted to determine the scope of adult public participation in the arts through the Surveys of Public…

  7. Helping dentists manage accounts receivable.

    PubMed

    Scott, J

    2001-01-01

    First Pacific Corporation (FPC) has worked with dental practices since 1961, providing personal services that optimize practice performance. In addition to being the premier service provider for administrative tasks in dental offices, they supply state-of-the-art hardware and accounts receivable management software. FPC designs and teaches practice development strategies, deliver on-site training, and much more. FPC is dedicated to the long-term professional success of dental clients, their staff, and their practices through a unique, integrated package of services. As a family-owned business, with headquarters in Salem, Oregon, FPC employs approximately two hundred staff who serve practices in twenty-two states.

  8. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite China“s free antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent non-adherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent non-adherence (any missed ART in the past 4 weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent non-adherence. Male gender, lower education and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients“ educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities. PMID:24666239

  9. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Megan M; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Despite China's free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent nonadherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent nonadherence (any missed ART in the past four weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use, and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent nonadherence. Male gender, lower education, and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients' educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities.

  10. Nature's Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Vicki; And Others

    Over 60 art activities, designed to enhance environmental awareness and incorporate environmental concepts, are outlined in this document. A sample of the activities presented are: decorated notepaper and cards with feathers or weeds; wall plaques of prairie plants; methods of flower preservation; water plant prints; construction of dolls,…

  11. Art & Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmulsky, Lucinda

    2009-01-01

    In July 2004, The National Endowment for the Arts released the results of a survey entitled "Reading at Risk." The survey covered a 20-year period from 1982 to 2002 and documented a dramatic decline in the reading of literary works by all age groups during that period. The steepest decline of 28 percent was found among the youngest age group of…

  12. Spanish Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Anne; Wilson, Mary Ellen

    1995-01-01

    Provides instructional strategies and materials designed to introduce students to Spanish art. Includes four lesson plans with student objectives, background information, and step-by-step instructional procedures. Also includes four full-page color reproductions of paintings by Murillo, Picasso, El Greco, and de Goya. (CFR)

  13. Art & Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmulsky, Lucinda

    2009-01-01

    In July 2004, The National Endowment for the Arts released the results of a survey entitled "Reading at Risk." The survey covered a 20-year period from 1982 to 2002 and documented a dramatic decline in the reading of literary works by all age groups during that period. The steepest decline of 28 percent was found among the youngest age group of…

  14. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  15. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    The language arts course content guides presented in this manual cover English, oral communications, and journalism in grades 9-12 and provide a framework from which a curriculum can be built. Within each subject area and at each grade level, skills are identified at three instructional levels: basic, developmental, and extension. The basic skills…

  16. Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukehart, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Whether one views art as a cultural record, a political or religious instrument, a celebration of form and color, or an instinctual force, it is a given that sharing diverse expressions of creativity with children plants fresh understandings and pathways for their own questions and drives. It is impossible to do justice to the many outstanding…

  17. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  18. Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukehart, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Whether one views art as a cultural record, a political or religious instrument, a celebration of form and color, or an instinctual force, it is a given that sharing diverse expressions of creativity with children plants fresh understandings and pathways for their own questions and drives. It is impossible to do justice to the many outstanding…

  19. Chicken Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  20. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Paul L.

    Capitalizing on the resources available in an urban city block, this resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents a resource list and objectives and activities relative to teaching language arts (reading, English, listening, speaking, and writing). The resource list is comprised of approximately 150 physical facilities (e.g.,…

  1. Producing Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Describes an art activity for use in a unit on agriculture in which third grade students create packing crate labels. Students compare examples of packing crate labels, identifying the name, image, product description, and visual elements such as color and balance. Discusses the process of creating the labels. (CMK)

  2. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  3. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Paul L.

    Capitalizing on the resources available in an urban city block, this resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents a resource list and objectives and activities relative to teaching language arts (reading, English, listening, speaking, and writing). The resource list is comprised of approximately 150 physical facilities (e.g.,…

  4. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  5. Chicken Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  6. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls. PMID:23101561

  7. A state-of-the-art review of the management and treatment of taste and smell alterations in adult oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Trina; Olson, Karin; Wismer, Wendy

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine studies of interventions for the prevention and management of taste and smell alterations (TSA) experienced by adult oncology patients. Articles published between 1993 and 2013 were identified by searching CINAHL, MEDLINE and Food Science & Technology Abstracts (FSTA) and were included if they were in English and focused on adult oncology patients. Only interventions within the scope of nursing practice were reviewed. Twelve articles were identified for inclusion. Four research groups examined zinc supplementation, with two claiming that zinc supplementation was an effective intervention and two claiming it had no effect on TSA. The remaining research groups examined eight other interventions, with varying results. Marinol, megestrol acetate and Synsepalum dulcificum interventions appear promising. Based on this review, there does not yet appear to be an effective approach for preventing or managing TSA in adult oncology patients. Although some interventions show promise, further research is necessary to determine their efficacy.

  8. Some Books about Alaska Received in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of State Libraries.

    This annual bibliography of Alaska- and Arctic-related publications received by the Alaska Division of State Libraries is divided into three categories. There are 26 titles in the "Juvenile Fiction" section, 122 in the "Adult Non-Fiction" section, and 19 in the "Adult Fiction" section. Government publications are…

  9. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  10. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  11. Putting the "receive" in accounts receivable.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, John W; Baum, Neil

    2006-01-01

    There isn't a practice in the United States that doesn't have a concern about accounts receivable. The financial success of any practice depends on the care and feeding of the accounts receivable. This is not an area of practice management that can be taken lightly or delegated to someone who is not attentive to detail and doggedly persistent. In this article, we will discuss how to identify problematic accounts receivable and what can be done to bring the accounts receivable under control. We will provide you with a plan of action that can be adopted by any practice regardless of size, number of physicians, or whether the practice uses in-house billing or outsources its billing arrangements.

  12. Patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and level of care associated with lost to follow-up and mortality in adult patients on first-line ART in Nigerian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Odafe, Solomon; Idoko, Ochanya; Badru, Titilope; Aiyenigba, Bolatito; Suzuki, Chiho; Khamofu, Hadiza; Onyekwena, Obinna; Okechukwu, Emeka; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto N

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Clinical outcome is an important determinant of programme success. This study aims to evaluate patients’ baseline characteristics as well as level of care associated with lost to follow-up (LTFU) and mortality of patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods Retrospective cohort study using routine service data of adult patients initiated on ART in 2007 in 10 selected hospitals in Nigeria. We captured data using an electronic medical record system and analyzed using Stata. Outcome measures were probability of being alive and retained in care at 12, 24 and 36 months on ART. Potential predictors associated with time to mortality and time to LTFU were assessed using competing risks regression models. Results After 12 months on therapy, 85% of patients were alive and on ART. Survival decreased to 81.2% and 76.1% at 24 and 36 months, respectively. Median CD4 count for patients at ART start, 12, 18 and 24 months were 152 (interquartile range, IQR: 75 to 242), 312 (IQR: 194 to 450), 344 (IQR: 227 to 501) and 372 (IQR: 246 to 517) cells/µl, respectively. Competing risk regression showed that patients’ baseline characteristics significantly associated with LTFU were male (adjusted sub-hazard ratio, sHR=1.24 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.42]), ambulatory functional status (adjusted sHR=1.25 [95% CI: 1.01 to 1.54]), World Health Organization (WHO) clinical Stage II (adjusted sHR=1.31 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.59]) and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=0.76 [95% CI: 0.66 to 0.87]). Those associated with mortality include CD4 count <50 cells/µl (adjusted sHR=2.84 [95% CI: 1.20 to 6.71]), WHO clinical Stage III (adjusted sHR=2.67 [95% CI: 1.26 to 5.65]) and Stage IV (adjusted sHR=5.04 [95% CI: 1.93 to 13.16]) and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR=2.21 [95% CI: 1.30 to 3.77]). Conclusions Mortality was associated with advanced HIV disease and care in secondary facilities. Earlier initiation of therapy and strengthening systems in secondary level facilities may

  13. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics and level of care associated with lost to follow-up and mortality in adult patients on first-line ART in Nigerian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Odafe, Solomon; Idoko, Ochanya; Badru, Titilope; Aiyenigba, Bolatito; Suzuki, Chiho; Khamofu, Hadiza; Onyekwena, Obinna; Okechukwu, Emeka; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto N

    2012-09-18

    Clinical outcome is an important determinant of programme success. This study aims to evaluate patients' baseline characteristics as well as level of care associated with lost to follow-up (LTFU) and mortality of patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART). Retrospective cohort study using routine service data of adult patients initiated on ART in 2007 in 10 selected hospitals in Nigeria. We captured data using an electronic medical record system and analyzed using Stata. Outcome measures were probability of being alive and retained in care at 12, 24 and 36 months on ART. Potential predictors associated with time to mortality and time to LTFU were assessed using competing risks regression models. After 12 months on therapy, 85% of patients were alive and on ART. Survival decreased to 81.2% and 76.1% at 24 and 36 months, respectively. Median CD4 count for patients at ART start, 12, 18 and 24 months were 152 (interquartile range, IQR: 75 to 242), 312 (IQR: 194 to 450), 344 (IQR: 227 to 501) and 372 (IQR: 246 to 517) cells/µl, respectively. Competing risk regression showed that patients' baseline characteristics significantly associated with LTFU were male (adjusted sub-hazard ratio, sHR = 1.24 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.42]), ambulatory functional status (adjusted sHR = 1.25 [95% CI: 1.01 to 1.54]), World Health Organization (WHO) clinical Stage II (adjusted sHR = 1.31 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.59]) and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR = 0.76 [95% CI: 0.66 to 0.87]). Those associated with mortality include CD4 count < 50 cells/µl (adjusted sHR = 2.84 [95% CI: 1.20 to 6.71]), WHO clinical Stage III (adjusted sHR = 2.67 [95% CI: 1.26 to 5.65]) and Stage IV (adjusted sHR = 5.04 [95% CI: 1.93 to 13.16]) and care in a secondary site (adjusted sHR = 2.21 [95% CI: 1.30 to 3.77]). Mortality was associated with advanced HIV disease and care in secondary facilities. Earlier initiation of therapy and strengthening systems in secondary level facilities may improve retention and

  14. All About Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Ronald H.

    This is an experimental textbook for teaching about the visual arts at the elementary level. The content answers five questions about art: what is art; who makes art; what are the sources for art; why is art important to you; and why is art important to society. At the end of each section of the text is a set of questions and suggestions for…

  15. Snow Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It was nearing the end of a very long, rough winter with a lot of snow and too little time to play outside. The snow had formed small hills and valleys over the bushes and this was at the perfect height for the students to paint. In this article, the author describes how her transitional first-grade students created snow art paintings. (Contains 1…

  16. Art Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A new class of polyimides, synthesized by Langley Research Center, has been evaluated by the Getty Conservation Institute's Materials Science Group for possible art conservation applications. Polyimides are noted for resistance to high temperature, wear and radiation. They are thermally stable and soluble in some common solvents. After testing under simulated exposures for changes in color, permeability and flexibility, one coating, ODPA-3, 3-ODA may be used to protect bronze statues from corrosion. A test on stained glass windows was unsuccessful.

  17. Snow Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It was nearing the end of a very long, rough winter with a lot of snow and too little time to play outside. The snow had formed small hills and valleys over the bushes and this was at the perfect height for the students to paint. In this article, the author describes how her transitional first-grade students created snow art paintings. (Contains 1…

  18. Characteristics and Outcomes among Older HIV-Positive Adults Enrolled in HIV Programs in Four Sub-Saharan African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Eduardo, Eduard; Lamb, Matthew R.; Kandula, Sasi; Howard, Andrea; Mugisha, Veronicah; Kimanga, Davies; Kilama, Bonita; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Elul, Batya

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information exists on adults ≥50 years receiving HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa. Methodology Using routinely-collected longitudinal patient-level data among 391,111 adults ≥15 years enrolling in HIV care from January 2005–December 2010 and 184,689 initiating ART, we compared characteristics and outcomes between older (≥50 years) and younger adults at 199 clinics in Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, and Tanzania. We calculated proportions over time of newly enrolled and active adults receiving HIV care and initiating ART who were ≥50 years; cumulative incidence of loss to follow-up (LTF) and recorded death one year after enrollment and ART initiation, and CD4+ response following ART initiation. Findings From 2005–2010, the percentage of adults ≥50 years newly enrolled in HIV care remained stable at 10%, while the percentage of adults ≥50 years newly initiating ART (10% [2005]-12% [2010]), active in follow-up (10% [2005]-14% (2010]), and active on ART (10% [2005]-16% [2010]) significantly increased. One year after enrollment, older patients had significantly lower incidence of LTF (33.1% vs. 32.6%[40–49 years], 40.5%[25–39 years], and 56.3%[15–24 years]; p-value<0.0001), but significantly higher incidence of recorded death (6.0% vs. 5.0% [40–49 years], 4.1% [25–39 years], and 2.8% [15–24 years]; p-valve<0.0001). LTF was lower after vs. before ART initiation for all ages, with older adults experiencing less LTF than younger adults. Among 85,763 ART patients with baseline and follow-up CD4+ counts, adjusted average 12-month CD4+ response for older adults was 20.6 cells/mm3 lower than for adults 25–39 years of age (95% CI: 17.1–24.1). Conclusions The proportion of patients who are ≥50 years has increased over time and been driven by aging of the existing patient population. Older patients experienced less LTF, higher recorded mortality and less robust CD4+ response after ART initiation. Increased programmatic attention on

  19. Characteristics and outcomes among older HIV-positive adults enrolled in HIV programs in four sub-Saharan African countries.

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Eduard; Lamb, Matthew R; Kandula, Sasi; Howard, Andrea; Mugisha, Veronicah; Kimanga, Davies; Kilama, Bonita; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Elul, Batya

    2014-01-01

    Limited information exists on adults ≥50 years receiving HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa. Using routinely-collected longitudinal patient-level data among 391,111 adults ≥15 years enrolling in HIV care from January 2005-December 2010 and 184,689 initiating ART, we compared characteristics and outcomes between older (≥50 years) and younger adults at 199 clinics in Kenya, Mozambique, Rwanda, and Tanzania. We calculated proportions over time of newly enrolled and active adults receiving HIV care and initiating ART who were ≥50 years; cumulative incidence of loss to follow-up (LTF) and recorded death one year after enrollment and ART initiation, and CD4+ response following ART initiation. From 2005-2010, the percentage of adults ≥50 years newly enrolled in HIV care remained stable at 10%, while the percentage of adults ≥50 years newly initiating ART (10% [2005]-12% [2010]), active in follow-up (10% [2005]-14% (2010]), and active on ART (10% [2005]-16% [2010]) significantly increased. One year after enrollment, older patients had significantly lower incidence of LTF (33.1% vs. 32.6%[40-49 years], 40.5%[25-39 years], and 56.3%[15-24 years]; p-value<0.0001), but significantly higher incidence of recorded death (6.0% vs. 5.0% [40-49 years], 4.1% [25-39 years], and 2.8% [15-24 years]; p-valve<0.0001). LTF was lower after vs. before ART initiation for all ages, with older adults experiencing less LTF than younger adults. Among 85,763 ART patients with baseline and follow-up CD4+ counts, adjusted average 12-month CD4+ response for older adults was 20.6 cells/mm3 lower than for adults 25-39 years of age (95% CI: 17.1-24.1). The proportion of patients who are ≥50 years has increased over time and been driven by aging of the existing patient population. Older patients experienced less LTF, higher recorded mortality and less robust CD4+ response after ART initiation. Increased programmatic attention on older adults receiving HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa is warranted.

  20. Art Museums and Special Audiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Sandra K.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the efforts of six major art museums to make their exhibits physically and intellectually accessible to visitors with special needs. Programs, services, and facilities designed for the gifted, physically disabled, older adults, mentally retarded, and other groups are discussed. (AM)

  1. Identification of the Gifted in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalker, Martha Zola

    1981-01-01

    Using 103 adult art students, this study sought to develop a theoretical model for identifying those gifted in art, based on the hypothesis that cognitive complexity, executive skill in drawing, and affective intensity correlate significantly with behaviors consistent with artistic success. Results confirmed the importance and measurability of…

  2. Insights Gained into Arts and Smarts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Findings released this week from three years of studies by neuroscientists and psychologists at seven universities help amplify scientists' understanding of how training in the arts might contribute to improving the general thinking skills of children and adults. The idea that the arts, and music in particular, could make children smarter in other…

  3. Multicultural Diversity: Learning through the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, Sherre

    2007-01-01

    Through the arts, people holistically learn, interact with greater multicultural diversity than elsewhere, and form connections with others. Participating in the arts gives adults experiences, contexts, and tools to help them reexperience, revision, and reconceptualize multicultural diversity in their lives and communities. To illustrate aspects…

  4. Handbook of Art Therapy. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Providing a complete overview of art therapy, from theory and research to practical applications, this is the definitive handbook in the field. Leading practitioners demonstrate the nuts and bolts of arts-based intervention with children, adults, families, couples, and groups dealing with a wide range of clinical issues. Rich with illustrative…

  5. Insights Gained into Arts and Smarts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Findings released this week from three years of studies by neuroscientists and psychologists at seven universities help amplify scientists' understanding of how training in the arts might contribute to improving the general thinking skills of children and adults. The idea that the arts, and music in particular, could make children smarter in other…

  6. Handbook of Art Therapy. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Providing a complete overview of art therapy, from theory and research to practical applications, this is the definitive handbook in the field. Leading practitioners demonstrate the nuts and bolts of arts-based intervention with children, adults, families, couples, and groups dealing with a wide range of clinical issues. Rich with illustrative…

  7. Teaching the Art and Craft of Giving and Receiving Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Patricia L.; Roebuck, Deborah Britt

    2010-01-01

    In the workplace, the process of evaluating and discussing the performance of both employees and managers is referred to as feedback. The process generally involves a discussion of the individual's strengths or weaknesses, with suggestions on how to improve upon weaknesses. Feedback aligns workplace behavior with the overall goals of a team or an…

  8. Teaching the Art and Craft of Giving and Receiving Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Patricia L.; Roebuck, Deborah Britt

    2010-01-01

    In the workplace, the process of evaluating and discussing the performance of both employees and managers is referred to as feedback. The process generally involves a discussion of the individual's strengths or weaknesses, with suggestions on how to improve upon weaknesses. Feedback aligns workplace behavior with the overall goals of a team or an…

  9. The Art of Teaching Art in Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikoltsos, Catherine

    The role of arts education has been receiving increasing emphasis in early childhood education. This paper maintains that teaching itself may be considered an artistic, creative activity in the following ways: (1) teaching presents an artistic performance to the student; (2) the teacher has to make judgments during the course of instruction; (3)…

  10. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from art therapy? Art therapy is practiced in mental health, rehabilitation, medical, educational, forensic, wellness, private practice and community settings with diverse client populations in ...

  11. Breaking the Silos: The art Documentation Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-01

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that the training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work; too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.

  12. Breaking the silos: The art documentation suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-23

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that the training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work, too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.

  13. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  14. Spaceborne receivers: Basic principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principles of operation of microwave receivers for space observations of planetary surfaces were examined. The design philosophy of the receiver as it is applied to operate functionally as an efficient receiving system, the principle of operation of the key components of the receiver, and the important differences among receiver types are explained. The operating performance and the sensitivity expectations for both the modulated and total power receiver configurations are outlined. The expressions are derived from first principles and are developed through the important intermediate stages to form practicle and easily applied equations. The transfer of thermodynamic energy from point to point within the receiver is illustrated. The language of microwave receivers is applied statistics.

  15. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  16. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.; Hansen, Leif J.; Evans, David B.

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  17. Arts Education in America: What the Declines Mean for Arts Participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #52

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabkin, Nick; Hedberg, E. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPAs), conducted for the National Endowment for the Arts, have shown a steady decline in the rates of adult attendance at most "benchmark" arts events--specifically, classical music and jazz concerts, musical and non-musical plays, opera, and ballet performances--as well as declines in other forms…

  18. Quality of life in young adults having received a BMT during childhood: a GETMON study. Grupo Español de Trasplante de Médula Osea en el Niño.

    PubMed

    Badell, I; Igual, L; Gomez, P; Bureo, E; Ortega, J J; Cubells, J; Muñoz, A; Martinez, A; Madero, L; Verdeguer, A; Torres, A; Richard, C; Olivé, T; Daniel, M; Bayés, R

    1998-04-01

    A quality-of-life questionnaire study was administered in a group of 98 disease-free survivors more than 3 years after BMT. All participants were over the age of 17 years at the time of the survey. The transplants were performed between 1981 and 1993 in eight Spanish hospitals. Eighty-three percent of patients had undergone BMT for neoplastic disease. Seventy-three per cent received an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. A modified version of a questionnaire applied in Stanford Hospital to evaluate quality of life in adults after BMT was used. A single investigator was responsible for interviewing all subjects by telephone. We compare these results with the same questionnaire applied in a control group of 58 healthy subjects of similar age. The most significant results were: BMT patients valued their quality of life more highly than the control group. The mean score for global quality of life was 8.19+/-0.17 in BMT group as compared to 7.54+/-0.13 in control group (P=0.0013). Studies were cited as the major concern in both groups: 24% in BMT group and in 69% in control group (C.I. 95%=0.59 to 0.30). The patients in the BMT group considered they had fewer problems in comparison with the control group regarding interpersonal relationships with family members and friends, sleep, depression and leisure possibilities. However, they considered they had more problems concerning their physical appearance, studies and work possibilities than their peers. Considerations regarding weight, height, sexual functioning, anxiety, tendency to suffer illness and problems with insurance were similar in both groups.

  19. Artful Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    It is no secret that America is overweight. A record number of children are obese and are showing signs of adult diseases such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, people are recognizing this and beginning to do something about it: (1) restaurants and markets are offering healthier options; (2) menus are starting to list…

  20. Artful Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    It is no secret that America is overweight. A record number of children are obese and are showing signs of adult diseases such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, people are recognizing this and beginning to do something about it: (1) restaurants and markets are offering healthier options; (2) menus are starting to list…

  1. Loss to follow-up of adults in public HIV care systems in Mozambique: Identifying obstacles to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Micek, Mark A; Gimbel-Sherr, Kenneth; Baptista, Alberto João; Matediana, Eduardo; Montoya, Pablo; Pfeiffer, James; Melo, Armando; Gimbel-Sherr, Sarah; Johnson, Wendy; Gloyd, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) has expanded dramatically in resource-limited settings. Evaluating loss to follow-up from HIV testing through post-ART care can help identify obstacles to care. Methods Routine data was analyzed for adults receiving services in two public HIV care systems in central Mozambique. The proportion of people passing through the following steps was determined: (1) HIV testing, (2) enrollment at an ART clinic, (3) CD4 testing, (4) starting ART if eligible, and (5) adhering to ART. Results During the 12-month study period (2004–2005), an estimated 23,430 adults were tested for HIV, and 7,005 (29.9%) were HIV-positive. Only 3,956 (56.5%) of those HIV-positive enrolled at an ART clinic ≤30 days after testing. CD4 testing was obtained in 77.1% ≤30 days of enrollment. Of 1,506 eligible for ART, 471 (31.3%) started ART ≤90 days after CD4 testing. Of 382 with ≥180 days of potential follow-up time on ART, 317 (83.0%) had pharmacy-based adherence rates ≥90%. Discussion Substantial drop-offs were observed for each step between HIV testing and treatment, but were highest for referral from HIV testing to treatment sites and for starting ART. Interventions are needed to improve follow-up and ensure that people benefit from available HIV services. PMID:19550350

  2. Evaluation and Record of the Fine Arts Educational Improvement Project, 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baber, Eric

    The second year's activities of a fine arts educational program, funded under ESEA Title 3 and encompassing 184 schools in five central Illinois counties, are described and evaluated. The art activities evaluated are art demonstrations, art workshops, a materials resource center, adult programs, Saturday art centers, the Logan County Fine Arts…

  3. Age and Arts Participation, with a Focus on the Baby Boom Cohort. Research Division Report #34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Richard A.; And Others

    Using data taken from the National Endowment for the Arts' Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) which were conducted in 1982 and 1992, this report looks at the effect of age on adult arts participation in seven benchmark or core art forms: classical music, opera, ballet, musicals, jazz, plays, and art museums. The report examines the…

  4. Defining Art Appreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seabolt, Betty Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the differences and goals of four areas: (1) art appreciation; (2) art history; (3) art aesthetics; and (4) art criticism. Offers a definition of art appreciation and information on how the view of art appreciation in education has changed over time. (CMK)

  5. The Arts, Language and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.; Eisner, Elliot W.

    1987-01-01

    The human species excel in the exquisite use of symbols. The sending and receiving of sophisticated messages sets humans apart from all other creatures on planet earth. The arts are one of mankind's most visual and most essential forms of language; and if children are not educated in the symbol system called the arts, they will lose not only their…

  6. The Arts, Language and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.; Eisner, Elliot W.

    1987-01-01

    The human species excel in the exquisite use of symbols. The sending and receiving of sophisticated messages sets humans apart from all other creatures on planet earth. The arts are one of mankind's most visual and most essential forms of language; and if children are not educated in the symbol system called the arts, they will lose not only their…

  7. Children's Art Carnival Creative Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercado, Aurea A.

    The implementation of the Children's Art Carnival Creative Reading Program in New York City is evaluated in terms of the services it was designed to provide to 210 Title I eligible children in grades 2 to 5 who were at least one grade behind in reading. Children in the program attended the Art Carnival twice a week and received instruction from…

  8. History and Art: The Heart of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B; And Others

    Learning to appreciate religious art and to understand the interdependence of history and art are basic to the foundations of culture. Students need to be exposed to the art of the diverse adherents of all major religions in order to understand the beliefs and practices of others. Students can examine religious art from ancient times, including…

  9. Small Art Images--Big Art Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pam

    2005-01-01

    When small art images are incorporated into the curriculum, students are afforded opportunities to slow down, observe minute details, and communicate ideas about art and artists. This sort of purposeful art contemplation takes students beyond the day-to-day educational practice. It is through these sorts of art activities that students develop…

  10. Art Supply Inventors. Children's Art Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2001-01-01

    Discusses types of art materials that children enjoy using in their artworks. Explores the art materials such as tasty art supplies, such as candy; peeled supplies, such as pencil shavings; sticky art supplies, such as Band-Aids; and fast-food supplies, such as forks and spoons. (CMK)

  11. Fine Arts: Secondary Visual Arts Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This guide to Utah's requirements for students in secondary visual arts is organized and based upon a student achievement portfolio for each course. Foundation I, the required junior high/middle school visual arts course, is designed to provide an overview of visual arts while studying various art tools and materials. With an emphasis on studio…

  12. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  13. Small Art Images--Big Art Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pam

    2005-01-01

    When small art images are incorporated into the curriculum, students are afforded opportunities to slow down, observe minute details, and communicate ideas about art and artists. This sort of purposeful art contemplation takes students beyond the day-to-day educational practice. It is through these sorts of art activities that students develop…

  14. History and Art: The Heart of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B; And Others

    Learning to appreciate religious art and to understand the interdependence of history and art are basic to the foundations of culture. Students need to be exposed to the art of the diverse adherents of all major religions in order to understand the beliefs and practices of others. Students can examine religious art from ancient times, including…

  15. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  16. Managers of the Arts: Careers and Opinions of Senior Administrators of U.S. Art Museums, Symphony Orchestras, Resident Theaters, and Local Arts Agencies. Research Division Report #20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiMaggio, Paul

    This survey report provides information on senior administrators in four types of arts organizations: resident theaters, art museums, symphony orchestras, and community arts agencies. It examines: (1) their backgrounds and careers; (2) the rewards they receive from their work; (3) their expectations about future employment; (4) their training and…

  17. Conversations about Visual Arts: Facilitating Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ni; Cress, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Visual arts, such as drawings, are attractive to most young children. Marks left on paper by young children contain meaning. Although it is known that children's oral language could be enhanced through communication with adults, rarely is there a series of dialogues between adults and young children about their drawings. Often heard instead…

  18. Conversations about Visual Arts: Facilitating Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ni; Cress, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Visual arts, such as drawings, are attractive to most young children. Marks left on paper by young children contain meaning. Although it is known that children's oral language could be enhanced through communication with adults, rarely is there a series of dialogues between adults and young children about their drawings. Often heard instead…

  19. Data-fusion receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelmann, Jeffrey M.; Kattner, J. Stephen; Houston, Robert A.

    2006-12-19

    This invention is an ultra-low frequency electromagnetic telemetry receiver which fuses multiple input receive sources to synthesize a decodable message packet from a noise corrupted telemetry message string. Each block of telemetry data to be sent to the surface receiver from a borehole tool is digitally encoded into a data packet prior to transmission. The data packet is modulated onto the ULF EM carrier wave and transmitted from the borehole to the surface and then are simultaneously detected by multiple receive sensors disbursed within the rig environment. The receive sensors include, but are not limited to, electric field and magnetic field sensors. The spacing of the surface receive elements is such that noise generators are unequally coupled to each receive element due to proximity and/or noise generator type (i.e. electric or magnetic field generators). The receiver utilizes a suite of decision metrics to reconstruct the original, non noise-corrupted data packet from the observation matrix via the estimation of individual data frames. The receiver will continue this estimation process until: 1) the message validates, or 2) a preset "confidence threshold" is reached whereby frames within the observation matrix are no longer "trusted".

  20. Hybrid receiver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M. S.; Mcadam, P. L.; Saunders, O. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a 4 month study to design a hybrid analog/digital receiver for outer planet mission probe communication links. The scope of this study includes functional design of the receiver; comparisons between analog and digital processing; hardware tradeoffs for key components including frequency generators, A/D converters, and digital processors; development and simulation of the processing algorithms for acquisition, tracking, and demodulation; and detailed design of the receiver in order to determine its size, weight, power, reliability, and radiation hardness. In addition, an evaluation was made of the receiver's capabilities to perform accurate measurement of signal strength and frequency for radio science missions.

  1. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  2. Socialization and Participation in the Arts. Research Division Report #21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orend, Richard J.

    While the capacity to recognize and appreciate beauty may be inborn in all of us, participation in the arts as an audience or artist usually involves a learning process. What is the relationship between childhood and early adult experiences with the arts and later participation? In 1982, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, the…

  3. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  4. Imagining and Engaging Difference in the Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kimberly F.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on power, difference and knowledge, areas critical to adult education. It conveys insights into how educators and curators in an art museum imagined and engaged with difference, and particularly the black subject, when working within a collaborative project that included the acquisition of art objects (fine art photography).…

  5. Imagining and Engaging Difference in the Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kimberly F.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on power, difference and knowledge, areas critical to adult education. It conveys insights into how educators and curators in an art museum imagined and engaged with difference, and particularly the black subject, when working within a collaborative project that included the acquisition of art objects (fine art photography).…

  6. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  7. Ka Band Channelized Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Communications allocations reside in this band of the spectrum. This report defines a first-order system analysis of constructing an analog radio ......art in digital signal processing hardware and software algorithms. RF commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts are selected in order to develop a system

  8. The ART Advantage: Health Care Utilization for Diabetes and Hypertension in Rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Montana, Livia; Gómez-Olivé, Francesc Xavier; Rohr, Julia; Harling, Guy; Wagner, Ryan G; Wade, Alisha; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa W; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen; Berkman, Lisa F; Bärnighausen, Till W; Gaziano, Thomas A

    2017-08-15

    The prevalence of diabetes and hypertension has increased in HIV-positive populations, but there is limited understanding of the role that antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs play in the delivery of services for these conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between ART use and utilization of health care services for diabetes and hypertension. Health and Aging in Africa: A Longitudinal Study of an INDEPTH Community in South Africa is a cohort of 5059 adults. The baseline study collects biomarker-based data on HIV, ART, diabetes, and hypertension and self-reported data on health care utilization. We calculated differences in care utilization for diabetes and hypertension by HIV and ART status and used multivariable logistic regressions to estimate the relationship between ART use and utilization of services for these conditions, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, education, and household wealth quintile. Mean age, body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes prevalence were lower in the HIV-positive population (all P < 0.001). Multivariable logistic regression showed that ART use was significantly associated with greater odds of blood pressure measurement [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04 to 1.55] and blood sugar measurement (aOR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.51), counseling regarding exercise (aOR 1.57, 95% CI: 1.11 to 2.22), awareness of hypertension diagnosis (aOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.12 to 2.05), and treatment for hypertension (aOR 1.63, 95% CI: 1.21 to 2.19). HIV-positive patients who use ART are more likely to have received health care services for diabetes and hypertension. This apparent ART advantage suggests that ART programs may be a vehicle for strengthening health systems for chronic care.

  9. The ART advantage: healthcare utilization for diabetes and hypertension in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Montana, Livia; Gómez-Olivé, F. Xavier; Rohr, Julia; Harling, Guy; Wagner, Ryan G.; Wade, Alisha; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa Whiteson; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen; Berkman, Lisa F.; Bärnighausen, Till W.; Gaziano, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes and hypertension has increased in HIV-positive populations but there is limited understanding of the role that ART programs play in the delivery of services for these conditions. The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between ART use and utilization of healthcare services for diabetes and hypertension. Methods Health and Aging in Africa: a Longitudinal Study of an INDEPTH Community in South Africa is a cohort of 5,059 adults. The baseline study collects biomarker-based data on HIV, ART, diabetes and hypertension and self-reported data on healthcare utilization. We calculated differences in care utilization for diabetes and hypertension by HIV and ART status and used multivariable logistic regressions to estimate the relationship between ART use and utilization of services for these conditions, controlling for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), education and household wealth quintile. Results Mean age, BMI, hypertension and diabetes prevalence were lower in the HIV-positive population (all p<0.001). Multivariable logistic regression showed that ART use was significantly associated with greater odds of blood pressure (aOR 1.27 95% CI 1.04–1.55) and blood sugar measurement (aOR 1.26, 95% CI 1.05–1.51), counseling regarding exercise (aOR 1.57, 95% CI 1.11–2.22), awareness of hypertension diagnosis (aOR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12–2.05) and treatment for hypertension (aOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.21–2.19). Conclusions HIV-positive patients who use ART are more likely to have received healthcare services for diabetes and hypertension. This apparent ART advantage suggests that ART programs may be a vehicle for strengthening health systems for chronic care. PMID:28696346

  10. Literacy, Museums and the Arts: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Claire, Comp.

    This document presents a total of 130 references and annotations of works that are related to the topic of adult learning through museums or through the arts in general. Although not all of the materials cited focus specifically on adult models or experiences, all pertain to education in and through museums, art education theory and practice,…

  11. Effect of Visual Art School-Based Stroke Intervention for Middle School Students.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ashleigh B; Montgomery, Chelsea M; Dillard, Wesley A; Morrill, Kenneth; Hoesli, Coral; Gillette, Wesley M; Johnson, Brandon K; Nathaniel, Thomas I

    2017-08-01

    Community stroke awareness initiatives have traditionally been used to expand knowledge of stroke signs and risk factors to high-risk adult populations. Here, we use a novel unfettered, visual art-based approach for an elementary school initiative to raise stroke awareness. Seventh graders in a middle school art class received stroke awareness training during the course of the 2015 to 2016 school year through their teacher in the visual arts class. In turn, they used this training to develop their own artistic interpretations of key stroke awareness concepts via project-based learning and then present their projects to raise awareness about stroke. We evaluated our predata and postdata to determine whether the visual art school-based stroke intervention was effective in both educating students about stroke and enabling them to effectively disseminate this information to parents and other adults in their community. The pretest evaluation indicates a fair or good knowledge about stroke, and no student indicated an "outstanding" or "excellent" knowledge. The posttest evaluation indicated a higher degree of stroke awareness because students were rated as having an "outstanding," "excellent," or "very good" performance especially in the ability to translate knowledge of stroke awareness lessons learned in their art class into a well-articulated stroke-related project and presentation. Pearson χ test reveals significant difference (P < .001) between the pretest and posttest evaluations. Our results indicate that our school-based stroke intervention was effective in both educating students about stroke and enabling them to effectively disseminate this information to parents and other adults in their community. The use of a visual art teacher to lead the educational component in the intervention indicates that expertise in neurology or stroke is not necessary to facilitate understanding of stroke and highlights the importance of creativeness in stroke education for

  12. [Adult immunization].

    PubMed

    Beytout, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Adults receive several vaccinations related to occupational health. Travellers or immunocompromised people who are exposed to infections need some other vaccinations, too. People older than 65 receive influenza vaccine every year. Tetanus and poliomyelitis immunity should be maintained with a decennial injection following adult immunisation schedule but the application of this vaccine remains rather erratic. Diphtheria valence included in a recently licensed combined vaccine could be done together. Maintenance of immunity against "childhood infectious diseases" preventable with vaccinations is a new challenge; measles, rubella and pertussis occur now quite often in adults: the risk of complications is higher in these ages. Adults may even become the source of the contamination of youngers: many infants affected with whooping cough have contracted the disease from their own parents. The immunisation against these diseases should be prosecuted in adults. Related with the development of more efficacious new vaccines, the indications of pneumococcus, meningococcus or varicella vaccines should be defined in some populations of adults. Immunization policy of adults should be revised in order to continue the vaccination program of childhood. Some infections that may affect adults should be prevented by improving vaccine application. A real adult immunisation schedule and recommendations for populations at risk of preventable infections should be set up and their application reinforced.

  13. A Qualitative Analysis of the Effects of Depression and Antidepressants on Physical and Work Functioning among ART Clients in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Victoria K.; Wagner, Glenn J.; Huynh, Alexis; Ryan, Gery; Musisi, Seggane

    2013-01-01

    Depression is common among people living with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, little is known about how depression influences physical health and socioeconomic well-being in the context of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Semi-structured interviews with 40 adult HIV clients receiving ART in Uganda were conducted to assess experiences prior to and after HIV diagnosis and initiation of ART. Content analysis revealed themes that were suggestive of the following patterns: 1) functioning decreased after patients were diagnosed with HIV, but improved following ART, 2) depression is associated with lower physical health functioning and work status levels after both HIV diagnosis and ART, and 3) antidepressant medication is associated with better functioning compared to depressed patients not receiving depression treatment. These findings suggest that depression plays a role in the deleterious effects of HIV on functioning, and that antidepressant treatment provided alongside ART may serve to help individuals regain functioning, particularly employment. These findings highlight the potential value of integrating depression treatment into HIV care. PMID:23442495

  14. Right to Receive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oborn, Richard

    The concept of a United States citizen's right to receive information is acquiring increased judicial recognition. This report traces the evolution of that right from its philosophical basis in the United States Consitution, through its interpretation by the Supreme Court, up to the current concern that the public receive certain economic…

  15. Flight termination receiver catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-02-01

    This catalog provides reference information on ultra-high frequency flight termination receivers used at various U.S. missile ranges and test facilities. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all available flight termination receivers. Inclusion in this catalog does not constitute approval or endorsement for use at any government installation. Information in this catalog was extracted from manufacturers' specifications.

  16. Flight termination receiver catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-07-01

    This catalog provides reference information on ultrahigh-frequency flight termination receivers used at various U.S. missile ranges and test facilities. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all available flight termination receivers, and inclusion of hardware in this catalog does not constitute approval or endorsement for use at any government installation. Use of a specific receiver at a missile range or test facility requires the approval of the Commander of that installation. Approval for use of a particular receiver on a given missile at one installation does not constitute automatic approval for use of the same receiver on other missiles at the same installation or on the same missile at other installations. The information in this catalog has been extracted from manufacturers' specifications. It is provided as reference material only and is not intended as an endorsement of any model.

  17. Mississippi Fine Arts Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson.

    The Mississippi Fine Arts Framework is designed to develop K-12 students' interest and expertise in dance, music, theater arts, and visual arts. The introductory fine arts course, for secondary level students, explores the relationship and the function of the arts in both historical and contemporary culture through creative projects, performance,…

  18. CALUTRON RECEIVER STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Roush, J.L.

    1959-09-01

    A receiver is described for collecting isotopes in a calutron The receiver has several compartments, formed by a sertes of parallel metal plates and an open front. Each plate has flanges which space it from the other plates and a flexible extension pressing against a common supporting red to maintain the plate in assembled relation when all but the last rod is removed. The plates may be removed individualy from the front of the receiver, cleaned ard replaced without disturbing the alignment of the other plates.

  19. Digital Signal Processing Based Biotelemetry Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Avtar; Hines, John; Somps, Chris

    1997-01-01

    This is an attempt to develop a biotelemetry receiver using digital signal processing technology and techniques. The receiver developed in this work is based on recovering signals that have been encoded using either Pulse Position Modulation (PPM) or Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) technique. A prototype has been developed using state-of-the-art digital signal processing technology. A Printed Circuit Board (PCB) is being developed based on the technique and technology described here. This board is intended to be used in the UCSF Fetal Monitoring system developed at NASA. The board is capable of handling a variety of PPM and PCM signals encoding signals such as ECG, temperature, and pressure. A signal processing program has also been developed to analyze the received ECG signal to determine heart rate. This system provides a base for using digital signal processing in biotelemetry receivers and other similar applications.

  20. Self Awareness Through the Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanoff, Joan

    The development of a positive self concept through various art forms provides the foundation for an exploratory course presented to a group of enrollees in the New Careers Program. The students, whose work is here presented, are receiving on-the-job training in child development centers while receiving classroom instruction to prepare them as…