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Sample records for adults receiving art

  1. Psychosocial factors affecting medication adherence among HIV-1 infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Do, Natalie T; Phiri, Kelesitse; Bussmann, Hermann; Gaolathe, Tendani; Marlink, Richard G; Wester, C William

    2010-06-01

    As increasing numbers of persons are placed on potentially life-saving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in sub-Saharan Africa, it is imperative to identify the psychosocial and social factors that may influence antiretroviral (ARV) medication adherence. Using an 87 question survey, the following data were collected from patients on cART in Botswana: demographics, performance (Karnofsky) score, perceived stigma and level of HIV disclosure, attitudes and beliefs concerning HIV/AIDS, substance and/or drug use, depression, and pharmacy and healthcare provider-related factors. Overall adherence rates were determined by patient self-report, institutional adherence, and a culturally modified Morisky scale. Three hundred adult patients were recruited between April and May 2005. The overall cART adherence rate was 81.3% based on 4 day and 1 month patient recall and on clinic attendance for ARV medication refills during the previous 3 months. Adults receiving cART for 1-6 months were the least adherent (77%) followed by those receiving cART for greater than 12 months (79%). Alcohol use, depression, and nondisclosure of positive HIV status to their partner were predictive of poor adherence rates (p value <0.02). A significant proportion (81.3%) of cART-treated adults were adherent to their prescribed treatment, with rates superior to those reported in resource-rich settings. Adherence rates were poorest among those just starting cART, most likely due to the presence of ARV-related toxicity. Adherence was lower among those who have been treated for longer periods of time (greater than 1 year), suggesting complacency, which may become a significant problem, especially among these long-term cART-treated patients who return to improved physical and mental functioning and may be less motivated to adhere to their ARV medications. Healthcare providers should encourage HIV disclosure to "at-risk" partners and provide ongoing counseling and education to help patients

  2. Arts & Humanities in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Word's Worth: A Quarterly Newsletter of the Lifelong Learning Network, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly newsletter on lifelong learning focuses on the theme of the arts and humanities in adult literacy education. The following articles are included: (1) "In Defense of a Practical Education" (Earl Shorris); (2) "From the Program Director" (Elizabeth Bryant McCrary); (3) "Vermont Council on the Humanities: Book Discussion…

  3. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  4. Careers in Music and the Arts: The Messages Women Receive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordon, Ann E.

    This study examines women's experiences in pursuing careers in the arts or music. Data for the study was gathered through a survey mailed to a random sample of women graduates (n=73) from an internationally known school for music and art. While most survey questions were closed-ended and focused on demographic information, the most revealing…

  5. Time Spent Caregiving and Help Received by Spouses and Adult Children of Brain-Impaired Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Robert B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 233 family caregivers for brain-impaired adults. Spousal caregivers (both husbands and wives) devoted much time to caregiving. Most caregivers received little assistance from other family members and friends, but husbands received more than others. Employed spouses received more paid help than unemployed spouses; employment did not affect…

  6. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  7. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  8. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  9. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? An adult Indian is eligible to receive adult care assistance under this part if...

  10. Cover Art, Consumerism, and YA [Young Adult] Reading Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kies, Cosette

    Cover art has long been used as a marketing device for books, particularly with books aimed at young adults (YAs) aged 12 to 18. An examination of some of the teen thrillers published by novelist Lois Duncan since the 1970s yields several discoveries about changes in cover art that come with various editions. Many covers have been resigned to…

  11. Delay Discounting in Adults Receiving Treatment for Marijuana Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica N.; Petry, Nancy M.; LaPaglia, Donna M.; Reynolds, Brady; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Delay discounting is an index of impulsive decision-making and reflects an individual’s preference for smaller immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards. Multiple studies have indicated comparatively high rates of discounting among tobacco, alcohol, cocaine, and other types of drug users, but few studies have examined discounting among marijuana users. This report is a secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial that randomized adults with marijuana dependence to receive one of four treatments that involved contingency management (CM) and cognitive–behavioral therapy interventions. Delay discounting was assessed with the Experiential Discounting Task (Reynolds & Schiffbauer, 2004) at pretreatment in 93 participants and at 12 weeks posttreatment in 61 participants. Results indicated that higher pretreatment delay discounting (i.e., more impulsive decision-making) significantly correlated with lower readiness to change marijuana use (r = − 0.22, p = .03) and greater number of days of cigarette use (r = .21, p = .04). Pretreatment discounting was not associated with any marijuana treatment outcomes. CM treatment significantly interacted with time to predict change in delay discounting from pre- to posttreatment; participants who received CM did not change their discounting over time, whereas those who did not receive CM significantly increased their discounting from pre- to posttreatment. In this sample of court-referred young adults receiving treatment for marijuana dependence, delay discounting was not strongly related to treatment outcomes, but there was some evidence that CM may protect against time-related increases in discounting. PMID:23245197

  12. Visual Arts in Counselling Adults with Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Khai Ling; Mustaffa, M. S.; Tan, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a better understanding of using visual arts in counselling adults with depressive disorders. Three in-depth case studies were conducted in the counselling unit of a mental health hospital in Malaysia. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were applied to explore three adult participants' counselling experiences.…

  13. For the Arts To Have Meaning...A Model of Adult Education in Performing Arts Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitinoja, L.; Heimlich, J. E.

    A model of adult education appears to function in the outreach programs of three Columbus (Ohio) performing arts organizations. The first tier represents the arts organization's board of trustees, and the second represents the internal administration of the company. Two administrative bodies are arbitrarily labelled as education and marketing,…

  14. How Much English Language Arts and Mathematics Instruction Do Students Receive? Investigating Variation in Instructional Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Corey, Douglas; DeMonte, Jenny; Harrison, Delena; Loewenberg Ball, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The amount of instruction students receive has long been viewed as a foundational educational resource. This article presents an analysis of the time students spend in elementary English language arts (ELA) and mathematics instruction. In mathematics, the average student received about 140 hr of instruction, but students in the top sixth of…

  15. Perspectives from older adults receiving cancer treatment about the cancer-related information they receive

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Margaret I.; McAndrew, Alison; Harth, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Cancer patients have reported that information plays a significant role in their capacity to cope with cancer and manage the consequences of treatment. This study was undertaken to identify the importance older adults receiving cancer treatment assign to selected types of cancer-related information, their satisfaction with the cancer-related information they received, and the barriers to effective information provision for this age group. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases with separate samples. Six hundred and eighty-four older cancer patients receiving treatment completed a standardized survey and 39 completed a semi-structured interview to gather perspectives about cancer-related information. Data were analyzed for 65-79 years and 80+ year groups. Results: Information topics about their medical condition, treatment options, and side effects of treatment were rated as most important by the older cancer patients. Women assigned a higher importance ratings than men to information overall (t = 4.8, P < 0.01). Although participants were generally satisfied with the information, they received many described challenges they experienced in communicating with health care professionals because of the medical language and fast pace of speaking used by the professionals. Conclusions: The older cancer patients in this study endorsed the same topics of cancer-related information as most important as has been reported in studies for other age groups. However, this older group recommended that, during their interactions with older individuals, health care professionals use fewer medical words, speak at a slower pace, and provide written information in addition to the actual conversation. PMID:27981110

  16. Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Irma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can…

  17. The benefit of supplementary feeding for wasted Malawian adults initiating ART.

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, Joep J; Ndekha, MacDonald; Moore, Elinor; Kumwenda, Johnstone J; Zijlstra, Eduard E; Manary, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Food insecurity is considered to be an important contributor to HIV associated wasting in sub-Saharan Africa. Low body mass index (BMI) is a strong risk factor for early mortality during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Nutritional supplementation has become standard of care in wasted patients starting ART in many countries in the region, but there is no unequivocal evidence base for this intervention. Against this background, we performed a retrospective study to compare food supplementation versus no nutritional intervention in wasted adults starting ART in Blantyre, Malawi. All patients received free nevirapine, lamivudine, and stavudine. Participants in an effectiveness trial of two food supplements received either corn-soy blend (CSB) or ready-to-use food spread (RUFS) during the first 14 weeks of ART. Results were compared with a historical control group receiving no food supplement that was part of an observational cohort study of outcomes of the same ART regimen. Characteristics on initiation of ART were similar in the three groups, except the use of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis which was more frequent in the food-supplemented groups. Linear regression analysis showed that increase in BMI was greatest in the RUFS group and better in the CSB group than in those receiving no food supplementation at 14 weeks. These differences were no longer significant at 26 weeks. Lower BMI, CD4 count and hemoglobin, WHO clinical stage IV, male gender, and not receiving cotrimoxazole prophylaxis were independent risk factors for mortality at 14 and 26 weeks in the logistic regression analysis. Supplementary food use was not directly associated with improved survival.

  18. Learning with the Arts: What Opportunities Are There for Work-Related Adult Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Claire; Verenikina, Irina; Brown, Ian

    2010-01-01

    What can arts-based learning offer to adult, work-related education? A study was undertaken that explored the benefits of learning with the arts for professional development of an adult learner in Australia. The individual experiences of nine adults who participated in arts-based workshops to build work-related skills were examined using the…

  19. Retention in care, resource utilization, and costs for adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Zambia: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Of the estimated 800,000 adults living with HIV in Zambia in 2011, roughly half were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). As treatment scale up continues, information on the care provided to patients after initiating ART can help guide decision-making. We estimated retention in care, the quantity of resources utilized, and costs for a retrospective cohort of adults initiating ART under routine clinical conditions in Zambia. Methods Data on resource utilization (antiretroviral [ARV] and non-ARV drugs, laboratory tests, outpatient clinic visits, and fixed resources) and retention in care were extracted from medical records for 846 patients who initiated ART at ≥15 years of age at six treatment sites between July 2007 and October 2008. Unit costs were estimated from the provider’s perspective using site- and country-level data and are reported in 2011 USD. Results Patients initiated ART at a median CD4 cell count of 145 cells/μL. Fifty-nine percent of patients initiated on a tenofovir-containing regimen, ranging from 15% to 86% depending on site. One year after ART initiation, 75% of patients were retained in care. The average cost per patient retained in care one year after ART initiation was $243 (95% CI, $194-$293), ranging from $184 (95% CI, $172-$195) to $304 (95% CI, $290-$319) depending on site. Patients retained in care one year after ART initiation received, on average, 11.4 months’ worth of ARV drugs, 1.5 CD4 tests, 1.3 blood chemistry tests, 1.4 full blood count tests, and 6.5 clinic visits with a doctor or clinical officer. At all sites, ARV drugs were the largest cost component, ranging from 38% to 84% of total costs, depending on site. Conclusions Patients initiate ART late in the course of disease progression and a large proportion drop out of care after initiation. The quantity of resources utilized and costs vary widely by site, and patients utilize a different mix of resources under routine clinical conditions than if they were

  20. Creative arts therapy improves quality of life for pediatric brain tumor patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Madden, Jennifer R; Mowry, Patricia; Gao, Dexiang; Cullen, Patsy McGuire; Foreman, Nicholas K

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods pilot study evaluated the effects of the creative arts therapy (CAT) on the quality of life (QOL) of children receiving chemotherapy. A 2-group, repeated measures randomized design compared CAT with a volunteer's attention (n = 16). Statistical analysis of the randomized controlled phase of the study suggested an improvement in the following areas after the CAT: parent report of child's hurt (P = .03) and parent report of child's nausea (P = .0061). A nonrandomized phase, using a different instrument showed improved mood with statistical significance on the Faces Scale (P < .01), and patients were more excited (P < .05), happier (P < .02), and less nervous (P < .02). Provider focus groups revealed positive experiences. Case studies are included to exemplify the therapeutic process. With heightened interest in complementary therapy for children with cancer, future research with a larger sample size is needed to document the impact of incorporating creative arts into the healing process.

  1. 25 CFR 20.332 - Who can receive Adult Care Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... own resources; and (b) Does not require intermediate or skilled nursing care. ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can receive Adult Care Assistance? 20.332 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Adult Care Assistance § 20.332 Who can receive...

  2. Assessment of Quality of Life of HIV-Positive People Receiving ART: An Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Deepika; Puri, Seema; Mathew, Minnie

    2012-01-01

    Context: HIV/AIDS is known to affect an individual not only physically but also mentally, socially, and financially. It is a syndrome that builds a vacuum in a person affecting his/her life as a whole. Aims: The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) receiving ART and its association with Body mass index (BMI) and CD4 count. Study Design: An observational study was performed on PLHIV receiving ART in Orissa, India. Materials and Methods: Data on sociodemographic profile, BMI, and CD4 were gathered from 153 HIV-positive subjects. QOL was assessed using WHOQOL-HIV BREF scale. Results: The overall QOL score of the subjects was moderate; PLHIV with lower BMI also had poorer QOL (P<0.05). Employment affected only the social health domain of the subjects. Men reported poorer level of independence and physical health while women reported poorer social relationships and environment. All the six domains correlated significantly with the overall QOL indicated by the G-facet. Conclusion: Attention toward improving the nutritional status of PLHIV should be accorded high priority to ensure improvement in the overall QOL of PLHIV. PMID:23112442

  3. Beyond Traditional Art Education: Transformative Lifelong Learning in Community-Based Settings with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Pamela Harris; La Porte, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Quality community-based art education programs for older adults over the age of 50 should exploit the broad range of interests and cognitive abilities of participants by utilizing adult education theory, brain research, and the best practices of adult art education programs. We consider a developing paradigm on the cognitive abilities of the…

  4. THE ARTS IN HIGHER ADULT EDUCATION, A SECOND REVIEW OF PROGRAMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOLDMAN, FREDA H.

    A GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE ARTS IN THE CONTEMPORARY UNIVERSITY PRECEDES DESCRIPTIONS OF SPECIFIC ADULT PROGRAM PROTOTYPES. THE CURRENT PLACE OF THE ARTS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY INCLUDES RECENT TRENDS IN ART INSTITUTIONS, GOVERNMENT, BUSINESS, FOUNDATIONS, ARTS COUNCILS, PUBLICATIONS, AND EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION. ISSUES AND PROBLEMS CONCERNING THE…

  5. Liver Fibrosis in HIV Patients Receiving a Modern cART

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Raphael; Schierwagen, Robert; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Boesecke, Christoph; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Trebicka, Jonel; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Liver-related death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals is about 10 times higher compared with the general population, and the prevalence of significant liver fibrosis in those with HIV approaches 15%. The present study aimed to assess risk factors for development of hepatic fibrosis in HIV patients receiving a modern combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). This cross-sectional prospective study included 432 HIV patients, of which 68 (16%) patients were anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive and 23 (5%) were HBsAg positive. Health trajectory including clinical characteristics and liver fibrosis stage assessed by transient elastography were collected at inclusion. Liver stiffness values >7.1 kPa were considered as significant fibrosis, while values >12.5 kPa were defined as severe fibrosis. Logistic regression and Cox regression uni- and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent factors associated with liver fibrosis. Significant liver fibrosis was detected in 10% of HIV mono-infected, in 37% of HCV co-infected patients, and in 18% of hepatitis B virus co-infected patients. The presence of diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.6) and FIB4 score (OR = 2.4) were independently associated with presence of significant fibrosis in the whole cohort. Similarly, diabetes mellitus (OR = 5.4), adiposity (OR = 4.6), and the FIB4 score (OR = 3.3) were independently associated with significant fibrosis in HIV mono-infected patients. Importantly, cumulative cART duration protected, whereas persistent HIV viral replication promoted the development of significant liver fibrosis along the duration of HIV infection. Our findings strongly indicate that besides known risk factors like metabolic disorders, HIV may also have a direct effect on fibrogenesis. Successful cART leading to complete suppression of HIV replication might protect from development of liver fibrosis. PMID:26683921

  6. Determinants of Adult Functional Outcome in Adolescents Receiving Special Educational Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeown, H. R.; Johnstone, E. C.; McKirdy, J.; Owens, D. C.; Stanfield, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the role of IQ, autistic traits and challenging behaviours in affecting adult outcomes among adolescents who receive special educational assistance. Methods: A total of 58 participants were recruited from an ongoing longitudinal study. All received assessments of IQ, behavioural patterns (using the Childhood…

  7. Using Photography and Art in Concept Mapping Research with Adults with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams Carawan, Lena; Nalavany, Blace

    2010-01-01

    Reflexive photography for individual interviews and the use of art with focus groups provides a valuable method for exploring the psychosocial issues encountered by adults with dyslexia. Reflexive photography and art is particularly appropriate when interviewing adults with dyslexia who may have difficulty expressing and focusing on what they want…

  8. Lessons in Beauty: Art and Adult Education. Studies in Pedagogy, Andragogy, and Gerontagogy, Volume 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gent, Bastiaan

    This book explores the connections between art and education and, specifically, the links among the art of painting, the training of artists, and the education of adults. Five chapters discuss moralization, professionalization, aestheticization, musealization, and indoctrination. "Instruction and Diversion: Moral Lessons in Dutch Art"…

  9. The Use of Art in the Teaching Practice for Developing Communication Skills in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Niki; Fragoulis, Iosif

    2012-01-01

    The use of Art for educational reasons has been recently developing in Greece both in formal education and in Adult Education. Relevant theoretical texts and studies, (Dewey, 1934. Gardner, 1990. Perkins, 1994) pin point that training through the Arts can contribute to an integrated learning, since through systematic observation of works of art,…

  10. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  11. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  12. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments? Adults must: (a) Be unemployed, (b) Not qualify...

  13. The effectiveness of art therapy in the treatment of traumatized adults: a systematic review on art therapy and trauma.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Karin Alice; de Niet, Gerrit J; Knipscheer, Jeroen W; Kleber, Rolf J; Hutschemaekers, Giel J M

    2015-04-01

    Art therapy has often been applied in the treatment of traumatized adults, and good results in clinical practice have been reported. However, although art therapy experts underline these benefits, the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment has not been established by systematic review. The aim of this systematic review is to identify and evaluate empirical evidence of the effectiveness of art therapy for trauma treatment. As a result of the systematic review, six controlled, comparative studies on art therapy for trauma in adult patients were found. In half of the included studies, a significant decrease in psychological trauma symptoms was found in the treatment groups, and one study reported a significant decrease in depression. Although there are limitations in the number of included studies, the number of participants, the heterogeneity of included studies, and their methodological quality, the results contribute to insight into the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment and form an evidence base for the urgent need for further research on art therapy and trauma treatment.

  14. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied. The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells. A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children. B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02). Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:26166114

  15. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied.The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells.A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children.B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02).Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity.

  16. Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Young Adults Art Messaging as a Medium to Engage Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Slagle, Alexandra; Thomas, Alexandra; Hudson, Angela; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Avila, Glenna; Orser, Julie; Cuchilla, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Art has been shown to be an empowering and engaging entity with numerous benefits to vulnerable populations, including the homeless persons and young adults. Yet, little is known how homeless young adults perceive the use of art as messages that can communicate the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Objectives The purpose of this study was to solicit perspectives of homeless drug-using young adults as to how art can be used to design messages for their peers about the danger of initiating or continuing drug and alcohol use. Methods Qualitative methodology via focus group discussions was utilized to engage 24 homeless young adults enrolled from a drop-in site in Santa Monica. Results The findings revealed support for a myriad of delivery styles, including in person communication, flyers, music, documentary film and creative writing. The young adults also provided insight into the importance of the thematic framework of messages. Such themes ranged from empowering and hopeful messages to those designed to scare young homeless adults into not experimenting with drugs. Conclusions The findings indicate that in addition to messages communicating the need to prevent or reduce drug and alcohol use, homeless young adults respond to messages that remind them of goals and dreams they once had for their future, and to content that is personal, real and truthful. . Our research indicates that messages that reinforce protective factors such as hope for the future and self-esteem may be as important to homeless young adults as information about the risks and consequences of drug use. PMID:21441664

  17. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  18. Barriers to Successful Transition for Young Adults Who Receive SSI and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Jennifer L.; Timmons, Jaime Ciulla; Moloney, Mairead

    2003-01-01

    A study examined barriers to transition faced by 12 young adults with disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and their families. Obstacles to transition planning that were associated with SSI included difficulties managing the receipt of SSI and unawareness of the supports available through the SSI system. (Contains references.)…

  19. Food Insecurity and Food Choices in Rural Older Adults with Diabetes Receiving Nutrition Education via Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homenko, Daria R.; Morin, Philip C.; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate differences between rural older adults with diabetes reporting the presence or absence of food insecurity with respect to meal planning, preparation, shopping, obesity, and glycemic control after receiving nutrition counseling through telemedicine. Methods: Food insecurity data were obtained by telephone survey (n = 74).…

  20. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  1. A Guide To Setting Up a Creative Art Experiences Program for Older Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlan, Jane E.

    This guide is intended to help agencies serving older adults with mental retardation and other developmental disabilities in setting up a relatively inexpensive creative art program. The first section presents a rationale for creative art experiences for this population and then provides specific information on program development, including…

  2. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood and Anxiety for Adults in Treatment for Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurer, Mattye; van der Vennet, Renée

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether art production or viewing and sorting art reproductions would be more effective in reducing negative mood and anxiety for 28 adults with substance use disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups and completed pre- and posttest measures of negative mood and anxiety The hypothesis that art…

  3. Changes in Quality of Life in 7 Older Adult Patients Receiving Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Russell, David G.; Kimura, Melissa N.; Cowie, Harriet R.; de Groot, Caroline M.M.; McMinn, Elise A.P.; Sherson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case series is to report on symptomatic and quality of life (QoL) changes in 7 older adult chiropractic patients who were receiving care using Activator Methods Chiropractic Technique (AMCT). Clinical Features Seven patients were selected from 2 chiropractic offices in Auckland, New Zealand. Patients were included if they were older adults receiving AMCT care and for whom at least 2 QoL assessments had been performed. The patients, aged 69-80 years, primarily received care for a variety of musculoskeletal complaints. Intervention and Outcomes The patients reported improvements in their presenting complaints as well as a number of nonmusculoskeletal symptoms. Each patient demonstrated clinical improvements in their RAND 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) results. The average improvement in QoL measured using a SF-36 questionnaire was 8.0 points in the physical component and 4.1 points in the mental component. Four cases had a second progress evaluation using the SF-36 and showed an overall improvement of 5.2 in the physical and 9.8 in the mental components from baseline. Conclusion This case series describes an improvement in QoL, as measured by the SF-36 instrument, as well as subjectively reported improvements in both musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal symptoms in 7 older adults receiving chiropractic care. PMID:27069434

  4. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance among Ethnically Diverse Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Amanda Alders

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of art therapy on the cognitive performance of a multisite, ethnically diverse sample ("N" = 91) of older adults. Participants were recruited from several U.S. facilities that included a community center, a retirement center, an adult daycare, an assisted living facility, and a skilled nursing facility.…

  5. Substance Use and Adherence Among People Living with HIV/AIDS Receiving cART in Latin America.

    PubMed

    De Boni, Raquel B; Shepherd, Bryan E; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Cesar, Carina; Cortés, Claudia; Padgett, Denis; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F; Rebeiro, Peter F; Duda, Stephany N; McGowan, Catherine C

    2016-11-01

    This cross-sectional study describes substance use prevalence and its association with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) adherence among 3343 individuals receiving care at HIV clinics in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru. A rapid screening tool evaluated self-reported 7-day recall of alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine use, and missed cART doses. Overall, 29.3 % individuals reported having ≥1 alcoholic drinks, 5.0 % reported any illicit drug use and 17.0 % reported missed cART doses. In the logistic regression model, compared to no substance use, alcohol use [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.46, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.99-3.05], illicit drug use (AOR = 3.57, 95 % CI: 2.02-6.30), and using both alcohol and illicit drugs (AOR = 4.98, 95 % CI: 3.19-7.79) were associated with missed cART doses. The associations between substance use and likelihood of missing cART doses point to the need of targeting alcohol and illicit drug use to improve adherence among people living with HIV in Latin America.

  6. Participatory Arts for Older Adults: A Review of Benefits and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Noice, Tony; Noice, Helga; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the scientific literature on the enhancement of healthy aging in older adults through active participation in the arts. Methodologies and conclusions are described for studies of dance, expressive writing, music (singing and instrumental), theatre arts, and visual arts including documentation of mental/physical improvements in memory, creativity, problem solving, everyday competence, reaction time, balance/gait, and quality of life. In addition to these gains in measures of successful aging, the article also provides (in a Supplementary Appendix) some selected examples of arts engagement for remedial purposes. Finally, it offers suggestions for expanding inquiry into this underinvestigated corner of aging research. PMID:24336875

  7. Participatory arts for older adults: a review of benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Noice, Tony; Noice, Helga; Kramer, Arthur F

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews the scientific literature on the enhancement of healthy aging in older adults through active participation in the arts. Methodologies and conclusions are described for studies of dance, expressive writing, music (singing and instrumental), theatre arts, and visual arts including documentation of mental/physical improvements in memory, creativity, problem solving, everyday competence, reaction time, balance/gait, and quality of life. In addition to these gains in measures of successful aging, the article also provides (in a Supplementary Appendix) some selected examples of arts engagement for remedial purposes. Finally, it offers suggestions for expanding inquiry into this underinvestigated corner of aging research.

  8. Prevalence of urinary incontinence among community-dwelling adults receiving home care.

    PubMed

    Du Moulin, M F M T; Hamers, J P H; Ambergen, A W; Janssen, M A P; Halfens, R J G

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2005 to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with urinary incontinence (UI) in adults receiving home care. Of the 2,866 patients surveyed, 46% suffered from UI; 6.5% had stress, 16.6% had urge, 9% had mixed, and 17.6% had functional incontinence. No diagnosis regarding type of UI had been established in 50.2%. Factors associated with UI were advanced age, higher body mass index, and impaired mobility. UI is prevalent in older persons receiving home care, but the lack of diagnosis of type of UI in half of the participants surveyed impedes management of UI.

  9. RF surface receive array coils: the art of an LC circuit.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Zheng, Tsinghua; Yang, Xiaoyu; Finnerty, Matthew J; Handa, Shinya

    2013-07-01

    The radiofrequency (RF) receive array coil is a complicated device with many inductors and capacitors and serves as one of the most critical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) electronic devices. It directly determines the achievable level of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simply put, however, the RF coil is nothing but an LC circuit. The receive array coil was first proposed more than 20 years ago, evolving from a simple arrangement with a few electronic channels to a complicated system of 128 channels, enabling highly sophisticated parallel imaging, at different field strengths. This article summarizes the basic concepts pertaining to RF receive coil arrays and their associated SNR and reviews the theories behind the major components of such arrays. This includes discussions of the intrinsic SNR of a receive coil, the matching circuits, low-noise preamplifiers, coupling/decoupling amongst coils, the coupling between receive and transmit coils, decoupling via preamplifiers, and baluns. An 8-channel receive array coil on a cylindrical former serves as a useful example for demonstrating various points in the review.

  10. Writing and Reading with Art: Adult Literacy, Transformation, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Nair Rios; Goncalves, Maria Jose

    2012-01-01

    Especially in a time of economic and social crisis, besides poverty and social segregation, immigrants face an additional difficulty to get integrated in a new society: lack of oral and written knowledge of the language of the country they are now living in. This paper describes an on-going research project--Writing and Reading with Art (WRAP)…

  11. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  12. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  13. 24 CFR 1000.150 - How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How may Indian tribes and TDHEs receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? 1000.150 Section 1000.150 Housing... receive criminal conviction information on adult applicants or tenants? (a) As required by section 208...

  14. Retrospective reports of parenting received in their families of origin: relationships to adult attachment in adult children of alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Nair, Veena; Rawlings, Tanaya; Cash, Thomas F; Steer, Kate; Fals-Stewart, William

    2005-09-01

    The present study examined general and romantic attachment and parenting students received in their families of origin among 401 college students who resided with an alcohol-abusing parent prior to age 16 years as compared to those who did not reside with alcohol-abusing parents. Participants completed the Children's Report of Parent Behavior Instrument [Schludermann, E. and Schludermann, S. (1970). Children's Report of Parent Behavior Inventory (CRPBI). Canada: University of Manitoba], Experiences in Close Relationships--Revised [Fraley, R. C., Waller, N. G., and Brennan, K. G. (2000). An item response theory analysis of self-report measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78, 350-365], Relationship Scale Questionnaire [Griffin, D. W. and Bartholomew, K. (1994). Models of the self and other: Fundamental dimensions underlying measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 67, 430-445], and the Children of Alcoholics Screening Test [Jones, J. W. (1983). The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test: Test manual. Chicago: Camelot]. Young adults who met criteria for ACOAs reported more anxious and avoidant behavior in romantic relationships and a more fearful style of general adult attachment. Parenting behavior in one's family of origin predicted anxious behavior in romantic relationships and a fearful overall style of attachment, whereas being an ACOA and parenting in one's family of origin predicted avoidant behavior in romantic relationships.

  15. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  16. 20 CFR 663.820 - What are the eligibility requirements for adults to receive needs-related payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adults to receive needs-related payments? 663.820 Section 663.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.820 What are the eligibility requirements for adults...

  17. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  18. Freirean Literacy and the Liberal Arts: Empowering the Returning Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivisonno, Ann

    The "problem-posing" education model of Paulo Freire takes as its departure point the life experience of the learner, rather than the teacher's knowledge. Ursuline College (Cleveland, Ohio) created several courses for returning adult students that were based on Freire's ideas. One course called "Humanities Focus on Life" is for…

  19. Decreased Chronic Morbidity but Elevated HIV Associated Cytokine Levels in HIV-Infected Older Adults Receiving HIV Treatment: Benefit of Enhanced Access to Care?

    PubMed Central

    Mutevedzi, Portia C.; Rodger, Alison J.; Kowal, Paul; Nyirenda, Makandwe; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HIV with chronic morbidity and inflammatory markers (cytokines) in older adults (50+years) is potentially relevant for clinical care, but data from African populations is scarce. Objective To examine levels of chronic morbidity by HIV and ART status in older adults (50+years) and subsequent associations with selected pro-inflammatory cytokines and body mass index. Methods Ordinary, ordered and generalized ordered logistic regression techniques were employed to compare chronic morbidity (heart disease (angina), arthritis, stroke, hypertension, asthma and diabetes) and cytokines (Interleukins-1 and -6, C-Reactive Protein and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha) by HIV and ART status on a cross-sectional random sample of 422 older adults nested within a defined rural South African population based demographic surveillance. Results Using a composite measure of all morbidities, controlling for age, gender, BMI, smoking and wealth quintile, HIV-infected individuals on ART had 51% decreased odds (95% CI:0.26-0.92) of current morbidity compared to HIV-uninfected. In adjusted regression, compared to HIV-uninfected, the proportional odds (aPOR) of having elevated inflammation markers of IL6 (>1.56pg/mL) was nearly doubled in HIV-infected individuals on (aPOR 1.84; 95%CI: 1.05-3.21) and not on (aPOR 1.94; 95%CI: 1.11-3.41) ART. Compared to HIV-uninfected, HIV-infected individuals on ART had >twice partial proportional odds (apPOR=2.30;p=0.004) of having non-clinically significant raised hsCRP levels(>1ug/mL); ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals had >double apPOR of having hsCRP levels indicative of increased heart disease risk(>3.9ug/mL;p=0.008). Conclusions Although HIV status was associated with increased inflammatory markers, our results highlight reduced morbidity in those receiving ART and underscore the need of pro-actively extending these services to HIV-uninfected older adults, beyond mere provision at fixed clinics. Providing health services

  20. Evaluation of Altered Drug Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Michael A; Sieg, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-support modality used in patients with refractory cardiac and/or respiratory failure. A significant resurgence in the use ECMO has been seen in recent years as a result of substantial improvements in technology and survival benefit. With expanding ECMO use, a better understanding of how ECMO affects drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is necessary. The vast majority of PK studies in patients receiving ECMO have been conducted within neonatal or pediatric populations or within a controlled environment (e.g., in vitro or ex vivo). Because of significant differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, it may be inappropriate to extrapolate these PK data to adults. Thus, the aims of this review are to evaluate the changes in drug PK during ECMO and to summarize the available PK data for common drugs used in the adult critically ill patients during ECMO support. A search of the PubMed (1965-July 2016), EMBASE (1965-July 2016), and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register databases was performed. All relevant studies describing PK alterations during ECMO in ex vivo experiments and in adults were included. Evaluation of the data indicated that drug PK in adults receiving ECMO support may be significantly altered. Factors influencing these alterations are numerous and have intricate relationships with each other but can generally be classified as ECMO circuit factors, drug factors, and patient factors. Commonly used drugs in these patients include antimicrobials, sedatives, and analgesics. PK data for most of these drugs are generally lacking; however, recent research efforts in this patient population have provided some limited guidance in drug dosing. With an improved understanding of altered drug PK secondary to ECMO therapy, optimization of pharmacotherapy within this critically ill population continues to move forward.

  1. Lamivudine Concentration in Hair and Prediction of Virologic Failure and Drug Resistance among HIV Patients Receiving Free ART in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Jiafeng; Ruan, Yuhua; Hsi, Jenny; Liao, Lingjie; Shao, Yiming; Xing, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background The assessment of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important in order to predict treatment outcomes. Lamivudine (3TC) is one of the most widely used NRTIs in China, but its concentrations in hair and association with virologic failure and drug resistance have not been studied. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey to investigate 3TC concentrations in hair as a predictor of virologic failure and drug resistance among HIV patients receiving free ART. We also compared the capacity of hair 3TC concentrations with self-reported adherence in predicting virologic responses. Hair 3TC concentrations were detected through the LC-MS/MS system. Results In patients without HIV drug resistance (HIVDR), with a threshold hair 3TC concentration of 260 ng/g, the sensitivity and specificity in predicting virologic suppression were 76.9% and 89.9%, respectively. Some factors, including CD4+ cell counts, initial treatment regimens with 3TC, and current regimens with second-line drugs, influenced the association between hair 3TC concentrations and virologic suppression. In patients who experienced virologic failure with HIVDR, with a threshold of 180 ng/g, the sensitivity and specificity were 70.0% and 74.4%, respectively. Hair 3TC concentrations had higher sensitivity and specificity in predicting virologic failure and drug resistance than self-reported adherence. Conclusions The hair 3TC concentration was a stronger indicator than self-reported adherence in predicting virologic failure and drug resistance in HIV patients receiving free ART. PMID:27119346

  2. Institute of Study for Older Adults, Liberal Arts Program: Annual Report, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Nancy

    The Liberal Arts Program described in this report is the largest and most stable of the projects of the Institute of Study for Older Adults (ISOA) at New York City Technical College. The report deals with the program's activities and emphases during 1979-80. After introductory material on the ISOA's growth, activities, funding, and outreach model,…

  3. The Lure of Non-Credit Studio Art Classes for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Gina C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation and satisfaction of adult learners who participated in non-credit studio art classes. Leisure motivation has been researched by educators, philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists (Candy, 1991; Brookfield, 2005: Dewey, 1980; Knowles, 1998; Maslow, 1970; Rogers, 1961, Stebbins,…

  4. Art and Culture of the American Indian, A Guide for Adult Education Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickards, Montana H.; And Others

    Adult Basic Education for American Indians can most effectively be achieved through their art and culture. To highlight the desire of the Indian to be regarded in his own cultural setting, this document offers various ideas and expressions of noted American Indians who were participants at the 1970 ABE Institute for Teachers of American Indians…

  5. What If Grandma Moses Attended Night School? Strategies for Reprioritizing Adult Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Paul J.

    Through their own inventiveness and persistence, adults are circumventing institutional indifference and creating alternative educational networks to teach themselves art. Problems that must be overcome are as follows: inadequate instructor preparation, a generally narrow array of programs in most community centers with the preponderance of…

  6. Outcomes for adult scoliosis patients receiving chiropractic rehabilitation: a 24-month retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to retrospectively report the results of patients who completed an exercise-based chiropractic program and its potential to alter the natural progression of adult scoliosis at 24 months after the clinic portion of treatment was concluded. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted at 2 spine clinics in Michigan, USA. Each clinic uses the same chiropractic rehabilitation program to treat patients with adult scoliosis. Multidimensional patient outcomes included radiographic, respiratory, disability, and pain parameters. Outcomes were measured at baseline, at end of active treatment, and at long-term follow-up. Results A total of 28 patients fit the inclusion criteria for the study. The average beginning primary Cobb angle was 44° ± 6°. Patients received the same chiropractic rehabilitation program for approximately 6 months. At the end of active treatment, improvements were recorded in Cobb angle, pain scores, spirometry, and disability rating. All radiographic findings were maintained at 24-month follow-up. Conclusion This report is among the first to demonstrate sustained radiographic, self-rated, and physiologic benefits after treatment ceased. After completion of a multimodal chiropractic rehabilitation treatment, a retrospective cohort of 28 adult scoliosis patients reported improvements in pain, Cobb angle, and disability immediately following the conclusion of treatment and 24 months later. PMID:22014907

  7. From Amateur to Framauteur: Art Development of Adolescents and Young Adults within an Interest-Based Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manifold, Marjorie Cohee

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the art developmental progression of adolescents and young adults within the cultural context of an interest-based community is described; the role of narrative and sociocultural community to the art development of adolescents and young adults is highlighted. Artistic development begins in response to an aesthetic phenomenon, is…

  8. Reclaiming Joy: Pilot Evaluation of a Mental Health Peer Support Program for Older Adults Who Receive Medicaid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Rosemary K.; Sergeant, Julie F.; Landry, Sarah; Leedahl, Skye N.; Rachlin, Roxanne; Koenig, Terry; Graham, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stigma and lack of access to providers create barriers to mental health treatment for older adults living in the community. In order to address these barriers, we developed and evaluated a peer support intervention for older adults receiving Medicaid services. Design and Methods: Reclaiming Joy is a mental health intervention that pairs…

  9. A Randomized, Single-Blind, Substitution Study of OROS Methylphenidate (Concerta) in ADHD Adults Receiving Immediate Release Methylphenidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Mick, Eric; Surman, Craig B. H.; Hammerness, Paul; Doyle, Robert; Aleardi, Megan; Kotarski, Meghan; Williams, Courtney G.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the efficacy, tolerability, and compliance of an extended-release formulation of methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) in adults with ADHD receiving immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH). Method: Participants were outpatient adults with ADHD who were stable on IR-MPH-administered TID. Participants…

  10. Martial Art Training and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Adults

    PubMed Central

    Douris, Peter; Douris, Christopher; Balder, Nicole; LaCasse, Michael; Rand, Amir; Tarapore, Freya; Zhuchkan, Aleskey; Handrakis, John

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive performance includes the processes of attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning, which typically declines with aging. Previous research has demonstrated that aerobic and resistance exercise improves cognitive performance immediately following exercise. However, there is limited research examining the effect that a cognitively complex exercise such as martial art training has on these cognitive processes. Our study compared the acute effects of 2 types of martial art training to aerobic exercise on cognitive performance in middle-aged adults. We utilized a repeated measures design with the order of the 3 exercise conditions randomly assigned and counterbalanced. Ten recreational middle-aged martial artists (mean age = 53.5 ± 8.6 years) participated in 3 treatment conditions: a typical martial art class, an atypical martial art class, and a one-hour walk at a self-selected speed. Cognitive performance was assessed by the Stroop Color and Word test. While all 3 exercise conditions improved attention and processing speed, only the 2 martial art conditions improved the highest order of cognitive performance, executive function. The effect of the 2 martial art conditions on executive function was not different. The improvement in executive function may be due to the increased cortical demand required by the more complex, coordinated motor tasks of martial art exercise compared to the more repetitive actions of walking. PMID:26672872

  11. Martial Art Training and Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter; Douris, Christopher; Balder, Nicole; LaCasse, Michael; Rand, Amir; Tarapore, Freya; Zhuchkan, Aleskey; Handrakis, John

    2015-09-29

    Cognitive performance includes the processes of attention, memory, processing speed, and executive functioning, which typically declines with aging. Previous research has demonstrated that aerobic and resistance exercise improves cognitive performance immediately following exercise. However, there is limited research examining the effect that a cognitively complex exercise such as martial art training has on these cognitive processes. Our study compared the acute effects of 2 types of martial art training to aerobic exercise on cognitive performance in middle-aged adults. We utilized a repeated measures design with the order of the 3 exercise conditions randomly assigned and counterbalanced. Ten recreational middle-aged martial artists (mean age = 53.5 ± 8.6 years) participated in 3 treatment conditions: a typical martial art class, an atypical martial art class, and a one-hour walk at a self-selected speed. Cognitive performance was assessed by the Stroop Color and Word test. While all 3 exercise conditions improved attention and processing speed, only the 2 martial art conditions improved the highest order of cognitive performance, executive function. The effect of the 2 martial art conditions on executive function was not different. The improvement in executive function may be due to the increased cortical demand required by the more complex, coordinated motor tasks of martial art exercise compared to the more repetitive actions of walking.

  12. Localization of Sonic hedgehog secreting and receiving cells in the developing and adult rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Guasti, Leonardo; Paul, Alex; Laufer, Ed; King, Peter

    2011-04-10

    Sonic hedgehog signaling was recently demonstrated to play an important role in murine adrenal cortex development. The organization of the rat adrenal differs from that of the mouse, with the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata separated by an undifferentiated zone in the rat, but not in the mouse. In the present study we aimed to determine the mRNA expression patterns of Sonic hedgehog and the hedgehog signaling pathway components Patched-1 and Gli1 in the developing and adult rat adrenal. Sonic hedgehog expression was detected at the periphery of the cortex in cells lacking CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 expression, while signal-receiving cells were localized in the overlying capsule mesenchyme. Using combined in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that the cells expressing Sonic hedgehog lie between the CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 layers, and thus Sonic hedgehog expression defines one cell population of the undifferentiated zone.

  13. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Vancomycin in Adult Patients Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Healy, JR; Thoma, BN; Peahota, MM; Ahamadi, M; Schmidt, L; Cavarocchi, NC; Kraft, WK

    2016-01-01

    The literature on the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy is sparse. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for vancomycin in ECMO patients was developed using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling on the concentration–time profiles of 14 ECMO patients who received intravenous vancomycin. Model selection was based on log‐likelihood criterion, goodness of fit plots, and scientific plausibility. Identification of covariates was done using a full covariate model approach. The pharmacokinetics of vancomycin was adequately described with a two‐compartment model. Parameters included clearance of 2.83 L/hr, limited central volume of distribution 24.2 L, and low residual variability 0.67%. Findings from the analysis suggest that standard dosing recommendations for vancomycin in non‐ECMO patients are adequate to achieve therapeutic trough concentrations in ECMO patients. This further shows that ECMO minimally affects the PK of vancomycin in adults including in higher‐weight patients. PMID:27639260

  14. Connecting Socially Isolated Older Rural Adults with Older Volunteers through Expressive Arts.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ann; Skinner, Mark W; Wilkinson, Fay; Reid, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Employing a participatory arts-based research approach, we examined an innovative program from rural Ontario, Canada, designed to address social isolation among older people. Older socially isolated adults were matched to trained volunteers, where in dyads, the eight pairs created expressive art in their home setting over the course of 10 home visits. With thematic and narrative inquiry, we analysed the experiences and perceptions of the program leader, older participants, and older volunteers via their artistic creations, weekly logs, evaluations, and field notes. The findings reveal a successful intervention that positively influenced the well-being of older adult participants and older volunteers, especially in regards to relationships, personal development, and creating meaning as well as extending the intervention's impact beyond the program's duration. We also discuss opportunities for similar programs to inform policy and enable positive community-based health and social service responses to rural social isolation.

  15. More than Meets the Eye: Adult Education for Critical Consciousness in Luis Camnitzer's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana Carlina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness through the conceptual art of Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework grounding this research was critical public pedagogy, influenced by both critical theory and Stuart Hall's systems of representation (1997). This framework…

  16. The role of art education in adult prisons: The Western Australian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Margaret; Paris, Lisa; Whale, Jacqui

    2016-12-01

    Incarceration costs are high; in Australia, for example, each prisoner costs an average of AUD 115,000 per year. Other countries are also feeling the fiscal pinch of high incarceration costs, and a number of jurisdictions are now closing some of their prisons. Most prison costs are non-discretionary (accommodation, meals, etc.). But some of the costs relate to discretionary activities, services and facilities (including schooling). In terms of correctional education, many prison managers try to invest any meagre correctional education resources available to them in those classes and courses which have proven to have the best results, such as improved labour market outcomes and reduced recidivism, minimising subsequent re-imprisonment. Course offers for prisoner-students include vocational training, adult basic education (ABE) and art studies. The two-tiered question this paper asks is: do art classes and courses produce these measurable outcomes and, if not, are there other reasons why they should continue to be funded? Addressing these issues, the authors argue that (1) these measurable outcomes are too narrow and do not reflect the complex but less quantifiable benefits to the individual and the community of studying art in prison, and (2) better measures of all impacts of art studies in prisons are needed, including qualitative and humanitarian aspects.

  17. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-Based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracun Sova, Rajka

    2015-01-01

    Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires "knowledge". The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three…

  18. Experiences of Receiving a Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Survey of Adults in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lydia; Goddard, Lorna; Hill, Elisabeth L.; Henry, Lucy A.; Crane, Laura

    2014-01-01

    A total of 128 adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders were surveyed concerning the process they went through to obtain their diagnosis and the subsequent support they received. Results suggested that routes to diagnosis were quite heterogeneous and overall levels of satisfaction with the diagnostic process were mixed; 40% of…

  19. The Impact of Support Received and Support Provision on Changes in Perceived Social Support among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with…

  20. [Vaccination of adult patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Perspective of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Espínoza Mora, M Del Rosario; Lazo Páez, Gustavo; León Bratti, M Paz; Schauer, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In this article the present recommendations for immunization of adult patients who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation -a common procedure in therapy of many types of hematological diseases and serious inborn defects of the immune system- are reviewed and discussed. Patients that undergo this kind of transplantation procedure exhibit, compared to the general population, an elevated susceptibility of immune-preventable infections, due to loss of the humoral and cellular protective immunity. A revaccination strategy for transplanted patients can result in a significant diminution of morbidity and mortality related to the treatment of these diseases. Few data are published about the duration and magnitude of the vaccination response in this specific population of patients. Moreover, deviation from international guidelines recommendations for post-transplant immune prophylaxis can be observed frequently, partly as a result of the absence of specific vaccines in some countries. Multiple factors as intensity of the pharmacologic immune suppression, myeloablative regimen, administration of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, duration of the post-transplant period or the presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), can influence the immune response and establish special considerations for certain biological agents, as observed in case of living attenuated virus composed vaccines. This conditions are responsible for the fact that an optimal time point for vaccination of transplanted patients remains not clearly defined. More specific studies about the underlying immunological mechanisms during immunocompromised periods are necessary to understand better the immunogenicity and security of existing vaccines. The development of innovative vaccines as well can induce certain advances in the post-transplant therapy.

  1. Home-Based Art Therapy for Older Adults with Mental Health Needs: Views of Clients and Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElroy, Siobhan; Warren, Alison; Jones, Fay

    2006-01-01

    The value of art therapy for older people with mental health problems is well documented although there is a paucity of research for people who are home bound. This study, based in England, involved five clients, all older people with mental health problems, receiving art therapy sessions at home. The clients and caregivers were then interviewed…

  2. Garden walking and art therapy for depression in older adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Liehr, Patricia; Gregersen, Thomas; Nishioka, Reiko

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare garden walking (either alone or guided) with art therapy in older adults with depression. Depression was measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and stories of sadness/joy. Prior to the intervention, 47% of participants had depression scores in the severe range and 53% in the mild range. At the end of the intervention, none of the participants had scores in the severe range, 89% had scores in the mild range, and 11% had scores in the normal range. Results of the GDS data using repeated measures analysis of variance indicated significant decreases in depression for all three groups from pretest to posttest. All participants, regardless of group assignment, had a lower percentage of negative-emotion word use and a higher percentage of positive-emotion word use over time. This study provides evidence for nurses wishing to guide older adults in safe, easy, and inexpensive ways to reduce depression.

  3. Are Older Adults Receiving Evidence-Based Advice to Prevent Falls Post-Discharge from Hospital?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Den-Ching A.; Brown, Ted; Stolwyk, Rene; O'Connor, Daniel W.; Haines, Terry P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Older adults experience a high rate of falls when they transition to community-living following discharge from hospital. Objectives: To describe the proportion of older adults who could recall having discussed falls and falls prevention strategies with a health professional within 6 months following discharge from hospital. To describe…

  4. The impact of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kimberly A

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses longitudinal data from the 1993 U.S. Midwest floods to examine the influence of support received and support provision on changes in perceived social support among older adults exposed to an acute stressor. Results indicated that flood exposure and higher levels of social support at Time 1 were positively associated with both receiving social support and providing social support specific to the food. Individuals with higher levels of support provision and received support in turn reported higher levels of perceived support post disaster. Women were more likely to have received flood specific support and to have perceived higher social support post flood. This study provides support and elaboration of earlier findings that link disaster exposure to post-disaster changes in perceived social support.

  5. Increased proportions of dendritic cells and recovery of IFNγ responses in HIV/HCV co-infected patients receiving ART.

    PubMed

    Saraswati, Henny; Lee, Silvia; Tan, Dino; Yunihastuti, Evy; Gani, Rino; Price, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) numbers and functions can be affected by HIV and HCV disease, but the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on DC and the implications of these changes are unclear. We examined circulating DC in samples from Indonesian patients beginning ART with advanced HIV disease and documented mild/moderate HCV hepatitis. Frequencies of myeloid and plasmacytoid DC increased after 6 months on ART, but frequencies of DC producing IL-12 or IFNα following stimulation with TLR agonists (CL075, CpG) did not change. IFNγ responses to CL075, HCV and other antigens rose over this period. Hence increased IFNγ responses during ART may be associated with increased DC frequencies rather than changes in their functional capacity.

  6. Trends in adults receiving a recommendation for exercise or other physical activity from a physician or other health professional.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Patricia M; Schoenborn, Charlotte A

    2012-02-01

    The Healthy People 2020 objectives for physical activity include two objectives for increasing the proportion of physician office visits that include counseling or education related to exercise (see http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/default.aspx). Physician counseling for exercise has not previously been tracked by the Healthy People initiative. The present report looks at this emerging health issue from the vantage point of adults in the general population who had seen a physician or other health professional in the past 12 months and had been advised to begin or continue to do exercise or other physical activity. About 8 in 10 adults had seen a health professional in the past 12 months during 2000 (80.6%), 2005 (81.2%), and 2010 (79.8%), although estimates varied by demographic subgroups (10–12). Over time, estimates of the percentage of adults being advised to exercise could be influenced by major changes in the characteristics of adults seeing a health professional. In 2010, about one in three adults (32.4%) who had seen a physician or other health professional in the past year had been advised to exercise or do other physical activity, which reflects an upward trend since 2000, moving in the direction of meeting Healthy People 2020 goals. In relative terms, there has been more than a 40% increase—from 22.6% of adults in 2000 to 32.4% in 2010. Although increases were noted for every population and health condition group studied, these increases were larger for some groups than others. The increase in the percentage of adults receiving exercise advice is particularly noteworthy for the oldest age group. In 2000, 15.3% of adults aged 85 and over had been advised to exercise; by 2010, the percentage had increased to 28.9%. Across the chronic health conditions studied, adults with diabetes were the most likely, and those with cancer were the least likely, to have been advised by their physician to exercise. An upward trend of 8–10 percentage points, however

  7. Receipt of HIV/STD Prevention Counseling by HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Yuko; ZHU, Julia; CREPAZ, Nicole; BEER, Linda; PURCELL, David W.; JOHNSON, Christopher H.; VALVERDE, Eduardo E.; SKARBINSKI, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objective Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Design Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Methods Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. Results About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a health care provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. Conclusions HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines. PMID:24056066

  8. ASAM Patient Placement Criteria treatment levels: do they correspond to care actually received by homeless substance abusing adults?

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Freyder, Paul J; Gibbon, Jeanette L; Hanusa, Barbara J; Seltzer, Debora; Fine, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    We report findings from a community-based two-city survey of homeless adults comparing the level of substance abuse treatment assigned to them using the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria with care actually received during the previous 12 months. Overall 531 adults were surveyed with 382 meeting DSM-IIIR criteria of being in need of treatment or having a demand for treatment. Of those with a treatment need, 1.5% met criteria for outpatient care, 40.3% intensive outpatient/partial hospitalization care, 29.8% medically monitored care and 28.8% managed care levels. In contrast, of those receiving treatment (50.5%, 162 persons), almost all care received by this cohort was either inpatient or residential based (83.6%). Unsheltered homeless persons and those without insurance were significantly more likely to report not receiving needed treatment. Lack of treatment availability or capacity, expense, and changing one's mind while on a wait list were the most commonly cited reasons for no treatment.

  9. Delayed entry into HIV medical care in a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the USA.

    PubMed

    Robertson, McKaylee; Wei, Stanley C; Beer, Linda; Adedinsewo, Demilade; Stockwell, Sandra; Dombrowski, Julia C; Johnson, Christopher; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Before widespread antiretroviral therapy (ART), an estimated 17% of people delayed HIV care. We report national estimates of the prevalence and factors associated with delayed care entry in the contemporary ART era. We used Medical Monitoring Project data collected from June 2009 through May 2011 for 1425 persons diagnosed with HIV from May 2004 to April 2009 who initiated care within 12 months. We defined delayed care as entry >three months from diagnosis. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) were calculated to identify risk factors associated with delayed care. In this nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 7.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3-8.8) delayed care after diagnosis. Black race was associated with a lower likelihood of delay than white race (aPR 0.38). Men who have sex with women versus women who have sex with men (aPR 1.86) and persons required to take an HIV test versus recommended by a provider (aPR 2.52) were more likely to delay. Among those who delayed 48% reported a personal factor as the primary reason. Among persons initially diagnosed with HIV (non-AIDS), those who delayed care were twice as likely (aPR 2.08) to develop AIDS as of May 2011. Compared to the pre-ART era, there was a nearly 60% reduction in delayed care entry. Although relatively few HIV patients delayed care entry, certain groups may have an increased risk. Focus on linkage to care among persons who are required to take an HIV test may further reduce delayed care entry.

  10. Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults with ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Gary G.; Michaels, M. Alex; Pakull, Barton

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychostimulant treatment may improve simulated driving performance in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of simulated driving performance with mixed amphetamine salts--extended release (MAS XR) 50 mg/day (Cohort 1) and…

  11. Relationships among Young Adults' Marital Messages Received, Marital Attitudes, and Relationship Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurts, W. Matthew; Myers, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined relationships among university students' marital messages received (MMR), marital attitudes, and romantic relationship self-efficacy (RSE). Results indicated that students' marital attitudes and romantic relationship status predicted their level of RSE. The authors found differences in MMR, marital attitudes, and RSE on the…

  12. Safety and efficacy of ombitasvir – 450/r and dasabuvir and ribavirin in HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients receiving atazanavir or raltegravir ART regimens

    PubMed Central

    Eron, Joseph J; Lalezari, Jay; Slim, Jihad; Gathe, Joseph; Ruane, Peter J; Wang, Chia; Elion, Richard; Blick, Gary; Khatri, Amit; Hu, Yiran B; Gibbons, Krystal; Fredrick, Linda; Co, Melannie; D'Amico, Ronald; Da Silva-Tillmann, Barbara; Trinh, Roger; Sulkowski, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Objective Whether concomitant HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) affects the safety and efficacy of interferon-free HCV therapies or whether HCV treatment may negatively affect HIV control is unclear. We assessed the 3 direct-acting antiviral (3D) regimen of ombitasvir, ABT-450 (identified by AbbVie and Enanta; co-dosed with ritonavir) and dasabuvir with ribavirin (RBV) in HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients with and without cirrhosis, including HCV treatment-experienced, receiving atazanavir (ATV)- or raltegravir (RAL)-based ART therapy. Methods HCV genotype 1-positive treatment-naïve or pegIFN/RBV-experienced patients, with or without Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, CD4+ count ≥200 cells/mm3 or CD4 + % ≥14%, and plasma HIV-1 RNA suppressed on stable ART received open-label 3D + RBV for 12 or 24 weeks. Rates of HCV-sustained virologic response at post-treatment weeks 4 and 12 (SVR4 and SVR12, respectively) and bilirubin-related adverse events (AEs) are reported from post-hoc analyses for subgroups defined by treatment duration and ART regimen. Results The SVR12 rate for patients receiving 12 weeks of 3D + RBV was 93.5% with comparable rates in patients receiving either ATV (93.8%) or RAL therapy (93.3%) (Table 1). The SVR4 rate for the 24-week arm was 96.9% with a single virologic breakthrough at treatment week 16 in a patient receiving RAL therapy. Patients receiving concomitant ATV had more AEs related to indirect hyperbilirubinemia including ocular icterus, jaundice and grade 3 or 4 elevations in total bilirubin (predominantly indirect). No patient discontinued the study due to AEs, and no serious AEs were reported during or after treatment. No patient had a confirmed plasma HIV-1 RNA value ≥200 copies/mL during the treatment period. Conclusions In this first study to evaluate an IFN-free regimen in HCV genotype 1-positive treatment-naïve and experienced patients with HIV-1 co-infection, including those with cirrhosis, high rates of SVR were comparable to those with

  13. Circulating HIV DNA Correlates With Neurocognitive Impairment in Older HIV-infected Adults on Suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Michelli Faria de; Murrel, Ben; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Vargas, Milenka; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Older HIV-infected adults have a higher risk of neurocognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the associations between levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood, soluble markers of inflammation and cellular trafficking in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive functioning among 18 younger (22–40 years) and 26 older (50–71 years) HIV-infected subjects, who were administered a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Older HIV-infected individuals presented higher levels of inflammation in CSF and blood compared to younger individuals, but no difference was observed in HIV DNA levels. Among older participants, higher HIV DNA levels were significantly associated with more severe neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.005), particularly in the Executive Functions domain (p = 0.004). No association was observed between HIV DNA and neurocognition among younger individuals. Despite significantly increased inflammation observed in the older group, none of the inflammatory markers were associated with neurocognitive impairment among older HIV+ individuals (p > 0.05). Our study supports the involvement of peripheral HIV DNA reservoir in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive disorder during suppressive ART. Correlates of neurocognitive impairment might differ between younger and older adults, suggesting that future treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders likely need to be tailored based on age. PMID:26603568

  14. Adult Education for Social and Environmental Change in Contemporary Public Art Galleries and Museums in Canada, Scotland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, pubic art galleries and museums have a well-deserved reputation for elitism, colonialism and exclusion and they are, therefore, frequently omitted from the discourse of adult education. However, the escalating social, cultural and ecological problems of this new century have placed pressure on these public institutions to change and…

  15. Integrating Art into Group Treatment for Adults with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder from Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Carol-Lynne J.

    2015-01-01

    Current research supports the use of exposure-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and integrated treatments show potential for enhanced symptom reduction. This pilot study developed a manualized group treatment integrating art interventions with exposure, grounding, and narrative therapy for five adults with PTSD who were…

  16. The Feasibility of Inpatient Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults Receiving Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Levitan, Denise; Pardee, Timothy S.; Isom, Scott; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the feasibility and utility of a bedside geriatric assessment (GA) to detect impairment in multiple geriatric domains in older adults initiating chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). DESIGN Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING Single academic institution. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML and planned chemotherapy. MEASUREMENTS Bedside GA was performed during inpatient exmination for AML. GA measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Examination; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; Distress Thermometer, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (includes self- reported activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental ADLs, and mobility questions); Short Physical Performance Battery (includes timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance); grip strength, and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index. RESULTS Of 54 participants (mean age 70.8 ± 6.4) eligible for this analysis, 92.6% completed the entire GA battery (mean time 44.0 ± 14 minutes). The following impairments were detected: cognitive impairment, 31.5%; depression, 38.9%; distress, 53.7%; impairment in ADLs, 48.2%; impaired physical performance, 53.7%; and comorbidity, 46.3%. Most were impaired in one (92.6%) or more (63%) functional domains. For the 38 participants rated as having good performance status according to standard oncologic assessment (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Performance Scale score ≤1), impairments in individual GA measures ranged from 23.7% to 50%. Significant variability in cognitive, emotional, and physical status was detected even after stratification according to tumor biology (cytogenetic risk group classification). CONCLUSION Inpatient GA was feasible and added new information to standard oncology assessment, which may be important for stratifying therapeutic risk in older adults with AML. PMID:22091497

  17. Family nutritional support improves survival, immune restoration and adherence in HIV patients receiving ART in developing country.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Charlotte; Laporte, Remi; Ide, Moussa; Nouhou, Yacouba; de Truchis, Pierre; Rouveix, Elisabeth; Adamou, Adiza; Pauly, Vanessa; Mattei, Jean-François; Gastaut, Jean-Albert

    2010-01-01

    In developing countries, access to antiretroviral treatment for persons living with HIV is still in progress. Malnutrition represents another cause of acquired immunodeficiency and premature death. This evaluation program estimated the impact of family nutritional support during the first year of antiretroviral treatment in West Africa's sub-Sahara region. Family nutritional support was proposed to patients with CD-4 cell count <200 /mm3 and/or developing a WHO stage III/IV or with body mass index <18.5 kg/m2 and receiving antiretroviral treatment. Follow-up of 62 patients receiving support was compared to 118 patients who had only received antiretroviral treatment the year before. Average body mass index, CD-4 cell count were 20.7 and 20.5, 217 and 191/mm3 respectively in supported and control groups (NS). Twenty-two (36%) and 56 (48%) were WHO stage III/IV (NS) respectively in supported and control groups. One patient who received support and twelve controls died (Mortality Ratio=0.19; p<0.05). Increase in CD-4 cell count was around 1.7 times higher (+ 114 vs. + 68 CD-4 cells/mm3 respectively in supported and control groups; p<0.05) and observance was improved in supported group (p<0.005). The evolutions of WHO stage and body mass index were not different but the study period was short. Family nutritional support for persons living with HIV initiating antiretroviral treatment in a developing country showed a positive impact after six months. This family intervention could be integrated into AIDS interventions as an effective and comprehensive community-based primary care.

  18. Values important to terminally ill African American older adults in receiving hospice care.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    While racial disparity in the use of hospice care by older African Americans is widely acknowledged, little is known about the values that they consider as important in receiving health care services along with direct experiences with having these values respected by hospice care providers. Using individual, face-to-face interviews, data were collected directly from 28 African American hospice patients about their experiences in hospice care. Content analysis was used to identify and categorize themes from multiple readings of the qualitative data. Resulting themes included: dying at home, open communications, independent decision-making, autonomy in daily life, unwillingness to be a burden, and relationships. Through the initial assessment, value preferences can be explored and then shared with hospice team members to ensure that services are provided in such a way that their values and preferences are respected.

  19. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections.

  20. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Geiger, Ann M; Tooze, Janet A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Williamson, Jeff D; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Powell, Bayard L

    2013-05-23

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients.

  1. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients. PMID:23550038

  2. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals Changes in Intestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Who Received a Daily Dose of Immunomodulatory Probiotic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota. PMID:26016655

  3. Pyrosequencing analysis reveals changes in intestinal microbiota of healthy adults who received a daily dose of immunomodulatory probiotic strains.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-05-26

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota.

  4. Effectiveness, safety, durability and immune recovery in a retrospective, multicentre, observational cohort of ART-experienced, HIV-1-infected patients receiving maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Dentone, C; Sterrantino, G; Signori, A; Cenderello, G; Guerra, M; De Leo, P; Bartolacci, V; Mantia, E; Orofino, G; Giacomini, M; Bruzzone, B; Francisci, D; Di Biagio, A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective, multicentre, observational study was to assess the durability, safety, immune recovery and effectiveness on viral suppression of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a maraviroc (MVC)-based cohort. We collected clinical, demographical, immunological and virological parameters of adult HIV patients who were infected by CCR5-tropic virus and started an ART regimen containing MVC from 2005 to 2012. We created a longitudinal mixed model to assess the change over time of data. We enrolled 126 drug-experienced patients; the median duration of MVC treatment was 25 months. The probability of stopping ART at one year was 13.3%, and at three years was 27.3%. Statistically significant changes were observed for CD4+ cell count increase ( p < 0.001), HIV-RNA decrease ( p < 0.001) and total cholesterol decrease ( p = 0.005). Ninety-four patients (79.7%) had CD4 ≥ 200 cells/mm(3) at baseline while nine of them reached this threshold at nine months (7.6%), 17 (13%) after nine months and six (5%) remained below 200 cells/mm(3) at the end of the study. Overall, 114 patients (90.5%) achieved an HIV-RNA ≤ 50 cp/ml. A majority of patients maintained CD4 cell counts of ≥ 200 cells/mm(3) and achieved an undetectable HIV viral load within three months. MVC-containing regimens are safe and appear to be a feasible therapeutic option for ART.

  5. Continued Slow Decay of the Residual Plasma Viremia Level in HIV-1–Infected Adults Receiving Long-term Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Riddler, Sharon A.; Aga, Evgenia; Bosch, Ronald J.; Bastow, Barbara; Bedison, Margaret; Vagratian, David; Vaida, Florin; Eron, Joseph J.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Mellors, John W.

    2016-01-01

    We measured plasma human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA levels by means of single-copy assay in 334 participants receiving virologically suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). A residual viremia load of ≥1 copy/mL after 4 years of ART was predicted by a higher pre-ART HIV-1 RNA level, higher CD8+ T-cell count during treatment, and a lower ratio of CD4+ T cells to CD8+ T cells during treatment but not by initial ART regimen. In a longitudinal subset of 64 individuals, continued decay of the plasma HIV-1 RNA level was observed, with an average annual decrease of 6% and an estimated half-life of 11.5 years. In contrast to prior reports, the persistent viremia level continues to slowly decline during years 4–12 of suppressive ART. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT00001137. PMID:26333941

  6. Understanding, management and modelling of urban hydrology and its consequences for receiving waters: A state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, T. D.; Andrieu, H.; Hamel, P.

    2013-01-01

    Urban hydrology has evolved to improve the way urban runoff is managed for flood protection, public health and environmental protection. There have been significant recent advances in the measurement and prediction of urban rainfall, with technologies such as radar and microwave networks showing promise. The ability to predict urban hydrology has also evolved, to deliver models suited to the small temporal and spatial scales typical of urban and peri-urban applications. Urban stormwater management increasingly consider the needs of receiving environments as well as those of humans. There is a clear trend towards approaches that attempt to restore pre-development flow-regimes and water quality, with an increasing recognition that restoring a more natural water balance benefits not only the environment, but enhances the liveability of the urban landscape. Once regarded only as a nuisance, stormwater is now increasingly regarded as a resource. Despite the advances, many important challenges in urban hydrology remain. Further research into the spatio-temporal dynamics of urban rainfall is required to improve short-term rainfall prediction. The performance of stormwater technologies in restoring the water balance and in removing emerging priority pollutants remain poorly quantified. All of these challenges are overlaid by the uncertainty of climate change, which imposes a requirement to ensure that stormwater management systems are adaptable and resilient to changes. Urban hydrology will play a critical role in addressing these challenges.

  7. The Adult Years: Mastering the Art of Self-Renewal. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Frederic M.

    This book identifies skills and competencies that can empower adults throughout the life cycle. Part 1 focuses on the emerging adult. Chapter 1 contrasts new opportunities for adult living with the negative belief that the United States' best days are behind. Chapter 2 makes a case for a cyclical pattern for understanding adult life. Part 2…

  8. Time to treatment benefit for adult patients with Fabry disease receiving agalsidase β: data from the Fabry Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alberto; Abiose, Ademola; Bichet, Daniel G; Cabrera, Gustavo; Charrow, Joel; Germain, Dominique P; Hopkin, Robert J; Jovanovic, Ana; Linhart, Aleš; Maruti, Sonia S; Mauer, Michael; Oliveira, João P; Patel, Manesh R; Politei, Juan; Waldek, Stephen; Wanner, Christoph; Yoo, Han-Wook; Warnock, David G

    2016-01-01

    Background Agalsidase β is a form of enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease, a genetic disorder characterised by low α-galactosidase A activity, accumulation of glycosphingolipids and life-threatening cardiovascular, renal and cerebrovascular events. In clinical trials, agalsidase β cleared glycolipid deposits from endothelial cells within 6 months; clearance from other cell types required sustained treatment. We hypothesised that there might be a ‘lag time’ to clinical benefit after initiating agalsidase β treatment, and analysed the incidence of severe clinical events over time in patients receiving agalsidase β. Methods The incidence of severe clinical events (renal failure, cardiac events, stroke, death) was studied in 1044 adult patients (641 men, 403 women) enrolled in the Fabry Registry who received agalsidase β (average dose 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks) for up to 5 years. Results The incidence of all severe clinical events was 111 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 84 to 145) during the first 6 months. After 6 months, the incidence decreased and remained stable within the range of 40–58 events per 1000 patient-years. The largest decrease in incidence rates was among male patients and those aged ≥40 years when agalsidase β was initiated. Conclusions Contrary to the expected increased incidence of severe clinical events with time, adult patients with Fabry disease had decreased incidence of severe clinical events after 6 months treatment with agalsidase β 1 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Trial registration number NCT00196742. PMID:26993266

  9. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure among HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but has not been studied extensively in resource-limited settings. Insight in the predictors or correlates of poor HRQoL may be helpful to identify patients most in need of additional support and to design appropriate interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and April 2013 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients who were at least 6 months on cART were randomly selected and individual patient data were retrieved from medical records. HRQoL was measured by the WHOQoL-HIVBREF, depressive-symptoms by the Kessler-6 scale, and stigma by the Kalichman internalized AIDS-related stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was carried-out to examine associations between HRQoL and the other variables. A total of 664 patients (response-rate 95%) participated in the study. A higher level of depressive-symptoms was most strongly and consistently associated with a lower HRQoL, both in terms of the magnitude of the relationship and in the number of HRQoL domains associated with it. Also, a higher level of HIV-stigma was associated with a lower HRQoL except for the physical domain, while obtaining sufficient nutritious food and job opportunity were associated with a better HRQoL except for the spiritual and social domains, respectively. Demographics, clinical, and treatment characteristics yielded few significant associations with HRQoL. Our study findings suggest that interventions to improve HRQoL should focus on reducing depressive-symptoms and HIV-stigma, and on enhancing food security and job opportunity.

  10. Antifungal catheter lock therapy for the management of a persistent Candida albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Paul DiMondi, V; Townsend, Mary L; Johnson, Melissa; Durkin, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Antifungal catheter lock therapy (AfLT) with liposomal amphotericin B has been used in the treatment of pediatric central line infections caused by Candida species; however, reports describing the use of liposomal amphotericin B lock therapy in the adult hemodialysis patient population are lacking. Management of central line-associated candidemia with systemic therapy alone is often challenging due to the propensity of Candida species to form biofilms on foreign bodies. We describe a 64-year-old woman who was receiving hemodialysis 3 times/week and was hospitalized with persistent fungemia. Despite receiving intravenous micafungin, she had multiple positive blood cultures for Candida albicans, which finally cleared after 7 days. Her double-lumen catheter was considered the most likely nidus of infection. Although catheter removal would have been preferred, this was not possible given her vasculopathy, history of multiple bloodstream infections, and lack of other available sites for vascular access. Catheter exchange was performed, and liposomal amphotericin B AfLT was administered in combination with intravenous micafungin for a total of 6 days. During this time, the patient experienced no discernible adverse effects secondary to AfLT. At discharge, AfLT was discontinued, and intravenous micafungin was changed to oral fluconazole. After 6 months of treatment, the patient remained culture negative and maintained her dialysis access. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of liposomal amphotericin B catheter lock therapy used to manage a persistent C. albicans bloodstream infection in an adult receiving hemodialysis. AfLT is a novel concept for treating catheter-associated fungal infections. Liposomal amphotericin B was chosen based on its favorable in vitro activity against Candida species biofilms in catheter lock environments. We identified several barriers to implementing AfLT, and these issues may prohibit the use of AfLT. This case report

  11. Mortality, AIDS-morbidity and loss to follow-up by current CD4 cell count among HIV-1 infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Africa and Asia: data from the ANRS 12222 collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Gabillard, Delphine; Lewden, Charlotte; Ndoye, Ibra; Moh, Raoul; Ségéral, Olivier; Tonwe-Gold, Besigin; Etard, Jean-François; Pagnaroat, Men; Fournier-Nicolle, Isabelle; Eholié, Serge; Konate, Issouf; Minga, Albert; Mpoudi-Ngolé, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Anglaret, Xavier; Laurent, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited countries, estimating CD4-specific incidence rates of mortality and morbidity among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) may help assess the effectiveness of care and treatment programmes, identify program weaknesses and inform decisions. Methods We pooled data from 13 research cohorts in five sub-Saharan African (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire and Senegal) and two Asian (Cambodia and Laos) countries. HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) who received ART in 1998-2008 and had at least one CD4 count available were eligible. Changes in CD4 counts over time were estimated by a linear mixed regression. CD4-specific incidence rates were estimated as the number of first events occurring in a given CD4 stratum divided by the time spent within the stratum. Results Overall 3,917 adults (62% women) on ART were followed-up during 10,154 person-years. In the ≤50, 51-100, 101-200, 201-350, 351-500, 501-650 and >650/mm3 CD4 cells strata, death rates were: 20.6, 11.8, 6.7, 3.3, 1.8, 0.9 and 0.3 per 100 person-years; AIDS rates were: 50.5, 32.9, 11.5, 4.8, 2.8, 2.2 and 2.2 per 100 person-years; and loss to follow-up rates were: 4.9, 6.1, 3.5, 3.1, 2.9, 1.7 and 1.2 per 100 person-years, respectively. Mortality and morbidity were higher during the first year following ART initiation. Conclusion In these resource-limited settings, death and AIDS rates remained substantial after ART initiation, even in individuals with high CD4 cell counts. Ensuring earlier ART initiation and optimizing case finding and treatment for AIDS-defining diseases should be seen as priorities. PMID:23274931

  12. Effects of Art Therapy on Distress Levels of Adults with Cancer: A Proxy Pretest Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glinzak, Leara

    2016-01-01

    This study identified decreased distress after art therapy in a proxy pretest study with a convenience sample of 73 patients being treated for cancer. Art therapy outcomes from 4 settings (oncology unit, infusion clinic, individual sessions, and open studio) were measured via the self-report Distress Thermometer, which was collected as part of an…

  13. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance of Hispanic/Latino Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alders, Amanda; Levine-Madori, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot study investigating the efficacy of art therapy to enhance cognitive performance in a sample of 24 elderly Hispanic/Latino members of a community center who participated in a weekly structured thematic therapeutic arts program. A 12-week, quasi-experimental, pretest/posttest, nonrandomized, controlled…

  14. Promoting Well-Being and Gerotranscendence in an Art Therapy Program for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Raquel Chapin

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a community art therapy program that was designed to promote health and well-being in old age. Observations of diverse participant interactions in the nondirective therapy studio over the course of 6 years revealed the benefits of art making and how it may influence well-being during the process of advancing age. Program…

  15. The Black Arts Movement and African American Young Adult Literature: An Evaluation of Narrative Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Laretta

    2005-01-01

    In this article I question whether or not African American young adult literature serves as a primer for, and a version of, African American adult literature. Using the Black Aesthetic as my literary theory and the Coretta Scott King Award as the young adult canon, I note that while the content of adolescent literature is consistent with the…

  16. Task Force Report. State of the Art of Adult Education: CONFINTEA Follow Up. [and] Workshop Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes task force recommendations on the role of the International Council for Adult Education in monitoring achievement of adult education objectives, qualitative and quantitative indicators, and diverse data collection methods. Eleven workshop reports discuss progress on adult education policy advocacy, documentation, health care reform,…

  17. Polymorphisms and Mutational Covariation Associated with Death in a Prospective Cohort of HIV/AIDS Patients Receiving Long-Term ART in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengtao; Feng, Yi; Wu, Jianjun; Tian, Suian; Su, Bin; Wang, Zhe; Liao, Lingjie; Xing, Hui; You, Yinghui; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Background HIV drug resistance is associated with faster clinical progression of AIDS. However, the effect of significant polymorphisms and mutational covariation on mortality among HIV/AIDS patients receiving long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), have rarely been studied. Methods In this prospective cohort study from December 2003 to December 2014, we present a new computational modelling approach based on bioinformatics-based models and several statistical methods to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the acquisition of polymorphisms and mutations on death in HIV/AIDS patients receiving long-term ART in China. Results This study involved 654 ART-treated patients, who had been followed for 5473.4 person-years, a median of 9.8 years, and 178 died (25.2%, 3.3/100 person-years). The first regimens included AZT/d4T + NVP+ ddI (78.9%) or AZT/d4T + NVP+ 3TC (20.0%). We calculated an individual Ka/Ks value for each specific amino acid mutation. Result showed that 20 polymorphisms (E6D, Q18H, E35D, S37N, T39A, K43E, S68N, L74I, I93L, K103N, V106A, E169D, Y181C, G190A, Q197K, T200V, T200E, T215I, E224D and P225H) were strongly associated with AIDS related deaths. Among them, 7 polymorphisms (L74I, K103N, V106A, Y181C, G190A, T215I and P225H) were known to be drug resistance mutations, 7 polymorphisms (E6D, E35D, S37N, I93L, E169D, T200V and T200E were considered to be potential drug resistance mutations, and 6 polymorphisms (T39A, K43E, S68N, Q197K, T200V and E224D) were newly found to have an association with drug resistance mutations, which formed a complex network of relationships. Conclusions Some polymorphisms and mutational covariation may be the important influencing factors in the failure of treatment. Understanding these mechanisms is essential for the development of new therapies, designing optimal drug combinations, and determining effective clinical management of individual patients. PMID:28099515

  18. Magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia among adult HIV patients receiving first line HAART in Northwestern Tanzania: a cross sectional clinic based study

    PubMed Central

    Gunda, Daniel Wilfred; Kilonzo, Semvua Bukheti; Mpondo, Bonaventura Cornel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Moderate to severe anemia is an important clinical problem in HIV patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy. The rate of progression and mortality in this sub group of patients is high compared to non anemic patients. In sub Saharan Africa with scale up of Anti retroviral therapy, the magnitude of this problem is not known especially in Tanzania. This study aimed at determining the magnitude and correlates of moderate to severe anemia in HIV patients receiving first line ART in northwestern Tanzania. Methods This was a cross sectional clinic based study, involving adult HIV patients on first line Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy at Bugando Medical Centre Care and Treatment Center. The patients’ data were analyzed using STATA version 11 to determine the prevalence of moderate to severe anemia and risk factors that could predict occurrence of anemia. Results In this study 346 patients on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy were enrolled, of whom 100(40.46%) had moderate to severe anemia. The odds of being anemic were strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 count (< 200 cells/μl) and HIV stage 3&4 at enrollment. Most of the anemic patients had mean corpuscular volume of >100fl. Conclusion The prevalence of moderate to severe anemia is significantly high in this cohort of HIV-infected patients on first line Anti Retroviral Therapy and it is strongly predicted by Zidovudine based regime, low baseline CD4 and HIV stage 3 and 4. On clinical grounds this suggests that patients who are initiated on Zidovudine based regimen and those in advanced HIV at enrollment should have regular haemoglobin follow up to identify anemia at its earliest stage to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. PMID:27200131

  19. Prevalence of 'being at risk of malnutrition' and associated factors in adult patients receiving nursing care at home in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Franck MPsych, Erik; Lopez Hartmann, Maja; Weyler, Joost; Ysebaert, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is a known problem in hospitals and nursing homes. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of being at risk of malnutrition in community living adults receiving homecare nursing and to determine factors independently associated with this risk of malnutrition. Furthermore, it also aimed to describe aspects of current nutritional nursing care. Patients (n = 100) are screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool to evaluate their risk of malnutrition. A patient survey was used to analyse associated factors. In this population, 29% are at risk for malnutrition. Following a multivariate logistic regression analysis, 'loss of appetite' proved the most important factor. A survey for nurses (n = 61) revealed low awareness, poor knowledge, poor communication between stakeholders and a moderate approach of malnutrition. These findings should encourage homecare nurses to use a recommended screening tool for malnutrition and to actively observe and report loss of appetite to initiate the prescription of individual tailored interventions. Belgian homecare nurses' management does not yet fully comply with international recommendations. Additional training in nutritional nursing care and screening methods for malnutrition is needed. Systematic screening should be further developed and evaluated in this at-risk population.

  20. Adult Education and Lifelong Learning in Arts and Cultural Institutions: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clover, Darlene E.; Sanford, Kathy; Jayme, Bruno de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Using a content analysis approach, this article shares the results of scholarly adult education study on museum and library adult education and learning as represented in peer-reviewed publications over the past 60 years. Findings show a paucity of studies in general, but particularly around libraries. The majority of publications on libraries…

  1. Trends in Adults Receiving a Recommendation for Exercise or Other Physical Activity from a Physician or Other Health ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. adults and varies substantially across population subgroups. Definitions Body mass index : Based on respondent-reported height ... and CDC in each of these years. (See "Definitions" for question wording.) The unweighted numbers of adults ...

  2. Comparing longitudinal CD4 responses to cART among non-perinatally HIV-infected youth versus adults: Results from the HIVRN Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fleishman, John A.; Mahiane, Guy; Nonyane, Bareng Aletta Sanny; Althoff, Keri N.; Yehia, Baligh R.; Berry, Stephen A.; Rutstein, Richard; Nijhawan, Ank; Mathews, Christopher; Aberg, Judith A.; Keruly, Jeanne C.; Moore, Richard D.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Youth have residual thymic tissue and potentially greater capacity for immune reconstitution than adults after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, youth face behavioral and psychosocial challenges that may make them more likely than adults to delay ART initiation and less likely to attain similar CD4 outcomes after initiating cART. This study compared CD4 outcomes over time following cART initiation between ART-naïve non-perinatally HIV-infected (nPHIV) youth (13–24 years-old) and adults (≥25–44 years-old). Methods Retrospective analysis of ART-naïve nPHIV individuals 13–44 years-old, who initiated their first cART between 2008 and 2011 at clinical sites in the HIV Research Network. A linear mixed model was used to assess the association between CD4 levels after cART initiation and age (13–24, 25–34, 35–44 years), accounting for random variation within participants and between sites, and adjusting for key variables including gender, race/ethnicity, viral load, gaps in care (defined as > 365 days between CD4 tests), and CD4 levels prior to cART initiation (baseline CD4). Results Among 2,595 individuals (435 youth; 2,160 adults), the median follow-up after cART initiation was 179 weeks (IQR 92–249). Baseline CD4 was higher for youth (320 cells/mm3) than for ages 25–34 (293) or 35–44 (258). At 239 weeks after cART initiation, median unadjusted CD4 was higher for youth than adults (576 vs. 539 and 476 cells/mm3, respectively), but this difference was not significant when baseline CD4 was controlled. Compared to those with baseline CD4 ≤200 cells/mm3, individuals with baseline CD4 of 201–500 and >500 cells/mm3 had greater predicted CD4 levels: 390, 607, and 831, respectively. Additionally, having no gaps in care and higher viral load were associated with better CD4 outcomes. Conclusions Despite having residual thymic tissue, youth attain similar, not superior, CD4 gains as adults. Early ART initiation

  3. The Effect of a Community-Engaged Arts Program on Older Adults' Well-being.

    PubMed

    Phinney, Alison; Moody, Elaine M; Small, Jeff A

    2014-09-01

    This mixed-methods study evaluated the effect of a community-engaged arts program on the physical, emotional, and social well-being of seniors. Weekly workshops were offered over a three-year period at community centers where artists worked with four groups of seniors to produce a collective art piece or performance for public presentation. Participants completed pre- and post- questionnaires, and group interviews were conducted at the program's end. Paired t-test analyses indicated that seniors experienced improvement in perceived overall health, experience of pain, and sense of community. Interpretive descriptive analysis of the group interviews revealed six themes that informed understanding : (1) providing structure and discipline; (2) facilitating coping; (3) requiring hard work and effort; (4) bringing out one's artistic side; (5) promoting social involvement; and (6) making a contribution. These results are consistent with previous research and contribute to further understanding of how community-engaged arts can benefit the well-being of older people.

  4. Applying the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) to Adults in an Asian Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nan, Joshua Kin-man; Hinz, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment is the foundation for conceptualizing effective interventions. Due to their nonverbal nature, art therapy assessments have an advantage over traditional verbal assessments in some populations and potentially across cultures. This pilot study provides preliminary reliability data to support the cross-cultural use of the Formal Elements…

  5. A "Neogeographical Education"? The Geospatial Web, GIS and Digital Art in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadimitriou, Fivos

    2010-01-01

    Neogeography provides a link between the science of geography and digital art. The carriers of this link are geospatial technologies (global navigational satellite systems such as the global positioning system, Geographical Information System [GIS] and satellite imagery) along with ubiquitous information and communication technologies (such as…

  6. A Comparison of Adults' Responses to Collage versus Drawing in an Initial Art-Making Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaelli, Teresa; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this systematic comparison of collage and drawing was to contribute to the sparse body of literature on the way individuals might respond to two materials commonly used in art therapy. Eight graduate and undergraduate university students who identified as non-artists completed two tasks, one using drawing materials and one using…

  7. [Adult cardiopulmonary bypass in the twentieth century: science, art or empiricism?].

    PubMed

    Mota, André Lupp; Rodrigues, Alfredo José; Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to highlight some less discussed aspects of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), taking into consideration the physiology, physiopathology, and some new technologies of perfusion. Thus, some points, to a certain extent philosophical, have motivated this revision: a) To preserve and update the surgeon knowledge regarding CPB, even to keep his/her pedagogical leadership on his/her surgical team; b) To question if elderly and diabetic patients, as a result of their individual characteristics deserve more appropriate protocols similar to those adopted for children; c) One third aspect would be the questioning of the systemic inflammatory reaction caused by the blood exposure to CPB non-endothelized circuit surface, in face of the increasing importance of blood contact with the surgical wound; d) In relation to the treatment of the vasoplegic syndrome, methylene blue continues being the best therapeutical option, even so, many times are not efficient on account of a highly probable existence of a "therapeutical window" based on the guanylate cyclase dynamics of action (saturation and synthesis "de novo") and; finally, e) The reason of the title, highlighting that based on its current patterns, would the CPB be an outcome of empiricism, art, or science? The bottom line of this article carries the certainty of that as much as the empiricism, art, and science are highly related to CPB.

  8. Health-Related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-Term Services and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubritsky, Cynthia; Abbott, Katherine M.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Foust, Janice B.; Naylor, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL)…

  9. Understanding Patterns of Social Support and Their Relationship to an ART Adherence Intervention Among Adults in Rural Southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Atukunda, Esther C; Musiimenta, Angella; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Wyatt, Monique A; Ashaba, Justus; Ware, Norma C; Haberer, Jessica E

    2017-02-01

    SMS is a widely used technology globally and may also improve ART adherence, yet SMS notifications to social supporters following real-time detection of missed doses showed no clear benefit in a recent pilot trial. We examine the demographic and social-cultural dynamics that may explain this finding. In the trial, 63 HIV-positive individuals initiating ART received a real-time adherence monitor and were randomized to two types of SMS reminder interventions versus a control (no SMS). SMS notifications were also sent to 45 patient-identified social supporters for sustained adherence lapses. Like participants, social supporters were interviewed at enrollment, following their matched participant's adherence lapse and at exit. Social supporters with regular income (RR = 0.27, P = 0.001) were significantly associated with fewer adherence lapses. Instrumental support was associated with fewer adherence lapses only among social supporters who were food secure (RR = 0.58, P = 0.003). Qualitative interview data revealed diverse and complex economic and relationship dynamics, affecting social support. Resource availability in emotionally positive relationships seemingly facilitated helpful support, while limited resources prevented active provision of support for many. Effective social support appeared subject to social supporters' food security, economic stability and a well-functioning social network dependent on trust and supportive disclosure.

  10. In Vitro Differentiation of Embryonic and Adult Stem Cells into Hepatocytes: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Snykers, Sarah; De Kock, Joery; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are a unique source of self-renewing cells within the human body. Before the end of the last millennium, adult stem cells, in contrast to their embryonic counterparts, were considered to be lineage-restricted cells or incapable of crossing lineage boundaries. However, the unique breakthrough of muscle and liver regeneration by adult bone marrow stem cells at the end of the 1990s ended this long-standing paradigm. Since then, the number of articles reporting the existence of multipotent stem cells in skin, neuronal tissue, adipose tissue, and bone marrow has escalated, giving rise, both in vivo and in vitro, to cell types other than their tissue of origin. The phenomenon of fate reprogrammation and phenotypic diversification remains, though, an enigmatic and rare process. Understanding how to control both proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and their progeny is a challenge in many fields, going from preclinical drug discovery and development to clinical therapy. In this review, we focus on current strategies to differentiate embryonic, mesenchymal(-like), and liver stem/progenitor cells into hepatocytes in vitro. Special attention is paid to intracellular and extracellular signaling, genetic modification, and cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. In addition, some recommendations are proposed to standardize, optimize, and enrich the in vitro production of hepatocyte-like cells out of stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19056906

  11. A Study of the Graduates of the Master of Arts Program in Adult Education at the University of Minnesota: Roles, Educative Functions, and Assessment of the Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, James

    A study was conducted to identify the employment history and educative functions of the graduates of the Master of Arts (M.A.) in adult education of the University of Minnesota and their assessment of the M.A. program. A self-administered mailed questionnaire was used to survey the 61 graduates of the program between 1979 and 1986; 54 graduates…

  12. Dual-Process Models of Associative Recognition in Young and Older Adults: Evidence from Receiver Operating Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Michael R.; Light, Leah L.; Chung, Christie

    2005-01-01

    In 3 experiments, young and older adults studied lists of unrelated word pairs and were given confidence-rated item and associative recognition tests. Several different models of recognition were fit to the confidence-rating data using techniques described by S. Macho (2002, 2004). Concordant with previous findings, item recognition data were best…

  13. EXCRETION OF THIAMINE AND ITS METABOLITES IN THE URINE OF YOUNG ADULT MALES RECEIVING RESTRICTED INTAKES OF THE VITAMIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Eight young men consuming a 2800-kcal diet consisting of 80 g protein, 100 g fat and 400 g carbohydrate and providing 0.11 to 0.18 mg thiamine/day...change appreciably during thiamine deficiency. The biochemical pattern for thiamine deficiency in human adults is described. (Author)

  14. Martial art training enhances the glutathione antioxidant system in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Douris, Peter C; Elokda, Ahmed S; Handrakis, John P; Principal, Suze; Rondo, Eleni; Bovell, Juan; Coughlin, William P; Mastroianni, Charles N; Wong, Michael J; Zimmerman, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the antioxidant capacity of physically active middle-aged martial artists to age-matched sedentary controls. Nine sedentary subjects (mean age 52.9 yr) and 9 martial artists (mean age 51.8 yr) who practice Soo Bahk Do, a Korean martial art and were age- and sex-matched performed a graded exercise test (GXT) using a modified Bruce protocol. Ages ranged from 41 to 58 years. A GXT has been shown to be an effective technique for inducing oxidative stress. Glutathione (GSH) is the body's most highly concentrated antioxidant, is the central component of the antioxidant system, and plays an essential role in protecting tissues against oxidative stress. Free radical oxidation leads to the transformation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Venous blood samples for GSH and GSSG were collected before and immediately after the GXT. Repeated measures analysis of variance were performed on the resting baseline values and immediate post-GXT values of GSH, GSSG, and GSH:GSSG to compare groups. The blood GSH, GSSG, and GSH:GSSG levels were significantly different (p < 0.001) between the 2 groups at rest and after the GXT. The Soo Bahk Do practitioners had higher resting levels of GSH and lower levels of GSSG and responded more effectively to acute oxidative stress than the age-matched sedentary controls. Soo Bahk Do appears to enhance the antioxidant defense system and may be an effective intervention for improving overall health by protecting against the adverse effects of oxidative stress that is associated with the free radical theory of aging. Health professionals should be aware of alternative methods of training, conditioning, and exercise that can improve the general adaptation response to oxidative stress.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus DNA loads in adult human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Paul D.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; Peng, Rong Sheng; White, Zoe S.; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are at high risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoma. However, little is known of the EBV DNA loads in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay, we demonstrated that significantly more HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART than HIV-1-uninfected volunteers had detectable EBV DNA in blood (57 [81%] of 70 vs. 11 [16%] of 68 patients; P=.001) and saliva (55 [79%] of 68 vs. 37 [54%] of 68 patients; P=.002). The mean EBV loads in blood and saliva samples were also higher in HIV-1-infected patients than in HIV-1-uninfected volunteers (P=.001). The frequency of EBV detection in blood was associated with lower CD4+ cell counts (P=.03) among HIV-1-infected individuals, although no differences were observed in the EBV DNA loads in blood or saliva samples in the HIV-1-infected group. Additional studies are needed to determine whether EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells play a role in the pathogenesis of EBV in HIV-1-infected patients receiving HAART.

  16. Iatrogenic chylothorax due to pleural cavity extravasation of total parenteral nutrition in two adults receiving nutrition through a peripherally inserted central catheter.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas J; Jamous, Fady G; Kooistra, Alma; Zawada, Edward T

    2010-02-01

    Extravasation of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) delivered via central lines is a known potential complication, but significant extravasations of infusate into the pleural space when using peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have not been reported in adults. We report 2 cases ofpleural cavity extravasation ofTPN delivered via a PICC. Measurement of the glucose level of the effusate is a quick way to determine the presence of TPN and should be considered in any patient receiving TPN via any type of central line with a rapidly developing effusion.

  17. A Pilot Study of Brief Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback to Reduce Craving in Young Adult Men Receiving Inpatient Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Eddie, D.; Kim, C.; Lehrer, P.; Deneke, E.; Bates, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    The present pilot study investigated the implementation feasibility, and efficacy for reducing alcohol and drug craving, of a brief, 3-session heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV BFB) intervention added to a traditional 28-day substance abuse disorder (SUD) inpatient treatment program. Forty-eight young adult men received either treatment as usual (TAU) plus three sessions of HRV BFB training over three weeks, or TAU only. Participants receiving HRV BFB training were instructed to practice daily using a handheld HRV BFB device. HRV BFB training was well tolerated by participants and supported by treatment staff. Men receiving TAU + HRV BFB demonstrated a greater, medium effect size reduction in alcohol and drug craving compared to those receiving TAU only, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. In addition, an interaction effect was observed in analyses that accounted for baseline craving levels, wherein heart rate variability (HRV) levels at treatment entry were predictive of changes in craving in the TAU group only. Low baseline levels of HRV were associated with increases in craving, whereas higher baseline HRV levels were associated with greater decreases in craving from start to end of treatment. In the TAU + HRV BFB group, however, there was no such association. That is, HRV BFB appeared to dissociate individual differences in baseline HRV levels from changes in craving. Given that alcohol and drug craving often precipitates relapse, HRV BFB merits further study as an adjunct treatment to ameliorate craving experienced by persons with substance use disorders. PMID:25179673

  18. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV. PMID:25844941

  19. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-05-01

    Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (with standard-of-care control groups), considering at least one of a list of HIV-related behavioral or biological outcomes in PLWHA aged ≥18 receiving HIV care with at least 3-month follow-up were included. No language or publication status restrictions were set. Standardized search, data abstraction, and evaluation methods were used. Five randomized controlled trials were included in the review. We found limited evidence that sexual risk reduction interventions increase condom use consistency in HIV transmission risk acts, and reduce the number of (casual) sexual partners. We still believe that regular interactions between HIV care providers and PLWHA provide valuable opportunities for theory-based sexual risk reduction interventions to restrain the spread of HIV.

  20. Talk or text to tell? How young adults in Canada and South Africa prefer to receive STI results, counseling, and treatment updates in a wireless world.

    PubMed

    Labacher, Lukas; Mitchell, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Young adults often lack access to confidential, long-lasting, and nonjudgmental interactions with sexual health professionals at brick-and-mortar clinics. To ensure that patients return for their STI test results, post-result counseling, and STI-related information, computer-mediated health intervention programming allows them to receive sexual health information through onsite computers, the Internet, and mobile phone calls and text messages. To determine whether young adults (age: M = 21 years) prefer to communicate with health professionals about the status of their sexual health through computer-mediated communication devices, 303 second-year university students (183 from an urban North American university and 120 from a periurban university in South Africa) completed a paper-based survey indicating how they prefer to communicate with doctors and nurses: talking face to face, mobile phone call, text message, Internet chat programs, Facebook, Twitter, or e-mail. Nearly all students, and female students in South Africa in particular, prefer to receive their STI test results, post-results counseling, and STI-related information by talking face to face with doctors and nurses rather than communicating through computers or mobile phones. Results are clarified in relation to gender, availability of various technologies, and prevalence of HIV in Canada and in South Africa.

  1. Arts Education Beyond the Classroom. ACA Arts Research Seminar Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfe, Judith H., Ed.; Heine, Joni Cherbo, Ed.

    The 13 seminar papers presented in this collection discuss various avenues used for educating adults in the arts in order to enrich existing arts audiences and to educate the widest possible adult population in the practice and history of art and aesthetics. These efforts will ensure that the quality and quantity of arts participation and support…

  2. Duration of Influenza Virus Shedding Among HIV-Infected Adults in the cART Era, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Timothy; Kojic, E. Milu; Overton, Edgar T.; Henry, Keith; Önen, Nur; Rhame, Frank; Conley, Lois; Brooks, John T.; Fry, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The duration of influenza virus shedding in HIV-infected adults is unknown and could affect quarantine and treatment recommendations. Participants were monitored for influenza-like illness (ILI), defined as fever and cough or sore throat, using weekly telephone audio computer-assisted self-interviews. Those with ILI were further evaluated at three HIV specialty clinics. For those with influenza, we collected nasopharyngeal washes every 3 days after the date of confirmed influenza infection for 21–28 days; specimens underwent reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and viral culture. Duration of influenza virus shedding was the interval from the date of onset (day 0) of ILI to the date of last culture-positive specimen. Characteristics were compared between patients with and without influenza using Fisher's exact test. We used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test to examine factors that may have affected influenza virus shedding. From October 2010 to April 2011, we enrolled 961 participants in syndromic surveillance and diagnosed 20 patients with influenza whose characteristics were as follows: median age 48 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 43–53), 60% male, 50% non-Hispanic black, 95% had been prescribed combination highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART), 85% were virologically suppressed (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml), median CD4 cell count 317 cells/mm3 (IQR: 190-544), and median follow-up time 21 days (IQR: 19–22). Compared with persons without influenza, persons with influenza were more likely to be older, use injection drugs, and have a lower median CD4 cell count and were less likely to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. Median durations of shedding, PCR detection, and ILI symptoms were 3 (IQR: 0–5), 10 (IQR: 6–15), and 14 days (IQR: 12–26), respectively. Median days of shedding were similar among patients with and without any prior influenza vaccination (0 vs. 4, p = .448), HIV viral suppression (2 vs

  3. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO.

  4. Impact of Cannabis Use on Treatment Outcomes among Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Shevorykin, Alina; Radoncic, Vanja; Smith, Kathryn M. Z.; Smith, Philip H.; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Papini, Santiago; Hien, Denise A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Research has demonstrated a strong link between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) in general and cannabis use disorders in particular. Yet, few studies have examined the impact of cannabis use on treatment outcomes for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs. Methods: Participants were 136 individuals who received cognitive-behavioral therapies for co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Multivariate regressions were utilized to examine the associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment outcomes. Multilevel linear growth models were fit to the data to examine the cross-lagged associations between weekly cannabis use and weekly PTSD symptom severity and primary substance use during treatment. Results: There were no significant positive nor negative associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment PTSD symptom severity and days of primary substance use. Cross-lagged models revealed that as cannabis use increased, subsequent primary substance use decreased and vice versa. Moreover, results revealed a crossover lagged effect, whereby higher cannabis use was associated with greater PTSD symptom severity early in treatment, but lower weekly PTSD symptom severity later in treatment. Conclusion: Cannabis use was not associated with adverse outcomes in end-of-treatment PTSD and primary substance use, suggesting independent pathways of change. The theoretical and clinical implications of the reciprocal associations between weekly cannabis use and subsequent PTSD and primary substance use symptoms during treatment are discussed. PMID:28178207

  5. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Cheng, Yoyo T Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Yu, Esther Y T; Chow, Gary C C; Chak, Yvonne T C; Chan, Ivy K Y; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan; Chung, Louisa M Y

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

  6. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Training on Upper Extremity Muscle Strength and Eye-Hand Coordination in Community-Dwelling Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheng, Yoyo T. Y.; Yu, Esther Y. T.; Chow, Gary C. C.; Chak, Yvonne T. C.; Chan, Ivy K. Y.; Zhang, Joni; Macfarlane, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) martial art training on the upper extremity muscle strength and eye-hand coordination of middle-aged and older adults. Methods. This study used a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design. Forty-two community-dwelling healthy adults participated in the study; 24 (mean age ± SD = 68.5 ± 6.7 years) underwent VT training for 4 weeks (a supervised VT session twice a week, plus daily home practice), and 18 (mean age ± SD = 72.0 ± 6.7 years) received no VT training and acted as controls. Shoulder and elbow isometric muscle strength and eye-hand coordination were evaluated using the Lafayette Manual Muscle Test System and a computerized finger-pointing test, respectively. Results. Elbow extensor peak force increased by 13.9% (P = 0.007) in the VT group and the time to reach peak force decreased (9.9%) differentially in the VT group compared to the control group (P = 0.033). For the eye-hand coordination assessment outcomes, reaction time increased by 2.9% in the VT group and decreased by 5.3% in the control group (P = 0.002). Conclusions. Four weeks of VT training could improve elbow extensor isometric peak force and the time to reach peak force but not eye-hand coordination in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. PMID:27525020

  7. Site-specific differences in T cell frequencies and phenotypes in the blood and gut of HIV-uninfected and ART-treated HIV+ adults.

    PubMed

    Yukl, Steven A; Shergill, Amandeep K; Girling, Valerie; Li, Qingsheng; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Haase, Ashley; Havlir, Diane V; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy.

  8. Site-Specific Differences in T Cell Frequencies and Phenotypes in the Blood and Gut of HIV-Uninfected and ART-Treated HIV+ Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep K.; Girling, Valerie; Li, Qingsheng; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Haase, Ashley; Havlir, Diane V.; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy. PMID:25811360

  9. Attitudes of Adult Learners toward the Board of Governors Bachelor of Arts Degree Program at Chicago State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson-Davenport, Michael A.

    A study was conducted to determine the attitudes of adult learners toward the Board of Governors (BOG) bachelor's degree program at Chicago State University. The study also examined characteristics and types of adult learners, availability and kinds of services adult learners want, relevance of coursework, biases from campus officials toward…

  10. Relationship specialization amongst sources and receivers of social support and its correlations with loneliness and subjective well-being: a cross sectional study of Nepalese older adults.

    PubMed

    Chalise, Hom Nath; Saito, Tami; Takahashi, Miyako; Kai, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Social support, subjective well-being (SWB), and loneliness are issues of central importance in research concerned with the quality of life (QOL) of elderly people in the 21st century. However, very little is known about the situation in low-income countries such as in Nepal. The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationships significant in social support (received (SSR) and provided (SSP)) and analyze their connections with loneliness and SWB. The subjects, not suffering from dementia, were 60 years and above living in Kathmandu city. The data was analyzed using logistic regression with some confounding variables controlled. The results indicate that loneliness is high and SWB is low amongst Nepalese older adults. SSR from children living together and SSP to spouse, children living together and friends and neighbors reduce loneliness. SSP to children living apart increases SWB-life satisfaction. SSR from children living together and SSP to children (living together and apart) increases SWB-life stability. However, SSP to relatives reduces SWB-life satisfaction and SSR from relatives reduces SWB-life stability in Nepalese older adult men.

  11. How cultural capital, habitus and class influence the responses of older adults to the field of contemporary visual art.

    PubMed

    Newman, Andrew; Goulding, Anna; Whitehead, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    This article explores the responses of 38 older people to contemporary visual art through the results of a 28-month study entitled, Contemporary Visual Art and Identity Construction: Wellbeing amongst Older People. A framework for the analysis is provided by previous work on the consumption of art and by Bourdieu's constructs of cultural capital, habitus and field. Five groups of older people, with a range of different backgrounds, were taken to galleries and their responses were recorded, transcribed and analysed. It is concluded that participants' responses are influenced by their cultural capital, habitus and class-which, in turn, are affected by their life course experiences. Those who could not recognise the field (e.g., did not view contemporary art as "art") created their own meanings that they associated with the artworks. Evidence indicates that group dynamics and class mobility are likewise important. Participants also used the experience to respond to real or anticipated age-associated deficits.

  12. Socialization in the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orend, Richard J.

    Socialization is a process by which children learn the attitudes and orientations that will guide their behavior as adults. The analyses described in this report use this socialization model as a basis for describing the relationship between childhood and early adult arts-related experiences and current arts-related leisure participation. Three…

  13. Prevalence and predictors of kaposi sarcoma herpes virus seropositivity: a cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the most common AIDS-defining tumour in HIV-infected individuals in Africa. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection precedes development of KS. KSHV co-infection may be associated with worse outcomes in HIV disease and elevated KSHV viral load may be an early marker for advanced HIV disease among untreated patients. We examined the prevalence of KSHV among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) and compared immunological, demographic and clinical factors between patients seropositive and seronegative for KSHV. Results We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from 404 HIV-infected treatment-naïve adults initiating ART at the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa between November 2008 and March 2009. Subjects were screened at ART initiation for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens. Seropositivity to KSHV was defined as positive to either lytic KSHV K8.1 or latent KSHV Orf73 antibodies. KSHV viremia was determined by quantitative PCR and CD3, 4 and 8 lymphocyte counts were determined with flow cytometry. Of the 404 participants, 193 (48%) tested positive for KSHV at ART initiation; with 76 (39%) reactive to lytic K8.1, 35 (18%) to latent Orf73 and 82 (42%) to both. One individual presented with clinical KS at ART initiation. The KSHV infected group was similar to those without KSHV in terms of age, race, gender, ethnicity, smoking and alcohol use. KSHV infected individuals presented with slightly higher median CD3 (817 vs. 726 cells/mm3) and CD4 (90 vs. 80 cells/mm3) counts than KSHV negative subjects. We found no associations between KSHV seropositivity and body mass index, tuberculosis status, WHO stage, HIV RNA levels, full blood count or liver function tests at initiation. Those with detectable KSHV viremia (n = 19), however, appeared to present with signs of more advanced HIV disease including anemia and WHO stage 3 or 4 defining conditions compared to those in whom the virus was

  14. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-06-16

    An improved receiver and receiver mount for calutrons are described. The receiver can be manipulated from outside the tank by a single control to position it with respect to the beam. A door can be operated exteriorly also to prevent undesired portions of the beam from entering the receiver. The receiver has an improved pocket which is more selective in the ions collected. (T.R.H.)

  15. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups.

  16. Evidence for Technology Interventions to Promote ART Adherence in Adult Populations: A review of the literature 2012 - 2015

    PubMed Central

    Amico, K. Rivet

    2015-01-01

    Leveraging technology to enhance antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, and factors associated with it, has tremendous appeal as a low-cost, generalizable strategy to offer high-quality adherence support given an increasingly limited workforce. As the numbers of individuals living with HIV entering care and initiating ART are expected to increase substantially worldwide in the next decade, capacity to support ART adherence is needed and use of computers, internet and mobile phones has the potential to offer those efficiencies--providing they are effective. This review summarizes recent advances in the evidence base for technology-driven, -delivered or -enhanced ART adherence intervention approaches. A Pubmed search limited to January 2013 through July 2015 identified 13 qualifying studies evaluating computer-delivered interventions, internet approaches, mobile phone technologies, and electronic dose monitoring with triggered messaging and data-informed counseling. Considerable support for each area has emerged, with the majority of studies reviewed demonstrating significant effects on ART adherence and clinical outcomes. Gaps are identified and recommendations offered. PMID:26412085

  17. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Brunk, W.O.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given for an improved calutron receiver having a face plate lying at an angle to the direction of the entering ion beams but having an opening, the plane of which is substantially perpendicular to that of the entering ion beams. By so positioning the opening in the receiver, the effective area through which the desired material may enter the receiver is increased, and at the same time the effective area through which containattng material may enter the receiver is reduced.

  18. 30-micron heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Spears, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Advantages and constraints of remote measurements using heterodyne spectroscopy near 30 microns are discussed. The state of the art of wideband HgCdTe photomixers and PbSnSe diode-laser local oscillators being developed for FIR heterodyne receivers is described. The first compact 30-micron heterodyne radiometer was built, and initial results at 28-microns show about 2-percent mixer efficiency for a 500-MHz-bandwidth receiver. Factors limiting receiver performance are discussed, along with the projected sensitivity of new interdigitated-electrode HgCdTe photoconductor mixers being developed for operation up to 200 microns.

  19. The role of SNPs in the α-chain of the IL-7R gene in CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV-infected African patients receiving suppressive cART.

    PubMed

    Rajasuriar, R; Booth, D R; Gouillou, M; Spelman, T; James, I; Solomon, A; Chua, K; Stewart, G; Deeks, S; Bangsberg, D R; Muzoora, C; Cameron, P U; Hunt, P; Martin, J; Lewin, S R

    2012-01-01

    We previously found an association between faster CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and interleukin-7 receptor-α (IL-7Rα) haplotype-2 in a predominantly Caucasian cohort. This study aims to determine whether this association was also significant in Africans. Patients were recruited from the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes (UARTO) cohort (n=352). We used survival analysis and linear mixed modelling (LMM) to determine factors associated with CD4 T-cell recovery. Eight IL-7Rα single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in both Africans and Caucasians (n=57). Soluble (s)IL-7Rα levels were measured by ELISA. In UARTO, IL-7Rα haplotype-2 was associated with slower CD4 T-cell recovery following cART by using survival analysis (P=0.020) and no association was found with LMM (P=0.958). The tagging-SNP for IL-7Rα haplotype-2 (rs6897932) was associated with decreased sIL-7Rα (P<0.001). The haplotypes for the IL-7Rα were significantly different in Africans and Caucasians. Using IL-7Rα genotypes we found slower CD4 T-cell recovery in UARTO patients was still associated with rs6897932 (P=0.009) and rs3194051 was associated with faster CD4 T-cell recovery (P=0.006). Unlike Caucasians, we did not demonstrate a significant association between IL-7Rα haplotype 2 and faster CD4 T-cell recovery in Africans. The IL-7Rα SNPs associated with CD4 T-cell recovery following cART differ in African and Caucasian cohorts.

  20. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly. PMID:26350595

  1. Long-term speech and language outcomes in prelingually deaf children, adolescents and young adults who received cochlear implants in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Chad V; Kronenberger, William G; Colson, Bethany G; Henning, Shirley C; Pisoni, David B

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated long-term speech and language outcomes in 51 prelingually deaf children, adolescents and young adults who received cochlear implants (CIs) prior to 7 years of age and had used their implants for at least 7 years. Average speech perception scores were similar to those found in prior research with other samples of experienced CI users. Mean language test scores were lower than norm-referenced scores from nationally representative normal-hearing, typically developing samples, although a majority of the CI users scored within 1 standard deviation of the normative mean or higher on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Fourth Edition (63%), and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, Fourth Edition (69%). Speech perception scores were negatively associated with a meningitic etiology of hearing loss, older age at implantation, poorer preimplant unaided pure-tone average thresholds, lower family income and the use of 'total communication'. Subjects who had used CIs for 15 years or more were more likely to have these characteristics and were more likely to score lower on measures of speech perception compared to those who had used CIs for 14 years or less. The aggregation of these risk factors in the >15 years of CI use subgroup accounts for their lower speech perception scores and may stem from more conservative CI candidacy criteria in use at the beginning of pediatric cochlear implantation.

  2. Addressing the Vaccine Hesitancy Continuum: An Audience Segmentation Analysis of American Adults Who Did Not Receive the 2009 H1N1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Galarce, Ezequiel; Xuan, Ziming; Alexander-Molloy, Jaclyn; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the heterogeneity of groups along the vaccine hesitancy continuum presents an opportunity to tailor and increase the impact of public engagement efforts with these groups. Audience segmentation can support these goals, as demonstrated here in the context of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine. In March 2010, we surveyed 1569 respondents, drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults, with oversampling of racial/ethnic minorities and persons living below the United States Federal Poverty Level. Guided by the Structural Influence Model, we assessed knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to H1N1; communication outcomes; and social determinants. Among those who did not receive the vaccine (n = 1166), cluster analysis identified three vaccine-hesitant subgroups. Disengaged Skeptics (67%) were furthest from vaccine acceptance, with low levels of concern and engagement. The Informed Unconvinced (19%) were sophisticated consumers of media and health information who may not have been reached with information to motivate vaccination. The Open to Persuasion cluster (14%) had the highest levels of concern and motivation and may have required engagement about vaccination broadly. There were significant sociodemographic differences between groups. This analysis highlights the potential to use segmentation techniques to identify subgroups on the vaccine hesitancy continuum and tailor public engagement efforts accordingly.

  3. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    York, H.F.

    1959-07-01

    A receiver construction is presented for calutrons having two or more ion sources and an individual receiver unit for each source. Design requirements dictate that the face plate defining the receiver entrance slots be placed at an angle to the approaching beam, which means that ions striking the face plate are likely to be scattcred into the entrance slots of other receivers. According to the present invention, the face plate has a surface provided with parallel ridges so disposed that one side only of each ridge's exposed directly to the ion beam. The scattered ions are directed away from adjacent receivers by the ridges on the lace plate.

  4. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.H.; Stone, K.F.

    1958-09-01

    S>This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and, more specifically, describes a receiver fer collecting the ion curreot after it is formed into a beam of non-homogeneous isotropic cross-section. The invention embodies a calutron receiver having an ion receiving pocket for separately collecting and retaining ions traveling in a selected portion of the ion beam and anelectrode for intercepting ions traveling in another selected pontion of the ion beam. The electrode is disposed so as to fix the limit of one side of the pontion of the ion beam admitted iato the ion receiving pocket.

  5. Prevention of respiratory tract infections with bacterial lysate OM-85 bronchomunal in children and adults: a state of the art

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and also represent a cause of death in some parts of the world. The treatment of RTIs implies a continuous search for stronger therapies and represents an economical burden for health services and society. In this context the prevention of infections is absolutely required. The use of bacterial lysates as immuno-modulators to boost immunological response is widely debated. Aim of this review is to summarize the main clinical studies on the effect of the bacterial lysate OM-85 in treating RTIs in susceptible subjects - namely children and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-affected adults. Results from clinical trials and recent systematic reviews are reported. The results show that mean number of RTIs decreases upon treatment with OM-85, as measured by frequency of exacerbations or number of antibiotic courses. Data from systematic reviews indicated that OM-85 is particularly beneficial in children at high risk of RTIs. In COPD-affected adults, clinical studies showed that treatment with OM-85 reduced exacerbations, although systematic reviews did not legitimate the protective effect of OM-85 toward COPD as significant. The use of OM-85 could be efficacious in reducing exacerbation frequency of RTIs in children and adults at risk. However further high-quality studies are needed to better explain the mechanism of action and confirm the beneficial results of OM85. PMID:23692890

  6. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, Jeremy A.

    1982-01-01

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  7. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, J.A.

    1981-01-19

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals is described. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  8. Art for Libraries' Sake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Mark-Elliot

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates the benefits of an aggressive library program of regularly scheduled and professionally curated art exhibitions and related events. Describes the Visual Arts Program at the Pacific Beach branch library (San Diego). A sidebar by Debra Wilcox Johnson discusses libraries' development of cultural programming for adults. (AEF)

  9. Gerontology and the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jean Ellen, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews research on the place of the arts in programs for the elderly. In nine articles deals with characteristics and attitudes of adult students in art and music, dance therapy, and creativity. Discusses the aging advocacy movement and suggests it can be useful to program planners and gerontologists. (JAC)

  10. PLANNING THE ART ROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POPOLIZIO, VINCENT J.; AND OTHERS

    FACILITIES FOR CARRYING OUT AN ART PROGRAM MUST BE DESIGNED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS IN SCHOOL AND THOSE ENROLLED IN ADULT PROGRAMS. PROVISIONS MUST BE INCLUDED FOR PAINTING AND DRAWING, THE GRAPHIC ARTS, GENERAL CRAFTS, MODELING, SCHULPTURING, PHOTOGRAPHY, SERIGRAPHY, AND MECHANICAL DRAWING. WORK CENTERS AND TRAFFIC FLOW NEED CAREFUL…

  11. The Effects of Art History-Enriched Art Therapy on Anxiety, Time on Task, and Art Product Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol L.

    1993-01-01

    Investigated effects of art history enrichment of art therapy task on anxiety, time on task, and art product quality among 13 chronic adult psychiatric day hospital patients. Results indicated art history enrichment task reduced anxiety and increased time on task. Art organization level tended toward significant increase compared with control…

  12. Industrial and Practical Arts, Vocational Education, and General Adult Education, Leflore County School District, Mississippi. Reports of Consultants and Advisory Specialists under Planning Grant, Title III, Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Roy W.; Hunt, Elizabeth E.

    Descriptions of vocational, practical arts, and general adult education programs for an exemplary school curriculum, grades K-12 in Leflore County, Mississippi, are given in this 1969 document. Suggestions include development of an area vocational-technical school designed to supply partially the anticipated manpower needs of this rural county. It…

  13. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese martial art training on musculoskeletal health, balance performance, and self-efficacy in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Lip, Ryan W T; Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Liu, Karen P Y; Guo, X

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) Chinese martial art training on radial bone strength, upper- and lower-limb muscular strength, shoulder joint mobility, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly participants. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve seniors voluntarily joined the VT training group, and twenty-seven seniors voluntarily joined the control group. The VT group received VT training for three months, while the control group received no training. The bone strength of the distal radius was assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer. Muscular strength in the limbs was evaluated using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer and the five times sit-to-stand test. Shoulder joint mobility was examined using a goniometer. Balance performance and self-efficacy were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Chinese version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant group-by-time interaction effect, group effect, and time effect for all outcome variables. However, general trends of maintenance or improvement in all outcome parameters were observed to a greater extent in the VT group than in the control group. [Conclusion] VT training might be a potential fall-prevention exercise that can be used to maintain general physique, balance, and confidence in the elderly population. A further randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm this postulation.

  14. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese martial art training on musculoskeletal health, balance performance, and self-efficacy in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lip, Ryan W.T.; Fong, Shirley S.M.; Ng, Shamay S.M.; Liu, Karen P.Y.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) Chinese martial art training on radial bone strength, upper- and lower-limb muscular strength, shoulder joint mobility, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly participants. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve seniors voluntarily joined the VT training group, and twenty-seven seniors voluntarily joined the control group. The VT group received VT training for three months, while the control group received no training. The bone strength of the distal radius was assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer. Muscular strength in the limbs was evaluated using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer and the five times sit-to-stand test. Shoulder joint mobility was examined using a goniometer. Balance performance and self-efficacy were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Chinese version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant group-by-time interaction effect, group effect, and time effect for all outcome variables. However, general trends of maintenance or improvement in all outcome parameters were observed to a greater extent in the VT group than in the control group. [Conclusion] VT training might be a potential fall-prevention exercise that can be used to maintain general physique, balance, and confidence in the elderly population. A further randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm this postulation. PMID:25931704

  15. High rate of virological failure and low rate of switching to second-line treatment among adolescents and adults living with HIV on first-line ART in Myanmar, 2005-2015

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Oo, Myo Minn; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Win, Than; Aung, Thet Ko; Min, Aung Chan; Oo, Htun Nyunt

    2017-01-01

    Background The number of people living with HIV on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Myanmar has been increasing rapidly in recent years. This study aimed to estimate rates of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART due to treatment failure at the Integrated HIV Care program (IHC). Methods Routinely collected data of all adolescent and adult patients living with HIV who were initiated on first-line ART at IHC between 2005 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The cumulative hazard of virological failure on first-line ART and switching to second-line ART were estimated. Crude and adjusted hazard ratios were calculated using the Cox regression model to identify risk factors associated with the two outcomes. Results Of 23,248 adults and adolescents, 7,888 (34%) were tested for HIV viral load. The incidence rate of virological failure among those tested was 3.2 per 100 person-years follow-up and the rate of switching to second-line ART among all patients was 1.4 per 100 person-years follow-up. Factors associated with virological failure included: being adolescent; being lost to follow-up at least once; having WHO stage 3 and 4 at ART initiation; and having taken first-line ART elsewhere before coming to IHC. Of the 1032 patients who met virological failure criteria, 762 (74%) switched to second-line ART. Conclusions We found high rates of virological failure among one third of patients in the cohort who were tested for viral load. Of those failing virologically on first-line ART, about one quarter were not switched to second-line ART. Routine viral load monitoring, especially for those identified as having a higher risk of treatment failure, should be considered in this setting to detect all patients failing on first-line ART. Strategies also need to be put in place to prevent treatment failure and to treat more of those patients who are actually failing. PMID:28182786

  16. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improvement in a calutron receiver for collecting the isotopes ts described. The electromagnetic separation of the isotopes produces a mass spectrum of closely adjacent beams of ions at the foci regions, and a dividing wall between the two pockets is arranged at an angle. Substantially all of the tons of the less abundant isotope enter one of the pockets and strike one side of the wall directly, while substantially none of the tons entering the other pocket strikes the wall directly.

  17. A Balanced Comprehensive Art Curriculum Makes Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tollifson, Jerry

    1988-01-01

    Ohio schools have developed a Balanced Comprehensive Art Curriculum (BCAC) that includes art history, art criticism, and art in society as well as traditional art production. Students in kindergarten through 12th grade receive equitable instruction in all four curriculum areas. Includes a resource list and table. (MD)

  18. The Combination of Pill Count and Self-Reported Adherence is a Strong Predictor of First-Line ART Failure for Adults in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Johnson, Brent A.; Nachega, Jean B.; Wu, Baohua; Ordóñez, Claudia E.; Hare, Anna Q.; Kearns, Rachel; Murphy, Richard; Sunpath, Henry; Marconi, Vincent C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a strong predictor of virologic failure (VF) among people with HIV. Various methods such as patient self-report, pill counts and pharmacy refills have been utilized to monitor adherence. However, there are limited data on the accuracy of combining methods to better predict VF in routine clinical settings. We examined various methods to assess adherence including pill count, medication possession ratio (MPR), and self-reported adherence in order to determine which was most highly associated with VF after ≥ 6 months on ART. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a case-control study. At enrollment, pharmacy refill data were collected retrospectively from the medical chart, pill counts were completed to derive a pill count adherence ratio (PCAR) and a self-report questionnaire was administered to all participants. Parametric smooth splines and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses were carried out to assess the accuracy of the adherence methods. Results 458 patients were enrolled from October 2010 to June 2012. Of these, 158 (34.50%) experienced VF (cases) and 300 (65.50%) were controls. The median (IQR) PCAR was 1.10 (0.99–1.14) for cases and 1.13 (1.08–1.18) for controls (p<0.0001). The median MPR was 1.00 (0.97–1.07) for cases and 1.03 (0.96–1.07) for controls (p=0.83). Combination of PCAR and self-reported questions was highly associated with VF. Conclusion In this setting, a combination of pill count adherence and self-report adherence questions had the highest diagnostic accuracy for VF. Further validation of this simple, low-cost combination is warranted in large prospective studies. PMID:25426940

  19. Giving and taking--differential effects of providing, receiving and anticipating emotional support on quality of life in adults with multiple illnesses.

    PubMed

    Warner, Lisa M; Schüz, Benjamin; Wurm, Susanne; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Tesch-Römer, Clemens

    2010-07-01

    Multimorbidity challenges quality of life (QoL) in old age. Anticipating and providing social support have been shown to promote QoL whereas receiving support often had detrimental effects. Little is known about which psychological processes explain these effects. This study examines the effects of receiving, anticipating and providing emotional support on QoL, with control beliefs and self-esteem as simultaneous mediators in an elderly multimorbid sample (N = 1415). Anticipating and providing support positively predicted QoL, mediated through self-esteem and control beliefs. Received support negatively predicted QoL, without mediation. Self-esteem and control beliefs can help to explain the relation between QoL and support.

  20. The Role of Community Centre-based Arts, Leisure and Social Activities in Promoting Adult Well-being and Healthy Lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mat; Kimberlee, Richard; Deave, Toity; Evans, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Developed countries are experiencing high levels of mental and physical illness associated with long term health conditions, unhealthy lifestyles and an ageing population. Given the limited capacity of the formal health care sector to address these public health issues, attention is turning to the role of agencies active in civil society. This paper sought to evaluate the associations between participation in community centre activities, the psycho-social wellbeing and health related behaviours. This was based on an evaluation of the South West Well-being programme involving ten organisations delivering leisure, exercise, cooking, befriending, arts and crafts activities. The evaluation consisted of a before-and-after study with 687 adults. The results showed positive changes in self-reported general health, mental health, personal and social well-being. Positive changes were associated with diet and physical activity. Some activities were different in their outcomes—especially in cases where group activities were combined with one-to-one support. The results suggest that community centre activities of this nature offer benefits that are generically supportive of health behaviour changes. Such initiatives can perform an important role in supporting the health improvement objectives of formal health care services. For commissioners and partner agencies, accessibility and participation are attractive features that are particularly pertinent to the current public health context. PMID:23665850

  1. Brain responses to biological motion predict treatment outcome in young adults with autism receiving Virtual Reality Social Cognition Training: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y J Daniel; Allen, Tandra; Abdullahi, Sebiha M; Pelphrey, Kevin A; Volkmar, Fred R; Chapman, Sandra B

    2017-03-29

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by remarkable heterogeneity in social, communication, and behavioral deficits, creating a major barrier in identifying effective treatments for a given individual with ASD. To facilitate precision medicine in ASD, we utilized a well-validated biological motion neuroimaging task to identify pretreatment biomarkers that can accurately forecast the response to an evidence-based behavioral treatment, Virtual Reality-Social Cognition Training (VR-SCT). In a preliminary sample of 17 young adults with high-functioning ASD, we identified neural predictors of change in emotion recognition after VR-SCT. The predictors were characterized by the pretreatment brain activations to biological vs. scrambled motion in the neural circuits that support (a) language comprehension and interpretation of incongruent auditory emotions and prosody, and (b) processing socio-emotional experience and interpersonal affective information, as well as emotional regulation. The predictive value of the findings for individual adults with ASD was supported by regression-based multivariate pattern analyses with cross validation. To our knowledge, this is the first pilot study that shows neuroimaging-based predictive biomarkers for treatment effectiveness in adults with ASD. The findings have potentially far-reaching implications for developing more precise and effective treatments for ASD.

  2. [Use of Mental Health Service Among Young Adults on Unemployment Benefit Before and after Receiving Counseling at a Psychiatric Liaison Department].

    PubMed

    Hagen, C; Bänfer, S; Werkstetter, L; Hebebrand, J; Reissner, V

    2016-12-14

    Objective: To determine mental health service utilization before and after consultation of a psychiatric liaison service ("Support 25") among youths aged 16-24 years suffering from mental disorders and receiving unemployment benefits. Methods: Longitudinal registration of mental health service use over a 9-month period (N=148); measurement of possible moderators with questionnaires and rating scales. Results: Mental health service utilization increased from initially 22% to 40% and 47.5% 3 and 6 months after receiving individual treatment recommendation. Low-threshold psychosocial counseling was frequented more often than specific psychiatric or psychotherapeutic treatment. Subjects who contacted mental health services showed a trend towards a lower level of psychosocial functioning than subjects who did not seek treatment. Stigma-related factors did not hinder mental health service use. Conclusions: Despite a high degree of psychiatric morbidity, the surveyed sample of unemployed youths had problems to successfully enter mental health services. Although a substantial increase in service use was observed after receiving psychoeducational information at a psychiatric liaison service, the use of low-threshold counseling predominated. This finding suggests that the mental health system should adapt better to the specific needs of young unemployed, for example, by expanding low-threshold psychiatric pre-treatment offers at vocational centers.

  3. Great spotted cuckoo fledglings often receive feedings from other magpie adults than their foster parents: which magpies accept to feed foreign cuckoo fledglings?

    PubMed

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius)--magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism.

  4. Great Spotted Cuckoo Fledglings Often Receive Feedings from Other Magpie Adults than Their Foster Parents: Which Magpies Accept to Feed Foreign Cuckoo Fledglings?

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Manuel; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ibáñez-Álamo, Juan Diego; Roncalli, Gianluca; Macías-Sánchez, Elena; de Neve, Liesbeth

    2014-01-01

    Natural selection penalizes individuals that provide costly parental care to non-relatives. However, feedings to brood-parasitic fledglings by individuals other than their foster parents, although anecdotic, have been commonly observed, also in the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius) – magpie (Pica pica) system, but this behaviour has never been studied in depth. In a first experiment, we here show that great spotted cuckoo fledglings that were translocated to a distant territory managed to survive. This implies that obtaining food from foreign magpies is a frequent and efficient strategy used by great spotted cuckoo fledglings. A second experiment, in which we presented a stuffed-cuckoo fledgling in magpie territories, showed that adult magpies caring for magpie fledglings responded aggressively in most of the trials and never tried to feed the stuffed cuckoo, whereas magpies that were caring for cuckoo fledglings reacted rarely with aggressive behavior and were sometimes disposed to feed the stuffed cuckoo. In a third experiment we observed feedings to post-fledgling cuckoos by marked adult magpies belonging to four different possibilities with respect to breeding status (i.e. composition of the brood: only cuckoos, only magpies, mixed, or failed breeding attempt). All non-parental feeding events to cuckoos were provided by magpies that were caring only for cuckoo fledglings. These results strongly support the conclusion that cuckoo fledglings that abandon their foster parents get fed by other adult magpies that are currently caring for other cuckoo fledglings. These findings are crucial to understand the co-evolutionary arms race between brood parasites and their hosts because they show that the presence of the host's own nestlings for comparison is likely a key clue to favour the evolution of fledgling discrimination and provide new insights on several relevant points such as learning mechanisms and multiparasitism. PMID:25272009

  5. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  6. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  7. Parents as Partners in Art Education Enrichment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    The author describes a parent art program, how it works, and ways to implement it. She emphasizes the strengths of parent programs as a way to support and enrich existing arts education, not as a replacement. Hansen describes the art kit--the adult's teaching resource--and the basic four-part process: presentation, demonstration, an art activity,…

  8. Trabecular Bone Score Reflects Trabecular Microarchitecture Deterioration and Fragility Fracture in Female Adult Patients Receiving Glucocorticoid Therapy: A Pre-Post Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A recently developed diagnostic tool, trabecular bone score (TBS), can provide quality of trabecular microarchitecture based on images obtained from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Since patients receiving glucocorticoid are at a higher risk of developing secondary osteoporosis, assessment of bone microarchitecture may be used to evaluate risk of fragility fractures of osteoporosis. In this pre-post study of female patients, TBS and fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX) adjusted with TBS (T-FRAX) were evaluated along with bone mineral density (BMD) and FRAX. Medical records of patients with (n = 30) and without (n = 16) glucocorticoid treatment were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had undergone DXA twice within a 12- to 24-month interval. Analysis of covariance was conducted to compare the outcomes between the two groups of patients, adjusting for age and baseline values. Results showed that a significant lower adjusted mean of TBS (p = 0.035) and a significant higher adjusted mean of T-FRAX for major osteoporotic fracture (p = 0.006) were observed in the glucocorticoid group. Conversely, no significant differences were observed in the adjusted means for BMD and FRAX. These findings suggested that TBS and T-FRAX could be used as an adjunct in the evaluation of risk of fragility fractures in patients receiving glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:28127556

  9. Gourdeous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a gourd art project for her art club. Prior to students actually working on the gourds, the author and her art volunteer did a joint demonstration on the process students would go through to create their project. The volunteer brought in and explained her gourd art and shared information about the drying and…

  10. Predictors and impact of non-adherence in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder receiving OROS methylphenidate: results from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication non-adherence has an important impact on treatment efficacy and healthcare burden across a range of conditions and therapeutic areas. The aim of this analysis was to determine predictors of non-adherence and impact of non-adherence on treatment response in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Post-hoc analysis of a 13-week randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study of OROS methylphenidate (MPH) 54 and 72 mg/day. Primary efficacy variable was the Conners’ Adult ADHD Rating Scale – Screening Version (CAARS:O-SV). Daily adherence was calculated as average daily adherence (100 × capsules taken/2), with overall adherence calculated as the average daily adherence. Predictors of adherence were assessed using mixed-effects logistic regression. Descriptive statistics were generated for change in CAARS:O-SV score for adherent (> 95% adherence) and non-adherent subjects. Predictors of change were analyzed using a mixed model. Results Subjects were allocated to OROS MPH (54 mg, n = 87; 72 mg, n = 92) or placebo (n = 97). Mean adherence was 92.6% and 93.3% (OROS MPH 54 and 72 mg/day, respectively), versus 97.5% (placebo). Adherence was higher and less variable in completers. Factors significantly associated with non-adherence included female sex, shorter time since ADHD diagnosis, higher education level (completion of university) and score on the Drug Use Screening Inventory psychiatric disorders subscale. Improvements from baseline in CAARS:O-SV score were numerically greater in subjects defined as adherent than in those who were non-adherent. Significant predictors of CAARS:O-SV change in patients who completed the study included percentage adherence up to the point of assessment (p < 0.0001), baseline score (p < 0.0001) and family history of ADHD (p = 0.0003). Conclusion The results of this analysis suggest that newly diagnosed patients, those with a high score on the DUSI-R psychiatric disorder scale, women

  11. You've Got Art Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2000-01-01

    States that paying attention to the mail children receive, the items that are contained, and how children prepare and send mail is an excellent lesson for art teachers interested in advancing the "mail arts" as an authentic form of child's art. Describes mail art as created by children. (CMK)

  12. Art Education/Art Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The special issue presents 13 articles dealing with art education and art therapy for special groups. Included are the following titles and authors: "Art Education for Special Groups: The Emotionally Disturbed" (E. Ulman); "You Are The Early Warning System" (C. Stember); "School Art Therapist Rationale for DPI Certification" (V. Minar); "Art…

  13. Language Arts - Spanish Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Magdalena; Sones, Mary

    This publication presents three suggested language arts curriculum units. They represent a cross-section of materials that have been developed to deal with the learning problems of students with special language difficulties. Originally developed for grades 7-12, these units may be adapted for use in adult education or at other grade levels. They…

  14. Art. Program Planning, Primary, Junior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York Borough Board of Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    Over 20 ideas for planning art programs for grades 1 through 6 are included in this planning guide. Introductory comments stress the individuality of children and caution art teachers not to judge by adult standards and not to direct lessons step-by-step or show how things should be drawn. Outdoor sketching is recommended as a way to develop…

  15. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  16. Car Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilach, Dona Z.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses car art and its appeal to boys and girls. Describes the popularity of customizing cars, focusing on this as a future career for students. Includes a list of project ideas that focuses on car art. (CMK)

  17. Art English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Art English is a combination of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL)/English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) and art content. As a new instructional area, it faces several challenges: as with all English for Special Purposes (ESP), exchange of information among programs; development of a suitable combination of art content and ESL, due to lack of…

  18. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  19. Art Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Advocating that Canadian art programs should use and model environmentally safe practices, the articles in this journal focus on issues of safe practices in art education. Articles are: (1) "What is WHMIS?"; (2) "Safety Precautions for Specific Art Processes"; (3) "Toxic Substances"; (4) "Using Clay, Glazes, and…

  20. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  1. Integrating Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    These articles focus on art as a component of interdisciplinary integration. (1) "Integrated Curriculum and the Visual Arts" (Anna Kindler) considers various aspects of integration and implications for art education. (2) "Integration: The New Literacy" (Tim Varro) illustrates how the use of technology can facilitate…

  2. Guerilla Science: Outreach at music and art festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosin, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Guerilla Science a non-profit science education organization that, since 2007, has brought live events to unconventional venues for science, such as music festivals, art galleries, banquets, department stores and theaters. Guerilla Science sets science free by taking it out of the lab and into the traditional domains of the arts. By producing events that mix science with art, music and play, they create unique opportunities for adult audiences to experience science in unorthodox ways, such as interactive events, games, live experiments, demonstrations and performances by academics, artists, musicians, actors, and professional science communicators. Much of Guerilla Science's work has focused on astrophysical and terrestrial plasmas, and this presentation will provide an overview of Guerilla Science's work in this area. Guerilla Science has produced over twenty events, receiving international media coverage, and directly reached over fifteen thousand members of the public.

  3. Art in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Students are often required to create work in a vacuum, handing in papers to an inauthentic audience for the purpose of receiving a grade. As a result, students often neglect to consider the effects that their work can have on others. In this article, the author highlights an art project from her middle school in Kings Park, New York, that…

  4. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  5. [Art therapy and "art brut"].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Emese; Simon, Lajos

    2010-01-01

    The authors in this article explor the most important steps of the development of the research on the psychopathology of expression. They introduce the development of Art Brut and it's place in art history. They deal with the characteristics of art therapy.

  6. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  7. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  8. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  9. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  10. 45 CFR 1152.9 - How does the Chairman receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 1152.9 How does the Chairman receive and...

  11. Mindful art.

    PubMed

    Malafouris, Lambros

    2013-04-01

    Bullot & Reber (B&R) begin asking if the study of the mind's inner life can provide a foundation for a science of art. Clearly there are many epistemological problems involved in the study of the cognitive and affective basis of art appreciation. I argue that context is key. I also propose that as long as the "mind's life" continues to be perceived as an "inner" intracranial phenomenon, little progress can be made. Mind and art are one.

  12. One World, Many Cultures. Papers from the International Conference on Adult Education and the Arts (4th, St. Andrews, Scotland, July 10-14, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David, Ed.; McConnell, Bridget, Ed.; Normie, Gerald, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Bridget McConnell); "Introduction" (David J. Jones); opening addresses by George Robertson MP, Shadow Scottish Secretary, and by Charlie McConnell, Executive Director, Scottish Community Education Council; and speech by Christine Hamilton, Deputy Director, Scottish Arts Council;…

  13. Art Playgroup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiniger, Christina

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how parents can be involved in a developmentally appropriate art program for very young children. "Art Playgroup," a program for children ages two to five and their parents is one suggestion. Operating under the auspices of DTA Center for Learning & Growing, a nonprofit in Ellsworth, Maine, DTA…

  14. Creative Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Richard J.; Fleming, Mary Ann

    Educational goals and objectives, student activities, and visual aids are included in this guide to a three-dimensional design unit that combines creative art and industrial arts skills. Course goals include challenging students' creative skills, encouraging student interaction and successful group work, and providing an atmosphere of fun and…

  15. Indigenous Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Linda Lomahaftewa, a noted painter, has taught at much bigger places than the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). But Lomahaftewa, who is Hopi-Choctaw, and others on the faculty of IAIA are intensely devoted to the mission of this small but unique school. IAIA--the nation's only four-year fine arts institution devoted to American Indian and…

  16. Art Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Though people may like different types of music, everyone likes music. In middle school, music and art are of key importance for students to express and define what kind of person they are. In this article, the author presents an art project where students are asked to create their own guitars. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  17. Graphic Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide to teaching graphic arts, one in a series of instructional materials for junior high industrial arts education, is designed to assist teachers as they plan and implement new courses of study and as they make revisions and improvements in existing courses in order to integrate classroom learning with real-life experiences. This graphic…

  18. Outcomes of HIV-infected patients receiving care at multiple clinics.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Schranz, Asher J; Momplaisir, Florence; Keller, Sara C; Gross, Robert; Frank, Ian; Metlay, Joshua P; Brady, Kathleen A

    2014-08-01

    Receiving care at multiple clinics may compromise the therapeutic patient-provider alliance and adversely affect the treatment of people living with HIV. We evaluated 12,759 HIV-infected adults in Philadelphia, PA between 2008 and 2010 to determine the effects of using multiple clinics for primary HIV care. Using generalized estimating equations with logistic regression, we examined the relationship between receiving care at multiple clinics (≥ 1 visit to two or more clinics during a calendar year) and two outcomes: (1) use of ART and (2) HIV viral load ≤ 200 copies/mL for patients on ART. Overall, 986 patients (8 %) received care at multiple clinics. The likelihood of attending multiple clinics was greater for younger patients, women, blacks, persons with public insurance, and for individuals in their first year of care. Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, patients receiving care at multiple clinics were less likely to use ART (AOR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.55-0.71) and achieve HIV viral suppression (AOR = 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.94) than individuals using one clinic. Qualitative data are needed to understand the reasons for visiting multiple clinics.

  19. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls. PMID:23101561

  20. Using Interdisciplinary Arts Education to Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorimer, Maureen Reilly

    2009-01-01

    Amid crossing currents of educational expectations pressing on principals, the author advocates for enhancing inclusion of the visual and performing arts. Although electives and clubs provide arts exposure to a selected few, many students do not receive consistent and high-quality arts experiences. Carefully planned, interdisciplinary arts…

  1. Education and Arts Participation: A Study of Arts Socialization and Current Arts-Related Activities Using 1982 and 1992 SPPA Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orend, Richard J.; Keegan, Carol

    This monograph focuses on the relationship between pre-adult socialization in the arts and subsequent arts participation, as measured in the data collected in the 1992 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The study aims to increase understanding of art socialization experiences as they relate to…

  2. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  3. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.220 Who may receive intensive services? There are two categories of adults and dislocated workers who may receive intensive services: (a) Adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed,...

  4. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite China“s free antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent non-adherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent non-adherence (any missed ART in the past 4 weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent non-adherence. Male gender, lower education and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients“ educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities. PMID:24666239

  5. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Megan M; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Despite China's free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent nonadherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent nonadherence (any missed ART in the past four weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use, and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent nonadherence. Male gender, lower education, and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients' educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities.

  6. Some Books about Alaska Received in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of State Libraries.

    This annual bibliography of Alaska- and Arctic-related publications received by the Alaska Division of State Libraries is divided into three categories. There are 26 titles in the "Juvenile Fiction" section, 122 in the "Adult Non-Fiction" section, and 19 in the "Adult Fiction" section. Government publications are…

  7. The art of being healthy: a qualitative study to develop a thematic framework for understanding the relationship between health and the arts

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Christina R; Knuiman, Matthew; Wright, Peter; Rosenberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective In recent years the health–arts nexus has received increasing attention; however, the relationship is not well understood and the extent of possible positive, negative and unintended outcomes is unknown. Guided by the biopsychosocial model of health and theories of social epidemiology, the aim of this study was to develop a framework pertaining to the relationship between arts engagement and population health that included outcomes, confounders and effect modifiers. A health–arts framework is of value to researchers seeking to build the evidence base; health professionals interested in understanding the health–arts relationship, especially those who use social prescribing for health promotion or to complement treatments; in teaching medical, nursing and health-science students about arts outcomes, as well as artists and health professionals in the development of policy and programmes. Design A qualitative study was conducted. Semistructured interviews were analysed thematically. Setting Western Australia. Participants 33 Western Australian adults (18+ years). Participants were randomly selected from a pool of general population nominees who engaged in the arts for enjoyment, entertainment or as a hobby (response rate=100%). Results A thematic analysis was conducted using QSR-NVivo10. The resulting framework contained seven outcome themes and 63 subthemes. Three themes specifically related to health, that is, mental, social and physical health, while economic, knowledge, art and identity outcomes were classified as health determinants. Within each theme, positive, negative and unintended outcomes (subthemes) were identified and categorised as relating to the individual and/or to the community. A list of confounding and/or effect modifying factors, related to both the arts and health, was identified. Conclusions Given the increasing pressure on health resources, the arts have the potential to assist in the promotion of health and healing. This

  8. Helping dentists manage accounts receivable.

    PubMed

    Scott, J

    2001-01-01

    First Pacific Corporation (FPC) has worked with dental practices since 1961, providing personal services that optimize practice performance. In addition to being the premier service provider for administrative tasks in dental offices, they supply state-of-the-art hardware and accounts receivable management software. FPC designs and teaches practice development strategies, deliver on-site training, and much more. FPC is dedicated to the long-term professional success of dental clients, their staff, and their practices through a unique, integrated package of services. As a family-owned business, with headquarters in Salem, Oregon, FPC employs approximately two hundred staff who serve practices in twenty-two states.

  9. Americans Personal Participation in the Arts: 1992. A Monograph Describing the Data from the Survey of Public Participation in the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Monnie; Cherbo, Joni Maya

    This monograph examines the extent to which the U.S. adult population was involved in personal art participation in 1992, compares it to participation in 1982, and profiles personal arts participants. The National Endowment for the Arts attempted to determine the scope of adult public participation in the arts through the Surveys of Public…

  10. Putting the "receive" in accounts receivable.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, John W; Baum, Neil

    2006-01-01

    There isn't a practice in the United States that doesn't have a concern about accounts receivable. The financial success of any practice depends on the care and feeding of the accounts receivable. This is not an area of practice management that can be taken lightly or delegated to someone who is not attentive to detail and doggedly persistent. In this article, we will discuss how to identify problematic accounts receivable and what can be done to bring the accounts receivable under control. We will provide you with a plan of action that can be adopted by any practice regardless of size, number of physicians, or whether the practice uses in-house billing or outsources its billing arrangements.

  11. Loss to follow-up of adults in public HIV care systems in Mozambique: Identifying obstacles to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Micek, Mark A; Gimbel-Sherr, Kenneth; Baptista, Alberto João; Matediana, Eduardo; Montoya, Pablo; Pfeiffer, James; Melo, Armando; Gimbel-Sherr, Sarah; Johnson, Wendy; Gloyd, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) has expanded dramatically in resource-limited settings. Evaluating loss to follow-up from HIV testing through post-ART care can help identify obstacles to care. Methods Routine data was analyzed for adults receiving services in two public HIV care systems in central Mozambique. The proportion of people passing through the following steps was determined: (1) HIV testing, (2) enrollment at an ART clinic, (3) CD4 testing, (4) starting ART if eligible, and (5) adhering to ART. Results During the 12-month study period (2004–2005), an estimated 23,430 adults were tested for HIV, and 7,005 (29.9%) were HIV-positive. Only 3,956 (56.5%) of those HIV-positive enrolled at an ART clinic ≤30 days after testing. CD4 testing was obtained in 77.1% ≤30 days of enrollment. Of 1,506 eligible for ART, 471 (31.3%) started ART ≤90 days after CD4 testing. Of 382 with ≥180 days of potential follow-up time on ART, 317 (83.0%) had pharmacy-based adherence rates ≥90%. Discussion Substantial drop-offs were observed for each step between HIV testing and treatment, but were highest for referral from HIV testing to treatment sites and for starting ART. Interventions are needed to improve follow-up and ensure that people benefit from available HIV services. PMID:19550350

  12. Art & Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmulsky, Lucinda

    2009-01-01

    In July 2004, The National Endowment for the Arts released the results of a survey entitled "Reading at Risk." The survey covered a 20-year period from 1982 to 2002 and documented a dramatic decline in the reading of literary works by all age groups during that period. The steepest decline of 28 percent was found among the youngest age group of…

  13. Producing Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Describes an art activity for use in a unit on agriculture in which third grade students create packing crate labels. Students compare examples of packing crate labels, identifying the name, image, product description, and visual elements such as color and balance. Discusses the process of creating the labels. (CMK)

  14. Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukehart, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Whether one views art as a cultural record, a political or religious instrument, a celebration of form and color, or an instinctual force, it is a given that sharing diverse expressions of creativity with children plants fresh understandings and pathways for their own questions and drives. It is impossible to do justice to the many outstanding…

  15. Spanish Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Anne; Wilson, Mary Ellen

    1995-01-01

    Provides instructional strategies and materials designed to introduce students to Spanish art. Includes four lesson plans with student objectives, background information, and step-by-step instructional procedures. Also includes four full-page color reproductions of paintings by Murillo, Picasso, El Greco, and de Goya. (CFR)

  16. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    The language arts course content guides presented in this manual cover English, oral communications, and journalism in grades 9-12 and provide a framework from which a curriculum can be built. Within each subject area and at each grade level, skills are identified at three instructional levels: basic, developmental, and extension. The basic skills…

  17. Scanner Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworski, Joy; Murphy, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they incorporated environmental awareness into their art curriculum. Here, they describe a digital photography project in which their students used flatbed scanners as cameras. Their students composed their objects directly on the scanner. The lesson enabled students to realize that artists have voices…

  18. Nature's Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Vicki; And Others

    Over 60 art activities, designed to enhance environmental awareness and incorporate environmental concepts, are outlined in this document. A sample of the activities presented are: decorated notepaper and cards with feathers or weeds; wall plaques of prairie plants; methods of flower preservation; water plant prints; construction of dolls,…

  19. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  20. Chicken Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how a visit from a flock of chickens provided inspiration for the children's chicken art. The gentle clucking of the hens, the rooster crowing, and the softness of the feathers all provided rich aural, tactile, visual, and emotional experiences. The experience affirms the importance and value of direct…

  1. Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Paul L.

    Capitalizing on the resources available in an urban city block, this resource guide for the emotionally handicapped (K-6) presents a resource list and objectives and activities relative to teaching language arts (reading, English, listening, speaking, and writing). The resource list is comprised of approximately 150 physical facilities (e.g.,…

  2. Spaceborne receivers: Basic principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principles of operation of microwave receivers for space observations of planetary surfaces were examined. The design philosophy of the receiver as it is applied to operate functionally as an efficient receiving system, the principle of operation of the key components of the receiver, and the important differences among receiver types are explained. The operating performance and the sensitivity expectations for both the modulated and total power receiver configurations are outlined. The expressions are derived from first principles and are developed through the important intermediate stages to form practicle and easily applied equations. The transfer of thermodynamic energy from point to point within the receiver is illustrated. The language of microwave receivers is applied statistics.

  3. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  4. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.; Hansen, Leif J.; Evans, David B.

    1985-01-01

    A receiver for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700.degree.-900.degree. C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  5. High rates of virological failure and drug resistance in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving lifelong antiretroviral therapy in routine clinics in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Mounerou; Dagnra, Anoumou Y; Butel, Christelle; Vidal, Nicole; Serrano, Laetitia; Takassi, Elom; Konou, Abla A; Houndenou, Spero; Dapam, Nina; Singo-Tokofaï, Assetina; Pitche, Palokinam; Atakouma, Yao; Prince-David, Mireille; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been scaled up over the last decade but compared to adults, children living with HIV are less likely to receive ART. Moreover, children and adolescents are more vulnerable than adults to virological failure (VF) and emergence of drug resistance. In this study we determined virological outcome in perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents receiving ART in Togo. Methods HIV viral load (VL) testing was consecutively proposed to all children and adolescents who were on ART for at least 12 months when attending HIV healthcare services for their routine follow-up visit (June to September 2014). Plasma HIV-1 VL was measured using the m2000 RealTime HIV-1 assay (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA). Genotypic drug resistance was done for all samples with VL>1000 copies/ml. Results and discussion Among 283 perinatally HIV-1-infected children and adolescents included, 167 (59%) were adolescents and 116 (41%) were children. The median duration on ART was 48 months (interquartile range: 28 to 68 months). For 228 (80.6%), the current ART combination consisted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) (zidovudine and lamivudine) and one non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) (nevirapine or efavirenz). Only 28 (9.9%) were on a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen. VL was below the detection limit (i.e. 40 copies/ml) for 102 (36%), between 40 and 1000 copies/ml for 35 (12.4%) and above 1000 copies/ml for 146 (51.6%). Genotypic drug-resistance testing was successful for 125/146 (85.6%); 110/125 (88.0%) were resistant to both NRTIs and NNRTIs, 1/125 (0.8%) to NRTIs only, 4/125 (3.2%) to NNRTIs only and three harboured viruses resistant to reverse transcriptase and PIs. Overall, 86% (108/125) of children and adolescents experiencing VF and successfully genotyped, corresponding thus to at least 38% of the study population, had either no effective ART or had only a single effective drug in

  6. Insights Gained into Arts and Smarts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Findings released this week from three years of studies by neuroscientists and psychologists at seven universities help amplify scientists' understanding of how training in the arts might contribute to improving the general thinking skills of children and adults. The idea that the arts, and music in particular, could make children smarter in other…

  7. Handbook of Art Therapy. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Providing a complete overview of art therapy, from theory and research to practical applications, this is the definitive handbook in the field. Leading practitioners demonstrate the nuts and bolts of arts-based intervention with children, adults, families, couples, and groups dealing with a wide range of clinical issues. Rich with illustrative…

  8. Identification of the Gifted in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalker, Martha Zola

    1981-01-01

    Using 103 adult art students, this study sought to develop a theoretical model for identifying those gifted in art, based on the hypothesis that cognitive complexity, executive skill in drawing, and affective intensity correlate significantly with behaviors consistent with artistic success. Results confirmed the importance and measurability of…

  9. Teaching the Art and Craft of Giving and Receiving Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, Patricia L.; Roebuck, Deborah Britt

    2010-01-01

    In the workplace, the process of evaluating and discussing the performance of both employees and managers is referred to as feedback. The process generally involves a discussion of the individual's strengths or weaknesses, with suggestions on how to improve upon weaknesses. Feedback aligns workplace behavior with the overall goals of a team or an…

  10. Snow Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    It was nearing the end of a very long, rough winter with a lot of snow and too little time to play outside. The snow had formed small hills and valleys over the bushes and this was at the perfect height for the students to paint. In this article, the author describes how her transitional first-grade students created snow art paintings. (Contains 1…

  11. Art Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A new class of polyimides, synthesized by Langley Research Center, has been evaluated by the Getty Conservation Institute's Materials Science Group for possible art conservation applications. Polyimides are noted for resistance to high temperature, wear and radiation. They are thermally stable and soluble in some common solvents. After testing under simulated exposures for changes in color, permeability and flexibility, one coating, ODPA-3, 3-ODA may be used to protect bronze statues from corrosion. A test on stained glass windows was unsuccessful.

  12. The Art of Teaching Art in Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikoltsos, Catherine

    The role of arts education has been receiving increasing emphasis in early childhood education. This paper maintains that teaching itself may be considered an artistic, creative activity in the following ways: (1) teaching presents an artistic performance to the student; (2) the teacher has to make judgments during the course of instruction; (3)…

  13. All About Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Ronald H.

    This is an experimental textbook for teaching about the visual arts at the elementary level. The content answers five questions about art: what is art; who makes art; what are the sources for art; why is art important to you; and why is art important to society. At the end of each section of the text is a set of questions and suggestions for…

  14. Arts Education in America: What the Declines Mean for Arts Participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #52

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabkin, Nick; Hedberg, E. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPAs), conducted for the National Endowment for the Arts, have shown a steady decline in the rates of adult attendance at most "benchmark" arts events--specifically, classical music and jazz concerts, musical and non-musical plays, opera, and ballet performances--as well as declines in other forms…

  15. Artful Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2012-01-01

    It is no secret that America is overweight. A record number of children are obese and are showing signs of adult diseases such as high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, people are recognizing this and beginning to do something about it: (1) restaurants and markets are offering healthier options; (2) menus are starting to list…

  16. Breaking the silos: The art documentation suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-23

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that the training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work, too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.

  17. Breaking the Silos: The art Documentation Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-01

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that the training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work; too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.

  18. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from art therapy? Art therapy is practiced in mental health, rehabilitation, medical, educational, forensic, wellness, private practice and community settings with diverse client populations in ...

  19. Age and Arts Participation, with a Focus on the Baby Boom Cohort. Research Division Report #34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Richard A.; And Others

    Using data taken from the National Endowment for the Arts' Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) which were conducted in 1982 and 1992, this report looks at the effect of age on adult arts participation in seven benchmark or core art forms: classical music, opera, ballet, musicals, jazz, plays, and art museums. The report examines the…

  20. Hybrid receiver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M. S.; Mcadam, P. L.; Saunders, O. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a 4 month study to design a hybrid analog/digital receiver for outer planet mission probe communication links. The scope of this study includes functional design of the receiver; comparisons between analog and digital processing; hardware tradeoffs for key components including frequency generators, A/D converters, and digital processors; development and simulation of the processing algorithms for acquisition, tracking, and demodulation; and detailed design of the receiver in order to determine its size, weight, power, reliability, and radiation hardness. In addition, an evaluation was made of the receiver's capabilities to perform accurate measurement of signal strength and frequency for radio science missions.

  1. Data-fusion receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Gabelmann, Jeffrey M.; Kattner, J. Stephen; Houston, Robert A.

    2006-12-19

    This invention is an ultra-low frequency electromagnetic telemetry receiver which fuses multiple input receive sources to synthesize a decodable message packet from a noise corrupted telemetry message string. Each block of telemetry data to be sent to the surface receiver from a borehole tool is digitally encoded into a data packet prior to transmission. The data packet is modulated onto the ULF EM carrier wave and transmitted from the borehole to the surface and then are simultaneously detected by multiple receive sensors disbursed within the rig environment. The receive sensors include, but are not limited to, electric field and magnetic field sensors. The spacing of the surface receive elements is such that noise generators are unequally coupled to each receive element due to proximity and/or noise generator type (i.e. electric or magnetic field generators). The receiver utilizes a suite of decision metrics to reconstruct the original, non noise-corrupted data packet from the observation matrix via the estimation of individual data frames. The receiver will continue this estimation process until: 1) the message validates, or 2) a preset "confidence threshold" is reached whereby frames within the observation matrix are no longer "trusted".

  2. The Arts, Language and the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.; Eisner, Elliot W.

    1987-01-01

    The human species excel in the exquisite use of symbols. The sending and receiving of sophisticated messages sets humans apart from all other creatures on planet earth. The arts are one of mankind's most visual and most essential forms of language; and if children are not educated in the symbol system called the arts, they will lose not only their…

  3. Children's Art Carnival Creative Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercado, Aurea A.

    The implementation of the Children's Art Carnival Creative Reading Program in New York City is evaluated in terms of the services it was designed to provide to 210 Title I eligible children in grades 2 to 5 who were at least one grade behind in reading. Children in the program attended the Art Carnival twice a week and received instruction from…

  4. Conversations about Visual Arts: Facilitating Oral Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ni; Cress, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Visual arts, such as drawings, are attractive to most young children. Marks left on paper by young children contain meaning. Although it is known that children's oral language could be enhanced through communication with adults, rarely is there a series of dialogues between adults and young children about their drawings. Often heard instead…

  5. Literacy, Museums and the Arts: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Claire, Comp.

    This document presents a total of 130 references and annotations of works that are related to the topic of adult learning through museums or through the arts in general. Although not all of the materials cited focus specifically on adult models or experiences, all pertain to education in and through museums, art education theory and practice,…

  6. Fine Arts: Secondary Visual Arts Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This guide to Utah's requirements for students in secondary visual arts is organized and based upon a student achievement portfolio for each course. Foundation I, the required junior high/middle school visual arts course, is designed to provide an overview of visual arts while studying various art tools and materials. With an emphasis on studio…

  7. History and Art: The Heart of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B; And Others

    Learning to appreciate religious art and to understand the interdependence of history and art are basic to the foundations of culture. Students need to be exposed to the art of the diverse adherents of all major religions in order to understand the beliefs and practices of others. Students can examine religious art from ancient times, including…

  8. Art Supply Inventors. Children's Art Diary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2001-01-01

    Discusses types of art materials that children enjoy using in their artworks. Explores the art materials such as tasty art supplies, such as candy; peeled supplies, such as pencil shavings; sticky art supplies, such as Band-Aids; and fast-food supplies, such as forks and spoons. (CMK)

  9. Small Art Images--Big Art Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pam

    2005-01-01

    When small art images are incorporated into the curriculum, students are afforded opportunities to slow down, observe minute details, and communicate ideas about art and artists. This sort of purposeful art contemplation takes students beyond the day-to-day educational practice. It is through these sorts of art activities that students develop…

  10. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  11. Ka Band Channelized Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    conversion architecture and the digital signal processing platform to be used. The system, which is composed entirely of commercial-off- the-shelf (COTS......art in digital signal processing hardware and software algorithms. RF commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts are selected in order to develop a system

  12. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  13. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  14. Imagining and Engaging Difference in the Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kimberly F.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on power, difference and knowledge, areas critical to adult education. It conveys insights into how educators and curators in an art museum imagined and engaged with difference, and particularly the black subject, when working within a collaborative project that included the acquisition of art objects (fine art photography).…

  15. Digital Signal Processing Based Biotelemetry Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Avtar; Hines, John; Somps, Chris

    1997-01-01

    This is an attempt to develop a biotelemetry receiver using digital signal processing technology and techniques. The receiver developed in this work is based on recovering signals that have been encoded using either Pulse Position Modulation (PPM) or Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) technique. A prototype has been developed using state-of-the-art digital signal processing technology. A Printed Circuit Board (PCB) is being developed based on the technique and technology described here. This board is intended to be used in the UCSF Fetal Monitoring system developed at NASA. The board is capable of handling a variety of PPM and PCM signals encoding signals such as ECG, temperature, and pressure. A signal processing program has also been developed to analyze the received ECG signal to determine heart rate. This system provides a base for using digital signal processing in biotelemetry receivers and other similar applications.

  16. Advanced heat receiver conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesseli, James; Saunders, Roger; Batchelder, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Solar Dynamic space power systems are candidate electrical power generating systems for future NASA missions. One of the key components of the solar dynamic power system is the solar receiver/thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem. Receiver development was conducted by NASA in the late 1960's and since then a very limited amount of work has been done in this area. Consequently the state of the art (SOA) receivers designed for the IOC space station are large and massive. The objective of the Advanced Heat Receiver Conceptual Design Study is to conceive and analyze advanced high temperature solar dynamic Brayton and Stirling receivers. The goal is to generate innovative receiver concepts that are half of the mass, smaller, and more efficient than the SOA. It is also necessary that these innovative receivers offer ease of manufacturing, less structural complexity and fewer thermal stress problems. Advanced Brayton and Stirling receiver storage units are proposed and analyzed in this study which can potentially meet these goals.

  17. Ultrasonic pulser-receiver

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Steven C.

    2006-09-12

    Ultrasonic pulser-receiver circuitry, for use with an ultrasonic transducer, the circuitry comprising a circuit board; ultrasonic pulser circuitry supported by the circuit board and configured to be coupled to an ultrasonic transducer and to cause the ultrasonic transducer to emit an ultrasonic output pulse; receiver circuitry supported by the circuit board, coupled to the pulser circuitry, including protection circuitry configured to protect against the ultrasonic pulse and including amplifier circuitry configured to amplify an echo, received back by the transducer, of the output pulse; and a connector configured to couple the ultrasonic transducer directly to the circuit board, to the pulser circuitry and receiver circuitry, wherein impedance mismatches that would result if the transducer was coupled to the circuit board via a cable can be avoided.

  18. Solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Jacob

    1978-01-01

    An improved long-life design for solar energy receivers provides for greatly reduced thermally induced stress and permits the utilization of less expensive heat exchanger materials while maintaining receiver efficiencies in excess of 85% without undue expenditure of energy to circulate the working fluid. In one embodiment, the flow index for the receiver is first set as close as practical to a value such that the Graetz number yields the optimal heat transfer coefficient per unit of pumping energy, in this case, 6. The convective index for the receiver is then set as closely as practical to two times the flow index so as to obtain optimal efficiency per unit mass of material.

  19. Project Echo: Receiving System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, E. A.

    1961-01-01

    A tracking horn-reflector antenna, a maser preamplifier (and standby parametric preamplifier), and a special FM demodulator were combined to form a low-noise receiving system which made possible the establishment of a high-quality voice circuit via the Echo I passive satellite. This paper describes the 2390-Mc receiving system located at the Bell Telephone Laboratories facility in Holmdel, New Jersey.

  20. Advanced Solar Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Low thermal efficiencies in solar receivers are discussed in terms of system design. It is recommended that careful attention be given to the overall thermal systems design, especially to conductive losses about the window and areas of relatively thin insulation. If the cavity design is carefully managed to insure a small, minimally reradiating aperture, the goal of a very high efficiency cavity receiver is a realistic one.

  1. OCD RADIO ALERT RECEIVERS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    for methods of operating a radioalert system were established in conjunction with OCD representatives. Four types of operation were selected. Three...models each of these four receiver types were fabricated and tested. The total of 12 laboratory models were delivered to OCD . Test equipment...suitable for demonstrating the two most promising receiver types was also assembled, and delivered to OCD . A preliminary analysis of the cost of mass

  2. Central solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M. Kevin

    1983-01-01

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  3. Tuberculosis incidence rate and risk factors among HIV-infected adults with access to antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Enju; MAKUBI, Abel; DRAIN, Paul; SPIEGELMAN, Donna; SANDO, David; LI, Nan; CHALAMILLA, Guerino; SUDFELD, Christopher R.; HERTZMARK, Ellen; FAWZI, Wafaie W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence rate and risk factors of tuberculosis (TB) among HIV-infected adults accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Tanzania. Design A prospective observational study among HIV-infected adults attending 47 HIV clinics in Dar es Salaam. Methods We estimated TB incidence rates among HIV-infected patients prior to and after ART initiation. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to determine the predictors of incident TB among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the HIV care and treatment program. Results We assessed 67,686 patients for a median follow-up period of 24 (interquartile range: 8–49) months; 7,602 patients were diagnosed with active TB. The TB incidence rate was 7.9 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 7.6–8.2)/100 person-years prior to ART initiation, and 4.4(95%CI, 4.2–4.4)/100 person-years for patients receiving ART. In multivariate analyses, patients on ART in the first 3 months had a 57% higher risk of TB (Hazard Ratio:1.57, 95%CI:1.47–1.68) compared to those not on ART, but the risk significantly decreased with increasing duration of ART. Risk factors for incident TB included being male, having low body mass index or middle upper arm circumference, lower CD4 cell count, and advanced WHO disease stage. There was seasonal variation for incident TB, with higher risk observed following the rainy seasons (May, June, and November). Conclusion In TB endemic regions, HIV-infected patients initiating ART, particularly males and those with poor nutritional status, should be closely monitored for active TB in the months following ART initiation. In addition to increasing the access to ART, interventions should be considered to improve nutritional status among HIV-infected patients. PMID:26091295

  4. National ART Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2: ART Cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos What are the steps for an ART cycle ... 37MB] Section 3: ART Cycles using frozen nondonor embryos Did implantation rates differ by a woman’s age? [ ...

  5. Funding the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Douglas P.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA), its birth, growth, and uncertain future, are examined. What the arts community is doing to insure a national arts environment is discussed. (RM)

  6. American Art Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... more My AATA Collaborate Types & Benefits Local Chapters Education Art Therapy Education ...Read more Educational Standards Approved Art Therapy Master’s ... Art Therapy Credentials Board (ATCB) Institute for Continuing Education (ICE) Ethics Multicultural Conference Conference Information ...Read more ...

  7. Teaching Art with Art: Grotesque Visions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses a type of visual art called grotesque art and includes four different examples of grotesque art: (1) the painting "Head of Medusa" by Peter Paul Rubens; (2) Rangda, the widow witch from Bali (Indonesia); (3) totem poles; and (4) grotesque sculptures from the Cathedral of Notre Dame (Paris, France). (CMK)

  8. Arts Impact: Lessons from ArtsBridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimshon-Santo, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Arts Impact summarizes lessons learned at the ArtsBridge Program. It is informed by in-depth participant observation, logic modeling, and quantitative evaluation of program impact on K-12 students in inner city schools and arts students at the University of California Los Angeles over a two year period. The case study frames its analysis through a…

  9. Keeping the Arts Alive: Fine Arts Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    When budgets are tightened, the school library media specialists and/or the arts programs are often considered expendable. No Child Left Behind legislation means increasing academic time for core subjects, which translates into cutting time for arts education. As money becomes tight, frills are cut (i.e., the arts). Schools don't seem able to fill…

  10. The Liberal Arts and the Martial Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Donald N.

    1984-01-01

    Liberal arts and the martial arts are compared from the perspective that courses of training in the martial arts often constitute exemplary educational programs and are worth examining closely. Program characteristics, individual characteristics fostered by them, the relationship between liberal and utilitarian learning, and the moral…

  11. The Art of Teaching Art Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit

    1999-01-01

    Examines the conceptions of educating beginning art teachers with specific reference to Canadian art education. Addresses the use of the visual journal, which demonstrates visual and verbal thinking, by preservice teachers at the University of British Columbia as a means to develop an artistic understanding of their growth as art teachers. (CMK)

  12. Olympus beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostergaard, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A medium-size Beacon Receiving System for reception and processing of the B1 (20 GHz) and B2 (30 GHz) beacons from Olympus has been developed. Integration of B1 and B2 receiving equipment into one system using one antenna and a common computer for control and data processing provides the advantages of a compact configuration and synchronization of the two receiver chains. Range for co-polar signal attenuation meaurement is about 30 dB for both beacons, increasing to 40 dB for B2 if the receivers are synchronized to B1. The accuracy is better than 0.5 dB. Cross-polarization discriminations of the order of 10 to 30 dB may be determined with an accuracy of 1 to 2 dB. A number of radiometers for complementary measurements of atmospheric attenuation of 13 to 30 GHz has also been constructed. A small multi-frequency system for operation around 22 GHz and 31 GHz is presently under development.

  13. Received Pronunciation and "Realphonetik."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibles, Warren

    1995-01-01

    This article argues that British Received Pronunciation (RP) is inconsistently defined, arbitrary, and anachronistic, and that it should be replaced as an instructional concept by British Pronunciation (BP), which would be based on an actual and adequate descriptive phonetics, called here "Realphonetik." Contains 77 references. (MDM)

  14. Help Seeking and Receiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadler, Arie

    Although social psychology has always had an interest in helping behavior, only recently has the full complexity of helping relations begun to be researched. Help seeking and receiving in the educational setting raise many issues regarding the use and effectiveness of the help itself. Central to all helping relations is the seeking/receiving…

  15. Submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Ward, John (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In an embodiment, a submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver includes a finline ortho-mode transducer comprising thin tapered metallic fins deposited on a thin dielectric substrate to separate a vertically polarized electromagnetic mode from a horizontally polarized electromagnetic mode. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  16. Zero-power receiver

    DOEpatents

    Brocato, Robert W.

    2016-10-04

    An unpowered signal receiver and a method for signal reception detects and responds to very weak signals using pyroelectric devices as impedance transformers and/or demodulators. In some embodiments, surface acoustic wave devices (SAW) are also used. Illustrative embodiments include satellite and long distance terrestrial communications applications.

  17. Hanson receives Macelwane Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Hanson, David R.

    At the 1996 Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, David R. Hanson received the 1996 James B. Macelwane Medal, which recognizes significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability. The medal citation and Hanson's response are given here.

  18. A digital beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransome, Peter D.

    1988-01-01

    A digital satellite beacon receiver is described which provides measurement information down to a carrier/noise density ratio approximately 15 dB below that required by a conventional (phase locked loop) design. When the beacon signal fades, accuracy degrades gracefully, and is restored immediately (without hysteresis) on signal recovery, even if the signal has faded into the noise. Benefits of the digital processing approach used include the minimization of operator adjustments, stability of the phase measuring circuits with time, repeatability between units, and compatibility with equipment not specifically designed for propagation measuring. The receiver has been developed for the European Olympus satellite which has continuous wave (CW) beacons at 12.5 and 29.7 GHz, and a switched polarization beacon at 19.8 GHz approximately, but the system can be reconfigured for CW and polarization-switched beacons at other frequencies.

  19. Therapeutic Recreation and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    1993-01-01

    Therapeutic recreation is a means of empowering individuals with disabilities through arts or sports. The field has developed differently in the United States and the United Kingdom; the former emphasizes professionalization and the latter the right to adult education. (SK)

  20. The Themis solar receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravrand, J. M.; Pouget-Abadie, X.

    The theoretical modeling, materials, and design of the central receiver heat exchanger on the tower of the Themis solar power plant are presented. The receiver was conceived based on the incident solar flux at different times of the day and year and the efficiency of transferring the heat to molten salts. The square aperture admits energy at a peak rate of 3.402 MWth at some points, with heat transfer to the power loop resulting in a maximum efficiency of 25 percent. Optimization studies indicated a receiver inclined 30 deg from the horizontal to face the heliostat field, and the flux incident on the walls was mapped. Tubes filled with the salts at 250 C form the walls behind radiator fins and elevate the salt to temperatures up to a limit of 490 C. Measures taken to allow for the expansion of the cavity walls and to mount the heat exchange tubes for easy replacement are described, along with the instrumentation to measure performance, flux, and detect malfunctions due to perturbations in the fluid flow or failure of any of the components.

  1. Integrating the Visual Arts--Building Young Children's Knowledge, Skills, and Confidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jill Englebright; Diffily, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    Explores the visual arts as a means to develop skills and abilities across the curriculum and nurture aesthetic development. Considers benefits of art for socioemotional, psychomotor, and cognitive development; integration of art into the curriculum; and the role of adults, children's books, and the classroom for encouraging art appreciation.…

  2. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chloe E.; Robbins, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Art therapists have long held that art production causes reductions in stress and elevations in mood (Rubin, 1999). The authors examined this claim in a randomized, controlled trial. Fifty adults between the ages of 18 and 30 were randomly assigned to either create an art work or to view and sort a series of art prints. Three measures of overall…

  3. Breaking the silos: The art documentation suite

    DOE PAGES

    Kutschke, Robert K.

    2015-12-23

    The art event-processing framework is used by almost all new experiments at Fermilab, and by several outside of Fermilab. All use art as an external product in the same sense that the compiler, ROOT, Geant4, CLHEP and boost are external products. The art team has embarked on a campaign to document art and develop training materials for new users. Many new users of art have little or no knowledge of C++, software engineering, build systems or the many external packages used by art or their experiments, such as ROOT, CLHEP, HEPPDT, and boost. To effectively teach art requires that themore » training materials include appropriate introductions to these topics as they are encountered. Experience has shown that simply referring readers to the existing native documentation does not work, too often a simple idea that they need to understand is described in a context that presumes prerequisites that are unimportant for a beginning user of art. There is the additional complication that the training materials must be presented in a way that does not presume knowledge of any of the experiments using art. Finally, new users of art arrive at random times throughout the year and the training materials must allow them to start to learn art at any time. This presentation will explain the strategies adopted by the art team to develop a documentation suite that complies with these boundary conditions. It will also show the present status of the documentation suite, including feedback the art team has received from pilot users.« less

  4. How Art Changes Your Brain: Differential Effects of Visual Art Production and Cognitive Art Evaluation on Functional Brain Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Bolwerk, Anne; Mack-Andrick, Jessica; Lang, Frieder R.; Dörfler, Arnd; Maihöfner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Visual art represents a powerful resource for mental and physical well-being. However, little is known about the underlying effects at a neural level. A critical question is whether visual art production and cognitive art evaluation may have different effects on the functional interplay of the brain's default mode network (DMN). We used fMRI to investigate the DMN of a non-clinical sample of 28 post-retirement adults (63.71 years ±3.52 SD) before (T0) and after (T1) weekly participation in two different 10-week-long art interventions. Participants were randomly assigned to groups stratified by gender and age. In the visual art production group 14 participants actively produced art in an art class. In the cognitive art evaluation group 14 participants cognitively evaluated artwork at a museum. The DMN of both groups was identified by using a seed voxel correlation analysis (SCA) in the posterior cingulated cortex (PCC/preCUN). An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was employed to relate fMRI data to psychological resilience which was measured with the brief German counterpart of the Resilience Scale (RS-11). We observed that the visual art production group showed greater spatial improvement in functional connectivity of PCC/preCUN to the frontal and parietal cortices from T0 to T1 than the cognitive art evaluation group. Moreover, the functional connectivity in the visual art production group was related to psychological resilience (i.e., stress resistance) at T1. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the neural effects of visual art production on psychological resilience in adulthood. PMID:24983951

  5. How art changes your brain: differential effects of visual art production and cognitive art evaluation on functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bolwerk, Anne; Mack-Andrick, Jessica; Lang, Frieder R; Dörfler, Arnd; Maihöfner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Visual art represents a powerful resource for mental and physical well-being. However, little is known about the underlying effects at a neural level. A critical question is whether visual art production and cognitive art evaluation may have different effects on the functional interplay of the brain's default mode network (DMN). We used fMRI to investigate the DMN of a non-clinical sample of 28 post-retirement adults (63.71 years ±3.52 SD) before (T0) and after (T1) weekly participation in two different 10-week-long art interventions. Participants were randomly assigned to groups stratified by gender and age. In the visual art production group 14 participants actively produced art in an art class. In the cognitive art evaluation group 14 participants cognitively evaluated artwork at a museum. The DMN of both groups was identified by using a seed voxel correlation analysis (SCA) in the posterior cingulated cortex (PCC/preCUN). An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was employed to relate fMRI data to psychological resilience which was measured with the brief German counterpart of the Resilience Scale (RS-11). We observed that the visual art production group showed greater spatial improvement in functional connectivity of PCC/preCUN to the frontal and parietal cortices from T0 to T1 than the cognitive art evaluation group. Moreover, the functional connectivity in the visual art production group was related to psychological resilience (i.e., stress resistance) at T1. Our findings are the first to demonstrate the neural effects of visual art production on psychological resilience in adulthood.

  6. Women, Art, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Georgia; Sandell, Renee

    Sex equity issues and efforts in art and art education are examined in five major focus areas: (1) "Matters of Conscious and Consciousness" deals with problematic relationships between women, art and education. (2) "Matters of Protest and Progress" explores the sex equity progress made in art and education. (3) "Matters of Herstory and Heritage"…

  7. Soviet Arts Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego County Office of Education, CA.

    This extensive curriculum guide was written in conjunction with the San Diego Arts Festival of Soviet Arts in 1989. It aimed to provide teachers with insights and ideas about arts in the Soviet Union before, during, and after the Arts Festival. A curriculum model is presented at the beginning of the guide to illustrate how the lessons were…

  8. Cultivating Demand for the Arts: Arts Learning, Arts Engagement, and State Arts Policy. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakaras, Laura; Lowell, Julia F.

    2008-01-01

    The findings summarized in this report are intended to shed light on what it means to cultivate demand for the arts, why it is necessary and important to cultivate this demand, and what state arts agencies (SAAs) and other arts and education policymakers can do to help. The research considered only the benchmark arts central to public policy:…

  9. Spotlight on Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    In this annual edition selected cultural arts organizations from across the state are featured, with a specific focus on how these organizations have aided local school systems as they implemented the arts education component of North Carolina's Basic Education Program. The following arts organizations are featured: Winston-Salem Arts Council;…

  10. Art and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Since the nineteenth century's interest in "art for art's sake," many thinkers have argued that art would supplant traditional religion as the spiritual locus of the increasingly secular society of Western modernity. If art can capture the sort of spirituality, idealism, and expressive community of traditional religions but without being ensnared…

  11. Winter Art Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Timo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Department of Art Education at the University of Lapland in Finland has developed winter art as a method of environmental and community-based art education. I will focus on the Snow Show Winter Art Education Project, a training project funded by the European Union and the State Provincial Office…

  12. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  13. Arts Inspire Community Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dan W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Southeastern Community College's efforts to focus on the arts, which included a campus visit by the artist Kenneth Larson and events centered on his Heroic Individual prints; a performing arts series supported by local corporations; an Associate in Fine Arts degree; regular art exhibits; and an artist-in-residence program. (DMM)

  14. Art, Reading . . . and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidenberg, Irving

    1979-01-01

    Interdisciplinary programs which use art to improve or enhance another subject are being developed, perhaps in an attempt to save art education in an era of budget constraints. It is suggested that this trend must not be allowed to destroy the magic of art for art's sake. (KC)

  15. Art Mini-Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Charlotte

    1976-01-01

    The idea of an open art studio or art mini-course to serve a need above and beyond the regularly scheduled art classes is important and necessary to a school program that is designed to meet the needs of the general intellectual and cultural growth of the child. Describes the art mini-course introduced at the Willow Ridge School in Tonawanda, New…

  16. Cultural Arts Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistone, Kathleen A.

    The handbook presents activities to aid elementary school classroom teachers as they develop and implement cultural arts lessons. A cultural arts program is interpreted as a way to help students develop perceptual awareness, build a basic vocabulary in some art cultural form, evaluate their own works of art, appreciate creative expressions, and…

  17. The Language of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winarski, Diana L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes activities of kindergarten through grade-four students in an art classroom that emphasizes expression of creative process along with the product. Explores interconnections between art, thinking, and writing as expressed by a former language arts teacher who transfers her knowledge of language, words, and creative expression to art. (BAC)

  18. K-12 Art Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furney, Trudy; And Others

    The development of students in various art fields is the focus of this K-12 art curriculum guide. The philosophy of the art program and the roles of administrator, teacher, and parent are outlined. The underlying school community relationships, and the objective, goals, and purposes of art education are described. Phases of child development in…

  19. LANL receiver system development

    SciTech Connect

    Laubscher, B.; Cooke, B.; Cafferty, M.; Olivas, N.

    1997-08-01

    The CALIOPE receiver system development at LANL is the story of two technologies. The first of these technologies consists of off-the-shelf mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) detectors and amplifiers. The vendor for this system is Kolmar Technologies. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer I (TTI) in 1995 and will be referred to in this paper as GEN I. The second system consists of a MCT detector procured from Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC) and an amplifier designed and built by LANL. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer II (TTII) system at the NTS tests in 1996 and will be referred to as GEN II. The LANL CALIOPE experimental plan for 1996 was to improve the lidar system by progressing to a higher rep rate laser to perform many shots in a much shorter period of time. In keeping with this plan, the receiver team set a goal of developing a detector system that was background limited for the projected 100 nanosecond (ns) laser pulse. A set of detailed simulations of the DIAL lidar experiment was performed. From these runs, parameters such as optimal detector size, field of view of the receiver system, nominal laser return power, etc. were extracted. With this information, detector physics and amplifier electronic models were developed to obtain the required specifications for each of these components. These derived specs indicated that a substantial improvement over commercially available, off-the-shelf, amplifier and detector technologies would be needed to obtain the goals. To determine if the original GEN I detector was usable, the authors performed tests on a 100 micron square detector at cryogenic temperatures. The results of this test and others convinced them that an advanced detector was required. Eventually, a suitable detector was identified and a number of these single element detectors were procured from SBRC. These single element detectors were witness for the detector arrays built for another DOE project.

  20. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  1. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-09-06

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, [+-] UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 16 figs.

  2. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  3. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-06-04

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, {+-}UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 21 figs.

  4. Custom accounts receivable modeling.

    PubMed

    Veazie, J

    1994-04-01

    In hospital and clinic management, accounts are valued as units and handled equally--a $20 account receives the same minimum number of statements as a $20,000 account. Quite often, the sheer number of accounts a hospital or clinic has to handle forces executives to manage accounts by default and failure--accounts mature on an aging track and, if left unpaid by patients, eventually are sent to collections personnel. Of the bad-debt accounts placed with collections agencies, many are misclassified as charity or hardship cases, while others could be collected by hospital or clinic staff with a limited amount of additional effort.

  5. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  6. Holography: science and art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Pierre M.

    1998-09-01

    Art and science are separated by a very large distance nowadays. Long ago, e.g. in Renaissance, or even earlier, in classic Greece and Rome, or still earlier in Egypt or Mesopotamia, arts and sciences were united. Today they seem to go separate paths: science for the industry, arts for the gallery. Holography is an exception: no art without science, but also no science without art.

  7. Weather Data Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Northern Video Graphics, Inc. developed a low-cost satellite receiving system for users such as independent meteorologists, agribusiness firms, small airports or flying clubs, marine vessels and small TV stations. Called Video Fax, it is designed for use with certain satellites; the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Space Agency's Meteosat and Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite. By dictum of the World Meteorological Organization, signals from satellites are available to anyone without cost so the Video Fax user can acquire signals directly from the satellite and cut out the middle man, enabling savings. Unit sells for about one-fifth the cost of the equipment used by TV stations. It consists of a two-meter antenna; a receiver; a microprocessor-controlled display computer; and a video monitor. Computer stores data from the satellites and converts it to an image which is displayed on the monitor. Weather map can be preserved as signal data on tape, or it can be stored in a video cassette as a permanent image.

  8. Schottky Heterodyne Receivers With Full Waveguide Bandwidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesler, Jeffrey; Crowe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Compact THz receivers with broad bandwidth and low noise have been developed for the frequency range from 100 GHz to 1 THz. These receivers meet the requirements for high-resolution spectroscopic studies of planetary atmospheres (including the Earth s) from spacecraft, as well as airborne and balloon platforms. The ongoing research is significant not only for the development of Schottky mixers, but also for the creation of a receiver system, including the LO chain. The new receivers meet the goals of high sensitivity, compact size, low total power requirement, and operation across complete waveguide bands. The exceptional performance makes these receivers ideal for the broader range of scientific and commercial applications. These include the extension of sophisticated test and measurement equipment to 1 THz and the development of low-cost imaging systems for security applications and industrial process monitoring. As a particular example, a WR-1.9SHM (400-600 GHz) has been developed (see Figure 1), with state-of-the-art noise temperature ranging from 1,000-1,800 K (DSB) over the full waveguide band. Also, a Vector Network Analyzer extender has been developed (see Figure 2) for the WR1.5 waveguide band (500 750 GHz) with 100-dB dynamic range.

  9. Socioeconomic Predictors of Adherence Behavior Among HIV-Positive Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abdulrahman, Surajudeen Abiola; Rampal, Lekhraj; Othman, Norlijah; Ibrahim, Faisal; Kadir Shahar, Hayati; Radhakrishnan, Anuradha P

    2017-04-01

    Medication adherence remains a critical link between the prescribed ART regimen and treatment outcome. Several factors may influence adherence behavior. This cross-sectional study aimed to highlight socioeconomic predictors of adherence behavior among a cohort of 242 adult Malaysian patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Hospital Sungai Buloh, Malaysia, where they were enrolled in a parent study (single-blinded randomized controlled trial) between January and December 2014. Statistical analysis of secondary data on adherence behavior and sociodemographic characteristics of the patients revealed mean age of 33.4 years and ranged from 18 to 64 years; 88.8% were males. A total of 224 (93%) patients who completed 6 months' adherence assessment were included in the model. Of these, 135 (60.3%) achieved optimal adherence. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed that patient's income and ethnicity were significant predictors of adherence behavior. This may be valuable for targeted programmatic interventions to further enhance successful treatment outcomes among the target population.

  10. Digital Receiver Phase Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcin, Martin; Abramovici, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The software of a commercially available digital radio receiver has been modified to make the receiver function as a two-channel low-noise phase meter. This phase meter is a prototype in the continuing development of a phase meter for a system in which radiofrequency (RF) signals in the two channels would be outputs of a spaceborne heterodyne laser interferometer for detecting gravitational waves. The frequencies of the signals could include a common Doppler-shift component of as much as 15 MHz. The phase meter is required to measure the relative phases of the signals in the two channels at a sampling rate of 10 Hz at a root power spectral density <5 microcycle/(Hz)1/2 and to be capable of determining the power spectral density of the phase difference over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz. Such a phase meter could also be used on Earth to perform similar measurements in laser metrology of moving bodies. To illustrate part of the principle of operation of the phase meter, the figure includes a simplified block diagram of a basic singlechannel digital receiver. The input RF signal is first fed to the input terminal of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). To prevent aliasing errors in the ADC, the sampling rate must be at least twice the input signal frequency. The sampling rate of the ADC is governed by a sampling clock, which also drives a digital local oscillator (DLO), which is a direct digital frequency synthesizer. The DLO produces samples of sine and cosine signals at a programmed tuning frequency. The sine and cosine samples are mixed with (that is, multiplied by) the samples from the ADC, then low-pass filtered to obtain in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signal components. A digital signal processor (DSP) computes the ratio between the Q and I components, computes the phase of the RF signal (relative to that of the DLO signal) as the arctangent of this ratio, and then averages successive such phase values over a time interval specified by the user.

  11. Reviews Book: SEP Communications: Transmitting and Receiving Signals Book: Gliding for Gold Book: Radioactivity: A History of a Mysterious Science Book: The New Quantum Age Books: The Art of Science and The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing Equipment: SEP Analogue/digital transmission unit Equipment: SEP Optical signal transmission set Book: Stars and their Spectra Book: Voicebox: The Physics and Evolution of Speech Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Transmitting and Receiving Signals SEP booklet transmits knowledge The New Quantum Age Understanding modern quantum theory The Art of Science and The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing Anthologies bring science to life SEP Analogue/digital transmission unit Kit transmits signal between two points SEP Optical signal transmission set Optical kit shows light transmission Stars and their Spectra New book for teaching astrophysics WORTH A LOOK Gliding for Gold Take a journey through the physics of winter sports Radioactivity: A History of a Mysterious Science Book looks at history of radioactivity Voicebox: The Physics and Evolution of Speech TExploring the evolution of the voice WEB WATCH An interactive program with promise?

  12. Water intoxication in epileptic patients receiving carbamazepine.

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, E; Garratt, A; Hebdige, S; Richens, A

    1978-01-01

    Plasma sodium and osmolality were determined in 80 adult epileptic patients receiving chronic treatment with carbamazepine and in 50 control patients treated with other anticonvulsant drugs. Mean plasma osmolality was significantly lower in the carbamazepine-treated patients but mean plasma sodium did not differ in the two groups. Hyponatraemia was found in five of the carbamazine-treated patients and hypo-osmolality in six. None of the control patients had hyponatraemia and only one had a borderline low osmolality. Three of the 13 patients receiving carbamazepine alone were hyponatraemic. Plasma sodium concentration correlated negatively with both daily carbamazepine dose and serum carbamazepine level. Free water clearance after an oral water load was determined in six patients on carbamazepine alone and in six normal subjects not receiving drug therapy. The capacity of some of the patients to excrete the water load was found to be grossly impaired. PMID:681958

  13. Solar thermal energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W. (Inventor); Dustin, Miles O. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A plurality of heat pipes in a shell receive concentrated solar energy and transfer the energy to a heat activated system. To provide for even distribution of the energy despite uneven impingement of solar energy on the heat pipes, absence of solar energy at times, or failure of one or more of the heat pipes, energy storage means are disposed on the heat pipes which extend through a heat pipe thermal coupling means into the heat activated device. To enhance energy transfer to the heat activated device, the heat pipe coupling cavity means may be provided with extensions into the device. For use with a Stirling engine having passages for working gas, heat transfer members may be positioned to contact the gas and the heat pipes. The shell may be divided into sections by transverse walls. To prevent cavity working fluid from collecting in the extensions, a porous body is positioned in the cavity.

  14. Responding to Young Adult Literature. Young Adult Literature Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monseau, Virginia R.

    This book focuses on how readers respond to the power of young adult literature--negating the assumption that because such literature appeals to adolescents it cannot possibly be worthy of a place in the language arts curriculum. The book serves two purposes: it describes and discusses the oral and written response of adolescents and adults to…

  15. Art Therapy: An Underutilized, yet Effective Tool.

    PubMed

    Bitonte, Robert A; De Santo, Marisa

    2014-03-04

    Art therapy has been recognized as beneficial and effective since first described by Adrian Hill in 1942. Even before this time, art therapy was utilized for moral reinforcement and psychoanalysis. Art therapy aids patients with, but not limited to, chronic illness, physical challenges, and cancer in both pediatric and adult scenarios. Although effective in patient care, the practice of art therapy is extremely underutilized, especially in suburban areas. While conducting our own study in northeastern Ohio, USA, we found that only one out of the five inpatient institutions in the suburban area of Mahoning County, Ohio, that we contacted provided continuous art therapy to it's patients. In the metropolitan area of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, only eight of the twenty-two inpatient institutions in the area provided art therapy. There could be many reasons as to why art therapy is not frequently used in these areas, and medical institutions in general. The cause of this could be the amount of research done on the practice. Although difficult to conduct formal research on such a broad field, the American Art Therapy Association has succeeded in doing such, with studies showing improvement of the patient groups emotionally and mentally in many case types.

  16. [Blood in art, art in blood].

    PubMed

    Danic, B; Lefrère, J-J

    2010-12-01

    In the different forms of art developed by Humanity over the centuries, artists have at times chosen themes from the world of medicine or health, such as blood donation or transfusion. In order to illustrate this, we have looked at three artistic domains: painting, movies and body art.

  17. Inspired Spirals. Teaching Art with Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirals in nature, man-made objects, and art. Focuses on art that incorporates the spiral, including works by M. C. Escher and Frank Lloyd Wright, an African headdress, and a burial urn. Describes activities to help students make spirals of their own, such as constructing a coil clay pot. (CMK)

  18. Focus on Fine Arts: Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Don L.

    Basic arts education must give students the essence of their civilization, the civilizations that contributed to it, and the more distant civilizations that enriched world civilizations as a whole. All students are potentially capable of experiencing and analyzing the fundamental qualitativeness of art; therefore, it is realistic to propose…

  19. CyberArts: Exploring Art and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda, Ed.

    This book takes the position that CyberArts(TM) is the new frontier in creativity, where the worlds of science and art meet. Computer technologies, visual design, music and sound, education and entertainment merge to form the new artistic territory of interactive multimedia. This diverse collection of essays, articles, and commentaries…

  20. Land Art in Preschools. An Art Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solberg, Ingunn

    2016-01-01

    The basis for my article is how, and if, a collaborative land art project can provide opportunities for such co-creating as suggested in the national framework plan for preschools, which explicitly states the child as a co-creator of a shared expressive culture. I further wish to propose land art as a meaningful cultural practice, closely…

  1. An Update on the Rhythmic Arts Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuduri, Eddie

    2008-01-01

    The Rhythmic Arts Project (TRAP) is touching the lives of typical children and adults with various disabilities all over the world and now has programs in two Bulgarian orphanages, day programs in Australia, and, most recently, in the general hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. TRAP is also currently approaching facilities in more than 20…

  2. Learning and Teaching Art: Through Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Social media practices are increasingly woven into the everyday lives of teens and adults, becoming a significant part of how they relate, know, and learn. In this article, I present findings from a design-based research study that explored how the dynamics of learning and teaching art shift through social media. Learning and teaching through…

  3. Learning by Heart: Intergenerational Theater Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildin, Marsha; Binder, Rose O.; Chipkin, Irving; Fogelman, Vera; Goldstein, Billie; Lippel, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The authors of this article describe themselves as a lucky group of older adults, ranging in age from sixty to ninety-two, who participate in an intergenerational arts program at their local senior center in Flushing, Queens, one of New York City's most culturally diverse communities. In their living history theater program, run by Elders Share…

  4. [Art therapy to support autistic people].

    PubMed

    Perron, Lysiane

    2014-01-01

    Art therapy, the result of a psychodynamic approach with mediation, can help autistic children and adults to express themselves and communicate. A one-to-one session gives rise to a therapeutic encounter which uses both analytical and educationaI approaches.

  5. Adherence to On-Time ART Drug Pick-Up and Its Association with CD4 Changes and Clinical Outcomes Amongst HIV Infected Adults on First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Nigerian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Anoje, Chukwuemeka; Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oladele, Edward A; Badru, Titilope; Adedokun, Oluwasanmi; Oqua, Dorothy; Khamofu, Hadiza; Adebayo, Olufunso; Torpey, Kwasi; Chabikuli, Otto Nzapfurundi

    2017-02-01

    Medication adherence is a major determinant of antiretroviral treatment (ART) success. Promptness in medication refill pick-ups may give an indication of medication adherence. This study determined medication refill adherence among HIV positive patients on ART and its association with treatment outcomes in HIV treatment centers in Nigeria. This retrospective multi-center cohort study involved a review of ART refill records for 3534 HIV-positive patients aged 18-60 years who initiated first-line ART between January 2008 and December 2009 and were on therapy for ≥18 months after ART initiation. Drug refill records of these patients for 10 consecutive refill visits after ART initiation were analyzed. The first ten consecutive refill appointment-keeping rates after ART initiation ranged from 64.3 % to 76.1 % which decreased with successive visits. Altogether, 743 (21.1 %) patients were deemed adherent, meaning they picked up their drugs within 7 days of the drug refill appointment date on at least nine out of ten refill visits. The adherent group of patients had a mean CD4 cells increase of 206 ± 6.1 cells/dl after 12 months of ART compared to 186 ± 7.1 cells/dl reported among the nonadherent group (p = 0.0145). The proportion of patients in the adherent category who showed no OIs after 12 months on ART (81 %) was significantly higher when compared to the proportion in the non-adherent category (23.5 %), (p = 0.008). The multivariate analysis showed that the odds of being adherent was 2-3 times more in patients who had a baseline CD4 count of less than 200 cells/dl compared to those with a baseline CD4 of >350 cells/dl. (AOR 2.43, 95 % CI 1.62-3.66). In addition, for patients with baseline CD4 cell count of 201-350 cells/dl, the odds of being adherent was found to be 1.9 compared to those with baseline CD4 of greater than 350 cells/dl (AOR 1.93, 95 % CI 1.27-2.94). Pharmacy refill data can serve as an adherence measure. Adherence to on-time drug

  6. The Politics of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Art

    2016-01-01

    Art Ellison is longtime advocate for adult education, having managed numerous advocacy campaigns over the past forty years on the state and national levels. Prior to his employment in 1980 as the NH State Director of Adult Education he worked for many years as a high school teacher and as a community organizer. In this article, Ellison offers some…

  7. Facilitating Creativity in Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Creativity in education research has received increasing attention, although the major focus of this research has been on children. Despite pleas by several adult educators for promoting creativity, very few studies have focused on adult learners, leaving to it to be explored what approaches are useful for adult educators to facilitate creativity…

  8. Artful terms: A study on aesthetic word usage for visual art versus film and music

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, M Dorothee; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Wagemans, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of the arts in human life, psychologists still know relatively little about what characterises their experience for the recipient. The current research approaches this problem by studying people's word usage in aesthetics, with a focus on three important art forms: visual art, film, and music. The starting point was a list of 77 words known to be useful to describe aesthetic impressions of visual art (Augustin et al 2012, Acta Psychologica 139 187–201). Focusing on ratings of likelihood of use, we examined to what extent word usage in aesthetic descriptions of visual art can be generalised to film and music. The results support the claim of an interplay of generality and specificity in aesthetic word usage. Terms with equal likelihood of use for all art forms included beautiful, wonderful, and terms denoting originality. Importantly, emotion-related words received higher ratings for film and music than for visual art. To our knowledge this is direct evidence that aesthetic experiences of visual art may be less affectively loaded than, for example, experiences of music. The results render important information about aesthetic word usage in the realm of the arts and may serve as a starting point to develop tailored measurement instruments for different art forms. PMID:23145287

  9. System for Isolation Testing of RF Transmitters and Receivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    one such software defined radio is the open source GNU radio platform utilizing the Universal Software Radio Peripheral. [0019] The advantages of...to a system that can perform isolation testing of a radio frequency (RF) transmitter or an RF receiver. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...Currently, the testing and diagnosing of a faulty radio frequency (RF) transmission and receiving systems requires that the system be taken out of the

  10. ADMX Receiver and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagon, Ana; ADMX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    ADMX looks for the excess radiation deposited into a cavity from the conversion of a dark matter axion into a microwave photon. The sensitivity of the experiment increases by reducing the background thermal noise and minimizing the electronic noise of the readout system. The axion masses that the experiment can detect are determined by the resonant frequency of the cavity mode of interest, which is tuned using a two rod configuration. One can also increase the search rate by measuring the output from two cavity modes at once, which requires two separate readout schemes. I will discuss the ADMX dual-channel receiver which has been upgraded to have near quantum-limited sensitivity on both channels, and describe how the correct modes are verified, using simulations, in the presence of dense electromagnetic structure. I conclude by describing upgrades to the ADMX analysis which allow for real-time exclusion limits. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  11. Bringing Art to Life through Multi-Sensory Tours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodek, Wendy L.

    2012-01-01

    Learning occurs in myriad ways yet most art museums remain wedded to visual instruction. Adult visitors touring the galleries are offered audio guides or lecture style tours to complement the visual but are there other ways to enhance learning? This article reports on a case study that found that active, multi-sensory experiences in art museums…

  12. Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants' Responses Following Art Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaimal, Girija; Ray, Kendra; Muniz, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated the impact of visual art making on the cortisol levels of 39 healthy adults. Participants provided saliva samples to assess cortisol levels before and after 45 minutes of art making. Participants also provided written responses about the experience at the end of the session. Results indicate that art…

  13. Where Does It Come From? Developmental Aspects of Art Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schabmann, Alfred; Gerger, Gernot; Schmidt, Barbara M.; Wögerer, Eva; Osipov, Igor; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Art is a unique feature of human experience. It involves the complex interplay among stimuli, persons and contexts. Little is known of how the various features deemed important in art appreciation depend on development, thus are already present at a young age. Similarly to our previous approach with adults of differing levels of expertise, the…

  14. Promoting Wisdom: The Role of Art Therapy in Geriatric Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Annette

    1997-01-01

    Explores adult developmental theories regarding implications for art therapy with impaired elderly. Examines the struggle inherent in the creative art process as a means to facilitate developmental struggle. Claims that artistic processes facilitate struggles, which can elicit conflict resolution and utilization of mature defenses with even…

  15. Visual Arts and Handicrafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Lois

    1998-01-01

    Lists recommended book titles for children on art, crafts, artists, optical illusions, and drawing. Provides the address for a Web site featuring art activities and information about artists for children. (PEN)

  16. Chemistry, Color, and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    2001-01-01

    Describes pigments and artists' colors from a chronological perspective. Explains how chemical analysis can be used to distinguish the differences between artists' palettes, identify the evolution of art, and lead to restoration of an art work. (Contains 13 references.) (YDS)

  17. Transpersonal Art Therapy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Michael; Farrelly-Hansen, Mimi; Marek, Bernie; Swan-Foster, Nora; Wallingford, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the task of training future art therapists through a unique branch of transpersonal psychology referred to as "contemplative education." Discusses contemplative practices, such as meditation, and their relationship to creating art. Offers a definition of transpersonal art therapy as well as a literature review. (Contains 80…

  18. Alaska Arts Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugan, Gene, Ed.

    This directory lists over 250 non-profit and for-profit arts organizations in 90 Alaskan communities. Compiled as a resource guide for artists, arts administrators, and teachers, this document offers information that assist them in sharing resources, communicating, and coordinating arts activities. It contains information from and about arts…

  19. Art Is for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensign, Arselia, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This pamphlet examines what art can mean to a child with a disability and offers "how-to's" for involving students in the creation of art. It emphasizes that the outcome of an art activity can be more than just the finished piece of work and that emphasis should be placed on involvement with the materials rather than on design or abstract concepts…

  20. Women Art Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Enid, Ed.; Stankiewicz, Mary Ann, Ed.

    This collection of papers on women art educators reveals the variety of roles played by those women, from anonymous art teachers to leaders in their profession. "Mary Rouse: A Remembrance" (G. Hubbard) is a personal perspective on Rouse, the development of her career, and her considerable impact in the field of art education. "The…

  1. Windows to Art Excitement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley; Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that aimed to bring more attention to an art program. Explains that the students created themed murals on the windows of the art classroom, such as a "Jungle,""Ocean,""Masterpiece Paintings," and "Rainforest Tree Frogs." Discusses how the murals were created. (CMK)

  2. Cultural Policy and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degge, Rogena M., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This document presents three papers by scholars who participated in a lecture series on current controversies regarding politics and the arts. Judith H. Balfe argues in her paper, "Affinities of Art and Politics: Gilt by Association," that despite a history of institutional separateness, art and politics are linked with one another because they…

  3. Art and Montessori.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Joy

    1982-01-01

    Designed for Montessori teachers with little background in the plastic arts, this discussion points out that, while the Montessori program has many features that support creative development, presently, no art curriculum exists. The article indicates the limitations of Maria Montessori's ideas and attitudes about the role of art in the education…

  4. Art and the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Education, Richmond. Div. of Humanities and Secondary Administration.

    The contributions of art experiences to special education are discussed and guidelines for integrating art into the curriculum are provided. Art is seen to have potential for developing handicapped children's self expression, independence, sensory stimulation and motivation, perception discrimination, skill development, and career and personal…

  5. Art and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamal, Pauline Dove

    Art has always adapted technological advances to its own uses. In the last 15 years, art has turned to color photocopiers, computers, mimeograph machines, and thermofax copiers. With this in mind, Central Piedmont Community College began offering a course in 1982 called "Art and Technology" which focused on the application of office…

  6. The Arts & Compensatory Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    Intended to help compensatory education personnel better understand the role of the arts in cognitive growth, this booklet provides practical suggestions for using arts strategies in basic education. Following a discussion of the role of the arts in the learning process, the booklet presents a number of activities that involve the interaction of…

  7. Art and Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Suesi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author offers lesson plan ideas that are designed to guide teachers of art and science to encourage their students to see connections between art images and physics principles. The four works of art discussed are examples that can be linked visually and conceptually to physics properties in mathematics, space, energy, and light.…

  8. "I like Art Because..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leishear, Christina Chiddo

    2012-01-01

    There is a lot of creative energy between students and their art materials. In this lesson, the author discusses materials an artist may use to create a work of art--paint, a paintbrush, a palette, crayons, markers, pastels, and so on. Each student sketched a picture of themselves holding some tools that can be used in art. The objectives of this…

  9. Arts throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manner, Jane Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes how curriculum integration can help art enhance learning during times when the arts may be considered dispensable and removed from education, presenting examples of how classroom teachers have examined art as a link to expanded understanding of history, science, math, reading, current events, geography, cultural studies, emotions,…

  10. Catalyst--The Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Edmund Burke

    1978-01-01

    Throughout European history, artists have celebrated the values of their patrons. Today, the schools are the largest employer of artists. To justify art education according to current Back-to-Basics values, art teachers should explain visual art as a language, which they can teach students to read and use. (SJL)

  11. Art Meets Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohs, C. Renee

    2007-01-01

    Numerous connections between the visual arts and sciences are evident if we choose to look for them. In February 2006, students and faculty from the Art and Geol/Geog departments at NW Missouri State University put together an exhibit at a local art gallery featuring works that were born out of science, inspired by science, or exploring the…

  12. Computer Aided Art Major.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jim

    The Computer Aided Art program offered at Northern State State University (Aberdeen, South Dakota), is coordinated with the traditional art major. The program is designed to familiarize students with a wide range of art-related computer hardware and software and their applications and to prepare students for problem-solving with unfamiliar…

  13. The Art of Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  14. A Work of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    During the 2002-03 fiscal crisis in Massachusetts, Gov. Mitt Romney proposed sweeping changes for public colleges in the state. Among them was a proposal to privatize three highly specialized colleges, including the Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MassArt), the nation's only independent public college of art and design. The rationale was…

  15. Arts in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstock, Ruth

    This monograph, part of an ongoing series, discusses the need for school arts programs and provides some examples of how the arts can be infused into the regular curriculum at the elementary level. Support systems for such programs are also discussed. Properly conceived, the arts constitute a great integrating force in the curriculum. To achieve…

  16. Windows into Art Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John…

  17. The Art of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the argument that when viewed as mutually supportive processes of inquiry, art and research have the potential to put the agency of educational change well within reach of artists and art teachers. As researchers well schooled in studio practices of many kinds, artists and art teachers understand that, as we…

  18. From soil in art towards Soil Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-02-01

    The range of art forms and genres dealing with soil is wide and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in cinema, architecture and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and cinema are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, with, or featuring soil or soil conservation issues, created by artists, and occasionally scientists, educators or collaborative efforts thereof.

  19. 37 CFR 1.412 - The United States Receiving Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The United States Receiving Office. 1.412 Section 1.412 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... requirements of PCT Art. 11(1), and PCT Rule 20; (2) Assuring that international applications meet...

  20. 37 CFR 1.412 - The United States Receiving Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The United States Receiving Office. 1.412 Section 1.412 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... requirements of PCT Art. 11(1), and PCT Rule 20; (2) Assuring that international applications meet...

  1. Music, Medicine, and the Art of Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Roessel, Peter; Shafer, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    The use of the arts in medical education has become increasingly widespread. Narrative and visual media, in particular, have received great attention as tools for teaching skills of empathy, observation and reflection. Music, however, has been relatively less applied in this context, and may be perceived as lacking immediate relevance to medicine.…

  2. Changing Medical Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants…

  3. Adult ESL Education in the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyring, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the state of the art in the field of "adult ESL" in the US. It identifies the size, characteristics, and settings of adult education and discusses relevant professional standards, assessment procedures, and teacher preparation. Three approaches to noncredit adult ESL education will be presented (Functional…

  4. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem. A goal in art therapy is to improve ... supports federal and state policies, legislation, regulations, judicial actions, and initiatives that encourage, promote, and support efforts ...

  5. The Art Classroom as Art Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr-Johnson, Virginia; Brockmyer, James J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests ways of turning the art room into a microenvironment of sensory intensification--a place where a student steps into a new world of color, sound, and smell that delights the eye and inspires the imagination. (Author/SJL)

  6. Beauty and art.

    PubMed

    Chang, C W David

    2006-08-01

    Definitions of beauty and art have been turned upside down when trying to describe 20th century and postmodern art. The classical sense of beauty looks toward the replication of nature as its inspiration. The development of Impressionist art and modern art forced the rules of aesthetics to be rethought and revised. Old standards of aesthetics were brought into question with each successive artistic challenge. This article endeavors to explore the meaning of beauty and the aesthetic experience as it relates to defining art.

  7. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    National estimates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and adherence support services utilization are needed to inform efforts to improve the health of HIV-infected persons in the United States. In a nationally representative sample of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care, 86% self-reported taking all ART doses in the past 72 hours. Overall, 20% reported using adherence support services and 2% reported an unmet need for services. If all nonadherent persons not receiving adherence support and all persons with a self-perceived unmet need for adherence support accessed services, resources to support ∼42,673 additional persons would be needed. Factors associated with lower adherence included younger age, female gender, depression, stimulant use, binge alcohol use, greater than once-daily dosing, longer time since HIV diagnosis, and patient beliefs. Predictors of adherence are multifactorial so multiple targeted strategies to improve adherence are warranted. Providing adherence support services to all those in need may require additional resources.

  8. Real-time software receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledvina, Brent M. (Inventor); Psiaki, Mark L. (Inventor); Powell, Steven P. (Inventor); Kintner, Jr., Paul M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A real-time software receiver that executes on a general purpose processor. The software receiver includes data acquisition and correlator modules that perform, in place of hardware correlation, baseband mixing and PRN code correlation using bit-wise parallelism.

  9. Real-time software receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledvina, Brent M. (Inventor); Psiaki, Mark L. (Inventor); Powell, Steven P. (Inventor); Kintner, Jr., Paul M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A real-time software receiver that executes on a general purpose processor. The software receiver includes data acquisition and correlator modules that perform, in place of hardware correlation, baseband mixing and PRN code correlation using bit-wise parallelism.

  10. Merging Literature, Visual Art and Physics: Teaching Through Comics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R.

    2012-12-01

    Comics have been around as a form of entertainment for decades. They are often as seen as one of the distracting vices of kids (and adults!), but comics and their more adult version, the graphic novel, are increasingly valued as a legitimate genre of both literature and visual. The APS Outreach Department has teamed up with the APS graphics department to create a series of comics, one featuring Nikola Tesla and his battles with the evil Thomas Edison, and four about laser the APS original super hero Spectra and her continuing battles with such villains as nefarious Miss Alignment and bumbling General Relativity. These comics have struck a delicate balance between education and entertainment being well received by both the comic book and education communities. By creating a compelling comic story that has correct physics, it is possible to use this under-appreciated medium to excite middle-school students who might otherwise be turned off by traditional teaching methods. In merging physics with the art of comics it is crucial to make sure first and foremost that the students enjoy the story and that they feel a connection to the characters. Students are thus hooked and once they are drawn in, the learning happens automatically.

  11. High temperature solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A design concept for a high temperature solar thermal receiver to operate at 3 atmospheres pressure and 2500 F outlet was developed. The performance and complexity of windowed matrix, tube-header, and extended surface receivers were evaluated. The windowed matrix receiver proved to offer substantial cost and performance benefits. An efficient and cost effective hardware design was evaluated for a receiver which can be readily interfaced to fuel and chemical processes or to heat engines for power generation.

  12. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  13. Optical receivers for wide band data transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, Branko

    1988-04-01

    Optical receiver designs for digital fiber data transmission systems operating with Gbit/s data rates in the 800 to 1500 nm wavelength region have been investigated. The tradeoffs between conflicting receiver design requirements are considered in detail. The state-of-the-art performance of photodetectors and low-noise amplifiers is discussed. Also, present receiver performance data, such as sensitivity, dynamic range, bit rate and bit pattern dependencies as a function of the bit rate in the 0.01-8 Gbit/s data range are summarized and reviewed.

  14. Cultivating Kuumba: Applying Art Based Strategies to Any Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Auburn Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    There are many contemporary issues to address in adult education. This paper explores art-based strategies and the utilization of creativity (Kuumba) to expand learning for global communities in any field of practice. Benefits of culturally grounded approaches to adult education are discussed. Images from ongoing field research can be viewed at…

  15. The Creative and Performing Arts in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, David E.

    The paper describes three creative and performing arts projects for handicapped persons: the production of a Shakespearean play using institutionalized mentally retarded adults; poetry writing with blind, deaf, physically handicapped and mentally retarded persons; and water ballet with mentally retarded adults. (CL)

  16. The Return of the Body: Performance Art and Art Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gaye Leigh

    1999-01-01

    Explains that performance art incorporates different artistic forms, emphasizes the process of art over the product, and blurs the line between life and art. Discusses the history of performance art, highlights the Performance Art, Culture, and Pedagogy Symposium, and provides examples of how to use performance art in the classroom. (CMK)

  17. Art-Based Learning Strategies in Art Therapy Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods research study examined the use of art-based teaching methods in master's level art therapy graduate education in North America. A survey of program directors yielded information regarding in which courses and how frequently art-based methods (individual in-class art making, dyad or group art making, student art projects as…

  18. New School Art Styles: The Project of Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gude, Olivia

    2013-01-01

    Art projects are appropriate building blocks for visual art curriculum because good art projects encode complex aesthetic strategies, giving students tools to investigate and make meaning. Art made in schools will inevitably be some form of "school art," defined by Arthur Efland in "The School Art Style: a Functional Analysis,"…

  19. Art in Elementary Education Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittain, Lambert

    1976-01-01

    Article discussed the practicalities in art education from the current economic squeeze on art programs to the overworked elementary art teacher attempting to implement art programs of dubious merit. (RK)

  20. Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria, 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Dokubo, E. Kainne; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Agolory, Simon G.; Auld, Andrew F.; Onotu, Dennis; Odafe, Solomon; Dalhatu, Ibrahim; Abiri, Oseni; Debem, Henry C.; Bashorun, Adebobola; Ellerbrock, Tedd

    2017-01-01

    Background Nigeria had the most AIDS-related deaths worldwide in 2014 (170,000), and 46% were associated with tuberculosis (TB). Although treatment of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces TB-associated morbidity and mortality, incident TB can occur while on ART. We estimated incidence and characterized factors associated with TB after ART initiation in Nigeria. Methods We analyzed retrospective cohort data from a nationally representative sample of adult patients on ART. Data were abstracted from 3,496 patient records, and analyses were weighted and controlled for a complex survey design. We performed domain analyses on patients without documented TB disease and used a Cox proportional hazard model to assess factors associated with TB incidence after ART. Results At ART initiation, 3,350 patients (95.8%) were not receiving TB treatment. TB incidence after ART initiation was 0.57 per 100 person-years, and significantly higher for patients with CD4<50/μL (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–12.7) compared with CD4≥200/μL. Patients with suspected but untreated TB at ART initiation and those with a history of prior TB were more likely to develop incident TB (AHR: 12.2, 95% CI: 4.5–33.5 and AHR: 17.6, 95% CI: 3.5–87.9, respectively). Conclusion Incidence of TB among PLHIV after ART initiation was low, and predicted by advanced HIV, prior TB, and suspected but untreated TB. Study results suggest a need for improved TB screening and diagnosis, particularly among high-risk PLHIV initiating ART, and reinforce the benefit of early ART and other TB prevention efforts. PMID:28282390

  1. Research Brief--Effects of An Experimental Program on the Quality of Children's Art and Concept Attainment Using a Synthesis of Japanese Music and Art Education Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platten, Marvin R.; Arimitsu, Tokuroh

    1982-01-01

    American 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old children participated in an art program synthesizing the Suzuki Music method and an art instruction method developed by Yoshio Tamano. Children receiving the self-paced art lessons at home gained more in concept formation and painting skill than did a control group. (PP)

  2. Art 10, Art 20, Art 30 Curriculum Guide 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    The curriculum guide details a unified sequential art program for grades 7-12 and clearly outlines specific objectives and descriptions of concepts and experiences. The objectives are designed to accommodate sequential learning and are derived from the goals and philosophy of the program. The format describes appropriate objectives and concepts…

  3. Changing medical students' attitudes toward older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants met for four 2-hour sessions at local art museums to create and discuss art. Three hundred and twenty-eight individuals (112 treatment group, 96 comparison, 120 older adults) in eight cities participated in the program and evaluation. Participants completed pre-and postsurveys that captured their attitude toward older adults, perception of commonality with older adults, and career plans. Findings suggest that medical students' attitudes toward old adults were positive at pretest. However, Vital Visionary students became more positive in their attitudes toward older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .60, and they felt they had more in common with older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .64. The program did not influence their career plans (p = .35). Findings from this demonstration project suggest that socializing medical students with healthy older adults through art programs can foster positive attitudes and enhance their sense of commonality with older adults.

  4. Art as Critical Public Pedagogy: A Qualitative Study of Luis Camnitzer and His Conceptual Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana; Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness from the perspective and work of conceptual artist, Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework is grounded in the critical public pedagogy literature. Data collection methods included interviews with conceptual artist Luis Camnitzer and with…

  5. Art Making as a Mental Health Recovery Tool for Change and Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Lith, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic benefits of art making may be implicated in how and why people with mental illness turn to art therapy to aid their recovery. In this longitudinal multiple case study adult participants (N = 12) with severe and ongoing mental illness were recruited through their involvement in diverse community mental health art therapy programs. An…

  6. Art & Early Childhood: Personal Narratives & Social Practices. Occasional Paper Series 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunday, Kris, Ed.; McClure, Marissa, Ed.; Schulte, Christopher, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    This issue explores the nature of childhood by offering selections that re/imagine the idea of the child as art maker; inquire about the relationships between children and adults when they are making art; and investigate how physical space influences approaches to art instruction. Readers are invited to join a dialogue that questions long-standing…

  7. The martial arts.

    PubMed

    Terry, Charles M

    2006-08-01

    Given the increasing popularity of the martial arts, it is likely that physicians in all specialties encounter patients who participate. From pediatric patients, to geriatric patients, to those living with various disabilities, the martial arts may offer physical, psychologic, and therapeutic benefits. An appreciation of the physical demands of the martial arts is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of injury as well as to planning treatment and prevention strategies and to determining safe return to participation after injury.

  8. The arts, health, and aging in america: 2005-2015.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Gay Powell; Noelker, Linda S; Bienvenu, Beth

    2015-04-01

    In advance of the White House Conference on Aging (WHCoA) in 1981, 1995, and 2005, the arts and aging communities held mini-conferences to ensure that arts, culture, and livability were part of larger public policy discussions. This article takes a historical look at recommendations from the 2005 WHCoA Mini-Conference on Creativity and Aging in America, including arts in health care, lifelong learning, and livability through universal design. Overarching recommendations in 2005 requested investments in research, including cost-benefit analyses; identification of best practices and model programs; program dissemination to broaden the availability of arts programs. The "Arts" is a broad term encompassing all forms of arts including music, theater, dance, visual arts, literature, multimedia and design, folk, and traditional arts to engage the participation of all older Americans; promotion of innovative public and private partnerships to support arts program development, including workforce development (e.g., artists, social workers, and health care providers); and public awareness of the importance of arts participation to healthy aging. Through the leadership of the National Endowment for the Arts and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, thinking about the arts and aging has broadened to include greater emphasis on a whole-person approach to the health and well-being of older adults. This approach engages older adults in arts participation not only as audience members, but as vital members of their community through creative expression focusing on life stories for intergenerational as well as interprofessional collaboration. This article reviews progress made to date and identifies critical gaps in services for future consideration at a 2015 Mini-Conference on Creativity and Aging related to the WCHoA area of emphasis on healthy aging.

  9. Low cost omega navigation receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a low cost Omega navigation receiver is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the completion and testing of a modular, multipurpose Omega receiver which utilizes a digital memory-aided, phase-locked loop to provide phase measurement data to a variety of applications interfaces. The functional units contained in the prototype device are described. The receiver is capable of receiving and storing phase measurements for up to eight Omega signals and computes two switch-selectable lines of position, displaying this navigation data in chart-recorded form.

  10. Ceramic technology for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Smoak, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The high-temperature capability, resistance to corrosive environments and non-strategic nature of ceramics have prompted applications in the solar thermal field whose advantages over metallic devices of comparable performance may begin to be assessed. It is shown by a survey of point-focusing receiver designs employing a variety of ceramic compositions and fabrication methods that the state-of-the-art in structural ceramics is not sufficiently advanced to fully realize the promised benefits of higher temperature capabilities at lower cost than metallic alternatives. The ceramics considered include alumina, berylia, magnesia, stabilized zirconia, fused silica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, mullite and cordierite, processed by such methods as isostatic pressing, dry pressing, slip casting, extrusion, calendaring and injection molding.

  11. Adult Undergraduate Students: Patterns of Learning Involvement. Final Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol E.; Blowers, Sally S.

    A research study examined the complex roles of adult life in relation to the student role, the nature of adult undergraduate engagement in learning, and adult perceptions of involvement. Adult students were interviewed in three types of institutions: 38 at two liberal arts colleges, 29 at two community colleges, and 23 at two public universities.…

  12. Wearable Arts of Japan: Seattle Art Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loudon, Sarah

    1996-01-01

    Presents four lesson plans centered around artworks involving Japanese clothing. Instructional materials include color plates of a 19th century print showing women's clothing, two beautifully handcrafted coats, and a coverlet in kimono form. The lesson plans discuss Japanese clothing, art, society, and culture. (MJP)

  13. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  14. Sequencing Events: Exploring Art and Art Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Pamela Geiger; Shaddix, Robin K.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity for upper-elementary students that correlates the actions of archaeologists, patrons, and artists with the sequencing of events in a logical order. Features ancient Egyptian art images. Discusses the preparation of materials, motivation, a pre-writing activity, and writing a story in sequence. (CMK)

  15. Math in Art or Art in Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biller, Jerry

    The concept of integrating mathematics and art course work broadens an appreciation of the connection between the two. Although calculations and getting the right answer have traditionally been the focus of mathematics at the secondary level, other topics have recently begun to be addressed, such as mathographics, or the relationship between art…

  16. Games for "Seeing" Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmundson, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Provides various activities that museum docents use to help students "see" rather than "look" at art objects. Ideas include playing a looking game, using the five senses to describe the painting, creating stories about the art object, and having a treasure hunt while visiting a museum. (CMK)

  17. Art Education Is Violent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavin, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In an era that is rife with aggression and hostility, most art educators hold close to their hearts the belief that they, and their students, can contribute to making the world a better place. Through their acts as teachers and the daily work of art education, they often strive toward creating a space of "non-violence." For K-12…

  18. Language Arts Topics Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jane M.; And Others

    This document brings together six papers on language skills and language arts teaching of gifted students. "The State of the Art Issues in Language Study for High Ability Learners: Thinking about Language with Gifted Children" (Michael Clay Thompson) considers two areas traditionally included in discussions of language study--grammar and…

  19. Parallels in the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffey, Grace

    1972-01-01

    A mini-course of nine weeks was organized as a laboratory course to survey relationships in literature, music, and art. Three periods in the arts (Romanticism, Impressionism, and Contemporary) were matched with three major activities; the basic areas of study and activity were poetry, short story, and novel. (Author)

  20. Art Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This journal issue provides a cogent look at general issues in art teacher education, specific teacher education programs and particular agendas as they are played out in a number of different countries. The topic is introduced in the Editorial, "The Education of Educators: Art Teacher Education around the World" (Kit Grauer). Articles…

  1. Art in the Garden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project in which beginning art students created ceramic vegetables that are supposed to be functional, such as a container. Explains how the teacher can demonstrate the process of creating the ceramic vegetables. Includes a list of materials. (CMK)

  2. Art as Peace Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Art educators can "critique" senseless violence--mistreatment, exclusion, intimidation, bullying, violation, abuse, corruption, murder, and war--by unleashing the power of students' creativity. In this article, the author, sharing her philosophical context, discusses how art is preventative medicine with the power to transform the cycle…

  3. The Art of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on secondary students with cognitive or intellectual disabilities. She discusses that these students can be successfully included into the classroom community if schools can provide the appropriate tools such literacy in the arts. Here, she cites the number of reasons why arts can meet the varied needs and…

  4. Art in a Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug, Ed.; Congdon, Kristin G., Ed.

    Society truly cannot be democratic unless the educational systems function democratically. Art education has a role to play in this process. The perceptions of many different groups in a pluralistic society must be considered in a new multicultural approach to the teaching of art. A "Foreword" (June King McFee) and "Introduction" (Doug Blandy;…

  5. Looking into Oceanic Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Nancy Schien; Maxedon, G. Edward

    1997-01-01

    Presents background material, suggested teaching activities, and four color plates illustrating the folk art of the Oceania islands (Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia). The background material is incorporated into an interview with two Oceanic art specialists from Indiana University who discuss the culture of the islands. (MJP)

  6. Cybernetics, Art and Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichardt, Jasia, Ed.

    The essays in this volume deal with the relationship of the computer and the arts, especially the exploration and demonstration of connections between creativity and technology, the links between scientific or mathematical approaches, intuitions, and the more irrational and oblique urges associated with the making of music, art, and poetry. The…

  7. The Art of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saccardi, Marianne

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of books for grades K and up which explores the folklore, poetry, fiction, and art of Mexico, and focuses on the Mayans and Aztecs and Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. Also suggests various research, reading, drama, music, social studies, physical education, and art activities and lists related videos and Internet…

  8. Comics as Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    Spider Man and the Green Lantern are not the first images that most people conjure up when someone mentions "important art." In the world of fine art, comic books are often viewed as the bottom rung of the artistic ladder. In the early half of the 1900s, such an assessment would not have been unreasonable. With their rudimentary visuals and…

  9. Performance Art: Kinetic Reproductions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassin, Cherie

    2001-01-01

    Provides an art project for use with eighth-grade students, who choose a work of art and recreate it in an interpretive and informative manner. Explains that students re-create the background of the artwork and then the students become a part of the painting via characters or objects. (CMK)

  10. Mola Art: Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsamian, Araxey

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author describes a lesson plan on Mola art she used in her elementary classroom. Using four examples of Kuna Indian molas, the teacher introduced students to the beautiful, colorful, creative art form of molas. The Kuna women have been making these layered pieces of cloth for more than one hundred years. They use a…

  11. The Boutique Liberal Arts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The structure of higher education today, in conjunction with those actively trying to devalue a liberal arts degree in the public sphere, has set the table for what seems like a completely rational solution: finding a "niche." Broadly speaking, colleges offering a liberal arts education identify their "niche market" in terms of…

  12. Art, Society and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    In considering the relation of art with society the author comments on the ideas of the American philosopher, John Dewey, the art historian, Lord Kenneth Clark, a popular humanistic educator, Clifton Fadiman, and a major cultural critic, Jacques Barzun. (Author/RK)

  13. Arte Brasileno Erudito y Arte Brasileno Popular. (Brazilian Fine Art and Brazilian Popular Art)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valladares, Clarival Do Prado

    1969-01-01

    Class differences in Brazil explain the inequality between the art produced in the high strata of society and that originating in the economically inferior communities. Genuine expression of art degenerates for two reasons: the influence of modern industrial civilization and the tendency to satisfy the taste of the acquisitive group. (Author/MF)

  14. Visual Arts Research, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Nancy C., Ed.; Thompson, Christine, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the journal "Visual Arts in Research" published in 1994. This journal focuses on the theory and practice of visual arts education from educational, historical, philosophical, and psychological perspectives. Number 1 of this volume includes the following contributions: (1) "Zooming in on the Qualitative…

  15. Culinary Arts Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This chart is intended for use in documenting the fact that a student participating in a culinary arts program has achieved the performance standards specified in the Missouri Competency Profile for culinary arts. The chart includes space for recording basic student and instructor information and the student's on-the-job training and work…

  16. Art Education with Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jere

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper explores the way in which art education advances the goals of citizenship education. In the first section of this paper the similarities between ethical and aesthetic concepts will be outlined and the visual art symbol system will be carefully examined. Findings: It will be argued that the transference of a value-adaptive…

  17. Mathematics and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, John

    2012-01-01

    This relationship is omnipresent to those who appreciate the shared attributes of these two areas of creativity. The dynamic nature of media, and further study, enable mathematicians and artists to present new and exciting manifestations of the "mathematics in art", and the "art in mathematics". The illustrative images of the relationship--that…

  18. Sustaining the Military Arts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. The military arts of strategy, operations, and tactics are merely the creative bridges that allow...Strategic pidgin isn’t the antidote for strategic illiteracy. about military arts and sciences is not merely a ’question of rhetorical clarity. Indeed

  19. Art Therapy: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantt, Linda, Comp.; Schmal, Marilyn Strauss, Comp.

    The bibliography on art therapy presents 1175 citations (1940-1973) drawn from searches of the medical indexes, computer systems of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Mental Health, other bibliographies, Centre International de Documentation Concernant les Expressions Plastiques, and the American Journal of Art Therapy.…

  20. Art Supports Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurst, Douglas; Jones, Dana; Moore, Jim

    2005-01-01

    State-mandated, high-stakes testing is the primary means by which schools are judged. Whether this is a fair and accurate way of judging the performance of schools may remain in debate for a long time. Some school districts have gone so far as reducing or eliminating "special" classes--in particular art and music. Art teachers can help prepare…

  1. Bringing Art to Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Art and Architecture program that involves K-12 students in the creation of public art. The program provides students with a sense of ownership through design and construction assignments created as part of an integrated curriculum, including mock bids and interpreting a floor plan into an elevation. Tips on how architects can start…

  2. Art in Public.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, David J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines four works of art, created for public spaces, to help students understand the value of public art in the community. Illustrates work by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, Siah Armajani, Jackie Ferrara, and Deborah Butterfield. Outlines lesson activities for elementary and secondary students. (KM)

  3. Visual Arts Research, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Nancy C., Ed.; Thompson, Christine, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues of the journal "Visual Arts Research" published in 1995. This journal focuses on the theory and practice of visual arts education from educational, historical, philosophical, and psychological perspectives. Number 1 of this volume includes the following contributions: (1) "Children's Sensitivity to…

  4. Tangrams: Puzzles of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fee, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Challenging one's brain is the beginning of making great art. Tangrams are a great way to keep students thinking about their latest art project long after leaving the classroom. A tangram is a Chinese puzzle. The earliest known reference to tangrams appears in a Chinese book dated 1813, but the puzzles existed long before that date. The puzzle…

  5. I: Making Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Malke; Johnson, Marquetta; Plemons, Anna; Makol, Suzanne; Zanskas, Meghan; Dzula, Mark; Mahoney, Meg Robson

    2014-01-01

    Writing about the teaching artist practice should mean writing about art making. As both teacher and artist, the authors are required to be cognizant of their own art-making processes, both how it works and why it is important to them, in order to make this process visible to their students. They also need the same skills to write about how and…

  6. The Talking Art Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Jacqui

    2009-01-01

    Every year, fourth graders at Sterling Morton Elementary School in Ohio present a talking art museum for the school and community. In this article, the author describes a lesson on art history which culminates in an activity showcasing all the students' finished paintings in gold frames. A student stands behind the painting and pokes his or her…

  7. Walking, Talking Art Gallery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Sheila

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a project that aimed at educating the public about art by bringing art to the people. Explains that students selected their favorite artwork and made a t-shirt displaying their artwork. States that the students went into their community and also created a mural. (CMK)

  8. The Art of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jory, Tina

    1997-01-01

    Advocates introducing young students to realistic nature drawing as a way of integrating art and science. Describes an earthworm art project using a salt dough model and a realistic drawing. This activity should begin with a view of the real subject whenever possible before proceeding to the actual artwork. (AIM)

  9. Elegant Art Nouveau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2005-01-01

    Gustav Klimt (1862-1918), a Viennese painter, was the founder of the Vienna Secession, the Austrian Art Nouveau movement. Art Nouveau is characterised by flowing lines and flat designs based on organic structures. This style is found in the symbolic aspect of Klimt's later work, and in the works of other artists of the late 1890s and early 1900s…

  10. Elementary Art Education. Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caucutt, Allen, Ed.

    This collection of writings addresses the issue of developing a generation of aesthetically aware and involved individuals. Each of the 19 articles emphasizes art education as an indispensable force in the total school program. Together these writings form sources of inspiration and ideas for the elementary art teacher. Divided into four…

  11. Primary Art Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton Unified School District 373, KS.

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary Grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Art. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide begins with a list of topics for art expression. The main body of the guide contains 15 color-coded sections on the following subjects: 1) mobiles and folded paper; 2) collage and photo montage; 3) square paper and mosaics; 4) wax paper and…

  12. Art & Science Grow Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stellflue, Pat; Allen, Marie; Gerber, D. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative effort that included a botany professor, an art teacher, and a science teacher, called,"Plants, Pots, and Paints." This interdisciplinary project was successful in connecting content across disciplines (science to art) and for motivating fourth-and fifth-grade students to create something beautiful both they…

  13. When Curriculum Meets Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giardina, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    A three-year grant program at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City encourages teachers to draw connections between curricular topics and works of art. In this article, museum educator Nicola Giardina describes how the program uses inquiry-based lessons to create meaningful learning experiences for underserved students. She highlights…

  14. Art and Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoubrey, Sharon

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue reviews and confirms the connection between thinking skills and art education. Articles offer possible teaching approaches and specific lesson plans dealing with thinking skills. The issue includes: (1) "Editor's View" (Sharon McCoubrey); (2) "Critical and Creative Thinking and Making Art" (Carol Fineberg); (3)…

  15. The Art of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Alim, Jamaal

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Robert F. Sabol, professor of visual and performing arts at Purdue University says that art education has suffered some serious setbacks since No Child Left Behind--the landmark federal education law that put a greater emphasis on high-stakes testing. Since No Child Left Behind became law in 2002, school systems--under increased pressure to…

  16. Older Adults and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Resources Clinical Trials Share Older Adults and Mental Health Overview It’s just as important for an older ... this helpline, sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), to receive immediate counseling. Calling ...

  17. Old Friends, Bookends: Art Educators and Art Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This viewpoint presents a reflection on a meaningful relationship that developed between a university art education department and a local art therapy studio. Such partnerships are desirable and mutually beneficial because of the significant interest many art educators have in the field of art therapy. The author, an art educator, describes the…

  18. Support for Arts Education. State Arts Agency Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Supporting lifelong learning in the arts is a top priority for state arts agencies. By supporting arts education in the schools, state arts agencies foster young imaginations, address core academic standards, and promote the critical thinking and creativity skills essential to a 21st century work force. State arts agencies also support…

  19. Receiver System Analysis and Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    True Top-Down Design Methodology .................................. 5 Figure 4. Generic 16- QAM direct-conversion receiver...ADC 16- QAM decoder Figure 4. Generic 16- QAM direct-conversion receiver Complex digitally generated signals defy traditional spreadsheet...Intercept Point Three QAM Quadrature Amplitude Modulation SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio USAF USR VCO United States Air Force Upsampling Ratio Voltage Controlled Oscillator

  20. Authenticity in Anatomy Art.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Jessica

    2017-01-12

    The aim of this paper is to observe the evolution and evaluate the 'realness' and authenticity in Anatomy Art, an art form I define as one which incorporates accurate anatomical representations of the human body with artistic expression. I examine the art of 17th century wax anatomical models, the preservations of Frederik Ruysch, and Gunther von Hagens' Body Worlds plastinates, giving consideration to authenticity of both body and art. I give extra consideration to the works of Body Worlds since the exhibit creator believes he has created anatomical specimens with more educational value and bodily authenticity than ever before. Ultimately, I argue that von Hagens fails to offer Anatomy Art 'real human bodies,' and that the lack of bodily authenticity of his plastinates results in his creations being less pedagogic than he claims.

  1. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  2. Community ART Support Groups in Mozambique: The Potential of Patients as Partners in Care

    PubMed Central

    Malimane, Inacio; Samo Gudo, Paula; Decroo, Tom; Macome, Vania; Couto, Aleny

    2016-01-01

    Background High rates of attrition are stymying Mozambique’s national HIV Program’s efforts to achieve 80% treatment coverage. In response, Mozambique implemented a national pilot of Community Adherence and Support Groups (CASG). CASG is a model in which antiretroviral therapy (ART) patients form groups of up to six patients. On a rotating basis one CASG group member collects ART medications at the health facility for all group members, and distributes those medications to the other members in the community. Patients also visit their health facility bi-annually to receive clinical services. Methods A matched retrospective cohort study was implemented using routinely collected patient-level data in 68 health facilities with electronic data systems and CASG programs. A total of 129,938 adult ART patients were registered in those facilities. Of the 129,938 patients on ART, 6,760 were CASG members. A propensity score matched analysis was performed to assess differences in mortality and loss to follow-up (LTFU) between matched CASG and non-CASG members. Propensity scores were estimated using a random-effects logistic regression model. The following covariates where included in the model: sex, educational status, WHO stage, year of ART initiation, age, CASG eligibility, CD4 cell count category, weight, and employment status. Results Non-CASG participants had higher LTFU rates (HR 2.356; p = 0.04) than matched CASG participants; however, there were no significant mortality differences between CASG and non-CASG participants. Compared with the full cohort of non-CASG members, CASG members were more likely to be female (74% vs. 68%), tended to have a lower median CD4 counts at ART initiation (183 cells/m3 vs. 200cells/m3) and be less likely to have a secondary school education (15% vs. 23%). Conclusion ART patients enrolled in CASG were significantly less likely to be LTFU compared to matched patients who did not join CASG. CASG appears to be an effective strategy to

  3. The impact of B-cell perturbations on pneumococcal conjugate vaccine response in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Thomas G; Søgaard, Ole S; Tolstrup, Martin; Petersen, Mikkel S; Bernth-Jensen, Jens M; Østergaard, Lars; Erikstrup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Untreated HIV infection results in severe perturbations of the B-cell population and hyporesponsiveness to vaccination. We studied associations between circulating B-cell subsets and antibody response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in treated and untreated HIV patients.Ninety-five HIV-infected adults were grouped according to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and CD4+ cell count as follows: 20 ART-naïve (no prior ART), 62 ART-responders (received ART, and CD4 count >500 cells/µl), and 13 impaired responders (received ART for more than 3 years, and CD4 count <500 cells/µl). All subjects were immunized twice with double-dose 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine with or without 1 mg CPG 7909 (toll-like receptor 9 agonist) at baseline and after three months. Pre-vaccination B-cell subpopulations were assessed by flow cytometry. Serum IgG concentrations for vaccine serotypes were quantified by ELISA at baseline and 3, 4, and 9 months post-vaccination. ART responders had more isotype-switched memory B cells and more marginal-zone (MZ)-like B cells compared with impaired responders. Furthermore, ART-naïve patients had higher concentration of transitional B cells and plasmablasts compared with B cells of other patient groups. The concentration of MZ-like, isotype switched memory cells and plasmablasts correlated positively with post-vaccination IgG concentration at 3, 4, and 9 months. Low concentrations of isotype-switched memory B cells was the strongest independent predictor of poor pneumococcal conjugate vaccine responsiveness, emphasizing that B-cell subset disturbances are associated with poor vaccine response among HIV-infected patients.

  4. Customizable Digital Receivers for Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn; Heavey, Brandon; Sadowy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Compact, highly customizable digital receivers are being developed for the system described in 'Radar Interferometer for Topographic Mapping of Glaciers and Ice Sheets' (NPO-43962), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (August 2007), page 72. The receivers are required to operate in unison, sampling radar returns received by the antenna elements in a digital beam-forming (DBF) mode. The design of these receivers could also be adapted to commercial radar systems. At the time of reporting the information for this article, there were no commercially available digital receivers capable of satisfying all of the operational requirements and compact enough to be mounted directly on the antenna elements. A provided figure depicts the overall system of which the digital receivers are parts. Each digital receiver includes an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a demultiplexer (DMUX), and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The ADC effects 10-bit band-pass sampling of input signals having frequencies up to 3.5 GHz. The input samples are demultiplexed at a user-selectable rate of 1:2 or 1:4, then buffered in part of the FPGA that functions as a first-in/first-out (FIFO) memory. Another part of the FPGA serves as a controller for the ADC, DMUX, and FIFO memory and as an interface between (1) the rest of the receiver and (2) a front-panel data port (FPDP) bus, which is an industry-standard parallel data bus that has a high data-rate capability and multichannel configuration suitable for DBF. Still other parts of the FPGA in each receiver perform signal-processing functions. The digital receivers can be configured to operate in a stand-alone mode, or in a multichannel mode as needed for DBF. The customizability of the receiver makes it applicable to a broad range of system architectures. The capability for operation of receivers in either a stand-alone or a DBF mode enables the use of the receivers in an unprecedentedly wide variety of radar systems.

  5. Adult Education and Family Literacy Reform Act. Hearing on S. 797 Authorizing Funds for Fiscal Years 1996 through 2005 to Improve and Reform Literacy Services for Adults and Families, before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This Congressional hearing discussed the issue of reform of adult education and family literacy legislation. Testimony includes oral and written statements of U.S. senators and individuals representing the following: U.S. Department of Education; National Institute for Literacy; Dallas Can! Academy, Dallas, Texas; Pima County Adult Education,…

  6. Essays on Art and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geering, Adrian D.

    This document contains 10 essays which focus on various aspects of art education in the elementary, secondary, and postsecondary educational institutions of Australia. Titles are "Art Education in Australia," The Visual Arts and Society,""The Parallels Between Primitive Art and Child Art,""The Mildura Sculpture…

  7. Dumbing down Art in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanger, David

    1993-01-01

    Argues that art education does not meet its objective of creativity and instead is replicative rather than original. Contends educational journals such as "Instructor" and "Good Apple" reduce fine art to its antithesis, popular art. Concludes that art educators must work diligently to protect fine art from becoming "dumb…

  8. Whither Programs and Arts Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Are these halcyon days for arts education, or are we at least in an auspicious or opportune period for the field? One encounters good news on a daily basis; arts advocates and policymakers are actively promoting the arts and arts education. Yet many in the arts education community do not feel that they are experiencing a renaissance period. What…

  9. Exact ART: A Complete Implementation of an ART Network.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Peter C.M.; Raijmakers, Maartje E.J.

    1997-06-01

    In this article we introduce a continuous time implementation of adaptive resonance theory (ART). ART designed by Grossberg concerns neural networks that self-organize stable pattern recognition categories of arbitrary sequences of input patterns. In contrast to the current implementations of ART we introduce a complete implementation of an ART network, including all regulatory and logical functions, as a system of ordinary differential equations capable of stand-alone running in real time. This means that transient behavior is kept in tact. This implementation of ART is based on ART 2 and is called Exact ART. Exact ART includes an implementation of a gated dipole field and an implementation of the orienting sub-system. The most important features of Exact ART, which are the design principles of ART 2, are proven mathematically. Also simulation studies show that Exact ART self-organizes stable recognition codes that agree with the classification behavior of ART 2. Copyright 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  10. 25 CFR 20.322 - Who can receive a TWEP incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who can receive a TWEP incentive payment? 20.322 Section... can receive a TWEP incentive payment? (a) The head of the family unit normally receives the TWEP assistance payment. (b) The social services worker can designate a spouse or other adult in the...

  11. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  12. 20 CFR 663.220 - Who may receive intensive services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... One-Stop operator to be in need of more intensive services to obtain employment; and (b) Adults and dislocated workers who are employed, have received at least one core service, and are determined by a One-Stop operator to be in need of intensive services to obtain or retain employment that leads to...

  13. An NNSS satellite timing receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, C. L.; Kumar, K.; Andharia, H. I.; Singh, M.; Dsouza, V.; Goel, V. K.; Sisodia, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Navy Navigation Satellite System, NNSS, offers a unique worldwide facility for precise time synchronization. Space Applications Centre (SAC) developed a simple timing receiver. Using this timing receiver first the internal time consistency of NNSS was studied and then its performance to synchronize time was compared with that of National Time Standard. The methodology of data analysis, results, and various sources of error which affect the time transfer accuracy were studied and described. The main source of error was found to be the receiver delay which varies with signal strength. It is possible to apply that this delay correction empirically provided signal strength is recorded.

  14. Body art education: the earlier, the better.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Myrna L; Tustin, Jane; Owen, Donna C; Koch, Jerome R; Roberts, Alden E

    2014-02-01

    Using the major format identified for successful prevention and intervention work, five "W" questions: what, why, whom, where, and who, plus one: how, this article first summarizes the current body art literature. Then, educational strategies specifically regarding the topic of tattoos and body piercing are presented for school nurses. These strategies can be used to create applicable, realistic information for young students before they are faced with decisions related to body art. The school nurse might be the first and only credible source of information the students receive related to body art in an education/health environment. Curriculum emphasis is on the decision making leading up to the action, and the major purposes, rather than on the markings or jewelry associated with procurement. Reducing decisional conflict while promoting positive development in the areas of empowerment, self-esteem, and maturing can help achieve stronger informed decision making.

  15. The Lesbian Art Project.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    Critics and artists influenced by the tenets of queer theory have dismissed much of the artwork made in the 1970s from a lesbian feminist perspective. The result has been very little being known or written about this pioneering work. This article is concerned with exploring an often overlooked aspect of lesbian art history: the activities and events associated with the Lesbian Art Project (LAP) founded by Terry Wolverton and Arlene Raven at the Woman's Building in Los Angeles. I argue that what is most significant about the LAP is the way in which the participants articulated lesbian identity and lesbian community through performance, art making, and writing.

  16. Aesthetic Learning Theory and the Faith Formation of Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Katherine M.

    2013-01-01

    Participation in the arts is a form of practical reason and as such has the potential to form and transform the faith of individuals. The findings from Katherine M. Douglass's 2011 study on the role of the arts in the faith lives of young adults provides examples of the transformative potential of the arts as they foster expression,…

  17. Multipath effects in a Global Positioning Satellite system receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1992-01-01

    This study, as a part of a large continuing investigation being conducted by the Communications Systems Branch of the Information and Electronic Systems Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center, was undertaken to explore the multipath response characteristics of a particular Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receiver which was available in the laboratory at the beginning and throughout the entirety of the study, and to develop a suitable regime of experimental procedure which can be applied to other state-of-the-art GPS receivers in the larger investigation.

  18. Average Weighted Receiving Time of Weighted Tetrahedron Koch Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Meifeng; Zhang, Danping; Ye, Dandan; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Lei

    2015-07-01

    We introduce weighted tetrahedron Koch networks with infinite weight factors, which are generalization of finite ones. The term of weighted time is firstly defined in this literature. The mean weighted first-passing time (MWFPT) and the average weighted receiving time (AWRT) are defined by weighted time accordingly. We study the AWRT with weight-dependent walk. Results show that the AWRT for a nontrivial weight factor sequence grows sublinearly with the network order. To investigate the reason of sublinearity, the average receiving time (ART) for four cases are discussed.

  19. Arts Teachers' Perceptions and Attitudes on Arts Integration While Participating in a Statewide Arts Integration Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Brittany Nixon; Robinson, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes of the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program (BTSALP) arts specialists on arts integration. BTSALP arts specialists (N = 50) throughout the state of Utah responded to a 20-item survey. Results indicated that a majority of BTSALP arts specialists believe that arts…

  20. Coe Receives 2007 Gilbert Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogue, Scott W.; Coe, Robert S.

    2008-05-01

    Robert S. Coe received the 2007 William Gilbert Award at the 2007 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes outstanding and unselfish work in magnetism of Earth materials and of the Earth and planets.

  1. Stevenson received the Whipple award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Stevenson, David J.

    1996-02-01

    David J. Stevenson received the Whipple Award at the 1994 Spring Meeting in Baltimore. The award is given for outstanding scientific contributions to the field of planetology. The citation and Stevenson's response are given here.

  2. California: Art on the Road.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, David

    1982-01-01

    Describes a touring exhibit of posters which has been used to promote cultural events in California since 1976. Many art forms and disciplines were represented, including all the visual arts, photography, film, folk arts, music, theater, and dance. (AM)

  3. Scanned Laser Illuminator/Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    illustrate parallel development of the PIN diode /CCD sensor hybrid and the 100W laser . Al- though a detailed cost analysis for procurement of this large...pmww^^W .m^n.m .,** ■ —ssa^ AFAL-TR-76-184 \\ SCANNED LASER ILLUMINATOR/RECEIVER ^ R. A. Honzik and F. B. Warren ^•Martin Marietta...NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Sublille) SCANNED LASER ILLUMINATOR/RECEIVER 5, TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final Technical Report Dec 75

  4. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  5. Solar dynamic heat receiver technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedgwick, Leigh M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-size, solar dynamic heat receiver was designed to meet the requirements specified for electrical power modules on the U.S. Space Station, Freedom. The heat receiver supplies thermal energy to power a heat engine in a closed Brayton cycle using a mixture of helium-xenon gas as the working fluid. The electrical power output of the engine, 25 kW, requires a 100 kW thermal input throughout a 90 minute orbit, including when the spacecraft is eclipsed for up to 36 minutes from the sun. The heat receiver employs an integral thermal energy storage system utilizing the latent heat available through the phase change of a high-temperature salt mixture. A near eutectic mixture of lithium fluoride and calcium difluoride is used as the phase change material. The salt is contained within a felt metal matrix which enhances heat transfer and controls the salt void distribution during solidification. Fabrication of the receiver is complete and it was delivered to NASA for verification testing in a simulated low-Earth-orbit environment. This document reviews the receiver design and describes its fabrication history. The major elements required to operate the receiver during testing are also described.

  6. Workshop: Teaching Primitive Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordison, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the concrete and spiritual aspects of teaching workshops on survival skills or primitive arts. Gives details on lostproofing, or ways to teach a child not to get lost in the outdoors; building a survival shelter; and wilderness cooking. (CDS)

  7. Interviewing Art Linkletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The article reports on the assignments and activities of Dean Griffin, one of four American Vocational Association associates directors; highlighted is a conversation of Griffin's with Art Linkletter, who addressed the Minnesota Vocational Association in October. (AJ)

  8. Expressing Culture through Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Jeffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an elementary art project in which students create a "mud cloth." States that the project was inspired by the clothing worn by teachers at the City School District (Rochester, New York). Includes a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  9. Building Arts Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soper, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the activities of the Education Department at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, including the local education outreach program and the Partners in Education program promoting school-community partnerships. (SR)

  10. Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention compiles annual reports on the success rates of ART. These reports can be accessed ... the chance of pregnancy in some cases. The success of IUI depends on the cause of the ...

  11. Sandpainting: A Healing Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Bethany

    2005-01-01

    As part of a unit on Native American art studies, students researched Navajo sand painting. They used Navajo image resources to develop designs for their sand paintings. The process and precautions for this lesson are described in this article.

  12. Anatomy and art.

    PubMed

    Laios, Konstantinos; Tsoukalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci, Jean Falcon, Andreas Vesalius, Henry Gray, Henry Vandyke Carter and Frank Netter created some of the best atlases of anatomy. Their works constitute not only scientific medical projects but also masterpieces of art.

  13. Art, surgery and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Roy Calne (1930-) has elegantly cultivated the science and art of transplantation. Throughout his medical and artistic career his eyes have remained fully open not only to science and scientific advances but to any new developments that would enhance his art of painting as applied to his patients, colleagues, events and surgical operations related to transplantation. Calne contributed to and developed a new field through art in the understanding of the lives of his patients, the working of his colleagues and the application of surgical principles to the specialty in which he labours, surgical transplantation. The application of "Art, Surgery and Transplantation" should in many ways be the fountain of information and support for those seeking this way of therapy.

  14. Directed Art Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, John; Clark, Mary

    1984-01-01

    Describes the use of art counseling in elementary schools, illustrated with a case study. The sessions involved serial drawing, in which the counselor asks the child to draw a house, tree, and person, as well as free drawings. (JAC)

  15. Exploring Art and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Carolyn

    1974-01-01

    At two of the Smithsonian Institution's museums in Washington, D. C. special places have been designed for children to enjoy the rich experiences that works of art can provide and to investigate a room filled with touchable exhibits. (CS)

  16. Varieties of Art Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Edmund Burke

    1982-01-01

    Describes the four main types of British art curricula. The content, objectives, and underlying principles are examined. Available from Carfax Publishing Company, P.O. Box 25, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 1RW England. (AM)

  17. Art Criticism and Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Edmund Burke; Woods, Don

    1981-01-01

    The authors review a body of theory and accumulating evidence which suggests that critical study of the arts facilitates the development of cognitive skills, including those essential to reading. (Author/SJL)

  18. Arts/Crafts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Described are various arts and crafts ideas, mostly with a February theme. Included are: ceramic boxes, valentine ideas, and patriotic projects--symbols of our country, silhouettes of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, and stars and stripes. (KC)

  19. Fine Arts through Nature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Carol

    1986-01-01

    Describes how high school students are involved in using natural materials found in the local environment for art projects. The materials used include wood, clay, and natural fibers. Provides photographs of ten students' projects. (JDH)

  20. Pop-Art Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…